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  1. Endovascular Management of Acute Embolic Occlusion of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: A 12-Year Single-Centre Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, J. Lojik, M. Chovanec, V. Renc, O.; Strýček, M.; Dvořák, P. Hoffmann, P.; Guňka, I. Ferko, A.; Ryška, P.; Omran, N.; Krajina, A. Čabelková, P.; Čermáková, E.; Malý, R.

    2016-02-15

    PurposeRetrospective evaluation of 12-year experience with endovascular management of acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) due to embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA).Materials and methodsFrom 2003 to 2014, we analysed the in-hospital mortality of 37 patients with acute mesenteric embolism who underwent primary endovascular therapy with subsequent on-demand laparotomy. Transcatheter embolus aspiration was used in all 37 patients (19 women, 18 men, median age 76 years) with embolic occlusion of the SMA. Adjunctive local thrombolysis (n = 2) and stenting (n = 2) were also utilised.ResultsWe achieved complete recanalization of the SMA stem in 91.9 %. One patient was successfully treated by surgical embolectomy due to a failed endovascular approach. Subsequent exploratory laparotomy was performed in 73.0 % (n = 27), and necrotic bowel resection in 40.5 %. The total in-hospital mortality was 27.0 %.ConclusionPrimary endovascular therapy for acute embolic SMA occlusion with on-demand laparotomy is a recommended algorithm used in our centre to treat SMA occlusion. This combined approach for the treatment of AMI is associated with in-hospital mortality rate of 27.0 %.

  2. Embolization for Acute Small-Bowel Bleeding from the Collateral Artery of the Superior Mesenteric Left Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Associated with Narrowing of the Bilateral Common External Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohira, Masashi Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-03-15

    We present a case of acute small-bowel bleeding from the collateral artery of the superior mesenteric-left deep circumflex iliac artery that was successfully managed by transarterial coil embolization.

  3. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy of superior mesenteric artery embolism

    PubMed Central

    Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Kavcic, Pavel; Popovic, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The present series present three consecutive cases of successful percutaneous mechanical embolectomy in acute superior mesenteric artery ischemia. Superior mesenteric artery embolism is a rare abdominal emergency that commonly leads to bowel infarction and has a very high mortality rate. Prompt recognition and treatment are crucial for successful outcome. Endovascular therapeutic approach in patients with acute SMA embolism in median portion of its stem is proposed. Case reports. Three male patients had experienced a sudden abdominal pain and acute superior mesenteric artery embolism in median portion of its stem was revealed on computed tomography angiography. No signs of intestinal infarction were present. The decision for endovascular treatment was made in concordance with the surgeons. In one patient 6 French gauge Rotarex® device was used while in others 6 French gauge Aspirex® device were used. All patients experienced sudden relief of pain after the procedure with no signs of intestinal infarction. Minor procedural complication – rupture of a smaller branch of SMA during Aspirex® treatment was successfully managed by coiling while transient paralytic ileus presented in one patient resolved spontaneously. All three patients remained symptom-free with patent superior mesenteric artery during the follow-up period. Conclusions Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy seems to be a rapid and effective treatment of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism in median portion of its stem in absence of bowel necrosis. Follow-up of our patients showed excellent short- and long-term results. PMID:24133388

  4. Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism Treated with Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Bunc, Matjaz

    2011-02-15

    A case of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism treated with percutaneous thrombus aspiration is described. A 63-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to the hospital with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an occlusion of the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was effectively treated using transaxillary percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using a 6F Aspirex thrombectomy catheter.

  5. Emergent Treatment of Acute Embolic Superior Mesenteric Ischemia with Combination of Thrombolysis and Angioplasty: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, H. Shiode, Tsuyoki; Kurose, Michihiro; Moritani, Hiroki; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Morimoto, Naoki; Kusachi, Shozo

    2004-08-15

    We successfully revascularized the acutely occluded superior mesenteric artery (SMA), caused by a thromboembolus, with a combination of thrombolysis and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in 2 patients. Considerable percent luminal reduction (>90%) was still observed after thrombolysis in both patients. Subsequent adjunctive balloon angioplasty produced sufficient luminal diameter of the SMA (<20% luminal reduction). No serious acute procedural complication occurred. The time from onset to partial reperfusion by thrombolysis was approximately 4.5 and 5.5 hours. Approximately 1 week after the combination therapy, colonoscopy and a small bowel radiocontrast series showed localized mucosal ischemia with mild erosions and ulcerations in the terminal ileum and ascending colon in 1 patient. Subsequent bowel resection was required but the resection was short (<20 cm). The other patient's bowel condition was good and did not require any surgical treatment. The present cases suggest that combination therapy is useful for achieving rapid and sufficient revascularization of acute proximal thromboembolic SMA occlusion, and prevents the considerably broad bowel necrosis that requires surgical bowel resection, resulting in short bowel syndrome.

  6. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  7. Aspergillus coronary embolization causing acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M; Trigg, M; de Alarcon, P; Giller, R

    1988-05-01

    An increased frequency of disseminated aspergillosis has been observed in the last decade, mostly occurring in immunocompromised patients including the bone marrow transplant population. Cardiac involvement by Aspergillus remains rare. We report the clinical and postmortem findings of an unusual case of Aspergillus pancarditis in a 7-year-old bone marrow transplant patient with Aspergillus embolization to the coronary arteries leading to a massive acute myocardial infarction. This case suggests that myocardial injury secondary to disseminated aspergillosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of chest pain in the immunocompromised pediatric patient.

  8. Prognostic Scores for Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Raquel; Moores, Lisa; Jiménez, David

    2017-02-06

    Rapid and accurate risk stratification is critical in determining the optimal treatment strategy for patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Early identification of patients with normal blood pressure and a favorable prognosis (low-risk PE) might select a subset of patients for outpatient treatment, which is associated with reduced cost and improved patient satisfaction, and has been shown to be effective and safe. Alternatively, identification of normotensive patients deemed as having a high risk for PE-related adverse clinical events (intermediate-high-risk PE) might select a subset of patients for close observation and consideration of escalation of therapy. Clinical prognostic scores have been gaining importance in the classification of patients into these categories. They should be derived and validated following strict methodological standards, and their use in clinical practice should be encouraged.

  9. Surgical embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Goncu, Tugrul; Eris, Cuneyt; Gucu, Arif; Ay, Derih; Erdolu, Burak; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Karaagac, Kemal; Vural, Hakan; Ozyazicioglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with significant mortality rate despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The aim of this study was to analyze our clinical outcomes of patients with acute massive PE who underwent emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Methods: This retrospective study included 13 consecutive patients undergoing emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive PE at our institution from March 2000 to November 2013. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demograhic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. All patients presented with cardiogenic shock with severe right ventricular dysfunction confirmed by echocardiography, where 4 (30.8%) of the patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation before surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 61.8 ± 14 years (range, 38 to 82 years) with 8 (61.5%) males. The most common risk factors for PE was the history of prior deep venous thrombosis (n = 9, 69.2%). There were 3 (23.1%) in-hospital deaths including operative mortality of 7.7% (n = 1). Ten (76.9%) patients survived and were discharged from the hospital. The mean follow-up was 25 months; follow-up was 100% complete in surviving patients. There was one case (7.7%) of late death 12 months after surgery due to renal carcinoma. Postoperative echocardiographic pressure measurements demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, all patients were in New York Heart Association class I and no readmission for a recurrent of PE was observed. Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a reasonable option and could be performed with acceptable results, if it is performed early in patients with acute massive PE who have not reached the profound cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. PMID:25664045

  10. Pulmonary embolism: treatment of the acute episode.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Franco; Roncon, Loris; Greco, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    The prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is mainly related to the clinical presentation and circulatory state of the patient: the therapeutic strategy is consequently different, ranging from an aggressive treatment in patients in life-threatening clinical conditions to a "stabilization" treatment in those hemodynamically stable. Since the majority of PE patients are clinically stable, a well conducted anticoagulant therapy, either with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparins together with a vitamin K antagonist, is sufficient to stop thrombus extension, to minimize the risk of recurrent embolism and prevent mortality. In about 15-20% of cases presenting with clinical instability of variable severity, prompt intravenous thrombolysis with a short-acting compound often represents a life-saving treatment and should be the first-line approach. In normotensive patients with right ventricular dysfunction at echocardiography, who represent about 30% of PE patients, the debate regarding the optimal therapy is still open and further studies are required to document a clinically relevant improvement in the benefit-risk ratio of thrombolytic agents over heparin alone: young people, with a very low risk of bleeding and a concomitant reduction of cardiopulmonary reserve might be the best candidates to systemic thrombolysis. In any case such patients should be admitted to an intensive care unit to monitor the clinical status for at least 48-72 hours and detect signs of possible hemodynamic worsening. Mechanical thrombectomy, either percutaneous or surgical, are ancillary procedures and should be reserved to a minority of highly compromised patients who are unable to receive thrombolysis.

  11. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  12. Q Fever Endocarditis Presenting with Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism and Renal Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Nachiket; Pham, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease with a reservoir in mammals, birds, and ticks. Acute cases in human beings can be asymptomatic, or they can present with a flu-like illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis. Approximately 5% of cases progress to chronic Q fever. Endocarditis, the most typical manifestation of chronic Q fever, is usually associated with small vegetations that occur in patients who have had prior valvular damage or who are immunocompromised. We present what we think is the first reported case of superior mesenteric artery embolism from Q fever endocarditis of the aortic valve, in a 39-year-old woman who needed surgical embolectomy and subsequent aortic valve replacement. PMID:27047296

  13. Embolization of Onyx Causing Acute Limb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lind, Benjamin B; Briggs, Charles S; Golan, John; Gupta, NavYash

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a refractory type II endoleak treated with translumbar Onyx with passage of the Onyx material into the endograft and subsequent embolization to the infrainguinal vasculature. This report represents a new complication of Onyx embolization that, to our knowledge, has not previously been described in the literature.

  14. Emergency Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Renal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong Liang; Xu, Chun Yang; Wang, Hong Hui; Xu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to identify arteriographic manifestations of acute renal hemorrhage and to evaluate the efficacy of emergency embolization. Emergency renal artery angiography was performed on 83 patients with acute renal hemorrhage. As soon as bleeding arteries were identified, emergency embolization was performed using gelatin sponge, polyvinyl alcohol particles, and coils. The arteriographic presentation and the effect of the treatment for acute renal hemorrhage were analyzed retrospectively. Contrast extravasation was observed in 41 patients. Renal arteriovenous fistulas were found in 12 of the 41 patients. In all, 8 other patients had a renal pseudoaneurysm, 5 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal arteriovenous fistula, and 1 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal artery-calyceal fistula. Another 16 patients had tumor vasculature seen on arteriography. Before the procedure, 35 patients underwent renal artery computed tomography angiography (CTA). Following emergency embolization, complete hemostasis was achieved in 80 patients, although persistent hematuria was present in 3 renal trauma patients and 1 patient who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (justifying surgical removal of the ipsilateral kidney in this patient). Two-year follow-up revealed an overall effective rate of 95.18 % (79/83) for emergency embolization. There were no serious complications. Emergency embolization is a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment for renal hemorrhage. Because of the diversified arteriographic presentation of acute renal hemorrhage, proper selection of the embolic agent is a key to successful hemostasis. Preoperative renal CTA plays an important role in diagnosing and localizing the bleeding artery.

  15. Emergency Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Renal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Liang; Xu, Chun Yang; Wang, Hong Hui; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to identify arteriographic manifestations of acute renal hemorrhage and to evaluate the efficacy of emergency embolization. Emergency renal artery angiography was performed on 83 patients with acute renal hemorrhage. As soon as bleeding arteries were identified, emergency embolization was performed using gelatin sponge, polyvinyl alcohol particles, and coils. The arteriographic presentation and the effect of the treatment for acute renal hemorrhage were analyzed retrospectively. Contrast extravasation was observed in 41 patients. Renal arteriovenous fistulas were found in 12 of the 41 patients. In all, 8 other patients had a renal pseudoaneurysm, 5 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal arteriovenous fistula, and 1 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal artery-calyceal fistula. Another 16 patients had tumor vasculature seen on arteriography. Before the procedure, 35 patients underwent renal artery computed tomography angiography (CTA). Following emergency embolization, complete hemostasis was achieved in 80 patients, although persistent hematuria was present in 3 renal trauma patients and 1 patient who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (justifying surgical removal of the ipsilateral kidney in this patient). Two-year follow-up revealed an overall effective rate of 95.18 % (79/83) for emergency embolization. There were no serious complications. Emergency embolization is a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment for renal hemorrhage. Because of the diversified arteriographic presentation of acute renal hemorrhage, proper selection of the embolic agent is a key to successful hemostasis. Preoperative renal CTA plays an important role in diagnosing and localizing the bleeding artery. PMID:26496273

  16. Superselective embolization of superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysms following intramuscular injection: case report.

    PubMed

    Vauthey, J N; Maddern, G J; Balsiger, D; Blumgart, L H; Triller, J

    1991-08-01

    Two bleeding superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysms occurred in a patient with advanced malignant disease following an intramuscular injection. This was diagnosed by angiography and successfully managed by superselective embolization. This avoided further surgery and no additional complication from the pseudoaneurysm occurred up to the time of the patient's demise.

  17. Transcutaneous Puncture of the Superior Ophthalmic Vein for Embolization of Dural Carotid-Ophthalmic Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Hsien; Tsai, I-Chen; Huang, Hou-Chi; Lin, Chun-Han; Hung, Hao-Chun; Wu, Chen-Hao; Chi-Chang Chen, Clayton

    2008-01-01

    Summary Carotid-ophthalmic fistula is a rare disease, which can be treated by transvenous endovascular embolization. Here, we report a unique case with draining vein thrombosed, making a transvenous approach impossible. An old but valuable technique, direct transcutaneous puncture of the superior ophthalmic vein, was used to save the patient's right eye. The old technique, direct puncture of the superior ophthalmic vein, retains its irreplaceable usefulness in this special situation. Thus, interventional neuroradiologists should equip themselves with this essential technique. PMID:20557794

  18. Acute management of vascular air embolism.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nissar; Ummunisa, Firdous

    2009-09-01

    Vascular air embolism (VAE) is known since early nineteenth century. It is the entrainment of air or gas from operative field or other communications into the venous or arterial vasculature. Exact incidence of VAE is difficult to estimate. High risk surgeries for VAE are sitting position and posterior fossa neurosurgeries, cesarean section, laparoscopic, orthopedic, surgeries invasive procedures, pulmonary overpressure syndrome, and decompression syndrome. Risk factors for VAE are operative site 5 cm above the heart, creation of pressure gradient which will facilitate entry of air into the circulation, orogenital sex during pregnancy, rapid ascent in scuba (self contained underwater breathing apparatus) divers and barotrauma or chest trauma. Large bolus of air can lead to right ventricular air lock and immediate fatality. In up to 35% patient, the foramen ovale is patent which can cause paradoxical arterial air embolism. VAE affects cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system. High index of clinical suspicion is must to diagnose VAE. The transesophgeal echocardiography is the most sensitive device which will detect smallest amount of air in the circulation. Treatment of VAE is to prevent further entrainment of air, reduce the volume of air entrained and haemodynamic support. Mortality of VAE ranges from 48 to 80%. VAE can be prevented significantly by proper positioning during surgery, optimal hydration, avoiding use of nitrous oxide, meticulous care during insertion, removal of central venous catheter, proper guidance, and training of scuba divers.

  19. Endovascular Therapeutic Approaches for Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, S. Sonesson, B.; Resch, T.

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcome of attempted endovascular intervention in patients with acute embolic or thrombotic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion. The records of 21 patients during a 3-year period between 2005 and 2008 were retrieved from the in-hospital registry. The first group included 10 patients (6 women and 4 men; median age 78 years) with acute embolic occlusion of the SMA. The median duration of symptoms from symptom onset to angiography was 30 hours (range 6 to 120). Synchronous emboli (n = 12) occurred in 6 patients. Embolus aspiration was performed in 9 patients, and 7 of these had satisfactory results. Complementary local thrombolysis was successful in 2 of 3 patients. Residual emboli were present at completion angiography in all 7 patients who underwent successful aspiration embolectomy, and bowel resection was necessary in only 1 of these patients. One serious complication occurred because of a long SMA dissection. The in-hospital survival rate was 90% (9 of 10 patients). The second group included 11 patients (10 women and 1 man; median age 68 years) with atherosclerotic acute SMA occlusions. The median time of symptom duration before intervention was 97 hours (range 17 to 384). The brachial, femoral, and SMA routes were used in 6, 7, and 5 patients, respectively. SMA stenting was performed through an antegrade (n = 7) or retrograde (n = 3) approach. Bowel resection was necessary in 4 patients. No major complications occurred. The in-hospital survival rate was 82% (9 of 11 patients). Endovascular therapy of acute SMA occlusion provides a good alternative to open surgery.

  20. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission.

  1. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  2. Acute Paraplegia as a Presentation of Aortic Saddle Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Guishard, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute onset paraplegia has a myriad of causes most often of a nonvascular origin. Vascular etiologies are infrequent causes and most often associated with postsurgical complications. Objective. To describe the occurrence and possible mechanism for aortic saddle embolism as a rare cause of acute paraplegia. Case Report. Described is a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with the sudden onset of nontraumatic low back pain with rapidly progressive paraplegia which was subsequently determined to be of vascular origin. PMID:27822396

  3. Imaging of acute superior mesenteric artery embolus using spectral CT in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongzhen; Xiao, Xigang; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Zhiwen; Zhang, Jin ling; Tang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of single-source dual-energy spectral CT (sDECT) imaging in an acute superior mesenteric artery embolus (SMAE) canine model. Methods: Pre-contrast and double-phase contrast-enhanced sDECT were performed before and after embolization in eight SMAE dog models. Monochromatic images of embolized intestine with the best contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were obtained and compared with the polychromatic images. CT parameters including attenuation value, iodine content, water content and thickness of the embolized intestinal segments were obtained, and normalized difference in iodine concentration (NDIC) was calculated. Results: The CNR in pre-contrast, arterial phase and portal venous phase at 4 h after embolization was 1.11 ± 1.23, 13.50 ± 1.54 and 10.63 ± 3.75, respectively, significantly higher than those of the polychromatic images (p < 0.05). The iodine-based images clearly revealed the embolized intestinal segments, which were highly consistent with the gross findings. The difference in attenuation values between the embolization area and non-embolization area in the monochromatic images was 105.06 ± 35.35 HU, higher than that in the polychromatic images (p < 0.001). The attenuation values and NDIC were significantly decreased at 2 h after embolization, relatively increased at 4 h and gradually decreased at 6 and 8 h. The changing pattern of thickness was similar to that of NDIC over time after embolization. Conclusion: sDECT can provide the optimal monochromatic images and allow increased detection rates of lesions. sDECT is a very promising tool for quantitative diagnosis of SMAE. Advances in knowledge: Our research provides more quantitative parameters for the assessment of SMAE by sDECT. PMID:26185922

  4. Acute ECG ST-segment elevation mimicking myocardial infarction in a patient with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common cardiovascular emergency, but it is still often misdiagnosed due to its unspecific clinical symptoms. Elevated troponin concentrations are associated with greater morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary embolism. Right ventricular ischemia due to increased right ventricular afterload is believed to be underlying mechanism of elevated troponin values in acute pulmonary embolism, but a paradoxical coronary artery embolism through opened intra-artrial communication is another possible explanation as shown in our case report. PMID:21106090

  5. Acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery following covered stent occlusion in the superior mesenteric artery: endovascular therapy using mechanical rotational thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Goltz, Jan P; Petritsch, Bernhard; Spor, Leo; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2012-09-01

    Acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery is a rare and often fatal condition in which surgery represents the golden standard in therapy. We present a case in which a patient was treated with covered stent implantation for acute bleeding from the superior mesenteric artery following pancreatic resection, radiation, and embolization of a hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. Some weeks later clinical signs were suggestive of acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery and digital subtraction angiography showed occlusion of the previously implanted covered stents. The patient was successfully treated transfemorally with percutaneous mechanical instent thrombectomy using a 6F Rotarex® catheter. We conclude that in selected cases percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy may represent a minimally-invasive alternative to open surgical thrombectomy for treatment of acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery.

  6. [Acute pulmonary embolism: beware of the wolf in sheep's clothing].

    PubMed

    Klok, Frederikus A; Vahl, Jelmer E; Huisman, Menno V; van Dijkman, Paul R M

    2012-01-01

    Two male patients aged 57 and 73 were referred to the cardiologist because of progressive dyspnoea. In one patient, the general practitioner had previously adopted an expectative policy because of a clean chest X-ray. At presentation after 4 weeks, the patient was diagnosed with and treated for acute coronary syndrome because of minor ECG abnormalities. Additional CT scanning showed a large saddle embolus. Despite adequate treatment, the patient suffered an electrical asystole and died. The other patient underwent ECG, bicycle ergometry, MRI adenosine, echocardiography and lung function tests over a period of 5 weeks before pulmonary embolism (PE) was diagnosed. As the signs and symptoms of PE are largely non-specific, diagnostic delay is common, with risk of poor clinical outcome. PE should at least be considered whenever a patient presents with acute or worsening breathlessness, chest pain, circulatory collapse or coughing, particularly in the presence of known thrombotic risk factors or when there is no clear alternative.

  7. Syncope as a presentation of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Altınsoy, Bülent; Erboy, Fatma; Tanrıverdi, Hakan; Uygur, Fırat; Örnek, Tacettin; Atalay, Figen; Tor, Meltem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Syncope is an atypical presentation for acute pulmonary embolism (APE). There are conflicting data concerning syncope and prognosis of APE. Patients and methods One hundred and seventy-nine consecutive patients aged 22–96 years (median, 68 years) with APE were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Results Prevalence of syncope was 13% (n=23) at the time of presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher rate of central embolism (83% vs 43%, respectively, P=0.002), right ventricular dysfunction (91% vs 68%, P=0.021), and troponin positivity (80% vs 39%, P=0.001) but not 30-day mortality (13% vs 10%, P=0.716). Multivariate analysis showed that central localization (odds ratio: 9.08) and cardiac troponin positivity (odds ratio: 4.67) were the independent correlates of the presence of syncope in the patients with APE. Frequency of cardiopulmonary disease was lower, and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission was shorter in patients with syncope (P=0.138 and 0.118, respectively), although not significant. Conclusion Syncope most likely represents an intermediate condition between massive APE and hypotension. In APE patients with syncope, the prognosis seems to depend on the underlying pathology, the patient’s age, comorbidities and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission, and the use of thrombolytic therapy. PMID:27390523

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Spontaneous Isolated Dissecting Aneurysm of the Superior Mesenteric Artery Using Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Toshiro Kimura, Motomasa; Yoshimura, Norihiko; Hori, Yoshiro; Takano, Toru; Kamura, Takesi; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sasai, Keisuke

    2006-06-15

    Spontaneous isolated dissecting aneurysm of the main trunk of the superior mesenteric artery is a rare condition. We treated a patient with this condition successfully by stent-assisted coil embolization. Intravascular stent placement may widen the indications for endovascular coiling of the aneurysmal false lumen to avoid perforation.

  9. Adjunctive Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, V. M.; Lee-Llacer, J.; Williams, J.; Ubaissi, H.; Gutierrez, G.

    2010-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are sometimes placed as an adjunct to full anticoagulation in patients with significant pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to determine the prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement in individuals diagnosed with PE, as well as the effect of adjunctive filter placement on mortality in patients with right heart strain associated with PE. This was a retrospective study of patients with acute PE treated with full anticoagulation admitted to a single academic medical center. Information abstracted from patient charts included presence or absence of right heart strain and of deep-vein thrombosis, and whether or not an IVC filter was placed. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Over 2.75 years, we found that 248 patients were diagnosed with acute PE, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 4.4%. The prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement was 13.3% (33 of 248), and the prevalence of documented right heart strain was 27.0% (67 of 248). In-hospital mortality was 10.2% in the non-filter-treated group (5 of 49), whereas there were no deaths in the filter-treated group (0 of 18); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Both the presence of deep-vein thrombosis and of right heart strain increased the likelihood that an adjunctive IVC filter was placed (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). At our institution, patients were treated with IVC filters in addition to anticoagulation in 13.3% of cases of acute PE. Prospective studies or large clinical registries should be conducted to clarify whether this practice improves outcomes.

  10. Acute neurological symptoms during hypobaric exposure: consider cerebral air embolism.

    PubMed

    Weenink, Robert P; Hollmann, Markus W; van Hulst, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is well known as a complication of invasive medical procedures and as a risk in diving and submarine escape. In the underwater environment, CAGE is caused by trapped air, which expands and leads to lung vessel rupture when ambient pressure decreases during ascent. Pressure decrease also occurs during hypobaric activities such as flying and, therefore, CAGE may theoretically be a risk in hypobaric exposure. We reviewed the available literature on this subject. Identified were 12 cases of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. Based on these cases, we discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. The low and slow pressure decrease during most hypobaric activities (as opposed to diving) account for the low incidence of CAGE during these exposures and suggest that severe air trapping must be present to cause barotrauma. This is also suggested by the large prevalence of air filled cysts in the case reports reviewed. We recommend considering CAGE in all patients presenting with acute central neurological injury during or shortly after pressure decrease such as flying. A CT scan of head and chest should be performed in these patients. Treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy should be initiated as soon as possible in cases of proven or probable CAGE.

  11. Acute kidney injury in patients with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fu, Chung-Ming; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Shao-Wei; Chang, Su-Wei; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is overlooked in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk factors for and long-term outcomes of this complication remain unknown. This study evaluated the predictors and prognosis of AKI in patients with PE. This retrospective cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We enrolled a total of 7588 patients who were admitted to a hospital for PE from January1997 to December 2011 and administered anticoagulation or thrombolytic agents. All demographic data, risk factors, and outcomes were analyzed. AKI was diagnosed in 372 (4.9%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed pre-existing chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, massive PE, anemia, and sepsis as independent risk factors for AKI. In the long-term follow-up, the survival rate was similar in the AKI and non-AKI groups. Careful risk factor screening and intensive intervention in patients with AKI might yield outcomes similar to those in patients without AKI. PMID:28248851

  12. Transarterial Thrombin Injection Secured with an Embolic Protection Device as a Treatment for a Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Krasinski, Zbigniew; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Waclaw

    2011-02-15

    A pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is a rare and life-threatening condition of various etiology. Even unruptured it can cause severe health problems or death. We report a 71-year-old male with a SMA pseudoaneurysm who was successfully treated with a transarterial thrombin injection secured with an embolic protection device used in carotid angioplasty. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a SMA pseudoaneurysm treated by this method.

  13. Assessment of heat shock proteins and endothelial dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    İn, Erdal; Deveci, Figen; Kaman, Dilara

    2016-06-01

    We determined the levels of some heat shock proteins (HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90), L-arginine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) levels in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. The present case-control study comprised a healthy control group (n = 57) and patients with acute pulmonary embolism (n = 84). HSPs, L-arginine, ADMA, and SDMA levels were measured in all of the cases. The mean age of the control group was 56.72 ± 8.44 years, and the mean age of the patients with acute pulmonary embolism was 60.20 ± 16.56 years (P = 0.104). Compared with controls, patients with acute pulmonary embolism had significantly higher mean serum HSP27, HSP90, and ADMA levels, whereas the mean serum L-arginine and SDMA levels were lower (P < 0.001, for all parameters). In patients with acute pulmonary embolism serum HSP27, HSP70, and ADMA levels were negatively correlated with partial pressures of arterial oxygen levels (r = -0.281, P = 0.01; r = -0.263, P = 0.016; and r = -0.275, P = 0.011, respectively) and arterial oxygen saturation (r = -0.225, P = 0.039; r = -0.400, P < 0.001; r = -0.299, P = 0.006, respectively). The findings of the present study demonstrated that oxidative stress and endothelial damage increase in acute pulmonary embolism.

  14. Acute ischemic colitis secondary to air embolism after diving

    PubMed Central

    Payor, Austin Daniel; Tucci, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic colitis (IC) secondary to air embolism from decompression sickness or barotrauma during diving is an extremely rare condition. After extensive review of the available literature, we found that there has been only one reported case of IC secondary to air embolism from diving. Although air embolization from diving and the various medical complications that follow have been well documented, the clinical manifestation of IC from an air embolism during diving is very rare and thus far unstudied. Common symptoms of IC include abdominal pain, bloody or non-bloody diarrhea or nausea or vomiting or any combination. Emergency physicians and Critical Care specialists should consider IC as a potential diagnosis for a patient with the above-mentioned symptoms and a history of recent diving. We report a case of IC from air embolism after a routine dive to 75 feet below sea level in a 53-year-old White female who presented to a community Emergency Department complaining of a 2-day history of diffuse abdominal pain and nausea. She was diagnosed by colonoscopy with biopsies and treated conservatively with antibiotics, bowel rest, and a slow advancement in diet. PMID:22096777

  15. Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy of an Occluded Superior Division Branch of the Left MCA for Acute Cardioembolic Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, H. C. Meyers, P. M.; Yavagal, D. R.; Harel, N. Y.; Elkind, M. S. V.; Mohr, J. P.; Pile-Spellman, J.

    2003-06-15

    Cardiac embolism accounts for a large proportion of ischemic stroke. Revascularization using systemic or intra-arterial thrombolysis is associated with increasing risks of cerebral hemorrhageas time passes from stroke onset. We report successful mechanicalthrombectomy from a distal branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA)using a novel technique. A 72-year old man suffered an acute ischemic stroke from an echocardiographically proven ventricular thrombus due toa recent myocardial infarction. Intra-arterial administration of 4 mgrt-PA initiated at 5.7 hours post-ictus failed to recanalize an occluded superior division branch of the left MCA. At 6 hours,symptomatic embolic occlusion persisted. Mechanical extraction of the clot using an Attracter-18 device (Target Therapeutics, Freemont, CA) resulted in immediate recanalization of the MCA branch. Attracter-18 for acute occlusion of MCA branches may be considered in selected patients who fail conventional thrombolysis or are nearing closure of the therapeutic window for use of thrombolytic agents.

  16. Acute arterial embolism of left lower extremity caused by paradoxical embolism in Ebstein's anomaly

    PubMed Central

    LI, Jun-Sheng; Ma, Jie; Yan, Zi-Xing; Cheng, Dong-Ming; Chang, Liang; Zhang, Hai-Chun; Liu, Jiang-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Ebstein's anomaly is a benign and stable congenital heart disease for asymptomatic patients. Despite a low incidence of Ebstein's anomaly (EA), patients’ quality of life can be badly affected by EA without positive surgical intervention. Especially EA is associated with other congenital heart disease, such as the atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale, and arterial embolism exclude other reasons, it is often considered to be the consequence of paradoxical embolism, and surgical intervention must be conducted. Case report: An 11-year-old girl falling off the bed suffered pain from left lower extremity. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed an EA, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and secundum atrial septal defect. Both left leg amputation and cardiac surgery were conducted after recovery. Under the condition of anesthesia cardiopulmonary bypass extracorporeal circulation, atrial septal defect repair and Cone reconstruction of the tricuspid valve were performed. Patient recovered well and left hospital smoothly. Discussion: EA is a rare and complex congenital cardiac malformation. There are about 80% to 90% of EA patients with combined atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale. Sudden arterial occlusion is very rare especially in childhood. When thoracic roentgenoscopy, arterial blood gas analysis, coagulation test, and echocardiographic of lower extremity deep venous system are all normal, one should consider the possibility of a paradoxical embolism. If patients have the paradoxical embolism or worsening tricuspid regurgitation, the most suitable therapeutic regimen should be chosen according to patients’ condition. With surgical techniques and methods renewed continuously, cone reconstruction of the tricuspid valve has been confirmed in clinical trials, which can use its own tissues to form not only central bloodstream, but also the coaption between leaflet and leaflet. PMID:28151866

  17. Acute myocardial infarction with concomitant pulmonary embolism as a result of patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Bozbeyoğlu, Emrah; Akyüz, Şükrü; Yıldırımtürk, Özlem; Bozbay, Mehmet; Bakhshaliyev, Nijad; Renda, Emir; Gök, Gülay; Eren, Mehmet; Pehlivanoğlu, Seçkin

    2015-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) and pulmonary embolism canal one lead to life-threatening conditions such as sudden cardiac death and congestive heart failure. We discuss a case of a 74-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute dyspnea and chest pain. Acute anterior MI and pulmonary embolism concomitantly were diagnosed. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention performed because of preliminary acute anterior MI diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to determine further complications caused by acute MI because patient had a continuous tachycardia and dyspnea although hemodynamically stable. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a thrombus that was stuck into the patent foramen ovale with parts in right and left atria. Anticoagulation therapy was started; neither fibrinolytic therapy nor operation was performed because of low survey expectations of the patient's recently diagnosed primary disease stage IV lung cancer. Patient was discharged on his 20th day with oral anticoagulation and antiagregant therapy.

  18. [Echocardiography in acute pulmonary embolism. Not a routine method but useful in the diagnosis of simultaneous hemodynamic disorders].

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1998-08-19

    Echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism as illustrated by three case reports is discussed in the article. Acute pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by demonstration of right heart strain in one case, of long vermiform thrombi floating in the right atrium in another, and in the third case by demonstration of a long thrombus lodged in the foramen ovale, astride the atrial septum, and with its ends floating in either atrium. Thus, as echocardiography enables pulmonary embolism to be diagnosed by demonstration either of right heart strain or of intracardial thrombi, it is a useful diagnostic tool in cases of haemodynamic compromise, though it does not detect minor pulmonary embolism.

  19. [Clinical picture of acute pulmonary embolism. Relations to the degree of vascular obstruction].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, T T; Lund, O; Hedegaard, M; Hansen, H H; Albrechtsen, O

    1992-07-13

    In 132 consecutive patients treated for pulmonary embolism, duration of symptoms, number of embolic episodes before the diagnosis, circulatory affection (stable circulation (n = 61), reversible shock (n = 60), circulatory collapse (n = 11), electrocardiographic findings and systolic pulmonary pressure (n = 60) were analysed in relation to 1) underlying diseases (orthopedic surgical patients (n = 43), gynecological-abdominal surgical patients (n = 22), preembolic healthy patients (n = 42), miscellaneous medical patients (n = 25)), and 2) the obstruction of the pulmonary vascular bed quantified by a scintigraphic or angiographic score. While embolic score did not differ between the groups of underlying diseases, preembolic healthy patients with deep vein trombosis (n = 30) had longer mean duration of symptoms (14 days), more embolic episodes, (1.7 episode) and higher pulmonary pressure (72 mmHg) than the material on an average with values of 7 days, 0.9 episodes and 57 mmHg, respectively (p less than 0.001). Among patients with reversible shock or circulatory collapse, half had at least one previous embolic episode, one fifth from two to four. Embolic score correlated well with the circulatory affection (p less than 0.001). A high pulmonary pressure correlated with long duration of symptoms and a high number of embolic episodes (p less than 0.002). Sinus tachycardia and electrocardiographic signs of acute right ventricular strain (complete and incomplete right bundle branch block, SIQIIITIII-pattern and inverted T-waves in V2-4) correlated positively to the circulatory affection and inversely to duration of symptoms and number of embolic episodes (p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery as a complication of posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting: 3D-CT angiography and arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Won, Yoo-Dong; Riew, K. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Superior gluteal artery injuries are rare, but potentially serious complications that occur during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting. The authors reported an arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery, which occurred as a complication during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting and was diagnosed with 3D-CT angiography, then treated with arterial embolization. PMID:19294431

  1. Endovascular Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism Using the Ultrasound-Enhanced EkoSonic System.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Acute, symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) in the massive and submassive categories continues to be a healthcare concern with significant risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Despite increased awareness and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, endovascular treatment is still an important option for many of these patients. There are a variety of techniques and devices used for treating PE, but none have been evaluated as extensively as the EkoSonic endovascular system that is also currently the only FDA-approved device for the treatment of pulmonary embolism. This article describes the use of the EkoSonic device for this patient population.

  2. Pulmonary mucormycosis with embolism: two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Yasunori; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with hematological malignancies. The diagnosis of mucormycosis usually requires mycological evidence through tissue biopsy or autopsy because the signs and symptoms are nonspecific and there are currently no biomarkers to identify the disease. We herein present two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia with prolonged neutropenia who developed invasive mucormycosis accompanied by pulmonary artery embolism. Our cases were featured by unexplained fever and rapidly progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan detected nodular lesions or nonspecific consolidations in the lungs. Cultures, cytological study, and serum fungal markers consistently gave negative results. Autopsy revealed embolism of the pulmonary artery which consisted of fibrin clots by filamentous fungi. Genomic DNA was extracted from the paraffin-embedded clots and was applied to polymerase chain reaction amplification, leading to the diagnosis of infection by Rhizopus microsporus. We should carefully search for life-threatening pulmonary embolism when patients with hematological malignancies develop pulmonary mucormycosis.

  3. Treatment of acute embolic occlusions of the subclavian and axillary arteries using a rotational thrombectomy device.

    PubMed

    Zeller, T; Frank, U; Bürgelin, K; Sinn, L; Horn, B; Schwarzwälder, U; Roskamm, H; Neumann, F J

    2003-05-01

    Acute embolic or local thrombotic ischaemia of the upper limbs can be treated by embolectomy or by endovascular techniques. We report here on the endovascular thrombectomy of acute embolic occlusions of subclavian and axillary arteries in two patients using a rotational thrombectomy device and give an overview about the actual literature. Two female patients, each with a history of multivessel coronary disease and intermittent atrial fibrillation, complained of sudden onset of pain at rest and paleness of the left and right arm, respectively. Duplex ultrasound showed a localized embolic occlusion of the left subclavian artery and the bifurcation of the brachial artery in the first patient and a localized embolic occlusion of the distal right subclavian and axillary artery in the second patient. In the first patient, the left subclavian artery was reopened using a 8F-Rotarex device via the femoral access, while the bifurcation of the brachial artery was reopened by local thrombolysis using 25 mg rt-PA because of the insufficient length of the thrombectomy device of 80 cm. In the second patient, the right subclavian and axillary arteries were reopened using a 6F-Rotarex device. Follow-up examinations before discharge and after 6 months showed normalized perfusion of the arms of both patients.

  4. Performance of magnetic resonance angiography in suspected acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Blum, Alain; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Guillemin, Francis; Douek, Philippe; Laprévote-Heully, Marie-Claude; Wahl, Denis

    2005-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially fatal disorder. Non-specific findings make the clinical diagnosis of PE difficult. To assess the diagnostic value and inter-observer agreement of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in a cohort of patients with suspected PE, we conducted a prospective clinical study. MRA was compared for sensitivity and specificity to a diagnostic strategy including clinical probability, D-dimer testing, spiral CT, ultrasound leg compression and pulmonary angiography. A total of 89 patients with clinically suspected PE were included: the clinical probability of PE was intermediate or high in 78, and low in the remaining 11. All patients underwent monoor multi-slice spiral CT and MRA with gadolinium injection (both within 24 hours of entry to the study). Anticoagulation was withheld in patients concerned about the strategy. All subjects were followed up for 3 months. MRA was read independently by two experienced teams of radiologists: one local and one from another university centre. Spiral CT was positive in 62 of 63 cases of confirmed PE. No patient with negative CT findings was positive ultrasonographically. Only one patient with a negative CT (and negative ultrasound) had a recurrent thromboembolic event. The first team diagnosed PE with MRA in 47 cases, with a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 92%; the second team obtained the diagnosis in 23 cases, with a sensitivity of 31% and a specificity of 85%. Inter-observer agreement between MRA reading was low: Kappa = 0.16 (-0.01 to 0.33); p = 0.07. In conclusion, compared with a non-invasive strategy based on spiral CT, the diagnostic value of MRA is limited by poor inter-observer agreement.

  5. Clearance of Subarachnoid Clots after GDC Embolization for Acutely Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S.; Satoh, A.; Koguchi, Y.; Wada, M.; Tokunaga, H.; Miyata, A.; Nakamura, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Yagishita, T.

    2001-01-01

    Summary It is apparent that subarachnoid clots play an important role in the development of delayed vasospasm that is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in patients with acutely ruptured cerebral aneurysm. The purpose of this study is to compare the clearance of subarachnoid clots in the acute stage after the treatment with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC) and after treatment with direct surgery. Forty-nine patients were treated by GDC embolization within four days of the ictus. After GDC embolization, adjunctive therapies, such as ventricular and/or spinal drainage (67%), intrathecal administration of urokinase (41%), continuous cisternal irrigation (16%), and external decompression (16%), were performed. Seventy-four surgically treated patients were subsequently treated by continuous cisternal irrigation with mock-CSF containing ascorbic acid for ten days. The clearance of subarachnoid clots was assessed by the Hounsfield number serial changes on the CT scans taken on days 0, 4, 7,10 after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence of symptomatic vasospasm was lower in the GDC group (6%) than in the surgery group (12%). The clearance of subarachnoid clots from both the basal cistern and the Sylvian fissure was more rapid in the GDC cases than in the surgery cases in the first four days. Intrathecal administration of urokinase accelerated the clearance significantly. GDC embolization followed by intrathecal administration of thrombolytic agents accelerates the reduction of subarachnoid clots and favorably acts to prevent delayed vasospasm. PMID:20663379

  6. Free Floating Right Heart Thrombus Associated with Acute Pulmonary Embolism: An Unsettled Therapeutic Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Nkoke, Clovis; Faucher, Olivier; Camus, Lise; Flork, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Free floating right heart thrombus is a rare phenomenon in the context of acute pulmonary embolism and it is associated with a poor outcome. The increased use of echocardiography has led to an increased detection of right heart thrombi. However, optimal management of free floating right heart thrombus remains controversial with no clear consensus. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea on minimal exertion which had developed over a period of 1 day. A computed tomography of the chest demonstrated massive bilateral proximal pulmonary embolism. A bedside transthoracic echocardiography performed showed a moderately dilated, poorly functioning right ventricle with visible highly mobile serpiginous thrombus moving to and fro across the tricuspid valve. Thrombolytic therapy was immediately initiated with tenecteplase which resulted in excellent results. Although there is no clear consensus for the management of right heart thrombus associated with pulmonary embolism, thrombolysis is readily available and can be effective in carefully selected patients. PMID:26078887

  7. Successful retreatment with osimertinib after osimertinib-induced acute pulmonary embolism in a patient with lung adenocarcinoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Hayama, Manabu; Satoh, Shingo; Nasu, Shingo; Tanaka, Ayako; Morita, Satomu; Morishita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) can be life-threatening, and it is challenging to diagnose because of its nonspecific signs and symptoms. PE is also an important potential risk of osimertinib treatment, however, clinical courses regarding retreatment after osimertinib-induced acute pulmonary embolism remain unclear. We described a 77-year-old woman with postoperative recurrent lung adenocarcinoma who developed osimertinib-induced acute PE. She received apixaban and was later successfully retreated with osimertinib. This case suggests that retreatment with osimertinib after osimertinib-induced acute PE may be a treatment option when alternative therapeutic options are limited.

  8. Use of the pCONus as an adjunct to coil embolization of acutely ruptured aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, M Aguilar; Bhogal, P; Moreno, R Martinez; Wendl, C; Bäzner, H; Ganslandt, O; Henkes, H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Coil embolization of ruptured aneurysms has become the standard treatment in many situations. However, certain aneurysm morphologies pose technical difficulties and may require the use of adjunctive devices. Objective To present our experience with the pCONus, a new neck bridging device, as an adjunct to coil embolization for acutely ruptured aneurysms and discuss the technical success, angiographic and clinical outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of our database of prospectively collected data to identify all patients who presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage that required adjunctive treatment with the pCONus in the acute stage. We searched the database between April 2011 and April 2016. Results 21 patients were identified (13 male, 8 female) with an average age of 54.6 years (range 31–73). 8 aneurysms were located at the basilar artery tip, 7 at the anterior communicating artery, 4 at the middle cerebral artery bifurcation, 1 pericallosal, and 1 basilar fenestration. 61.8% patients achieved modified Raymond–Roy classification I or II at immediate angiography, with 75% of patients having completely occluded aneurysms or stable appearance at initial follow-up. There were no repeat aneurysmal ruptures and two device-related complications (no permanent morbidity). Four patients in our cohort died. Conclusions Use of the pCONus is safe and effective in patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms and carries a high rate of technical success. PMID:27411859

  9. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Hirzel, Florian C.; Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L.; Hess, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  10. Surgical management of peritonitis secondary to acute superior mesenteric artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute arterial mesenteric ischemia in the early stages is now possible using modern computed tomography with intravenous contrast enhancement and imaging in the arterial and/or portal phase. Most patients have acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion, and a large proportion of these patients will develop peritonitis prior to mesenteric revascularization, and explorative laparotomy will therefore be necessary to evaluate the extent and severity of intestinal ischemia, and to perform bowel resections. The establishment of a hybrid operating room in vascular units in hospitals is most important to be able to perform successful intestinal revascularization. This review outlines current frontline surgical strategies to improve survival and minimize bowel morbidity in patients with peritonitis secondary to acute SMA occlusion. Explorative laparotomy needs to be performed first. Curative treatment is based upon intestinal revascularization followed by bowel resection. If no vascular imaging has been carried out, SMA angiography is performed. In case of embolic occlusion of the SMA, open embolectomy is performed followed by angiography. In case of thrombotic occlusion, the occlusive lesion can be recanalized retrograde from an exposed SMA, the guidewire snared from either the femoral or brachial artery, and stented with standard devices from these access sites. Bowel resections and sometimes gall bladder removal due to transmural infarctions are performed at initial laparotomy, leaving definitive bowel reconstructions to a planned second look laparotomy, according to the principles of damage control surgery. Patients with peritonitis secondary to acute SMA occlusion should be managed by both the general and vascular surgeon, and a hybrid revascularization approach is of utmost importance to improve outcomes. PMID:25110423

  11. Successful recovery from an acute kidney injury due to amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Katsuhito; Naito, Shotaro; Okado, Tomokazu; Rai, Tatemitu; Mori, Yutaro; Toda, Takayuki; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Matsui, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese woman at 40 weeks gestation visited the maternity hospital after imminent labor had begun. After the delivery, persistent bleeding developed resulting in hemorrhagic shock. Although the hemorrhage was eventually controlled, hepatic and renal dysfunction occurred, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The patient's clinical presentation was suggestive of amniotic fluid embolism (AFE). We subsequently initiated continuous renal replacement therapy (RRT) for AKI. The patient's condition improved, she discontinued RRT, and her renal function recovered. We herein report a patient who successfully recovered from AKI caused by AFE.

  12. Risk Stratification for Proven Acute Pulmonary Embolism: What Information Is Needed?

    PubMed

    Barrios, Deisy; Yusen, Roger D; Jiménez, David

    2017-02-01

    Classification of risk drives treatment decisions for patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). High-risk patients with acute symptomatic PE have hemodynamic instability (i.e., shock or hypotension present), and treatment guidelines suggest systemically administered thrombolytic therapy in this setting. Normotensive PE patients at low risk for early complications (low-risk PE) might benefit from treatment at home or early discharge, while normotensive patients with preserved systemic arterial pressure deemed as having a high risk for PE-related adverse clinical events (intermediate-high-risk PE) might benefit from close observation and consideration of escalation of therapy. Prognostic tools (e.g., clinical prognostic scoring systems, imaging testing, and cardiac laboratory biomarkers) assist with the classification of patients into these categories.

  13. Acute right ventricular failure caused by concomitant coronary and pulmonary embolism: successful treatment with endovascular coronary and pulmonary thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Sasha; Roijer, Anders; Holmqvist, Jasminka; Keussen, Inger; Cwikiel, Wojciech; Öhlin, Bertil; Erlinge, David

    2013-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is present in approximately 25% of the general population. PFO is characterized by intermittent shunting of blood from the right to the left atrium, especially in the context of increased right-sided filling pressures, with risk of paradoxical embolism. We describe a 69-year-old woman presenting with acute chest pain, severe dyspnoea, and acute inferolateral ST-segment elevation on the electrocardiogram. The patient was diagnosed with myocardial infarction and failure of the right cardiac ventricle, which was considered to be secondary to extensive pulmonary embolism leading to increased filling pressures and paradoxical coronary embolism. The patient underwent emergent percutaneous interventions with coronary thrombus extraction and pulmonary thrombus fragmentation and local thrombolysis. The patient was free of symptoms at follow up 6 months later and echocardiography showed substantially improved right ventricular function. We discuss issues related to the diagnosis, treatment, and secondary prevention for patients with concomitant pulmonary and coronary arterial thrombosis. PMID:24222822

  14. Selection of patients with acute pulmonary embolism for thrombolytic therapy. Thrombolysis in pulmonary embolism (TIPE) patient survey. The TIPE Investigators.

    PubMed

    Terrin, M; Goldhaber, S Z; Thompson, B

    1989-05-01

    During a recent one-year period, 44 clinical centers in the United States saw 2,539 patients with diagnoses of pulmonary embolism as supported by high probability lung scans and/or positive pulmonary angiograms. In developing proposals for a clinical trial of Thrombolysis in Pulmonary Embolism (TIPE), investigators in the 44 clinical centers reviewed the 2,539 patients' medical charts for contraindications to thrombolytic therapy. Overall, 1,345 (53.5%) patients surveyed in the TIPE clinical centers would have been acceptable for treatment with thrombolytic therapy, a proportion higher than generally anticipated. Risks of major blood loss were the most frequent contraindications to thrombolytic therapy and were found in 838 (33.3%) patients. Risks to the CNS were found to contraindicate thrombolytic therapy in 453 (17.9%) patients. Risks of bleeding into special compartments were found to contraindicate thrombolytic therapy in 76 (3.0%) patients. Pulmonary embolism is underdiagnosed in most clinical settings, and even more patients than found in the TIPE survey could benefit from appropriate diagnosis and treatment. The question remains as to whether pulmonary embolism patients will benefit from thrombolytic therapy. Only a randomized clinical trial will provide a satisfactory answer.

  15. Surviving a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by an acute superior vena cava and thoracic compartment syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Michael W; Rodas, Edgar B; Bartnik, Jakub P; Puente, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first reported survivor of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by acute superior vena cava (SVCS) and thoracic compartment syndromes (TCS). A thirty one year old male was involved in a boating accident. The patient was diagnosed with a grade IV liver laceration, which was initially managed with both angio-embolization and open surgical repair. Exactly one month from admission, the patient presented with an abrupt cardiac arrest, which was further complicated by a SVCS and TCS. The SVCS was managed with bilateral thoracostomies which revealed a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture into the right chest cavity. The TCS was managed with a decompressive thoraco-abdominal incision. The patient survived and is now leading a normal life. Our success was largely due to an integrated trauma system of physicians, nurses and technicians that prompted the early recognition of two potentially life threatening complications of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture. PMID:21887041

  16. Surviving a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by an acute superior vena cava and thoracic compartment syndromes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Michael W; Rodas, Edgar B; Bartnik, Jakub P; Puente, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    We describe the first reported survivor of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by acute superior vena cava (SVCS) and thoracic compartment syndromes (TCS). A thirty one year old male was involved in a boating accident. The patient was diagnosed with a grade IV liver laceration, which was initially managed with both angio-embolization and open surgical repair. Exactly one month from admission, the patient presented with an abrupt cardiac arrest, which was further complicated by a SVCS and TCS. The SVCS was managed with bilateral thoracostomies which revealed a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture into the right chest cavity. The TCS was managed with a decompressive thoraco-abdominal incision. The patient survived and is now leading a normal life. Our success was largely due to an integrated trauma system of physicians, nurses and technicians that prompted the early recognition of two potentially life threatening complications of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture.

  17. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  18. Treatment of acute massive pulmonary embolism by streptokinase during labour and delivery.

    PubMed

    Hall, R J; Young, C; Sutton, G C; Cambell, S

    1972-12-16

    A 29-year-old woman sustained an acute massive pulmonary embolism in the 32nd week of pregnancy. Rapid clinical improvement followed the use of streptokinase. Treatment was continued for 41 hours, including labour and the first three hours after delivery. There was slow but severe postpartum haemorrhage. Partial uterine atony occurred, and may have been due, at least in part, to fibrin degradation products arising from thrombolysis. No adverse effects were noted in the baby.Our experience suggests that streptokinase may be given during labour but that an oxytocic agent may be needed; and that reversal of fibrinolysis before delivery is best achieved by the use of aprotinin (Trasylol) rather than aminocaproic acid.

  19. The role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute and chronic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Halil; de Roos, Albert; Geleijins, Jacob; Huisman, Menno V.; Kroft, Lucia J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life threatening condition requiring adequate diagnosis and treatment. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is excellent for including and excluding PE, therefore CT is the first-choice diagnostic imaging technique in patients suspected of having acute PE. Due to its wide availability and low invasiveness, CTPA tends to be overused. Correct implementation of clinical decision rules in diagnostic workup for PE improves adequate use of CT. Also, CT adds prognostic value by evaluating right ventricular (RV) function. CT-assessed RV dysfunction and to lesser extent central emboli location predicts PE-related mortality in normotensive and hypotensive patients, while PE embolic obstruction index has limited prognostic value. Simple RV/left ventricular (LV) diameter ratio measures >1.0 already predict risk for adverse outcome, whereas ratios <1.0 can safely exclude adverse outcome. Consequently, assessing the RV/LV diameter ratio may help identify patients who are potential candidates for treatment at home instead of treatment in the hospital. A minority of patients develop chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) following acute PE, which is a life-threatening condition that can be diagnosed by CT. In proximal CTEPH, involving the more central pulmonary arteries, thrombectomy usually results in good outcome in terms of both functional status and long-term survival rate. CT is becoming the imaging method of choice for diagnosing CTEPH as it can identify patients who may benefit from thrombectomy. New CT developments such as distensibility measurements and dual-energy or subtraction techniques may further refine diagnosis and prognosis for improved patient care. PMID:26133321

  20. Immuno-inflammatory activation in acute cardio-embolic strokes in comparison with other subtypes of ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Licata, Giuseppe; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Corrao, Salvatore; Di Sciacca, Riccardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between inflammatory biomarker blood levels, cardioembolic stroke subtype and neurological deficit. So the aim of our study is to evaluate plasma levels of immuno-inflammatory variables in patients with cardio-embolic acute ischaemic stroke compared to other diagnostic subtypes and to evaluate the relationship between immuno-inflammatory variables, acute neurological deficit and brain infarct volume. One hundred twenty patients with acute ischaemic stroke and 123 controls without a diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke were evaluated. The type of acute ischaemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST classification. We evaluated plasma levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10, E-selectin, P-selectin, sICAM-1,sVCAM-1, vWF, TPA and PAI-1. Patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cardio-embolic (CEI) showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly higher median plasma levels of TNF-alpha , IL-6 and IL-1beta. Furthermore stroke patients classified as lacunar showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly lower median plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1beta. Multiple linear regression showed a significant association between the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) score at admission and diagnostic subtype, infarct volume of cardio-embolic strokes and some inflammatory variables. Our findings confirm that cardio-embolic strokes have a worse clinical presentation and produce larger and more disabling strokes than other ischaemic stroke subtypes reporting a possible explanation of higher immuno-inflammatory activation of the acute phase.

  1. Embolization of a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula with Onyx via Direct Puncture of the Cavernous Sinus through the Superior Orbital Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Amiridze, N.; Zoarski, G.; Darwish, R.; Obuchowski, A.; Soloveychic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Treatment of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) may be challenging. We describe a patient who had presented with progressive ocular symptoms due to CSDAVF requiring urgent interventional therapy. Initial attempts to embolize the fistula utilizing a transvenous approach through the inferior petrosal sinus failed because of difficult anatomy. Successful occlusion of the fistula was subsequently achieved with injection of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx (EV3 Neurovascular, Irvine, CA, USA), via direct percutaneous puncture of the cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure. A brief period of asystole during the initial injection of Onyx may be the result of the trigeminocardiac reflex. PMID:20465896

  2. Regional right ventricular dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism: relationship with clot burden and biomarker profile.

    PubMed

    Tuzovic, Mirela; Adigopula, Sasikanth; Amsallem, Myriam; Kobayashi, Yukari; Kadoch, Michael; Boulate, David; Krishnan, Gomathi; Liang, David; Schnittger, Ingela; Fleischmann, Dominik; McConnell, Michael V; Haddad, François

    2016-03-01

    Regional right ventricular (RV) dysfunction (RRVD) is an echocardiographic feature in acute pulmonary embolism (PE), primarily reported in patients with moderate-to-severe RV dysfunction. This study investigated the clinical importance of RRVD by assessing its relationship with clot burden and biomarkers. We identified consecutive patients admitted to the emergency department between 1999 and 2014 who underwent computed tomographic angiography, echocardiography, and biomarker testing (troponin and NT-proBNP) for suspected acute PE. RRVD was defined as normal excursion of the apex contrasting with hypokinesis of the mid-free wall segment. RV assessment included measurements of ventricular dimensions, fractional area change, free-wall longitudinal strain and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion. Clot burden was assessed using the modified Miller score. Of 82 patients identified, 51 had acute PE (mean age 66 ± 17 years, 43% male). No patient had RV myocardial infarction. RRVD was present in 41% of PEs and absent in all patients without PE. Among patients with PE, 86% of patients with RRVD had central or multi-lobar PE. Patients with RRVD had higher prevalence of moderate-to-severe RV dilation (81 vs. 30%, p < 0.01) and dysfunction (86 vs. 23%, p < 0.01). There was a strong trend for higher troponin level in PE patients with RRVD (38 vs. 13% in PE patients without RRVD, p = 0.08), while there was no significant difference for NT-proBNP (67 vs. 73%, p = 0.88). RRVD showed good concordance between readers (87%). RRVD is associated with an increased clot burden in acute PE and is more prevalent among patients with moderate-to-severe RV enlargement and dysfunction.

  3. The predictive value of echocardiography for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after acute pulmonary embolism in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Sup; Ahn, Jinhee; Choi, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Lee, Han Cheol; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a life-threatening complication after acute pulmonary embolism (APE) and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of CTEPH after APE in Korea and to determine echocardiographic predictors of CTEPH. Methods Among 381 patients with APE confirmed by chest computed tomography (CT) between January 2007 and July 2013, 246 consecutive patients with available echocardiographic data were enrolled in this study. CTEPH was defined as a persistent right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) greater than 35 mmHg on echocardiography during follow-up and persistent pulmonary embolism on the follow-up CT. Results Fifteen patients (6.1%) had CTEPH. The rate of right ventricular (RV) dilatation (66.7% vs. 28.1%, p = 0.002) and the RVSP (75.5 mmHg vs. 39.0 mmHg, p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the CTEPH group. D-dimers, RV dilatation, RV hypertrophy, RVSP, and intermediate-risk APE were associated with the risk of CTEPH after APE (odds ratio [OR] 0.59, 5.11, 7.82, 1.06, and 4.86, respectively) on univariate analysis. RVSP remained as a significant predictor of CTEPH on multivariate analysis (OR, 1.056; 95% confidence interval, 1.006 to 1.109; p = 0.029). Conclusions This study showed that the incidence of CTEPH after APE in Korea was 6.1% and that initial RVSP by echocardiography was a strong prognostic factor for CTEPH. PMID:27044855

  4. Catheter-Based Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Tapson, Victor F; Jimenez, David

    2017-02-01

    Except when contraindicated, anticoagulation should be initiated when pulmonary embolism (PE) is strongly suspected and the bleeding risk is perceived to be low, even if the evaluation has not been completed. Low-risk patients with acute PE are simply continued on anticoagulation. Severely ill patients with high-risk (massive) PE require aggressive therapy, and if the bleeding risk is acceptable, systemic thrombolysis should be considered. However, despite clear evidence that parenteral thrombolytic therapy leads to more rapid clot resolution than anticoagulation alone, the risk of major bleeding including intracranial bleeding is significantly higher with thrombolytic therapy. It has been demonstrated that right ventricular dysfunction as well as abnormal biomarkers (troponin and brain natriuretic peptide) are associated with increased mortality in acute PE. In spite of this, intermediate-risk (submassive) PE comprises a fairly broad clinical spectrum so that there is not a solid evidence base permitting a consistent algorithm for clinicians to follow. Thus, for several decades, thromboembolism basic scientists, clinical trialists, and clinicians have worked toward a lower risk solution for treatment of patients with more than simply low-risk PE. Catheter-based therapy, consisting of various devices and techniques, with or without low-dose thrombolytic therapy, offers one potential solution and continues to evolve.

  5. Higher mortality rate in patients hospitalised for acute pulmonary embolism during weekends.

    PubMed

    Gallerani, Massimo; Imberti, Davide; Ageno, Walter; Dentali, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    The management of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is often challenging and requires specific medical expertise, diagnostic techniques and therapeutic options that may not be available in all hospitals throughout the entire week. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether or not an association exists between weekday or weekend admission and mortality for patients hospitalised with acute PE. Using routinely collected hospital administrative data, we examined patients discharged with a diagnosis of PE from the hospitals of the Emilia- Romagna Region in Italy (January 1999-December 2009). The risk of in-hospital death was calculated for admissions at the weekend and compared to weekday admissions. Of a total of 26,560 PEs, 6,788 (25.6%) had been admitted during weekends. PE admissions were most frequent on Mondays (15.8%) and less frequent on Saturdays and Sundays/holidays (12.8%) (p<0.001). Weekend admissions were associated with significantly higher rates of in-hospital mortality than weekday admissions (28% vs. 24.8%) (p<0.001). The risk of weekend admission and in-hospital mortality was higher after adjusting for sender, hospital characteristics, and the Charlson co-morbidity index. In conclusion, hospitalisation for PE on weekends seems to be associated with a significantly higher mortality rate than on weekdays. Further research is needed to investigate the reasons for this observed difference in mortality in order to try and implement future strategies that ensure an adequate level of care throughout the entire week.

  6. Comparative proteome analysis of serum from acute pulmonary embolism rat model for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-qing; Yun, Jun; Xue, Fu-bo; Bai, Chang-qing; Yang, Shu-guang; Que, Hai-ping; Zhao, Xin; Wu, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shao-jun

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common, potentially fatal disease and its diagnosis is challenging because clinical signs and symptoms are nonspecific. In this study, to investigate protein alterations of a rat PE model, total serum proteins collected at different time points were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Bioinformatics analysis of 24 differentially expressed proteins showed that 20 had corresponding protein candidates in the database. According to their properties and obvious alterations after PE, changes of serum concentrations of Hp, Fn, DBP, RBP, and TTR were selected to be reidentified by western blot analysis. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed DBP, RBP, and TTR to be down-regulated at mRNA levels in livers but not in lung tissues. The low serum concentrations of DBP, RBP, and TTR resulted in the up-regulation of 25(OH)D3, vitamin A, and FT4 (ligands of DBP, RBP, and TTR) after acute PE in rat models. The serum levels of Hp and Fn were detected in patients with DVT/PE and controls to explore their diagnostic prospects in acute PE because the mRNA levels of Hp and Fn were found to be up-regulated both in lung tissues and in livers after acute PE. Our data suggested that the concentration of serum Fn in controls was 79.42 +/- 31.57 microg/L, whereas that of PE/DVT patients was 554.43 +/- 136.18 microg/L (P < 0.001), and that the concentration of serum Hp in controls was 824.37 +/- 235.24 mg/L, whereas that of PE/DVT patients was 2063.48 +/- 425.38 mg/L (P < 0.001). The experimental PE rat model selected in this study was more similar to the clinical process than the other existing PE animal models, and the findings indicated instant changes of serum proteins within 48 h after acute PE. The exploration of these differentially expressed proteins or their combination with existent markers such as D-dimer may greatly improve the

  7. Weight-based contrast administration in the computerized tomography evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Lisa; Zamfirova, Ina; Sulo, Suela; Baral, Pesach

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Compare individualized contrast protocol, or weight-based protocol, to standard methodology in evaluating acute pulmonary embolism. Retrospective chart review was performed on patients undergoing computed tomography angiography with standard contrast protocol (n = 50) or individualized protocol (n = 50). Computerized tomography images were assessed for vascular enhancement and image quality. Demographics were comparable, however, more patients in the individualized group were admitted to intensive care unit (48% vs 16%, P = 0.004). Vascular enhancement and image quality were also comparable, although individualized protocol had significantly fewer contrast and motion artifact limitations (28% vs 48%, P = 0.039). Fifteen percent decrease in intravenous contrast volume was identified in individualized group with no compromise in image quality. Individualized contrast protocol provided comparable vascular enhancement and image quality to the standard, yet with fewer limitations and lower intravenous contrast volume. Catheter-gauge flow rate restrictions resulting in inconsistent technologist exam execution were identified, supporting the need for further investigation of this regimen. PMID:28151887

  8. Successful provision of inter-hospital extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for acute post-partum pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; Laurie, J; Janssens, S; Zazulak, C; Kotze, P; Shekar, K

    2017-01-09

    Mortality during pregnancy in a well-resourced setting is rare, but acute pulmonary embolism is one of the leading causes. We present the successful use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) in a 22-year old woman who experienced cardiopulmonary collapse following urgent caesarean section in the setting of a sub-massive pulmonary embolus. Resources and personnel to perform eCPR were not available at the maternity hospital and were recruited from an adjacent pediatric hospital. Initial care used low blood flow extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with pediatric ECMO circuitry, which was optimized when the team from a nearby adult cardiac hospital arrived. Following ECMO support, the patient experienced massive hemorrhage which was managed with uterotonic agents, targeted transfusion, bilateral uterine artery embolisation and abdominal re-exploration. The patient was transferred to an adult unit where she remained on ECMO for five days. She was discharged home with normal cognitive function. This case highlights the role ECMO plays in providing extracorporeal respiratory or mechanical circulatory support in a high risk obstetric patient.

  9. Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in the Course of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Clinical Significance and Impact on Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Agnieszka; Kiluk, Izabela; Kosacka, Urszula; Krajewski, Jacek; Musial, Wlodzimierz Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    The relationship and clinical implications of atrial fibrillation (AF) in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are poorly investigated. We aimed to analyze clinical characteristics and prognosis in PE patients with paroxysmal AF episode. Methods. From the 391 patients with PE 31 subjects with paroxysmal AF were selected. This group was compared with patients with PE and sinus rhythm (SR) and 32 patients with PE and permanent AF. Results. Paroxysmal AF patients were the oldest. Concomitant DVT varies between groups: paroxysmal AF 32.3%, SR 49.5%, and permanent AF 28.1% (p = 0.02). The stroke history frequency was 4.6% SR, 12.9% paroxysmal AF, and 21.9% permanent AF (p < 0.001). Paroxysmal AF comparing to permanent AF and SR individuals had higher estimated SPAP (56 versus 48 versus 47 mmHg, p = 0.01) and shorter ACT (58 versus 65 versus 70 ms, p = 0.04). Patients with AF were more often classified into high-risk group according to revised Geneva score and sPESI than SR patients. In-hospital mortality was lower in SR (5%) and paroxysmal AF (6.5%) compared to permanent AF group (25%) (p < 0.001). Conclusions. Patients with PE-associated paroxysmal AF constitute a separate population. More severe impairment of the parameters reflecting RV afterload may indicate relation between PE severity and paroxysmal AF episode. Paroxysmal AF has no impact on short-term mortality. PMID:28280732

  10. Disturbed right ventricular ejection pattern as a new Doppler echocardiographic sign of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Kurzyna, Marcin; Torbicki, Adam; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Burakowska, Barbara; Fijałkowska, Anna; Kober, Jaroslaw; Oniszh, Karina; Kuca, Paweł; Tomkowski, Witold; Burakowski, Janusz; Wawrzyńska, Liliana

    2002-09-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is frequently performed in patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (APE) to search for right ventricular (RV) pressure overload. We prospectively assessed the diagnostic value of a new Doppler echocardiographic sign of APE based on the disturbed RV ejection pattern ("60/60 sign") and compared its diagnostic performances with that of the presence of RV pressure overload, as well as with "McConnell sign" based on RV regional wall motion abnormalities. We assessed 100 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of APE, including those with previous cardiorespiratory diseases. After TTE, all of the patients underwent reference diagnostic tests for APE. The 60/60 sign required RV acceleration time of acute respiratory distress syndrome following lung resection. McConnell sign was fully specific but was noted in only 13 of 67 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 81% and 45% for "RV-pressure overload" signs, 25% and 94% for 60/60 sign, and 19% and 100% for McConnell sign. When combined, the 2 latter signs were 94% specific and 36% sensitive in diagnosing APE. Thus, RV overload at echocardiography is not specific for APE. The 60/60 and McConnell signs are insensitive, but are reliable and helpful in bedside diagnosis of APE when direct visualization of the pulmonary arteries is impossible. Combining these 2 signs may increase the sensitivity without compromising the specificity of echocardiographic diagnosis of APE.

  11. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  12. Prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Antoine; Mallett, Susan; Daoud-Elias, Marie; Poggi, Jean-Noël; Clarke, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence for existing prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and determine how valid and useful they are for predicting patient outcomes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources OVID MEDLINE and EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library from inception to July 2014, and sources of grey literature. Eligibility criteria Studies aiming at constructing, validating, updating or studying the impact of prognostic models to predict all-cause death, PE-related death or venous thromboembolic events up to a 3-month follow-up in patients with an acute symptomatic PE. Data extraction Study characteristics and study quality using prognostic criteria. Studies were selected and data extracted by 2 reviewers. Data analysis Summary estimates (95% CI) for proportion of risk groups and event rates within risk groups, and accuracy. Results We included 71 studies (44 298 patients). Among them, 17 were model construction studies specific to PE prognosis. The most validated models were the PE Severity Index (PESI) and its simplified version (sPESI). The overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.3% (1.7% to 2.9%) in the low-risk group and 11.4% (9.9% to 13.1%) in the high-risk group for PESI (9 studies), and 1.5% (0.9% to 2.5%) in the low-risk group and 10.7% (8.8% to12.9%) in the high-risk group for sPESI (11 studies). PESI has proved clinically useful in an impact study. Shifting the cut-off or using novel and updated models specifically developed for normotensive PE improves the ability for identifying patients at lower risk for early death or adverse outcome (0.5–1%) and those at higher risk (up to 20–29% of event rate). Conclusions We provide evidence-based information about the validity and utility of the existing prognostic models in acute PE that may be helpful for identifying patients at low risk. Novel models seem attractive for the high-risk normotensive PE but need to be externally validated then be assessed in impact studies. PMID

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Thrombolytic Therapy in Acute Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Sachan, Mohit; Goel, Amit; Singh, Karandeep; Mishra, Vikas; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Kumar, Ashutosh; Abdali, Nasar; Asif, Mohammad; Razi, Mahamdula; Pandey, Umeshwar; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Krishna, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis in acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PE) remains controversial. So we studied impact of thrombolytic therapy in acute submassive PE in terms of mortality, hemodynamic status, improvement in right ventricular function, and safety in terms of major and minor bleeding. Method A single-center, prospective, randomized study of 86 patients was conducted at LPS Institute of Cardiology, G.S.V.M. Medical College, Kanpur, India. Patients received thrombolysis (single bolus of tenecteplase) with unfractionated heparin (UFH, group I) or placebo with UFH (group II). Result Mean age of patients was 54.35 ± 12.8 years with male dominance (M:F = 70%:30%). Smoking was the most common risk factor seen in 29% of all patients, followed by recent history of immobilization (25%), history of surgery or major trauma within past 1 month (15%), dyslipidemia (10%) and diabetes mellitus (10%). Dyspnea was the most common symptom in 80% of all patients, followed by chest pain in 55% and syncope in 6%. Primary efficacy outcome occurred significantly better in group I vs. group II (4.5% vs. 20%; P = 0.04), and significant difference was also found in hemodynamic decompensation (4.5% vs. 20%; P = 0.04), the fall in mean pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) (28.8% vs. 22.5%; P = 0.03), improvement in right ventricular (RV) function (70% vs. 40%; P = 0.001) and mean hospital stay (8.1 ± 2.5 vs. 11.1 ± 2.14 days; P = 0.001). There was no difference in mortality and major bleeding as safety outcome but increased minor bleeding occurred in group I patients (16% vs. 12%; P = 0.04). Conclusion Patients with acute submassive PE do not derive overall mortality benefit, recurrent PE and rehospitalization with thrombolytic therapy but had improved clinical outcome in form of decrease in hemodynamic decompensation, mean hospital stay, PASP and improvement of RV function with similar risk of major bleed but at cost of increased minor bleeding. PMID:28090232

  14. Clinical and pathological features of fat embolism with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang Jyh; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    FES (fat embolism syndrome) is a clinical problem, and, although ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome) has been considered as a serious complication of FES, the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with FES remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the clinical manifestations, and biochemical and pathophysiological changes, in subjects associated with FES and ARDS, to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in this disorder. A total of eight patients with FES were studied, and arterial blood pH, PaO(2) (arterial partial pressure of O(2)), PaCO(2) (arterial partial pressure of CO(2)), biochemical and pathophysiological data were obtained. These subjects suffered from crash injuries and developed FES associated with ARDS, and each died within 2 h after admission. In the subjects, chest radiography revealed that the lungs were clear on admission, and pulmonary infiltration was observed within 2 h of admission. Arterial blood pH and PaO(2) declined, whereas PaCO(2) increased. Plasma PLA(2) (phospholipase A(2)), nitrate/nitrite, methylguanidine, TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha), IL-1beta (interleukin-1beta) and IL-10 (interleukin-10) were significantly elevated. Pathological examinations revealed alveolar oedema and haemorrhage with multiple fat droplet depositions and fibrin thrombi. Fat droplets were also found in the arterioles and/or capillaries in the lung, kidney and brain. Immunohistochemical staining identified iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) in alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, our clinical analysis suggests that PLA(2), NO, free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with FES. The major source of NO is the alveolar macrophages.

  15. Predictive value of D-dimer test for recurrent venous thromboembolism at hospital discharge in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Luo, Qin; Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Zhao, Qing

    2011-11-01

    D-dimer can be used to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE) for its high negative predictive value (NPV). Also, it is a predictor of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after anticoagulation withdrawal. The aim of the present study was to assess the predictive value of D-dimer for recurrent VTE when tested at hospital discharge. Plasma D-dimer levels were repeatedly measured at hospital discharge in 204 consecutive patients with the first episode of acute pulmonary embolism. Patients were categorized to two groups by D-dimer levels at hospital discharge and followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. The primary end point was symptomatic, recurrent fatal or nonfatal VTE. D-dimer levels were persistently abnormal in 66 patients (32%). After 31±19 months follow-up, patients with persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels showed a higher rate of of recurrent VTE (14 patients, 21%) compared to those with D-dimer regression (8 patients, 6%) (P = 0.001). At the multivariate analysis, after adjustment for other relevant factors, persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels were an independent predictor of recurrent VTE in all subjects investigated, (hazard ratio, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.61-10.39; P = 0.003), especially in those with unprovoked PE (hazard ratio, 4.61; 95% CI, 1.85-11.49; P = 0.001). The negative predictive value of D-dimer was 94.2 and 92.9% in all subjects or those with unprovoked PE, respectively. Persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels at hospital discharge have a high negative predictive value for recurrence in patients with acute pulmonary embolism, especially in subjects with an unprovoked previous event.

  16. Acute Coronary Artery Air Embolism Following CT-Guided Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Asem AbdelRaouf, Salah; Qandeel, Monther; Swaidan, Maisa

    2005-01-15

    CT-guided needle biopsy is a common procedure for obtaining a tissue diagnosis and consequently correctly managing patients. This procedure has many potential complications, ranging from simple pneumothorax or self-limiting hemoptysis to life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and air embolism. Though the latter is a rare complication of CT-guided needle biopsy, it has attracted a lot of interest. We report a case of right coronary air embolism resulting in myocardial infarction after a CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the lung.

  17. Late outcomes after acute pulmonary embolism: rationale and design of FOCUS, a prospective observational multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros V; Barco, Stefano; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Lankeit, Mareike; Held, Matthias; Gerhardt, Felix; Bruch, Leonard; Ewert, Ralf; Faehling, Martin; Freise, Julia; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Grünig, Ekkehard; Halank, Michael; Heydenreich, Nadine; Hoeper, Marius M; Leuchte, Hanno H; Mayer, Eckhard; Meyer, F Joachim; Neurohr, Claus; Opitz, Christian; Pinto, Antonio; Seyfarth, Hans-Jürgen; Wachter, Rolf; Zäpf, Bianca; Wilkens, Heinrike; Binder, Harald; Wild, Philipp S

    2016-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent cause of death and serious disability. The risk of PE-associated mortality and morbidity extends far beyond the acute phase of the disease. In earlier follow-up studies, as many as 30 % of the patients died during a follow-up period of up to 3 years, and up to 50 % of patients continued to complain of dyspnea and/or poor physical performance 6 months to 3 years after the index event. The most feared 'late sequela' of PE is chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), the true incidence of which remains obscure due to the large margin of error in the rates reported by mostly small, single-center studies. Moreover, the functional and hemodynamic changes corresponding to early, possibly reversible stages of CTEPH, have not been systematically investigated. The ongoing Follow-Up after acute pulmonary embolism (FOCUS) study will prospectively enroll and systematically follow, over a 2-year period and with a standardized comprehensive program of clinical, echocardiographic, functional and laboratory testing, a large multicenter prospective cohort of 1000 unselected patients (all-comers) with acute symptomatic PE. FOCUS will possess adequate power to provide answers to relevant remaining questions regarding the patients' long-term morbidity and mortality, and the temporal pattern of post-PE abnormalities. It will hopefully provide evidence for future guideline recommendations regarding the selection of patients for long-term follow-up after PE, the modalities which this follow-up should include, and the findings that should be interpreted as indicating progressive functional and hemodynamic post-PE impairment, or the development of CTEPH.

  18. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke.

  19. Bilateral Superior Cerebellar Artery Embolic Occlusion with a Fetal-Type Posterior Cerebral Artery Providing Collateral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Taylor J.; Saporito, Rachael C.; Hope, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral infarction of the superior cerebellar arteries with sparing of the rest of the posterior circulation, particularly the posterior cerebral arteries, is an uncommon finding in neurological practice. Most commonly, the deficits of the superior cerebellar arteries and posterior cerebral arteries occur together due to the close proximity of their origins at the top of the basilar artery. A patient was transferred to the neurological intensive care unit with a history of recent-onset falls from standing, profound hypertension, dizziness, and headaches. The neurological exam revealed cerebellar signs, including dysmetria of the right upper extremity and a decreased level of consciousness. Computed tomography of the head and neck revealed decreased attenuation throughout most of the cerebellar hemispheres suggestive of ischemic injury with sparing of the rest of the brain. Further investigation with a computed tomography angiogram revealed a fetal-type posterior cerebral artery on the right side that was providing collateral circulation to the posterior brain. Due to this embryological anomaly, the patient was spared significant morbidity and mortality that would have likely occurred had the circulation been more typical of an adult male. PMID:28203181

  20. Bilateral Superior Cerebellar Artery Embolic Occlusion with a Fetal-Type Posterior Cerebral Artery Providing Collateral Circulation.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Taylor J; Saporito, Rachael C; Hope, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral infarction of the superior cerebellar arteries with sparing of the rest of the posterior circulation, particularly the posterior cerebral arteries, is an uncommon finding in neurological practice. Most commonly, the deficits of the superior cerebellar arteries and posterior cerebral arteries occur together due to the close proximity of their origins at the top of the basilar artery. A patient was transferred to the neurological intensive care unit with a history of recent-onset falls from standing, profound hypertension, dizziness, and headaches. The neurological exam revealed cerebellar signs, including dysmetria of the right upper extremity and a decreased level of consciousness. Computed tomography of the head and neck revealed decreased attenuation throughout most of the cerebellar hemispheres suggestive of ischemic injury with sparing of the rest of the brain. Further investigation with a computed tomography angiogram revealed a fetal-type posterior cerebral artery on the right side that was providing collateral circulation to the posterior brain. Due to this embryological anomaly, the patient was spared significant morbidity and mortality that would have likely occurred had the circulation been more typical of an adult male.

  1. A Case of Acute Ischemic Duodenal Ulcer Associated with Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection After Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Sun; Jeong, Sook-Hyang Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Hyub; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon

    2009-03-15

    We report a case of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)-related acute ischemic duodenal ulcer that developed in association with dissection of the superior mesenteric artery. We conclude that the acute duodenal ulcer was developed by ischemia related to superior mesenteric artery dissection during TACE. TACE should be conducted carefully with continuous observation of abdominal arteries.

  2. "False negatives" and "false positives" in acute pulmonary embolism: a clinical-postmortem comparison.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, V; Schmid, C; Zogno, C; Morpurgo, M

    1997-02-01

    Although recent advances have been made in understanding its epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment, pulmonary embolism (PE) is still largely undetected and untreated, and the mortality rate has not appreciably changed in the last decades. The aim of this study was to: compare the postmortem frequency of massive and sub-massive PE during two different time periods in the same general hospital; ascertain whether the percentage of correct clinical diagnosis of PE has changed; identify factors which might contribute to the inaccuracy of the clinical diagnosis of PE. Altogether, 288 patients with autopsy-proven PE and adequate clinical data were collected in the first period; 182 subjects with the same characteristics were found in the second period. Cases observed from 1989 through 1994 were evaluated in terms of frequency of false negatives and false positives, predictive value of the clinical diagnosis of PE, and correlations between clinical and post-mortem diagnosis of PE on one side and several independent variables such as age, gender, associated diseases, recent surgery on the other. In our hospital the frequency of massive and submassive PE at autopsy was 8.6% from 1966 through 1974, 12.6% from 1989 through 1994 (p < 0.01). The percentage of correct clinical diagnosis of PE was 19.6% in the former period, 21.6% in the latter (NS) with 78.57% of false negatives and only 1.73% of false positives. Altogether the true positives were 21.42%, most of them being patients with massive PE. Clinical findings showed the coexistence of heart disease in 51.6% of the cases, congestive heart failure in 20.15%, metabolic disease in 7%, stroke in 12.5%, recent surgery in 12.5%. Autopsy revealed the presence of pulmonary infarction in 22% of cases, malignancy in 24.0%, pneumonia in 17.05%, acute myocardial infarction in 14.8%. Seventy percent of the cases in whom the point of origin of thromboemboli could be demonstrated had one or more thrombus in the district of inferior vena

  3. Interventional treatment for symptomatic acute-subacute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Yong; Wang, Mao-Qiang; Fan, Qing-Sheng; Duan, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Song, Peng

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To summarize our methods and experience with interventional treatment for symptomatic acute-subacute portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PV-SMV) thrombosis. METHODS: Forty-six patients (30 males, 16 females, aged 17-68 years) with symptomatic acute-subacute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis were accurately diagnosed with Doppler ultrasound scans, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. They were treated with interventional therapy, including direct thrombolysis (26 cases through a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt; 6 through percutaneous transhepatic portal vein cannulation) and indirect thrombolysis (10 through the femoral artery to superior mesenteric artery catheterization; 4 through the radial artery to superior mesenteric artery catheterization). RESULTS: The blood reperfusion of PV-SMV was achieved completely or partially in 34 patients 3-13 d after thrombolysis. In 11 patients there was no PV-SMV blood reperfusion but the number of collateral vessels increased significantly. Symptoms in these 45 patients were improved dramatically without severe operational complications. In 1 patient, the thrombi did not respond to the interventional treatment and resulted in intestinal necrosis, which required surgical treatment. In 3 patients with interventional treatment, thrombi re-formed 1, 3 and 4 mo after treatment. In these 3 patients, indirect PV-SMV thrombolysis was performed again and was successful. CONCLUSION: Interventional treatment, including direct or indirect PV-SMV thrombolysis, is a safe and effective method for patients with symptomatic acute-subacute PV-SMV thrombosis. PMID:19859995

  4. Life-threatening Cerebral Edema Caused by Acute Occlusion of a Superior Vena Cava Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sofue, Keitaro Takeuchi, Yoshito Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-02-15

    A71-year-old man with advanced lung cancer developed a life-threatening cerebral edema caused by the acute occlusion of a superior vena cava (SVC) stent and was successfully treated by an additional stent placement. Although stent occlusion is a common early complication, no life-threatening situations have been reported until now. Our experience highlights the fact that acute stent occlusion can potentially lead to the complete venous shutdown of the SVC, resulting in life-threatening cerebral edema, after SVC stent placement. Immediate diagnosis and countermeasures are required.

  5. Prevalence of Echocardiography Use in Patients Hospitalized with Confirmed Acute Pulmonary Embolism: A Real-World Observational Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Rong; Chow, Vincent; Lau, Jerrett K.; Thomas, Liza; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) carries an increased risk of death. Using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to assist diagnosis and risk stratification is recommended in current guidelines. However, its utilization in real-world clinical practice is unknown. We conducted a retrospective observational study to delineate the prevalence of inpatient TTE use following confirmed acute PE, identify predictors for its use and its impact on patient’s outcome. Methods Clinical details of consecutive patients (2000 to 2012) from two tertiary-referral hospitals were retrieved from dedicated PE databases. All-cause and cause-specific mortality was tracked from a state-wide death registry. Results In total, 2306 patients were admitted with confirmed PE, of whom 687 (29.8%) had inpatient TTE (39.3% vs 14.4% between sites, P<0.001). Site to which patient presented, older age, cardiac failure, atrial fibrillation and diabetes were independent predictors for inpatient TTE use, while malignancy was a negative predictor. Overall mortality was 41.4% (mean follow-up 66.5±49.5months). Though inpatient TTE use was not an independent predictor for all-cause or cardiovascular mortality in multivariable analysis, in the inpatient TTE subgroup, right ventricle-right atrial pressure gradient (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02 per-1mmHg increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.03) and moderate/severe aortic stenosis (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.20–4.27) independently predicted all-cause mortality. Conclusions Inpatient TTE is used infrequently in real-world clinical settings following acute PE despite its usefulness in risk stratification, prognostication and assessing comorbid cardiac pathologies. Identifying patients that will benefit most from a TTE assessment following an acute PE episode and reducing barriers in accessing TTE should be explored. PMID:27977781

  6. Upper extremity acute compartment syndrome during tissue plasminogen activator therapy for pulmonary embolism in a morbidly obese patient

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Serkan; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Mutlu, Serhat; Ketenci, Ismail Emre; Ulusoy, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are more frequently observed in morbidly obese patients. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a thrombolytic agent which dissolves the thrombus more rapidly than conventional heparin therapy and reduces the mortality and morbidity rates associated with PE. Compartment syndrome is a well-known and documented complication of thrombolytic treatment. In awake, oriented and cooperative patients, the diagnosis of compartment syndrome is made based on clinical findings including swelling, tautness, irrational and continuous pain, altered sensation, and severe pain due to passive stretching. These clinical findings may not be able to be adequately assessed in unconscious patients. Presentation of case In this case report, we present compartment syndrome observed, for which fasciotomy was performed on the upper right extremity of a 46-year old morbidly obese, conscious female patient who was receiving tPA due to a massive pulmonary embolism. Discussion Compartment syndrome had occurred due to the damage caused by the repeated unsuccessful catheterisation attempts to the brachial artery and the accompanying tPA treatment. Thus, the bleeding that occurred in the volar compartment of the forearm and the anterior compartment of the arm led to acute compartment syndrome (ACS). After relaxation was brought about in the volar compartment of the forearm and the anterior compartment of the arm, the circulation in the limb was restored. Conclusion As soon as the diagnosis of compartment syndrome is made, an emergency fasciotomy should be performed. Close follow-up is required to avoid wound healing problems after the fasciotomy. PMID:25618841

  7. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  8. Catheter-Directed Therapy in Acute Pulmonary Embolism with Right Ventricular Dysfunction: A Promising Modality to Provide Early Hemodynamic Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Dilektasli, Asli Gorek; Cetinoglu, Ezgi Demirdogen; Acet, Nilufer Aylin; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ursavas, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Coskun, Funda; Karadag, Mehmet; Ege, Ercument

    2016-01-01

    Background Catheter-directed therapy (CDT) for pulmonary embolism (PE) is considered as an alternative to systemic thrombolysis (ST) in patients with hemodynamically unstable acute PE who are considered at high bleeding risk for ST. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CDT in the management of acute PE with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD). The primary outcomes were mortality, clinical success, and complications. Secondary outcomes were change in hemodynamic parameters in the first 24 hours following the procedure. Material/Methods Medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed as having acute massive or submassive PE with accompanying RVD treated by immediate CDT at our institution from January 2007 to January 2014 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, mortality, achievement of clinical success, and minor and major bleeding complications were analyzed in the overall study group, as well as massive vs. submassive PE subgroups. Change in hemodynamic parameters in the second, eighth, and 24th hours after the CDT procedure were also analyzed. Results The study included 15 consecutive patients (M/F=10/5) with a mean age of 54.2±16.6 years who underwent immediate CDT. Nine of the patients had submassive PE, and 6 had massive PE. In-hospital mortality rate was 13.3% (95% CI, 0.04–0.38). One major, but not life-threatening, bleeding episode was evident in the whole group. Hemodynamic parameters were stabilized and clinical success was achieved in 14/15 (93.3%; 95% CI, 70.2–98.8) of the patients in the first 24 hours. Notably, the hemodynamic recovery was significantly evident in the first 8 hours after the procedure. Conclusions CDT is a promising treatment option for patients with acute PE with RVD with no fatal bleeding complication. In experienced centers, CDT should be considered as a first-line treatment for patients with acute PE and RVD and contraindications for ST, with the advantage of providing early hemodynamic recovery. PMID:27081754

  9. [From acute pulmonary embolism to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: Pathobiology and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) represents a unique subtype of pulmonary hypertension characterized by the presence of mechanical obstruction of the major pulmonary vessels caused by venous thromboembolism. CTEPH is a progressive and devastating disease if not treated, and is the only subset of PH potentially curable by a surgical procedure known as pulmonary endarterectomy. The clot burden and pulmonary embolism recurrence may contribute to the development of CTEPH however only few thrombophilic factors have been found to be associated. A current hypothesis is that CTEPH results from the incomplete resolution and organization of thrombus modified by inflammatory, immunologic and genetic mechanisms, leading to the development of fibrotic stenosis and adaptive vascular remodeling of resistance vessels. The causes of thrombus non-resolution have yet to be fully clarified. CTEPH patients often display severe PH that cannot be fully explained by the degree of pulmonary vascular obstruction apparent on imaging studies. In such cases, the small vessel disease and distal obstructive thrombotic lesions beyond the sub-segmental level may contribute for out of proportion elevated PVR. The processes implicated in the development of arteriopathy and micro-vascular changes might explain the progressive nature of PH and gradual clinical deterioration with poor prognosis, as well as lack of correlation between measurable hemodynamic parameters and vascular obstruction even in the absence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. This review summarizes the most relevant up-to-date aspects on pathobiology and pathophysiology of CTEPH.

  10. [Has high-definition spiral computed tomography changed the management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism?].

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Raffaele; de Conti, Giorgio; Minotto, Isabella; Prandoni, Paolo

    2008-12-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common condition carrying a significant degree of mortality if not diagnosed early. The diagnosis of PE is challenging, because of the non-specific nature of its clinical features. For many years the diagnostic strategies for PE have mainly involved ventilation/perfusion lung scan as the chief diagnostic procedure, often associated with a few clinical models of pre-test probability and the D-dimer test. These modalities of diagnosing PE, though quite satisfactory in various clinical settings, show several limitations, the most important one being the high rate of non-diagnostic procedures. The introduction of computed tomography (CT) has changed the diagnostic strategies and has become the main diagnostic procedure for diagnosing PE. CT is undergoing a rapid technological upgrade, which will open in the near future new frontiers in the diagnosis of PE. Nonetheless, CT carries a number of limitations, which should be carefully identified. This article reviews the evidences on both the traditional and newer diagnostic strategies for PE, outlines their strengths and weaknesses and describes future applications of CT for diagnosing PE.

  11. Contribution of fibrinolysis to the physical component summary of the SF-36 after acute submassive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Lauren K.; Peitz, Geoffrey W.; Nordenholz, Kristen E.; Courtney, D. Mark; Kabrhel, Christopher; Jones, Alan E.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Diercks, Deborah B.; Klinger, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) can diminish patient quality of life (QoL). The objective was to test whether treatment with tenecteplase has an independent effect on a measurement that reflects QoL in patients with submassive PE. This was a secondary analysis of an 8-center, prospective randomized controlled trial, utilizing multivariate regression to control for predefined predictors of worsened QoL including: age, active malignancy, history of PE or deep venous thrombosis (DVT), recurrent PE or DVT, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure. QoL was measured with the physical component summary (PCS) of the SF-36. Analysis included 76 patients (37 randomized to tenecteplase, 39 to placebo). Multivariate regression yielded an equation f(8, 67), P<0.001, with R2 = 0.303. Obesity had the largest effect on PCS (β = −8.6, P<0.001), with tenecteplase second (β = 4.73, P = 0.056). After controlling for all interactions, tenecteplase increased the PCS by +5.37 points (P = 0.027). In patients without any of the defined comorbidities, the coefficient on the tenecteplase variable was not significant (−0.835, P = 0.777). In patients with submassive PE, obesity had the greatest influence on QoL, followed by use of fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis had a marginal independent effect on patient QoL after controlling for comorbidities, but was not significant in patients without comorbid conditions. PMID:25433511

  12. Factors determining altered perfusion after acute pulmonary embolism assessed by quantified single-photon emission computed tomography-perfusion scan

    PubMed Central

    Meysman, Marc; Everaert, Hendrik; Vincken, Walter

    2017-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of the study was to analyze the evolution of perfusion (Q)-defects in patients treated for acute pulmonary embolism (PE), correlation with baseline parameters and evaluation of recurrence risk. METHODS: This is a single-center prospective observational cohort study in symptomatic normotensive PE. Comparison of the ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q-SPECT) acquired at baseline with a quantified SPECT (Q-SPECT) repeated at 1 week and 6 months. The Q-defect extent (percentage of total lung volume affected) was measured semiquantitatively. Data collected at baseline were age, gender, body mass index (BMI), history of previous venous thromboembolism (HVTE), Charlson's Comorbidity Score (CcS), plasma troponin-T and D-dimer levels, PE Severity Index, and tricuspid regurgitation jet (TRJ) velocity. RESULTS: Forty-six patients (22 men/24 women, mean age 61.7 years (± standard deviation 16.3)) completed the study. At 1 week, 13/46 (28.3 %) and at 6 months 22/46 (47.8%) patients had completely normalized Q-SPECT. Persistence of Q-defects was more frequent in female patients in univariate and multivariate analysis. We found no correlation between the persistence of Q-defects on Q-SPECT and HVTE, BMI, plasma troponin-T, and CcS. However, lower TRJ and younger age were statistically significantly linked to normalization of Q-scans after 6 months of treatment only in univariate analysis. There is no difference in the frequency of recurrent PE in relation to the persistence of Q-defects. CONCLUSION: Acute PE patients of female, older age, and higher TRJ in univariate analysis and patients of female in multivariate analysis seem to have a higher risk of persistent Q-defects after 6 months treatment. The presence of residual Q-abnormalities at 6 months was not associated with an increased risk for recurrent PE. PMID:28197219

  13. Coagulopathy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: a pilot study of whole blood coagulation and markers of endothelial damage.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Per; Johansson, Pär I; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Møller, Christian H; Bang, Lia E; Olsen, Peter Skov; Carlsen, Jørn

    2017-02-01

    Whole blood coagulation and markers of endothelial damage were studied in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), and evaluated in relation to PE severity. Twenty-five patients were enrolled prospectively each having viscoelastical analysis of whole blood done using thrombelastography (TEG) and Multiplate aggregometry. Fourteen of these patients were investigated for endothelial damage by ELISA measurements of Syndecan-1 (endothelial glycocalyx degradation), soluble endothelial Selectin (endothelial cell activation), soluble Thrombomodulin (endothelial cell injury) and Histone Complexed DNA fragments (endothelial cytotoxic histones). The mean values of TEG and Multiplate parameters were all within the reference levels, but a significant difference between patients with high and intermediate risk PE was observed for Ly30 (lytic activity) 1.5% [0-10] vs. 0.2% [0-2.2] p = .04, and ADP (platelet reactivity) 92 U [20-145] vs. 59 U [20-111] p = .03. A similar difference was indicated for functional fibrinogen 21 mm [17-29] vs. 18 mm [3-23] p = .05. Analysis of endothelial markers identified a significant difference in circulating levels between high and intermediate risk PE patients for Syndecan-1 118.6 ng/mL [76-133] vs. 36.3 ng/mL [11.8-102.9] p = .008. In conclusion, patients with acute PE had normal whole blood coagulation, but high risk PE patients had signs of increased activity of the haemostatic system and significantly increased level of endothelial glycocalyx degradation.

  14. Split-Bolus Single-Pass Multidetector-Row CT Protocol for Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Brunese, Luca; Piscioli, Irene; Pierotti, Luisa; Bellantonio, Lucio; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become a widely accepted clinical tool in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Objectives: To report split-bolus single-pass 64-multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol for diagnosis of PE. Patients and Methods: MDCT split-bolus results in 40 patients suspicious of PE were analyzed in terms of image quality of target pulmonary vessels (TPVs) and occurrence and severity of flow-related artifact, flow-related artifact, false filling defect of the pulmonary veins and beam hardening streak artifacts. Dose radiation to patients was calculated. Results: MDCT split-bolus protocol allowed diagnostic images of high quality in all cases. Diagnosis of PE was obtained in 22 of 40 patients. Mean attenuation for target vessels was higher than 250 HU all cases: 361 ± 98 HU in pulmonary artery trunk (PAT); 339 ± 93 HU in right pulmonary artery (RPA); 334 ± 100 HU in left pulmonary artery (LPA). Adequate enhancement was obtained in the right atrium (RA):292 ± 83 HU; right pulmonary vein (RPV): 302 ± 91 HU, and left pulmonary vein (LPV): 291 ± 83 HU. The flow related artifacts and the beam hardening streak artifacts have been detected respectively in 4 and 25 patients. No false filling defect of the pulmonary veins was revealed. Conclusion: MDCT split-bolus technique by simultaneous opacification of pulmonary arteries and veins represents an accurate technique for diagnosis of acute PE, removes the false filling defects of the pulmonary veins, and reduces flow related artifacts. PMID:27110334

  15. Alveolar dead space and capnographic variables before and after thrombolysis in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Marcos Mello; Terzi, Renato G G; Carvalho, Carlos Heitor N; de Oliveira Neto, Antonio Francisco; Pereira, Mônica Corso; Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common condition. The central aim of this study was to describe the use of volumetric capnography (VCap) before and after fibrinolytic treatment of major PE. Lung scintigraphy was used as a base of comparison for the results of this treatment. We describe the cases of two conscious and spontaneously breathing patients (20- and by 24-year-old women) with major PE undergoing thrombolysis. Curves of CO2 were obtained VCap and associated with arterial blood gas analysis and D-dimer. The pattern of VCap was compared with the VCap of health volunteers. Parameters also calculated were: P(a-et)CO2 gradient, alveolar dead space fraction (AVDSf ), late dead space fraction (fDlate), and slope phase III (Slp III). The VCap results before and after thrombolysis for patients 1 and 2 were, respectively, P(a-et)CO2: 12.6 to 5.8 and 7.9 to 1.6 (mmHg); AVDSf: 0.46 to 0.18 and 0.25 to 0.05; fDlate: 0.46 to 0.21 and 0.24 to 0.04; Slp III: 1.75 to 5.10 and 1.21 to 5.61 (mmHg/L). Lung scintigraphy was used to compare VCap results from the two subjects with VCap results from healthy volunteers and pigs before and after treatment associated with arterial blood gas, D-dimer, and showed satisfactory agreement. PMID:19436653

  16. Estimation of right ventricular dysfunction by computed tomography pulmonary angiography: a valuable adjunct for evaluating the severity of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Hou, Gang

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in differentiating acute pulmonary embolism (PE) patients with or without right ventricular dysfunction and to evaluate the severity of right ventricular dysfunction in acute PE patients with CPTA. We retrospectively collected and measured the following parameters: right ventricular diameter by short axis in the axial plane (RVDaxial), left ventricular diameter by short axis in the axial plane (LVDaxial), right ventricular diameter by level on the reconstructed four-chamber views (RVD4-CH), left ventricular diameter by level on the reconstructed four-chamber views (LVD4-CH), main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAD), ascending aorta diameter (AOD), coronary sinus diameter (CSD), superior vena cava diameter (SVCD), inferior vena cava (IVC) reflux and interventricular septum deviation by CTPA, and we calculated the RVDaxial/LVDaxial, RVD4-CH/LVD4-CH and MPAD/AOD ratios in acute PE patients. We assessed right ventricular function and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) by echocardiography (ECHO) and then divided the patients into two groups: group A had right ventricular dysfunction, and group B did not have right ventricular dysfunction. We utilized a logistic regression model to analyse the relationship between right ventricular dysfunction and the measurement parameters obtained from CTPA, and we constructed the ROC curve to confirm the optimal cut-off value of the statistically significant parameter in the logistic regression model. After an initial screening, 113 acute PE patients were enrolled in our study. Among them, 42 patients showed right ventricular dysfunction (37.2 %), and 71 patients showed no right ventricular dysfunction (62.8 %). The difference between the patients with right ventricular dysfunction and patients without right ventricular dysfunction was statistical significant in RVD4-CH/LVD4-CH ratio. Logistic regression model analysis revealed

  17. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Robin R.

    1997-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome, an important contributor to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, has been associated with both traumatic and nontraumatic disorders. Fat embolization after long bone trauma is probably common as a subclinical event. Fat emboli can deform and pass through the lungs, resulting in systemic embolization, most commonly to the brain and kidneys. The diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is based on the patient’s history, supported by clinical signs of pulmonary, cerebral and cutaneous dysfunction and confirmed by the demonstration of arterial hypoxemia in the absence of other disorders. Treatment of fat embolism syndrome consists of general supportive measures, including splinting, maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and the administration of oxygen. Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilatory assistance can be indicated. The role of corticosteroids remains controversial. Early stabilization of long bone fractures has been shown to decrease the incidence of pulmonary complications. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that the exact method of fracture fixation plays a minor role in the development of pulmonary dysfunction. As more is learned about the specifics of the various triggers for the development of fat embolism syndrome, it is hoped that the prospect of more specific therapy for the prevention and treatment of this disorder will become a reality. PMID:9336522

  18. Algorithm for the diagnosis and follow-up of acute pulmonary embolisms.

    PubMed

    Calvillo Batllés, P

    The urgent diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism benefits from the use of evidence-based clinical guidelines that improve patients' prognoses and reduce the unnecessary use of imaging tests. This article explains the diagnostic algorithms for pulmonary thromboembolism most recently published by the relevant scientific societies both for the general population and for special situations, trying to clear up common doubts and analyzing persistent controversies. It also discusses the need to follow up the thromboembolism after anticoagulation treatment, which is not currently recommended in the guidelines.

  19. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    PubMed Central

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14–0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1–0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19–0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22–0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033–0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15–0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32–0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality

  20. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Yaniv; Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases.

  1. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-01-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases. PMID:27335150

  2. Effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia on resting and postprandial superior mesenteric artery blood flow.

    PubMed

    Loshbaugh, Jenny E; Loeppky, Jack A; Greene, E Richard

    2006-01-01

    Reduced blood flow to the gut may contribute to weight loss and gastrointestinal symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) at altitude. A study in humans tested the hypothesis that acute hypobaric hypoxia (ALT) would attenuate the normal postprandial hyperemia in the superior mesenteric artery (SM). Blood pressure, cardiac output (CO), and (SM) were measured with previously validated noninvasive Doppler ultrasonic flowmetry in 9 (3 women) healthy young adults (mean age: 23; range: 18-33 yr) residing at 1700 m. Baseline measurements were made after 2 h at ALT in a chamber at 430 mmHg (asymptotically equal to 4800 m = 15,750 ft) after 10-12-h fasting, and the next day the control (CON) measurements were made at 615 mmHg (1850 m). Postprandial measurements were made 45 to 60 min after ingesting a 1000-cal liquid meal under both conditions. At ALT, 5 of the 9 subjects had AMS by the Lake Louise score criteria of headache > or =1 and total score > or =3. ALT significantly reduced fasting, baseline SM relative to CON by 15%, and increased CO by 16%. The postprandial CO increase was not different between ALT and CON, but (SM) increased 115% at CON, but only 75% at ALT, the attenuation being significant (p < 0.006). Neither the diminution of fasting (SM) at ALT nor the attenuation of the postprandial increase in (SM) correlated significantly with AMS symptom scores. These results suggest that baseline and postprandial gut blood flow are altered during acute altitude exposure because of increased intestinal sympathetic tone, inferred from increased local resistance, and may be related to reduced energy intake if sustained during prolonged exposure.

  3. Coronary artery ectasia presenting with thrombus embolization and acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongle; Wu, Chengcheng; Liu, Wennan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is characterized by an abnormal dilatation of the coronary arteries. CAE is often associated with the presence of slow coronary flow and may lead to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), even without total occlusion. Patient concerns and diagnosis: We report a case of a 24-year-old male patient with CAE suffering from AMI. Interventions: Percutaneous coronary intervention with aspiration thrombectomy failed to restore adequate blood flow. Heparin and antiplatelet treatment were provided for pharmacological management, but follow-up angiography 15 days later still revealed a poor result. This patient was ultimately treated with antiplatelet therapy in combination with warfarin treatment. Outcomes: Follow-up coronary angiography 15 months later showed a restored normal Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grade (TIMI) 3 flow. Lessons: CAE-related infarct is often associated with high-burden thrombus formation. Long-term warfarin in combination with antiplatelet therapy may be a good alternative intervention to decrease thrombus burden and enhance blood flow. PMID:28121950

  4. Thrombolytic treatment (alteplase; rt-Pa) in acute massive pulmonary embolism and cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Adem; Ozkaya, Sevket; Atas, Ali Ekber; Ulu, Esra Kayahan; Kitapci, Ilknur; Ece, Ferah

    2014-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) often decompensate suddenly, and once hemodynamic compromise has developed, mortality is extremely high. Currently, thrombolytic therapy for PE is still controversial. We retrospectively evaluated 34 patients with PE between January 2010 and December 2013 in the Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical Park Samsun Hospital, Samsun, Turkey. The demographic and disease characteristics of patients who received thrombolytic treatment were retrospectively analyzed. The female to male ratio was 19/15 and the mean age was 63.1±13.2 years. PE diagnosis was made using echocardiography (64.7%) or contrast-enhanced thorax computed tomography with echocardiography (32.4%). Twenty-two (64.7%) patients went into the cardiopulmonary arrest due to massive PE and 17 (50%) patients recovered without sequelae. Eleven (32.4%) patients were diagnosed with massive PE during cardiopulmonary arrest with clinical and echocardiographic findings. Alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rt-PA]) was administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and four (36.3%) patients responded and survived without sequelae. The complications of rt-PA treatment were hemorrhage in five (14.7%) patients and allergic reactions in two (5.9%) patients. There was no mortality due to rt-PA treatment complications. In conclusion, mortality due to massive PE is much more than estimated and alteplase can be used safely in patients with massive PE. This thrombolytic treatment was not associated with any fatal hemorrhage complication. If there is any sign of acute PE, echocardiography should be used during cardiopulmonary arrest/instability. Alteplase should be given to patients with suspected massive PE.

  5. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  6. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Pulmonary Embolism Explore Pulmonary Embolism What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Deep Vein Thrombosis Lung VQ Scan Overweight and Obesity Send a ...

  7. Acute Myocardial Infarction Due to Coronary Artery Embolism in a 22-Year-Old Woman with Mitral Stenosis with Atrial Fibrillation Under Warfarinization: Successful Management with Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Razi, Mahmadula; Chaturvedi, Vikash; Erappa, Yatish Besthenahalli; Singh, Shravan; Mishra, Vikas; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Singh, Karandeep

    2017-04-07

    BACKGROUND Coronary artery embolization is an exceedingly rare cause of myocardial infarction, but a few cases in association with prosthetic mechanical valves have been reported. We report a case of embolic myocardial infarction caused by a thrombus in the left atrium with deranged coagulation profile in a patient with critical mitral stenosis under warfarinization. CASE REPORT A 22-year-old woman was taken to the catheterization lab for early coronary intervention in lieu of non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Electrocardiography showed T↓ in V1 to V4, and atrial fibrillation with controlled ventricular rate. Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the mid-left anterior descending artery with thrombus. After upstream treatment with tirofiban, the apparent thrombus was dislodged distally while passing a BMW wire. No abnormalities were seen by intravascular ultrasound study. Echocardiography revealed critical mitral stenosis, and left atrial clot with mild left ventricular dysfunction. Coagulation profile revealed sub-therapeutic international normalized ratio levels. The sequential angiographic images, normal intravascular ultrasound study, and presence of atrial fibrillation are confirmatory of coronary embolism as the cause of myocardial infarction. Anticoagulation and treatment of acute coronary syndrome were initiated and she was referred for closed mitral valvulotomy. CONCLUSIONS Coronary artery thromboembolism as a nonatherosclerotic cause of acute coronary syndrome is rare. The treatment consists of aggressive anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, and interventional options, including simple wiring when possible. In this context, primary prevention in the form of patient education on optimal anticoagulation with oral vitamin K antagonist and medical advice about imminent thromboembolic risks are of extreme importance.

  8. Revascularization for acute regional infarct: superior protection with warm blood cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Horsley, W S; Whitlark, J D; Hall, J D; Gott, J P; Pan-Chih; Huang, A H; Park, Y; Jones, D P; Guyton, R A

    1993-12-01

    Continuous retrograde warm blood cardioplegia was compared with two widely used hypothermic myocardial protection techniques in a canine model of acute regional myocardial ischemia with subsequent revascularization. Animals (n = 30) underwent 45 minutes of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion then cardioplegic arrest (60 minutes), followed by separation from cardiopulmonary bypass and data collection. The cold oxygenated crystalloid cardioplegia group (CC; n = 8) and the cold blood cardioplegia group (CC; n = 10) had cardiopulmonary bypass at 28 degrees C, antegrade arrest, and intermittent retrograde delivery. The warm blood cardioplegia group (WB; n = 12) had normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, antegrade arrest, and continuous retrograde delivery. Overall ventricular function (preload recruitable stroke work relationship; ergs x 10(3)/mL) was significantly (p < 0.001) better for WB (WB, 80 +/- 11; CB, 67 +/- 13; CC, 57 +/- 12). Systolic function (maximum elastance relationship; mm Hg/mL) was also significantly (p < 0.001) better for WB (WB, 11.6 +/- 3.6; CB, 8.6 +/- 2.7; CC, 6.2 +/- 1.3). Diastolic function (stress-strain relationship; dynes x 10(3)/cm2) revealed significantly (p < 0.001) decreased compliance for CC (WB, 20 +/- 6; CB, 19 +/- 7; CC, 27 +/- 11). Left anterior descending coronary artery regional adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate ratios were significantly (p = 0.02) worse for CC (WB, 10.2 +/- 2.3; CB, 9.4 +/- 2.6; CC, 5.6 +/- 1.5). Myocardial edema significantly (p = 0.03) increased over time only in the CC animals (WB, 0.4% +/- 2.3%; CB, -0.3% +/- 3.6%; CC, 5.5% +/- 2.3%). In this model of acute regional myocardial ischemia and revascularization, continuous retrograde warm aerobic blood cardioplegia provided superior myocardial protection compared with cold oxygenated crystalloid cardioplegia with intermediate results for cold blood cardioplegia.

  9. Femur chondrosarcoma misdiagnosed as acute knee arthritis and osteomyelitis--further developing a hitherto unreported complication of tumor embolic ischemic ileal perforation after arthroscopic lavage.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2014-12-01

    The differentiation between osteomyelitis and bone tumor may be difficult due to their overlapping clinical and radiological features. A 25-year-old lady presented with left knee pain and joint effusion associated with redness and hotness. A sub-optimally taken plain radiograph showed mixed osteolytic and osteoblastic lesion in the left lower femur with surrounding soft tissue swelling. Since the clinical diagnosis was acute osteomyelitis and arthritis, arthroscopic lavage was performed as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The removed loose bodies and fibrinous tissue showed pathological features suspicious of chondrosarcoma. Subsequent MRI revealed an infiltrative tumor eroding through the cortex and joint cartilage. En bloc excision of the left lower femur, upper tibia including the knee joint and patella was performed, and the final diagnosis was grade 2 chondrosarcoma. The patient developed bilateral pulmonary metastasis 33 months after operation. Five months later, she suffered from a hitherto undescribed complication of ischemic perforation of the terminal ileum secondary to tumor embolic arterial obstruction with no macroscopic intestinal or peritoneal tumor deposit. The patient developed multiple brain metastases and died 43 months after initial presentation. Our case illustrates that malignant bone tumor as a differential diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis and arthritis merits recognition and exclusion before arthroscopic lavage, which may enhance tumor dissemination and in our patient results in embolic ischemic ileal perforation.

  10. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  11. Endovascular embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... plastic particles, glue, metal coils, foam, or a balloon through it to seal off the faulty blood vessel. (If coils are used, it is called coil embolization.) This procedure can take several hours.

  12. Catheter Embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotum that may be a cause of infertility. Catheter embolization may be used alone or combined ... in patients with diabetes or other pre-existing kidney disease. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  13. Massive Thrombosis of the Right Atrium Extended to the Superior Vena Cava at the Diagnosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Houssou, Bienvenu; Orou-Guiwa, Gnon Gourou; Habbal, Rachida; Qachouh, Meryem; Quessar, Asmaa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Venous thromboembolic disease is a common complication found in 8% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The location at the right atrium is exceptional. These last fifty years, only 6 cases of thrombosis of the atrium in the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia were published on PubMed search engine. Case Presentation. 35-year-old farmer, who had been admitted by emergency department for superior vena cava syndrome and had a hyperleukocytic AML with complex karyotype associated with a significant thrombosis of the right atrium, extended all along the superior vena cava. He has been treated by the 2011 AML protocol using low molecular weight heparin and died from respiratory distress. Conclusions. If thrombosis is common in AML, the location in right atrium is rare. Its management requires surgery that is sometimes difficult to achieve.

  14. Massive Thrombosis of the Right Atrium Extended to the Superior Vena Cava at the Diagnosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Orou-Guiwa, Gnon Gourou; Habbal, Rachida; Qachouh, Meryem; Quessar, Asmaa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Venous thromboembolic disease is a common complication found in 8% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The location at the right atrium is exceptional. These last fifty years, only 6 cases of thrombosis of the atrium in the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia were published on PubMed search engine. Case Presentation. 35-year-old farmer, who had been admitted by emergency department for superior vena cava syndrome and had a hyperleukocytic AML with complex karyotype associated with a significant thrombosis of the right atrium, extended all along the superior vena cava. He has been treated by the 2011 AML protocol using low molecular weight heparin and died from respiratory distress. Conclusions. If thrombosis is common in AML, the location in right atrium is rare. Its management requires surgery that is sometimes difficult to achieve. PMID:27847650

  15. Hyperbaric programs in the United States: Locations and capabilities of treating decompression sickness, arterial gas embolisms, and acute carbon monoxide poisoning: survey results.

    PubMed

    Chin, Walter; Jacoby, Laura; Simon, Olivia; Talati, Nisha; Wegrzyn, Gracelene; Jacoby, Rachelle; Proano, Jacob; Sprau, Susan E; Markovitz, Gerald; Hsu, Rita; Joo, Ellie

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the primary treatment for arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness and acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Though there has been a proliferation of hyperbaric centers throughout the United States, a scarcity of centers equipped to treat emergency indications makes transport of patients necessary. To locate and characterize hyperbaric chambers capable of treating emergency cases, a survey of centers throughout the entire United States was conducted. Using Google, Yahoo, HyperbaricLink and the UHMS directory, a database for United States chambers was created. Four researchers called clinicians from the database to administer the survey. All centers were contacted for response until four calls went unreturned or a center declined to be included. The survey assessed chamber readiness to respond to high-acuity patients, including staff availability, use of medical equipment such as ventilators and intravenous infusion devices, and responding yes to treating hyperbaric emergencies within a 12-month period. Only 43 (11.9%, N = 361) centers had equipment, intravenous infusion pumps and ventilators, and staff necessary to treat high-acuity patients. Considering that a primary purpose of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the treatment of arterial gas embolism and decompression sickness, more hyperbaric centers nationwide should be able to accommodate these emergency cases quickly and safely.

  16. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  17. Amniotic fluid embolism

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Bhardwaj, Mamta; Kumar, Prashant; Singhal, Suresh; Singh, Tarandeep; Hooda, Sarla

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the catastrophic complications of pregnancy in which amniotic fluid, fetal cells, hair, or other debris enters into the maternal pulmonary circulation, causing cardiovascular collapse. Etiology largely remains unknown, but may occur in healthy women during labour, during cesarean section, after abnormal vaginal delivery, or during the second trimester of pregnancy. It may also occur up to 48 hours post-delivery. It can also occur during abortion, after abdominal trauma, and during amnio-infusion. The pathophysiology of AFE is not completely understood. Possible historical cause is that any breach of the barrier between maternal blood and amniotic fluid forces the entry of amniotic fluid into the systemic circulation and results in a physical obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. The presenting signs and symptoms of AFE involve many organ systems. Clinical signs and symptoms are acute dyspnea, cough, hypotension, cyanosis, fetal bradycardia, encephalopathy, acute pulmonary hypertension, coagulopathy etc. Besides basic investigations lung scan, serum tryptase levels, serum levels of C3 and C4 complements, zinc coproporphyrin, serum sialyl Tn etc are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and uterine artery embolization have been tried from time to time. The maternal prognosis after amniotic fluid embolism is very poor though infant survival rate is around 70%. PMID:27275041

  18. Effectiveness of MR Angiography for the Primary Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Clinical Outcomes at 3 Months and 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Nagle, Scott K.; François, Christopher J.; Repplinger, Michael D.; Hamedani, Azita G.; Vigen, Karl K.; Yarlagadda, Rajkumar; Grist, Thomas M.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effectiveness of MR angiography for pulmonary embolism (MRA-PE) in symptomatic patients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients whom were evaluated for possible pulmonary embolism (PE) using MRA-PE. A 3-month and 1-year from MRA-PE electronic medical record (EMR) review was performed. Evidence for venous thromboembolism (VTE) (or death from PE) within the year of follow-up was the outcome surrogate for this study. Results There were 190 MRA-PE exams performed with 97.4% (185/190) of diagnostic quality. There were 148 patients (120 F: 28 M) that had both a diagnostic MRA-PE exam and 1 complete year of EMR follow-up. There were 167 patients (137 F: 30 M) with 3 months or greater follow-up. We found 83% (139/167) and 81% (120/148) MRA-PE exams negative for PE at 3 months and 1 year, respectively. Positive exams for PE were seen in 14% (23/167). During the 1-year follow-up period, five patients (false negative) were diagnosed with DVT (5/148 = 3.4 %), and one of these patients also experienced a non–life-threatening PE. The negative predictive value (NPV) for MRA-PE was 97% (92–99; 95% CI) at 3 months and 96% (90–98; 95% CI) with 1 year of follow-up. Conclusion The NPV of MRA-PE, when used for the primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in symptomatic patients, were found to be similar to the published values for CTA-PE. In addition, the technical success rate and safety of MRA-PE were excellent. PMID:23553735

  19. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  20. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for embolization (especially to the brain) is mitral stenosis . Endocarditis (infection of the inside of the heart) can also cause arterial emboli. A common source for an embolus is from areas of hardening (atherosclerosis) in the aorta and other large blood vessels. These clots can ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-09-15

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT.

  2. Acute embolic occlusion of the right common iliac artery after revision total hip arthroplasty treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongqi; Chen, Song; Chen, Li; Li, Yuefeng; Chai, Yasheng; Wei, Ping; Xu, Shunchi; Liu, Tangyou; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Methods: A 63-year-old woman with atrial fibrillation presented clinical symptoms and signs of acute ischemia in the right lower extremity on the 17th postoperative day after revision total hip arthroplasty of the left hip for aseptic loosening of femoral component. Aspirin was discontinued 7 days before surgery. Both computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography demonstrated complete occlusion of the right common iliac artery. An emergency catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase combined with balloon angioplasty was performed to obtain complete patency of the right common iliac artery. Results: The patient received anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy postoperatively and was fine at the 2-year follow-up. Conclusions: This case demonstrated that catheter-directed thrombolysis combined with balloon angioplasty could be an efficacious, minimally invasive approach for the treatment of acute embolic occlusion of the common iliac artery. Preoperative anticoagulation for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty with long-term use of aspirin for atrial fibrillation needs further investigation. PMID:27489692

  3. Outcome in stable patients with acute pulmonary embolism who had right ventricular enlargement and/or elevated levels of troponin I.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Janjua, Muhammad; Yaekoub, Abdo Y; Jaweesh, Fadel; Alrifai, Ahmed

    2010-08-15

    Normotensive patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) who have increased troponin levels and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are thought to be at high risk of death, but the level of risk is unclear. We retrospectively evaluated outcome in 1,273 stable patients with PE who had echocardiographic evaluations of RV size and/or measurement of cardiac troponin I (cTnI). In-hospital all-cause mortality was higher in those with RV enlargement (8.0%, 19 of 237, vs 3.3%, 22 of 663, p = 0.003). With an increased cTnI, irrespective of RV enlargement, all-cause mortality was 8.0% (28 of 330) versus 1.9% (15 of 835) in patients with a normal cTnI (p <0.0001). In patients with an increased cTnI combined with an enlarged right ventricle, all-cause mortality was 10.2% (12 of 118) compared to 1.9% (8 of 421) in patients who had neither (p <0.0001). These data show that increased levels of cTnI and RV enlargement are associated with an adverse outcome in stable patients with acute PE. In conclusion, increased levels of cTnI in combination with RV enlargement might indicate a group who would benefit from intense monitoring and aggressive treatment if subsequently indicated. The outcomes, however, were not extreme enough to warrant routine thrombolytic therapy.

  4. Peculiarities of Blood Flow Changes in Venae Cavae during Experimental Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Evlakhov, V I; Poyassov, I Z; Shaidakov, E V

    2016-10-01

    The model of acute pulmonary embolism in rabbits demonstrated reduced pulmonary blood flow, cardiac output, left atrial pressure, and blood flow in venae cavae against the background of elevated left pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Simultaneously, the blood flow in the superior vena cava decreased to a lesser extent than that in the inferior vena cava, which was a characteristic feature of the model of pulmonary pathology. In contrast, when histamine was infused into the left jugular vein to equally elevate pressure in pulmonary artery as in the above model, the blood flow in the superior vena cava decreased to a greater extent than that in inferior vena cava. During stenosis of inferior vena cava that decreased the cardiac output to the level observed during modeled pulmonary embolism, the blood flows in both venae cavae dropped equally.

  5. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  6. Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... embolization. This occurs when fibroids located inside the uterine cavity detach after embolization. Women with this problem may require a procedure called D & C (dilatation and curettage) to ... who undergo uterine fibroid embolization, normal menstrual cycles resume after the ...

  7. Cholesterol crystal embolism (atheroembolism).

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Chiara; Jeannin, Guido; Sottini, Laura; Dallera, Nadia; Scolari, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolism, known as atheroembolic disease, is caused by showers of cholesterol crystals from an atherosclerotic plaque that occludes small arteries. Embolization can occur spontaneously or as an iatrogenic complication from an invasive vascular procedure (angiography or vascular surgery) and after anticoagulant therapy. The atheroembolism can give rise to different degrees of renal impairment. Some patients show a moderate loss of renal function, others severe renal failure requiring dialysis. Renal outcome can be variable: some patients deteriorate or remain on dialysis, some improve and some remain with chronic renal impairment. Clinically, three types of atheroembolic renal disease have been described: acute, subacute or chronic. More frequently a progressive loss of renal function occurs over weeks. Atheroembolization can involve the skin, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. The diagnosis is difficult and controversial for the protean extrarenal manifestations. In the past, the diagnosis was often made post-mortem. In the last 10 yrs, awareness of atheroembolic renal disease has improved. The correct diagnosis requires the clinician to be alert. The typical patient is a white male aged >60 yrs with a history of hypertension, smoking and arterial disease. The presence of a classic triad (precipitating event, renal failure and peripheral cholesterol crystal embolization) suggests the diagnosis. This can be confirmed by a biopsy of the target organs. A specific treatment is lacking; however, it is an important diagnosis to make because an aggressive therapeutic approach can be associated with a more favorable clinical outcome.

  8. Cholesterol crystal embolism (atheroembolism)

    PubMed Central

    VENTURELLI, CHIARA; JEANNIN, GUIDO; SOTTINI, LAURA; DALLERA, NADIA; SCOLARI, FRANCESCO

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolism, known as atheroembolic disease, is caused by showers of cholesterol crystals from an atherosclerotic plaque that occludes small arteries. Embolization can occur spontaneously or as an iatrogenic complication from an invasive vascular procedure (angiography or vascular surgery) and after anticoagulant therapy. The atheroembolism can give rise to different degrees of renal impairment. Some patients show a moderate loss of renal function, others severe renal failure requiring dialysis. Renal outcome can be variable: some patients deteriorate or remain on dialysis, some improve and some remain with chronic renal impairment. Clinically, three types of atheroembolic renal disease have been described: acute, subacute or chronic. More frequently a progressive loss of renal function occurs over weeks. Atheroembolization can involve the skin, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. The diagnosis is difficult and controversial for the protean extrarenal manifestations. In the past, the diagnosis was often made post-mortem. In the last 10 yrs, awareness of atheroembolic renal disease has improved. The correct diagnosis requires the clinician to be alert. The typical patient is a white male aged >60 yrs with a history of hypertension, smoking and arterial disease. The presence of a classic triad (precipitating event, renal failure and peripheral cholesterol crystal embolization) suggests the diagnosis. This can be confirmed by a biopsy of the target organs. A specific treatment is lacking; however, it is an important diagnosis to make because an aggressive therapeutic approach can be associated with a more favorable clinical outcome. PMID:21977265

  9. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  10. Early Administration of Therapeutic Anticoagulation Following Intravenous Thrombolysis for Acute Cardiogenic Embolic Stroke Caused by Left Ventricular Thrombus: Case Report and Topic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Rick; Donahey, Elisabeth; Ruland, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic cerebral embolism represents 20% of all acute ischemic strokes (AISs) with one-third of these being caused by left ventricular thrombus (LVT). LVT is not a contraindication for treatment with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rtPA) for AIS. However, the subsequent treatment of a potentially unstable LVT is contraindicated for 24 h following the use of IV rtPA according to current guidelines. We present a 66-year-old man with AIS treated with IV rtPA. Echocardiogram shortly after treatment demonstrated both a large apical and septal thrombus in the left ventricle and at 12 h post IV rtPA infusion, therapeutic anticoagulation with heparin was started without complication. In practice, the action of IV rtPA outlasts its apparent half-life because of thrombin-binding and the prolonged effects and longer half-life of its product, plasmin; however, the pharmacokinetics do not warrant prolonged avoidance of therapeutic anticoagulation when clinically indicated. Our case demonstrates that anticoagulation for potentially unstable LVT can be safely initiated at 12 h following IV rtPA treatment for AIS. PMID:25699011

  11. Does Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Embolic Stroke Have Long-term Side Effects on Intracranial Vessels? An Angiographic Follow-up Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kurre, Wiebke Perez, Marta Aguilar; Horvath, Diana; Schmid, Elisabeth; Baezner, Hansjoerg; Henkes, Hans

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Mechanical thrombectomy (mTE) proved to be effective treating acute vessel occlusions with an acceptable rate of procedural complications. Potential long-term side effects of the vessel wall trauma caused by mechanical irritation of the endothelium are unknown up to now. Methods. From a retrospectively established database of 640 acute stroke treatments, we selected 261 patients with 265 embolic vessel occlusions treated successfully by mTE without permanent implantation of a stent. Analysis comprised the type of devices used and the number of passes performed. Digital subtraction angiography immediately after treatment was evaluated for vasospasm, dissection, and extravasation. Control angiographic images were evaluated for any morphological change compared to the immediate posttreatment angiographic run. Results. Recanalization was achieved with a median of one (range 1-10) mTE maneuvers. Vasospasm occurred in 69 territories (26.0 %) and was treated with glyceroltrinitrate in three. Dissection was observed in one vessel (0.4 %). Intraprocedural hemorrhage in two patients (0.8 %) was either wire or device induced. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography was available for 117 territories after a median of 107 days, revealing target vessel occlusion in one segment (0.9 %) and a de novo stenosis of four segments (3.4 %). All findings were clinically asymptomatic. Posttreatment vasospasm was more frequent in patients with de novo stenosis and occlusion (p = 0.038). Conclusion. De novo stenoses and occlusions occur in a small proportion of patients after mTE. Because all lesions were clinically asymptomatic, this finding does not affect the overall benefit of the treatment. Vasospasm may predict late vessel wall changes.

  12. Incidence of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after acute pulmonary embolism: a contemporary view of the published literature.

    PubMed

    Ende-Verhaar, Yvonne M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Delcroix, Marion; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Mairuhu, Albert T A; Huisman, Menno V; Klok, Frederikus A

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) after pulmonary embolism (PE) is relevant for management decisions but is currently unknown.We performed a meta-analysis of studies including consecutive PE patients followed for CTEPH. Study cohorts were predefined as "all comers", "survivors" or "survivors without major comorbidities". CTEPH incidences were calculated using random effects models.We selected 16 studies totalling 4047 PE patients who were mostly followed up for >2-years. In 1186 all comers (two studies), the pooled CTEPH incidence was 0.56% (95% CI 0.1-1.0). In 999 survivors (four studies) CTEPH incidence was 3.2% (95% CI 2.0-4.4). In 1775 survivors without major comorbidities (nine studies), CTEPH incidence was 2.8% (95% CI 1.5-4.1). Both recurrent venous thromboembolism and unprovoked PE were significantly associated with a higher risk of CTEPH, with odds ratios of 3.2 (95% CI 1.7-5.9) and 4.1 (95% CI 2.1-8.2) respectively. The pooled CTEPH incidence in 12 studies that did not use right heart catheterisation as the diagnostic standard was 6.3% (95% CI 4.1-8.4).The 0.56% incidence in the all-comer group probably provides the best reflection of the incidence of CTEPH after PE on the population level. The ∼3% incidences in the survivor categories may be more relevant for daily clinical practice. Studies that assessed CTEPH diagnosis by tests other than right heart catheterisation provide overestimated CTEPH incidences.

  13. Coronary air embolism treated with aspiration catheter

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, M S; Kiemeneij, F

    2005-01-01

    Coronary air embolism remains a recognised complication of coronary catheterisation despite a strong emphasis on prevention. Current treatment consists of supportive measures with 100% oxygen and analgesia. Recent case reports describe the use of mechanical treatments aimed at dispersing or removing the air embolus with variable success. A case of coronary air embolism causing an acute coronary syndrome is described that was definitively treated with an aspiration system. The effectiveness of the aspiration system in the distal section of an obtuse marginal artery indicates that such dedicated aspiration systems may prove useful in the standard treatment of air embolism. PMID:15831621

  14. Coronary air embolism treated with aspiration catheter.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M S; Kiemeneij, F

    2005-05-01

    Coronary air embolism remains a recognised complication of coronary catheterisation despite a strong emphasis on prevention. Current treatment consists of supportive measures with 100% oxygen and analgesia. Recent case reports describe the use of mechanical treatments aimed at dispersing or removing the air embolus with variable success. A case of coronary air embolism causing an acute coronary syndrome is described that was definitively treated with an aspiration system. The effectiveness of the aspiration system in the distal section of an obtuse marginal artery indicates that such dedicated aspiration systems may prove useful in the standard treatment of air embolism.

  15. Case Report of Percutaneous Retrograde Transcollateral Recanalization of the Superior Mesenteric Artery via the Celiac Artery for Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prateek K.; Smith, Brigitte K.; Yamanouchi, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Revascularization for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) can be achieved through a bypass from the aorta or iliac arteries, embolectomy, open exposure of SMA and retrograde recanalization and stent, or percutaneous antegrade stenting. Flush occlusion of the SMA can make antegrade recanalization very challenging and is usually unsuccessful. We present a novel approach for recanalization of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) via the celiac artery for acute mesenteric ischemia. A 69-year-old lady with previous endarterectomy of SMA and extensive small bowel resection presented with severe abdominal pain, emesis, leukocytosis, and imaging finding of new SMA flush occlusion. She refused to consent for a laparotomy. Percutaneous retrograde transcollateral recanalization of SMA was performed via the celiac artery through the pancreaticoduodenal arcade, and the SMA then stented. This resulted in subsequent resolution of patient's symptoms and discharge. SMA revascularization with retrograde transcollateral wiring technique is an important tool in the armamentarium of the vascular care specialist when antegrade percutaneous approach and open exposure via laparotomy are not an option. PMID:26683911

  16. The Effect of Acute Superior Oblique Palsy on Torsional Optokinetic Nystagmus in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaoyan; Tian, Jing; Ying, Howard S.; Walker, Mark F.; Guyton, David; Quaia, Christian; Optican, Lance M.; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Zee, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of acquired superior oblique palsy (SOP) and corrective strabismus surgery on torsional optokinetic nystagmus (tOKN) in monkeys. Methods The trochlear nerve was severed intracranially in two rhesus monkeys (M1 and M2). For each monkey, more than 4 months after the SOP, the ipsilateral inferior oblique muscle was denervated and extirpated. For M2, 4 months later, the contralateral inferior rectus muscle was recessed by 2 mm. tOKN was elicited during monocular viewing of a rotating stimulus that was rear projected onto a screen 43.5 cm in front of the animal. Angular rotation of the stimulus about the center was 40 deg/s clockwise or counterclockwise. Results The main findings after trochlear nerve sectioning were (1) the amplitude and peak velocity of torsional quick and slow phases of the paretic eye was less than that in the normal eye for both intorsion and extorsion, and (2) the vertical motion of the paretic eye increased during both torsional slow and quick phases. After corrective inferior oblique surgery, both of these effects were even greater. Conclusions Acquired SOP and corrective inferior oblique–weakening surgery create characteristic patterns of change in tOKN that reflect alterations in the dynamic properties of the extraocular muscles involved in eye torsion. tOKN also provides information complementary to that provided by the traditional Bielschowsky head-tilt test and potentially can help distinguish among different causes of vertical ocular misalignment. PMID:18385059

  17. Helical computerized tomography and NT-proBNP for screening of right ventricular overload on admission and at long term follow-up of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) can be assessed with helical computerized tomography (CT) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Signs of RVD and elevated natriuretic peptides like NT-proBNP and cardiac troponin (TnT) are associated with increased risk of mortality. However, the prognostic role of both initial diagnostic strategy and the use of NT-proBNP and TnT for screening for long-term probability of RVD remains unknown. The aim of the study was to determine the role of helical CT and NT-proBNP in detection of RVD in the acute phase. In addition, the value of NT-proBNP for ruling out RVD at long-term follow-up was assessed. Methods Sixty-three non-high risk APE patients were studied. RVD was assessed at admission in the emergency department by CT and TTE, and both NT-proBNP and TnT samples were taken. These, excepting CT, were repeated seven months later. Results At admission RVD was detected by CT in 37 (59 %) patients. RVD in CT correlated strongly with RVD in TTE (p < 0.0001). NT-proBNP was elevated (≥ 350 ng/l) in 32 (86 %) patients with RVD but in only seven (27 %) patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). All the patients survived until the 7-month follow-up. TTE showed persistent RVD in 6 of 63 (10 %) patients who all had RVD in CT at admission. All of them had elevated NT-proBNP levels in the follow-up compared with 5 (9 %) of patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). Conclusions TTE does not confer further benefit when helical CT is used for screening for RVD in non-high risk APE. All the patients who were found to have RVD in TTE at seven months follow-up had had RVD in the acute phase CT as well. Thus, patients without RVD in diagnostic CT do not seem to require further routine follow-up to screen for RVD later. On the other hand, persistent RVD and thus need for TTE control can be ruled out by assessment of NT-proBNP at follow-up. A follow-up protocol based on these findings is suggested. PMID:22559861

  18. Evaluation of biventricular ejection fraction with ECG-gated 16-slice CT: preliminary findings in acute pulmonary embolism in comparison with radionuclide ventriculography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Vlassenbroek, Alain; Roelants, Véronique; D'Hoore, William; Verschuren, Franck; Goncette, Louis; Maldague, Baudouin

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the feasibility of cardiac global function evaluation during a whole-chest multi-slice CT (MSCT) acquisition in patients referred for suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE), and to compare the results with planar equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (ERNA). Ten consecutive haemodynamically stable patients (six female, four male; mean age 69.7 years; heart rate 65-99 bpm) with suspicion of PE underwent an MSCT and ERNA within a 6 h period. CT acquisition was performed after contrast medium injection by using 16x1.5 mm collimation and retrospective ECG gating. Left ventricular (LVEF) and right ventricular (RVEF) ejection fractions were calculated using dedicated three-dimensional software. Relationships between measurements obtained with MSCT and ERNA were assessed using linear regression analysis and reliability of MSCT was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to calculate limits of agreement between MSCT and ERNA. MSCT was performed successfully in ten patients with a mean acquisition time of 16.5+/-2.8 s. Functional cardiac evaluation was possible on CT for all patients except for one due to poor opacification of right ventricle. Linear regression analysis showed a good correlation between MSCT and ERNA for the LVEF (R=0.91) and the RVEF (R=0.89) measurements. Intra-class correlation was superior for LVEF (0.92) than for the RVEF (0.68). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that MSCT substantially overestimated the ERNA RVEF. Morphological CT data demonstrated PE in four of ten of patients and alternative diagnoses in five of ten patients. Our study reveals that MSCT with retrospective ECG gating may provide in one modality a morphological and a functional cardiopulmonary evaluation. Comparison with ERNA demonstrated a good correlation for both ventricular ejection fractions.

  19. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-03-03

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  20. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  1. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacob; George, Reeba; Dixit, R.; Gupta, R. C.; Gupta, N.

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is an often overlooked cause of breathlessness in trauma wards. Presenting in a wide range of clinical signs of varying severity, fat embolism is usually diagnosed by a physician who keeps a high degree of suspicion. The clinical background, chronology of symptoms and corroborative laboratory findings are instrumental in a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. There are a few diagnostic criteria which are helpful in making a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. Management is mainly prevention of fat embolism syndrome, and organ supportive care. Except in fulminant fat embolism syndrome, the prognosis is usually good. PMID:23661916

  2. Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Following Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew J.; Garafalo, Thomas; Ko, Tak-ming; Place, Ronald J.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the second case of a superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis following an uneventful laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. The patient presented on postoperative day 10 with acute onset of abdominal pain and inability to tolerate oral food. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed superior mesenteric and portal venous thrombosis with questionable viability of the proximal small bowel. He was heparinized and taken for emergent exploratory laparotomy. At surgery and at a planned re-exploration the following day, the bowel was viable and no resection was needed. Despite continuation on anticoagulation therapy, he developed a pulmonary embolism. A hypercoagulable workup was normal. After continued anticoagulation therapy and supportive care, a duplex ultrasound 2 months after the event showed normal flow in both the superior mesenteric and portal veins. Possible mechanisms are discussed along with a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:12856849

  3. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  4. Uterine artery embolization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000161.htm Uterine artery embolization - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had uterine artery embolization (UAE). UAE is a procedure to treat ...

  5. Living with Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Embolism Pulmonary embolism (PE) usually is treated in a hospital. After leaving ... you're taking medicine. Medicines used to treat PE can thin your blood too much. This can ...

  6. Embolization of Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, H.; Hongo, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Takamae, T.; Okudera, H.; Koyama, J.I.; Oya, F.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Treatment options for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) are still controversial due to the recent result of stereotactic radiosurgery and the improved result of microsurgical resection. We investigated previously treated AVM cases and discussed the efficacy and safety of preoperative embolization especially for microsurgical resection of high-grade AVM in the Spetzler-Martin grading. Efficacy of preoperative embolization was evaluated based on 126 previously treated AVM cases at Shinshu University Hospital during the last 25 years. The safety of embolization was evaluated based on our previously-embolized 58 AVM cases (91 procedures) in the last 11 years after introduction of preoperative embolization for AVM. In all 126 cases, 82 were treated before introduction of embolization and 44 were treated after introduction of embolization. In 82 cases of the pre-embolization era, 63 lesions were removed totally in 63 AVMs (77%), partially resected in 11 (13%) and untreated in eight (10%). In 74 surgically removed cases, 11 (15%) cases showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In 44 cases of the embolization era, lesions were removed totally in 29 AVMs (66%), disappeared only with embolization in one (2%), disappeared with radiosurgery in seven (16%) and were untreated in five (11%). In 32 surgically removed cases, only one (2%) case showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In all 58 embolized cases, 44 were surgically removed, six were treated with radiosurgery, one was eliminated with embolization alone and six were partially obliterated and followed up for their location. In 91 procedures for 58 cases, two haemorrhagic and three ischemic complications occurred, three were transient and two remained having neurological deficits. The introduction of preoperative embolization improved the total removal rate and reduced the intra/postoperative bleeding rate in surgical removal of AVM. The total risk of embolization is low and well-designed preoperative

  7. Massive Pulmonary Calculi Embolism: A Novel Complication of Pneumatic Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pneumatic lithotripsy is a minimally invasive technique mainly for the treatment of urinary staghorn stones. Previous literatures have reported some therapeutic complications during or after this procedure, but calculi embolism has not been mentioned before. We report here a fatal case of calculi-induced pulmonary embolism in an adult woman who underwent pneumatic lithotripsy. An autopsy did not reveal any evidence of pulmonary embolism. However, light microscopy revealed noticeable presence of calculi in pulmonary arterioles and capillaries, as evidenced by environmental scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The primary determinants of calculi embolism include intrarenal pressure, and volume and viscosity of the calculi fragments formation. Vascular intravasation of smashed calculi might increase pulmonary vascular resistance and hypoxemia and decrease cardiac output. This case report intends to provide information for clinicians to consider the probability of intraoperative calculi embolism during lithotripsies when patients develop typical symptoms of acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:26222867

  8. Modeling the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pliskin, Nava; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The problem of acute pulmonary embolism is employed to illustrate that medical decision analysis is possible despite some of the difficulties encountered in previous application. The usefulness of computerized decision models is discussed. (LBH)

  9. Successful Recanalization of Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Thromboembolic Occlusion by a Combination of Intraarterial Thrombolysis and Mechanical Thrombectomy with a Carotid Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sinak, Igor; Janik, Jan; Mikolajcik, Anton; Mistuna, Dusan

    2013-06-15

    Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion is a life-threatening disease, and acute intestinal ischemia develops from the sudden decrease in perfusion to the intestines. The key to saving the patient's life is early diagnosis, and prompt revascularization of the SMA can prevent intestinal infarction and decrease the risk of bowel segment necrosis. Computed tomographic angiography may be useful for rapid diagnosis. We report recanalization of an SMA occlusion in an 80-year-old man with a combination of intraarterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy with a carotid filter.

  10. Cerebral air embolism from angioinvasive cavitary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Barrio, George A; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Kranz, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nontraumatic cerebral air embolism cases are rare. We report a case of an air embolism resulting in cerebral infarction related to angioinvasive cavitary aspergillosis. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports associating these two conditions together. Case Presentation. A 32-year-old female was admitted for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Her hospital course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis. On hospital day 55, she acutely developed severe global aphasia with right hemiplegia. A CT and CT-angiogram of her head and neck were obtained demonstrating intravascular air emboli within the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) branches. She was emergently taken for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Evaluation for origin of the air embolus revealed an air focus along the left lower pulmonary vein. Over the course of 48 hours, her symptoms significantly improved. Conclusion. This unique case details an immunocompromised patient with pulmonary aspergillosis cavitary lesions that invaded into a pulmonary vein and caused a cerebral air embolism. With cerebral air embolisms, the acute treatment option differs from the typical ischemic stroke pathway and the provider should consider emergent HBOT. This case highlights the importance of considering atypical causes of acute ischemic stroke.

  11. Acute thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery in a 39-year-old woman with protein-S deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery is a condition with an unfavorable prognosis. Treatment of this condition is focused on early diagnosis, surgical or intravascular restoration of blood flow to the ischemic intestine, surgical resection of the necrotic bowel and supportive intensive care. In this report, we describe a case of a 39-year-old woman who developed a small bowel infarct because of an acute thrombotic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, also involving the splenic artery. Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian woman presented with acute abdominal pain and signs of intestinal occlusion. The patient was given an abdominal computed tomography scan and ultrasonography in association with Doppler ultrasonography, highlighting a thrombosis of the celiac trunk, of the superior mesenteric artery, and of the splenic artery. She immediately underwent an explorative laparotomy, and revascularization was performed by thromboendarterectomy with a Fogarty catheter. In the following postoperative days, she was given a scheduled second and third look, evidencing necrotic jejunal and ileal handles. During all the surgical procedures, we performed intraoperative Doppler ultrasound of the superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk to control the arterial flow without evidence of a new thrombosis. Conclusion Acute mesenteric ischemia is a rare abdominal emergency that is characterized by a high mortality rate. Generally, acute mesenteric ischemia is due to an impaired blood supply to the intestine caused by thromboembolic phenomena. These phenomena may be associated with a variety of congenital prothrombotic disorders. A prompt diagnosis is a prerequisite for successful treatment. The treatment of choice remains laparotomy and thromboendarterectomy, although some prefer an endovascular approach. A second-look laparotomy could be required to evaluate viable intestinal handles. Some authors support a laparoscopic second

  12. [Paradoxical air embolism resulted in acute myocardial infarction and massive ischemic brain injury in a patient operated on in a sitting position].

    PubMed

    Anan'ev, E P; Polupan, A A; Savin, I A; Goryachev, A S; Troitskiy, A P; Kolokol'nikov, A E; Kulikovskiy, V P; Matskovskiy, I V; Abramov, T A; Podlepich, V V; Krylov, K Yu; Sychev, A A; Tabasaranskiy, T F; Pashin, A A; Lubnin, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical air embolism (PAE) is a rare life-threatening complication when air emboli enter arteries of the systemic circulation and cause their occlusion. Here, we describe a clinical case of PAE developed during neurosurgery in a patient in the sitting position. PAE led to injuries to the cerebral blood vessels, coronary arteries, and lungs, which caused death of the patient. An effective measure for preventing PAE is abandoning surgery in the sitting position in favor of surgery in the prone position.

  13. Impact of earthquakes on risk for pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kodama, Makoto; Tanabe, Naohito; Nakamura, Yuichi; Nagai, Tsuneo; Sato, Masahito; Okabe, Masaaki; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2008-09-16

    Physical and psychological stress induced by catastrophic events such as earthquakes can lead to sudden death, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the impact of the earthquake that occurred in Niigata, Japan, on pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolism increased to 9 cases in the 4 weeks after the earthquake, compared to 1 case in the 4 weeks before the earthquake, 2 cases in the corresponding 8 weeks in 2003, and 1 case in 2002. The first case occurred two days after the initial earthquake and new cases were reported for 27 days thereafter. Six of 9 patients (67%) took refuge in their automobiles before the onset of pulmonary embolism. Sudden death also increased after the earthquake and 7 of 22 cases (32%) spend night(s) in automobile. In conclusion, pulmonary embolism should be attended after disasters and prolonged immobilization in automobiles may increase risk of pulmonary embolism and sudden death.

  14. Mortality after portal vein embolization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eung Chang; Park, Sang-Jae; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Duk; Kim, Seong Hoon; Lee, In Joon; Kim, Hyun Beom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Portal vein embolization (PVE) is increasingly performed worldwide to reduce the possibility of liver failure after extended hepatectomy, by inducing future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy and atrophy of the liver planned for resection. The procedure is known to be very safe and to have few procedure-related complications. In this study, we described 2 elderly patients with Bismuth–Corlette type IV Klatskin tumor who underwent right trisectional PVE involving the embolization of the right portal vein, the left medial sectional portal branch, and caudate portal vein. Within 1 week after PVE, patients went into sepsis combined with bile leak and died within 1 month. Sepsis can cause acute liver failure in patients with chronic liver disease. In this study, the common patient characteristics other than sepsis, that is, trisectional PVE; chronic alcoholism; aged >65 years; heart-related comorbidity; and elevated serum total bilirubin (TB) level (7.0 mg/dL) at the time of the PVE procedure in 1 patient, and concurrent biliary procedure, that is, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in the other patient might have affected the outcomes of PVE. These cases highlight that PVE is not a safe procedure. Care should be taken to minimize the occurrence of infectious events because sepsis following PVE can cause acute liver failure. Additionally, prior to performing PVE, the extent of PVE, chronic alcohol consumption, age, comorbidity, long-lasting jaundice, concurrent biliary procedure, etc. should be considered for patient safety. PMID:28178122

  15. An Autopsy Case of Acute Massive Hematochezia Caused by Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis: A First Report in Forensic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mayumi; Unuma, Kana; Makino, Yohsuke; Noritake, Kanako; Yamada, Atsushi; Iwase, Hirotaro; Uemura, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT) is an uncommon cause of intestinal ischemia and massive gastrointestinal bleeding. This report describes a man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, who died of massive hematochezia due to SMVT. A medicolegal autopsy disclosed a thrombus at the superior mesenteric vein and hemorrhagic infarction of the bowel wall, an area also within the territory of the superior mesenteric vein. Liver cirrhosis, an enlarged spleen, and esophageal varices without rupture were also observed, but ulcers and variceal bleeding were not. Other organs showed no significant findings. His blood alcohol level was 0.14% w/v. Thus, this man died from severe hematochezia associated with SMVT due to liver cirrhosis and alcohol dehydration, which can lead to coagulopathy and rapid progress of thrombus formation. This is the first report on an alternate cause for massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a cirrhotic patient in a forensic autopsy.

  16. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    about $7,500 higher than surgical clipping. Assuming that the total number of intracranial aneurysm repairs in Ontario increases to 750 in the fiscal year of 2007, and assuming that up to 60% (450 cases) of these will be repaired by coil embolization, the difference in device costs for the 450 cases (including a 15% recurrence rate) would be approximately $3.8 million. This figure does not include capital costs (e.g. $3 million for an angiosuite), additional human resources required, or costs of follow-up. The increase in expenditures associated with coil embolization may be offset partially, by shorter operating room times and hospitalization stays for endovascular repair of unruptured aneurysms; however, the impact of these cost savings is probably not likely to be greater than 25% of the total outlay since the majority of cases involve ruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, the recent growth in aneurysm repair has predominantly been in the area of coil embolization presumably for patients for whom surgical clipping would not be advised; therefore, no offset of surgical clipping costs could be applied in such cases. For ruptured aneurysms, downstream cost savings from endovascular repair are likely to be minimal even though the savings for individual cases may be substantial due to lower perioperative complications for endovascular aneurysm repair. Guidelines The two Guidance documents issued by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (UK) in 2005 support the use of coil embolization for both unruptured and ruptured (SAH) intracranial aneurysms, provided that procedures are in place for informed consent, audit, and clinical governance, and that the procedure is performed in specialist units with expertise in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Conclusion For people in good clinical condition following subarachnoid hemorrhage from an acute ruptured intracranial aneurysm suitable for either surgical clipping or endovascular repair, coil embolization

  17. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  18. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma extending retrograde into the superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Portillo-Sanchez, José; Hessein-Abdou, Yasser; Puga-Alcalde, Eugenio; Perez-Martinez, Maria Angeles; Del Carmen Jimenez-Meneses, Maria; Camacho-Pedrero, Agustín; Valdepeñas-Herrero, Luís Ruíz

    2011-01-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor that is highly fatal. It can be misdiagnosed as acute or chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Herein, we report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and superior vena caval thrombosis. Intraoperatively, an extensive sarcoma was seen to extend retrograde from the pulmonary artery, past the right ventricle and right atrium, and into the superior vena cava. Surgical resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the central pulmonary arteries, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, relieved the clinical symptoms. The patient remained free of cancer at 14 months postoperatively. We believe that this is the 1st report of a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma that extended retrograde into the superior vena cava.

  19. An autopsy case of acute cor pulmonale and paradoxical systemic embolism due to tumour cell microemboli in a patient with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Uga, Sayuri; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Matsukage, Sho-ichi; Hamada, Mareomi

    2012-09-30

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of severe respiratory distress. Diagnostic imaging studies suggested the existence of inexplicable cor pulmonale. Although we immediately sought the aetiology of her severe condition, she died suddenly on the fourth day after admission. Postmortem autopsy revealed tumour cell microemboli in the small pulmonary arteries. In addition, tumour cell embolisation identical to that in primary breast cancer cells was also observed in microvessels in systemic multiple organs, such as the liver, brain, kidneys, spleen, uterus, bone marrow and adrenal glands-with simultaneous findings of peripheral infarction. Systemic tumour cell embolism mediated through the patent foramen ovale superimposed on pulmonary tumour cell emboli (PTCE) is considered to be the mechanism underlying inexplicable cor pulmonale. The rapid aggravation of her condition terminated in death.

  20. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain ... Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and ...

  1. Pulmonary embolism and concomitant paradoxical embolism. A case report.

    PubMed

    Abad-Arranz, María; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Martos-Maine, José Luis; Carrasco-Hernandez, Laura; Ortega-Ruiz, Francisco; Otero-Candelera, Remedios

    2014-03-01

    Although patent foramen ovale is a relatively common disease, the presence of paradoxical embolism is a rare clinical condition, representing less than 2% of arterial ischemias. We report the case of a 55-year-old male diagnosed with massive pulmonary embolism and paradoxical embolism in the right arm, secondary to patent foramen ovale. We also highlight some uncertainties in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with paradoxical embolism.

  2. Percutaneous embolization of a high-flow pancreatic transplant arteriovenous fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J. Fritz; Matsumoto, Alan H.; McGraw, J. Kevin; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; McCullough, Christopher S.

    1999-03-15

    Percutaneous endovascular techniques were used to treat an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) associated with pancreatic transplantation. A pancreatic transplant superior mesenteric artery-to-superior mesenteric-vein AVF was successfully embolized while flow to the pancreas transplant was preserved. The embolization was aided by the use of Guglielmi detachable coils and a detachable balloon. No complications were encountered. At 23 months follow-up, the patient is doing well with no recurrence.

  3. Percutaneous Embolization of a High-Flow Pancreatic Transplant Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J. Fritz; Matsumoto, Alan H.; McGraw, J. Kevin; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; McCullough, Christopher S.

    1998-03-15

    Percutaneous endovascular techniques were used to treat an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) associated with pancreatic transplantation. A pancreatic transplant superior mesenteric artery-to-superior mesenteric-vein AVF was successfully embolized while flow to the pancreas transplant was preserved. The embolization was aided by the use of Guglielmi detachable coils and a detachable balloon. No complications were encountered. At 23 months follow-up, the patient is doing well with no recurrence.

  4. How Is Pulmonary Embolism Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Embolism Treated? Pulmonary embolism (PE) is treated with medicines, procedures, and other therapies. The main goals of treating PE are to stop the blood clot from getting ...

  5. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective testing for pulmonary embolism is necessary, because clinical assessment alone is unreliable and the consequences of misdiagnosis are serious. No single test has ideal properties (100% sensitivity and specificity, no risk, low cost). Pulmonary angiography is regarded as the final arbiter but is ill suited for diagnosing a disease present in only a third of patients in whom it is suspected. Some tests are good for confirmation and some for exclusion of embolism; others are able to do both but are often non-diagnostic. For optimal efficiency, choice of the initial test should be guided by clinical assessment of the likelihood of embolism and by patient characteristics that may influence test accuracy. Standardised clinical estimates can be used to give a pre-test probability to assess, after appropriate objective testing, the post-test probability of embolism. Multidetector computed tomography can replace both scintigraphy and angiography for the exclusion and diagnosis of this disease and should now be considered the central imaging investigation in suspected pulmonary embolism. PMID:15192162

  6. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  7. Paradoxical cerebral air embolism causing large vessel occlusion treated with endovascular aspiration.

    PubMed

    Belton, Patrick J; Nanda, Ashish; Alqadri, Syeda L; Khakh, Gurpreet S; Chandrasekaran, Premkumar Nattanmai; Newey, Christopher; Humphries, William E

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a dreaded complication of invasive medical procedures. The mainstay of therapy for patients with cerebral air embolism has been hyperbaric oxygen therapy, high flow oxygen therapy, and anticonvulsants. We present a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of cerebral air embolism causing large vessel occlusion, using endovascular aspiration. Our patient developed a cerebral air embolism following sclerotherapy for varicose veins. This caused near total occlusion of the superior division of the M2 segment of the right middle cerebral artery. Symptoms included unilateral paralysis, unintelligible speech, and hemianopia; National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on presentation was 16. The air embolism was treated using a distal aspiration technique. Angiography following aspiration showed Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction 2B reperfusion. Following aspiration, the patient was re-examined; NIHSS at that time was 4. At 1 month follow-up, the modified Rankin Scale score was 1 and NIHSS was 1. Treatment of cerebral air embolism is discussed.

  8. Definitive Embolization of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, B.T.; Lin, E.; Pile-Spellman, J.

    2005-01-01

    Summary This review examines the possible role for definitive embolization as a primary therapy for intracranial meningiomas. Surgery or radiosurgery are currently considered the standard of care for most benign meningiomas. However, each of these carries substantial risks. The perioperative mortality for surgical resection, as reported in large series, is between 3.7-9.4%; these studies report a similarly high rate of new neurological deficits following surgery. The rate of complications from radiosurgery is reported between 2-16% and it may take months to years before improvement in symptoms occurs following this therapy. There are a few reports of treating meningiomas by embolization without subsequent surgery. While these studies include small numbers of patients and have limited follow-up, the initial results are very promising. Given the risks and limitations of surgery and radiosurgery, prospective trials are now needed to determine the safety and efficacy of definitive embolization. PMID:20584499

  9. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  10. Embolization of Collateral Vessels Using Mechanically Detachable Coils in Young Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Ogino, H.; Hara, M.; Satake, M.; Oshima, H.; Banno, T.; Mizuno, K.; Mishima, A.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2003-11-15

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of embolizing collateral vessels using mechanically detachable coils (MDCs) in children aged 3 years or younger with congenital heart disease. The subjects were 8 children with congenital heart disease featuring collateral vessels (age 18 days-3 years): 3 with a single ventricle, 2 with the tetralogy of Fallot, 2 with pulmonary atresia, and 1 with a ventricular septal defect. The embolized vessels were the major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) in 5 patients, the persistent left superior vena cava in 2, and the coronary arteriovenous fistula in 1. A 4 or a 5 F catheter was used as the guiding device, and embolization was performed using MDCs and other conventional coils introduced through the microcatheter. One patient had growth of new MAPCAs after embolization, and these MAPCAs were also embolized with MDCs. Thus, a total of 9 embolization procedures were performed in 8 patients. Complete occlusion of the collateral vessels was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures (89%). Seven of 8 patients (88%) had uneventful courses after embolization, and MDC procedures appeared to play important roles in avoiding coil migration and achievement of safe coil embolization. One patient who underwent MAPCA embolization showed no improvement in heart function and died 2 months and 19 days later. Embolization of collateral vessels using MDCs in young children with congenital heart disease can be an effective procedure and a valuable adjunct to surgical management.

  11. A simplified flow cytometric assay identifies children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who have a superior clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Stow, Patricia; Zhou, Yinmei; Pui, Ching-Hon; Rivera, Gaston K.; Pedrosa, Francisco; Campana, Dario

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow normal lymphoid progenitors (CD19+, CD10+, and/or CD34+) are exquisitely sensitive to corticosteroids and other antileukemic drugs. We hypothesized that, in patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cells with this phenotype detected early in treatment should be leukemic rather than normal. We therefore developed a simple and inexpensive flow cytometric assay for such cells and prospectively applied it to bone marrow samples collected on day 19 from 380 children with B-lineage ALL. In 211 patients (55.5%), these cells represented 0.01% or more of the mononuclear cells; results correlated remarkably well with those of more complex flow cytometric and molecular minimal residual disease (MRD) evaluations. Among 84 uniformly treated children, the 10-year incidence of relapse or remission failure was 28.8% ± 7.1% (SE) for the 42 patients with 0.01% or more leukemic cells on day 19 detected by the simplified assay versus 4.8% ± 3.3% for the 42 patients with lower levels (P = .003). These assay results were the strongest predictor of outcome, even after adjustment for competing clinicobiologic variables. Thus, this new assay would enable most treatment centers to identify a high proportion of children with ALL who have an excellent early treatment response and a high likelihood of cure. (Blood. 2006;108:97-102) PMID:16537802

  12. Massive Pulmonary Calculi Embolism: A Novel Complication of Pneumatic Lithotripsy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-07-01

    Pneumatic lithotripsy is a minimally invasive technique mainly for the treatment of urinary staghorn stones. Previous literatures have reported some therapeutic complications during or after this procedure, but calculi embolism has not been mentioned before.We report here a fatal case of calculi-induced pulmonary embolism in an adult woman who underwent pneumatic lithotripsy. An autopsy did not reveal any evidence of pulmonary embolism. However, light microscopy revealed noticeable presence of calculi in pulmonary arterioles and capillaries, as evidenced by environmental scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The primary determinants of calculi embolism include intrarenal pressure, and volume and viscosity of the calculi fragments formation. Vascular intravasation of smashed calculi might increase pulmonary vascular resistance and hypoxemia and decrease cardiac output.This case report intends to provide information for clinicians to consider the probability of intraoperative calculi embolism during lithotripsies when patients develop typical symptoms of acute pulmonary embolism.

  13. Detection of gas embolism by transesophageal echocardiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Derouin, M; Couture, P; Boudreault, D; Girard, D; Gravel, D

    1996-01-01

    Using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), 16 patients (ASA physical status I-III), undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, were assessed for the occurrence of episodes of gas embolism and cardiovascular changes related to those emboli. The long-axis four-chamber view was monitored continuously, except for predetermined intervals where the transgastric short-axis view was obtained to derive the end-diastolic area (EDA), the end-systolic area (ESA), and the ejection fraction (EF). In one patient, we monitored the longitudinal view of the superior and the inferior vena cava. The monitoring of the patients also included: heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), arterial saturation by pulse oximetry (Spo2), end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), minute ventilation (VE), and peak inspiratory pressure (PIP). Embolic events were defined as the appearance of gas bubbles in the right cardiac chambers. We observed gas embolism in 11/16 patients (five during peritoneal insufflation and six during gallbladder dissection). Using the longitudinal view of the superior and inferior vena cava (IVC), we found that these emboli were transmitted through the IVC. No episode of cardiorespiratory instability (decrease in MAP > or = 10 mm Hg, Spo2 < 90%) was observed. There was no significant difference in cardiorespiratory variables between patients who presented gas embolism (n = 11) and patients who did not (n = 5) during the studied period. In this small group of patients, we conclude that gas embolism occurs commonly during laparoscopic cholecystectomy but that these gas emboli cause minimal cardiorespiratory instability.

  14. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Multiple Embolic Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Cindy W.; Lee, Eungseok; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Park, Hee-Kwon; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of Turner syndrome (TS) with ischemic stroke have been reported. Various arteriopathies of the cerebral arteries, including fibromuscular dysplasia, congenital hypoplasia, moyamoya syndrome, and premature atherosclerosis have been assumed to be the cause of ischemic stroke in TS. There has been no case report of a TS patient presenting with an embolic stroke pattern without any cerebral arteriopathy. A 28-year-old woman with TS was referred to our hospital because of abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. She underwent brain MRI at the referring hospital because she experienced sudden-onset diffuse headache. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed multiple acute embolic infarcts in different vascular territories. Intracranial and extracranial arterial disease was not detected on cerebral magnetic resonance angiography and carotid sonography. Embolic source workups, including transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, Holter monitoring, and transcranial Doppler shunt study, were all negative. Hypercoagulability and vasculitis panels were also negative. Our patient was diagnosed with cryptogenic embolic stroke. This is the first report of a TS patient with an embolic stroke pattern. Our case shows that ischemic stroke in TS could be due to embolism as well as the various cerebral arteriopathies documented in previous reports. PMID:27790125

  15. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Multiple Embolic Infarcts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Cindy W; Lee, Eungseok; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Park, Hee-Kwon; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of Turner syndrome (TS) with ischemic stroke have been reported. Various arteriopathies of the cerebral arteries, including fibromuscular dysplasia, congenital hypoplasia, moyamoya syndrome, and premature atherosclerosis have been assumed to be the cause of ischemic stroke in TS. There has been no case report of a TS patient presenting with an embolic stroke pattern without any cerebral arteriopathy. A 28-year-old woman with TS was referred to our hospital because of abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. She underwent brain MRI at the referring hospital because she experienced sudden-onset diffuse headache. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed multiple acute embolic infarcts in different vascular territories. Intracranial and extracranial arterial disease was not detected on cerebral magnetic resonance angiography and carotid sonography. Embolic source workups, including transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, Holter monitoring, and transcranial Doppler shunt study, were all negative. Hypercoagulability and vasculitis panels were also negative. Our patient was diagnosed with cryptogenic embolic stroke. This is the first report of a TS patient with an embolic stroke pattern. Our case shows that ischemic stroke in TS could be due to embolism as well as the various cerebral arteriopathies documented in previous reports.

  16. Thrombotic and nonthrombotic pulmonary arterial embolism: spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Franquet, Tomas; Müller, Nestor L; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Byun, Hong Sik

    2003-01-01

    Along with clinical examination and laboratory tests, imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Multi-detector row helical computed tomography (CT) is particularly helpful in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) owing to its capacity to directly show emboli as intravascular filling defects. Although parenchymal abnormalities at CT are nonspecific for acute PTE, they may contribute to a correct diagnosis of chronic PTE, the characteristic helical CT features of which are similar to its angiographic features and include webs or bands, intimal irregularities, abrupt narrowing or complete obstruction of the pulmonary arteries, and "pouching defect." Nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon condition but is sometimes associated with specific imaging findings, including discrete nodules with cavitation (septic embolism), widespread homogeneous and heterogeneous areas of increased opacity or attenuation that typically appear 12-24 hours after trauma (fat embolism), and fine miliary nodules that subsequently coalesce into large areas of increased opacity or attenuation (talcosis). Knowledge of appropriate imaging methods and familiarity with the specific imaging features of pulmonary embolism should facilitate prompt, effective diagnosis.

  17. [Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis after intrathecal chemotherapy and intravenous high-dose cytarabine in an acute myeloid leukemia case with t(8;21)(q22;q22)].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Keiki; Ito, Ryugo; Kageyama, Yuki; Nagaharu, Keiki; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Ito, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) is a very rare but life-threatening complication in leukemia patients. SSST is very rare in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In leukemia patients, several risk factors for SSST have been reported such as administration of L-asparaginase, disseminated intravascular coagulation, congenital thrombophilia, meningeal leukemia, and intrathecal chemotherapy (IT). Lumbar puncture itself and corticosteroid administration have also been acknowledged as risk factors. We describe herein our clinical experience with SSST in a 29-year-old Japanese man suffering from AML with t(8;21)(q22;q22), who presented with abrupt onset of loss of consciousness, left hemiplegia, and seizure soon after IT and high-dose cytarabine (HD-AraC) with dexamethasone for post remission consolidation. Despite the presence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) due to SSST rupture, we conducted anticoagulant therapy with heparin. Although ICH worsened temporarily, his clinical condition gradually improved with resolution of the SSST, and he eventually became fully ambulatory. There were no deficiencies of natural anticoagulants. Three additional cycles of HD-AraC without IT therapy were conducted, but no neurological complications recurred with the concomitant use of warfarin. He was discharged free of neurological deficits. In our case, there is a possibility that IT and the administration of corticosteroids along with HD-AraC triggered SSST.

  18. Arteriovenous Fistula Embolization in Suspected Parauterine Choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Almarzooqi, Mohamed-Karji; Oliva, Vincent; Gilbert, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This is a case of choriocarcinoma that did not regress after chemotherapy treatment. A 30-year-old female patient (gravida 2, para 2), presented to our ER with stroke and persistent mild pelvic pain 2 months after a Caesarean section. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an ischemic left hemicerebellar region and a hypervascular mass in the pelvic region. This mass was not present on routine fetal ultrasound during pregnancy. The lesion was treated by chemotherapy after closure of a foramen ovale and insertion of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. After that, 2 courses of EMACO (Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide, and Vincristine) chemotherapy regimen were given. Posttreatment CT showed the hypervascular mass without any changes. Arteriography showed the arteriovenous fistulae that were embolized successfully with plugs, coils, and glue. Embolization was considered due to the risk of acute hemorrhagic life-threatening complications. Eight chemotherapy courses were added after embolization. Treatment by endovascular approach and reduction of the hypervascular mass can be a valuable adjunct to chemotherapy treatment of choriocarcinoma. PMID:27403360

  19. Physiologic Studies of the Pulmonary Capillary Bed after Barium Sulfate Embolization*

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Walter J.; Waldhausen, John A.

    1967-01-01

    22 anesthetized dogs were given a barium sulfate suspension intravenously in a dose sufficient to double mean pulmonary artery pressure. 10 sec breath-holding carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO10) was measured before and after this standard embolization in each dog. No post-embolic decrease in DLCO10 was observed. In the study of this apparent paradox, it was found that the potential for further increase in DLCO10 during exercise remained after embolization. During rest prolongation of breath holding to 60 sec decreased CO absorption significantly more in the embolized than in the nonembolized dogs. While DLCO10 was not affected by standard barium embolization, oxygen diffusing capacity was clearly decreased. The bronchial collateral circulation did not participate in preventing a DLCO10 decrease after embolization since surgical interruption of the bronchial circulation did not alter the response to barium. Microscopic examination of lung sections taken after standard embolization showed plugging of precapillary vessels in the 40-50 μ range. These studies suggest that acute precapillary embolic obstruction of vessels of this size interferes remarkably little with CO absorption over short periods of time, probably because of continued CO absorption in portions of the capillary net distal to the sites of impaction. The remarkable anastomotic nature of this capillary network with multiple sources of access possibly provides the anatomic basis for this observation. This study demonstrates a clear dissociation between acute changes in pulmonary vascular resistance and DLCO10—both during rest and exercise. Images PMID:6061739

  20. Splenic Arterial Embolization in the Treatment of Severe Portal Hypertension Due to Pancreatic Diseases: The Primary Experience in 14 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi Xiong, Bin Zheng, ChuanSheng Liang, Ming Han, Ping

    2016-03-15

    ObjectiveThis retrospective study reports our experience using splenic arterial particle embolization and coil embolization for the treatment of sinistral portal hypertension (SPH) in patients with and without gastric bleeding.MethodsFrom August 2009 to May 2012, 14 patients with SPH due to pancreatic disease were diagnosed and treated with splenic arterial embolization. Two different embolization strategies were applied; either combined distal splenic bed particle embolization and proximal splenic artery coil embolization in the same procedure for acute hemorrhage (1-step) or interval staged distal embolization and proximal embolization in the stable patient (2-step). The patients were clinically followed.ResultsIn 14 patients, splenic arterial embolization was successful. The one-step method was performed in three patients suffering from massive gastric bleeding, and the bleeding was relieved after embolization. The two-step method was used in 11 patients, who had chronic gastric variceal bleeding or gastric varices only. The gastric varices disappeared in the enhanced CT scan and the patients had no gastric bleeding during follow-up.ConclusionsSplenic arterial embolization, particularly the two-step method, proved feasible and effective for the treatment of SPH patients with gastric varices or gastric variceal bleeding.

  1. Prevention of distal embolization and no-reflow in patients with acute myocardial infarction and total occlusion in the infarct-related vessel: a subgroup analysis of the cohort of acute revascularization in myocardial infarction with excimer laser-CARMEL multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Johannes B; Ebersole, Douglas; Das, Tony; Madyhoon, Hooman; Vora, Kishor; Baker, John; Hilton, David; Topaz, On

    2005-01-01

    To overcome the adverse complications of percutaneous coronary interventions in thrombus laden lesions (i.e., distal embolization, platelet activation, no-reflow phenomenon), mechanical removal of the thrombus or distal embolization protection devices are frequently required. Pulsed-wave ultraviolet excimer laser light at 308 nm can vaporize thrombus, suppress platelet aggregation, and, unlike other thrombectomy devices, ablate the underlying plaque. The following multicenter registry was instituted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of laser ablation in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by persistent thrombotic occlusions. Patients with AMI and complete thrombotic occlusion of the infarct-related vessel were included in eight participating centers. Patients with further compromising conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, thrombolysis failures) were also included. Primary endpoint was procedural respective laser success; secondary combined endpoints were TIMI flow and % stenosis by quantitative coronary analysis and visual assessment at 1-month follow-up. Eighty-four percent of all patients enrolled (n = 56) had a very large thrombus burden (TIMI thrombus scale > or = 3), and 49% were compromised by complex clinical presentation, i.e., cardiogenic shock (21%), degenerated saphenous vein grafts (26%), or thrombolysis failures (5%). Laser success was achieved in 89%, angiographic success in 93%, and the overall procedural success rate was 86%. The angiographic prelaser total occlusion was reduced angiographically to 58% +/- 25% after laser treatment and to 4% +/- 13% final residual stenosis after adjunctive balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. TIMI flow increased significantly from grade 0 to 2.7 +/- 0.5 following laser ablation (P < 0.001) and 3.0 +/- 0.2 upon completion of the angioplasty procedure (P > 0.001 vs. baseline). Distal embolizations occurred in 4%, no-reflow was observed in 2%, and perforations in 0.6% of cases

  2. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  3. Interventional Therapy for Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, Alan B.; Suarez, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) present with highly variable clinical symptoms and often have accompanying comorbidities. Timely diagnosis and treatment are critical to help prevent recurrence and increased morbidity/mortality. While open surgical thrombectomy was once reserved only for those with massive PE and hemodynamic compromise, it has been reevaluated with a focus on careful patient selection and early intervention. Lately, there has been increased interest in catheter-based interventions and in combining these with an open surgical component to decrease the magnitude of the intervention—for example, direct placement of large-bore thrombectomy devices directly into the right ventricle via sternotomy or subxiphoid approaches. In addition, improved diagnostic capabilities have allowed for expedited diagnosis and treatment of patients with life-threatening PE. At our institution, a hybrid room allows patients suspected of having a massive or submassive PE to undergo on-table contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography scan, thus creating a high-resolution 3-dimensional image of the arterial system that can provide immediate guidance for therapeutic intervention. This review highlights the array of therapeutic options currently used in our armamentarium at the Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and describes our development of a pulmonary angioplasty procedure that we believe will greatly facilitate selective thrombus removal in the acute PE setting. PMID:28289497

  4. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism due to a Hidden Skull Fracture Secondary to Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Ai; Yamaguchi, Tetsuto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Shibagaki, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous air embolism is sometimes caused by head trauma. One of the paths of air entry is considered a skull fracture. We report a case of cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma. The patient was a 55-year-old man who fell and hit his head. A head computed tomography (CT) scan showed the air in the superior sagittal sinus; however, no skull fractures were detected. Follow-up CT revealed a fracture line in the right temporal bone. Cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma might have occult skull fractures even if CT could not show the skull fractures. PMID:26693366

  5. Reperfusion Hemorrhage Following Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Michael; McSweeney, Sean; Fulton, Gregory; Buckley, John; Maher, Michael Guiney, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement is now an established treatment option for chronic mesenteric ischemia and is associated with low mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of reperfusion hemorrhage complicating endovascular repair of superior mesenteric artery stenosis. Although a recognized complication following repair of carotid stenosis, hemorrhage has not previously been reported following mesenteric endovascular reperfusion. We describe both spontaneous cessation of bleeding and treatment with coil embolization.

  6. [Embolism of the humeral artery originating in a thrombosed axillo-femoral bypass].

    PubMed

    Barba, A; Escribano, J V; García-Alfageme, A

    1992-01-01

    A case of a patient, with acute arterial ischemia at the upper limb is reported. On this case, ischemia was caused by humeral arterial embolism. The embolic origin was focused on the proximal end of a thrombosed axillofemoral bypass. After a rude manipulation during surgical procedure, part of the thrombus, following the sanguineous current, occluded the humeral artery. Patient underwent an emergent surgery. Posterior course was good. Histology showed a re-epithelialized, ancient thrombus. Cardiologic studies and angiography showed no others embolic focuses.

  7. Repair of Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Using N-Butyl-2-Cyano-Acrylate Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Tanihata, Hirohiko; Sahara, Shinya; Takasaka, Isao; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2010-04-15

    Embolization using N-butyl-2-cyano-acrylate (NBCA) has been highly regarded for treating pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, and hemorrhage of the visceral arteries. We report the case of a patient who fell from a cliff and sustained hemorrhagic shock with blunt abdominal aortic rupture and who underwent embolization using NBCA. This treatment achieved immediate hemostasis and stabilization of vital signs. Although the long-term durability of NBCA is unknown, it appears that certain types of acute aortic hemorrhage with narrow-necked pseudoaneurysm can be controlled by embolization using NBCA.

  8. Monitoring for suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Capan, L M; Miller, S M

    2001-12-01

    It is fortunate that serious embolic phenomena are uncommon because, with the exception of neurosurgery in the sitting position and cardiac surgery, thoracic echocardiography and the precordial Doppler device, the most sensitive indicators of embolism, are seldom used. Vigilance is required of the anesthesiologist to recognize the rapid fall in end-tidal PCO2, the usual first indicator of a clinically significant PE. Any sudden deterioration in the patient's vital signs should include embolism in the differential diagnosis, particularly during procedures that carry a high risk of the complication.

  9. Multiple Intrahepatic Artery Aneurysms in a Patient with Behcet's Disease: Use of Transcatheter Embolization for Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Irfan; Fotiadis, Nikolas I. Dilks, Phil; Kocher, Hemant M.; Fotheringham, Tim; Matson, Matthew

    2010-04-15

    Intrahepatic artery aneuryms are a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. We present the first case in the English literature of multiple intrahepatic artery aneuryms in a patient with Behcet's disease who presented acutely with rupture. The ruptured aneurysm was treated successfully with transcatheter arterial coil embolization-CT and clinical follow-up confirming a good result. We discuss the management dilemma with regard to prophylactic embolization of the numerous other small asymptomatic intrahepatic aneurysms in this same patient.

  10. Partial splenic embolization to permit continuation of systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luz, Jose Hugo M; Luz, Paula M; Marchiori, Edson; Rodrigues, Leonardo A; Gouveia, Hugo R; Martin, Henrique S; Faria, Igor M; Souza, Roberto R; Gil, Roberto de Almeida; Palladino, Alexandre de M; Pimenta, Karina B; de Souza, Henrique S

    2016-10-01

    Systemic chemotherapy treatments, commonly those that comprise oxaliplatin, have been linked to the appearance of distinctive liver lesions that evolves to portal hypertension, spleen enlargement, platelets sequestration, and thrombocytopenia. This outcome can interrupt treatment or force dosage reduction, decreasing efficiency of cancer therapy. We conducted a prospective phase II study for the evaluation of partial splenic embolization in patients with thrombocytopenia that impeded systemic chemotherapy continuation. From August 2014 through July 2015, 33 patients underwent partial splenic embolization to increase platelets count and allow their return to treatment. Primary endpoint was the accomplishment of a thrombocyte level superior to 130 × 10(9) /L and the secondary endpoints were the return to chemotherapy and toxicity. Partial splenic embolization was done 36 times in 33 patients. All patients presented gastrointestinal cancer and colorectal malignancy was the commonest primary site. An average of 6.4 cycles of chemotherapy was done before splenic embolization and the most common regimen was Folfox. Mean platelet count prior to embolization was 69 × 10(9) /L. A total of 94% of patients achieved primary endpoint. All patients in need reinitiated treatment and median time to chemotherapy return was 14 days. No grade 3 or above adverse events were identified. Aiming for a 50% to 70% infarction area may be sufficient to achieve success without the complications associated with more extensive infarction. Combined with the better safety profile, partial splenic embolization is an excellent option in the management of thrombocytopenia, enabling the resumption of systemic chemotherapy with minimal procedure-related morbidity.

  11. Digital infarction in a hemodialysis patient due to embolism from a thrombosed brachial arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Yj, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Acute onset of digital ischemia and infarction is an unusual complication in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This is a report of a patient on regular hemodialysis who presented with acute distal extremity ischemia, progressing to digital infarction and on evaluation was found to have thrombosis of brachial arteriovenous fistula with embolization to the distal arteries causing digital artery occlusion.

  12. Onyx Embolization of Intracranial Pial Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Min; Kim, Ki-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pial arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are rare cerebrovascular lesions consisting of one or more arterial connections to a single venous channel without an intervening nidus. Because of the location and high flow dynamics of these lesions, neurosurgeons may have a difficulty deciding between endovascular treatment and open surgical treatment. We report on a patient who underwent endovascular treatment with liquid embolic agent. A 50-year-old man with a decreased mental state and a tonic seizure event was brought to our hospital. Computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed a subcortical hematoma in the right temporoparietal lobe. On three-dimensional cerebral artery CT, there was no evidence of definite cerebrovascular abnormality. Cerebral angiography showed a pial AVF supplied by the right middle cerebral artery with early drainage into the right superior cerebral vein. The patient was treated with Onyx embolization for definitive closure of the fistula. The patient was transferred to the department of rehabilitation medicine two weeks later with grade 4 left hemiparesis. The application of advanced equipment, such as the latest angiography and endovascular tools, will facilitate the correct diagnosis and delicate treatment of pial AVF. PMID:27847777

  13. Pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nakia N; Toledo, Alexander; Endom, Erin E

    2010-12-01

    This article discusses pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and pulmonary embolism in pediatric practice. Although children appear to have better outcomes than adults, the risk factors are substantial. Topics covered include the pathophysiology incidence, presentation, diagnosis, and management of these diseases.

  14. Diagnostic value of gas exchange tests in patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Prediletto, Renato; Miniati, Massimo; Tonelli, Lucia; Formichi, Bruno; Di Ricco, Giorgio; Marini, Carlo; Bauleo, Carolina; Allescia, Germana; Cocci, Franca; Monti, Simonetta; Pistolesi, Massimo; Giuntini, Carlo

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of parameters derived from arterial blood gas tests in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Method: We measured alveolar-arterial partial pressure of oxygen [P(A–a)O2] gradient, PaO2 and arterial partial pressure of carbon diaxide (PaCO2) in 773 consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism who were enrolled in the Prospective Investigative Study of Acute Pulmonary Embolism. Diagnosis: The study design required pulmonary angiography in all patients with abnormal perfusion scans. Results: Of 773 scans, 270 were classified as normal/near-normal and 503 as abnormal. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by pulmonary angiography in 312 of 503 patients with abnormal scans. Of 312 patients with pulmonary embolism, 12, 14 and 35% had normal P(A–a)O2, PaO2 and PaCO2, respectively. Of 191 patients with abnormal scans and negative angiograms, 11, 13 and 55% had normal P(A–a)O2, PaO2 and PaCO2, respectively. The proportions of patients with normal/near-normal scans who had normal P(A–a)O2, PaO2 and PaCO2 were 20, 25 and 37%, respectively. No differences were observed in the mean values of arterial blood gas data between patients with pulmonary embolism and those who had abnormal scans and negative angiograms. Among the 773 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, 364 (47%) had prior cardiopulmonary disease. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in 151 (41%) of 364 patients with prior cardiopulmonary disease, and in 161 (39%) of 409 patients without prior cardiopulmonary disease. Among patients with pulmonary embolism, there was no difference in arterial blood gas data between patients with and those without prior CPD. Conclusion: These data indicate that arterial blood gas tests are of limited value in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary embolism if they are not interpreted in conjunction with clinical and other laboratory tests. PMID:11056733

  15. The diagnosis and management of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Abunasser, Jafar; Tejada, John Patrick; Foley, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), most commonly originating from thrombosis in the deep venous system of the lower extremities, remains a controversial area of medicine that frequently generates lively debate. Its clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic, incidentally detected pulmonary emboli to massive embolism resulting in sudden death. Despite the advances made in recent years, a number of fundamental questions remain unanswered regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this disease. The diagnosis of PE is confounded by a presentation that may be subtle, atypical, or obscured by a concomitant condition. Safe, minimally invasive techniques have been developed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the clinical evaluation, and obviate the need to obtain pulmonary arteriography in all but a minority of patients. However, no single diagnostic test is sufficiently sensitive or specific for diagnosis in all patients. This dilemma has resulted in the development of numerous clinical scoring systems to stratify risk, pretest probability and help guide an appropriate diagnostic approach. Anticoagulation therapy with unfractionated heparin (UFH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and Factor Xa inhibitors are the mainstay of therapy for acute PE. The choice of agent is influenced by disease severity, presence or absence of provokingfactors, patient comorbidities, and bleeding risk. These factors also determine whether measures such as thrombectomy, thrombolysis and vena cava filter placement may be employed as adjuncts to anticoagulation. Warfarin is the agent of choice for secondary prevention; newer agents such as direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors are emerging as safe and effective alternatives.

  16. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed Ahmed, Magdy M; Aftab, Muhammad; Al-Najjar, Raed M; de la Cruz, Kim I; Benjamin, Robert S; Hallman, Charles H

    2014-10-01

    Primary sarcomas that arise from major blood vessels are exceedingly rare, and some of the published cases have been autopsy reports. Most patients are adults. We report a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma in a 77-year-old man who presented with acute onset of dyspnea. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a large mass within the pulmonary trunk and its main branches. Because massive pulmonary embolism was suspected, both anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapies were initiated. The patient responded poorly to these therapies, which then necessitated resection of both the mass and the pulmonary valve. A bioprosthetic porcine valve replaced the native valve, and we reconstructed the right ventricular outflow tract with a Dacron patch. Histopathologic examination revealed a high-grade sarcoma with focal myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 7. He was subsequently treated with chemotherapy and radiation and continued to show no evidence of disease. The diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma should be suspected in patients who present with manifestations of pulmonary embolism, especially when there is no evidence of deep venous thrombosis and poor response to anticoagulant therapy. Multimodal therapy can provide prolonged survival.

  17. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Mimicking Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Muhammad; Al-Najjar, Raed M.; de la Cruz, Kim I.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Hallman, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary sarcomas that arise from major blood vessels are exceedingly rare, and some of the published cases have been autopsy reports. Most patients are adults. We report a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma in a 77-year-old man who presented with acute onset of dyspnea. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a large mass within the pulmonary trunk and its main branches. Because massive pulmonary embolism was suspected, both anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapies were initiated. The patient responded poorly to these therapies, which then necessitated resection of both the mass and the pulmonary valve. A bioprosthetic porcine valve replaced the native valve, and we reconstructed the right ventricular outflow tract with a Dacron patch. Histopathologic examination revealed a high-grade sarcoma with focal myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 7. He was subsequently treated with chemotherapy and radiation and continued to show no evidence of disease. The diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma should be suspected in patients who present with manifestations of pulmonary embolism, especially when there is no evidence of deep venous thrombosis and poor response to anticoagulant therapy. Multimodal therapy can provide prolonged survival. PMID:25425986

  18. Ileocolic Arteriovenous Fistula with Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurism: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorio, Miguel Angel de; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Medrano, Joaquin; Schoenholz, Caudio; Rodriguez, Juan; D'Agostino, Horacio

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of a venous aneurysm secondary to an acquired ileocolic arteriovenous fistula in a 64-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain and history of appendectomy. The aneurysm was diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography. Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula between ileocolic branches of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. This vascular abnormality was successfully treated with coil embolization.

  19. Emborrhoid: A New Concept for the Treatment of Hemorrhoids with Arterial Embolization: The First 14 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, V.; Sapoval, M.; Sielezneff, Y.; Parades, V. De; Tradi, F. Louis, G. Bartoli, J. M.; Pellerin, O.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe ‘emborrhoid’ technique consists of the embolization of the hemorrhoidal arteries. The endovascular arterial occlusion is performed using coils placed in the terminal branches of the superior rectal arteries. The emborrhoid technique has been modeled after elective transanal Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal artery ligation which has been shown to be effective in hemorrhoidal disease. We report the first 14 cases of our experience with emborrhoid technique.Materials and MethodsFourteen patients with disabling chronic rectal bleeding were treated using the emborrhoid technique (3 women, 11 men). The stage of the hemorrhoidal disease was II (10 patients), III (3), and IV (1). This treatment was decided by a multidisciplinary team (proctologist, visceral surgeon, and radiologist). Seven patients underwent previous proctological surgery. Ten patients had coagulation disorders (anticoagulants or cirrhosis). Superior rectal arteries were embolized with pushable microcoils (0.018).ResultsTechnical success of the embolization procedure was 100 %. Clinical success at 1 month was 72 % (10/14). Of the 4 patients who experienced rebleeding, two underwent additional embolization of the posterior rectal arteries with success. No pain or ischemic complications were observed in 13 patients. One patient experienced a temporary painful and edematous, perianal reaction.ConclusionOur case studies suggest that coil embolization of the superior rectal arteries is technically feasible, safe and well tolerated. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this new ‘emborrhoid’ technique in the management of hemorrhoidal disease.

  20. Cardiac septic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xin yu; Li, Shan; Cao, Jian; Xu, Kai; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuo jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on the source of the embolus, septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) can be classified as cardiac, peripheral endogenous, or exogenous. Cardiac SPEs are the most common. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 patients with cardiac SPE hospitalized between 1991 and 2013 at a Chinese tertiary referral hospital. The study included 14 males and 6 females with a median age of 38.1 years. Fever (100%), cough (95%), hemoptysis (80%), pleuritic chest pain (80%), heart murmur (80%), and moist rales (75%) were common clinical manifestations. Most patients had a predisposing condition: congenital heart disease (8 patients) and an immunocompromised state (5 patients) were the most common. Staphylococcal (8 patients) and Streptococcal species (4 patients) were the most common causative pathogens. Parenchymal opacities, nodules, cavitations, and pleural effusions were the most common manifestations observed via computed tomography (CT). All patients exhibited significant abnormalities by echocardiography, including 15 patients with right-sided vegetations and 4 with double-sided vegetations. All patients received parenteral antimicrobial therapy as an initial treatment. Fourteen patients received cardiac surgery, and all survived. Among the 6 patients who did not undergo surgery, only 1 survived. Most patients in our cardiac SPE cohort had predisposing conditions. Although most exhibited typical clinical manifestations and radiography, they were nonspecific. For suspected cases of SPE, blood culture, echocardiography, and CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) are important measures to confirm an early diagnosis. Vigorous early therapy, including appropriate antibiotic treatment and timely cardiac surgery to eradicate the infective source, is critical. PMID:27336870

  1. Embolization of Life-Threatening Arterial Rupture in Patients with Vascular Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya; Frank, Michael; Pellerin, Olivier Primio, Massimiliano Di Angelopoulos, Georgios; Boughenou, Marie-Fazia; Pagny, Jean-Yves; Messas, Emmanuel; Sapoval, Marc

    2013-05-09

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of transarterial embolization of life-threatening arterial rupture in patients with vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (vEDS) in a single tertiary referral center.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed transarterial embolization for vEDS performed at our institution from 2000 to 2012. The indication of embolization was spontaneous arterial rupture or pseudoaneurysm with acute bleeding. All interventions used a percutaneous approach through a 5F or less introducer sheath. Embolic agents were microcoils and glue in 3 procedures, glue alone in 2, and microcoils alone in 2.ResultsFive consecutive vEDS patients were treated by 7 embolization procedures (4 women, mean age 29.8 years). All procedures were successfully performed. Two patients required a second procedure for newly arterial lesions at a different site from the first procedure. Four of the five patients were still alive after a mean follow-up of 19.4 (range 1–74.7) months. One patient died of multiple organ failure 2 days after procedure. Minor procedural complications were observed in 3 procedures (43 %), all directly managed during the same session. Remote arterial lesions occurred after 3 procedures (43 %); one underwent a second embolization, and the other 2 were observed conservatively. Puncture site complication was observed in only one procedure (14 %).ConclusionEmbolization for vEDS is a safe and effective method to manage life-threatening arterial rupture.

  2. [Experimental studies of segmental hepatic artery embolization with a super absorbent embolic agent].

    PubMed

    Inoue, E; Hori, S; Narumi, Y; Fujita, M; Ishiguro, S; Kuroda, C

    1990-11-25

    Super absorbent (Sumikagel) is a unique polymer mainly composed of polysodium acrylate (PSA). When PSA contacts water, it absorbs water and swells in a few seconds. This new embolic material suspended in Lipiodol (Lp-PSA), was used for hepatic artery embolization in five dogs. The purpose of this study is to examine the necrotizing effect of the new embolic material on segmental hepatic artery embolization. Gross liver examination demonstrated congestion and segmental infarction within the embolized area, and microscopically focal necrosis of liver parenchyma was observed. Segmental hepatic artery embolization with Lp-PSA should be an effective method of hepatic tumor embolization.

  3. Cerebral embolic stroke after disappearing takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Ikeda, Yoshio; Deguchi, Shoko; Yamashita, Toru; Kurata, Tomoko; Deguchi, Kentaro; Abe, Koji

    2013-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy can induce cerebral embolic stroke because of intracardiac thrombosis, but the timing of cardiogenic embolism relating to takotsubo cardiomyopathy has not been well described. We evaluated a 71-year-old woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, who developed cardiogenic cerebral embolism after recovery of cardiac wall motion. Nevertheless, we treated her with anticoagulation therapy. The present clinical observation suggests that attention should be paid to the timing when takotsubo cardiomyopathy resolves against risk of cardiogenic cerebral embolism.

  4. Embolization of Iatrogenic Vascular Injuries of Renal Transplants: Immediate and Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Bankier, Alexander; Turetschek, Karl; Schmidt, Alice; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome in seven patients in whom iatrogenic vascular complications were treated with catheter embolization. Methods: Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula in six of the seven patients, a pseudoaneurysm in three patients, and an arteriocaliceal fistula in three patients. Embolization was performed with GAW coils or microcoils in all cases. In three patients enbucrilate, polyvinyl alcohol, or absorbable gelatin powder was administered as an adjunct to the coils. Results: Angiographic success with total occlusion of the vascular injury was achieved in five of the seven patients and clinical success was achieved in four of seven cases. In two cases, nephrectomy after embolization was necessary because of renal artery occlusion or acute hemorrhage at the renal artery anastomosis, respectively. Infarction of 30%-50% of the renal parenchyma was seen in two cases. Conclusion: Angiographically successful embolization is not necessarily associated with clinical success. The complication rate is high.

  5. Resuscitation of prolonged cardiac arrest from massive pulmonary embolism by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Seok; Choi, Wookjin; Hwang, Jaecheol

    2017-01-10

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be used as a rescue strategy in cases of prolonged cardiac arrest caused by massive pulmonary embolism. We present a case of a male patient who was in prolonged cardiac arrest following massive pulmonary embolism. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated approximately 93 min after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. After resuscitation, bedside echocardiography and a chest computed tomography angiogram revealed a massive pulmonary embolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. The patient received transcatheter mechanical thrombectomy without haemodynamic instability in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. He was also treated with therapeutic hypothermia to improve neurological outcome. Renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury was continued for 36 days. The patient was discharged at 60 days after admission with no serious complications. This case demonstrates that veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and therapeutic hypothermia are an effective treatment strategy for prolonged cardiac arrest caused by massive pulmonary embolism.

  6. Microballoon Occlusion Test to Predict Colonic Ischemia After Transcatheter Embolization of a Ruptured Aneurysm of the Middle Colic Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Inokuchi, Hiroyuki; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-15

    A 76-year-old woman presented with sudden massive melena, and superior mesenteric arteriography showed an aneurysm in the middle colic artery (MCA). Because she had a history of right hemicolectomy and ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, embolization of the MCA aneurysm was considered to pose a risk comparable to that of colonic ischemia. A microballoon occlusion test during occlusion of the MCA confirmed retrograde visualization of the IMA branches through the collateral arteries by way of the left internal iliac artery, and embolization was successfully performed using microcoils. No colonic ischemia or aneurysm rupture occurred after embolization.

  7. Reflex Anuria After Renal Tumor Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  8. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Frank E.; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  9. Successful Embolization of a Spontaneous Mesocaval Shunt Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II

    SciTech Connect

    Boixadera, Helena; Tomasello, Alejandro; Quiroga, Sergi; Cordoba, Joan; Perez, Mercedes; Segarra, Antoni

    2010-10-15

    A 48-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy was found to have a large, spontaneous mesocaval shunt. The shunt was successfully occluded with the use of an Amplatzer Vascular Plug. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this device to embolize a mesocaval shunt involving the superior mesenteric vein.

  10. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  11. Endovascular Management of Visceral Artery Pseudoaneurysms: Transcatheter Coil Embolization Using the Isolation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Nakasone, Yutaka; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2010-12-15

    PurposeTo describe our experiences with treatment of visceral artery pseudoaneurysms (VAPA) by transcatheter coil embolization using an isolation technique and to propose indications for treating VAPA with this method.Materials and MethodsWe treated 37 patients with VAPA endovascularly: There were 15 pancreaticoduodenal arcade, 10 hepatic, 5 renal, 3 splenic, and 1 each left gastric, gastroepiploic, adrenal, and superior mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysms. Preprocedure computed tomography (CT) and/or angiographic studies confirmed the presence of VAPA in all 37 patients. Using the isolation technique, we embolized vessels at sites distal and proximal to the pseudoaneurysm.ResultsTranscatheter coil embolization with the isolation technique was technically successful in 33 (89%) of 37 patients, and angiogram confirmed the complete disappearance of the VAPA in 32 patients. No major complications occurred during the procedures. In a patient with a pancreaticoduodenal arcade artery pseudoaneurysm, we were unable to control hemorrhage. In 30 of 32 patients who recovered after transcatheter coil embolization using the isolation technique, follow-up CT scan showed no flow in VAPA; they survived without rebleeding. Two of the 32 patients (6%) with confirmed complete disappearance of VAPA on angiogram and CT scan obtained the day after the procedure manifested rebleeding during follow-up.ConclusionTranscatheter coil embolization using the isolation technique is an effective alternative treatment in patients with VAPA. In combination with coil embolization, the isolation technique is particularly useful in patients whose pseudoaneurysms present surgical difficulties.

  12. Clinical application value of preoperative selective partial splenic embolization before splenectomy plus portal-azygous disconnection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengxing; Chang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the clinical application value of preoperative selective partial splenic embolization before splenectomy plus portal-azygous disconnection. 158 cases of liver cirrhosis combined with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage patients were selected, which were randomly divided into splenic embolization group (S, n=77) and the non-splenic embolization group (U, n=81). Group S patients were firstly performed partial splenic embolization (PSE), and then underwent splenectomy plus portal-azygous disconnection, and the group U patients were directly performed splenectomy plus portal-azygous disconnection. Statistical analysis was used SAS8.0 statistical analysis software. One week after partial splenic embolization, the platelet of group S returned to normal, and the rise of white blood cells and hemoglobin, and shorten of prothrombin time in group S were much better than that in group U (P<0.01, P<0.05); the indexes, such as the intraoperative blood loss, the blood transfusion amount, the amount of platelet infusion, and the incidence of complications in group S were more superior than that in group U (P<0.05). Preoperative selective splenic artery embolization before splenectomy plus portal-azygous disconnection can restore the spleen function, and reduce the risk of surgery and incidence of complications. PMID:26464721

  13. Two variants of fat embolism syndrome evolving in a young patient with multiple fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bajuri, Mohd Yazid; Johan, Rudy Reza; Shukur, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a continuum of fat emboli. Variants of FES: acute fulminant form and classic FES are postulated to represent two different pathomechanisms. Acute fulminant FES occurs during the first 24 h. It is attributed to massive mechanical blockage pulmonary vasculature by the fat emboli. The classic FES typically has a latency period of 24–36 h manifestation of respiratory failure and other signs of fat embolism. Progression of asymptomatic fat embolism with FES frequently represents inadequate treatment of hypovolaemic shock. We present a rare case of two variants of FES evolving in a patient with multiple fractures to emphasis the importance of adequate and appropriate treatment of shock in preventing the development of FES. Since supportive therapy which is a ventilatory support remains as the treatment of FES, it is appropriate to treat FES in the intensive care unit setting. PMID:23576653

  14. Fatal cerebral air embolism following endoscopic evaluation of rectal stump

    PubMed Central

    Baban, Chwanrow Karim; Murphy, Michael; Hennessy, Tony; O'Hanlon, Deirdre

    2013-01-01

    A 63-year-old man underwent endoscopic evaluation of the rectal stump for rectal bleeding and suffered a massive cerebral air embolism with severe neurological impairment and subsequent death. The patient underwent a Hartmann's procedure 9 month previously for ischaemic bowel and was noted to have portal hypertension at laparotomy. We hypothesise that air entered the venous plexus around rectum and entered the azygos vein via a porto-systemic shunt and travelled retrogradely via the superior vena cava to the venous sinuses of the brain. PMID:23704447

  15. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Upper Gastrointestinal Nonvariceal Hemorrhage: Is Empiric Embolization Warranted?

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Fidelman, Nicholas Gordon, Roy L.; LaBerge, Jeanne M.; Kerlan, Robert K.; Klimov, Alexander; Bloom, Allan I.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine whether transcatheter arterial embolization performed in the setting of active gastric or duodenal nonvariceal hemorrhage is efficacious when the bleeding source cannot be identified angiographically. Methods: Records of 115 adult patients who underwent visceral angiography for endoscopically documented gastric (50 patients) or duodenal (65 patients) nonvariceal hemorrhage were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were subdivided into three groups according to whether angiographic evidence of arterial hemorrhage was present and whether embolization was performed (group 1 = no abnormality, no embolization; group 2 = no abnormality, embolization performed [empiric embolization]; and group 3 = abnormality present, embolization performed). Thirty-day rates and duration of primary hemostasis and survival were compared.ResultsFor patients with gastric sources of hemorrhage, the rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after embolization was greater when embolization was performed in the setting of a documented angiographic abnormality than when empiric embolization was performed (67% vs. 42%). The rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after angiography was greater for patients with duodenal bleeding who either underwent empiric embolization (60%) or embolization in the setting of angiographically documented arterial hemorrhage (58%) compared with patients who only underwent diagnostic angiogram (33%). Patients with duodenal hemorrhage who underwent embolization were less likely to require additional invasive procedures to control rebleeding (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Empiric arterial embolization may be advantageous in patients with a duodenal source of hemorrhage but not in patients with gastric hemorrhage.

  16. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Large Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm with Mechanically Detachable Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Fujimoto, Yukinori; Jin, Myeong Jun; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2004-03-15

    Large aneurysms (5.5 and 3.6 cm in diameter) arising from the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery located just near the main superior mesenteric artery were incidentally diagnosed in two patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization, packing mechanically detachable coils and microcoils into the aneurysms, was performed while the inflated balloon catheter was placed near the neck of the aneurysms. The procedures were successfully performed and no aneurysmal rupture or bowel ischemia was noted during follow-up. Balloon-assisted transcatheter arterial embolization with mechanically detachable coils seems to be an effective and safe treatment for large inferior pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms.

  17. Embolization Coils Migrating and Being Passed per Rectum After Embolization of a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm, 'The Migrating Coil': A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Numan A.; Akingboye, Akinfemi; Haldipur, Nandon; Mackinlay, James Y.; Jacob, George

    2007-11-15

    Acute or chronic blood loss from pseudoaneurysms of the splanchnic artery in chronic pancreatitis poses diagnostic and management challenges. Arteriographic examination offers both diagnostic and therapeutic options, with success rates of 76%-100% for both modalities. In cases of failure of embolization, repeat embolization is also an option. Surgical intervention is advocated for rebleeding and failure of embolization. Evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal treatment modality for this condition are lacking. There has been a reported case of dislodgement of coil into the stomach through a gastropseudocystic fistula. We report the case of a migrating steel-wire coil through the gastrointestinal tract and splenic artery pseudoaneurysm. We highlight the potential complications of pseudoaneurysm and other available therapeutic management options.

  18. Preoperative Embolization of Cervical Spine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Sylvia C.; Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Ackermann, Ludwig W.; Harms, Juergen

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the technical success rate, complications, and effect on intraoperative blood loss of preoperative transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 38 patients with tumors of the cervical spine; 69 vertebrae were affected. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, coils, gelfoam particles, either alone or in combination, were used for preoperative tumor embolization. After embolization a total of 57 corporectomies with titanium basket implantation were performed. Results: In 36 of 38 patients, complete (n= 27) or partial (n= 9) embolization was achieved. In 23 patients one vertebral artery was completely occluded by coil placement, and in one patient the ipsilateral internal and external carotid arteries were occluded in addition. No neurological complications could be directly related to the embolization, but two postoperative brain stem infarctions occurred. The mean intraoperative blood loss was 2.4 L. Conclusion: Transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors is a safe and effective procedure to facilitate extensive surgery.

  19. Therapy-resistant nephrolithiasis following renal artery coil embolization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcatheter renal artery embolization is an effective and minimally invasive treatment option for acute renal bleeding. Early post-interventional complications include groin hematoma, incomplete embolization, coil misplacement and coil migration. Late complications are rare and mostly related to coil migration. Case presentation A 22-year-old woman with a history of recurrent stone disease and a lumbal meningomyelocele underwent bilateral open pyelolithotomy for bilateral staghorn calculi. Post-operatively, acute hemorrhage of the left kidney occurred and selective arterial coil embolization of a lower pole interlobular renal artery was performed twice. Four years after this intervention the patient presented with a new 15.4 mm stone in the lower calyx of the left kidney. After two extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatments disintegration of the stone was not detectable. Therefore, flexible ureterorenoscopy was performed and revealed that the stone was adherent to a partially intraluminal metal coil in the lower renal calyx. The intracalyceal part of the coil and the adherent stone were successfully removed using the holmium laser. Conclusion Therapy-resistant nephrolithiasis was caused by a migrated metal coil, which was placed four years earlier for the treatment of acute post-operative renal bleeding. Renal coils in close vicinity to the renal pelvis can migrate into the collecting system and trigger renal stone formation. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy seems to be inefficient for these composite stones. Identification of these rare stones is possible during retrograde intrarenal surgery. It also enables immediate stone disintegration and removal of the stone fragments and the intraluminal coil material. PMID:23758632

  20. Delayed presentation and treatment of popliteal artery embolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cambria, R P; Ridge, B A; Brewster, D C; Moncure, A C; Darling, R C; Abbott, W M

    1991-01-01

    In the course of reviewing a 10-year experience with popliteal artery embolism (PAE), two distinct patterns of clinical presentation were identified. In addition to those patients presenting with typical acute (symptom duration less than 7 days) arterial ischemia, a second group was identified who presented with more chronic symptoms. The present study was conducted to contrast the clinical factors and treatment of these two temporal patterns of presentation with PAE. Sixty PAEs in 58 patients were documented by the combination of angiography and/or exploration of the popliteal artery. Acute presentation (AP) was seen in 41 (68%) of these and delayed presentation (DP) was noted in 19 (32%) patients. Delayed presentation patients typically presented with a history of sudden onset of claudication or rest pain and a median symptom duration of 30 days. Eighty per cent of AP patients presented with immediately threatened limbs. Angiography was generally diagnostic of chronic popliteal embolism. In the acute group, 90% were treated with embolectomy alone, while 20% of the DP group required bypass grafting. However in two thirds of the DP group, embolectomy alone performed through a direct popliteal approach was possible. Current results with overall limb salvage (92%) and mortality (7%) represents a substantial improvement compared to the authors' previous experience with PAE. The current study suggests that as many as one third of patients with popliteal artery embolism may present in delayed fashion with chronic symptoms. Furthermore most of these patients can be treated with direct popliteal embolectomy alone with favorable results. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2064471

  1. Lung embolism with liquid silicone.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A; Martínez, M C; Lopez-Artíguez, M; Soria, M L; Bernier, F; Repetto, M

    1989-03-01

    A lung embolism was reported in a case involving death following repeated injections of liquid silicone for aesthetic reasons. The liquid extracted from the sites of injection was identified as methylsilicone using infrared spectrophotometry, and the presence of silicone in vacuoles in the lung was verified by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA). A study has been carried out with rats after intravenous and subcutaneous injections of methylsilicone.

  2. [Pulmonary embolism following percutaneous vertebroplasty].

    PubMed

    Bedini, Marianela Patricia; Albertini, Ricarso Arturo; Orozco, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of osteoporotic fractures. Within its complications is pulmonary embolism, which can be asymptomatic or with respiratory distress and may be notes by radiography or computed tomography. At present there is no guide to indicate the routine performance of imaging techniques after treatment, and all agreed on the need to start anticoagulant therapy for 3 months or so with coumarin in symptomatic or asymptomatic central emboli.

  3. Effects on steroid hormones secretion resulting from the acute stimulation of sectioning the superior ovarian nerve to pre-pubertal rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the adult rat, neural signals arriving to the ovary via the superior ovarian nerve (SON) modulate progesterone (P4), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) secretion. The aims of the present study were to analyze if the SON in the pre-pubertal rat also modulates ovarian hormone secretion and the release of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing (LH) hormone. P4, T, E2, FSH and LH serum levels were measured 30 or 60 minutes after sectioning the SON of pre-pubertal female rats. Our results indicate that the effects on hormone levels resulting from unilaterally or bilaterally sectioning the SON depends on the analyzed hormone, and the time lapse between surgery and autopsy, and that the treatment yielded asymmetric results. The results also suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat the neural signals arriving to the ovaries via the SON regulate the enzymes participating in P4, T and E2 synthesis in a non-parallel way, indicating that the mechanisms regulating the synthesis of each hormone are not regulated by the same signals. Also, that the changes in the steroids hormones are not explained exclusively by the modifications in gonadotropins secretion. The observed differences in hormone levels between rats sacrificed 30 and 60 min after surgery reflect the onset of the compensatory systems regulating hormones secretion. PMID:23110668

  4. [Big myxoma of the left atrium suggesting pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Teresa; Stachurski, Andrzej; Rachwalik, Maciej; Kustrzycki, Wojciech; Szełemej, Roman

    2010-06-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare. They usually appear as a sporadic isolated mass in the left atrium of women with no other pathology. Our patient had symptoms which may suggest pulmonary embolism (PE)-TTE, D-dimers, ECG, laboratory findings seemed to confirm acute PE. Physical examination was unremarkable. Signs of pulmonary hypertension and shortened acceleration time also suggested PE. However, angio-CT excluded it. The patient was transfered to surgical department. During the operation the big myxoma filling the whole space of the left atrium and blocking the entrance to the left ventricle was found and easily removed. Kardiol Pol 2010; 68, 6: 695-696.

  5. Transvenous embolization of high flow carotid cavernous fistula: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, M; Fujiwara, N; Hino, I; Satoh, K; Takashima, H; Tanabe, M; Honjo, Y; Irie, K; Nagao, S; Kojima, K; Osaka, K

    1996-01-01

    We treated a patient with a high flow traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) by embolization using detachable balloons and metallic coils, by transarterial and transvenous approaches. The patient was a 20-year-old woman who had fractures in the skull base from a traffic accident. She was admitted to our hospital one month after the accident due to exophthalmos, chemosis, and periorbital bruit. Cerebral angiograms demonstrated left traumatic CCF and steal phenomenon of blood flow. Balloon embolization by transarterial approach performed three times was unsuccessful, probably because of balloon puncture due to bone fragments. Embolization using metalic coils via the superior ophthalmic vein route was then attempted. As a result of this approach, complete obliteration of CCF was obtained, and clinical symptoms subsided within a few days. Treatment of CCF by transvenous approach is one alternative when transarterial occlusion is difficult.

  6. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Hernández-Juviel, José M; Gordon, Larry M; Waring, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf(®), a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  7. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  8. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics after partial splenic embolization in cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Helaly, Ahmed Z; Al-Warraky, Mohamed S; El-Azab, Gasser I; Kohla, Mohamed A S; Abdelaal, Elsayed E

    2015-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of partial splenic embolization (PSE) on portal and splanchnic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis. Ninety-five patients with hypersplenism were included in the study. Duplex examinations were performed before and 3 and 7 days after PSE. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics including vessel cross-sectional area (CSA), mean flow velocities (cm/s), blood flows (mL/min), Doppler indices as portal congestion index (CI), liver vascular index, hepatic artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pulsatility and resistive indices (PI and RI), were performed before and after PSE. In our study, 69 of 95 patients were males (72.6%) and 26 females (27.3%). Chronic hepatitis C virus infection was the main cause of cirrhosis (81.1%). PSE failed technically in six patients (6.3%). After PSE, both CSA and CI significantly decreased (p < 0.05 and <0.01). The portal vein velocity significantly increased (p < 0.01). The portal flow volume (892.4 ± 151 mL/min) did not show significant changes. The hepatic artery RI and PI showed a steady increase that became significant 7 days post-PSE (p < 0.05). The RI and PI of SMA increased significantly after 7 days of PSE (p < 0.05). PSE has an immediate portal decompression effect in patients with portal hypertension without reduction in portal flow. This effect on portal pressure should be investigated in future studies as a potential tool for management of acute variceal bleeding when other medical procedures fail.

  9. Early lymphocyte recovery predicts superior overall survival after unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplant for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia evolving from myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Dai-Hong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Han, Wei; Chen, Huan; Wang, Feng-Rong; Lv, Meng; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether early lymphocyte recovery, after unmanipulated, haploidentical, blood and marrow transplant (HBMT), affected clinical outcomes in 78 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia evolving from MDS. Lymphocyte recovery was based on the absolute lymphocyte count on day 30 (ALC-30). Patients with high ALC-30 (≥ 300 cells/μL) had lower relapse rates (13.8% vs. 35.5%, p = 0.049) and lower incidence of bacterial infections (3.4% vs. 25.8%, p = 0.015) than those with low ALC-30 values. Multivariate analysis showed that a high ALC-30 was associated with improved overall survival (OS, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.099, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.029-0.337; p < 0.0001), improved leukemia-free survival (HR: 0.245, 95% CI: 0.112-0.539; p < 0.0001), lower relapse rate (HR: 0.096, 95% CI: 0.011-0.827; p = 0.033) and lower transplant-related mortality (TRM, HR: 0.073, 95% CI: 0.016-0.324; p = 0.001). Combinations of three mismatches in the human leukocyte antigen loci were associated with a higher TRM (HR: 5.026, 95% CI: 1.392-18.173; p = 0.014). Our results suggest that the ALC-30 can predict a favorable OS after unmanipulated HBMT.

  10. Biocompatibility and Effectiveness Evaluation of a New Hemostatic Embolization Agent: Thrombin Loaded Alginate Calcium Microsphere

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Fengqi; Rong, Jingjing; Liang, Ming; Zhang, Xuwen; Sun, Jingyang; Zhao, Lijun; Li, Yang; Liu, Dan; Li, Fei; Wang, Xiaozeng

    2017-01-01

    Background. Until now, there has been no ideal embolization agent for hemorrhage in interventional treatment. In this study, the thrombin was encapsulated in alginate calcium microsphere using electrostatic droplet technique to produce new embolization agent: thrombin loaded alginate calcium microspheres (TACMs). Objectives. The present work was to evaluate the biocompatibility and hemostatic efficiency of TACMs. Methods. Cell cytotoxicity, hemolysis, and superselective embolization of dog liver arteries were performed to investigate the biocompatibility of TACMs. To clarify the embolic effect of TACMs mixed thrombus in vivo, hepatic artery injury animal model of 6 beagles was established and transcatheter artery embolization for bleeding was performed. Results. Coculture with VECs revealed the noncytotoxicity of TACMs, and the hemolysis experiment was negligible. Moreover, the histological study of TACMs in liver blood vessel showed signs of a slight inflammatory reaction. The results of transcatheter application of TACMs mixed thrombus for bleeding showed that the blood flow was shut down completely after the TACMs mixed thrombus was delivered and the postprocedural survival rate of animal models at 12 weeks was 100%. Conclusions. With their good biocompatibility and superior hemostatic efficiency, TACMs might be a promising new hemostatic agent with a wide range of potential applications. PMID:28303245

  11. Incidence of pulmonary embolism during COPD exacerbation*, **

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Evrim Eylem; Hoşgün, Derya; Akpýnar, Serdar; Ataç, Gökçe Kaan; Doğanay, Beyza; Gülhan, Meral

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because pulmonary embolism (PE) and COPD exacerbation have similar presentations and symptoms, PE can be overlooked in COPD patients. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of PE during COPD exacerbation and to describe the clinical aspects in COPD patients diagnosed with PE. METHODS: This was a prospective study conducted at a university hospital in the city of Ankara, Turkey. We included all COPD patients who were hospitalized due to acute exacerbation of COPD between May of 2011 and May of 2013. All patients underwent clinical risk assessment, arterial blood gas analysis, chest CT angiography, and Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremities. In addition, we measured D-dimer levels and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) levels. RESULTS: We included 172 patients with COPD. The prevalence of PE was 29.1%. The patients with pleuritic chest pain, lower limb asymmetry, and high NT-pro-BNP levels were more likely to develop PE, as were those who were obese or immobile. Obesity and lower limb asymmetry were independent predictors of PE during COPD exacerbation (OR = 4.97; 95% CI, 1.775-13.931 and OR = 2.329; 95% CI, 1.127-7.105, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of PE in patients with COPD exacerbation was higher than expected. The association between PE and COPD exacerbation should be considered, especially in patients who are immobile or obese. PMID:24626268

  12. Management of Pulmonary Embolism: An Update.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros V; Barco, Stefano; Lankeit, Mareike; Meyer, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) remains a major contributor to global disease burden. Risk-adapted treatment and follow-up contributes to a favorable outcome. Age-adjusted cutoff levels increase D-dimer specificity and may decrease overuse of imaging procedures and overdiagnosis of PE. Primary systemic fibrinolysis has an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio in intermediate-risk PE; catheter-directed techniques are an option for patients with hemodynamic decompensation and high bleeding risk. New oral anticoagulant agents are effective and safe alternatives to standard anticoagulation regimens. Recent trial data do not support insertion of cava filters in patients who can receive anticoagulant treatments. Remaining areas of uncertainty include the therapeutic implications of subsegmental PE, the optimal diagnostic approach to the pregnant patient with suspected PE, and the efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulant agents in patients with cancer. Campaigns to increase awareness combined with strategies to implement guideline recommendations will be crucial steps towards further optimizing management of acute PE.

  13. Superior performance of co-cultured mesenchymal stem cells and hepatocytes in poly(lactic acid-glycolic acid) scaffolds for the treatment of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingying; Yang, Jiacai; Hu, Wenjun; Zhang, Shichang; Wang, Yingjie

    2016-02-02

    Recently, cell-based therapies have attracted attention as promising treatments for acute liver failure (ALF). Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential candidates for co-culture with hepatocytes in poly(lactic acid-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds to support hepatocellular function. However, the mechanism of culturing protocol using PLGA scaffolds for MSC differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells as well as the therapeutic effect of cell seeded PLGA scaffolds on ALF remain unsatisfactory in clinical application. Here, MSCs and hepatocytes were co-cultured at ratios of 1:2.5 (MSCs: Hep), 1:5 and 1:10, respectively. The proliferation abilities of these co-cultured cells were detected by CCK8, MTT, EdU and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the ability of MSCs to differentiate into hepatocytes was detected by PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Therapeutic trials of cell seeded PLGA scaffolds were conducted through mouse abdominal cavity transplantation. Results showed that the 1:5 group showed significantly higher cellular proliferation than the 1:2.5 and 1:10 groups, supernatant albumin and urea nitrogen levels were also significantly higher in the 1:5 group than in other two groups. Similarly, the 1:5 group demonstrated better DNA transcription and liver-specific protein (albumin, CK18 and P450) production. Meanwhile, the GalN-stimulated levels of ALT, AST and TBil in mouse serum were down-regulated significantly more by (MSC  +  Hep)-PLGA scaffold treatment than MSC-PLGA or Hep-PLGA scaffold treatments. Furthermore, the (MSC  +  Hep)-PLGA scaffold-treated ALF mice showed a lower immunogenic response level than the other two groups. These data suggested that the ratio of 1:5 (MSC:Hep) co-cultures was the optimal ratio for MSCs to support hepatocellular metabolism and function in PLGA scaffolds in vitro, the (MSC  +  Hep)-PLGA scaffold treatment could perform better restoration for damaged liver

  14. Methods of Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paul D.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Sostman, H. Dirk; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Kanal, Emanuel; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Nadich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J; Tapson, Victor F.; Wakefield, Thomas W.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2008-01-01

    The methods of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III) are described in detail. PIOPED III is a multicenter collaborative investigation sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The purpose is to determine the accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd-MRA) in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography (Gd-MRV) for the diagnosis for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A composite reference standard based on usual diagnostic methods for pulmonary embolism is used. All images will be read by two blinded and study-certified central readers. Patients with no PE according to the composite reference test will be randomized to undergo Gd-MRA/MRV. This will reduce the proportion of patients with negative tests at no loss in evaluation of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19331840

  15. [A case of spectacular shrinking deficit caused by paradoxical cerebral embolism secondary to pulmonary arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Ito, Ai; Ii, Yuichiro; Higashigawa, Takatoshi; Murashima, Shuichi; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of spectacular shrinking deficit caused by paradoxical cerebral embolism through pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (AVF). A 79-year-old female suddenly developed right hemiplegia, paresthesia, and speech disturbance symptoms that were improved within 20 min, indicating a diagnosis of spectacular shrinking deficit. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute cerebral infarcts in the left parietal cortex of the left middle cerebral arterial territory. A contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography scan revealed a pulmonary AVF in the middle lobe of the right lung. The patient had deep venous thrombosis in her left lower leg. She had no clinical signs of telangiectasia, did not exhibit recurrent epistaxis, and had no family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Therefore, she was diagnosed with paradoxical cerebral embolism secondary to the pulmonary AVF without HHT. Pulmonary AVF should be considered in patients with cerebral embolism, even when presenting with spectacular shrinking deficit.

  16. Successful surgical correction of an embolized prosthetic valve poppet: case report.

    PubMed

    Ansbro, J; Clark, R; Gerbode, F

    1976-07-01

    Embolization of a prosthetic valve poppet, a rare complication following valve replacement, has been, until recently, generally fatal. Immediate recognition followed by replacement of the poppet or valve and extraction of the embolized poppet is the only feasible approach. Recently, a patient was seen was seen shortly after the onset of acute pulmonary edema with wide-open mitral regurgitation. A diagnosis of extrusion of the poppet from a previously placed prosthetic valve was confirmed and a successful mitral valve replacement accomplished. The nonradiopaque poppet, subsequently localized by an ultrasound B-sac, was removed from the lower abdominal aorta at a later operation. We believe this to be the second reported case of survival following successful reoperation for embolization of a prosthetic poppet.

  17. Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Ruptured Occipital Arterial Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Tsuge, Yusuke; Kojima, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Haruo

    2011-02-15

    Two cases of ruptured aneurysms in the posterior cervical regions associated with type-1 neurofibromatosis treated by transcatheter embolization are reported. Patients presented with acute onset of swelling and pain in the affected areas. Emergently performed contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated aneurysms and large hematomas widespread in the posterior cervical regions. Angiography revealed aneurysms and extravasations of the occipital artery. Patients were successfully treated by percutaneous transcatheter arterial microcoil embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization therapy was found to be an effective method for treating aneurysmal rupture in the posterior cervical regions occurring in association with type-1 neurofibromatosis. A literature review revealed that rupture of an occipital arterial aneurysm, in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1, has not been reported previously.

  18. Extracorporeal Lung Support as a Bridge to Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tumor Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Bridging to diagnosis is an emerging technique used in end-stage cardiorespiratory failure that prolongs a patient's life using various modalities of extracorporeal lung support (ECLS) to achieve antemortem diagnosis. Pulmonary tumor embolism occurs when cell clusters travel from primary malignancies through venous circulation to the lungs, causing respiratory failure through inflammatory and venoocclusive pathways. Due to its nonspecific symptomatology, pulmonary tumor embolism remains an elusive diagnosis antemortem. Herein, we bridge a patient who presented in acute respiratory failure to the diagnosis of pulmonary tumor embolism from a gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma using ECLS modalities including venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and centrally cannulated Novalung pumpless extracorporeal lung assist. We demonstrate the utility of this approach in diagnostically uncertain cases in unstable patients who are potentially acceptable ECLS and transplant candidates. PMID:28070437

  19. Neural Network Classification of Cerebral Embolic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    application of new signal processing techniques to the analysis and classification of embolic signals. We applied a Wavelet Neural Network algorithm...to approximate the embolic signals, with the parameters of the wavelet nodes being used to train a Neural Network to classify these signals as resulting from normal flow, or from gaseous or solid emboli.

  20. The role of embolization for hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Rossi, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Teresa; Altimari, Guglielmo; Rimondi, Eugenio; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2012-08-01

    We retrospectively studied 31 patients with painful bone (15 patients) and soft-tissue (16 patients) hemangiomas treated with 39 embolizations using N-2-butyl cyanoacrylate from 2003 to 2010. The mean tumor size before embolization was 6 cm for bone and 7 cm for soft-tissue hemangiomas. The technique of embolization was the same for bone and soft-tissue lesions. Preoperative embolization was done in six patients, while the remaining patients had embolization as only treatment. The mean follow-up was 47 months (11-89 months). The clinical and imaging effect of treatment was evaluated at follow-up with a pain score scale, tumor size, and ossification. In four patients, embolization was not feasible because of the inability to catheterize and low blood flow of the feeding vessels. Nine patients with bone and 10 with soft-tissue hemangiomas experienced complete pain relief. Four patients with bone and four with soft-tissue hemangiomas experienced recurrence of pain and were treated with repeat embolization. Re-recurrences were not observed in any of the patients with soft-tissue hemangiomas until the period of this study. Ossification and tumor size reduction were higher for bone hemangiomas. Embolization-related complications were more common for soft-tissue hemangiomas.

  1. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  2. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed Central

    Fennerty, T.

    1997-01-01

    Currently, clinicians have to make decisions about how to manage pulmonary embolism on the basis of imperfect tests and assessment of odds. Management protocols that inevitably result in large numbers of patients being referred for angiography are unhelpful. Management decisions based on assessment of odds and investigation of leg veins will inevitably result in some patients who have survived a pulmonary embolus being left untreated. Current evidence suggests that for most patients this is probably not important, the clear exception being those patients with underlying cardiorespiratory disease. PMID:9040390

  3. Embolization Therapy for Traumatic Splenic Lacerations

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Matsumoto, Alan H. Arslan, Bulent; Turba, Ulku C.; Sabri, Saher; Angle, John F.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the clinical success, complications, and transfusion requirements based on the location of and agents used for splenic artery embolization in patients with splenic trauma. Methods: A retrospective study was performed of patients with splenic trauma who underwent angiography and embolization from September 2000 to January 2010 at a level I trauma center. Electronic medical records were reviewed for demographics, imaging data, technical aspects of the procedure, and clinical outcomes. Results: Fifty patients were identified (34 men and 16 women), with an average age of 48 (range, 16-80) years. Extravasation was seen on initial angiography in 27 (54%) and was absent in 23 (46%). All 27 patients with extravasation were embolized, and 18 of 23 (78.2%) without extravasation were embolized empirically. Primary clinical success was similar (>75%) across all embolization locations, embolic agents, and grades of laceration treated. Of 45 patients treated, 9 patients (20%) were embolized in the main splenic artery, 34 (75.6%) in the splenic hilum, and 2 (4.4%) were embolized in both locations. Partial splenic infarctions developed in 47.3% treated in the splenic hilum compared with 12.5% treated in the main splenic artery. There were four (8.9%) mortalities: two occurred in patients with multiple critical injuries and two from nonbleeding etiologies. Conclusions: Embolization of traumatic splenic artery injuries is safe and effective, regardless of the location of treatment. Embolization in splenic hilar branches may have a higher incidence of infarction. The grade of laceration and agents used for embolotherapy did not impact the outcomes.

  4. Efficacy of an Embolic Protection Stent as a Function of Delay to Reperfusion in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (from the MASTER Trial).

    PubMed

    Dudek, Dariusz; Brener, Sorin J; Rakowski, Tomasz; Dziewierz, Artur; Abizaid, Alexandre; Silber, Sigmund; Yaacoby, Elad; Dizon, José M; Costa, Ricardo A; Maehara, Akiko; Dressler, Ovidiu; Stone, Gregg W

    2014-11-15

    The ability of stent implantation to improve indexes of reperfusion may depend on the time to reperfusion in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and may also vary with stent type. The purpose of this prespecified analysis from the randomized MGUARD for Acute ST Elevation Reperfusion trial was to evaluate the impact of delay to reperfusion on outcomes in patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention with the MGuard embolic protection stent or standard metallic stents. A total of 431 patients were divided according to symptom-onset-to-balloon time (SBT) into 2 groups: SBT ≤3 hours (167 patients; 39%) and SBT >3 hours (264 patients; 61%). Complete ST-segment resolution (STR) after percutaneous coronary intervention was more often achieved in patients with shorter SBT (58.6% vs 47%, p = 0.02). At 1 year, the all-cause mortality rate was lower in patients with shorter SBT (0% vs 3.5%, p = 0.02). STR was achieved in 58% of MGuard patients and in 45% of the control stent patients (p = 0.008). STR was 57% in the MGuard group versus 38% in the control group (p = 0.002 for SBT >3 hours) and 60% versus 57% (p = 0.72), respectively, for SBT ≤3 hours (p for interaction = 0.11). In conclusion, longer delay to mechanical reperfusion remains an important factor negatively influencing outcomes in patients with STEMI. Use of the MGuard embolic protection stent compared with conventional metallic stents resulted in superior rates of complete STR, even in patients with longer delays to reperfusion.

  5. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up.

  6. Right heart thrombi in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Deisy; Rosa-Salazar, Vladimir; Jiménez, David; Morillo, Raquel; Muriel, Alfonso; Del Toro, Jorge; López-Jiménez, Luciano; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Yusen, Roger; Monreal, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    There is a lack of comprehensive data on the prevalence, predictors and prognostic significance of right heart thrombi (RHT) in pulmonary embolism.In this study of patients with pulmonary embolism from the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE) registry, we assessed the prevalence and predictors of RHT, and the association between the presence of RHT and the outcomes of all-cause mortality, pulmonary embolism-related mortality, recurrences, and major bleeding through 30 days after initiation of pulmonary embolism treatment.Of 12 441 patients with pulmonary embolism and baseline echocardiographic data, 2.6% had RHT. The following increased the risk of RHT: younger age, previous bleeding, congestive heart failure, cancer, syncope, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, and arterial oxyhaemoglobin saturation <90%. Patients with RHT were significantly more likely to die from any cause (adjusted OR 2.50 (95% CI 1.62-3.84); p<0.001) and from pulmonary embolism (adjusted OR 4.29 (95% CI 2.45-7.48); p<0.001) during follow-up. RHT was associated with an increased risk of recurrence during follow-up (1.8% versus 0.7%; p=0.04). Major bleeding was similar in patients with and without RHT.In patients presenting with pulmonary embolism, RHT is relatively infrequent. Patients with RHT had a worse outcome when compared with those without RHT.

  7. Microcatheter Embolization of Intractable Idiopathic Epistaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, Martti; Seppaenen, Seppo; Laranne, Jussi; Kuoppala, Katriina

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of microcatheter embolization in the treatment of intractable idiopathic epistaxis. Methods: Thirty-seven patients underwent microcatheter embolization in 1991-1998. We evaluated retrospectively the technical and clinical outcome, the number of complications, the duration of embolization in each case, and the number of blood transfusions needed. All embolizations were done with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) equipment. The procedure was carried out under local anesthesia using transfemoral catheterization, except in one case where the translumbar route was used. Tracker 18 or 10 microcatheters were advanced as far as possible to the distal branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles were used for embolization in most cases, while platinum coils or a combination of these two materials were occasionally used. The primary outcome was always assessed immediately by angiography. Follow-up data were obtained from patient records, by interviewing patients on the telephone or by postal questionnaires when necessary. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. Results: The embolization was technically successful in all 37 cases. A curative outcome was achieved in 33 cases (89%). The mean duration of the procedure was 110 min. Four patients (8%) had mild transient complications, but no severe or persistent complications were encountered. Twenty-three patients needed a blood transfusion. Slight rebleeding occurred in three patients during the follow-up; all responded to conservative treatment. One patient suffered two episodes of rebleeding within 2 months after primary embolization. Re-embolizations successfully stopped the bleeding. Conclusion: Embolization is the primary invasive modality for treating intractable idiopathic epistaxis. It proved both safe and effective over a relatively long follow-up.

  8. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  9. Transarterial Onyx Embolization for Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas Who Have Failed Transvenous Embolization.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Duan, Chuan-Zhi; Huang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Xin; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Xi-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Transvenous embolization is the treatment of choice for cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (csDAVFs) despite occasional difficulty in transvenous catheterization. We reported our experience in the treatment of csDAVFs by transarterial Onyx embolization in patients who had failed transvenous catheterization. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of csDAVFs patients receiving transarterial Onyx embolization after failed transvenous Onyx embolization at our institution over a period of 31 months. Success was defined as complete or near complete occlusion upon angiographic examination. In seven cases, the microcatheter failed to reach the cavernous sinus; in the remaining case, the internal jugular vein was occlusive. Eight sessions of the embolization and catheterization procedures via the arterial routes were conducted. Among them, five cases via the middle meningeal artery and the other three via the accessory meningeal artery. Angiography, immediately after embolization, revealed complete occlusion in seven cases (87.5 %) and partial occlusion in the remaining case. Angiographic follow-up (range, 6-10 months) showed that all patients achieved complete embolization. In cases where transvenous embolization of the cavernous sinus is difficult, transarterial embolization of the fistulas offers a safe and effective alternative.

  10. Experimental Evaluation of Early and Long-Term Effects of Microparticle Embolization in Two Different Mini-Pig Models. Part II: Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfl, S.; Stampfl, U.; Rehnitz, C.; Schnabel, Ph.; Satzl, S.; Christoph, P.; Henn, C.; Thomas, F.; Richter, G. M.

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate trisacryl-gelatin microspheres (40-120 {mu}m) for acute and chronic tissue embolization in mini-pig livers. Methods. Thirteen animals were divided into four groups: group 1 (n = 3), total arterial bed occlusion with acute procedure; groups 2 to 4, chronic superselective embolization with follow-up of 1 week (group 2, n = 1), 4 weeks (group 3, n 4) or 14 weeks (group 4, n = 5). Key endpoints were homogeneity and particle distribution in acute embolizations (group 1) and necrosis and inflammation in chronic embolizations (groups 2-4) as assessed microscopically and angiographically. Results. After liver embolization, parenchymal necrosis did not occur; only signs of vessel wall disintegration were evident. The bile ducts remained intact. A distinct foreign body reaction with sparse leukocytic infiltration and giant cells was found at 14 weeks, but no signs of major inflammation were found. Particles were seen at the presinusoidal level, but no particle transportation into the sinusoids was observed. Conclusions. Embolization in mini-pig livers, using small trisacryl-gelatin microspheres, results in vessel fibrosis without parenchymal or bile duct necrosis. The most likely explanation for preservation of the parenchyma is portal inflow. Small trisacryl-gelatin microspheres may be ideal as an adjunct for chemoembolization.

  11. Carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Kwon, Ja-Young; Kim, Ki Jun

    2012-05-01

    Clinically significant carbon dioxide embolism is a rare but potentially fatal complication of anesthesia administered during laparoscopic surgery. Its most common cause is inadvertent injection of carbon dioxide into a large vein, artery or solid organ. This error usually occurs during or shortly after insufflation of carbon dioxide into the body cavity, but may result from direct intravascular insufflation of carbon dioxide during surgery. Clinical presentation of carbon dioxide embolism ranges from asymptomatic to neurologic injury, cardiovascular collapse or even death, which is dependent on the rate and volume of carbon dioxide entrapment and the patient's condition. We reviewed extensive literature regarding carbon dioxide embolism in detail and set out to describe the complication from background to treatment. We hope that the present work will improve our understanding of carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic surgery.

  12. Ischemic Effects of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate-Lipiodol on the Colon in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Takasaka, Isao; Nakata, Kouhei; Sahara, Shinya; Sawa, Naohisa; Shirai, Shintaro; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-10-15

    This study was designed to assess the safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate-lipiodol (NBCA-Lp) for the large bowel and to investigate the vital response to NBCA-Lp in a swine model. In nine swine, nine arteries nourishing the colon were embolized with NBCA-Lp (1 ml of NBCA mixed with 4 ml of lipiodol): sigmoid-rectal branch artery in six swine, right colic branch artery in two, and middle colic branch artery in one. The amount of NBCA-Lp was 0.1-0.4 ml. Sacrifice was conducted 3 days after TAE to identify histological infarction. Classification was conducted retrospectively: group A, vasa recta without NBCA-Lp embolization despite TAE; group B, three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization; and group C, five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization. In one swine in group A, no necrotic focus was observed. In group B, three of four swine experienced no ischemic damage. The remaining one swine experienced necrosis of mucosal and submucosal layers in one-fourth of the circumference. In group C, all four swine with marginal artery and five vasa recta or more embolized experienced total necrosis of mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle layers of the whole colonic circumference. Significant difference on the extent of ischemic damage was observed between groups B and C (P < 0.05). Microscopically, NBCA-Lp induced acute vasculitis. Embolization of three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced no ischemic damage or limited necrosis, whereas embolization of five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced extensive necrosis.

  13. Mortality and Embolic Potential of Cardiac Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Fernandes, Fábio; Ramires, Félix José Alvarez; Mady, Charles; Albuquerque, Cícero Piva; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are rare, mostly benign with high embolic potential. Objectives To correlate the histological type of cardiac masses with their embolic potential, implantation site and long term follow up in patients undergoing surgery. Methods Between January 1986 and December 2011, we retrospectively analyzed 185 consecutive patients who underwent excision of intracardiac mass (119 females, mean age 48±20 years). In 145 patients, the left atrium was the origin site. 72% were asymptomatic and prior embolization was often observed (19.8%). The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, magnetic resonance and histological examination. Results Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. Myxoma was the most common (72.6%), followed by fibromas (6.9%), thrombi (6.4%) and sarcomas (6.4%). Ranging from 0.6cm to 15cm (mean 4.6 ± 2.5cm) 37 (19.8%) patients had prior embolization, stroke 10.2%, coronary 4.8%, peripheral 4.3% 5.4% of hospital death, with a predominance of malignant tumors (40% p < 0.0001). The histological type was a predictor of mortality (rhabdomyomas and sarcomas p = 0.002) and embolic event (sarcoma, lipoma and fibroelastoma p = 0.006), but not recurrence. Tumor size, atrial fibrillation, cavity and valve impairment were not associated with the embolic event. During follow-up (mean 80±63 months), there were 2 deaths (1.1%) and two recurrences 1 and 11 years after the operation, to the same cavity. Conclusion Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. The histological type was predictor of death and preoperative embolic event, while the implantation site carries no relation with mortality or to embolic event. PMID:25029470

  14. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  15. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with the Rotarex Thrombectomy System

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Sheng; Shi Haibin; Gu Jianping; Yang Zhengqiang; Chen Liang; Lou Wensheng; He Xu; Zhou Weizhong; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) for acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Fourteen patients (8 men, 6 women) with a mean age of 55.4 (range, 38-71) years with acute massive PE were initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and confirmed by pulmonary angiography. All patients presented with acute PE symptoms and hemodynamic compromise. Each patient was treated with Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device and five patients received additional thrombolysis. Technique success and clinical improvement were achieved in all patients without major complications. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) decreased from 37.6 {+-} 6.6 to 29 {+-} 6.4 mmHg (P < 0.01) after PMT. Partial arterial pressures of O{sub 2} (PaO{sub 2}) increased from 61.1 {+-} 9.2 to 88 {+-} 5.1 mmHg (P < 0.01). The Miller index was 0.67 {+-} 0.11 and 0.37 {+-} 0.13 (P < 0.01), respectively, before and after PMT (P < 0.01). Eleven patients had no recurrence of PE on a mean follow-up of 28.3 months, whereas the other three patients were lost to follow-up. The preliminary experience in our series suggests that the Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device, which has been utilized in peripheral arteries, also is useful for the treatment of acute massive PE.

  16. Embolization of Large Gastric Varices Using Vena Cava Filter and Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jason M.; Shah, Himanshu Stecker, Michael S.; Namyslowski, Jan

    2004-08-15

    A 40-year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis and portal hypertension presented with acute variceal hemorrhage. Abdominal CT scan and endoscopy revealed large gastric varices. The patient underwent a TIPS procedure. Portal venography demonstrated persistent filling of the large gastric varices with associated high-flow spontaneous splenorenal shunt. Because of the large size of the varices, a Simon-Nitinol filter was used in conjunction with multiple embolization coils to enable successful occlusion of the varices.

  17. Inferior petrosal sinus route microcatheterization study and embolization for primary orbital varix

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek; Udiya, Alok; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Sharma, Kumudini; Kanaujia, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Primary orbital varix is a rare lesion but difficult to treat. Our main aim was to demonstrate the varices and their central venous communication and to explore the feasibility of embolization of these lesions. Method In four patients with clinical suspicion of varix, in whom MRI showed retro-global vascular channels, microcatheter digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the varices was performed using femoral venous access. Embolization was carried out in two patients. Results In all four patients orbital varices could be accessed with a microcatheter through inferior petrosal sinus and ophthalmic vein (superior or inferior) route. Microcatheter angiography showed opacification of varices and demonstrated their central venous communication. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. Complete resolution of symptoms was seen in one patient and partial relief in the other. Conclusion The study presents microcatheterization of orbital varices via the inferior petrosal sinus–cavernous sinus–ophthalmic vein route with injections into distal ophthalmic veins for demonstration of these variceal sacs and their central venous connection. Coiling to disconnect the venous communication should be the primary goal of embolization. PMID:26628456

  18. Transarterial Embolization of a Cervical Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, S.A.; Lassig, J.P.; Nicol, E.; Thompson, B.G.; Gemmete, J.J.; Gandhi, D.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of a 75-year-old man who presented with acute onset of headache and subarachnoid hemorrhage and initial cerebral angiography was deemed "negative". In retrospect, a faint contrast collection was present adjacent to the right vertebral artery at the C1 level suspicious for a small dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF). Follow-up angiography with selective microcatheter injections of the right vertebral artery and C1 radicular artery confirmed a complex dAVF with characteristically specific venous drainage patterns associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage presentation. Subsequently, the cervical dAVF was treated with superselective glue embolization resulting in complete occlusion. Cervical dAVFs are extremely rare vascular causes of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Both diagnostic angiography and endovascular treatment of these lesions can be challenging, especially in an emergent setting, requiring selective evaluation of bilateral vertebral arteries and careful attention to their cervical segments. Although only a single prior case of a cervical dAVF presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage has been successfully treated with embolization, modern selective transarterial techniques may allow easier detection and treatment of subtle pathologic arteriovenous connections. PMID:20569588

  19. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:27561915

  20. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice.

  1. Pulmonary cement embolism in a child following total elbow replacement for primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Subramaniam; Vora, Tushar; Gulia, Ashish; Mahajan, Abhishek; Desai, Subhash

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary bone cement embolism (PCE) is an uncommon event occurring after implantation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in orthopaedic surgeries involving adult patients, more so in the elderly. Its incidence in the paediatric population is extremely rare. We herein describe a case of PCE in a 15-year-old girl, 9 days after she underwent total elbow replacement with PMMA placement for a primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of the distal humerus. This report describes the occurrence of a common post-operative complication of bone cement embolism in an uncommon scenario of total elbow replacement for a bone tumour in a child, which masqueraded initially as acute pneumonitis.

  2. [Amniotic fluid embolism: a review].

    PubMed

    Tramoni, G; Boisson, C; Gamerre, L; Clement, H-J; Bon, C; Rudigoz, R-C; Viale, J-P

    2006-06-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism occurs rarely but is a leading cause of maternal mortality. It is a difficult and somewhat intangible diagnosis that warrants a high index of suspicion by physicians. AFE is an unpredictable, unpreventable, and, for the most part, an untreatable obstetric emergency. Management of this condition includes prompt recognition of the signs and symptoms, aggressive resuscitation efforts, and supportive therapy. Any delays in diagnosis and treatment can result in increased maternal and/or foetal impairment or death. Whereas once the invariable outcome of AFE was death of the mother, today the prognosis is somewhat brighter thanks to increased awareness of the syndrome and advances in intensive care medicine. No laboratory test is specific to attest the diagnosis and autopsy must to be realised in case of maternal death. Although non-specific, the diagnosis of AFE could be supported by the observation of amniotic fluid in the central venous blood as well as in the bronchoalveolar fluid. This easy and quick test will be helpful in decision-making. Prompt and aggressive supportive treatment is required to lessen an otherwise dismal outcome, which may include death and permanent disability. This article provides an account of the protean clinical features, pathogenesis, and principles involved in treatment.

  3. Coagulation and the vessel wall in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Venous thromboembolism comprises deep-vein thrombosis, thrombus in transit, acute pulmonary embolism, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Pulmonary thromboemboli commonly resolve, with restoration of normal pulmonary hemodynamics. When they fail to resorb, permanent occlusion of the deep veins and/or CTEPH are the consequences. Apart from endogenous fibrinolysis, venous thrombi resolve by a process of mechanical fragmentation, through organization of the thromboembolus by invasion of endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts leading to recanalization. Recent data utilizing various models have contributed to a better understanding of venous thrombosis and the resolution process that is directed at maintaining vascular patency. This review summarizes the plasmatic and cellular components of venous thrombus formation and resolution. PMID:25006391

  4. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pham, Toan; Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/- SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization.

  5. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/− SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization. PMID:28210507

  6. Superior Vena Cava Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Trainini, Jorge Carlos; Auricchio, Renato; Del Bagno, Horacio Augusto; Federico, Vicente; Acrich, Mario Willie; Osorio, Julio Nestor

    1983-01-01

    A case of superior vena cava obstruction due to carcinoma of unknown origin is reported. A superior vena cava bypass with polytetrafluoroethylene was performed by suturing the prosthesis to the left innominate vein and the right atrium, respectively. Long-term satisfactory results were achieved. Images PMID:15227139

  7. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Percutaneous Emergency Treatment Using an Aspirex Thrombectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter; Bunc, Matjaz

    2010-10-15

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition with a high early mortality rate caused by acute right ventricular failure and cardiogenic shock. A 51-year-old woman with a massive PE and contraindication for thrombolytic therapy was treated with percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using an Aspirex 11F catheter (Straub Medical AG, Wangs, Switzerland). The procedure was successfully performed and showed a good immediate angiographic result. The patient made a full recovery from the acute episode and was discharged on heparin treatment. Our case report indicates that in patients with contraindications to systemic thrombolysis, catheter thrombectomy may constitute a life-saving intervention for massive PE.

  8. Pulmonary Artery Perforation Repair During Thrombectomy Using Microcoil Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiroyuki Murata, Satoru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Abe, Yutaka; Takano, Teruo

    2006-02-15

    A distal pulmonary artery perforation was successfully occluded by percutaneous microcoil embolization via a microcatheter. Microcoil embolization is a reasonable alternative therapeutic approach for this rare complication of pulmonary interventional procedures.

  9. Distal Embolic Protection for Renal Arterial Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubel, Gregory J. Murphy, Timothy P.

    2008-01-15

    Distal or embolic protection has intuitive appeal for its potential to prevent embolization of materials generated during interventional procedures. Distal protection devices (DPDs) have been most widely used in the coronary and carotid vascular beds, where they have demonstrated the ability to trap embolic materials and, in some cases, to reduce complications. Given the frequency of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal artery stenosis undergoing stent placement, it is reasonable to propose that these devices may play an important role in limiting distal embolization in the renal vasculature. Careful review of the literature reveals that atheroembolization does occur during renal arterial interventions, although it often goes undetected. Early experience with DPDs in the renal arteries in patients with suitable anatomy suggests retrieval of embolic materials in approximately 71% of cases and renal functional improvement/stabilization in 98% of cases. The combination of platelet inhibition and a DPD may provide even greater benefit. Given the critical importance of renal functional preservation, it follows that everything that can be done to prevent atheroembolism should be undertaken including the use of DPDs when anatomically feasible. The data available at this time support a beneficial role for these devices.

  10. Air Embolism: Diagnosis, Clinical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Colin J.; Behravesh, Sasan; Naidu, Sailendra G.; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-01-01

    Air embolism is a rare but potentially fatal complication of surgical procedures. Rapid recognition and intervention is critical for reducing morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively characterized our experience with air embolism during medical procedures at a tertiary medical center. Electronic medical records were searched for all cases of air embolism over a 25-year period; relevant medical and imaging records were reviewed. Sixty-seven air embolism cases were identified; the mean age was 59 years (range, 3–89 years). Ninety-four percent occurred in-hospital, of which 77.8% were during an operation/invasive procedure. Vascular access-related procedures (33%) were the most commonly associated with air embolism. Clinical signs and symptoms were related to the location the air embolus; 36 cases to the right heart/pulmonary artery, 21 to the cerebrum, and 10 were attributed to patent foramen ovale (PFO). Twenty-one percent of patients underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), 7.5% aspiration of the air, and 63% had no sequelae. Mortality rate was 21%; 69% died within 48 hours. Thirteen patients had immediate cardiac arrest where mortality rate was 53.8%, compared to 13.5% (p = 0.0035) in those without. Air emboli were mainly iatrogenic, primarily associated with endovascular procedures. High clinical suspicion and early treatment are critical for survival. PMID:28106717

  11. Catheter directed lysis and thrombectomy of submassive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Krichavsky, Marc Z; Rybicki, Frank J; Resnic, Frederic S

    2011-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially highly morbid disease. However, there are a broad range of clinical presentations, varying from asymptomatic to life-threatening hemodynamic compromise. Accordingly, the aggressiveness of treatment for acute PE must be adjusted to the acuity of the presentation and patient-specific comorbidities. Thrombolysis is FDA approved for massive PE with hemodynamic compromise. However, this therapy has associated risk, most notably intracranial hemorrhage and other bleeding complications. This has prompted interest in catheter-directed therapies to mechanically remove thrombus and to locally deliver reduced doses of thrombolytics. Guidelines support use of this catheter-based strategy in cases of increased bleeding risk or high acuity with insufficient time for systemic pharmacologic therapy to be effective. We present the case of an 83-year-old man with acute high-risk PE and worsening hemodynamic and respiratory status who was treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and rheolytic thrombectomy. There was significant improvement in thrombus burden, symptoms, and hemodynamic parameters including right ventricular function and pulmonary artery pressures. However, his course was complicated by intracranial hemorrhage and access site hematoma, demonstrating that even reduced doses and local delivery of thrombolytics do not ensure freedom from bleeding complications.

  12. Pulmonary embolism: new treatments for an old problem

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John

    2016-01-01

    Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, previously referred to as novel oral anticoagulants, have emerged in recent years as attractive treatment options for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). However, despite the widespread anticipation by physicians and the approval of rivaroxaban, apixaban, dabigatran, and more recently edoxaban, there is still some reluctance to choose these newer agents over conventional treatment with heparin/vitamin K antagonists. Acute PE puts a considerable strain on emergency departments, and medical staff rely on efficient diagnosis and risk assessment to manage the condition appropriately and economically. Rivaroxaban and apixaban offer a convenient and cost-effective single-drug therapeutic approach. The ease of administration and drug management may enable earlier discharge and outpatient treatment in low-risk patients and alleviate the demands put on emergency-care infrastructures. This review discusses the current guidelines and anticoagulation options in the emergency setting for patients with acute PE and explores the reasons for the slow transition from old to new treatment options. PMID:27843361

  13. Successful transcatheter arterial embolization of an inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with celiac axis stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Uenoyama, Shoichi; Isogai, Satoshi

    2004-05-01

    A case of inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) aneurysm associated with celiac axis stenosis was successfully treated using only transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). A 57-year-old woman was urgently referred to our hospital with sudden abdominal pain; computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal hematoma due to bleeding from an aneurysm around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Selective angiography into the SMA showed an aneurysm derived from the IPDA posterior branch; the IPDA anterior branch was intact and contrast medium flowed into the common hepatic artery territory through the pancreatic arcade because of celiac axis stenosis. We subsequently performed TAE on the lesion. Arteriography after TAE showed that the aneurysm had disappeared and that the IPDA anterior branch was intact. She had no aneurysm recurrence for about two years after the treatment. We believe that TAE is effective even for a PDA aneurysm with celiac axis stenosis or occlusion. However, it is important to perform embolization precisely and over a long period.

  14. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Mycotic Renal Artery Aneurysm by Use of a Self-Expanding Neurointerventional Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Rabellino, Martin; Garcia-Nielsen, Luis; Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Llorens, Rafael; Maynar, Manuel

    2011-02-15

    Mycotic aneurysms are uncommon, especially those located in visceral arteries. We present a case of a patient with two visceral mycotic aneurysms due to bacterial endocarditis, one located in right upper pole renal artery and the second in the splenic artery. Both aneurysms were treated as endovascular embolization using microcoils. In the aneurysm located at the renal artery, the technique of stent-assisted coils embolization was preferred to avoid coils migration due to its wide neck. The stent used was the Solitaire AB, which was designed for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms and was used recently in acute stroke as a mechanical thrombectomy device. Complete embolization of the aneurysm was achieved, preserving all the arterial branches without nephrogram defects in the final angiogram.

  15. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  16. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  17. Permanent cortical blindness after bronchial artery embolization.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Colette S; De Boo, Diederick W; Weersink, Els J M; van Delden, Otto M; Reekers, Jim A; van Lienden, Krijn P

    2013-12-01

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  18. Permanent Cortical Blindness After Bronchial Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, Colette S. van De Boo, Diederick W.; Weersink, Els J. M.; Delden, Otto M. van Reekers, Jim A. Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-12-15

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  19. Giant saphenous vein graft pseudoaneurysm to right posterior descending artery presenting with superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Estrada, Andres; Edwards, Dianna; Bashir, Mohammad; Rossen, James; Zahr, Firas

    2015-06-26

    Saphenous vein grafts (SVG) pseudoaneurysms, especially giant ones, are rare and occur as a late complication of coronary artery bypass grafting. This condition affects both genders and typically occurs within the sixth decade of life. The clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic incidental finding on imaging studies to new onset angina, dyspnea, myocardial infarction or symptoms related to compression of neighboring structures. An 82-year-old woman presented with acute onset back pain, dyspnea and was noted to have significantly engorged neck veins. In the emergency department, a chest computed tomographic angiogram with intravenous contrast revealed a ruptured giant bilobed SVG pseudoaneurysm to the right posterior descending artery (RPDA). This imaging modality also demonstrated compression of the superior vena cava (SVC) by the SVG pseudoaneurysm. Coronary angiogram with bypass study was performed to establish the patency of this graft. Endovascular coiling and embolization of the SVG to RPDA was initially considered but disfavored after the coronary angiogram revealed preserved flow from the graft to this arterial branch. After reviewing the angiogram films, a surgical strategy was favored over a percutaneous intervention with a Nitinol self-expanding stent since the latter would have not addressed the superior vena cava compression caused by the giant pseudoaneurysm. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram demonstrated SVC compression by the giant pseudoaneurysm cranial lobe. Our patient underwent surgical ligation and excision of the giant pseudoaneurysm and the RPDA was regrafted successfully. In summary, saphenous vein grafts pseudoaneurysms can be life-threatening and its therapy should be guided based on the presence of mechanical complications, the patency of the affected vein graft and the involved myocardial territory viability.

  20. Giant saphenous vein graft pseudoaneurysm to right posterior descending artery presenting with superior vena cava syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Estrada, Andres; Edwards, Dianna; Bashir, Mohammad; Rossen, James; Zahr, Firas

    2015-01-01

    Saphenous vein grafts (SVG) pseudoaneurysms, especially giant ones, are rare and occur as a late complication of coronary artery bypass grafting. This condition affects both genders and typically occurs within the sixth decade of life. The clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic incidental finding on imaging studies to new onset angina, dyspnea, myocardial infarction or symptoms related to compression of neighboring structures. An 82-year-old woman presented with acute onset back pain, dyspnea and was noted to have significantly engorged neck veins. In the emergency department, a chest computed tomographic angiogram with intravenous contrast revealed a ruptured giant bilobed SVG pseudoaneurysm to the right posterior descending artery (RPDA). This imaging modality also demonstrated compression of the superior vena cava (SVC) by the SVG pseudoaneurysm. Coronary angiogram with bypass study was performed to establish the patency of this graft. Endovascular coiling and embolization of the SVG to RPDA was initially considered but disfavored after the coronary angiogram revealed preserved flow from the graft to this arterial branch. After reviewing the angiogram films, a surgical strategy was favored over a percutaneous intervention with a Nitinol self-expanding stent since the latter would have not addressed the superior vena cava compression caused by the giant pseudoaneurysm. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram demonstrated SVC compression by the giant pseudoaneurysm cranial lobe. Our patient underwent surgical ligation and excision of the giant pseudoaneurysm and the RPDA was regrafted successfully. In summary, saphenous vein grafts pseudoaneurysms can be life-threatening and its therapy should be guided based on the presence of mechanical complications, the patency of the affected vein graft and the involved myocardial territory viability. PMID:26131340

  1. Cerebral Fat Embolism: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Babita; Kaur, Manpreet; D’souza, Nita; Dey, Chandan Kumar; Shende, Seema; Kumar, Atin; Gamangatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a rare but a serious clinical catastrophe occurring after traumatic injury to long bones. Cerebral involvement in the absence of pulmonary or dermatological manifestation on initial presentation may delay the diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism (CFE). We discuss a case series of CFE which posed a challenge in diagnosis. The clinical presentations of these patients did not satisfy the commonly used clinical criteria for aiding the diagnosis of FES. Early MRI brain (DWI and T2 weighted sequences) in patients with neurological symptoms after trauma even in the absence of pulmonary and dermatological findings should be the goal. PMID:21957425

  2. Lifesaving Embolization of Coronary Artery Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Patel, Sundip; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun

    2009-09-15

    Coronary artery perforation remains one of the most fearsome complications during cardiac catheterization procedures. Although emergent bypass surgery is the preferred treatment for cases with uncontrollable perforation, endovascular vessel sealing and arrest of bleeding with a combination of balloons, covered stents, or embolic materials have also been proposed. The authors describe a case of emergent lifesaving microcoil embolization of the distal right coronary artery in a patient with uncontrollable grade III guidewire perforation resulting in cardiac tamponade. The relevant literature is reviewed and the merits and limitations of the endovascular approach are highlighted.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with amniotic fluid embolism associated with severe cardiopulmonary complications.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Watanabe, Masafumi; Terashima, Masahiro; Amiya, Eisuke; Nakao, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Akiko; Hyodo, Hironobu; Ando, Jiro; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare but devastating complication of pregnancy. Acute circulatory failure and obstetric disseminated intravascular coagulopathy are often associated with AFE and lead to poor prognosis of this syndrome. Although many reports of AFE and its cardiopulmonary complications exist, their etiology remains unknown. Classically, it was believed that the fatal cardiopulmonary complication in AFE is due to acute and severe pulmonary hypertension caused by critical obstruction of the pulmonary vessels by embolized amniotic fluid. However, recent hypotheses are suggesting that anaphylactic reaction or a cytokine effect induced by amniotic fluid is the main pathophysiological mechanism. We report a case in which cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed at the chronic stage of AFE. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was detected at the mid-wall of the left ventricle with no evidence of pulmonary hypertension. This finding suggests that the pathophysiological mechanism of severe cardiac complications in AFE may include direct left ventricular myocardial injury through an immune reaction or cytokine release, rather than pulmonary embolism.

  4. [Pulmonary embolism in patients with cancer: foundations of the EPIPHANY study].

    PubMed

    Font, Carme; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Plasencia, Juana M; Calvo-Temprano, David; Sánchez, Marcelo; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Beato, Carmen; Biosca, Mercè; Vicente, Vicente; Otero, Remedios

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Having cancer is an independent risk factor for death in the general series of patients with PE and is included as a variable in the prognostic scales of acute symptomatic PE. This fact limits the discriminatory power of these general scales for patients with cancer and has prompted the development of specific prognostic tools: POMPE-C and a scale derived from the RIETE registry. Whether the increased risk of death by PE in patients with cancer is due to complications related to the neoplasm or to a greater severity of the thromboembolic episode in this population has not been well studied. Moreover, the introduction of computed multidetector tomography in recent years has led to a growing diagnosis of incidental PE, which currently represents up to half of pulmonary embolisms in patients with cancer. The EPIPHANY study attempts to further the understanding of the characteristics of pulmonary embolisms in patients with cancer by including incidental and symptomatic events. Its primary objectives are a) to understand the clinical and epidemiological patterns of pulmonary embolism associated with cancer and b) to develop and validate a specific prognosis model for PE in this population. The registry includes variables of interest to oncology (cancer type and extent, oncospecific treatments, patient's functional condition, cancer progression), radiological variables (thrombotic burden, signs of ventricular overload and other findings), location of treatment (hospital or outpatient), acute complications and causes of death in patients with PE associated with cancer.

  5. Severe pulmonary oedema following therapeutic embolization with Onyx for cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, C; Saravanan, Sundararaj; Rajkumar, John; Prasad, Jagadish; Banakal, Sanjay; Muralidhar, Kanchi

    2008-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by sudden onset of respiratory distress, infiltrates on radiographs consistent with pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia and increased work in breathing. Infiltrates on radiographs are bilateral, but may be patchy or diffuse and fluffy or dense. It is associated with absence of left heart failure and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio of < or =200. Ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which was approved by the US FDA in July 2005, is used as an embolic agent for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM). It is a biocompatible liquid polymer that precipitates and solidifies on contact with blood, thus forming a soft and spongy embolus. We report a case of ARDS following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer for cerebral AVM under general anaesthesia. Experienced perioperative physicians adopted standard anaesthetic technique and monitoring for this procedure. Acute respiratory distress and hypoxaemia developed in the patient following extubation of the trachea. Infiltrates seen on postprocedural chest radiographs were consistent with pulmonary oedema. DMSO, the solvent for the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, is excreted via the lungs after administration and we postulate that DMSO was the possible cause of ARDS in this patient. Monitoring of haemodynamic parameters (invasive blood pressure, electrocardiography) and ventilatory parameters (ETCO2, SpO2, airway pressure monitoring) are important in the recognition of this possible event. One should be vigilant and anticipate this complication following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol polymer for the treatment of cerebral AVM.

  6. [Disseminated arterial occlusions revealing bilateral venous thrombosis with paradoxical embolisms].

    PubMed

    Elsendoorn, A; Desport, E; Vialle, R; Frat, J-P; Bridoux, F; Touchard, G

    2009-06-01

    Paradoxical embolism is a diagnosis of exclusion. Clinical triad associates deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism, arterial embolism, and intracardiac communication with right-to-left shunt. The intracardiac communication is generally related to a patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report a 75-year-old patient, who presented with bilateral deep venous thrombosis of the legs, complicated by massive pulmonary embolism and paradoxical embolisms through a PFO. This resulted in cerebral, mesenteric, splenic and bilateral kidney infarctions. A promptly initiated anticoagulant treatment allowed a favourable outcome.

  7. Methods of Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III).

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Gottschalk, Alexander; Sostman, H Dirk; Chenevert, Thomas L; Fowler, Sarah E; Goodman, Lawrence R; Hales, Charles A; Hull, Russell D; Kanal, Emanuel; Leeper, Kenneth V; Nadich, David P; Sak, Daniel J; Tapson, Victor F; Wakefield, Thomas W; Weg, John G; Woodard, Pamela K

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the methods of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III) are described in detail. PIOPED III is a multicenter collaborative investigation sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The purpose is to determine the accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A composite reference standard based on usual diagnostic methods for PE is used. All images will be read by 2 blinded and study-certified central readers. Patients with no PE according to the composite reference test will be randomized to undergo gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography. This procedure will reduce the proportion of patients with negative tests at no loss in evaluation of sensitivity and specificity.

  8. Clinical Application of Partial Splenic Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-Song; Hu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Partial splenic embolization (PSE) is one of the intra-arterial therapeutic approaches of diseases. With the development of interventional radiology, the applications of PSE in clinical practice are greatly extended, while various materials are developed for embolization use. Common indications of PSE include hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, splenic trauma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, splenic hemangioma, and liver cancer. It is also performed to exclude splenic artery aneurysms from the parent vessel lumen and prevent aneurysm rupture, to treat splenic artery steal syndrome and improve liver perfusion in liver transplant recipients, and to administer targeted treatment to areas of neoplastic disease in the splenic parenchyma. Indicators of the therapeutic effect evaluation of PSE comprise blood routine test, changes in hemodynamics and in splenic volume. Major complications of PSE include the pulmonary complications, severe infection, damages of renal and liver function, and portal vein thrombosis. The limitations of PSE exist mainly in the difficulties in selecting the arteries to embolize and in evaluating the embolized volume. PMID:25538966

  9. Urgent arterial embolization of ruptured renal angiomyolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    The most undesired complication of renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is bleeding. Because of tumor rupture, the bleeding can spread to the retroperitoneal field and can be severe enough to be life threatening. We report a case of retroperitoneal hemorrhage caused by a ruptured AML that was successfully treated with transarterial embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate. PMID:28352700

  10. Is Embolization of the Pancreas Safe? Pancreatic Histological Changes after Selective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Takahashi, Takuya; Izaki, Kenta; Uotani, Kensuke; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety of selective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in a swine model in terms of histological changes in the pancreas. Methods: Three groups of two female swine (58-64 kg) per group underwent TAE of the dorsal pancreatic artery, under anesthesia, with 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. Blood parameters were evaluated at days 1, 4, and 10 after TAE, after which the animals were sacrificed and pancreatic tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results: All of the animals were asymptomatic and survived for 10 days. Cone beam computed tomographic angiography revealed occlusion of the dorsal pancreatic artery and no enhancement in the embolized area. The white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level were elevated slightly on day 1 after TAE (mean {+-} SD: 252.7 {+-} 27.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2}/{mu}l and 0.15 {+-} 0.07 mg/l, respectively), but they normalized or remained near the upper normal limit thereafter. The serum amylase and lipase levels also were elevated on day 1 (8831.7 {+-} 2169.2 U/l and 130 {+-} 53.4 U/l, respectively) but normalized thereafter. Histologically, necrosis and fibrosis were noted only in the embolized segment, and necrosis and acute inflammatory reactions were absent in the nonembolized segment. The border between both segments was well defined. Lymphocytic infiltration and foreign body reaction were noted around the embolized vessels. Conclusions: Selective TAE with NBCA in the pancreas caused localized ischemic necrosis without clinically significant pancreatitis; therefore, this procedure is tolerable in swine.

  11. Massive pulmonary embolism: treatment with the rotarex thrombectomy system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin; Gu, Jian-Ping; Yang, Zheng-Qiang; Chen, Liang; Lou, Wen-Sheng; He, Xu; Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Zhou, Chun-Gao; Zhao, Lin-Bo; Xia, Jin-Guo; Li, Lin-Sun

    2011-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) for acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Fourteen patients (8 men, 6 women) with a mean age of 55.4 (range, 38-71) years with acute massive PE were initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and confirmed by pulmonary angiography. All patients presented with acute PE symptoms and hemodynamic compromise. Each patient was treated with Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device and five patients received additional thrombolysis. Technique success and clinical improvement were achieved in all patients without major complications. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) decreased from 37.6 ± 6.6 to 29 ± 6.4 mmHg (P < 0.01) after PMT. Partial arterial pressures of O(2) (PaO(2)) increased from 61.1 ± 9.2 to 88 ± 5.1 mmHg (P < 0.01). The Miller index was 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.37 ± 0.13 (P < 0.01), respectively, before and after PMT (P < 0.01). Eleven patients had no recurrence of PE on a mean follow-up of 28.3 months, whereas the other three patients were lost to follow-up. The preliminary experience in our series suggests that the Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device, which has been utilized in peripheral arteries, also is useful for the treatment of acute massive PE.

  12. Superiorization with level control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegielski, Andrzej; Al-Musallam, Fadhel

    2017-04-01

    The convex feasibility problem is to find a common point of a finite family of closed convex subsets. In many applications one requires something more, namely finding a common point of closed convex subsets which minimizes a continuous convex function. The latter requirement leads to an application of the superiorization methodology which is actually settled between methods for convex feasibility problem and the convex constrained minimization. Inspired by the superiorization idea we introduce a method which sequentially applies a long-step algorithm for a sequence of convex feasibility problems; the method employs quasi-nonexpansive operators as well as subgradient projections with level control and does not require evaluation of the metric projection. We replace a perturbation of the iterations (applied in the superiorization methodology) by a perturbation of the current level in minimizing the objective function. We consider the method in the Euclidean space in order to guarantee the strong convergence, although the method is well defined in a Hilbert space.

  13. Sporadic Multicentric Right Atrial and Right Ventricular Myxoma Presenting as Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyajit; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Mohanty, Bipin Bihari; Biswas, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric cardiac myxoma is a rare syndrome; usually it is familial. We report a rare case of sporadic right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) myxoma in a 26-year-old female presenting to our hospital for the evaluation of sudden onset of dyspnea and left precordial pain attributed to the embolization of degenerating tumor fragments to the pulmonary artery (PA). The exact incidence of sporadic multicentric RA and RV myxoma presenting as acute pulmonary embolism is unknown as multicentric RA and RV myxoma are very rare. Myxomas presenting as pulmonary embolism is <10%. Majority of cardiac myxomas present as exertional dyspnea, chest pain, positional syncope, fever, weight loss and other constitutional symptoms. Any young patient presenting with acute onset dyspnea with multiple cardiac masses may have tumor embolization to the PA diagnosis with transthoracic echocardiography and high-resolution computed tomography of thorax, fast-tracks patient transfer for urgent cardiac surgery to prevent further embolization.

  14. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  15. Mechanical Removal of Migrated Onyx Due to Microcatheter Rupture During AVM Embolization: A Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Cagin

    2015-12-01

    We report a case where migrated Onyx could be removed safely with a mechanical thrombectomy device after withdrawal of the damaged microcatheter. A microcatheter was retained in the superior cerebellar artery with attached Onyx fragments on its tip during embolization of a bled cerebellar AVM. During retrieval maneuvers microcatheter shaft was ruptured and Onyx fragments were released into the vertebrobasilar system causing occlusion. Finally, Onyx fragment on tip of the microcatheter could be detached with dimethyl sulfoxide injection and the microcatheter could be withdrawn. A Merci retriever device (Concentric Medical, Mountain View, CA, USA) was successfully used to retrieve most of the dislodged Onyx material and recanalize the vertebrobasilar circulation.

  16. A patient-specific CFD-based study of embolic particle transport for stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    Roughly 1/3 of all strokes are caused by an embolus traveling to a cerebral artery and blocking blood flow in the brain. A detailed understanding of the dynamics of embolic particles within arteries is the basis for this study. Blood flow velocities and emboli trajectories are resolved using a coupled Euler-Lagrange approach. Computer model of the major arteries is extracted from patient image data. Blood is modeled as a Newtonian fluid, discretized using the Finite Volume method, with physiologically appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The embolus trajectory is modeled using Lagrangian particle equations accounting for embolus interaction with blood as well as vessel wall. Both one and two way fluid-particle coupling are considered, the latter being implemented using momentum sources augmented to the discretized flow equations. The study determines individual embolus path up to arteries supplying the brain, and compares the size-dependent distribution of emboli amongst vessels superior to the aortic-arch, and the role of fully coupled blood-embolus interactions in modifying both trajectory and distribution when compared with one-way coupling. Specifically for intermediate particle sizes the model developed will better characterize the risks for embolic stroke. American Heart Association (AHA) Grant: Embolic Stroke: Anatomic and Physiologic Insights from Image-Based CFD.

  17. Clinical characteristics of pulmonary embolism with concomitant pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung-Ick; Choi, Keum-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Although pneumonia is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia are uncommon. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of pulmonary embolism with coexisting pneumonia. We retrospectively compared clinical, radiologic and laboratory parameters between patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia (pneumonia group) and those with unprovoked pulmonary embolism (unprovoked group), and then between the pneumonia group and those with pulmonary infarction (infarction group). Of 794 patients with pulmonary embolism, 36 (5%) had coexisting pneumonia and six (1%) had no provoking factor other than pneumonia. Stroke was significantly more common in the pneumonia group, than either the unprovoked group or the infarction group. In the pneumonia group, fever was significantly more common and serum C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher. By contrast, central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation on computed tomography were significantly less frequent in the pneumonia group. In addition, an adverse outcome due to pulmonary embolism was less common in the pneumonia group than in either of the other two groups. The coexistence of pulmonary embolism and pneumonia is rarely encountered in clinical practice, especially without the presence of other factors that could provoke venous thromboembolism and is commonly associated with stroke. It is characterized by lower incidences of central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation and by a lower rate of adverse outcomes due to pulmonary embolism itself.

  18. An injectable shear-thinning biomaterial for endovascular embolization.

    PubMed

    Avery, Reginald K; Albadawi, Hassan; Akbari, Mohsen; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Duggan, Michael J; Sahani, Dushyant V; Olsen, Bradley D; Khademhosseini, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi

    2016-11-16

    Improved endovascular embolization of vascular conditions can generate better patient outcomes and minimize the need for repeat procedures. However, many embolic materials, such as metallic coils or liquid embolic agents, are associated with limitations and complications such as breakthrough bleeding, coil migration, coil compaction, recanalization, adhesion of the catheter to the embolic agent, or toxicity. Here, we engineered a shear-thinning biomaterial (STB), a nanocomposite hydrogel containing gelatin and silicate nanoplatelets, to function as an embolic agent for endovascular embolization procedures. STBs are injectable through clinical catheters and needles and have hemostatic activity comparable to metallic coils, the current gold standard. In addition, STBs withstand physiological pressures without fragmentation or displacement in elastomeric channels in vitro and in explant vessels ex vivo. In vitro experiments also indicated that STB embolization did not rely on intrinsic thrombosis as coils did for occlusion, suggesting that the biomaterial may be suitable for use in patients on anticoagulation therapy or those with coagulopathy. Using computed tomography imaging, the biomaterial was shown to fully occlude murine and porcine vasculature in vivo and remain at the site of injection without fragmentation or nontarget embolization. Given the advantages of rapid delivery, in vivo stability, and independent occlusion that does not rely on intrinsic thrombosis, STBs offer an alternative gel-based embolic agent with translational potential for endovascular embolization.

  19. Elevated d-dimer cut-off values for computed tomography pulmonary angiography—d-dimer correlates with location of embolism

    PubMed Central

    Kubak, Mateuzs Piotr; Borthne, Arne; Ruud, Espen Asak; Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is a potentially fatal condition, and making a timely diagnosis can be challenging. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the modality of choice, and this contributes to the increasing load on emergency room CT scanners. Our purpose was to investigate whether an elevated d-dimer cut-off could reduce the demand for CTPA while maintaining a high sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV). Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients referred for CTPA with suspicion of APE in 2012, and collected d-dimer values and CTPA results. We investigated the diagnostic performance of d-dimer using a 0.5 mg/L cut-off and an age adjusted cut-off. We also evaluated a new and elevated cut-off. Cases were categorized according to their CTPA result into: no embolism, peripheral embolism, lobar embolism and central embolism. Finally we investigated a possible correlation between d-dimer values and location of embolism. Results We included 1,051 CTPAs, from which 216 (21%) showed pulmonary embolism. There were concomitant d-dimer analyses in 822 CTPA examinations. The current 0.5 mg/L cut-off achieved a sensitivity and NPV of 99%. The age-adjusted cut-off achieved a sensitivity and NPV of 98%, and our suggested cut-off of 0.9 mg/L achieved a sensitivity and NPV of 97%. Conclusions We conclude that the elevated d-dimer cut-off of 0.9 mg/L achieved a high sensitivity and NPV, while reducing the number of CTPA by 27%. The correlation between d-dimer values and location of embolisms supports the suggestion of an elevated d-dimer value. PMID:27386486

  20. Endovascular Therapy as a Primary Revascularization Modality in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kärkkäinen, Jussi M.; Lehtimäki, Tiina T. Saari, Petri; Hartikainen, Juha; Rantanen, Tuomo Paajanen, Hannu; Manninen, Hannu

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate endovascular therapy (EVT) as the primary revascularization method for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI).MethodsA retrospective review was performed on all consecutive patients treated for AMI during a 5-year period (January 2009 to December 2013). EVT was attempted in all patients referred for emergent revascularization. Surgical revascularization was performed selectively after failure of EVT. Patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and outcomes were studied. Failures and complications of EVT were recorded.ResultsFifty patients, aged 79 ± 9 years (mean ± SD), out of 66 consecutive patients with AMI secondary to embolic or thrombotic obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery were referred for revascularization. The etiology of AMI was embolism in 18 (36 %) and thrombosis in 32 (64 %) patients. EVT was technically successful in 44 (88 %) patients. Mortality after successful or failed EVT was 32 %. The rates of emergency laparotomy, bowel resection, and EVT-related complication were 40, 34, and 10 %, respectively. Three out of six patients with failure of EVT were treated with surgical bypass. EVT failure did not significantly affect survival.ConclusionsEVT is feasible in most cases of AMI, with favorable patient outcome and acceptable complication rate.

  1. Paraplegia after aortic and superior mesenteric artery stenting for occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Hans, Sachinder S; Ngo, William; McAllister, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Paraplegia after endovascular therapy for aortic and visceral artery occlusive disease is an extremely uncommon occurrence. Two cases of paraplegia after placement of an aortic covered stent for infrarenal aortic stenosis and a superior mesenteric artery stent for chronic visceral ischemia are presented. In both patients, embolization of the arterial supply to the spinal cord was the presumed cause. One patient had a slight recovery after intense physical therapy and rehabilitation. The second patient did not have any recovery from her paraplegia.

  2. Intra-Arterial Treatment in a Child with Embolic Stroke Due to Atrial Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    van den Wijngaard, Ido; Wermer, Marieke; van Walderveen, Marianne; Wiendels, Natalie; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arterial ischaemic stroke is an important cause of morbidity in children. Timely diagnosis is necessary for acute stroke treatment but can be challenging in clinical practice. Due to a paucity of data there are no specific recommendations regarding the use of mechanical thrombectomy devices in current paediatric stroke guidelines. A 14-year-old boy presented with a severe acute left hemisphere stroke due to a proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion caused by emboli from an atrial myxoma. No clinical improvement was seen after administration of intravenous thrombolysis. Subsequent mechanical thrombectomy with a second-generation stent-based thrombectomy device resulted in successful recanalization and clinical improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mechanical thrombectomy in a child with acute embolic stroke caused by atrial myxoma. PMID:24976098

  3. Hemodynamic indexes derived from computed tomography angiography to predict pulmonary embolism related mortality.

    PubMed

    John, Gregor; Marti, Christophe; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Perrier, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) induces an acute increase in the right ventricle afterload that can lead to right-ventricular dysfunction (RVD) and eventually to circulatory collapse. Hemodynamic status and presence of RVD are important determinants of adverse outcomes in acute PE. Technologic progress allows computed tomography angiography (CTA) to give more information than accurate diagnosis of PE. It may also provide an insight into hemodynamics and right-ventricular function. Proximal localization of emboli, reflux of contrast medium to the hepatic veins, and right-to-left short-axis ventricular diameter ratio seem to be the most relevant CTA predictors of 30-day mortality. These elements require little postprocessing time, an advantage in the emergency room. We herein review the prognostic value of RVD and other CTA mortality predictors for patients with acute PE.

  4. Spontaneous Hemothorax in Neurofibromatosis Treated with Percutaneous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Kazunori; Sanada, Junichiro Kurozumi, Akiko; Watanabe, Toshio; Matsui, Osamu

    2007-06-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial coil embolization therapy for the treatment of spontaneous hemothorax followed by aneurysm rupture in neurofibromatosis patients. Three patients were treated for massive hemothorax caused by arterial lesions associated with neurofibromatosis. Bleeding episodes were secondary to ascending cervical artery aneurysm and dissection of vertebral artery in 1 patient, and intercostal artery aneurysm with or without arteriovenous fistula in 2 patients. Patients were treated by transarterial coil embolization combined with chest drainage. In 1 patient, the ruptured ascending cervical artery aneurysm was well embolized but, shortly after the embolization, fatal hemorrhage induced by dissection of the vertebral artery occurred and the patient died. In the other 2 patients, the ruptured intercostal artery aneurysm was well embolized and they were successfully treated and discharged. Transcatheter arterial coil embolization therapy is an effective method for the treatment of spontaneous hemothorax followed by aneurysm rupture in neurofibromatosis patients.

  5. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sen Sun, Xi-Wen Yu, Dong Jie, Bing

    2013-05-15

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA.

  6. An unusual cause of acute cor pulmonale--significance of the 'continuous diaphragm sign'.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Sandeep; Sajeev, C G; Muneer, Kader; Rajesh, G; Krishnan, M N; Pillai, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    A patient presented with chest pain and clinical features of acute right heart failure. Initial work up revealed the presence of severe PAH. Acute pulmonary embolism is the commonest and most life-threatening cause for acute cor pulmonale. Even though the clinical picture suggested pulmonary embolism, a subtle sign was missed from the first chest X-ray taken in the emergency department. However on reanalysis the 'continuous diaphragm sign' later guided us towards the diagnosis. Our case represents one of the first reports of a rare etiology for acute cor pulmonale--hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Right ventricular dysfunction was caused by an acute rise in pulmonary artery pressures as well as by the compressive effects of pneumomediastinum. We emphasize the role played by a good quality chest X-ray early in the management of acute chest pain syndromes. However pulmonary embolism should be ruled out conclusively before redirecting attention to less malignant conditions.

  7. Multidisciplinary pulmonary embolism response teams and systems

    PubMed Central

    Monteleone, Peter P.; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a complex diagnosis that encompasses a wide range of clinical presentations. Often patients who present with PE have complicated medical histories which can make their management challenging. Many novel therapeutic strategies and tools are emerging to improve the care and outcomes of patients with PE. Pulmonary embolism response teams (PERTs) are developing at multiple centers to improve the decision making, efficiency and orchestration of these clinical strategies. Concordantly with development of PERT programs is the design and implementation of systems to allow for numerous specialists to convene and discuss complex PE patients in real time. The mechanisms to engage a multidisciplinary approach are proving to be an invaluable resource in the decision making processes and treatment of high risk PE patients. Ultimately, other multi-disciplinary teams may adopt these methods to better address their clinical needs. PMID:28123986

  8. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking a pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, A; Yates, T J; Kuriakose, P

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas involving the lung are a rare occurrence, often a result of metastatic disease from primary malignancies involving the skin, liver, breast or heart. Primary pulmonary artery sarcomas are rarer still, with limited cases reported world-wide and consequently data regarding treatment modalities are sparse and largely experimental. These tumors are often mistaken for a pulmonary embolism and seemingly supported by radiological findings. Patients will often present without symptom resolution despite therapeutic anticoagulation. The following case illustrates how a soft tissue sarcoma of the pulmonary artery can mimic a pulmonary embolism, thus, resulting in both a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. A positron emission tomography scan was an invaluable tool in this case, showing increased radiotracer uptake and placing neoplasm at the top of the differential diagnosis. This ultimately led to a biopsy that was vimentin positive, cytokeratin negative and CD117 negative, thus consistent with soft tissue sarcoma.

  9. Catheter-directed interventions for pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Charles, Hearns W.; Maldonado, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), a potentially life-threatening entity, can be treated medically, surgically, and percutaneously. In patients with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), anticoagulation alone may be insufficient to restore cardiac function. Because of the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical embolectomy, clinical interest in catheter-directed interventions (CDI) has resurged. We describe specific catheter-directed techniques and the evidence supporting percutaneous treatments. PMID:28123985

  10. Arterial Embolization of Giant Hepatic Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Giavroglou, Constantinos; Economou, Hippolete; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2003-02-15

    Hepatic cavernous hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. They are usually discovered incidentally and only a few require treatment. However, giant hemangiomas may cause symptoms,which are indications for treatment. We describe four cases of symptomatic giant hepatic hemangiomas successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, performed with polyvinyl alcohol particles. There were no complications. Follow-up with clinical and imaging examinations showed disappearance of symptoms and decrease in size of lesions.

  11. Embolization and radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Andres R.; Santillan, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) requires a multidisciplinary management including microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This article reviews the recent advancements in the multimodality treatment of patients with AVMs using endovascular neurosurgery and SRS. We describe the natural history of AVMs and the role of endovascular and radiosurgical treatment as well as their interplay in the management of these complex vascular lesions. Also, we present some representative cases treated at our institution. PMID:22826821

  12. Arterial embolism in thyrotoxicosis with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Staffurth, J S; Gibberd, M C; Fui, S N

    1977-01-01

    In 262 patients with thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation there were 26 episodes of arterial embolism (17 cerebral and nine elsewhere) in 21 patients. Twelve incidents occurred with active thyrotoxicosis, three on reversion to sinus rhythm, and 11 after the patients were euthyroid. This important complication is more common than is realised, and most patients should be put on prophylactic anticoagulants when first seen with atrial fibrillation. PMID:902055

  13. Referred Pain to the Ipsilateral Forehead and Orbit: An Unusual Phenomenon During Bronchial Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakantan, Ravi; Ketkar, Manoj; Maddali, Krishna; Deshmukh, Hemant

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: We report an unusual pattern of referred pain to the ipsilateral forehead and orbit observed during bronchial artery embolization (BAE) for massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and postulate possible neural mechanisms for its occurrence. Methods: Seven men, from a series of 194 patients (171 men, 23 women) undergoing BAE (right bronchial artery 4, left 3) with gelatin sponge for control of massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary TB form the subject of this report. Results: Embolization was successful in achieving control of hemoptysis in these patients and there were no complications following the embolization. Transient, moderately severe, ipsilateral supraorbital and/or retroorbital pain occurred only during the injection of the gelatin sponge contrast mixture into the bronchial artery. The pain did not occur during the injection of heparinized saline or ionic contrast medium. Conclusions: Referred pain during BAE is an unusual phenomenon. Acute vessel distension triggering visceral sensations is probably the causative mechanism. Sympathetic afferents from the bronchi coursing through the posterior pulmonary plexus eventually pass to the trigeminal ganglion via the carotid sympathetic chain. The ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the trigeminal nerve then mediate pain sensation to the ipsilateral forehead and orbit. Similarly, parasympathetic afferents from the pulmonary plexus crossing the nucleus of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve may be responsible for interexchange of impulses to the neurons in this nucleus. Sensory fibers of the ophthalmic and maxillary nerves relaying in this nucleus are then involved in this pain being referred to the forehead and orbit.

  14. Posterior spinal cord infarction due to fibrocartilaginous embolization in a 16-year-old athlete.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Seema; Brown, Wendy; Dayal, Anuradha; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-07-01

    Spinal cord infarction is extremely rare in children, and, similar to cerebrovascular infarcts, the pathogenesis is different from adults. Spinal cord infarcts are most commonly reported in adults in the context of aortic surgery; in children, the etiology is frequently unknown. Fibrocartilaginous embolization is a potential cause of spinal cord infarct in both populations. It is a process that occurs when spinal injury has resulted in disc disease, and subsequently disc fragments embolize to the cord, resulting in ischemia and/or infarction. In this report, we present a 16-year-old athlete who presented with symptoms of acute myelopathy after a period of intense exercise. Our original concern was for an inflammatory process of the spinal cord; however, given her history of competitive tumbling and degenerative disc changes on her initial spine magnetic resonance imaging scan, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed, which demonstrated acute spinal cord infarction. Unlike many cases of spinal cord infarction, our patient was fortunate to make a near-complete recovery. This case highlights the importance of recognizing rare causes of spinal cord pathology and considering infarction in the differential diagnosis of acute myelopathy because management and prognosis varies.

  15. Venous air embolism following insufflation of the urethra.

    PubMed

    Vanlinthout, L; Boghaert, A; Thienpont, L

    1986-01-01

    Venous air embolism following urethral inflation only scarcely documented: an extensive search of the literature yielded four papers relating to this subject. We report a new case of venous air embolism due to this uncommon etiology. Careful study revealed some common pathogenetic features with previously reported cases. Some important precautions can diminish the likelihood of gas embolism and reduce its fatal outcome in situations, similar to the kind mentioned.

  16. [The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: the role of noninvasive technics].

    PubMed

    Petruzzelli, S; Palla, A; Donnamaria, V; Celi, A; Giuntini, C

    1991-06-01

    Today a large group of patients with pulmonary embolism is still undetected because this disease is not suspected. We evaluated the role of routine clinical procedures such as history, chest x-ray, electrocardiogram and blood gas analysis in the diagnosis of this disease. We studied 177 patients sent to our observation with suspicion of pulmonary embolism, which was later confirmed in 97 and excluded in 80. Prolonged immobilization, surgical procedures and deep vein thrombosis are the most frequent predisposing factors (P less than 0.05 or less) in patients with pulmonary embolism with respect to patients with unconfirmed suspicion of embolism. Among symptoms and signs, pleuritic chest pain, sudden onset of dyspnea, tachypnea, fever, enlarged jugular veins, enhanced pulmonary component of the second heart sound, pulmonary systolic murmur and basal hypophonesis were the most frequent signs (P less than 0.005 or less) in patients with embolism. Among radiographic signs "sausage" descending pulmonary artery, diaphragmatic elevation, pulmonary infarction, Westermark sign and azygos vein enlargement were more frequent (P less than 0.05 or less) in patients with embolism with respect to patients with unconfirmed suspicion of embolism. Among electrocardiographic signs, tachycardia, P-R segment displacement and negative T wave in V1-V2 were more frequent in patients with embolism with respect to patients with unconfirmed suspicion of embolism (P less than 0.05 or less). PO2, standard pO2 and pCO2 were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) in patients with embolism. After discriminant analysis of the whole data set most patients were correctly classified as embolic (90/97) and non-embolic (75/80).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Air Superiority Fighter Characteristics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-05

    many a dispute could have been deflated into a single paragraph if the disputants had just dared to define their terms.7 Aristotle ...meaningful. This section will expand on some key ideology concepts. The phrase "air superiority fighter" may bring to mind visions of fighter... biographies are useful in garnering airpower advocate theories as well as identifying key characteristics. Air campaign results, starting with World

  18. Evaporation From Lake Superior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C.; Blanken, P.; Hedstrom, N.; Leshkevich, G.; Fortin, V.; Charpentier, D.; Haywood, H.

    2009-05-01

    Evaporation is a critical component of the water balance of each of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and understanding the magnitude and physical controls of evaporative water losses are important for several reasons. Recently, low water levels in Lakes Superior and Michigan/Huron have had socioeconomic, ecological, and even meteorological impacts (e.g. water quality and quantity, transportation, invasive species, recreation, etc.). The recent low water levels may be due to increased evaporation, but this is not known as operational evaporation estimates are currently calculated as the residual of water or heat budgets. Perhaps surprisingly, almost nothing is known about evaporation dynamics from Lake Superior and few direct measurements of evaporation have been made from any of the Laurentian Great Lakes. This research is the first to attempt to directly measure evaporation from Lake Superior by deploying eddy covariance instrumentation. Results of evaporation rates, their patterns and controlling mechanisms will be presented. The direct measurements of evaporation are used with concurrent satellite and climate model data to extrapolate evaporation measurements across the entire lake. This knowledge could improve predictions of how climate change may impact the lake's water budget and subsequently how the water in the lake is managed.

  19. A SECOND CASE OF LATE EMBOLIZATION OF PROSTHETIC MITRAL VALVE OCCLUDER WITH SURVIVAL FOLLOWING REOPERATION

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Adib H.; O'Hare, James E.; Schocket, Lee I.; Pinckley, James N.

    1975-01-01

    A 51-year-old male with acute fulminating pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock secondary to severe mitral insufficiency from dislodgment of the disc occluder in a Wada-Cutter valve was treated by immediate open heart procedure with a Bjork-Shiley mitral valve replacement. The patient survived and remains well. This is the second patient reported to survive operation and replacement of a malfunctioning prosthetic mitral valve from which the poppet escaped and embolized. The first case was reported by Hughes et al1 in February, 1975. Some striking similarities, as well as differences, in these two cases are discussed. Images PMID:15215920

  20. A SECOND CASE OF LATE EMBOLIZATION OF PROSTHETIC MITRAL VALVE OCCLUDER WITH SURVIVAL FOLLOWING REOPERATION.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Adib H.; O'Hare, James E.; Schocket, Lee I.; Pinckley, James N.

    1975-01-01

    A 51-year-old male with acute fulminating pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock secondary to severe mitral insufficiency from dislodgment of the disc occluder in a Wada-Cutter valve was treated by immediate open heart procedure with a Bjork-Shiley mitral valve replacement. The patient survived and remains well. This is the second patient reported to survive operation and replacement of a malfunctioning prosthetic mitral valve from which the poppet escaped and embolized. The first case was reported by Hughes et al(1) in February, 1975. Some striking similarities, as well as differences, in these two cases are discussed.

  1. Asymptomatic pulmonary embolism. A common event in high risk patients.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J W; Eikman, E A; Greenberg, S

    1982-01-01

    Ventilation and perfusion lung scans were obtained before and at weekly intervals following hip surgery or major amputation in 158 patients. Pulmonary arteriograms were obtained in 21 of 33 patients developing perfusion patterns strongly suggesting embolism; 19 of the 21 arteriograms demonstrated pulmonary embolism. From autopsy and clinical data, 36 patients were diagnosed as having an embolus while under study, and 12 patients were suspected of having had an embolus during their illness but prior to entry into the study. Only four of these 48 patients experienced symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism. We conclude that asymptomatic pulmonary embolism is a common event in the populations studied. PMID:7059242

  2. Asymptomatic pulmonary embolism: a common event in high risk patients

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.W.; Eikman, E.A.; Greenberg, S.

    1982-03-01

    Ventilation and perfusion lung scans were obtained before and at weekly intervals following hip surgery or major amputation in 158 patients. Pulmonary arteriograms were obtained in 21 of 33 patients developing perfusion patterns strongly suggesting embolism; 19 of the 21 arteriograms demonstrated pulmonary embolism. From autopsy and clinical data, 36 patients were diagnosed as having an embolus while under study, and 12 patients were suspected of having had an embolus during their illness but prior to entry into the study. Only four of these 48 patients experienced symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism. We conclude that asymptomatic pulmonary embolism is a common event in the populations studied.

  3. Air Embolism: Practical Tips for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Colin J.; Behravesh, Sasan; Naidu, Sailendra G.; Oklu, Rahmi

    2016-01-01

    Air embolism is a rarely encountered but much dreaded complication of surgical procedures that can cause serious harm, including death. Cases that involve the use of endovascular techniques have a higher risk of air embolism; therefore, a heightened awareness of this complication is warranted. In particular, central venous catheters and arterial catheters that are often placed and removed in most hospitals by a variety of medical practitioners are at especially high risk for air embolism. With appropriate precautions and techniques it can be preventable. This article reviews the causes of air embolism, clinical management and prevention techniques. PMID:27809224

  4. Experimental study of temperature-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate embolic material in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile in swines.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xianbin; Zhao, Changfu; Pang, Jinfeng; Ding, Zhaoyi; Wang, Yubo; Xu, Kan; Chen, Hao; Li, Bingwei; Luo, Q I

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive liquid embolic material, chitosan/β-glycerophosphate (C/GP), in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile (REM) in a swine model of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cAVM). A total of 24 domestic swines were used as the experimental animals, among which 12 pigs underwent direct embolization of one side of the REM, while the other 12 pigs underwent embolization of the bilateral REM following anastomosis of the carotid artery and jugular vein. A super-selective microcatheter was introduced into the REM during the embolization procedure, and the C/GP hydrogel was injected until an image of the REM disappeared in the angiography examination. Further angiography examinations were performed after 2 and 6 weeks, and histological examination of the REM was performed after 6 weeks. Of the 24 domestic swines, 23 cases underwent successful thrombosis. Convulsions occurred in one case and that pig died during the embolization procedure. Following embolization, the angiography observations revealed that the embolized REM was no longer able to be developed, and adhesion of the microcatheter tip with the embolic agent did not occur. In addition, no apparent revascularization was observed in the angiography examinations performed at weeks 2 and 6. Therefore, the current preliminary study indicated that use of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive embolic material was feasible for the embolization of cAVM; thus, C/GP may be used as an ideal embolic material for the treatment of cAVM.

  5. Natural course of treated pulmonary embolism. Evaluation by perfusion lung scintigraphy, gas exchange, and chest roentgenogram.

    PubMed

    Prediletto, R; Paoletti, P; Fornai, E; Perissinotto, A; Petruzzelli, S; Formichi, B; Ruschi, S; Palla, A; Giannella-Neto, A; Giuntini, C

    1990-03-01

    Perfusion lung scintigrams, pulmonary gas exchange data, and chest roentgenograms were obtained in 33 patients during acute embolism and over the following six months in order to assess their clinical usefulness in monitoring the effect of therapy. To this purpose, the measurement of pulmonary gas exchange and the presence of chest x-ray findings were compared with perfusion lung scintigraphic abnormalities both at diagnosis and after 7, 30, and 180 days during treatment. More than 50 percent of the pulmonary arterial tree was obstructed at diagnosis, and a large part of perfusion recovery was complete within the first month. All of the gas exchange parameters were abnormal at diagnosis, and the rate of their improvement was related to that of perfusion recovery. Interestingly, PaO2st (ie, PaO2 corrected for hyperventilation) and VE tended to return to normal during the first month as a consequence of the progressive recovery of perfusion, whereas oxygen and carbon dioxide gradients and physiologic dead space showed the persistence of some abnormalities six months after diagnosis. Significant correlations were observed between the number of ULSs evaluated on the perfusion lung scintigram (and considered an index of the severity of pulmonary embolization) and all of the gas exchange parameters at diagnosis (correlation coefficients averaged from 0.41 to 0.73) and after 7 and 30 days. The enlargement of the right descending pulmonary artery and particularly the "sausage" sign and the Westermark sign were significantly associated with a higher degree of gas exchange impairment and with a more severe embolization. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that perfusion lung scintigraphy has a primary role in monitoring the recovery of patients with pulmonary embolism under treatment. Moreover, the chest roentgenogram may help in this purpose. A second major result is that the simple measurement of some gas exchange parameters may allow the assessment of functional

  6. Superior Vena Cava Obstruction Complicated by Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Novel Endovascular Approach.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Patel, Neeral; Moser, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO) and associated thrombus formation can occur in patients with upper mediastinal or right apical masses. While stenting is useful in relieving obstruction, it can facilitate the passage of upper extremity deep vein thrombus to the pulmonary arterial tree, resulting in a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism (PE). We present a case that illustrates a novel technique, which protects the patient from PE while also relieving the SVCO. This involves placing an inferior vena cava filter in an inverted position within a superior vena cava (SVC) stent to capture emboli. This procedure offers a potentially lifesaving endovascular therapeutic option to patients who would otherwise be deemed unsuitable for SVC stenting.

  7. Pulmonary embolism: an unsuspected killer.

    PubMed

    Laack, Torrey A; Goyal, Deepi G

    2004-11-01

    The presentation of PE is often subtle and may mimic other diseases. Many pulmonary emboli invariably preclude diagnosis by their occult nature or by leading to rapid death from cardiopulmonary arrest. In patients who do manifest symptoms from PE, accurate diagnosis is essential. Often it is difficult to distinguish the vague symptoms of PE from other diagnoses, such as acute coronary syndrome, pneumonia, COPD, CHF,aortic dissection, myocarditis or pericarditis, pneumothorax, and musculo-skeletal or gastrointestinal causes. Regardless of the presentation, the most fundamental step in making the diagnosis of PE is first to consider it. Historical clues and risk factors should raise the clinician's suspicion.PE is an unsuspected killer with a nebulous presentation and high mortality. In all likelihood, PE will remain an elusive diagnosis despite advances in technology and a wealth of research. A high index of suspicion is required, but no amount of suspicion would eliminate all missed cases. Patients with significant underlying cardiopulmonary disease seem to be the most challenging. Patients with significant comorbidity have poor reserve and are likely to have poor outcomes, especially if the diagnosis is not made and anticoagulation is not initiated early. Controversy exists over the best diagnostic approach to PE. A battery of diagnostic studies is available, with few providing definitive answers. Studies such as CT may be helpful at some institutions but offer poor predictive value at others. Other diagnostic tests are not universally available. It is hoped that further research and improvements in current diagnostic modalities will clear some of the current confusion and controversy of this ubiquitous and deadly disease.

  8. Successful treatment of aberrant splenic artery aneurysm with a combination of coils embolization and covered stents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysms of an aberrant splenic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) are extremely rare; however, they are clinically important because possible rupture could be catastrophic. The methods of treatment for this condition include surgical resection, minimally invasive techniques (include laparoscopic technique) and endovascular therapy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of coils embolization combined with covered stents to treat aberrant splenic artery aneurysm (SAA). Cases Presentation We report four consecutive cases of aberrant SAA that the aberrant splenic artery was embolized with coils and the superior mesenteric artery was excluded with a covered stent and an up-to-date review of all previous cases in the field. A follow-up computed tomography performed 6 to 12 months postoperatively showed persistent exclusion with marked shrinkage of the aneurysm sac. Conclusions The authors believe although early results are promising, further careful follow-up will be needed to determine the long-term clinical efficacy, safety and applicability of this approach. PMID:25176112

  9. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  10. Statistics of superior records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2013-08-01

    We study statistics of records in a sequence of random variables. These identical and independently distributed variables are drawn from the parent distribution ρ. The running record equals the maximum of all elements in the sequence up to a given point. We define a superior sequence as one where all running records are above the average record expected for the parent distribution ρ. We find that the fraction of superior sequences SN decays algebraically with sequence length N, SN˜N-β in the limit N→∞. Interestingly, the decay exponent β is nontrivial, being the root of an integral equation. For example, when ρ is a uniform distribution with compact support, we find β=0.450265. In general, the tail of the parent distribution governs the exponent β. We also consider the dual problem of inferior sequences, where all records are below average, and find that the fraction of inferior sequences IN decays algebraically, albeit with a different decay exponent, IN˜N-α. We use the above statistical measures to analyze earthquake data.

  11. Tunable delivery of niflumic acid from resorbable embolization microspheres for uterine fibroid embolization.

    PubMed

    Bédouet, Laurent; Moine, Laurence; Servais, Emeline; Beilvert, Anne; Labarre, Denis; Laurent, Alexandre

    2016-09-10

    Uterine arteries embolization (UAE) is a recent technique that aims, by means of particles injected percutaneously, to stifle fibroids (leiomyomas). This treatment is non-invasive, compared with uterine ablation, but generates pelvic pain for a few days. A strategy to reduce the post-embolization pain would be to use calibrated embolization microspheres preloaded with a non-steroidal inflammatory drug (NSAID). In this study, we first compared four drugs, all active at low concentration on cyclooxygenase-2, i.e. ketoprofen, sodium diclofenac, flurbiprofen and niflumic acid (NFA), for their capacity to be loaded on resorbable embolization microspheres (REM) 500-700μm. NFA had the highest capacity of loading (5mg/mL) on resorbable microspheres. Then, we evaluated in vitro the NFA release profiles from REM having various degradation times of one, two or five days. NFA release was biphasic, with an initial burst (about 60% of the loading) followed by a sustained release that correlated significantly to REM's hydrolysis (rho=0.761, p<0.0001). For each group of beads, the size distribution was not modified by the loading of NFA and their delivery through microcatheter was not impaired by the drug. NFA eluted from REM inhibited the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 from rabbit uterus explants. In summary, NFA is loadable on REM in significant amount and its delivery can be tuned according to the degradation rate of REM to provide an antalgic effect for a few days after UAE.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Early and Long-Term Effects of Microparticle Embolization in Two Different Mini-Pig Models. Part I: Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfl, S.; Stampfl, U.; Rehnitz, C.; Schnabel, Ph.; Satzl, S.; Christoph, P.; Henn, C.; Thomas, F.; Kauffmann, G. W.; Richter, G. M.

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. Using a pig model: (1) to evaluate the vascular distribution pattern, including the homogeneity and completeness of the intra-arterial microsphere distribution, of 40-120-{mu}m trisacryl-gelatin microspheres (Embospheres) in acute whole-kidney embolization; (2) to evaluate the durability and biocompatibility of 40-120-{mu}m trisacryl-gelatin microspheres (Embospheres) in chronic partial kidney embolization. Methods. Twenty-two animals were divided into four groups: group 1 (n = 4) underwent total arterial renal occlusion with immediate euthanasia. Groups 2-4 had chronic superselective and partial renal embolization with increasing follow-up times: group 2 (n = 2), 1 week; group 3 (n = 7), 4 weeks; and group 4 (n = 9), 14 weeks. Key endpoints in group 1 were homogeneity and completeness of acute embolizations. In groups 2-4 the key endpoints were durability of embolization and particle-related inflammation in chronic partial embolizations as assessed by quantitative angiography or histomorphometry. A numerical angiographic occlusion score (0.0 to 4.0, where 3.0 is optimal) was developed to assess and quantify the angiographic durability of superselective embolizations (groups 2-4). Results. In group 1, a relatively homogeneous distribution of the particles from segmental arteries to the precapillary level was shown by histomorphometry. Some particles reached the glomerular vas afferens (10 {mu}m diameter). In groups 2-4, a mild recanalization appeared during follow-up. The immediate average postembolization occlusion score of 3.18 {+-} 0.73 was reduced to 1.44 {+-} 0.73 (statistically significant). Microscopy revealed subtotal necrosis but no foreign body granuloma formation. The intra-arterial appearance of giant cells closely attaching to the surface of the embolic spheres inside the vessel lumen was noted. Vessel walls showed major ischemic reactions. Conclusion. Microspheres 40-120 {mu}m in diameter might achieve total occlusion of the arterial kidney

  13. Endovascular Embolization of Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage Secondary to Anticoagulant Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Isokangas, Juha-Matti Peraelae, Jukka M.

    2004-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to report a single hospital's experience of endovascular treatment of patients with retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RPH) secondary to anticoagulant treatment. Ten consecutive patients treated in an intensive care unit and needing blood transfusions due to RPH secondary to anticoagulation were referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to detect the bleeding site(s) and to evaluate the possibilities of treating them by transcatheter embolization. DSA revealed bleeding site(s) in all 10 patients: 1 lumbar artery in 4 patients, 1 branch of internal iliac artery in 3 patients and multiple bleeding sites in 3 patients. Embolization could be performed in 9 of them. Coils, gelatin and/or polyvinyl alcohol were used as embolic agents. Bleeding stopped or markedly decreased after embolization in 8 of the 9 (89%) patients. Four patients were operated on prior to embolization, but surgery failed to control the bleeding in any of these cases. Abdominal compartment syndrome requiring surgical or radiological intervention after embolization developed in 5 patients. One patient died, and 2 had sequelae due to RPH. All 7 patients whose bleeding stopped after embolization had a good clinical outcome. Embolization seems to be an effective and safe method to control the bleeding in patients with RPH secondary to anticoagulant treatment when conservative treatment is insufficient.

  14. Cutis marmorata and cerebral arterial gas embolism.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Peter T

    2015-12-01

    Dr Kemper and colleagues reported that, when air was injected into the cerebral circulation of pigs, they developed a rash that looked very similar to cutis marmorata of cutaneous decompression illness (DCI) and to livido reticularis. They postulated that cutaneous DCI in divers may be centrally mediated as a result of cerebral gas embolism. It would be helpful if Kemper et al. described the distribution of the rash in their pigs. In divers, cutaneous DCI is generally confined to parts of the body with significant amounts of subcutaneous fat, such as the trunk and thighs, and the rash often crosses the midline. Colleagues and I have reported that cutaneous DCI is commonly associated with significant right-to-left shunts and particularly persistent foramen ovale (PFO). We postulated that the manifestations of shunt-related DCI, whether neurological or cutaneous, are in large part determined by peripheral amplification of embolic bubbles in those tissues that are most supersaturated with dissolved nitrogen (or other inert gas) at the time that emboli arrive. Hence we postulated that cutaneous DCI is the result of amplification of gas emboli that invade cutaneous capillaries. Dr Kemper has kindly sent me a number of the publications from his department on which their report of this skin rash in pigs is based. The aim of their experiments was to produce significant brain injury by means of cerebral air embolism. Their pigs had no tissues supersaturated with inert gas. They were ventilated with a FiO₂ of 0.4 and anaesthetised with ketamine and midazolam. They were also given pancuronium and atropine, before air was injected into their cerebral circulation. If their findings in pigs and the resulting hypothesis were applicable to man, it would mean that one could get cutaneous DCI without decompression: one would only need cerebral gas embolism. During contrast echocardiography, I have produced arterial gas embolism in many hundreds of patients with right

  15. Detection of pulmonary embolism with 99mTc-labeled F(ab)2 fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shundong; Fang, Wei; Zhu, Mingqing; Bai, Xia; Wang, Chen; Ruan, Changgeng

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common and potentially life-threatening condition, and its correct diagnosis is highly desirable before anticoagulant therapy is initiated. However, the safe and accurate diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism remains a challenge. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a highly sensitive scintigraphic imaging technique. Pulmonary embolism can be detected by SPECT with (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agents that bind to components present predominantly on thromboemboli. P-selectin is an adhesion glycoprotein that is expressed in platelets and endothelial cells. P-selectin on activated platelets is a suitable biomarker of the active thrombus process. The objective of this study was to evaluate (99m)Tc-labeled F(ab)(2) fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody SZ51, (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), for imaging pulmonary embolism in beagle canines. SZ51 was digested to F(ab)(2) fragment, named SZ51-F(ab)(2), and its specific binding to P-selectin on either human or canine platelets was verified by flow cytometry assay. In each dog, an 18-gauge catheter was inserted into left or right pulmonary artery, and a two-stranded spiral stainless-steel coil (20 mm) was inserted through catheter. At 30 min after coil placement, X-ray angiography was performed to document the pulmonary embolism and the locations of the coil. After intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), experimental thrombi in dogs could be consistently visualized for 2-3 hours by SPECT. Pulmonary embolism showed higher uptake of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2). The present study suggests that (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2) may be a promising agent for detecting pulmonary embolism.

  16. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical.

  17. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  18. The role of embolization in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Broadley, K E; Kurowska, A; Dick, R; Platts, A; Tookman, A

    1995-10-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization (TCAE) is a well recognized radiological technique that has been used for over 25 years. It is a method of diminishing blood flow through selected vessels by inserting haemostatic material under angiographic control. The procedure is performed under local anaesthetic through a femoral or, occasionally, an axillary approach. We present our experience of the use of TCAE in the management of pain and haemorrhage in three hospice inpatients in whom other options had been exhausted. The use of TCAE as a technique for the palliation of these symptoms in the hospice setting is discussed.

  19. Extended-duration rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: MAGELLAN study protocol.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander Thomas; Spiro, Theodore Erich; Büller, Harry Roger; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex; Tapson, Victor

    2011-05-01

    Patients with acute medical illnesses are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended in these patients but questions remain regarding the optimal duration of therapy. The aim of this study is to determine whether oral rivaroxaban is non-inferior to standard-duration (approximately 10 days) subcutaneous (s.c.) enoxaparin for the prevention of VTE in acutely ill medical patients, and whether extended-duration (approximately 5 weeks) rivaroxaban is superior to standard-duration enoxaparin. Patients aged 40 years or older and hospitalized for various acute medical illnesses with risk factors for VTE randomly receive either s.c. enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (od) for 10 ± 4 days or oral rivaroxaban 10 mg od for 35 ± 4 days. The primary efficacy outcomes are the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT), symptomatic DVT, symptomatic non-fatal pulmonary embolism (PE), and VTE-related death up to day 10 + 4 and up to day 35 + 4. The primary safety outcome is the composite of treatment-emergent major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding. As of July 2010, 8,101 patients from 52 countries have been randomized. These patients have a broad range of medical conditions: approximately one-third were diagnosed with acute heart failure, just under one-third were diagnosed with acute infectious disease, and just under one-quarter were diagnosed with acute respiratory insufficiency. MAGELLAN will determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacological profile of oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of VTE in a diverse population of medically ill patients and the potential of extended-duration therapy to reduce incidence of VTE.

  20. Prevalence of Pulmonary Embolism among Patients Hospitalized for Syncope.

    PubMed

    Prandoni, Paolo; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin H; Ciammaichella, Maurizio; Perlati, Marica; Mumoli, Nicola; Bucherini, Eugenio; Visonà, Adriana; Bova, Carlo; Imberti, Davide; Campostrini, Stefano; Barbar, Sofia

    2016-10-20

    Background The prevalence of pulmonary embolism among patients hospitalized for syncope is not well documented, and current guidelines pay little attention to a diagnostic workup for pulmonary embolism in these patients. Methods We performed a systematic workup for pulmonary embolism in patients admitted to 11 hospitals in Italy for a first episode of syncope, regardless of whether there were alternative explanations for the syncope. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was ruled out in patients who had a low pretest clinical probability, which was defined according to the Wells score, in combination with a negative d-dimer assay. In all other patients, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography or ventilation-perfusion lung scanning was performed. Results A total of 560 patients (mean age, 76 years) were included in the study. A diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was ruled out in 330 of the 560 patients (58.9%) on the basis of the combination of a low pretest clinical probability of pulmonary embolism and negative d-dimer assay. Among the remaining 230 patients, pulmonary embolism was identified in 97 (42.2%). In the entire cohort, the prevalence of pulmonary embolism was 17.3% (95% confidence interval, 14.2 to 20.5). Evidence of an embolus in a main pulmonary or lobar artery or evidence of perfusion defects larger than 25% of the total area of both lungs was found in 61 patients. Pulmonary embolism was identified in 45 of the 355 patients (12.7%) who had an alternative explanation for syncope and in 52 of the 205 patients (25.4%) who did not. Conclusions Pulmonary embolism was identified in nearly one of every six patients hospitalized for a first episode of syncope. (Funded by the University of Padua; PESIT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01797289 .).

  1. Devascularization of Head and Neck Paragangliomas by Direct Percutaneous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyer, Umut Harman, Ali; Yildirim, Erkan; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Akay, Tankut Hakki; Boyvat, Fatih

    2010-10-15

    Preoperative transarterial embolization of head and neck paragangliomas using particulate agents has proven beneficial for decreasing intraoperative blood loss. However, the procedure is often incomplete owing to extensive vascular structure and arteriovenous shunts. We report our experience with embolization of these lesions by means of direct puncture and intratumoral injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or Onyx. Ten patients aged 32-82 years who were referred for preoperative embolization of seven carotid body tumors and three jugular paragangliomas were retrospectively analyzed. Intratumoral injections were primarily performed in four cases with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders and adjunctive to transarterial embolization in six cases with incomplete devascularization. Punctures were performed under ultrasound and injections were performed under roadmap fluoroscopic guidance. Detailed angiographies were performed before and after embolization procedures. Control angiograms showed complete or near-complete devascularization in all tumors. Three tumors with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders were treated with primary NBCA injections. One tumor necessitated transarterial embolization after primary injection of Onyx. Six tumors showed regional vascularization from the vasa vasorum or small-caliber branches of the external carotid artery following the transarterial approach. These regions were embolized with NBCA injections. No technical or clinical complications related to embolization procedures occurred. All except one of the tumors were surgically removed following embolization. In conclusion, preoperative devascularization with percutaneous direct injection of NBCA or Onyx is feasible, safe, and effective in head and neck paragangliomas with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders and in cases of incomplete devascularization following transarterial embolization.

  2. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Giedrius, Bernotavičius; Kęstutis, Saniukas; Irena, Karmonaitė; Rimantas, Zagorskis

    2016-01-01

    Background. An obstruction of the distal part of the duodenum can occur because of the superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) after a surgical correction of scoliosis. It is essential to evaluate the risk factors and diagnose the SMAS in time because complications of this condition are life-threatening and it is associated with a high rate of morbidity. Diagnostics of the SMAS is challenging, because it is rare and its symptoms are non-specific. Therefore, in order to better understand the essence of this pathology and to make diagnosis easier we present a rare clinical case of the superior mesenteric artery syndrome after a surgical correction of neuromuscular scoliosis. The clinical case. A 12-year-old girl with a specific development disorder, sensory neuropathy and progressive kypho-scoliosis was admitted to Vilnius University Children’s Hospital. The patient had right side 50-degree thoracic scoliosis and an 80-degree thoracic kyphosis. She underwent posterior spinal fusion with hooks and screws from Th1 to L2. On the fourth day after the surgery the patient developed nausea and began to vomit each day 1-2 times per day, especially after meals. The SMAS was suspected and a nasogastric tube was inserted, stomach decompression and the correction of electrolytes disbalance were made. After the treatment, the symptoms did not recur and a satisfactory correction and balance of the spine were made in coronal and sagittal planes. Conclusions. It is extremely important to identify the risk factors of the SMAS and begin preoperative diet supplements before surgical correction of scoliosis for patients with a low body mass index. After the first episode of vomiting following the surgery, we recommend to investigate these patients for a gastrointestinal obstruction as soon as possible. Decompression of the stomach, enteral or parenteral nutrition, and fluid therapy are essential in treating the SMAS. PMID:28356803

  3. The advantages of balloon assistance in endovascular embolization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular embolization is accepted as an alternative to surgical management of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) in most patients; however, when the feeder vessel arises from the trunk vessel with an acutely angled origin, microcatheter navigation may be difficult, hazardous, and sometimes impossible. We propose a technique that eases microguidewire engagement and microcatheterization of arteries that arise at very acute angles with the assistance of a parallel compliant balloon that acts as supporter, guider, and protector. This technique was successfully applied in three consecutive patients with spinal DAVF with unfavorable vascular anatomy that limited selective microcatheterization. The balloon supports and guides the microguidewire along the feeder (supportive role). The balloon can then be placed at the origin of the feeder vessel and inflated during embolization to prevent liquid agent reflux (protective role). Use of this technique as a first option reduces procedure time and radiation exposure. A limiting factor is the need for a relatively large working channel to allow the combined use of a balloon and a microcatheter.

  4. Patient Presentation and Management of Labial Ulceration Following Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Carin Franciosa, Stefan V.; Shah, Suken; Bonn, Joseph; Wu, Christine

    2007-11-15

    Uterine artery embolization is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Nontarget embolization of adjacent internal iliac artery branches is a reported complication of uterine artery embolization. The following report describes the presentation and management of ulcerations of the labium minora due to nontarget embolization of the internal pudendal artery.

  5. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Following Appendectomy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lardo, Soroy; Ariane, Anna; Chen, Khie

    2015-07-01

    Septic Pulmonary embolism is a rare condition where there were numerous pulmonary infarcts resulting from blood clot emboli that also contains microorganism. This disorder is insidious onset, Its clinical features usually unspecific and the diagnosis usually difficult to establish. A 43 old woman who underwent an appendicitis surgery, reentered the hospital at the sixth day after surgery presented with fever, pain at the surgical site, progressive severe dyspnea and chest tightness. From the physical examination finding there were tachycardia, tachypneu, wet rough basal rhonki on the right rear and tenderness at right lower region of the abdomen. The thorax-abdomen CT scan result was pleuropneumonial with minimal effusion in the right side. A CT angiography scan of the chest and abdomen showed intralumen emboli in medial lobe segmen of right pulmonary artery, right pleuropneumonia with segmental lession in segmen 10 right lobe and inflammation process along right lateral wall of the abdomen. Laboratory results that also supported diagnosis were D dimer 3442 ng/mL and culture result from surgical site pus showed E. Coli ESBL (+). Base on these findings, this case was established as a septic pulmonary embolism.

  6. Therapeutic Dilemmas Regarding Anticoagulation: An Experience in a Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Pulmonary Embolism, and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Patients with active bleeding complications who concomitantly develop overt pulmonary embolism (PE) present distinct therapeutic dilemmas, since they are perceived to be at substantial risk for the progression of the embolism in the absence of treatment and for aggravation of the hemorrhagic lesions if treated with anticoagulants. A 76-year-old patient with nephrotic syndrome, which is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism, concurrently developed acute PE and intracranial bleeding because of traumatic brain injury. In this case, we prioritized the treatment for PE with the intravenous unfractionated heparin followed by warfarinization. Despite the transient hemorrhagic progression of the brain contusion after the institution of anticoagulation, our patient recovered favorably from the disease without any signs of neurological compromise. Several conundrums regarding anticoagulation that emerged in this case are also discussed. PMID:27840582

  7. [Thrombus of the left auricle: a rarely noticed cause of systemic embolism. Apropos of an echocardiographic case report].

    PubMed

    Herpin, D; Gaudeau, B; Ciber, M A; Guillem, J P; Amiel, A; Boutaud, P; Demange, J

    1986-08-01

    The authors report the case of a 70 year old woman who had 3 episodes of acute ischaemia of the lower limbs in the space of 2 months. She was admitted to the Cardiology Unit after the second embolism: successive ECG recordings showed signs of the sick sinus syndrome justifying permanent pacing and anti-arrhythmic and anticoagulant therapy. The standard 2D echocardiographic views showed no signs of intracardiac disease, but a modified high short axis view demonstrated an oblong thrombus in the left auricle. Unfortunately, therapeutic non-compliance led to a third episode of embolism 2 weeks later; a repeat 2D echocardiogram showed the left auricle to be completely free of thrombosis. The authors review the medical literature of this condition. Echocardiography only began to play a useful diagnostic role from 1984 when technical improvements and the use of new and more appropriate views of the left auricle were introduced.

  8. Evaluation of meteorological and epidemiological characteristics of fatal pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törő, Klára; Pongrácz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Váradi-T, Aletta; Marcsa, Boglárka; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Lovas, Attila; Dunay, György; Sótonyi, Péter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors among epidemiological factors and meteorological conditions in connection with fatal pulmonary embolism. Information was collected from forensic autopsy records in sudden unexpected death cases where pulmonary embolism was the exact cause of death between 2001 and 2010 in Budapest. Meteorological parameters were detected during the investigated period. Gender, age, manner of death, cause of death, place of death, post-mortem pathomorphological changes and daily meteorological conditions (i.e. daily mean temperature and atmospheric pressure) were examined. We detected that the number of registered pulmonary embolism (No 467, 211 male) follows power law in time regardless of the manner of death. We first described that the number of registered fatal pulmonary embolism up to the nth day can be expressed as Y( n) = α ṡ n β where Y denotes the number of fatal pulmonary embolisms up to the nth day and α > 0 and β > 1 are model parameters. We found that there is a definite link between the cold temperature and the increasing incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism. Cold temperature and the change of air pressure appear to be predisposing factors for fatal pulmonary embolism. Meteorological parameters should have provided additional information about the predisposing factors of thromboembolism.

  9. Endovascular Occlusion of Dural Cavernous Fistulas through a Superior Ophthalmic Vein Approach

    PubMed Central

    Briganti, Francesco; Caranci, Ferdinando; Leone, Giuseppe; Napoli, Manuela; Cicala, Domenico; Briganti, Giuseppe; Tranfa, Fausto; Bonavolontà, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dural cavernous fistulas are low-flow vascular malformations with usually benign clinical course and a high rate of spontaneous resolution. Cases with symptom progression must be treated with an endovascular approach by arterial or venous route. We report 30 patients with dural cavernous fistulas treated by coil embolization using surgical exposure and retrograde catheterization of the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). The procedure resulted in closure of the fistula without other endovascular treatments in all 30 patients and clinical remission or improvement in 20 and eight patients, respectively. Embolization via a SOV approach is a safe and easy endovascular procedure, particularly indicated for dural cavernous fistulas with exclusive or prevalent internal carotid artery feeders and anterior venous drainage. PMID:24199817

  10. Ultrastructure of the myocardium after pulmonary embolism. A study in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cuénoud, H. F.; Joris, I.; Majno, G.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether acute massive pulmonary embolism can produce myocardial changes visible by light and electron microscopy. Ww therefore produced pulmonary embolism in rats using plastic microspheres (diameter, 15 +/- 5 mu). Two experimental protocols were used: lethal embolism, with a dose of microspheres known to kill in 3 to 15 hours (these rats were killed after 1 hour), and sublethal embolism, with a dose compatible with 100% survival (these rats were killed after 24 hours). In both groups, the left ventricle was normal. The right ventricle showed two tyes of changes: a) A distinctive lesion of the myocytes, more diffuse after lethal enbolism and different from the "zonal lesion" of shock. It consisted primarily in a localized shredding of the myofibrillar system; hence, the name shredding is proposed. Earlier stages of this lesion were represented by focal dissolution of the Z line (Z lysis). The pathogenesis of these lesions appeared to be primarily mechanical. b) Necrosis was already apparent at 1 hour and was more extensive after 24 hours. The pathogensis of the necrotic lesions is best explained by a temporary ischemia followed by delayed reflow; a possible potentiating role of endogenous catecholamines cannot be excluded. Most capilaries in the necrotic foci remained functional; this explains the rapid rate of the healing process of such lesions. A comparison is drawn between the observed foci of necrosis and the human myocardial lesions knowns as "miliary infarcts" and "myocytolysis." It is proposed that a factor common to all three is the preservation of the microcirculatory vessels and that our experimental model helps illuminate the pathogenesis of the human lesions. It is concluded that the right ventricle of acute cor pulmonale may develop cellular changes with a complex pathologenesis (mechanical, ischemic, and possibly hormonal). The nature of the changes found in our model could represent the morphologic substrate

  11. Microvascular Perfusion Changes following Transarterial Hepatic Tumor Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carmen Gacchina; Sharma, Karun V.; Levy, Elliot B.; Woods, David L.; Morris, Aaron H.; Bacher, John D.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Dreher, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify changes in tumor microvascular (< 1 mm) perfusion relative to commonly used angiographic endpoints. Materials and Methods Rabbit Vx2 liver tumors were embolized with 100–300-µm LC Bead particles to endpoints of substasis or complete stasis (controls were not embolized). Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by delivering two different fluorophore-conjugated perfusion markers (ie, lectins) through the catheter before embolization and 5 min after reaching the desired angiographic endpoint. Tumor microvasculature was labeled with an anti-CD31 antibody and analyzed with fluorescence microscopy for perfusion marker overlap/mismatch. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and post hoc test (n = 3–5 per group; 18 total). Results Mean microvascular density was 70 vessels/mm2 ± 17 (standard error of the mean), and 81% ± 1 of microvasculature (ie, CD31+ structures) was functionally perfused within viable Vx2 tumor regions. Embolization to the extent of substasis eliminated perfusion in 37% ± 9 of perfused microvessels (P > .05 vs baseline), whereas embolization to the extent of angiographic stasis eliminated perfusion in 56% ± 8 of perfused microvessels. Persistent microvascular perfusion following embolization was predominantly found in the tumor periphery, adjacent to normal tissue. Newly perfused microvasculature was evident following embolization to substasis but not when embolization was performed to complete angiographic stasis. Conclusions Nearly half of tumor microvasculature remained patent despite embolization to complete angiographic stasis. The observed preservation of tumor microvasculature perfusion with angiographic endpoints of substasis and stasis may have implications for tumor response to embolotherapy. PMID:26321051

  12. Embolism formation during freezing in the wood of Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Stefan; Cochard, Hervé; Améglio, Thierry; Kikuta, Silvia B

    2007-01-01

    Freeze-thaw events can cause embolism in plant xylem. According to classical theory, gas bubbles are formed during freezing and expand during thawing. Conifers have proved to be very resistant to freeze-thaw induced embolism, because bubbles in tracheids are small and redissolve during thawing. In contrast, increasing embolism rates upon consecutive freeze-thaw events were observed that cannot be explained by the classical mechanism. In this study, embolism formation during freeze-thaw events was analyzed via ultrasonic and Cryo-scanning electron microscope techniques. Twigs of Picea abies L. Karst. were subjected to up to 120 freeze-thaw cycles during which ultrasonic acoustic emissions, xylem temperature, and diameter variations were registered. In addition, the extent and cross-sectional pattern of embolism were analyzed with staining experiments and Cryo-scanning electron microscope observations. Embolism increased with the number of freeze-thaw events in twigs previously dehydrated to a water potential of -2.8 MPa. In these twigs, acoustic emissions were registered, while saturated twigs showed low, and totally dehydrated twigs showed no, acoustic activity. Acoustic emissions were detected only during the freezing process. This means that embolism was formed during freezing, which is in contradiction to the classical theory of freeze-thaw induced embolism. The clustered pattern of embolized tracheids in cross sections indicates that air spread from a dysfunctional tracheid to adjacent functional ones. We hypothesize that the low water potential of the growing ice front led to a decrease of the potential in nearby tracheids. This may result in freezing-induced air seeding.

  13. Spontaneous occlusion of cerebral arteriovenous malformation following partial embolization with Onyx.

    PubMed

    Nas, Omer Fatih; Ozturk, Kerem; Gokalp, Gokhan; Hakyemez, Bahattin

    2017-02-01

    Management options for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are surgery, radiosurgery, and endovascular embolization. The aim of partial embolization in endovascular treatment is to make total resection possible. However, increased risk of bleeding in partial embolization creates some controversies about treatment options. Spontaneous total occlusion of cerebral AVMs following partial obliteration with embolization agents is a rarely seen condition. We present a case with an AVM vanishing from right posterior cerebral artery which spontaneously occluded following partial embolization with Onyx liquid agent.

  14. Applicability of liquid radiopaque polyurethane for transcatheter embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, D.; Wieners, H.; Rueckner, R.

    1983-08-01

    Polyurethane Bayer was tested as an occlusive agent for experimental embolization in postmortem and postnephrectomy kidneys which served as a tumor model. Coaxial and balloon catheters were used for the embolization. To make polyurethane radiopaque, the material was labeled with different water-soluble, oily and solid contrast agents. Best results were achieved with oily contrast materials, e.g., Pantopaque. We found that polyurethane can easily be injected during a predetermined working time of 8-10 min. The embolization results in a complete, permanent, and homogeneous occlusion of the proximal arterial branches and small peripheral vessels.

  15. Renoduodenal Fistula After Transcatheter Embolization of Renal Angiomyolipoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, Rahul A.; Feldman, Adam S.; Walker, T. Gregory

    2015-02-15

    Transcatheter embolization of renal angiomyolipomas is a routinely performed, nephron-sparing procedure with a favorable safety profile. Complications from this procedure are typically minor in severity, with postembolization syndrome the most common minor complication. Abscess formation is a recognized but uncommon major complication of this procedure and is presumably due to superinfection of the infarcted tissue after arterial embolization. In this case report, we describe the formation of a renoduodenal fistula after embolization of an angiomyolipoma, complicated by intracranial abscess formation and requiring multiple percutaneous drainage procedures and eventual partial nephrectomy.

  16. Improving the results of transarterial embolization of type 2 endoleaks with the embolic polymer Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Wnuk, Emilia; Maciag, Rafal; Solonynko, Bohdan; Korzeniowski, Krzysztof; Lamparski, Krzysztof; Rowinski, Olgierd

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 endoleaks (T2E) occur in 10 to 20% of patients after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and remain a significant clinical issue. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and clinical outcomes of transarterial treatment of persistent type II endoleaks after EVAR using the liquid embolic Onyx. Material and methods From February 2012 to August 2015 transarterial T2E embolization was attempted in 22 patients (21 men, median age: 73, range: 62–88 years). Indications for treatment included an increase in the diameter of the aneurysm sac above 5 mm and a persistent endoleak observed for more than 6 months. Mean time from EVAR to endoleak treatment was 43 months (range: 2–125 months). Results Primary technical success was achieved in 17 (77.3%) patients and secondary technical success in 81.8%, with 0% in-hospital mortality. The mean procedure time was 95 ±48 min, with an average fluoroscopy time of 54 ±25 min. The mean amount of Onyx used was 7.5 ±6.6 ml. Clinical success was seen in 17/21 patients with follow-up imaging (80.9%). Mean follow-up time was 17 months (range: 3–38 months). Conclusions Onyx has been shown to effectively stabilize previous aneurysm growth as a result of the T2E in the majority of our patients. Transarterial embolization of T2E can be significantly improved as compared to previously reported results by using liquid embolic polymers such as Onyx. PMID:28194246

  17. Embolization of a giant pediatric, posttraumatic, skull base internal carotid artery aneurysm with a liquid embolic agent.

    PubMed

    Reig, Adam S; Simon, Scott; Mericle, Robert A

    2009-11-01

    Many treatments for posttraumatic, skull base aneurysms have been described. Eight months after an all-terrain-vehicle accident, this 12-year-old girl presented with right-side Horner syndrome caused by a 33 x 19-mm internal carotid artery aneurysm at the C-1 level. We chose to treat the aneurysm with a new liquid embolic agent for wide-necked, side-wall aneurysms (Onyx HD 500). We felt this treatment would result in less morbidity than surgery and was less likely to occlude the parent artery than placement of a covered stent, especially in a smaller artery in a pediatric patient. Liquid embolic agents also appear to be associated with a lower chance of recanalization and lower cost compared with stent-assisted coil embolization. After the patient was treated with loading doses of aspirin, clopidogrel bisulfate, and heparin, 99% of the aneurysm was embolized with 9 cc of the liquid embolic agent. There were no complications, and the patient remained neurologically stable. Follow-up angiography revealed durable aneurysm occlusion after 1 year. The cost of Onyx was less than the cost of coils required for coil embolization of similarly sized intracranial aneurysms at our institution. Liquid embolic agents can provide a safe, efficacious, and cost-effective approach to treatment of select giant, posttraumatic, skull base aneurysms in pediatric patients.

  18. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O. Okuducu, A. F.; Jordan, O.; Tesmer, K.; Pech, M.; Weigang, E.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Doelker, E.; Felix, R.

    2006-12-15

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  19. [A new embolic material: super absorbent polymer (SAP) microsphere and its embolic effects].

    PubMed

    Jiaqi, Y; Hori, S; Minamitani, K; Hashimoto, T; Yoshimura, H; Nomura, N; Ishida, T; Fukuda, H; Tomoda, K; Nakamura, H

    1996-01-01

    SAP-Microsphere (sodium acrylic acid-vinyl alcohol copolymer) has the ability to absorb fluids within a few minutes and increase its diameter. Its diameter can also be calibrated. The diameters in ionic contrast material and human serum are 2.1 and 3.5 times larger, respectively, than the original size. It can pass through a microcatheter with an ionic contrast material, and swells at the occluding point into the desired size. It can be recognized under fluoroscopy due to its absorption of contrast material. A total of 10 rabbit kidney embolizations were done followed by resection in 1-14 weeks. Recanalization was absent in all cases. No adhesion to the perirenal tissue was found. Limited reactive change in endothelial cells was found at one week. No changes in the smooth muscle layer were found at any time during the study. Limited infiltration of neutrophil cells was found in perivascular tissue within a period of one week. SAP-Microspheres maintained their spherical shape during a 14-week period. Extensive fibrosis and calcification were found after 4 weeks. SAP-Microspheres are promising as an embolic agent to obtain satisfactory results of embolization therapy.

  20. Coronary Embolization Caused by Pleomorphic Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Tadashi; Yonetsu, Taishi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Kakuta, Tsunekazu

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man who had been transferred to our emergency room due to sudden chest pain was diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Primary percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. A long, white object which looked like a parasitic worm was retrieved via intracoronary aspiration and revascularization was successfully completed. Contrast computed tomography revealed a huge 7×6 cm mass in the right upper pulmonary lobe with direct pulmonary vein invasion. Histopathologic examination of the aspirated coronary object revealed pleomorphic lung carcinoma. This is an unusual case of STEMI caused by lung tumor embolization via direct pulmonary vein invasion to the left side of the heart. PMID:27980261

  1. Micro-Embolic Renal Ischemia and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean; Mersereau, William A.

    1965-01-01

    A new experimental method of causing apparently sustained hypertension of renal origin is described. The method depends on the production of a source of micro-emboli in the thoracic aorta of rabbits by the insertion of magnesium-aluminum wire, covered by a plastic in which notches have been cut. Thrombus, considered to be formed largely of platelets, forms on the exposed areas of the wire and atrophic lesions subsequently occur along the cortical surface of the kidneys. It is probable that the atrophic lesions are due to repeated episodes of platelet micro-embolism. These lesions resemble the marginal zone of infarcts, which has been suggested as the source of a pressor substance. Proximal to the atrophic lesions, arterioles show a prominent intimal thickening resembling that seen in severe hypertension. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:14246295

  2. Onyx, a New Liquid Embolic Material for Peripheral Interventions: Preliminary Experience in Aneurysm, Pseudoaneurysm, and Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Vanninen, Ritva L. Manninen, I.

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To describe our preliminary experience with a new liquid embolization agent, Onyx, in peripheral interventions. Methods and results. We successfully treated two peripheral aneurysms (one in an internal iliac artery, one in a thoracic collateral artery of an aortic coarctation), two peripheral pseudoaneurysms (one in a lumbar artery, one in a renal artery), and one pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Conclusion. Onyx is a promising alternative embolic material for peripheral interventions. It can be combined with coils in selected cases, and balloon catheters can be effectively used during slow injection of embolic material to control flow and protect the aneurysm neck.

  3. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Surgical Pulmonary Embolectomy.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Aaron; Tapson, Victor F; Ramzy, Danny

    2017-02-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) refers to large emboli that cause hemodynamic instability, right ventricular failure, and circulatory collapse. According to the 2016 ACCP Antithrombotic Guidelines, therapy for massive PE should include systemic thrombolytic therapy in conjunction with anticoagulation and supportive care. However, in patients with a contraindication to systemic thrombolytics or in those who fail the above interventions, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and/or surgical embolectomy may be used to improve oxygenation, achieve hemodynamic stability, and successfully treat massive PE. Randomized controlled human trials evaluating ECMO in this context have not been done, and its role has not been well-defined. The European Society of Cardiology 2014 acute PE guidelines briefly mention that ECMO can be used for massive PE as a method for hemodynamic support and as an adjunct to surgical embolectomy. The 2016 CHEST Antithrombotic Therapy for venous thromboembolism Disease guidelines do not mention ECMO in the management of massive PE. However, multiple case reports and small series cited benefit with ECMO for massive PE. Further, ECMO may facilitate stabilization for surgical embolectomy. Unfortunately, ECMO requires full anticoagulation to maintain the functionality of the system; hence, significant bleeding complicates its use in 35% of patients. Contraindications to ECMO include high bleeding risk, recent surgery or hemorrhagic stroke, poor baseline functional status, advanced age, neurologic dysfunction, morbid obesity, unrecoverable condition, renal failure, and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation without adequate perfusion of end organs. In this review, we discuss management of massive PE, with an emphasis on the potential role for ECMO and/or surgical embolectomy.

  4. Embolization of Spontaneous Hemarthrosis Post Total Knee Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Given, M. F. Smith, P.; Lyon, S. M.; Robertson, D.; Thomson, K. R.

    2008-09-15

    Spontaneous nonhemophiliac hemarthrosis is an unusual entity, which has been little described. We present three cases of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis post total knee replacement (TKR) and successful management with embolization. Three male patients were referred to our service for angiography and treatment of recurrent hemarthrosis post TKR. In all three patients antegrade ipsilateral common femoral artery punctures and selective angiography of the geniculate branches were performed with a microcatheter. Abnormal vasculature was noted in all cases. Subsequent embolization was performed with Contour (Boston Scientific, Target Vascular, Cork, Ireland) embolization particles (150-250 and 250-355 {mu}m) in two patients and microcoils in the third (TornadoR; Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA). Technical success was 100%. One patient had a recurrence of symptoms requiring a repeat procedure 6 months later. No complications were encountered. Selective angiography and particle embolization is an effective technique for management of this unusual but problematic postoperative sequelae.

  5. Selective Embolization of Large Symptomatic Iatrogenic Renal Transplant Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, Fay L.; Kessel, David Nicholson, Tony; Robertson, Iain

    2006-12-15

    We report on the successful treatment of hypertension by occlusion of a large iatrogenic renal transplant arteriovenous fistula using detachable embolization coils with concomitant flow reduction by occlusion balloon in two patients.

  6. Percutaneous embolization of bony pelvic neoplasms with tissue adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, F.S.; Rosch, J.; Bird, C.B.

    1983-04-01

    Eight patients with tumors of the bony pelvis underwent embolization with isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate (IBCA). Five patients had primary bone tumors, of which 2 were malignant and 3 were benign; 3 patients had metastases to the bony pelvis from the thyroid gland, kidney, and femur, respectively. Embolization was performed to minimize blood loss during resection of a giant-cell tumor in one patient and insertion of a hip prosthesis in another who had metastatic renal carcinoma. It was also done prior to scheduled surgery in one of the patients with aneurysmal bone cyst, but healing was sufficient to cancel the operation; in the other patient, embolization was the only therapy. Palliative embolization was performed in 4 patients with malignant tumors after other means failed to control pain or slow progression. IBCA appears to be an efficient means of occluding the vessels feeding selected primary bone tumors and metastases.

  7. Stomal Varices: Treatment by Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, Keiko; Hara, Akihiko; Arita, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Katsuhiko; Matsui, Norichika; Kaneyuki, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    1999-11-15

    Bleeding from stomal varices in a patient with portal hypertension, uncontrolled by surgical ligation and sclerotherapy, was well controlled by percutaneous transhepatic embolization with platinum and stainless-steel coils.

  8. Embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug in TIPS Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pattynama, Peter M. T. Wils, Alexandra; Linden, Edwin van der; Dijk, Lukas C. van

    2007-11-15

    Vessel embolization can be a valuable adjunct procedure in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). During the creation of a TIPS, embolization of portal vein collaterals supplying esophageal varices may lower the risk of secondary rebleeding. And after creation of a TIPS, closure of the TIPS itself may be indicated if the resulting hepatic encephalopathy severely impairs mental functioning. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP; AGA Medical, Golden Valley, MN) is well suited for embolization of large-diameter vessels and has been employed in a variety of vascular lesions including congenital arteriovenous shunts. Here we describe the use of the AVP in the context of TIPS to embolize portal vein collaterals (n = 8) or to occlude the TIPS (n = 2)

  9. Aortic Branch Artery Pseudoaneurysms Associated with Intramural Hematoma: When and How to Do Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Giancarlo; Williams, David M.

    2013-04-15

    To describe when and how to perform endovascular embolization of aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B intramural hematoma (IMH) involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) that increased significantly in size during follow-up. Sixty-one patients (39 men; mean {+-} standard deviation age 66.1 {+-} 11.2 years) with acute IMH undergoing at least two multidetector computed tomographic examinations during follow-up for 12 months or longer were enrolled. Overall, 48 patients (31 men, age 65.9 {+-} 11.5) had type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III). Among the 48 patients, 26 (54 %; 17 men, aged 64.3 {+-} 11.4 years) had 71 aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms. Overall, during a mean follow-up of 22.1 {+-} 9.5 months (range 12-42 months), 31 (44 %) pseudoaneurysms disappeared; 22 (31 %) decreased in size; two (3 %) remained stable; and 16 (22 %) increased in size. Among the 16 pseudoaneurysms with increasing size, five of these (three intercostal arteries, one combined intercostobronchial/intercostal arteries, one renal artery), present in five symptomatic patients, had a significant increase in size (thickness >10 mm; width and length >20 mm). These five patients underwent endovascular embolization with coils and/or Amplatzer Vascular Plug. In all patients, complete thrombosis and exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysm and relief of back pain were achieved. Aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) may be considered relatively benign lesions. However, a small number may grow in size or extend longitudinally with clinical symptoms during follow-up, and in these cases, endovascular embolization can be an effective and safe procedure.

  10. Percutaneous Embolization of Transhepatic Tracks for Biliary Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Stuart M.; Terhaar, Olaf; Given, Mark F.; O'Dwyer, Helena M.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2006-12-15

    Significant pain can occur after removing transhepatic catheters from biliary access tracks, after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) or stenting. We undertook a randomized prospective study to ascertain whether track embolization decreases the amount of pain or analgesic requirement after PBD. Fifty consecutive patients (M:F, 22:28; age range:29-85 years; mean age: 66.3 years) undergoing PBD were randomized to receive track embolization or no track embolization after removal of biliary drainage catheters. A combination of Lipoidol and n-butyl cyanoacrylate were used to embolize transhepatic tracks using an 8F dilator. The patients who did not have track embolization performed had biliary drainage catheters removed over a guide wire. A visual analog scoring (VAS) system was used to grade pain associated with catheter removal, 24 h afterward. A required analgesic score (RAS) was devised to tabulate the analgesia required. No analgesia had a score of 0, oral or rectal nonopiate analgesics had a score of 1, oral opiates had a score of 2, and parenteral opiates had a score of 3. The average VAS and RAS for both groups were calculated and compared.Seven patients were excluded for various reasons, leaving 43 patients in the study group. Twenty-one patients comprised the embolization group and 22 patients comprised the nonembolization group. The mean biliary catheter dwell time was not significantly different (p > 0.05) between the embolization group and nonembolization (mean: 5.4 days vs 6.9 days, respectively). In the nonembolization group, the mean VAS was 3.4. Eight patients required parenteral opiates, three patients required oral opiates, and five patients required oral or rectal analgesics, yielding a mean RAS of 1.6. In the embolization group, the mean VAS was 0.9. No patient required parenteral opiates, six patients required oral opiates, and two patients had oral analgesia. The average RAS was 0.6. Both the VAS and the RAS were significantly lower in the

  11. Looking for the Ideal Particle: An Experimental Embolization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Senturk, Cagin; Cakir, Volkan; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Yilmaz, Osman; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2010-04-15

    This study sought to compare the most frequently used embolic particles in an animal model. In 16 New Zealand white rabbits, right renal arteries were embolized using four different embolic particles (polyvinyl alcohol [PVA] particles, 150-250 {mu}m; PVA microspheres [PVAMs], 150-300 {mu}m; Tris-acryl gelatin microspheres [TGMs], 100-300 {mu}m; expanding microspheres [EXMs], 50-100 {mu}m). Quantity of embolic material used, embolization time, and angiographic patterns were documented. Fourteen days later, a control angiography was done to document angiographic recanalization and all animals were sacrificed. Histopathological specimens were analyzed for microscopic appearance and granulometric size of the particles, extravasation of the particles, perivascular inflammation, and neocapillarization. The volume of the infarct area in each kidney was calculated. Results revealed a significantly lesser amount of embolic material used in the EXM group (p = 0.020). The angiographic recanalization rate in the EXM group (100%), compared with the PVA (0%) and TGM (0%) groups, was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.014). Although 75% of the renal arteries embolized with PVAMs were recanalized, this was not found to be statistically significant (p = 0.071). Occlusion levels in the PVA group were more proximal than with any of the microspheres. While there was no extravasation in the TGM group, extravasation rates in the PVA, PVAM, and EXM groups were 50%, 25%, and 75%, respectively. A mild degree of inflammation was noted in the PVA, PVAM, and TGM groups. EXMs caused a moderate degree of inflammation in two kidneys (50%). There was neocapillarization in the vessel lumen in all kidneys in the PVA and PVAM groups. The difference was significant (p = 0.014) compared with the TGM and EXM groups, which did not have any neocapillarization. Regarding infarct area volumes, the difference among the groups was significant (p = 0.022). EXMs caused significantly (p = 0.021) less

  12. Comparison of the Efficacy of the Embolic Agents Acrylamido Polyvinyl Alcohol Microspheres and Tris-Acryl Gelatin Microspheres for Uterine Artery Embolization for Leiomyomas: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington-Kirsch, Robert L.; Chesnick, Richard

    2011-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of acrylamido polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (a-PVAM) as an embolic agent for uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared with Tris-acryl gelatin microspheres (TAGM).Design, Setting, ParticipantsProspective randomized double-blind noninferiority trial. Conducted at two sites both with regional UAE practices. Forty-six women with symptomatic leiomyomas.InterventionUAE procedure was performed with either of the two embolic agents. Either 700-900-{mu}m a-PVAM or 500-700-{mu}m TAGM was used.Main Outcome MeasuresChanges in leiomyoma perfusion, overall uterine volume, and dominant leiomyomas volume measured by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after UAE by a reader blinded to the embolic agent used. Changes in Uterine Fibroid Symptoms and Quality of Life questionnaire scores were measured at 3, 6, and 12 months after UAE. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized and treated under the study protocol (a-PVAM n = 22, TAGM n = 24). There were no procedure-related complications. Two patients were excluded from analysis (one technical failure of the procedure, one withdrawal from study). Successful (>90%) leiomyoma devascularization was observed in 81% of subjects at 1 week after UAE, 97% at 3 months after UAE, and 95% at 6 months after UAE. No significant differences were observed in 14 of 15 outcome measurements, consistent with noninferiority. TAGM was slightly superior to a-PVAM on one comparison (overall quality of life at 3 months after UAE).

  13. Superselective Embolization in Posttraumatic Priapism with Glubran 2 Acrylic Glue

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Spinelli, Alessio; Konda, Daniel Reale, Carlo Andrea; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-09-15

    Two patients with posttraumatic priapism underwent transcatheter embolization using microcoils, resulting in temporary penile detumescence and an apparent resolution of the artero-venous fistula. In both cases, priapism recurred 24 hours after the procedure and was successfully treated through selective transcatheter embolization of the nidus using acrylic glue (Glubran 2). The patients showed complete recovery of sexual activity within 30 days from the procedure and persistent exclusion of the artero-venous fistula after a 12-month follow-up.

  14. Paradoxical Cerebral Fat Embolism in Revision Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Piuzzi, Nicolás S.; Zanotti, Gerardo; Comba, Fernando M.; Buttaro, Martin A.; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of clinical fat embolism syndrome (FES) is low (<1%) whilst fat embolism (FE) of marrow fat appears to occur more often (Mellor and Soni (2001)). Paradoxical brain FE may occur in patients undergoing hip orthopedic surgery who have an undocumented patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report a case of an eighty-year-old male patient, who underwent a scheduled revision hip surgery suffering a paradoxical cerebral FE. PMID:25184065

  15. Electrocardiographic findings in Emergency Department patients with pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Richman, Peter B; Loutfi, Hassan; Lester, Steven J; Cambell, Patricia; Matthews, Jessica; Friese, Jeremy; Wood, Joseph; Kasper, David; Chen, Frederick; Mandell, Mark

    2004-08-01

    To assess the pre-study, null hypothesis that there is no difference in the electrocardiogram (EKG) findings for Emergency Department (ED) patients who rule in vs. rule out for suspected pulmonary embolism, a retrospective review of a cohort of patients with pulmonary embolism and their controls was conducted in an academic, suburban ED. Patients who were evaluated in the ED during a one-year study period for symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism were eligible for inclusion. All patients with pulmonary embolism and sex- and age-matched controls comprised the final study groups. Two board-certified cardiologists reviewed each patient's EKG. There were 350 eligible patients identified; 49 patients with pulmonary embolism and 49 controls were entered into the study. The most common rhythm observed in both groups was normal sinus rhythm (67.3% cases vs. 68.6 % controls; p = 1.0). Abnormalities believed to be associated with pulmonary embolism occurred with similar frequency in both case and control groups (sinus tachycardia [18.8 % vs. 11.8%, respectively; p = 0.40]), incomplete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.24), complete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 6.0, respectively; p = 1.0), S1Q3T3 pattern (2.1 vs. 0.0, respectively; p = 0.49), S1Q3 pattern (0.0 vs. 0.0), and extreme right axis (0.0 vs. 0.0). New EKG changes were identified more frequently for patients with pulmonary embolism (33.3% vs. 12.5% controls; p = 0.03), but specific findings were rarely different between cases and controls. In our cohort of ED patients, we did not identify EKG features that are likely to help distinguish patients with pulmonary embolism from those who rule out for the disease.

  16. A Case of Traumatic Mesenteric Bleeding Controlled by only Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, Yoshiki E-mail: asayama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Isoda, Takuro; Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakashima, Hideaki

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of mesenteric hematoma following blunt abdominal trauma that was successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and did not require surgical repair. A 43-year-old man with blunt abdominal trauma caused in a factory accident was admitted with a stable general condition and laboratory data. On CT examination, a large mesenteric hematoma with extravasation of contrast media was observed. TAE was first attempted to control the bleeding. A superior mesenteric angiogram showed extravasation of contrast medium from a branch of the ileocolic artery and obstruction of the cecal branch. After successful TAE using microcoils, the distal portion of the cecal branch was still preserved via collateral circulation. No abdominal symptoms have occurred during the 7 months following TAE. In mesenteric injury cases with limited intestinal damage, TAE may therefore be a reasonable alternative to emergent laparotomy.

  17. Infiltrated Embolization of Meningioma with Dilute Cyanoacrylate Glue

    PubMed Central

    OHNISHI, Hiroyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru; MURAO, Kenichi; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; TAKAHASHI, Kenkichi; OHNISHI, Hideyuki; KUROIWA, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    We describe the efficacy and technical aspects of infiltrated preoperative embolization of meningioma by penetration of very dilute glue. In this method, a 13% n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-lipiodol mixture is injected extremely slowly from the middle meningeal artery (MMA) in a similar manner to plug and push injection of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer mixed with tantalum and dimethyl sulfoxide (Onyx®) after the tortuous side feeders are proximally embolized. The glue is infiltrated into small tumor arteries and extends to inaccessible feeders from deep meningeal arteries. Since 2011, we have used this technique in the embolization of 32 cases preoperatively diagnosed with meningioma. Intratumoral embolization was possible in 30 cases (94%), and a greater than 50% reduction in contrast area of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging (T1-WI) was achieved in 18 cases (56%). Two cases achieved complete devascularization, showing a remarkable shrinkage in tumor size after embolization. If excessive reflux of embolization and the resulting migration of glue into normal arteries is achieved, this method provides extremely effective devascularization on surgical extirpation. It might also be applicable to surgically untreatable meningiomas as a semi-radical treatment option. PMID:27646010

  18. Single-session Coil Embolization of Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Keun

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is no clear treatment strategy for the management of multiple intracranial aneurysms because of variable anatomical distribution, difficult identification of the aneurysm ruptured, and poor overall outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of single-session coil embolization for multiple intracranial aneurysms. Methods Between September 2008 and December 2012, 209 aneurysms in 117 patients were treated at our institute. Twenty eight among the 117 patients had multiple aneurysms with a total of 71, and 60 of the 71 aneurysms underwent coil embolization in a single-session. Results A total of 60 aneurysms were treated with a single-session coil embolization, of which the most frequent locations were in the posterior communicating artery, followed by the middle cerebral artery. Immediate post-embolization angiographies showed total occlusion in 49 (81.7%) aneurysms, remnant neck in 6 (10%), and body-filling in 5 (8.3%). Procedure-related complications had developed in 2 (3.3%) of the 60 embolized aneurysms: an asymptomatic thromboembolic event, and a partial coil protrusion without a subsequent thromboembolic complication. Conclusion With careful evaluation of individual aneurysm characteristics and configuration, multiple intracranial aneurysms previously thought to require multimodality therapy can be safely treated in a single-session coil embolization. PMID:24167798

  19. Interventional embolization therapy of puerile congenital deep femoral arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JING; TAN, XIAO-YUN; ZHOU, SHAO-YI; CHEN, KUN-SHAN; LI, HAI-BO; CHUANQIANG-NIU; JIANG, YI-ZHOU; LIN, QUE-QING

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the treatment efficiency of interventional embolization therapy in puerile congenital deep femoral arteriovenous fistula. A retrospective analysis was conducted for 9 cases of congenital deep femoral arteriovenous fistulae treated in our department in the past 5 years. B-ultrasound examination indicated that all puerile patients suffered from deep femoral arteriovenous fistulae, which was confirmed by angiography examination. For all patients, endovascular interventional embolization therapy was conducted and angiography re-examination was implemented after 4 weeks. If there were residual orificium fistulae, the interventional embolization therapy was conducted again. In the 6 month to 2 year follow-up period, improvement of clinical symptoms was observed. Following interventional embolization, 9 cases of deep femoral arteriovenous fistulae were completely occluded and the clinical symptoms were improved. No relapses occurred. In addition, after three embolization treatments, the disease condition of one case was controlled well and the disease condition did not progress. Interventional embolization therapy has a number of advantages, including simple surgery and reliable treatment efficacy. Therefore, it is worthy of promotion and application in the clinic. PMID:23407852

  20. Midterm Clinical and First Reproductive Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Uterine Fibroid Embolization and Myomectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Michal Maskova, Jana; Fucikova, Zuzana; Kuzel, David; Belsan, Tomas; Sosna, Ondrej

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the midterm results of a radiological and surgical approach to uterine fibroids. One hundred twenty-one women with reproductive plans who presented with an intramural fibroid(s) larger than 4 cm were randomly selected for either uterine artery embolization (UAE) or myomectomy. We compared the efficacy and safety of the two procedures and their impact on patient fertility. Fifty-eight embolizations and 63 myomectomies (42 laparoscopic, 21 open) were performed. One hundred eighteen patients have finished at least a 12-month follow-up; the mean follow-up in the entire study population was 24.9 months. Embolized patients underwent a significantly shorter procedure and required a shorter hospital stay and recovery period. They also presented with a lower CRP concentration on the second day after the procedure (p < 0.0001 for all parameters). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the rate of technical success, symptomatic effectiveness, postprocedural follicle stimulating hormone levels, number of reinterventions for fibroid recurrence or regrowth, or complication rates. Forty women after myomectomy and 26 after UAE have tried to conceive, and of these we registered 50 gestations in 45 women. There were more pregnancies (33) and labors (19) and fewer abortions (6) after surgery than after embolization (17 pregnancies, 5 labors, 9 abortions) (p < 0.05). Obstetrical and perinatal results were similar in both groups, possibly due to the low number of labors after UAE to date. We conclude that UAE is less invasive and as symptomatically effective and safe as myomectomy, but myomectomy appears to have superior reproductive outcomes in the first 2 years after treatment.

  1. A New Device for Vascular Embolization: Report on Case of Two Pulmonary Arteriovenous Fistulas Embolization Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto Greco, Laura; Stefanini, Giulio; Citone, Michele; Speranza, Annnarita; David, Vincenzo

    2006-10-15

    A pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (PAVF) is a rare vascular malformation commonly treated by embolization with coils or balloons to prevent the risk of several serious complications such as cerebral embolism and brain abscess. A 32-year-old female with two PAVFs and neurological ischemic manifestations has been successfully treated by transcatheter embolization of both fistulas using a new device (Amplatzer Vascular Plug). This self-expanding cylindrical nitinol mesh cage with high radial strength allows a chance of relocation until properly positioned. It is preferred to coils or balloons because a large caliber of feeding artery implied high risk of uncontrollable distal embolization. There appear to be no reports in the literature concerning use of this device, which could represent a useful innovative tool in embolotherapies, especially in large vascular areas.

  2. Relation of electrocardiographic changes in pulmonary embolism to right ventricular enlargement.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Sabra, Michel J; Treadaway, Brent; Vijapura, Chirag; Warren, Robert; Joshi, Parth; Sadiq, Muhammad; Kofoed, J Thomas; Hughes, Patrick; Chabala, Stephen D; Keyes, Daniel C; Kakish, Edward; Hughes, Mary J

    2013-12-15

    The electrocardiographic (ECG) findings in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) and no previous cardiopulmonary disease are well documented; however, investigation of the relation of ECG abnormalities to right ventricular (RV) enlargement has been limited. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess further the relation of ECG changes in acute PE to RV cavity enlargement (dilation). The records of patients hospitalized from January 2009 to December 2012 with acute PE and no previous cardiopulmonary disease were reviewed. A total of 289 patients were included. RV cavity enlargement was present in 141 patients (49%). Normal ECG findings were less prevalent in patients with PE and RV enlargement than those with PE and no RV enlargement (35 of 141 [25%] vs 56 of 148 [38%]; p = 0.02). One or more of the traditional ECG manifestations of acute cor pulmonale (S1Q3T3, complete right bundle branch block, P pulmonale, or right axis deviation) was found in 18 of 141 patients (13%) with RV enlargement and 13 of 148 (8.8%) with a normal size RV (p = NS). None of the ECG abnormalities was sensitive for RV enlargement. The specificity of P and QRS abnormalities was high. The positive predictive values were ≤83% or had wide 95% confidence intervals. The negative predictive values ranged from 50% to 61%. In conclusion, ECG findings were not useful for the detection or exclusion of RV cavity enlargement in patients with acute PE.

  3. The original and simplified Wells rules and age-adjusted D-dimer testing to rule out pulmonary embolism: an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Es, N; Kraaijpoel, N; Klok, F A; Huisman, M V; Den Exter, P L; Mos, I C M; Galipienzo, J; Büller, H R; Bossuyt, P M

    2017-04-01

    Essentials Evidence for the simplified Wells rule in ruling out acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is scarce. This was a post-hoc analysis on data from 6 studies comprising 7268 patients with suspected PE. The simplified Wells rule combined with age-adjusted D-dimer testing may safely rule out PE. Given its ease of use, the simplified Wells rule is to be preferred over the original Wells rule.

  4. Cerebral embolism through hematogenous dissemination of pulmonary mucormycosis complicating relapsed leukemia.

    PubMed

    Higo, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yamazaki, Sho; Ando, Sumiyo; Gonoi, Wataru; Ishida, Masanori; Okuma, Hidemi; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Ohtomo, Kuni; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2015-01-01

    Invasive mucormycosis in patients with hematological diseases mostly occurs in the lungs. Invasive mucormycosis of other anatomical sites is relatively infrequent and its pathogenesis has not so far been well elucidated. Here, we describe an autopsy case of pulmonary invasive mucormycosis complicated by cerebral embolism with infarct. A 77-year-old Japanese woman with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia complained of left visual disturbance and weakness of the lower limbs. The diagnosis of leukemic infiltration to the central nervous system was made. Repeated intrathecal injection of methotrexate plus cytarabine resulted in partial amelioration of the neurologic symptoms. However, the patient then developed fever, dyspnea, and subsequent right hemiparesis. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a consolidative shadow with halo sign in the left lung field, which was compatible with either invasive pulmonary aspergillosis or mucormycosis. These findings accounted for fever and dyspnea, but not hemiparesis. Despite antifungal therapy, the patient succumbed to death after two weeks. Autopsy revealed pulmonary invasive mucormycosis with a fungal ball in the lumina of the adjacent ascending aorta. Intriguingly, autopsy and postmortem CT scan identified left cerebral infarct due to mucormycosis, which accounted for the right hemiparesis. It is likely that the fungal ball caused the cerebral embolism through hematogenous dissemination. We should suspect hematogenous dissemination when we see a patient with pulmonary invasive mucormycosis developing neurologic symptoms.

  5. Embolization for Hemoptysis in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Reesink, Herre J. Delden, Otto M. van; Kloek, Jaap J.; Jansen, Henk M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Bresser, Paul

    2007-02-15

    Hemoptysis is a known complication in patients with bronchial artery hypertrophy due to a variety of chronic pulmonary disorders. Bronchial artery hypertrophy is observed in most patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), but surprisingly little is known about the incidence of hemoptysis in these patients. In this paper, we report on 2 patients with CTEPH and recurrent severe hemoptysis, who were treated by bronchial artery embolization. One patient recovered and 1 patient died as a consequence of the bleeding. A systematic review revealed 21 studies on the underlying pathology in 1,844 patients with moderate to severe hemoptysis. CTEPH was reported to be the cause of bleeding in 0.1% (n = 2), pulmonary arterial hypertension without chronic thromboembolic disease in 0.2% (n = 4), and acute pulmonary embolism in 0.7% (n = 12) of the patients. In contrast to this, 5 patients (6%) in our own series of 79 CTEPH patients suffered from moderate to severe hemoptysis requiring medical intervention. Severe hemoptysis appears to be an uncommon, but possibly underreported, life-threatening complication in CTEPH patients. As most CTEPH patients require life-long anticoagulants a therapeutic dilemma may ensue. Therefore, we propose that even mild hemoptysis in CTEPH patients warrants prompt evaluation, and treatment by embolization should be offered as first choice in CTEPH patients.

  6. Computed tomography angiography with pulmonary artery thrombus burden and right-to-left ventricular diameter ratio after pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Ouriel, Kenneth; Ouriel, Richard L; Lim, Yeun J; Piazza, Gregory; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Computed tomography angiography is used for quantifying the significance of pulmonary embolism, but its reliability has not been well defined. Methods The study cohort comprised 10 patients randomly selected from a 150-patient prospective trial of ultrasound-facilitated fibrinolysis for acute pulmonary embolism. Four reviewers independently evaluated the right-to-left ventricular diameter ratios using the standard multiplanar reformatted technique and a simplified (axial) method, and thrombus burden with the standard modified Miller score and a new, refined Miller scoring system. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient for intra-observer variability was .949 and .970 for the multiplanar reformatted and axial methods for estimating right-to-left ventricular ratios, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was high and similar for the two methods, with intraclass correlation coefficient of .969 and .976. The modified Miller score had good intra-observer agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient .820) and was similar to the refined Miller method (intraclass correlation coefficient .883) for estimating thrombus burden. Inter-observer agreement was also comparable between the techniques, with intraclass correlation coefficient of .829 and .914 for the modified Miller and refined Miller methods. Conclusions The reliability of computed tomography angiography for pulmonary embolism was excellent for the axial and multiplanar reformatted methods for quantifying the right-to-left ventricular ratio and for the modified Miller and refined Miller scores for quantifying of pulmonary artery thrombus burden.

  7. Coil Protruding into the Common Femoral Vein Following Pelvic Venous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Petra Holdstock, Judith M.; Bacon, Jennifer L.; Lopez, Anthony J.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Price, Barrie A.

    2008-03-15

    Pelvic venous embolization is performed for pelvic congestion syndrome and prior to lower limb varicose vein surgery in females with associated pelvic venous insufficiency. The procedure is analogous to varicocele embolization in males, although refluxing internal iliac vein tributaries may also be embolized. We report a case of inadvertent coil placement in the common femoral vein while embolizing the obturator vein, during pelvic vein embolization for recurrent lower limb varicose veins. There were no clinical consequences and the coil was left in situ. We advise caution when embolizing internal iliac vein tributaries where there is clinically significant communication with veins of the lower limb.

  8. Use of preoperative embolization prior to Transplant nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yeast, Carrie; Riley, Julie M.; Holyoak, Joshua; Ross, Gilbert; Weinstein, Stephen; Wakefield, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction After a failed transplant, management of a non-functional graft with pain or recurrent infections can be challenging. Transplant nephrectomy (TN) can be a morbid procedure with the potential for significant blood loss. Embolization of the renal artery alone has been proposed as a method of reducing complications from an in vivo failed kidney transplant. While this does yield less morbidity, it may not address an infected graft or refractory hematuria or rejection. We elected to begin preoperative embolization to assess if this would help decrease the blood loss and transfusion rate associated with TN. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent non-emergent TN at our institution. Patients who had functioning grafts that later failed were included in analysis. TN was performed for recurrent infections, pain or hematuria. We evaluated for blood loss (EBL) during TN, transfusion rate and length of hospital stay. Results A total of 16 patients were identified. Nine had preoperative embolization or no blood flow to the graft prior to TN. The remaining 7 did not have preoperative embolization. The shortest time from transplant to TN was 8 months and the longest 18 years with an average of 6.3 years. Average EBL for the embolized patients (ETN) was 143.9cc compared to 621.4cc in the non-embolized (NETN) group (p=0.041). Average number of units of blood transfused was 0.44 in the ETN with only 3/9 patients requiring transfusion. The NETN patients had average of 1.29 units transfused with 5/7 requiring transfusion. The length of stay was longer for the ETN (5.4 days) compared to 3.9 in the NETN. No intraoperative complications were seen in either group and only one patient had a postoperative ileus in the NETN. Conclusion Embolization prior to TN significantly decreases the EBL but does not significantly decrease transfusion rate. However, patients do require a significantly longer hospitalization with

  9. Giant serous microcystic adenoma of the pancreas safely resected after preoperative arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    TAJIMA, HIDEHIRO; OHTA, TETSUO; KITAGAWA, HIROHISA; SHINBASHI, HIROYUKI; HIROSE, ATSUSHI; SAKAI, SEISHO; MAKINO, ISAMU; HAYASHI, HIRONORI; NAKAGAWARA, HISATOSHI; ONISHI, ICHIRO; TAKAMURA, HIROYUKI; NINOMIYA, ITASU; FUSHIDA, SACHIO; TANI, TAKASHI; FUJIMURA, TAKASHI; KAYAHARA, MASATO; KODA, WATARU; MATSUI, OSAMU

    2010-01-01

    Serous microcystic adenomas are rare and account for 1–2% of all exocrine pancreatic tumors and 25% of all pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Recently, with advances in imaging techniques, these adenomas have been identified at an increasing frequency. A 63-year-old woman visited her doctor in 1999 due to a gastric deformity detected by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a cystic lesion measuring 6.0 cm in diameter, resulting in a diagnosis of serous microcystic adenoma of the pancreatic head. During follow-up, the tumor increased steadily in size, measuring 6.0 cm in diameter in 1999 and 13.0 cm in 2008, while remaining asymptomatic throughout this period of time. The risk of malignant transformation appears to be low even over the long-term. However, some cases of malignant transformation to serous cystadenocarcinoma have recently been reported. In this case, assessment of the relationship between the tumor and adjacent vascular structures, such as massive drainage vein development on the surface or tumor flow into the portal and superior mesenteric veins and the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries, was critical for determining tumor resectability. The risk of massive intra-operative hemorrhage was felt to be considerable, given the extent of the veins on the surface of the tumor, as well as the size and location of the primary pancreatic mass. Therefore, preoperative embolization of the tumor-feeding arteries arising from the celiac axis (gastroduodenal, splenic and dorsal pancreatic arteries) was performed. Tumor resection with pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed without a blood transfusion, with an estimated blood loss of 570 ml. The final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of serous microcystic adenoma. The patient is currently alive and disease-free. Preoperative partial embolization of the tumor feeding arteries and intra-operative resection of the right gastric and inferior pancreatoduodenal arteries, allowed

  10. Spontaneous Rupture of the Hepatic Artery in a Patient with Type 1 Neurofibromatosis Treated by Embolization: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V. Day, C.P.; Manimaran, N.; Hurlow, R.A.; Orme, R.

    2007-02-15

    We report the case of a 48-year-old man with neurofibromatosis presenting with sudden-onset abdominal pain, profound hypotension, and a drop in hemoglobin. CT scan demonstrated a massive hematoma within the right lobe of the liver with rupture into the peritoneal cavity. Angiography demonstrated diffuse abnormalities of the hepatic circulation with fusifom, ectatic, and stenotic segments. Acute extravasation from a peripheral branch of the right hepatic artery was identified and successfully embolized with subsequent hemodynamic stabilization of the patient. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of this kind in a patient with type I neurofibromatosis.

  11. Gas Embolic Stroke Secondary to Bowel Infarction.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Dhruv; Leyon, Joe Joseph; Chavda, Swarupsinh

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old gentleman with metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma presented with acute abdominal pain to the emergency medicine department and subsequently developed an acute left hemiplegia while in the resuscitation unit. An unenhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the head showed right frontal cerebral gas emboli while an unenhanced CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed extensive portal venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis, presumed secondary to bowel infarction.

  12. Ruptured Intrasellar Superior Hypophyseal Artery Aneurysm Presenting with Pure Subdural Haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, M.; Hillard, V.; Nwagwu, C.; Zablow, B. C.; Murali, R.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Subdural haemorrhage from a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is a well-known entity when associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage. However, haemorrhage confined only to the subdural space is rare because there are limited anatomical sites where extravasation can be purely subdural. We report the rare case of a patient who suffered pure subdural haematoma after the rupture of a left superior hypophyseal artery aneurysm located within the sella turcica. The patient was treated with endovascular coil embolization of the aneurysm. Angiography immediately after treatment and one month later revealed complete obliteration of the aneurysm. Six months after treatment, the patient remained symptom free. PMID:20587264

  13. TREATMENT OF MICROVASCULAR MICRO-EMBOLIZATION USING MICROBUBBLES AND LONG-TONE-BURST ULTRASOUND: AN IN VIVO STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, John J.; Brands, Judith; Schnatz, Frederick G.; Black, John J.; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite epicardial coronary artery reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention, distal micro-embolization into the coronary microcirculation limits myocardial salvage during acute myocardial infarction. Thrombolysis using ultrasound and microbubbles (sonothrombolysis) is an approach that induces microbubble oscillations to cause clot disruption and restore perfusion. We sought to determine whether this technique could restore impaired tissue perfusion caused by thrombotic microvascular obstruction. In 16 rats, an imaging transducer was placed on the biceps femoris muscle, perpendicular to a single-element 1-MHz treatment transducer. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was performed at baseline and after micro-embolization. Therapeutic ultrasound (5000 cycles, pulse repetition frequency = 5 0.33 Hz, 1.5 MPa) was delivered to nine rats for two 10-min sessions during intra-arterial infusion of lipid-encapsulated microbubbles; seven control rats received no ultrasound–microbubble therapy. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was repeated after each treatment or control period, and microvascular volume was measured as peak video intensity. There was a 90% decrease in video intensity after micro-embolization (from 8.6 ± 4.8 to 0.7 ± 0.8 dB, p < 0.01). The first and second ultrasound–microbubble sessions were respectively followed by video intensity increases of 5.8 ± 5.1 and 8.7 ± 5.7 dB (p < 0.01, compared with micro-embolization). The first and second control sessions, respectively, resulted in no significant increase in video intensity (2.4 ± 2.3 and 3.6 ± 4.9) compared with micro-embolization (0.6 ± 0.7 dB). We have developed an in vivo model that simulates the distal thrombotic microvascular obstruction that occurs after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Long-pulse-length ultrasound with microbubbles has a therapeutic effect on microvascular perfusion and may be a valuable adjunct to reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction

  14. Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence (SSCD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... canal that is being activated. Analysis of the eye movements evoked by sound and pressure stimuli in patients ... to the identification of this syndrome. These evoked eye movements often align with the plane of the superior ...

  15. Interleukin-6 as an early marker for fat embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yoga, R; Theis, JC; Walton, M; Sutherland, W

    2009-01-01

    Background Fat Embolism is a complication of long bone fractures, intramedullary fixation and joint arthroplasty. It may progress to fat embolism syndrome, which is rare but involves significant morbidity and can occasionally be fatal. Fat Embolism can be detected at the time of embolization by transoesophageal echocardiography or atrial blood sampling. Later, a combination of clinical signs and symptoms will point towards fat embolism but there is no specific test to confirm the diagnosis. We investigated serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a possible early marker for fat embolism. Methods An animal study was conducted to simulate a hip replacement in 31 adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia and the animals divided into 3 groups: control, uncemented and cemented. Following surgery and recovery from anaesthesia, the rats allowed to freely mobilize in their cages. Blood was taken before surgery and at 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours to measure serum IL-6 levels. The rats were euthanized at 24 hours and lungs removed and stained for fat. The amount of fat seen was then correlated with serum IL-6 levels. Results No rats in the control group had fat emboli. Numerous fat emboli were seen in both the uncemented and cemented implant groups. The interleukin levels were raised in all groups reaching a peak at 12 hours after surgery reaching 100 pg/ml in the control group and around 250 pg/ml in the uncemented and cemented implant groups. The IL-6 levels in the control group were significantly lower than any of the implant groups at 12 and 24 hours. At these time points, the serum IL-6 correlated with the amount of fat seen on lung histology. Conclusion Serum IL-6 is a possible early marker of fat embolism. PMID:19523233

  16. MR Venography of Deep Veins: Changes with Uterine Fibroid Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumori, Tetsuya Kasahara, Toshiyuki; Tsuchida, Yoko; Nara, Yoshinori

    2009-03-15

    Deep veins (DVs) can be compressed by a uterus enlarged with fibroids. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of luminal narrowing of DVs caused by a myomatous uterus, and the change in DV narrowing in women with symptomatic fibroids after embolization using time-of-flight (TOF)-magnetic resonance venography (MRV). Twenty-nine consecutive women with symptomatic uterine fibroids underwent TOF-MRV and pelvic MRI before and 4 months after embolization. Based on the TOF-MRV, we evaluated the luminal narrowing of three DVs, including the inferior vena cava, and the bilateral common and external iliac veins, and divided the findings into three grades. The scores for each DV were added for each patient (lowest, 0; highest, 6). DV scores and symptom severity (SS) scores were compared between the baseline and 4 months after embolization using the paired t-test. The relationship between DV scores and uterine volume was investigated using Pearson's test. DV scores decreased significantly, from 1.52 {+-} 1.70 at baseline to 0.93 {+-} 1.56 at 4 months after embolization (p = 0.004). The uterine volume decreased from 948 {+-} 647 mL at baseline to 617 {+-} 417 mL at 4 months after embolization (p < 0.001). DV score correlated with uterine volume (r = 0.856, p < 0.001). SS scores decreased from 54.5 {+-} 14.6 at baseline to 26.8 {+-} 15.4 at 4 months after embolization (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the degree of luminal narrowing of DVs caused by a uterus with fibroids is correlated with the uterine volume. Uterine artery embolization may induce an improvement of luminal narrowing of DVs due to a reduction of the myomatous uterus volume.

  17. Transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, MIHAELA; JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; MOALE, MIHAI; CHIRA, ROMEO

    2017-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is one of the most common conditions encountered in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is extensive and identifying the underlying etiology can be challenging. We report a case of acute transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection in a patient with no cardiovascular risk factors or autoimmune diseases. Symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain usually treated in the surgical department. The patient had criteria for conservative treatment and rapidly recovered. We highlight a rare condition which should be taken into account for the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. PMID:28246505

  18. Comparison of three different embolic materials for varicocele embolization: retrospective study of tolerance, radiation and recurrence rate

    PubMed Central

    Favard, Nicolas; Moulin, Morgan; Fauque, Patricia; Bertaut, Aurélie; Favelier, Sylvain; Estivalet, Louis; Michel, Frédéric; Cormier, Luc; Sagot, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate pain, radiation and recurrence rates in patients undergoing varicocele embolization with three different embolic materials. Methods Retrospective study of 182 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter retrograde varicocele embolization from July 2011 to May 2015 with glue (Glubran®2) (group 1, n=63), mechanical agents (coils and/or plugs) (group 2, n=53) or a sclerosing agent (polidocanol) (group 3, n=66). Patients were asked by telephone interview to evaluate pain during embolization and at 1, 7 and 30 days using a quantitative pain scale ranging from 0 to 10. Duration of scopy, kinetic energy released per unit mass (kerma) and dose area product (DAP) were assessed as radiation parameters during embolization procedures. Recurrence rates after treatment were also evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed using parametric and non-parametric tests. Results Patients in the three study groups were comparable for age, clinical indication and embolization side. No difference was noted for significant pain (pain score ≥3) during embolization and at 1, 7 and 30 days after treatment. Discomfort (pain score <3) was more frequent in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 at 7 days after the procedure (P=0.049). No difference in discomfort was noted during embolization or at 1 and 30 days. Duration of scopy was shorter (P<0.0001) and kerma was lower (P=0.0087) in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. DAP was lower in group 1 than in group 2 (P=0.04) but no difference was noted between groups 1 and 3, and groups 2 and 3. The recurrence rate at a mean follow-up of 24.4 months (range, 2-53 months) was significantly lower in group 1 than in the two other groups (P=0.032). Conclusions The use of Glubran®2 acrylic glue for varicocele embolization is safe and leads to less radiation and lower recurrence rates than is the case for other embolic materials without any more significant pain. PMID:26807362

  19. Compromised natural killer cells in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qiang; Shen, Yuqin; Song, Haoming; Gong, Zhu; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The high morbidity, mortality and misdiagnosis rate render pulmonary embolism (PE) as a worldwide health problem. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease have not been well characterized. Increasing studies indicate infection and immunity play a crucial role in PE. Natural killer (NK) cells act as a bridge between the innate immune and acquired immune. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of NK cells in PE. Methods: Human cDNA microarray analysis was employed to detect genes associated with NK cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Random variance model corrected t-test was used for statistical analysis of differential gene expression. Flow cytometry was performed to detect the CD16+CD56+ NK cells. Results: In the present study, based on gene expression microarray analysis, we showed four inhibitory receptors (KLRB1, KLRD1, KLRF1, KLRG1) and four activating receptors (KLRC1, KLRC3, KLRK1 and NCR1) on NK cells were remarkably down-regulated and the cytological experiment demonstrated the proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells among PBMCs decreased in the PE group. Conclusions: We confirmed the presence of reduced expression of critical activating as well as inhibitory NK cell receptors and low proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells in PE. The consistence between genomic and cytological examination suggests compromised NK cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:26339393

  20. Risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Gjonbrataj, Endri; Kim, Ji Na; Gjonbrataj, Juarda; Jung, Hye In; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Won-Il

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods This retrospective cohort study included 237 patients with PE. Patients that had transient risk factors at diagnosis were classified as having provoked PE, with the remaining patients being classified as having unprovoked PE. The baseline clinical characteristics and factors associated with coagulation were compared. We evaluated the risk factors associated with provoked PE. Results Of the 237 PE patients, 73 (30.8%) had provoked PE. The rate of respiratory failure and infection, as well as the disseminated intravascular coagulation score and ratio of right ventricular diameter to left ventricular diameter were significantly higher in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. The protein and activity levels associated with coagulation, including protein C antigen, protein S antigen, protein S activity, anti-thrombin III antigen, and factor VIII, were significantly lower in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. Multivariate analysis showed that infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 7.4) and protein S activity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99) were significantly associated with provoked PE. Conclusions Protein S activity and presence of infection were important factors associated with provoked PE. We should pay attention to the presence of infection in patients with provoked PE. PMID:27097772

  1. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  2. Focal embolic cerebral ischemia in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Rui Lan; Jiang, Quan; Ding, Guangliang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of focal cerebral ischemia are well accepted for investigating the pathogenesis and potential treatment strategies for human stroke. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with an endovascular filament is a widely used model to induce focal cerebral ischemia. However, this model is not amenable to thrombolytic therapies. As thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is a standard of care within 4.5 hours of human stroke onset, suitable animal models that mimic cellular and molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and thrombolysis of stroke are required. By occluding the MCA with a fibrin-rich allogeneic clot, we have developed an embolic model of MCA occlusion in the rat, which recapitulates the key components of thrombotic development and of thrombolytic therapy of rtPA observed from human ischemic stroke. The surgical procedures of our model can be typically completed within approximately 30 min and are highly adaptable to other strains of rats as well as mice for both genders. Thus, this model provides a powerful tool for translational stroke research. PMID:25741989

  3. Saddle Pulmonary Embolism with Thrombus in Transit across a Patent Foramen Ovale

    PubMed Central

    White-Stern, Ashley; Rahaman, Oloruntobi; Kurian, Damian; Simon, Karen

    2017-01-01

    This is the case of a 25-year-old obese man who presented with acute shortness of breath, chest pain, and palpitations. Of note, he lives a sedentary lifestyle and was recently hospitalized for incision and drainage of a left foot abscess. On presentation he was tachypnoeic, tachycardiac, and hypoxic but blood pressure was stable. Laboratory studies were significant for elevated D-dimer and mildly increased troponin. On further investigation he was found to have a saddle pulmonary embolism with massive clot burden. Echocardiogram revealed thrombus in transit and McConnell's sign. He underwent surgical embolectomy and closure of a patent foramen ovale. This is a particularly rare case, especially in such a young patient. Because this is a rare diagnosis, with insufficient data, there is no formally established treatment guideline. However, in patients who are good surgical candidates, studies have shown better outcome with surgical embolectomy as compared to anticoagulation alone or thrombolysis. PMID:28246560

  4. Salvage intraosseous thrombolysis and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for massive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Northey, Luke Cameron; Shiraev, Timothy; Omari, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous access is an alternative route of pharmacotherapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides cardiac and respiratory support when conventional therapies fail. This case reports the use of intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO in a patient with acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). A 34-year-old female presented to the emergency department with sudden onset severe shortness of breath. Due to difficulty establishing intravenous access, an intraosseous needle was inserted into the left tibia. Echocardiography identified severe right ventricular dilatation with global systolic impairment and failure, indicative of PE. Due to the patient's hemodynamic compromise a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) bolus was administered through the intraosseous route. After transfer to the intensive care unit, venous-arterial ECMO was initiated as further therapy. The patient recovered and was discharged 36 days after admission. This is the first report of combination intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO as salvage therapy for massive PE.

  5. Neurological manifestation of arterial gas embolism following standard altitude chamber flight: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rios-Tejada, F; Azofra-Garcia, J; Valle-Garrido, J; Pujante Escudero, A

    1997-11-01

    In the course of a decompression at flight level 280 (28,000 ft) in an altitude chamber flight, a 45-yr-old cabin air traffic controller developed sudden numbness in his left upper and lower extremities and, soon after, complete paralysis in the left side, dysarthria and left facial palsy. A presumptive diagnosis of arterial gas embolism (AGE) was made and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) was given after airevac of the patient to the closest compression facility. Complete resolution of the symptoms was obtained after treatment Table VI-A (extended), plus 3 consecutive HBO treatments (90 min of Oxygen at 2.0 ATA). AGE is a rare event in the course of regular altitude chamber flight and diagnosis should be done in the context of the barometric pressure changes and an acute cerebral vascular injury. Risk factors and follow-up diagnostic procedures are discussed.

  6. Confusion after spine injury: cerebral fat embolism after traumatic rupture of a Tarlov cyst: Case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute low back pain is a very common symptom and reason for many medical consultations. In some unusual circumstances it could be linked to a rare aetiology. Case presentation We report a 70-year-old man with an 8-month history of left posterior thigh and leg pain who had sudden confusion after a fall from standing. It was due to cerebral fat embolism suspected by computed tomography scan, later confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A spinal MRI scan was then performed and revealed a sacral fracture which drained into an unknown perineurial cyst (Tarlov cyst). Under medical observation the patient fully recovered within three weeks. Conclusions Sacral perineurial cysts are rare, however they remain a potential cause of lumbosacral radiculopathy. PMID:20712856

  7. Frequent Embolization in Peripheral Angioplasty: Detection with an Embolism Protection Device (Angio Guard) and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Claudius W. Pusich, Benjamin; Tepe, Gunnar; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Hahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Wilke; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.

    2003-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the deliverability and protection capabilities of an embolism protection filter in angioplasty of peripheral arteries. Methods: The Angioguard emboli capture guidewire system was applied in 11 patients with femoropopliteal lesions (6 stenoses, 3 occlusions, 2 controls).Data on lesion crossing, flow deceleration and macroembolization were recorded. Filter membranes were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: System delivery was successful in all patients. Primary lesion crossing was feasible in four of six stenoses; predilatation was required in two of six. Marked flow deceleration was recorded in six patients. Emboli next to the filter were detected in each patient with concentric plaques, but could not reliably be removed with the filter. Downstream macroembolization was also present in all patients with concentric stenoses, but in none with chronic occlusion. None of the patients had clinical signs of ischemia. SEM analysis demonstrated only small particles on control group filters and non-obliterating fibrinous conglomerates on filters used in chronic occlusion. Substantial obliteration was seen on several filters used in stenotic lesions. Conclusion:Microembolization of fibrin aggregates is a common incident in balloon angioplasty of femoropopliteal stenoses. Macroembolization occurred more frequently than previously reported. The use of embolism protection filters aided in the detection but not in the removal of larger emboli.

  8. Prognostic value of D-dimer in elderly patients with Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, Hernan; Buzzini, Chiara; Orenti, Annalisa; Punzi, Veronica; Molteni, Mauro; Primitz, Laura; Cavalieri d'Oro, Luca; Arpaia, Guido; Boracchi, Patrizia; Cimminiello, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    In a general population with acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE) elevated D-dimer concentrations associate with increased mortality. The aim of the study was to assess the ability of D-dimer to predict 30 and 90-days mortality in elderly patients with acute PE. Hemodynamically stable patients aged ≥65 years old with confirmed PE were included in this retrospective cohort study. A pulmonary computerized tomography angiography scan, D-dimer concentrations, simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) variables and vital status were available for all patients. The study included 154 confirmed cases of PE (23.5 % of suspected), median age 79.1 years. D-dimer was higher in patients dead than in those alive at 30 (median 14,547 vs. 8340 ng/mL, p = 0.05) and 90 days (13,604 vs. 7973 ng/mL, p = 0.013). When adding D-dimer to sPESI, the discriminant capacity to predict mortality within 30 and 90 days was increased by 0.080 and 0.089, respectively. The contribution of D-dimer to the discriminating ability was NRI = 0.286 (95 % CI -0.198 to 0.770, p value: 0.247) at 30 days and NRI = 0.605 (95 % CI 0.223-0.988, p-value: 0.002) at 90 days.D-dimer concentration was associated with 30 and 90-days mortality and showed a higher discriminant capacity than sPESI alone to predict 90-days mortality. Adding D-dimer concentrations to sPESI score seems to improve its prognostic ability, supporting multivariable risk models as the best approach to estimate prognosis in elderly patients with PE.

  9. Prophylactic Residual Aneurysmal Sac Embolization with Expandable Hydrogel Embolic Devices for Endoleak Prevention: Preliminary Study in Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, Takao; Pavcnik, Dusan Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Yin Qiang; Wu Renghong; Niyyati, Mahtab; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2005-05-15

    Objective. To explore the feasibility and efficacy of residual aneurysmal sac (RAS) embolization with the expandable hydrogel embolic device (EHED) in prevention of endoleaks in a surgically created and endoluminally treated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods. In eight dogs, an AAA was created by means of side-to-side anastomosis between the infrarenal abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava (IVC) with ligation of the IVC above and below the anastomotic end, followed by deployment of an endograft with holes. The RAS was then embolized with the EHED. One animal was killed immediately after RAS embolization and one animal died 12 hr after the procedure. Follow-up aortograms were obtained in six animals after 1 day (1 animal), 2 weeks and 6 months (1 animal), and 8 weeks (4 animals). Results. Four animals had no endoleaks on the follow-up aortograms. The remaining two animals with incomplete RAS embolization had moderate type III endoleaks. Type I or II endoleaks were not seen in any animals. Complications included RAS wall penetration by the devices with platinum wires in two animals (nos. 1 and 2), device migration into an aortic circulation through the endograft holes in two animals (nos. 2 and 3) or through distal interstices between the aortic wall and endograft in one animal (no. 8), aortic occlusion in three animals (nos. 3, 7, and 8), and RAS rupture in one animal (no. 7). Histologic examination showed expanded hydrogels occupying the RAS with associated mature or immature organized thrombus, fibrinous thrombus, or degenerate blood cells. Conclusion. RAS embolization was feasible with the EHED, although additional modifications to the device are required to avoid complications. Angiographic and histologic results suggested that RAS embolization with the EHED may help in the prevention of endoleaks.

  10. Direct Tumor Embolization of Sinonasal Unclassified Spindle Cell Sarcoma with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Ankit; Srinet, Prateek; Manes, Richard Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives  To evaluate the use of a new tumor embolization agent, Onyx (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland), for the use of intraoperative embolization of a sinonasal unclassified spindle cell sarcoma. Methods  A 45-year-old female patient presented to the rhinology clinic with a nasal mass. A biopsy revealed a highly vascular mass consistent with a sinonasal unclassified spindle cell sarcoma. Secondary to its extensive vascularity, the patient underwent preoperative transarterial embolization (TAE) before definitive resection. Due to complex vascular anatomy including feeding vessels emanating from intracranial circulation, incomplete embolization was achieved. Subsequently, intraoperative embolization with Onyx at the time of resection was performed. Results  Intraoperative Onyx use resulted in almost complete devascularization of the tumor with decreased risk of intracranial embolization. Conclusions  Intraoperative embolization with Onyx after an incomplete TAE can be a safe and effective method of achieving near-total embolization of sinonasal tumors. PMID:27652195

  11. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil; Doddakashi, Satish; Bahramipour, Philip; Schubert, Johanna

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men) suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery.

  12. Echocardiographic detection and treatment of intraoperative air embolism.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Toya, S; Ohira, T; Mine, T; Greig, N H

    1986-03-01

    A real-time two-dimensional echocardiogram was used to detect the presence of an air embolism in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures in the sitting position. The technique could with good sensitivity detect the appearance of a single air bubble intraoperatively, thus allowing early intervention to prevent development of further air emboli. Two types of air embolism could be differentiated; the single-bubble type and the "stormy-bubble" type. The single-bubble type was observed during skin and muscle incisions, craniotomy, and brain lesion excision. Further embolism development was prevented by electrocoagulation and application of bone wax. The stormy-bubble type occurred during dura and muscle incisions and was prevented by electrocoagulation, reflection of the dura, or suturing the affected muscle. The routine use of a Swan-Ganz catheter for removal of air embolism by suction proved effective for the treatment of the stormy-bubble type of air embolism. Masking the operative field with saline-soaked cotton strips was of moderate benefit in the stabilization of the single-bubble type of air influx, but proved to be of little value in controlling the entrance of the stormy-bubble type.

  13. Absolute Ethanol Embolization of Arteriovenous Malformations in the Periorbital Region

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Li-xin; Jia, Ren-Bing; Wang, De-Ming Lv, Ming-Ming Fan, Xin-dong

    2015-06-15

    ObjectiveArteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the periorbital region are technically challenging clinical entities to manage. The purpose of the present study was to present our initial experience of ethanol embolization in a series of 16 patients with auricular AVMs and assess the outcomes of this treatment.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization and/or direct percutaneous puncture embolization were performed in the 16 patients. Pure or diluted ethanol was manually injected. The follow-up evaluations included physical examination and angiography at 1- to 6-month intervals.ResultsDuring the 28 ethanol embolization sessions, the amount of ethanol used ranged from 2 to 65 mL. The obliteration of ulceration, hemorrhage, pain, infection, pulsation, and bruit in most of the patients was obtained. The reduction of redness, swelling, and warmth was achieved in all the 16 patients, with down-staging of the Schobinger status for each patient. AVMs were devascularized 100 % in 3 patients, 76–99 % in 7 patients, and 50–75 % in 6 patients, according to the angiographic findings. The most common complications were necrosis and reversible blister. No permanent visual abnormality was found in any of the cases.ConclusionEthanol embolization is efficacious and safe in the treatment of AVMs in the periorbital region and has the potential to be accepted as the primary mode of therapy in the management of these lesions.

  14. Patent Foramen Ovale: Is Stroke Due to Paradoxical Embolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranoux, D.; Cohen, A.; Cabanes, L.; Amarenco, P.; Bousser, M. G.; Mas, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Background and Purpose: A patent foramen ovale has been reported to be significantly more frequent in young stroke patients than in matched control subjects, and paradoxical embolism has been suggested as the main mechanism of stroke in-this situation. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis. Methods: Sixty-eight consecutive patients under 55 years of age presenting with an ischemic stroke had an extensive workup, including transesophageal echocardiography with contrast. We compared the prevalence of criteria for the diagnosis of paradoxical embolism in patients with and without a patent foramen ovale. Results: A patent foramen ovale was found in 32 patients (47%). A Valsalva-provoking activity was present at stroke onset in six patients with a patent foramen ovale and in eight patients with no patent foramen ovale (X(sup 2)=0.1, nonsignificant). Clinical/radiological features suggestive of an embolic mechanism were not more frequent in patients with a patent foramen ovale. Clinical evidence of deep vein thrombosis was present in one patient with a patent foramen ovale and in none of the others. No occult venous thrombosis was found in a subgroup of patients with a patent foramen ovale and no definite cause for stroke who underwent venography (n=13). Conclusions. Our results do not support the hypothesis that paradoxical embolism is the primary mechanism of stroke in patients with a patent foramen ovale. (Stroke 1993;24:31-34) KEY WORDS e cerebral ischemia e embolism foramen ovale, patent

  15. Uterine fibroid vascularization and clinical relevance to uterine fibroid embolization.

    PubMed

    Pelage, Jean-Pierre; Cazejust, Julien; Pluot, Etienne; Le Dref, Olivier; Laurent, Alexandre; Spies, James B; Chagnon, Sophie; Lacombe, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    Embolization has become a first-line treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroid tumors. Selective catheterization and embolization of both uterine arteries, which are the predominant source of blood flow to fibroid tumors in most cases, is the cornerstone of treatment. Although embolization for treatment of uterine fibroid tumors is widely accepted, great familiarity with the normal and variant pelvic arterial anatomy is needed to ensure the safety and success of the procedure. The uterine artery classically arises as a first or second branch of the anterior division of the internal iliac artery and is usually dilated in the presence of a uterine fibroid tumor. Angiography is used for comprehensive pretreatment assessment of the pelvic arterial anatomy; for noninvasive evaluation, Doppler ultrasonography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR angiography also may be used. After the uterine artery is identified, selective catheterization should be performed distal to its cervicovaginal branch. For targeted embolization of the perifibroid arterial plexus, injection of particles with diameters larger than 500 mum is generally recommended. Excessive embolization may injure normal myometrium, ovaries, or fallopian tubes and lead to uterine necrosis or infection or to ovarian failure. Incomplete treatment or additional blood supply to the tumor (eg, via an ovarian artery) may result in clinical failure. The common postembolization angiographic end point is occlusion of the uterine arterial branches to the fibroid tumor while antegrade flow is maintained in the main uterine artery.

  16. Air embolism during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Chang, Choo-Hoon; Shin, Young Hee; Cho, Hyun-Sung

    2012-07-01

    There have been several reports of gas embolism occurring during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery. However, all these cases of air embolism were associated with the repair of venous circulation, using a CO(2) blower. In this report, we describe a rare case of air embolism in the coronary arteries associated with the use of a CO(2) blower during OPCAB. There was no injury to the veins during OPCAB. The air embolism was treated successfully with cardiopulmonary bypass.

  17. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral fat embolism following multiple bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Law, Huong Ling; Wong, Siong Lung; Tan, Suzet

    2013-02-01

    Fat embolism to the lungs and brain is an uncommon complication following fractures. Few reports with descriptions of computed tomographic (CT) findings of emboli to the brain or cerebral fat embolism are available. We report a case of cerebral fat embolism following multiple skeletal fractures and present its CT findings here.

  18. Pipeline Embolization Device with or without Adjunctive Coil Embolization: Analysis of Complications from the IntrePED Registry.

    PubMed

    Park, M S; Kilburg, C; Taussky, P; Albuquerque, F C; Kallmes, D F; Levy, E I; Jabbour, P; Szikora, I; Boccardi, E; Hanel, R A; Bonafé, A; McDougall, C G

    2016-06-01

    Flow diversion to treat cerebral aneurysms has revolutionized neurointerventional surgery. Because the addition of coils potentially increases the time and complexity of endovascular procedures, we sought to determine whether adjunctive coil use is associated with an increase in complications. Patients in the International Retrospective Study of Pipeline Embolization Device registry were divided into those treated with the Pipeline Embolization Device alone (n = 689 patients; n = 797 aneurysms; mean aneurysm size, 10.3 ± 7.6 mm) versus those treated with the Pipeline Embolization Device and concurrent coil embolization (n = 104 patients; n = 109 aneurysms; mean aneurysm size, 13.6 ± 7.8 mm). Patient demographics and aneurysm characteristics were examined. Rates of neurologic morbidity and mortality were compared between groups. The Pipeline Embolization Device with versus without coiling required a significantly longer procedure time (135.8 ± 63.9 versus 96.7 ± 46.2 min; P < .0001) and resulted in higher neurological morbidity (12.5% versus 7.8%; P = .13). These data suggest that either strategy represents an acceptable risk profile in the treatment of complex cerebral aneurysms and warrants further investigation.

  19. Pulmonary artery sarcoma masquerading as saddle pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Kanjanauthai, Somsupha; Kanluen, Tony; Ray, Cynthia

    2008-10-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a highly malignant tumour. Therefore, making the diagnosis is very important. We describe a case which presented with dyspnea on exertion and was initially diagnosed as saddle pulmonary embolism per CT thorax with contrast. Despite adequate anticoagulation, symptoms still progressed. Follow-up CT thorax showed an extension of the presumed filling defect or clots into the left main pulmonary artery with new lung nodules. This prompted suspicion that this may not be a pulmonary embolism. Biopsy of the lung nodule revealed high grade soft tissue sarcoma with primary source from the pulmonary artery. Our case highlights that pulmonary artery sarcoma should always be included in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism especially, if symptoms still progress while on adequate anticoagulation, or any pulmonary nodules develop on follow-up exam.

  20. [A case of spontaneous dissection of the superior mesenteric artery treated by percutaneous stent placement].

    PubMed

    Ko, Geun Jun; Han, Ki Jun; Han, Seo Goo; Hwang, Sang Yon; Choi, Chang Hwan; Gham, Chang Woo; Cho, Hyeon Geun; Song, Soon-Young; Jung, Jin Ho

    2006-02-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia can result from emboli, arterial and venous thrombi or vasoconstriction secondary to low-flow states. Isolated spontaneous dissection of the superior mesenteric artery is a rare cause of acute mesenteric ischemia. The mortality rates of acute mesenteric ischemia averages 71% with a range of 59-93%. Diagnosis before the occurrence of intestinal infarction is the most important factor in improving survival rate for patients with acute mesenteric ischemia. A 68-year-old female presented with postprandial epigastric pain, and a dissection of the superior mesenteric artery and a gallbladder polyp were shown in abdominal computed tomographic scan. After the percutaneous metalic stent placement and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, her symptoms improved. We report a case of spontaneous dissection of main trunk of the superior mesenteric artery which was successfully treated by percutaneous stent placement with a review of literature.

  1. Libman-Sacks Endocarditis and Embolic Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos A.; Sibbitt, Wilmer L.; Qualls, Clifford R.; Jung, Rex E.; Greene, Ernest R.; Gasparovic, Charles M.; Hayek, Reyaad; Charlton, Gerald A.; Crookston, Kendall

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether Libman-Sacks endocarditis is a pathogenic factor for cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Background A cardioembolic pathogenesis of SLE CVD manifested as 1) neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) including stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA), 2) neurocognitive dysfunction, and 3) MRI focal brain lesions has not been established. Methods A 6-year study of 30 patients with acute NPSLE (27 women, age 38±12 years), 46 age-and-sex matched SLE controls without NPSLE (42 women, age 36±12 years), and 26 age-and-sex matched healthy controls (22 women, age 34±11 years) who underwent clinical and laboratory evaluations, TEE, carotid duplex, transcranial Doppler, neurocognitive testing, and brain MRI/MRA. NPSLE patients were re-evaluated after 4.5 months of therapy. All patients were followed clinically for a median of 52 months. Results Libman-Sacks vegetations (87%), cerebromicroembolism (27% with 2.5 times more events per hour), neurocognitive dysfunction (60%), and cerebral infarcts (47%) were more common in NPSLE than in SLE (28%, 20%, 33%, and 0%) and healthy controls (8%, 0%, 4%, and 0%, respectively) (all p≤0.009). Patients with vegetations had 3 times more cerebromicroemboli per hour, lower cerebral blood flow, more stroke/TIA and overall NPSLE events, neurocognitive dysfunction, cerebral infarcts, and brain lesion load than those without (all p≤0.01). Libman-Sacks vegetations were independent risk factors of NPSLE (OR=13.4, p<0.001), neurocognitive dysfunction (OR=8.0, p=0.01), brain lesions (OR=5.6, p=0.004), and all 3 outcomes combined (OR=7.5, p<0.001). Follow-up re-evaluations in 18 (78%) of 23 surviving NPSLE patients demonstrated improvement of vegetations, microembolism, brain perfusion, neurocognitive dysfunction, and lesion load (all p≤0.04). Finally, patients with vegetations had reduced event free survival time to stroke/TIA, cognitive disability, or death (p=0.007). Conclusion The

  2. Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paul D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Naidich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Tapson, Victor F.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. Objective To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Design Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00241826) Setting 7 hospitals and their emergency services. Patients 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation–perfusion lung scan, venous ultra-sonography, D-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Results Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. Limitation A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Conclusion Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic

  3. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Reduces Neurological Damage after Cerebral Embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivin, Justin A.; Fisher, Marc; Degirolami, Umberto; Hemenway, Carl C.; Stashak, Joan A.

    1985-12-01

    Intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator immediately after the injection of numerous small blood clots into the carotid circulation in rabbit embolic stroke model animals caused a significant reduction in neurological damage. In vitro studies indicate that tissue plasminogen activator produced substantial lysis of clots at concentrations comparable to those expected in vivo, suggesting that this may be the mechanism of action of this drug. Drug-induced hemorrhages were not demonstrable. Tissue plasminogen activator may be of value for the immediate treatment of embolic stroke.

  4. Peripheral venous catheter fracture with embolism into the pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Chady; Campisi, Alessio; D’Andrea, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral vein catheterization is generally considered a harmless procedure. Venous catheter rupture associated with pulmonary embolism is an unlikely but potentially serious complication. We report a case of a peripheral venous catheter (PVC) fracture with pulmonary artery embolization in the left lower lobe treated successfully by a surgical approach. The positioning of a PVC is not always a harmless procedure. Every time there are difficulties in positioning or in removal of a catheter device, it should be carefully inspected to verify integrity. The advisability of removal of these small foreign bodies is debated; percutaneous retrieval is preferred, while surgery should be discussed case by case. PMID:28149586

  5. Endovascular strategies for treatment of embolizing thoracoabdominal aortic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jeyabalan, Geetha; Wallace, Justin R.; Chaer, Rabih Antoine; Leers, Steven A.; Marone, Luke Keith; Makaroun, Michel S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aortic sources of peripheral and visceral embolization remain challenging to treat. The safety of stent graft coverage continues to be debated. This study reports the outcomes of stent coverage of these complex lesions. Methods Hospital records were retrospectively reviewed for patients undergoing aortic stenting between 2006 and 2013 for visceral and peripheral embolic disease. Renal function, method of coverage, and mortality after stent grafting were reviewed. Results Twenty-five cases of embolizing aortic lesions treated with an endovascular approach were identified. The mean age was 65 ± 13 years (range, 45–87 years), and 64% were female. Sixteen (64%) patients presented with peripheral embolic events, six with concomitant renal embolization. Five patients presented with abdominal or flank pain, and two were discovered incidentally. Three patients had undergone an endovascular procedure for other indications within the preceding 6 months of presentation. Nineteen patients had existing chronic kidney disease (stage II or higher), but only three had stage IV disease. Of the eight patients tested, four had a diagnosed hypercoagulable state. Eight of the patients had lesions identified in multiple aortic segments, and aortic aneurysm disease was present in 24%. Coverage of both abdominal and thoracic sources occurred in eight patients, whereas 17 had only one segment covered. Minimal intraluminal catheter and wire manipulation was paired with the use of intravascular ultrasound in an effort to reduce embolization and contrast use. Intravascular ultrasound was used in the majority of cases and transesophageal echo in 28% of patients. Two patients with stage IV kidney disease became dialysis-dependent within 3 months of the procedure. No other patients had an increase in their postoperative or predischarge serum creatinine levels. No embolic events were precipitated during the procedure, nor were there any recurrent embolic events detected on follow

  6. Embolization of an Hepatic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rivitz, S. Mitchell; Waltman, Arthur C.; Kelsey, Peter B.

    1996-11-15

    Vascular injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy can occur in an analogous fashion to biliary injuries, with potential laceration, transection, and occlusion of blood vessels. A patient presented with symptomatic hemobilia 1 month following laparoscopic cholecystectomy and was found to have a right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm which communicated with the common bile duct. This was successfully embolized with several embolic agents, resulting in rapid resolution of all signs and symptoms. The patient has been free of symptoms during a follow-up period of 1 year. A brief discussion of hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms is presented.

  7. Diagnosis of gynecological pseudoaneurysms and embolization with cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Fernández Bermúdez, M J; Fernández Martínez, A M; Domitrovic, L A; Balboa Arregui, Ó

    2016-12-21

    Pseudoaneurysms of the uterine artery are an uncommon cause of severe gynecological bleeding secondary to surgical manipulation of the pelvis or to instrumental delivery. The different imaging techniques are of vital importance in the diagnosis. Angiography is the technique used for confirmation and also for treatment in many cases. Endovascular treatment by embolizing the pseudoaneurysm has become established as the treatment of choice, making it possible to avoid hysterectomy in women of childbearing age. This article presents two cases of gynecological bleeding due to pseudoaneurysms (one secondary to surgery and one secondary to childbirth) that were embolized in a novel way using cyanoacrylate.

  8. Systemic Air Embolism Associated with Pleural Pigtail Chest Tube Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Alkhankan, Emad; Nusair, Ahmad; Mazagri, Rida

    2016-01-01

    Pleural pigtail catheter placement is associated with many complications including pneumothorax, hemorrhage, and chest pain. Air embolism is a known but rare complication of pleural pigtail catheter insertion and has a high risk of occurrence with positive pressure ventilation. In this case report, we present a 50-year-old male with bilateral pneumonia who developed a pneumothorax while on mechanical ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure mode. During the placement of the pleural pigtail catheter to correct the pneumothorax, the patient developed a sudden left sided body weakness and became unresponsive. An air embolism was identified in the right main cerebral artery, which was fatal. PMID:27630781

  9. Fatal foreign-body granulomatous pulmonary embolization due to microcrystalline cellulose in a patient receiving total parenteral nutrition: all crystals are not what they seem.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sarah; Pena, Elena; Walker, Alfredo E

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary foreign-body granulomatous embolization has been described secondary to crystal precipitation in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) as well as when pharmaceutical tablets are crushed and injected intravenously. Extensive granulomatous embolization may cause pulmonary hypertension and death due to acute cor pulmonale. We report the case of a 34-year old woman who had been receiving TPN post-operatively secondary to complications of a paraesophageal hernia repair. During and following receiving TPN, she experienced episodes of hypoxia, tachycardia, fever, and hypotension. Computed tomography scans of the thorax showed centrilobular nodules, tree-in-bud and ground-glass opacities, as well as findings of pulmonary hypertension. Following an episode of hypoxia she was found unresponsive and died despite resuscitative efforts. Microscopic examination of the lungs following post-mortem examination revealed occlusive granulomatous inflammation of the pulmonary arterial vasculature by crystalline material. The morphologic and histochemical patterns of the crystals were suggestive of microcrystalline cellulose, a finding that was confirmed by energy dispersive X-spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Ancillary tests did not support that the crystalline material was the result of TPN precipitation. Foreign-body granulomatous embolization leading to acute core pulmonale may occur as a complication of both intravenous injection of oral medications as well as of TPN crystallization. The source of crystalline material may be difficult to discern based solely on morphological assessment or by histochemical staining. Ancillary studies such as energy dispersive X-spectroscopy or infrared spectroscopy should be performed to definitively discern the two entities.

  10. Paradoxical carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic cholecystectomy as a cause of cardiac arrest and neurologic sequelae: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Ju Deok; Yu, Soo Bong; Kim, Doo Sik; Kim, Kyung Han

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old male patient was scheduled for a laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to acute cholecystitis. About 50 minutes into the operation, the arterial blood pressure suddenly decreased and ventricular fibrillation appeared on the electrocardiography. The patient received cardiopulmonary resuscitation and recovered a normal vital sign. We suspected a carbon dioxide embolism as the middle hepatic vein had been injured during the surgery. We performed a transesophageal echocardiography and were able to confirm the presence of multiple gas bubbles in all of the cardiac chambers. After the operation, the patient presented a stable hemodynamic state, but showed weaknesses in the left arm and leg. There were no acute lesions except for a chronic cerebral cortical atrophy and chronic microvascular encephalopathy on the postoperative brain-computed tomography, 3D angiography and magnetic resonance image. Fortunately, three days after the operation, the patient's hemiparesis had entirely subsided and he was discharged without any neurologic sequelae. PMID:25558345

  11. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE.

  12. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization With Spherical Embolic Agent for Pulmonary Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Akihiko Hori, Shinichi Sueyoshi, Satoru Hori, Atsushi Kono, Michihiko Murata, Shinichi Maeda, Masahiko

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the safety and local efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with superabsorbent polymer microspheres (SAP-MS) in patients with pulmonary metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Sixteen patients with unresectable pulmonary metastases from RCC refractory to standard therapy were enrolled to undergo TAE with the purpose of mass reduction and/or palliation. The prepared SAP-MS swell to approximately two times larger than their dry-state size (100-150 {mu}m [n = 14], 50-100 {mu}m [n = 2]). Forty-nine pulmonary nodules (lung n = 22, mediastinal lymph node n = 17, and hilar lymph node n = 10) were selected as target lesions for evaluation. Local tumor response was evaluated 3 months after TAE according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST; version 1.1). The relationship between tumor enhancement ratio by CT during selective angiography and local tumor response was evaluated. Results: The number of TAE sessions per patient ranged from 1 to 5 (median 2.9). Embolized arteries at initial TAE were bronchial arteries in 14 patients (87.5 %) and nonbronchial systemic arteries in 11 patients (68.8 %). Nodule-based evaluation showed that 5 (10.2 %) nodules had complete response, 17 (34.7 %) had partial response, 15 (30.6 %) had stable disease, and 12 (24.5 %) had progressive disease. The response rate was significantly greater in 22 lesions that had a high tumor enhancement ratio than in 27 lesions that had a slight or moderate ratio (90.9 vs. 7.4 %, p = 0.01). Severe TAE-related adverse events did not occur. Conclusion: TAE with SAP-MS might be a well-tolerated and locally efficacious palliative option for patients with pulmonary metastases from RCC.

  13. Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection as a Cause of Acute Renal Infarction: Clinical and MDCT Findings.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kibo; Song, Soon Young; Lee, Chang Hwa; Ko, Byung Hee; Lee, Seunghun; Kang, Bo Kyeong; Kim, Mi Mi

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) as a cause of acute renal infarction, and to evaluate the clinical and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of SRAD. From November 2011 to January 2014, 35 patients who were diagnosed with acute renal infarction by MDCT were included. We analyzed the 35 MDCT data sets and medical records retrospectively, and compared clinical and imaging features of SRAD with an embolism, using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. The most common cause of acute renal infarction was an embolism, and SRAD was the second most common cause. SRAD patients had new-onset hypertension more frequently than embolic patients. Embolic patients were found to have increased C-reactive protein (CRP) more often than SRAD patients. Laboratory results, including tests for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and the BUN/creatinine ratio (BCR) were significantly higher in embolic patients than SRAD patients. Bilateral renal involvement was detected in embolic patients more often than in SRAD patients. MDCT images of SRAD patients showed the stenosis of the true lumen, due to compression by a thrombosed false lumen. None of SRAD patients progressed to an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m² or to end-stage renal disease during the follow-up period. SRAD is not a rare cause of acute renal infarction, and it has a benign clinical course. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of acute renal infarction, particularly in patients with new-onset hypertension, unilateral renal involvement, and normal ranges of CRP, LDH, BUN, and BCR.

  14. Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection as a Cause of Acute Renal Infarction: Clinical and MDCT Findings

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) as a cause of acute renal infarction, and to evaluate the clinical and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of SRAD. From November 2011 to January 2014, 35 patients who were diagnosed with acute renal infarction by MDCT were included. We analyzed the 35 MDCT data sets and medical records retrospectively, and compared clinical and imaging features of SRAD with an embolism, using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. The most common cause of acute renal infarction was an embolism, and SRAD was the second most common cause. SRAD patients had new-onset hypertension more frequently than embolic patients. Embolic patients were found to have increased C-reactive protein (CRP) more often than SRAD patients. Laboratory results, including tests for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and the BUN/creatinine ratio (BCR) were significantly higher in embolic patients than SRAD patients. Bilateral renal involvement was detected in embolic patients more often than in SRAD patients. MDCT images of SRAD patients showed the stenosis of the true lumen, due to compression by a thrombosed false lumen. None of SRAD patients progressed to an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or to end-stage renal disease during the follow-up period. SRAD is not a rare cause of acute renal infarction, and it has a benign clinical course. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of acute renal infarction, particularly in patients with new-onset hypertension, unilateral renal involvement, and normal ranges of CRP, LDH, BUN, and BCR. PMID:28244286

  15. Transarterial embolization/chemoembolization therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma fed by adrenal artery

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shibing; Tu, Jianfei; Jia, Zhongzhi; Huang, Yuanquan; Jiang, Guomin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess the value of transarterial embolization/chemoembolization (TAE/TACE) therapy via adrenal artery for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC who underwent TAE/TACE therapy via adrenal artery between May 2003 and October 2015 across 4 medical centers were identified. Clinical information, procedural data, and imaging data were analyzed to assess technical success, disease control, and survival rates. A t test was used to compare the differences in serum alpha-fetoprotein before and after treatment. A total of 23 patients (23 men; mean age, 54.6 ± 7.5 years; range, 37–72 years) were included in this study. All tumors were located under the capsule of the liver and adjacent to the adrenal gland (median tumor diameter, 8.2 cm). Lesions fed by the adrenal artery were demonstrated during initial TAE/TACE in 7 patients and during repeat TAE/TACE in 16 patients. The superior, middle, and inferior adrenal arteries were involved in 14, 3, and 6 patients, respectively. The technical success rate was 100%. The disease control rate at 3 months was 100%, with partial tumor response seen in 16 (69.6%) patients and stable disease seen in 7 (30.4%) patients. The cumulative survival rate from the time of TAE/TACE was 100% at 1 year. There were no embolization-related complications. TAE/TACE therapy via the adrenal arteries can improve the therapeutic efficacy of TAE/TACE and reduce the incidence of HCC recurrence and/or presence of residual HCC. PMID:28033293

  16. Splenic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Bleeding Secondary to Splenic Vein Thrombosis Complicated by Necrotizing Pancreatitis: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Kyu; Hur, Young Hoe; Koh, Yang Seok

    2016-01-01

    Splenic vein thrombosis is a relatively common finding in pancreatitis. Gastric variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of splenic vein thrombosis, resulting from increased blood flow to short gastric vein. Traditionally, splenectomy is considered the treatment of choice. However, surgery in necrotizing pancreatitis is dangerous, because of severe inflammation, adhesion, and bleeding tendency. In the Warshaw operation, gastric variceal bleeding is rare, even though splenic vein is resected. Because the splenic artery is also resected, blood flow to short gastric vein is not increased problematically. Herein, we report a case of gastric variceal bleeding secondary to splenic vein thrombosis complicated by necrotizing pancreatitis successfully treated with splenic artery embolization. Splenic artery embolization could be the best treatment option for gastric variceal bleeding when splenectomy is difficult such as in case associated with severe acute pancreatitis or associated with severe adhesion or in patients with high operation risk. PMID:27891150

  17. Transarterial Embolization of Type II Endoleaks after EVAR: The Role of Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, Rene Wohlgemuth, Walter A. Heiss, Peter Wiggermann, Philipp Guentner, Oliver Schreyer, Andreas G. Hoffstetter, Patrick Stroszczynski, Christian; Zorger, Niels

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of transarterial endoleak embolization using the liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx). Methods: Over a 7-year period eleven patients (6 women, 5 men; mean age 68 years, range 37-83 years) underwent transarterial embolization of a type II endoleak after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using the liquid embolic agent Onyx. Two patients (18 %) had a simple type II endoleak with only one artery in communication with the aneurysm sac, whereas 9 patients (82 %) had a complex type II endoleak with multiple communicating vessels. We retrospectively analyzed the technical and clinical success of transarterial type II endoleak embolization with Onyx. Complete embolization of the nidus was defined as technical success. Embolization was considered clinically successful when volume of the aneurysm sac was stable or decreased on follow-up CT scans. Result: Mean follow-up time was 26.0 (range 6-50) months. Clinical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients (73 %). Transarterial nidus embolization with Onyx was technically successful in 6 of 11 patients (55 %). In three cases the nidus was embolized without direct catheterization from a more distal access through the network of collateral vessels. Conclusion: Onyx is a favorable embolic agent for transarterial endoleak embolization. To achieve the best clinical results, complete occlusion of the nidus is mandatory.

  18. Development and evaluation of liquid embolic agents based on liquid crystalline material of glyceryl monooleate.

    PubMed

    Du, Ling-Ran; Lu, Xiao-Jing; Guan, Hai-Tao; Yang, Yong-Jie; Gu, Meng-Jie; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Lv, Tian-Shi; Yan, Zi-Guang; Song, Li; Zou, Ying-Hua; Fu, Nai-Qi; Qi, Xian-Rong; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2014-08-25

    New type of liquid embolic agents based on a liquid crystalline material of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) was developed and evaluated in this study. Ternary phase diagram of GMO, water and ethanol was constructed and three isotropic liquids (ILs, GMO:ethanol:water=49:21:30, 60:20:20 and 72:18:10 (w/w/w)) were selected as potential liquid embolic agents, which could spontaneously form viscous gel cast when contacting with water or physiological fluid. The ILs exhibited excellent microcatheter deliverability due to low viscosity, and were proved to successfully block the saline flow when performed in a device to simulate embolization in vitro. The ILs also showed good cytocompatibility on L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. The embolization of ILs to rabbit kidneys was performed successfully under monitoring of digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and embolic degree was affected by the initial formulation composition and used volume. At 5th week after embolization, DSA and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the renal arteries embolized with IL did not recanalize in follow-up period, and an obvious atrophy of the embolized kidney was observed. Therefore, the GMO-based liquid embolic agents showed feasible and effective to embolize, and potential use in clinical interventional embolization therapy.

  19. Diagnostic Value of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Combined with Perfusion Imaging for Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xijin; Wang, Shanshan; Jiang, Xingyue; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Wenjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism has become the third most common cardiovascular disease, which can seriously harm human health. Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of dual-source computerized tomography (CT) and perfusion imaging for peripheral pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients with suspected pulmonary embolism underwent dual-source CT exams. To compare the ability of pulmonary embolism detection software (PED) with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in determining the presence, numbers, and locations of pulmonary emboli, the subsequent images were reviewed by two radiologists using both imaging modalities. Also, the diagnostic consistency between PED and CTPA images and dual-energy pulmonary perfusion imaging (DEPI) for segmental pulmonary embolism was compared. Results CTPA images revealed 50 (7.81%) segmental and 56 (4.38%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms, while the PED images showed 68 (10.63%) segmental and 94 (7.34%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms. Thus, the detection rate on PED images for peripheral pulmonary embolism was significantly higher than that of the CTPA images (P < 0.05). There was good consistency for diagnosing segmental pulmonary embolism between PED and CTPA and DEPI (kappa = 0.85). The sensitivity and specificity of DEPI images for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism were 91.7% and 97.5%, respectively. Conclusion PED software of dual-source CT combined with perfusion imaging can significantly improve the detection rate of peripheral pulmonary embolism. PMID:27703656

  20. Coil Knotting during Endovascular Coil Embolization for Ruptured MCA Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, S.C.; Lyo, I.U.; Shin, S.H.; Park, J.B.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Complications during coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms include thromboembolic events, hemorrhagic complications related to procedural aneurysmal rupture and parent vessel perforation, and coil-related complications. The present report describes a rare coil-related complication involving spontaneous coil knotting. PMID:20557732

  1. Embolization of nonvariceal portosystemic collaterals in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Arias, Mercedes; Longo, Jesus Maria; Alejandre, Pedro Luis; Betes, Maria Teresa; Elizalde, Arlette Maria

    1997-03-15

    Percutaneous embolization of large portosystemic collaterals was performed in three patients following placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in order to improve hepatopetal portal flow. Improved hepatic portal perfusion was achieved in these cases, thereby theoretically reducing the risk of chronic hepatic encephalopathy.

  2. Bullet embolism of pulmonary artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamanari, Mauricio Gustavo Ieiri; Mansur, Maria Clara Dias; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Silverio, Paulo Rogerio Barboza; Jayanthi, Shri Krishna; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the case of a patient victim of gunshots, with a very rare complication: venous bullet embolism from the left external iliac vein to the lingular segment of the left pulmonary artery. Diagnosis is made with whole-body radiography or computed tomography. Digital angiography is reserved for supplementary diagnosis or to be used as a therapeutic procedure.

  3. Uterine Artery Embolization: Exploring New Dimensions in Obstetric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Seema; Singh, Abha; Raghunandan, Chitra; Gupta, Usha; Dutt, Seema

    2014-01-01

    The role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of obstetric emergencies is relatively new and not so commonly used. In the following series, the efficacy of this technique in situations such as scar site ectopic pregnancy, antepartum and postpartum obstetric hemorrhage, especially in the presence of coagulation derangement is presented. PMID:24936273

  4. Effect of Renal Embolization with Trisacryl and PAVc

    PubMed Central

    de Assis Barbosa, Leandro; Caldas, Jose Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Conti, Mario Luiz; Malheiros, Denise Maria Avancini Costa; Ramos, Francisco Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Evaluate the degree of vascular occlusion, vascular recanalization, and necrosis of the vascular wall caused by polyvinyl alcohol-covered polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) particles compared to trisacryl particles after renal embolization. METHODS Seventy-nine female albino New Zealand rabbits underwent arterial catheterization of the right kidney. Thirty-three animals were embolized with trisacryl particles, thirty-one with PVAc particles, and fifteen were kept as controls. Four animals were excluded (three trisacryl and one PVAc) due to early death. Five subgroups of six animals were created. The animals in the different groups were sacrificed either 48 hours, 5 days, 10 days, 30 days, or 90 days after embolization. The control group was divided into subgroups of three animals each and kept for the same periods of time. The kidneys were dyed with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson’s trichrome and then examined using optical microscopy. RESULTS There were significant differences in the degree of vascular occlusion caused by the trisacryl and the PVAc particles between the five-day and the ten-day groups. Additional differences were noted between the five-day and 48-hour groups in regard to the amount of necrosis. For both findings, the PVAc group members showed adequate tissue reaction (ischemia and volumetric reduction) and less recanalization than those treated with trisacryl. CONCLUSION The use of PVAc as an embolization material exhibited an adequate tissue reaction (ischemia and volumetric reduction), more expressive vascular occlusion and necrosis, and less recanalization than the trisacryl material. PMID:19936185

  5. Embolic Protection Devices During TAVI: Current Evidence and Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; Puri, Rishi; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is now the principal therapeutic option in patients with severe aortic stenosis deemed inoperable or at high surgical risk. Implementing TAVI in a lower risk profile population could be limited by relatively high cerebrovascular event rates related to the procedure. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies have demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of silent embolic cerebral infarcts after TAVI, with some data relating these lesions to subsequent cognitive decline. Embolic protection devices provide a mechanical barrier against debris embolizing to the brain during TAVI. We review the current evidence and ongoing uncertainties faced with the 3 currently available devices (Embrella, TriGuard and Claret) in TAVI. Studies evaluated neurological damage at 3 levels: clinical, subclinical, and cognitive. Feasibility and safety were analyzed for the 3 devices. In terms of efficacy, all studies were exploratory, but none demonstrated significant reductions in clinical event rates. The Embrella and Claret devices demonstrated significant reductions of the total cerebral lesion volume on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Studies evaluating the effects on cognition were also somewhat inconclusive. In conclusion, despite embolic protection devices demonstrating reductions in the total cerebral lesion volume on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the clinical efficacy in terms of preventing stroke/cognitive decline requires confirmation in larger studies.

  6. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section 868.2025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a patient's blood stream. It may use Doppler or other ultrasonic principles. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section 870.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section 870.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section 870.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section 870.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section 870.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular...

  12. Treatment of symptomatic pelvic varices by ovarian vein embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Capasso, Patrizio; Simons, Christine; Trotteur, Genevieve; Dondelinger, Robert F.; Henroteaux, Denis; Gaspard, Ulysse

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. Pelvic congestion syndrome is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain in women and its association with venous congestion has been described in the literature. We evaluated the potential benefits of lumboovarian vein embolization in the treatment of lower abdominal pain in patients presenting with pelvic varicosities. Methods. Nineteen patients were treated. There were 13 unilateral embolizations, 6 initial bilateral treatments and 5 treated recurrences (a total of 30 procedures). All embolizations were performed with either enbucrilate and/or macrocoils, and there was an average clinical and Doppler duplex follow-up of 15.4 months. Results. The initial technical success rate was 96.7%. There were no immediate or long-term complications. Variable symptomatic relief was observed in 73.7% of cases with complete responses in 57.9%. All 8 patients who had partial or no pain relief complained of dyspareunia. The direct relationship between varices and chronic pelvic pain was difficult to ascertain in a significant number of clinical failures. Conclusion. Transcatheter embolization of lumboovarian varices is a safe technique offering symptomatic relief of pelvic pain in the majority of cases. The presence of dyspareunia seemed to be a poor prognostic factor, indicating that other causes of pelvic pain may coexist with pelvic varicosities.

  13. Hepatic Artery Angiography and Embolization for Hemobilia Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Tony; Travis, Simon; Ettles, Duncan; Dyet, John; Sedman, Peter; Wedgewood, Kevin; Royston, Christopher

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: The effectiveness of angiography and embolization in diagnosis and treatment were assessed in a cohort of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Over a 6-year period 1513 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were carried out in our region. Nine of these patients (0.6%) developed significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 5-43 days after surgery. All underwent emergency celiac and selective right hepatic artery angiography. All were treated by coil embolization of the right hepatic artery proximal and distal to the bleeding point. Results: Pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery adjacent to cholecystectomy clips were demonstrated in all nine patients at selective right hepatic angiography. In three patients celiac axis angiography alone failed to demonstrate the pseudoaneurysm. Embolization controlled hemorrhage in all patients with no further bleeding and no further intervention. One patient developed a candidal liver abscess in the post-procedure period. All patients are alive and well at follow-up. Conclusion: Selective right hepatic angiography is vital in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Embolization offers the advantage of minimally invasive treatment in unstable patients, does not disrupt recent biliary reconstruction, allows distal as well as proximal control of the hepatic artery, and is an effective treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication.

  14. Preoperative Uterine Artery Embolization (PUAE) Before Uterine Fibroid Myomectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Dumousset, E.; Chabrot, P.; Rabischong, B.; Mazet, N.; Nasser, S.; Darcha, C.; Garcier, J.M.; Mage, G.; Boyer, L.

    2008-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the potential of uterine artery embolization to minimize blood loss and facilitate easier removal of fibroids during subsequent myomectomy. Methods. This retrospective study included 22 patients (median age 37 years), of whom at least 15 wished to preserve their fertility. They presented with at least one fibroid (mean diameter 85.6 mm) and had undergone preoperative uterine artery embolization (PUAE) with resorbable gelatin sponge. Results. No complication or technical failure of embolization was identified. Myomectomies were performed during laparoscopy (12 cases) and laparotomy (9 cases). One hysterectomy was performed. The following were noted: easier dissection of fibroids (mean 5.6 per patient, range 1-30); mean intervention time 113 min (range 25-210 min); almost bloodless surgery, with a mean peroperative blood loss of 90 ml (range 0-806 ml); mean hemoglobin pretherapeutically 12.3 g/dl (range 5.9-15.2 g/dl) and post-therapeutically 10.3 g/dl (range 5.6-13.3 g/dl), with no blood transfusion needed. Patients were discharged on day 4 on average and the mean sick leave was 1 month. Conclusion. Preoperative embolization is associated with minimal intraoperative blood loss. It does not increase the complication rate or impair operative dissection, and improves the chances of performing conservative surgery.

  15. Superselective Embolization with Coils in High-Flow Priapism

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Oliver; Heidenreich, A.; Klose, Klaus Jochen; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Alfke, Heiko

    2002-08-15

    Priapism can be divided into 'low-flow' veno-occlusive priapism and, especially in children, rare 'high-flow' arterial priapism. We report a 5-year-old boy who developed arterial priapism after blunt perineal trauma that was successfully treated by superselective embolization with microcoils.

  16. Stroke associated with pulmonary embolism after air travel.

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, F; Borron, S W; Surget, V; Sordelet, D; Lapandry, C; Adnet, F

    2003-06-24

    Prolonged air travel is associated with an increased incidence of thromboembolic events. The occurrence of stroke was studied in patients with pulmonary embolism after air travel in a review of all flights arriving at Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris during an 8-year period. Thromboembolic stroke and patent foramen ovale were diagnosed in four patients with pulmonary embolus.

  17. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Onyx extravasation during embolization of a brain arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Hirotoshi; Agawa, Yuji; Imai, Yukihiro; Tani, Shoichi; Adachi, Hidemitsu; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Mineharu, Yohei; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2017-04-01

    During Onyx embolization to treat brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM), carefully observing the penetration of Onyx to the nidus is important in order to avoid complications such as hemorrhage, ischemia, and difficulty with microcatheter removal. We encountered a case of Onyx extravasation during embolization of a cerebellar AVM confirmed by surgical resection and pathological analysis. The patient was a 44-year-old man with Spetzler-Martin grade I cerebellar AVM who underwent Onyx embolization prior to resection of the brain AVM. While injecting Onyx into the nidus using the "plug-and-push" technique, Onyx extravasation was observed. Onyx injection was paused and subsequently restarted, thereby allowing continuation of embolization. An oblate Onyx cast that was entirely covered in cerebellar tissue was removed during total resection of the AVM, performed the same day. The surgically removed oblate Onyx cast did not contain brain tissue or vessel wall, and immunohistochemical staining against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed Onyx penetration into GFAP-positive cerebellar tissue. Onyx extravasation was confirmed based on intraoperative findings during resection as well as pathological findings. The patient has been followed for four years postoperatively, and adverse events caused by Onyx extravasation have not been observed. Unexpected cast of Onyx, remote from the vascular architecture of the AVM, may represent an intra-parenchymal extravasation.

  19. CT and radiographic appearance of extracranial Onyx(®) embolization.

    PubMed

    Jia, J B; Green, C S; Cohen, A J; Helmy, M

    2015-03-01

    Onyx(®) (ev3, Irvine, CA, USA) is a liquid embolic agent composed of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide used for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations. Onyx is a preferred embolizing agent due to its unique properties, non-adhesive nature, and durability. In addition to its approved intracranial application, Onyx is also being used successfully in extracranial embolization in areas including extracranial aneurisms and vascular malformations, trauma, gastrointestinal bleeding, and neoplasms. Because of its increasing utilization, it is important for reporting radiologists to be able to recognize its extracranial appearance across different imaging techniques and to be familiar with its uses. The goal of this review is to describe the extracranial uses of Onyx and its appearance in various extracranial locations at radiography and CT, while providing didactic examples. Onyx appears radiodense at CT and plain radiography and has a curvilinear pattern following the expected path of the vessel embolized. At CT, Onyx creates streak artefact that may obstruct the view of surrounding tissues consistent with descriptions of other tantalum devices.

  20. Percutaneous and Endovascular Embolization of Ruptured Hepatic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew F.; Lee, Wai Kit

    2002-06-15

    A 72-year-old woman presented with an intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured intrahepatic arteryaneurysm, with an associated pseudoaneurysm developing a high-flow arteriovenous fistula. Persistent coagulopathy and a median arcuate ligament stenosis of the celiac axis further complicated endovascular management. Aneurysm thrombosis required percutaneous embolization with coils, a removable core guidewire and polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  1. Preoperative Embolization of Hypervascular Castleman's Disease of the Mediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, John Henri; Sgourdos, Georgios; Kritikos, Neoklis; Didier, Dominique; Terraz, Sylvain

    2008-01-15

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with mediastinal Castleman's disease of the hyaline vascular type. This large tumor was safely resected after arterial embolization. We describe the steps of this interventional procedure and discuss related necessary precautions.

  2. A systematic review of transarterial embolization versus emergency surgery in treatment of major nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Andrew D; Dilworth, Mark P; Powell, Susan L; Atherton, Helen; Griffiths, Ewen A

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE) are options for the treatment of recurrent or refractory nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Surgery has the disadvantage of high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Embolization has become more available and has the advantage of avoiding laparotomy in this often unfit and elderly population. Objective To carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies that have directly compared TAE with emergency surgery in the treatment of major upper gastrointestinal bleeding that has failed therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods A literature search of Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar was performed. The primary outcomes were all-cause mortality and rates of rebleeding. The secondary outcomes were length of stay and postoperative complications. Results A total of nine studies with 711 patients (347 who had embolization and 364 who had surgery) were analyzed. Patients in the TAE group were more likely to have ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] =1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33, 2.98; P=0.0008; I2=67% [random effects model]) and be coagulopathic (pooled OR =2.23; 95% CI: 1.29, 3.87; P=0.004; I2=33% [fixed effects model]). Compared with TAE, surgery was associated with a lower risk of rebleeding (OR =0.41; 95% CI: 0.22, 0.77; P<0.0001; I2=55% [random effects]). There was no difference in mortality (OR =0.70; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.02; P=0.06; I2=44% [fixed effects]) between TAE and surgery. Conclusion When compared with surgery, TAE had a significant increased risk of rebleeding rates after TAE; however, there were no differences in mortality rates. These findings are subject to multiple sources of bias due to poor quality studies. These findings support the need for a well-designed clinical trial to ascertain which technique is superior. PMID:24790465

  3. Pulmonary Air Embolism: An Infrequent Complication in the Radiology Suite

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranco, Julio; Romero-Legro, Ivan; Freire, Amado X.; Nearing, Katherine; Ratnakant, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 64 Final Diagnosis: Pulmonary air embolism Symptoms: Shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Air embolism can occur in a number of medical-surgical situations. Venous air embolism is frequently lethal when a substantial amount enters the venous circulation rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity if crossover to the systemic arterial circulation occurs. The diagnosis of massive air embolism is usually made on clinical grounds by the development of abrupt hemodynamic compromise. The true incidence, morbidity, and mortality of this event is unknown given the difficulties in diagnosis. Case Report: An inadvertent antecubital venous injection of 150 mL of air using a contrast power injector during a computed tomography (CT) is reported. Immediate imaging (CT) showed a significant amount of air in the right atrium and right ventricular cavity, and air mixed with contrast in the main pulmonary artery and proximal divisions of the pulmonary circulation. Patient condition deteriorated requiring mechanical ventilation for 48 hours. Condition improved over the next few days and patient was successfully extubated and discharged home. Conclusions: Air embolism is a rare complication, the potential for this to be life threatening makes prevention and early detection of this condition essential. This condition should be suspected when patients experience sudden onset respiratory distress and/or experience a neurological event in the setting of a known risk factor. Treatment options include Durant’s maneuver; left-lateral decubitus, head-down positioning; to decrease air entry into the right ventricle outflow tract, hyperbaric therapy, 100% O2 and supportive care. PMID:28115731

  4. A New Soluble Gelatin Sponge for Transcatheter Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sahara, Shinya; Minamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Motoki; Ikoma, Akira; Nakata, Kouhei; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2010-12-15

    To prepare a soluble gelatin sponge (GS) and to explore the GS particles (GSPs) that inhibit development of collateral pathways when transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization is performed. The approval of the Institutional Committee on Research Animal Care of our institution was obtained. By means of 50 and 100 kDa of regenerative medicine-gelatin (RM-G), RM-G sponges were prepared by freeze-drying and heating to temperatures of 110-150{sup o}C for cross-linkage. The soluble times of RM-GSPs were measured in vitro. Eight swine for transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization were assigned into two groups: six received 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSPs, and 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, with soluble time of 48 h or more in vitro; two swine received Gelpart GSPs (G-GSPs) with insoluble time of 14 days as a control. Transarterial chemoembolization was performed on two branches of the hepatic artery per swine. RM-GSPs heated at temperatures of 110-138{sup o}C were soluble. Mean soluble times of the RM-GSPs increased with higher temperature. Hepatic branches embolized with G-GSP remained occluded after 6 days, and development of collateral pathways was observed after 3 days. Hepatic branches embolized with 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSP and 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSP remained occluded for 4 h, and recanalization was observed after 1 day. Hepatic branches embolized with 138{sup o}C/50RM-GS remained occluded for 1 day, and recanalization was observed after 2 days with no development of collateral pathways. In RM-GSs with various soluble times that were prepared by modulating the heating temperature, 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSP was the soluble GSP with the longest occlusion time without inducing development of collateral pathways.

  5. Outcomes After Unilateral Uterine Artery Embolization: A Retrospective Review

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M. J.; Hussain, F. F.; Walker, W. J.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose. Bilateral uterine artery embolization (UAE) is considered necessary to provide effective treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids. Occasionally, only unilateral embolization is performed, and this study evaluates these outcomes. Materials and Methods. As part of a prospective observational study of more than 1600 patients treated with UAE since 1996, there have been 48 patients in whom unilateral embolization has been performed. This study retrospectively reviews clinical response as assessed by our standard questionnaire and radiological response assessed by either magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound. Results. Two principal groups emerged: the largest, where only the dominant unilateral arterial supply was electively embolized (30 patients); and the second, where there was technical failure to catheterize the second uterine artery as a result of anatomical constraints (12 patients). Favorable clinical response with a reduction in menorrhagia at 1 year was seen in 85.7% (18/21) of those patients with a dominant arterial supply to the fibroid(s). In contrast, in those patients where there was technical failure to embolize one uterine artery, there was a high rate of clinical failure requiring further intervention in 58.3% (7/12). Comparison of the technical failure group with the dominant uterine artery group demonstrated a statistically significant (Fisher's exact test) difference in the proportion of patients with evidence of persistent fibroid vascularity (p < 0.001) and requiring repeat intervention (p < 0.01). Conclusion. We conclude that unilateral UAE can achieve a positive clinical result in the group of patients where there is a dominant unilateral artery supplying the fibroid(s), in contrast to the poor results seen following technical failure.

  6. Prostatic Artery Embolization as a Primary Treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Preliminary Results in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Antunes, Alberto Azoubel; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Mauricio da; Oliveira Cerri, Luciana Mendes de; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Marcelino, Antonio Sergio Zafred; Freire, Geraldo Campos; Moreira, Airton Mota; Srougi, Miguel; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-04-15

    Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) typically occurs in the sixth and seventh decades, and the most frequent obstructive urinary symptoms are hesitancy, decreased urinary stream, sensation of incomplete emptying, nocturia, frequency, and urgency. Various medications, specifically 5-{alpha}-reductase inhibitors and selective {alpha}-blockers, can decrease the severity of the symptoms secondary to BPH, but prostatectomy is still considered to be the traditional method of management. We report the preliminary results for two patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH, successfully treated by prostate artery embolization (PAE). The patients were investigated using the International Prostate Symptom Score, by digital rectal examination, urodynamic testing, prostate biopsy, transrectal ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine volume complemented the investigation at 30, 90, and 180 days after PAE. The procedure was performed under local anesthesia; embolization of the prostate arteries was performed with a microcatheter and 300- to 500-{mu}m microspheres using complete stasis as the end point. One patient was subjected to bilateral PAE and the other to unilateral PAE; they urinated spontaneously after removal of the urethral catheter, 15 and 10 days after the procedure, respectively. At 6-month follow-up, US and MRI revealed a prostate reduction of 39.7% and 47.8%, respectively, for the bilateral PAE and 25.5 and 27.8%, respectively, for the patient submitted to unilateral PAE. The early results, at 6-month follow-up, for the two patients with BPH show a promising potential alternative for treatment with PAE.

  7. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  8. Preoperative Direct Puncture Embolization of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma in Combination with Transarterial Embolization: An Analysis of 22 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lv Mingming Fan, Xin-dong; Su Lixin; Chen Dong

    2013-02-15

    ObjectiveThis study was designed to evaluate the clinical application of preoperative auxiliary embolization for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) by direct puncture embolization (DPE) of the tumor in combination with transarterial embolization (TAE). The study included 22 patients. An 18-gauge needle was used to puncture directly into the tumor, and 20-25 % N-butyl cyanoacrylate was injected under the guidance of fluoroscopy after confirming the placement of the needle into the JNA and no leaking into the surrounding tissue. Tumors were obstructed later via TAE. The supplying arteries of JNA were from branches of the internal carotid and external carotid arteries. Control angiography showed the obliteration of contrast stain in the entire tumor mass and the distal supplying arteries disappeared after DPE in combination with TAE. Surgical resection was performed within 4 days after embolization and none of the patients required blood transfusion. The use of DPE in combination with TAE was a safe, feasible, and efficacious method. It can devascularize effectively the JNAs and reduce intraoperative bleeding when JNAs are extirpated.

  9. Partial splenic embolization for hypersplenism concomitant with or after arterial embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma in 30 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Han Mingjun; Zhao Hanguo; Ren Ke; Zhao Dongchun; Xu Ke; Zhang Xitong

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. To study the value of partial splenic embolization (PSE) for the treatment of hypersplenism in patients undergoing embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. Transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization (THAE) combined with PSE was performed in 30 patients with HCC complicating liver cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hypersplenism. Gelfoam sponge was used as the embolic material for PSE and limited to 100-150 pieces. Results. More than 50% of splenic parenchyma was infarcted in 27 patients. Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were corrected by PSE in 25 of 27 patients with hypersplenism. In 26 patients with esophageal varices, including 5 patients with bleeding, no rebleeding occurred during a 6-17 month follow-up. Hypersplenism was not corrected in 2 of 3 patients whose infarcted splenic parenchyma was less than 50%. No splenic abscesses or other severe complications were observed. Of the 30 patients treated, 19 are still alive after 1 year. Conclusions. THAE combined with PSE is a safe and effective measure for patients with HCC.

  10. Presumed Arterial Gas Embolism After Breath-Hold Diving in Shallow Water.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Stefani; Schramm, Dirk; Karenfort, Michael; Christaras, Andreas; Euler, Michael; Mayatepek, Ertan; Tibussek, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Dive-related injuries are relatively common, but almost exclusively occur in recreational or scuba diving. We report 2 children with acute central nervous system complications after breath-hold diving. A 12-year-old boy presented with unilateral leg weakness and paresthesia after diving beneath the water surface for a distance of ∼25 m. After ascent, he suddenly felt extreme thoracic pain that resolved spontaneously. Neurologic examination revealed right leg weakness and sensory deficits with a sensory level at T5. Spinal MRI revealed a nonenhancing T2-hyperintense lesion in the central cord at the level of T1/T2 suggesting a spinal cord edema. A few weeks later, a 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute dizziness, personality changes, confusion, and headache. Thirty minutes before, she had practiced diving beneath the water surface for a distance of ∼25 m. After stepping out, she felt sudden severe thoracic pain and lost consciousness. Shortly later she reported headache and vertigo, and numbness of the complete left side of her body. Neurologic examination revealed reduced sensibility to all modalities, a positive Romberg test, and vertigo. Cerebral MRI revealed no pathologic findings. Both children experienced a strikingly similar clinical course. The chronology of events strongly suggests that both patients were suffering from arterial gas embolism. This condition has been reported for the first time to occur in children after breath-hold diving beneath the water surface without glossopharyngeal insufflation.

  11. Anticoagulant Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism: The Present State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Johannes; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a disease entity comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a frequent and potentially life-threatening event. To date different agents are available for the effective treatment of acute VTE and the prevention of recurrence. For several years, the standard of care was the subcutaneous application of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or fondaparinux, followed by a vitamin K antagonist (VKA). The so-called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) were introduced rather recently in clinical practice for the treatment of VTE. DOAC seem to have a favorable risk-benefit profile compared to VKA. Moreover, DOAC significantly simplify VTE treatment because they are administered in fixed doses and no routine monitoring is needed. Patients with objectively diagnosed DVT or PE should receive therapeutic anticoagulation for a minimum of 3 months. Whether a patient ought to receive extended treatment needs to be evaluated on an individual basis, depending mainly on risk factors determined by characteristics of the thrombotic event and patient-related factors. In specific patient groups (e.g., pregnant women, cancer patients, and elderly patients), treatment of VTE is more challenging than that in the general population and additional issues need to be considered in those patients. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the currently available treatment modalities of acute VTE and secondary prophylaxis. In particular, specific aspects regarding the initiation of VTE treatment, duration of anticoagulation, and specific patient groups will be discussed.

  12. Treatment of Superior Vena Cava (SVC) Syndrome and Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Thrombosis in a Patient with Colorectal Cancer: Combination of SVC Stenting and IVC Filter Placement to Palliate Symptoms and Pave the Way for Port Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sauter, Alexander; Triller, Juergen; Schmidt, Felix; Kickuth, Ralph

    2008-07-15

    Thrombosis of the inferior vena cava is a life-threatening complication in cancer patients leading to pulmonary embolism. These patients can also be affected by superior vena cava syndrome causing dyspnea followed by trunk or extremity swelling. We report the case of a 61-year-old female suffering from an extended colorectal tumor who became affected by both of the mentioned complications. Due to thrombus formation within the right vena jugularis interna, thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, and superior vena cava syndrome, a combined interventional procedure via a left jugular access with stenting of the superior vena cava and filter placement into the inferior vena cava was performed As a consequence, relief of the patient's symptoms, prevention of pulmonary embolism, and paving of the way for further venous chemotherapy were achieved.

  13. Arterial supply to the bleeding diverticulum in the ascending duodenum treated by transcatheter arterial embolization- a duodenal artery branched from the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Hiroki H; Kawai, Nobuyuki N; Sato, Morio M; Tanaka, Fumihiro F; Nakata, Kouhei K; Minamiguchi, Hiroki H; Nakai, Motoki M; Sonomura, Tetsuo T

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of endoscopically unmanageable hemorrhagic diverticulum in the ascending duodenum. The ventral and dorsal walls of the ascending duodenum were supplied from the first jejunal artery (1JA) and inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA), respectively. The hemorrhage mainly occurred from IPDA. The abruptly branching of IPDA from superior mesenteric artery enabled successful catheterization of the IPDA with an angled microcatheter. Hemostasis was obtained by embolization using n-butyl cyanoacrylate. Gastroendoscopy depicted a duodenal hemi-circumferential ulcer. No symptoms related to hemorrhage were found at the last follow-up at 12 months.

  14. Atrial fibrillation (acute onset)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute atrial fibrillation is rapid, irregular, and chaotic atrial activity of recent onset. Various definitions of acute atrial fibrillation have been used in the literature, but for the purposes of this review we have included studies where atrial fibrillation may have occurred up to 7 days previously. Risk factors for acute atrial fibrillation include increasing age, cardiovascular disease, alcohol, diabetes, and lung disease. Acute atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. The condition resolves spontaneously within 24 to 48 hours in more than 50% of people; however, many people will require interventions to control heart rate or restore sinus rhythm. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent embolism, for conversion to sinus rhythm, and to control heart rate in people with recent-onset atrial fibrillation (within 7 days) who are haemodynamically stable? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amiodarone, antithrombotic treatment before cardioversion, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, digoxin, diltiazem, direct current cardioversion, flecainide, metoprolol, nebivolol, propafenone, sotalol, timolol, and verapamil. PMID:25430048

  15. High D-dimer levels increase the likelihood of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Tick, L W; Nijkeuter, M; Kramer, M H H; Hovens, M M C; Büller, H R; Leebeek, F W G; Huisman, M V

    2008-08-01

    Objective. To determine the utility of high quantitative D-dimer levels in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Methods. D-dimer testing was performed in consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. We included patients with suspected pulmonary embolism with a high risk for venous thromboembolism, i.e. hospitalized patients, patients older than 80 years, with malignancy or previous surgery. Presence of pulmonary embolism was based on a diagnostic management strategy using a clinical decision rule (CDR), D-dimer testing and computed tomography. Results. A total of 1515 patients were included with an overall pulmonary embolism prevalence of 21%. The pulmonary embolism prevalence was strongly associated with the height of the D-dimer level, and increased fourfold with D-dimer levels greater than 4000 ng mL(-1) compared to levels between 500 and 1000 ng mL(-1). Patients with D-dimer levels higher than 2000 ng mL(-1) and an unlikely CDR had a pulmonary embolism prevalence of 36%. This prevalence is comparable to the pulmonary embolism likely CDR group. When D-dimer levels were above 4000 ng mL(-1), the observed pulmonary embolism prevalence was very high, independent of CDR score. Conclusion. Strongly elevated D-dimer levels substantially increase the likelihood of pulmonary embolism. Whether this should translate into more intensive diagnostic and therapeutic measures in patients with high D-dimer levels irrespective of CDR remains to be studied.

  16. Impaired cerebral vasoreactivity after embolization of arteriovenous malformations: assessment with serial acetazolamide challenge xenon CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, R.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Horton, J.A.; Yonas, H.; Pentheny, S.; Durham, S.; Jungreis, C.A.; Hecht, S.T. )

    1991-05-01

    Embolization of a portion of the nidus of an arteriovenous malformation not only may alter hemodynamics within the nidus, but also may change blood flow dynamics in adjacent normal vessels. Sequential acetazolamide-challenge xenon CT cerebral blood flow studies were performed in eight patients before and after embolization of arteriovenous malformations to assess the hemodynamic effects on the major vascular territories supplying the malformation. Acetazolamide is a potent cerebral vasodilator, and its administration combined with cerebral blood flow studies allows assessment of cerebral vasoreactivity. In seven of the eight patients, one or more parenchymal areas exhibited a normal cerebral blood flow augmentation response to acetazolamide before embolization, but diminished acetazolamide flow augmentation was seen after embolization, indicating abnormal vasoreactivity. We found that the decrease in vasoreactivity peaked 6-10 days after embolization. In one of the eight patients, a temporary delayed neurologic deficit developed during a period of impaired cerebral vasoreactivity following embolization. Our results suggest that embolization of an arteriovenous malformation can induce vasoreactivity changes in adjacent normal vessels. Because these changes appear to be somewhat time-dependent, an appropriate interval should be observed between embolization stages or before surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation following embolization to allow hemodynamic equilibration to occur. Acetazolamide challenge combined with serial cerebral blood flow studies following embolization enables determination of this hemodynamic equilibration.

  17. Direct observation of local xylem embolisms induced by soil drying in intact Zea mays leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeongeun; Hwang, Bae Geun; Kim, Yangmin X.; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability of vascular plants to xylem embolism is closely related to their stable long-distance water transport, growth, and survival. Direct measurements of xylem embolism are required to understand what causes embolism and what strategies plants employ against it. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microscopy was used to non-destructively investigate both the anatomical structures of xylem vessels and embolism occurrence in the leaves of intact Zea mays (maize) plants. Xylem embolism was induced by water stress at various soil drying periods and soil water contents. X-ray images of dehydrated maize leaves showed that the ratio of gas-filled vessels to all xylem vessels increased with decreased soil water content and reached approximately 30% under severe water stress. Embolism occurred in some but not all vessels. Embolism in maize leaves was not strongly correlated with xylem diameter but was more likely to occur in the peripheral veins. The rate of embolism formation in metaxylem vessels was higher than in protoxylem vessels. This work has demonstrated that xylem embolism remains low in maize leaves under water stress and that there xylem has characteristic spatial traits of vulnerability to embolism. PMID:26946123

  18. Segmental Transarterial Embolization in a Translational Rat Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Terence P.F.; Hunt, Stephen J.; Harrison, Neil; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Weber, Charles; Pickup, Stephen; Furth, Emma E.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Soulen, Michael C.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically relevant, minimally invasive technique for transarterial embolization in a translational rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Oral diethylnitrosamine was administered to 53 male Wistar rats ad libitum for 12 weeks. Tumor induction was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging. Minimally invasive lobar or segmental transarterial embolization was performed through a left common carotid artery approach. Necropsy was performed to evaluate periprocedural mortality. Histologic analysis of tumors that received embolization was performed to assess percent tumor necrosis. Results Severe cirrhosis and autochthonous HCCs were characterized in a cohort of rats composed of two groups of rats identically treated with diethylnitrosamine with median survival times of 101 days and 105 days (n = 10/group). A second cohort was used to develop minimally invasive transarterial embolization of HCCs (n = 10). In a third cohort, lobar embolization was successfully performed in 9 of 10 rats and demonstrated a high rate of periprocedural mortality (n = 5). Necropsy performed for periprocedural mortality after lobar embolization demonstrated extensive tissue necrosis within the liver (n = 3) and lungs (n = 2), indicating nontarget embolization as the likely cause of mortality. In a fourth cohort of rats, a segmental embolization technique was successfully applied in 10 of 13 rats. Segmental embolization resulted in a reduction in periprocedural mortality (P = .06) relative to selective embolization and a 19% increase in average tumor necrosis (P = .04). Conclusions Minimally invasive, segmental embolization mimicking the currently applied clinical approach is feasible in a translational rat model of HCC and offers the critical advantage of reduced nontarget embolization relative to lobar embolization. PMID:25863596

  19. [Fat embolism and fracture, a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Müller, C; Rahn, B A; Pfister, U

    1992-06-01

    The reasons of fat embolism as well as the following fat embolism syndrome are most likely long bone fractures, especially if the femur is participated. On the other hand there are cases, where a severe concussion of the entire body caused fat embolism. But it is also supposed, that intramedullary reaming as well as the insertion of knee- and hip-prostheses could be a releasing factor, because the applicated pressure on the medullary canal can cause a fat release in the systemic blood system. The morbidity depends on age and fracture, which is on fractures between 0.9 and 2%. The most affected group are people between 18 and 28 years of age. The fat embolism is manifesting at 46-60% of the patients in the first 24 hours and over 90% of the patients are affected in the first three days. If you look at the metabolic changes, you will find shortly after the fracturing process a rapid increase of free fatty acids (FFA), as well as an increase of the plasmatic enzyme levels (lipase, GPT, GOT, GLDH, LDH, etc.), catecholamines and glucocorticoids. In order to discuss the pathogenesis in a fairly complete way, you have to take different theories into consideration, because several parallel running processes--which are influencing each other--are leading to the syndrome. Infloating theory: Proceeding on the assumption that contents of the bone marrow are floating out of the fracture gap into the venous system and are leading to fat embolism in the lungs. Lipase theory: You can diagnose in 50-70% of the fracture patients an increase of the lipase level, which is correlating with the manifestation of the fat embolism. The lipase releases fat from the body depositories in addition to the fat, who is coming out of the fracture gap. Shock and coagulation theory: During shock the microcirculation is decelerated, the blood viscosity is increased and the suspension stability of the cellular blood components is decreased, which is leading to the sludging phenomenon. So the

  20. Endovascular Treatment of a Superior Mesenteric Artery Aneurysm Secondary to Behcet's Disease with Onyx (Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer)

    SciTech Connect

    Gueven, Koray Rozanes, Izzet; Kayabali, Murat; Minareci, Ozenc

    2009-01-15

    Behcet's disease is a complex multisystemic chronic inflammatory disease that is characterized by oral and genital aphtous ulcers and vasculitis. Aneurysms of major arteries are the most important cause of mortality in Behcet's disease. Four patients with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) aneurysms related to Behcet's disease have been reported in the literature. We report here the first successful endovascular treatment of a giant, wide-necked SMA aneurysm secondary to Behcet's disease. We performed a balloon-assisted embolization technique using ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx, ev3, Irvine, CA, USA). There were no signs of recurrence during 2-year follow-up.

  1. Endovascular treatment of a traumatic dural arteriovenous fistula of the superior sagittal sinus using dual lumen balloon microcatheter

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yihao; Niu, Yin; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVFs) induced by trauma in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) are rare and difficult to treat because of their unique midline location, multiplicity of arterial feeders, and critical venous drainage. We report a case of an endovascular treatment using dual lumen balloon microcatheter on a patient with post-traumatic SSS DAVF. By the use of dual lumen Scepter balloon microcatheter, proximal Onyx reflux was prevented. In this case, complete embolization of the DAVFs was achieved and the outcome of the patient was fairly good. PMID:27094527

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  3. INTERDEPENDENT SUPERIORITY AND INFERIORITY FEELINGS

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Harrington V.

    1949-01-01

    It is postulated that in neurotic persons who have unrealistic feelings of superiority and inferiority the two are interdependent. This is a departure from the concept of previous observers that either one or the other is primary and its opposite is overcompensation. The author postulates considerable parallelism, with equal importance for each. He submits that the neurotic person forms two logic-resistant compartments for the two opposed self-estimates and that treatment which makes inroads of logic upon one compartment, simultaneously does so upon the other. Two examples are briefly reported. The neurotic benefits sought in exaggeration of capability are the same as those sought in insistence upon inferiority: Presumption of superiority at once bids for approbation and delivers the subject from the need to prove himself worthy of it in dreaded competition; exaggeration of incapability baits sympathy and makes competition unnecessary because failure is conceded. Some of the characteristics of abnormal self-estimates that distinguish them from normal are: Preoccupation with self, resistance to logical explanation of personality problems, inconsistency in reasons for beliefs in adequacy on the one hand and inadequacy on the other, unreality, rationalization of faults, and difficulty and vacillation in the selection of adequate goals. PMID:15390573

  4. Endovascular Covered Stent Reconstruction Improved the Outcomes of Acute Carotid Blowout Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Liang; Wong, Ho-Fai; Ku, Yi-Kang; Mun-Ching Wong, Alex; Wai, Yau-Yau; Ng, Shu-Hang

    2008-01-01

    Summary Carotid blowout is a devastating complication in patients with head and neck cancer, commonly encountered as a delayed complication of radiation therapy. The clinical outcomes in patients with carotid blowout are discouraging; even transarterial embolization has been performed to control the acute massive bleeding. In recent years, covered stents have been reported as an alternative treatment producing favorable results. In this study, 13 consecutive patients with acute carotid blowout syndrome were treated at our institute by covered-stent reconstruction between December 2005 and December 2007. The median posthemorrhagic survival period after reconstruction (187 days) was more than that reported in patients treated only with transarterial embolization (26 days). Though the estimated mortality was about 54%, those who survived showed favorable outcomes, and only one transit complication of acute in-stent thrombosis occurred. Thus, endovascular covered-stent reconstruction is a safe and effective approach to manage acute carotid blowout syndrome. PMID:20557797

  5. The role of rib infarcts in the acute chest syndrome of sickle cell diseases.

    PubMed

    Rucknagel, D L

    2001-01-01

    The acute chest syndrome is a generic term for pulmonary complications of sickle cell diseases with heterogeneous etiologies that include pneumonia, vaso-occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, rib infarction, and fat embolism syndrome. My review summarizes these etiologies, the evidence, and pathophysiology supporting the hypothesis that infarction of segments of ribs by the same vaso-occlusive process responsible for the acute episodes of pain (characteristic of the sickle cell diseases) is often involved in the acute chest structure. Inflammation associated with the infarct then causes splinting, hypoventilation, and hypoxia and further vaso-occlusion. The relationship with adult respiratory distress syndrome and fat embolism is also discussed. Use of the incentive spirometer combined with effective analgesia when chest pain is present is advocated for prevention of the pulmonary infiltrates. Newer understanding of the role of nitric oxide in regulating oxygen transport and its relationship to blood transfusions used in therapy of the acute chest syndrome are discussed.

  6. Splenic artery embolization using contour emboli before laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Kazuhiro; Higaki, Jun; Yoon, Hyung-Eun; Mikata, Shoki; Miyazaki, Minoru; Nishitani, Akiko; Hori, Shinichi; Kamiike, Wataru

    2002-10-01

    The present study assessed preoperative splenic artery embolization using spherical embolic material, super absorbent polymer microspheres (SAP-MS), before laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted splenectomy. Distal splenic artery embolization using 250 to 400 microm SAP-MS was performed in nine cases with ITP and in seven cases with the other diseases with splenomegaly. Laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted splenectomies, including a hand-assisted procedure and the procedure involving left upper minilaparotomy, were done 2 to 4 hours after embolization. Conversion to traditional laparotomy was not required in any of the 16 cases, while conversion to 12-cm laparotomy was required in one case with massive splenomegaly. Mean operating time was 161 minutes, and mean intraoperative blood loss was 290 mL. No major postoperative complications were identified, and only one patient reported postembolic pain before surgery. Preoperative splenic artery embolization using painless embolic material, SAP-MS, would be effective for easy and safe laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted splenectomy.

  7. Current Concepts of Immunology and Diagnosis in Amniotic Fluid Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Current thinking about pathophysiology has shifted away from embolism toward a maternal immune response to the fetus. Two immunologic mechanisms have been studied to date. Anaphylaxis appears to be doubtful while the available evidence supports a role for complement activation. With the mechanism remaining to be elucidated, AFE remains a clinical diagnosis. It is diagnosed based on one or more of four key signs/symptoms: cardiovascular collapse, respiratory distress, coagulopathy, and/or coma/seizures. The only laboratory test that reliably supports the diagnosis is the finding of fetal material in the maternal pulmonary circulation at autopsy. Perhaps the most compelling mystery surrounding AFE is not why one in 20,000 parturients are afflicted, but rather how the vast majority of women can tolerate the foreign antigenic presence of their fetus both within their uterus and circulation? PMID:21969840

  8. Maghemite based silicone composite for arterial embolization hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Smolkova, Ilona S; Kazantseva, Natalia E; Makoveckaya, Kira N; Smolka, Petr; Saha, Petr; Granov, Anatoly M

    2015-03-01

    Maghemite nanoparticle based silicone composite for application in arterial embolization hyperthermia is developed. It possesses embolization ability, high heating efficiency in alternating magnetic fields and radiopaque property. The initial components of the composite are selected so that the material stays liquid for 20min, providing the opportunity for transcatheter transportation and filling of the tumour vascular system. After this induction period the viscosity increases rapidly and soft embolus is formed which is able to occlude the tumour blood vessels. The composite is thermally stable up to 225°C, displays rubber-elastic properties and has a thermal expansion coefficient higher than that of blood. Maghemite nanoparticles uniformly distributed in the composite provide its rapid heating (tens of °Cmin(-1)) due to Neel magnetization relaxation. Required X-ray contrast of composite is achieved by addition of potassium iodide.

  9. Ileus caused by cholesterol crystal embolization: A case report.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Shunjiro; Ikenouchi, Maiko; Akamatsu, Takuji; Seta, Takeshi; Urai, Shunji; Uenoyama, Yoshito; Yamashita, Yukitaka

    2016-03-28

    Cholesterol crystal embolization (CCE) is a rare systemic embolism caused by formation of cholesterol crystals from atherosclerotic plaques. CCE usually occurs during vascular manipulation, such as vascular surgery or endovascular catheter manipulation, or due to anticoagulation or thrombolytic therapy. We report a rare case of intestinal obstruction caused by spontaneous CCE. An 81-year-old man with a history of hypertension was admitted for complaints of abdominal pain, bloating, and anorexia persisting for 4 mo. An abdominal computed tomography revealed intestinal ileus. His symptoms were immediately relieved by an ileus tube insertion, and he was discharged 6 d later. However, these symptoms immediately reappeared and persisted, and partial resection of the small intestine was performed. A histopathological examination indicated that small intestine obstruction was caused by CCE. At the 12-mo follow-up, the patient showed no evidence of CCE recurrence. Thus, in cases of intestinal obstruction, CCE should also be considered.

  10. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  11. Cold Plasma Reticulation of Shape Memory Embolic Tissue Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Nash, Landon D; Docherty, Nicole C; Monroe, Mary Beth B; Ezell, Kendal P; Carrow, James K; Hasan, Sayyeda M; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Maitland, Duncan J

    2016-12-01

    Polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) foams are proposed for use as thrombogenic scaffolds to improve the treatment of vascular defects, such as cerebral aneurysms. However, gas blown SMP foams inherently have membranes between pores, which can limit their performance as embolic tissue scaffolds. Reticulation, or the removal of membranes between adjacent foam pores, is advantageous for improving device performance by increasing blood permeability and cellular infiltration. This work characterizes the effects of cold gas plasma reticulation processes on bulk polyurethane SMP films and foams. Plasma-induced changes on material properties are characterized using scanning electron microscopy, uniaxial tensile testing, goniometry, and free strain recovery experiments. Device specific performance is characterized in terms of permeability, platelet attachment, and cell-material interactions. Overall, plasma reticulated SMP scaffolds show promise as embolic tissue scaffolds due to increased bulk permeability, retained thrombogenicity, and favorable cell-material interactions.

  12. Amniotic fluid embolism in progress: a management dilemma!

    PubMed

    Gogola, J; Hankins, G D

    1998-08-01

    Amniotic fluid (AF) embolism is a rare but catastrophic complication of pregnancy. We present the first case where the debris was seen in the maternal uterine veins at the time of cesarean section. During a cesarean delivery performed for deteriorating fetal status and in conjunction with massive hydramnios; air bubbles and vernix were observed in the left uterine vein and in an area of Couvelaire appearance of the uterine fundus. As the patient was clinically stable and desired retained fertility, a decision was made to attempt to contain the debris in the uterine vasculature. The infundibulopelvic ligament and uterine arteries were ligated and the area of Couvelaire uterus was oversewn. With the exception of a mild laboratory coagulopathy, which required no specific treatment, the patient did well. The area of Couvelaire uterus is the likely portal for the debris seen in this patient's vasculature. Containment appears to have averted the AF embolism syndrome.

  13. Ileus caused by cholesterol crystal embolization: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Shunjiro; Ikenouchi, Maiko; Akamatsu, Takuji; Seta, Takeshi; Urai, Shunji; Uenoyama, Yoshito; Yamashita, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolization (CCE) is a rare systemic embolism caused by formation of cholesterol crystals from atherosclerotic plaques. CCE usually occurs during vascular manipulation, such as vascular surgery or endovascular catheter manipulation, or due to anticoagulation or thrombolytic therapy. We report a rare case of intestinal obstruction caused by spontaneous CCE. An 81-year-old man with a history of hypertension was admitted for complaints of abdominal pain, bloating, and anorexia persisting for 4 mo. An abdominal computed tomography revealed intestinal ileus. His symptoms were immediately relieved by an ileus tube insertion, and he was discharged 6 d later. However, these symptoms immediately reappeared and persisted, and partial resection of the small intestine was performed. A histopathological examination indicated that small intestine obstruction was caused by CCE. At the 12-mo follow-up, the patient showed no evidence of CCE recurrence. Thus, in cases of intestinal obstruction, CCE should also be considered. PMID:27022232

  14. Statistical physics of cerebral embolization leading to stroke.

    PubMed

    Hague, J P; Chung, E M L

    2009-11-01

    We discuss the physics of embolic stroke using a minimal model of emboli moving through the cerebral arteries. Our model of the blood flow network consists of a bifurcating tree into which we introduce particles (emboli) that halt flow on reaching a node of similar size. Flow is weighted away from blocked arteries inducing an effective interaction between emboli. We justify the form of the flow weighting using a steady flow (Poiseuille) analysis and a more complicated nonlinear analysis. We discuss free flowing and heavily congested limits and examine the transition from free flow to congestion using numerics. The correlation time is found to increase significantly at a critical value and a finite-size scaling is carried out. An order parameter for nonequilibrium critical behavior is identified as the overlap of blockages' flow shadows. Our work shows embolic stroke to be a feature of the cerebral blood flow network on the verge of a phase transition.

  15. Traversing boundaries: thrombus in transit with paradoxical embolism

    PubMed Central

    Miriyala, Varun; Faraj, Kirmanj; Nagra, Bipinpreet

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old male is diagnosed with paradoxical embolus after he presented with concurrent deep vein thrombosis, stroke, and multiple arterial emboli in the presence of a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Paradoxical embolus requires the passage of a thrombus from the venous into the arterial circulation through a right-to-left shunt leading to systemic embolism. But, despite the high incidence of PFO (27.3% across all age groups by autopsy), paradoxical embolism (PDE) is uncommon, representing <2% of all arterial emboli. We present a case report where a thrombus has been directly observed passing through the PFO during an echocardiogram study; thus, clearly delineating the true cause of multiple thromboemboli and stoke in our patient. Subsequent Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE) also interestingly showed the thrombus in transit in the aorta and pulmonary artery. PMID:27609716

  16. Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism Following a Viper Envenomation in France

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Géraldine; Pineau, Samuel; Biron, Charlotte; Connault, Jérôme; Artifoni, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complications following snake bites are not common in France. We report the case of a bilateral pulmonary embolism following a viper envenomation in France. A healthy 72-year-old female presented with a lower limb hematoma following a viper bite. She was admitted at the hospital 2 days later and received low-molecular-weight heparin because of bed rest. Seven days later, she complained of thoracic pain and respiratory failure, and a bilateral pulmonary was diagnosed, without biological sign of neither disseminated intravascular coagulation nor coagulation trouble. Repeated lower limbs Doppler ultrasound were normal. This case is particularly interesting because it is only the 7th reported case of pulmonary embolism following a snake envenomation; moreover, it happened in France where poisonous snakes are very rare. Several hypotheses have been made to explain this late localized coagulopathy: an increased level of unstable fibrin produced by thrombin-like glycoproteins from the venom is one of them. PMID:27175626

  17. Disastrous Portal Vein Embolization Turned into a Successful Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrocky, Tomas; Kettenbach, Joachim; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben Kara, Levent

    2015-10-15

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) may be performed before hemihepatectomy to increase the volume of future liver remnant (FLR) and to reduce the risk of postoperative liver insufficiency. We report the case of a 71-year-old patient with hilar cholangiocarcinoma undergoing PVE with access from the right portal vein using a mixture of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodized oil. During the procedure, nontarget embolization of the left portal vein occurred. An aspiration maneuver of the polymerized plug failed; however, the embolus obstructing portal venous flow in the FLR was successfully relocated into the right portal vein while carefully bypassing the plug with a balloon catheter, inflating the balloon, and pulling the plug into the main right portal vein.

  18. Endovascular embolization of life threatening intracranial arterio-venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Khan, S U; Rahman, K M; Siddiqui, M R; Hoque, M A; Mondol, B A; Hussain, S; Mohammad, Q D

    2010-07-01

    Haemorrhagic stroke from cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) represents 2% of all hemorrhagic strokes. A clear understanding of the diagnostic and treatment algorithms of cerebral AVM management is very important, because AVMs are a cause of hemorrhage in young adults. Surgery, endovascular therapy, and radiosurgery can be used alone or in combination to treat an AVM. We reported a 40 years old man of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), complicated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Digital subtraction angiogram was done for diagnosis and endovascular embolization for treatment of the case. This is the first successful cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) embolization in any government hospital of Bangladesh. The aim of this case report is to inform about this new technologies and emerging treatment strategies in these areas.

  19. Gallbladder infarction following hepatic transcatheter arterial embolization: angiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, C.; Iwasaki, M.; Tanaka, T.; Tokunaga, K.; Hori, S.; Yoshioka, H.; Nakamura, H.; Sakurai, M.; Okamura, J.

    1983-10-01

    Gallbladder infarction developing after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with malignant hepatic tumors was studied by comparing preoperative angiographic and postoperative macroscopic and histological findings. Eight patients demonstrated occlusion of the cystic artery or its branches by embolic materials on post-TAE angiograms. Surgery revealed infarction of the gallbladder in 6 patients; no infarction was noted in the other 2, although branches of the cystic artery were occluded on the post-TAE angiogram. Due to recanalization of the occluded artery, the infarcted area could be assessed only by follow-up angiography. No patient experienced perforation of the gallbladder as a result of infarction. The authors suggest that patients with post-TAE infarction of the gallbladder can be treated consevatively if they are kept under close observation.

  20. The watering of tall trees--embolization and recovery.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Henri

    2015-03-21

    We can propound a thermo-mechanical understanding of the ascent of sap to the top of tall trees thanks to a comparison between experiments associated with the cohesion-tension theory and the disjoining pressure concept for liquid thin-films. When a segment of xylem is tight-filled with crude sap, the liquid pressure can be negative although the pressure in embolized vessels remains positive. Examples are given that illustrate how embolized vessels can be refilled and why the ascent of sap is possible even in the tallest trees avoiding the problem due to cavitation. However, the maximum height of trees is limited by the stability domain of liquid thin-films.