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Sample records for acute ethanol administration

  1. The effects of acute ethanol administration on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety-like syndrome in rats: A biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya; Hapidin, Hermizi; Get Bee, Yvonne-Tee; Ismail, Zalina

    2016-02-01

    Withdrawal from long-term ethanol consumption results in overexcitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the amygdala, which induces an anxiety-like syndrome. Most alcoholics that suffer from such symptoms frequently depend on habitual drinking as self-medication to alleviate their symptoms. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) and protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon have been reported to mediate acute and chronic effects of ethanol. This study explores the changes in mGlu5 and PKC epsilon in the amygdala following acute administration of ethanol during ethanol withdrawal (EW) induced anxiety. Male Wistar rats were fed a modified liquid diet containing low-fat cow milk, sucrose, and maltodextrin, with a gradual introduction of 2.4%, 4.8% and 7.2% ethanol for 20 days. Six hours into EW, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline and ethanol (2.5 g/kg, 20% v/v), and exposed to open-field and elevated plus maze tests. Then, amygdala tissue was dissected from the rat brain for Western blot and gene expression studies. EW-induced anxiety was accompanied by a significant increase in mGlu5, total PKC epsilon, and phosphorylated PKC epsilon protein levels, and also of mRNA of mGlu5 (GRM5) in the amygdala. Acute administration of ethanol significantly attenuated EW-induced anxiety as well as an EW-induced increase in GRM5. The acute challenge of ethanol to EW rats had little effect on the phosphorylated and total protein levels of PKC epsilon in the amygdala. Our results demonstrate that amygdala PKC epsilon may not be directly involved in the development of anxiety following EW.

  2. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening.

  3. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.A.; Rudeen, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effect upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity.

  4. Liver necrosis induced by acute intraperitoneal ethanol administration in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Giavarotti, Leandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Giavarotti, Karin A S; Azzalis, Ligia A; Rodrigues, Luciano; Cravero, Amerys A M; Videla, Luis A; Koch, Osvaldo R; Junqueira, Virginia B C

    2002-03-01

    It is generally agreed that the deleterious pathophysiological effects of ethanol are caused, at least partially by an increase in free radical production. However, little attention has been directed to the effects of ethanol upon elderly organisms. Male Wistar rats at ages 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months were treated either with a single i.p. dose of 35% ethanol (v/v) at 3 g ethanol/kg body weight or an isovolumetric amount of 0.9% saline solution. We then assessed the plasma levels of transaminases and hepatic levels of oxidative stress-related parameters, followed by liver histological evaluation. The younger rats (3 months old) were not affected by the treatment with ethanol with respect to any of the studied parameters except for a lowering of total hepatic GSH and an increase in hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBARS) formation, while animals older than 3 months were increasingly more affected by the treatment. Acute ethanol treatment elicited the similar responses to those in the 3 months-old group, plus a decrease in the hepatic and plasma levels of beta-carotene and the plasma level of alpha-tocopherol, as well as an increase in the activity of plasma transaminases. In the 12,18 and 24 months old groups, there was increasing liver necrosis. These findings suggest that liver damage induced by acute ethanol administration in elderly rats may involve a lack of antioxidants.

  5. Acute neuropsychological effects of MDMA and ethanol (co-)administration in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wezenberg, E.; Valkenberg, M. M. G. J.; de Jong, C. A. J.; Buitelaar, J. K.; van Gerven, J. M. A.; Verkes, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale In Western societies, a considerable percentage of young people expose themselves to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”). Commonly, ecstasy is used in combination with other substances, in particular alcohol (ethanol). MDMA induces both arousing as well as hallucinogenic effects, whereas ethanol is a general central nervous system depressant. Objective The aim of the present study is to assess the acute effects of single and co-administration of MDMA and ethanol on executive, memory, psychomotor, visuomotor, visuospatial and attention function, as well as on subjective experience. Materials and methods We performed a four-way, double-blind, randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (nine male, seven female) between the ages of 18–29. MDMA was given orally (100 mg) and blood alcohol concentration was maintained at 0.6‰ by an ethanol infusion regime. Results Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol was well tolerated and did not show greater impairment of performance compared to the single-drug conditions. Impaired memory function was consistently observed after all drug conditions, whereas impairment of psychomotor function and attention was less consistent across drug conditions. Conclusions Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol did not exacerbate the effects of either drug alone. Although the impairment of performance by all drug conditions was relatively moderate, all induced significant impairment of cognitive function. PMID:18305926

  6. Redox state and energy metabolism during liver regeneration: alterations produced by acute ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, J; Miranda-Garduño, L; Trejo-Izquierdo, E; Díaz-Muñoz, M; Vidrio, S; Morales-González, J A; Hernández-Muñoz, R

    1999-12-01

    Ethanol metabolism can induce modifications in liver metabolic pathways that are tightly regulated through the availability of cellular energy and through the redox state. Since partial hepatectomy (PH)-induced liver proliferation requires an oversupply of energy for enhanced syntheses of DNA and proteins, the present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of acute ethanol administration on the PH-induced changes in cellular redox and energy potentials. Ethanol (5 g/kg body weight) was administered to control rats and to two-thirds hepatectomized rats. Quantitation of the liver content of lactate, pyruvate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and adenine nucleotides led us to estimate the cytosolic and mitochondrial redox potentials and energy parameters. Specific activities in the liver of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes also were measured in these animals. Liver regeneration had no effect on cellular energy availability, but induced a more reduced cytosolic redox state accompanied by an oxidized mitochondrial redox state during the first 48 hr of treatment; the redox state normalized thereafter. Administration of ethanol did not modify energy parameters in PH rats, but this hepatotoxin readily blocked the PH-induced changes in the cellular redox state. In addition, proliferating liver promoted decreases in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and of cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1); ethanol treatment prevented the PH-induced diminution of ADH activity. In summary, our data suggest that ethanol could minimize the PH-promoted metabolic adjustments mediated by redox reactions, probably leading to an ineffective preparatory event that culminates in compensatory liver growth after PH in the rat.

  7. Development of tolerance to the inhibitory effects of ethanol in the rat isolated vas deferens: effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    DeTurck, K. H.; Pohorecky, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Contractions of the rat vas deferens elicited by the addition of noradrenaline (NA), K+-depolarizing solutions or by electrical stimulation were recorded before and after incubation with ethanol 181 mM. In tissues from untreated rats, the contractions were inhibited 40-50% by such exposure. Injection of ethanol (2 g kg-1) significantly attenuated ethanol's reduction of peak tension generated by the lowest concentration of NA (10(-4) mM). Chronic administration of ethanol, 18-14 g kg-1 daily for two weeks, resulted in significant tolerance to ethanol. Tissues of treated animals demonstrated ethanol-induced decreases of roughly one-half those of the maltose dextrin (isocaloric) and water (fluid control) groups. This tolerance persisted for at least 48 h after ethanol treatment had been terminated. Overall, the data suggest that ethanol acts both pre- and postsynaptically to produce acute inhibition of smooth muscle contractions or tolerance to these actions upon chronic exposure. PMID:3730699

  8. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  9. The effects of the acute administration of low-dosage ethanol on the phasic neurochemical oscillations of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Noori, H R

    2012-09-01

    The effects of the acute ethanol consumption on the brain's neurochemistry are largely studied at the synaptic level. Here, the acute action of low dosages of ethanol, in terms of the inhibition of the glutamatergic system through antagonizing the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, on the neurochemical oscillations along the neurocircuitry of the basal ganglia is investigated by mathematical models. Substantial alterations in the dynamical behaviour of the neurochemical oscillations after single administration of low dosages of ethanol have been observed. Significant dynamical changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate systems along the subthalamic-pallidal feedback loop and the dopamine system of the striatal complex suggest new perspectives in the understanding of the ethanol-induced motor dysfunctions.

  10. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Ethanol administration increased GPD1 mRNA expression. • Ethanol administration increased glucose incorporation into TG glycerol moieties. • No increase in hepatic TG levels was observed in ethanol-injected GPD1 null mice. • We propose that GPD1 is required for ethanol-induced TG accumulation in the liver. - Abstract: Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2 h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6 h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2 h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6 h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of {sup 14}C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  11. The influence of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on acute and chronic ethanol administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Blagaic, Vladimir; Romic, Zeljko; Sikiric, Predrag

    2004-09-24

    The stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W.1419), which was promising in inflammatory bowel disease (PL-10, PLD-116, PL-14736, Pliva) trials, protects against both acute and chronic alcohol-induced lesions in stomach and liver, but also, given peripherally, affects various centrally mediated disturbances. Now, in male NMRI mice BPC 157 (10 pg intraperitoneally, 10 ng and 10 microg, intraperitoneally or intragastrically) (i) strongly opposed acute alcohol (4 g/kg intraperitoneally) intoxication (i.e., quickly produced and sustained anesthesia, hypothermia, increased ethanol blood values, 25% fatality, 90-min assessment period) given before or after ethanol, and (ii) when given after abrupt cessation of ethanol (at 0 or 3 or 7 h withdrawal time), attenuated withdrawal (assessed through 24 hours) after 20%-alcohol drinking (7.6 g/kg) through 13 days, with provocation on the 14th day.

  12. Glutathione Depletion and Recovery After Acute Ethanol Administration in the Aging Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Barbara L.; Richie, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in the detoxification of ethanol (EtOH) and acute EtOH administration leads to GSH depletion in the liver and other tissues. Aging is also associated with a progressive decline in GSH levels and impairment in GSH biosynthesis in many tissues. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the effects of aging on EtOH-induced depletion and recovery of GSH in different tissues of the C57Bl/6NNIA mouse. EtOH (2-5 g/kg) or saline was administered i.p. to mice of ages 6 mo (young), 12 mo (mature), and 24 mo (old); and GSH and cyst(e)ine concentrations were measured 0-24 hours thereafter. EtOH administration (5g/kg) depleted hepatic GSH levels >50% by 6 hr in all animals. By 24 hr, levels remained low in both young and old mice, but recovered to baseline levels in mature mice. At 6 hr, the decrease in hepatic GSH was dose-dependent up to 3 g/kg EtOH, but not at higher doses. The extent of depletion at the 3 g/kg dose was dependent upon age, with old mice demonstrating significantly lower GSH levels than mature mice (P<0.001). Altogether these results indicate that aging was associated with a greater degree of EtOH and fasting-induced GSH depletion and subsequent impaired recovery in liver. An impaired ability to recover was also observed in young animals. Further studies are required to determine if an inability to recover from GSH depletion by EtOH is associated with enhanced toxicity. PMID:17343832

  13. Acute ethanol administration inhibits Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in rat intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Zhao, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Haiying; Tang, Chengwei

    2013-05-01

    Excess alcohol intake, as in binge drinking, increases susceptibility to microbial pathogens. Alcohol impairs macrophage function by suppression of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. This study investigated the effects of acute ethanol intake on the TLR4 pathway in rat intestinal epithelia, which usually encounters luminal antigens at first and participates in the development of intestinal immunity. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to an ethanol group given ethanol as a 25% (v/v) solution in water at 7.5 g/kg, or a control group given saline, by oral gavage daily for 3 days. The epithelial histology and ultrastructure, the intestinal microflora, peripheral and portal venous plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, and somatostatin (SST) levels in the peripheral plasma and small intestine were evaluated. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), TLR4, TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1), activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the intestinal mucosa were assayed. LPS responsiveness with or without SST pretreatment was assayed in vitro by quantification of TLR4, TBK1, activated NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia. Mucosal damage was observed in the ethanol group by light and electron microscopy. Escherichia coli cultures were unchanged in rat intestine of the ethanol group compared with controls, but lactobacilli cultures were reduced (p < 0.05). LPS levels increased in peripheral and portal venous plasma (p < 0.05), but mucosal TLR4, TBK1, nuclear NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α were unchanged in the ethanol group. LPS treatment in vitro up-regulated the level of TLR4, TBK1 and nuclear NF-κB as well as the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia in the control (p < 0.05), but not the ethanol group. The stimulatory effects of LPS on intestinal epithelia isolated from the control group were significantly inhibited by SST pretreatment (p < 0.05). The

  14. Acute ethanol administration affects zebrafish preference for a biologically inspired robot.

    PubMed

    Spinello, Chiara; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-08-01

    Preclinical animal models constitute a cornerstone against which the reward processes involved in drug addiction are often studied and dissected. While rodents have traditionally represented the species of choice, a growing body of literature indicates that zebrafish are emerging as a valuable model organism. Specifically, several studies demonstrate that the effects of ethanol at the level of emotional- and cognitive-related domains can be reliably investigated using zebrafish. The rapidly evolving nature of these efforts allows substantial room for the development of novel experimental paradigms suited to this freshwater species. The field of ethorobotics may prove particularly beneficial, due to its ability to convey fully controllable and easily reproducible experimental tools. In this study, we addressed the possibility of using a biologically inspired robot to investigate the emotionally related properties of ethanol in a preference task in zebrafish. To this aim, we evaluated wild-type zebrafish preference toward a robotic stimulus and addressed whether ethanol administration (0.25% and 1.00% ethanol/water concentration) may alter such preferences. In accordance with our previous studies, we observed that zebrafish exhibit a natural attraction toward the robot. Additionally, in agreement with our predictions, we showed that ethanol administration abolishes such preferences. This work is the first to demonstrate that robotic stimuli can be used in zebrafish to investigate the reward-related properties of alcohol.

  15. Comparative studies of oral administration of marine collagen peptides from Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiang; Li, Qiong; Lin, Bing; Yu, Yongchao; Ding, Ye; Dai, Xiaoqian; Li, Yong

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an oral administration of marine collagen peptides (MCPs) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. MCPs were orally administered to rats at doses of 0 g per kg bw, 2.25 g per kg bw, 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw, prior to or after the oral administration of ethanol. Thirty minutes after ethanol treatment, the effect of MCPs on motor incoordination and hypnosis induced by ethanol were investigated using a screen test, fixed speed rotarod test (5 g per kg bw ethanol) and loss of righting reflex (7 g per kg bw ethanol). In addition, the blood ethanol concentrations at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after ethanol administration (5 g per kg bw ethanol) were measured. The results of the screen test and fixed speed rotarod test suggested that treatment with MCPs at 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw prior to ethanol could attenuate ethanol-induced loss of motor coordination. Moreover, MCP administered both pre- and post-ethanol treatment had significant potency to alleviate the acute ethanol induced hypnotic states in the loss of righting reflex test. At 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after ethanol ingestion at 5 g per kg bw, the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) of control rats significantly increased compared with that in the 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw MCP pre-treated groups. However, post-treatment with MCPs did not exert a significant inhibitory effect on the BEC of the post-treated groups until 120 minutes after ethanol administration. Therefore, the anti-inebriation effect of MCPs was verified in SD rats with the possible mechanisms related to inhibiting ethanol absorption and facilitating ethanol metabolism. Moreover, the efficiency was better when MCPs were administered prior to ethanol.

  16. Food proteins and gut mucosal barrier. IV. Effects of acute and chronic ethanol administration on handling and uptake of bovine serum albumin by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of ethanol exposure on small intestinal handling and uptake of radiolabeled bovine serum albumin were investigated using everted gut sacs. There was less breakdown of BSA after acute ethanol administration in vitro and after acute and chronic in vivo exposure. Thus, the vascular compartment of the small intestine was confronted with more complete and potentially more antigenic material after ethanol. Changes in BSA binding and uptake after acute exposure were shown to be reversible after 4-6 hr. In all groups, there was more BSA binding when the small intestine was exposed to ethanol. This difference was most pronounced after chronic exposure. In the same group, uptake of BSA was correlated with binding and significantly increased. Combined effects of ethanol on the gut mucosal barrier may account for changes in food antigen handling and uptake.

  17. Developmental differences in EEG and sleep responses to acute ethanol administration and its withdrawal (hangover) in adolescent and adult Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N

    2013-12-01

    Age-related differences in sensitivity to the acute effects of alcohol may play an important role in the increased risk for the development of alcoholism seen in teens that begin drinking at an early age. The present study evaluated the acute and protracted (hangover) effects of ethanol in adolescent (P33-P40) and adult (P100-P107) Wistar rats, using the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). Six minutes of EEG was recorded during waking, 15 min after administration of 0, 1.5, or 3.0 g/kg ethanol, and for 3 h at 20 h post ethanol, during the rats' next sleep cycle. Significantly higher overall frontal and parietal cortical power was seen in a wide range of EEG frequencies in adolescent rats as compared to adult rats in their waking EEG. Acute administration of ethanol did not produce differences between adolescents and adults on behavioral measures of acute intoxication. However, it did produce a significantly less intense acute EEG response to ethanol in the theta frequencies in parietal cortex in the adolescents as compared to the adults. At 20 h following acute ethanol administration, during the rats' next sleep cycle, a decrease in slow-wave frequencies (1-4 Hz) was seen and the adolescent rats were found to display more reduction in the slow-wave frequencies than the adults did. The present study found that adolescent rats, as compared to adults, demonstrate low sensitivity to acute ethanol administration in the theta frequencies and more susceptibility to disruption of slow-wave sleep during hangover. These studies may lend support to the idea that these traits may contribute to increased risk for alcohol use disorders seen in adults who begin drinking in their early teenage years.

  18. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of (14)C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  19. Acute oral administration of the novel, competitive and selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34517 reduces the severity of ethanol withdrawal and related hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal axis activation

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Anna R.; Saunders, Meredith A.; Brewton, Honoree’ W.; Winchester, Sydney R.; Elgumati, Ibrahim S.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of ethanol dependence is associated with alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and activation of type II glucocorticoid receptors (GR). These effects may contribute to withdrawal-associated anxiety, craving and relapse to drinking. The present studies examined acute and oral administration of the novel, selective and competitive GR antagonist ORG 34517 on the severity of ethanol withdrawal. Methods Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered ethanol (4g/kg/i.g.) twice daily for 5 days followed by 2 days of withdrawal for 1, 2 or 3 consecutive cycles. Blood ethanol levels (BELs) were determined at 0930 on Day 4 of each week, while blood corticosterone levels (BCLs) were obtained at 1100 hrs on the first day of each ethanol withdrawal. During early withdrawal, subjects received oral administration of ORG 345617 (60 mg/kg/i.g.) or a placebo and withdrawal was monitored. Results Peak BELs of 225.52 mg/dl were observed during the third week. Withdrawal from three cycles of the regimen produced marked behavioral abnormalities (e.g. aggression, rigidity, and hypoactivity) and significant increases in BCLs of ethanol-dependent subjects. Acute, oral administration of ORG 34517 during early withdrawal significantly reduced both the severity of ethanol withdrawal, as reflected in reduced rigidity, aggression, and hypoactivity, and elevations in BCL without producing any sedative-like effects. Conclusions The present findings demonstrate that repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal is associated with significant behavioral abnormalities and dysregulation of HPA axis activation. Further these data suggest that selective GR antagonists should be further considered as putative pharmacotherapies for treatment of ethanol dependence. PMID:26143299

  20. Acute ethanol administration affects memory reactivation: a look at the neuronal density and apoptosis in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Alijan-pour, J; Abrari, K; Bluki, T Lashkar; Ghorbanian, M T; Goudarzi, I; Salmani, M Elahdadi; Mirshekar, M

    2012-08-01

    This study is an attempt to examine whether administration of ethanol after memory reactivation will modulate expression of memory in rats or not. We further examined whether this administration alters the number of tunnel positive cells in hippocampus. Adult male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning system using two 1s , 0.6 mA shock with an interval of 180 s. 24 h later the rats were returned to the chamber for reactivation, and then they were injected with ethanol (0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg) or saline, ip. Again, one, seven and fourteen days after reactivation, the rats were returned to the context for 5 min. The freezing time (absence of all movements except respiration) was scored in seconds. In the second experiment, after test 1, the animals were anesthetized and a transcardial perfuse with phosphate buffer and paraformaldehyde 4% was conducted. After post-fixation of brains 5-μm sections were stained with cresyl violet. Finally, paraffin-embedded sections of 10 μm were cut out throughout the tissue and each sample was processed with TUNEL. The number of apoptotic cells in a 130 μm-long segment of the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 fields and dentate gyrus was counted. The data demonstrate that ethanol exposure impairs post retrieval processes. Rats receiving ethanol (1.5 mg/kg) showed lower freezing levels during the first test. Moreover, ethanol decreases the density of CA1, CA3 and DG cells and increases the density of apoptotic cells in all regions of hippocampus. Therefore, ethanol exposure impairs reconsolidation of contextual fear conditioning probably via decreasing the density of CA1, CA3 and DG cells.

  1. Acute and chronic administration of a low-dose combination of topiramate and ondansetron reduces ethanol's reinforcing effects in male alcohol preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine F; Lycas, Matthew D; Bond, Colin W; Johnson, Bankole A; Lynch, Wendy J

    2014-02-01

    Topiramate (a GABA/glutamate modulator) and ondansetron (a serotonin-3 antagonist) have shown promise as treatments for alcohol use disorders (AUDs), although efficacy is modest/variable for both medications. We recently showed in animal models of consumption and relapse that acute treatment with a combination of these medications was more efficacious than either alone. To determine whether the mechanism for its beneficial effects is through modulation of ethanol's reinforcing effects, we measured the effect of this combination in male alcohol preferring (P) rats (N = 22) responding for ethanol under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule. Low doses, which either do not affect (ondansetron; 0.001 mg/kg) or only modestly affect (topiramate; 10 mg/kg) alcohol-related behaviors on their own, were selected in an attempt to maximize their combined efficacy while minimizing potential side effects. In addition to acute treatment (1 day), the effects of chronic administration (10 days) were examined in an attempt to model human treatment approaches. The effects of the combination were compared with the low dose of topiramate alone hypothesizing that the combination would be more efficacious than topiramate alone. Although both topiramate and the combination similarly reduced PR responding for ethanol following acute treatment and during the initial phase of chronic treatment (Days 1-5), after repeated administration (Days 6-10), only the combination produced a sustained reduction in ethanol-maintained responding. These results suggest an advantage of the combination over topiramate alone at producing a sustained reduction in ethanol's reinforcing effects following prolonged treatment, and lend further support for its use as a potential treatment for AUDs.

  2. Acute administration of 3-nitropropionic acid, a reactive oxygen species generator, boosts ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation. New support for the role of brain catalase in the behavioural effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor M; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2006-12-01

    The antioxidant enzyme catalase by reacting with H(2)O(2), forms the compound known as compound I (catalase-H(2)O(2)). This compound is able to oxidise ethanol to acetaldehyde in the CNS. It has been demonstrated that 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) induces the activity of the brain catalase-H(2)O(2) system. In this study, we tested the effect of 3-NPA on both the brain catalase-H(2)O(2) system and on the acute locomotor effect of ethanol. To find the optimal interval for the 3-NPA-ethanol interaction mice were treated with 3-NPA 0, 45, 90 and 135min before an ethanol injection (2.4mg/kg). In a second study, 3-NPA (0, 15, 30 or 45mg/kg) was administered SC to animals 90min before saline or several doses of ethanol (1.6 or 2.4g/kg), and the open-field behaviour was registered. The specificity of the effect of 3-NPA (45mg/kg) was evaluated on caffeine (10mg/kg IP) and cocaine (4mg/kg)-induced locomotion. The prevention of 3-NPA effects on both ethanol-induced locomotion and brain catalase activity by L-carnitine, a potent antioxidant, was also studied. Nitropropionic acid boosted ethanol-induced locomotion and brain catalase activity after 90min. The effect of 3-NPA was prevented by l-carnitine administration. These results indicate that 3-NPA enhanced ethanol-induced locomotion by increasing the activity of the brain catalase system.

  3. Estradiol increases expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor after acute administration of ethanol in the neonatal rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Firozan, Bita; Goudarzi, Iran; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Rezaei, Arezou; Abrari, Kataneh

    2014-06-05

    Recently it has been shown that estradiol prevents the toxicity of ethanol in developing cerebellum. The neuroprotective effect of estradiol is not due to a single phenomenon but rather encompasses a spectrum of independent proccesses. According to the specific timing of Purkinje cell vulnerability to ethanol and several protective mechanisms of estradiol, we considered the neurotrophin system, as a regulator of differentiation, maturation and survival of neurons during CNS development. Interactions between estrogen and Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, an essential factor in neuronal survival) lead us to investigate involvement of BDNF pathway in neuroprotective effects of estrogen against ethanol toxicity. In this study, 17β-estradiol (300-900μg/kg) was injected subcutaneously in postnatal day (PD) 4, 30min prior to intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (6g/kg) in rat pups. Eight hours after injection of ethanol, BDNF mRNA and protein levels were assayed. Behavioral studies, including rotarod and locomotor activity tests were performed in PD 21-23 and histological study was performed after completion of behavioral tests in PD 23. Our results indicated that estradiol increased BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the presence of ethanol. We also observed that pretreatment with estradiol significantly attenuated ethanol-induced motoric impairment. Histological analysis also demonstrated that estradiol prevented Purkinje cell loss following ethanol treatment. These results provide evidence on the possible mechanisms of estradiol neuroprotection against ethanol toxicity.

  4. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist varenicline increases the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of acute ethanol administration in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamens, Helen M.; Andersen, Jimena; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The costs associated with alcohol abuse are staggering, therefore much effort has been put into developing new pharmacological strategies to decrease alcohol abuse. Recently, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist varenicline has been shown to decrease ethanol consumption in both humans and animal models. Methods We examined the effects of varenicline on the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol. First, varenicline was administered prior to placement in a locomotor activity chamber to determine if varenicline influenced baseline locomotor activity. To determine the effect of nicotinic modulation on ethanol-induced motor incoordination, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to an acute ethanol injection and then mice were tested on the balance beam, dowel test or fixed-speed rotarod. To examine ethanol's sedative-hypnotic effects, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to 4 g/kg ethanol and the duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR) was measured. Results Varenicline markedly reduced baseline locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice. Varenicline increased ethanol-induced ataxia when measured on the balance beam and dowel test, but had no effect when measured on the fixed-speed rotarod. Pretreatment with varenicline increased the duration of LORR. Conclusions These data provide evidence that nAChRs may be involved in the ataxic and sedative effects of ethanol. It is possible that one mechanism which could contribute to the ability of varenicline to decrease ethanol consumption may be through increasing negative behavioral effects of alcohol. PMID:20946306

  5. Ethanol preexposure increases ethanol self-administration in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice.

    PubMed

    Camarini, Rosana; Hodge, Clyde W

    2004-12-01

    Genetic variables are thought to interact with environmental factors, such as alcohol exposure history, to produce individual differences in alcohol abuse and alcoholism. The objective of this study was to test the potential interaction between genetic predisposition to consume alcohol and alcohol pretreatment on subsequent self-administration. To accomplish this goal, four groups of mice from the ethanol-avoiding DBA/2J (D2) and ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) inbred strains were exposed to saline, acute ethanol (2 g/kg), or chronic intermittent ethanol (1 or 2 g/kg) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections. Locomotor activity was monitored after each injection. After preexposure, animals were given a two-bottle choice test with various concentrations of ethanol/sucrose vs. sucrose or ethanol vs. water for 4 days at each concentration. Then, all animals were challenged with a 2.0 g/kg ethanol i.p. injection and locomotor activity was assessed. Acute and chronic ethanol pretreatment increased locomotor activity in response to a challenge dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) in D2 mice but had no effect on B6 mice. Prior exposure to ethanol altered the amount of ethanol consumed in a mouse strain-dependent manner. D2 mice showed a positive relationship between ethanol intake and dose or duration of ethanol preexposure. B6 mice preexposed to ethanol consumed more ethanol than naive animals, independent of dose or duration of exposure. During the last phase of self-administration testing, D2 mice exposed to chronic ethanol (2 g/kg) consumed as much ethanol as B6 from the same pretreatment condition. After a history of ethanol self-administration, saline control mice from the D2 strain showed equal locomotor activation as compared to D2 mice that were pretreated with ethanol injections. B6 mice showed no change in locomotor activity after ethanol self-administration or injection. These results demonstrate that genetic predisposition to avoid alcohol (D2 mice) can be modified by a

  6. Soymilk products affect ethanol absorption and metabolism in rats during acute and chronic ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Kano, M; Ishikawa, F; Matsubara, S; Kikuchi-Hayakawa, H; Shimakawa, Y

    2002-02-01

    In this study we evaluated the effects of soy products on ethanol metabolism during periods of acute and chronic consumption in rats. Gastric ethanol content and blood ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations were investigated after the oral administration of ethanol (34 mmol/kg) plus soy products such as soymilk (SM) or fermented soymilk (FSM). The gastric ethanol concentration of the FSM group was greater than that of the control group, whereas portal and aortal blood ethanol concentrations of the FSM group were lower than in controls. The aortal acetaldehyde concentration in the FSM group was lower than that of the control group. The direct effect of isoflavones on liver function was investigated by using hepatocytes isolated from untreated rats. Genistein (5 micromol/L) decreased ethanol (P = 0.045) and tended to decrease acetaldehyde (P = 0.10) concentrations in the culture filtrate. Some variables of ethanol metabolism in the liver were investigated after chronic ethanol exposure for 25 d. Rats consumed a 5% ethanol fluid plus the SM diet, the FSM diet or a control diet. Microsomal ethanol oxidizing activity was significantly lower in the FSM group than the control group. Furthermore, cytosolic glutathione S-transferase activity was higher in the SM and FSM groups than in the control group. Acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (low K(m)) in the FSM group (P = 0.15), but not in the SM group (P = 0.31), tended to be greater than in the control group. The amount of thiobarbituric acid reacting substances in the liver of the SM and FSM groups tended to be less than that of the control group (P = 0.18 and 0.10, respectively). These results demonstrate that soymilk products inhibit ethanol absorption and enhance ethanol metabolism in rats.

  7. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  8. Actions of Acute and Chronic Ethanol on Presynaptic Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Marisa; Treistman, Steven N.; Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Weiner, Jeff; Galindo, Rafael; Mameli, Manuel; Valenzuela, Fernando; Zhu, Ping Jun; Lovinger, David; Zhang, Tao A.; Hendricson, Adam H.; Morrisett, Richard; Siggins, George Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium entitled “The Tipsy Terminal: Presynaptic Effects of Ethanol” (held at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, in Santa Barbara, CA, June 27, 2005). The objective of this symposium was to focus on a cellular site of ethanol action underrepresented in the alcohol literature, but quickly becoming a “hot” topic. The chairs of the session were Marisa Roberto and George Robert Siggins. Our speakers were chosen on the basis of the diverse electrophysiological and other methods used to discern the effects of acute and chronic ethanol on presynaptic terminals and on the basis of significant insights that their data provide for understanding ethanol actions on neurons in general, as mechanisms underlying problematic behavioral effects of alcohol. The 5 presenters drew from their recent studies examining the effects of acute and chronic ethanol using a range of sophisticated methods from electrophysiological analysis of paired-pulse facilitation and spontaneous and miniature synaptic currents (Drs. Weiner, Valenzuela, Zhu, and Morrisett), to direct recording of ion channel activity and peptide release from acutely isolated synaptic terminals (Dr. Treistman), to direct microscopic observation of vesicular release (Dr. Morrisett). They showed that ethanol administration could both increase and decrease the probability of release of different transmitters from synaptic terminals. The effects of ethanol on synaptic terminals could often be correlated with important behavioral or developmental actions of alcohol. These and other novel findings suggest that future analyses of synaptic effects of ethanol should attempt to ascertain, in multiple brain regions, the role of presynaptic terminals, relevant presynaptic receptors and signal transduction linkages, exocytotic mechanisms, and their involvement in alcohol’s behavioral actions. Such studies could lead to new treatment strategies for alcohol

  9. Evaluation of acute effects of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Zahoor Ahmad; Chowta, Mukta N.; Bolumbu, Ganaraja; Rakesh, K. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the acute effect of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats and to determine the specificity of the effect of melatonin on ethanol intake as compared to an intake of plain tap water or sugar water. Materials and Methods: A total of three experiments (2 weeks duration each) using different drinking solutions (ethanol, plain tap water, sugar water) was conducted in individually housed male wistar rats of 5 weeks age. Each animal had access to bottles containing drinking solutions for 2 h a day. In each experiment, on day 1, day 2, day 4, day 5, day 8, day 9, day 11, day 12 rats received drinking solutions. Each individual rat received single doses of saline, melatonin (50 mg and 100 mg/kg), and naltrexone on day 2, 5, 9, and 12, 1-h before receiving drinking solution. The order of drug administration is permuted such a way that each animal received the drugs in a different order in different experiments. Results: Melatonin has significantly decreased ethanol consumption by the rats and effect is dose-dependent. Naltrexone also has caused a significant reduction in the ethanol consumption. The maximum reduction in ethanol consumption was seen with melatonin 100 mg/kg dose compared to melatonin 50 mg/kg and naltrexone. There was no statistically significant effect of melatonin on plain water and sugar solution intake. Conclusions: Melatonin decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol naïve rats. The effect of melatonin is similar to naltrexone affecting selectively ethanol consumption, but not plain water and sugar water consumption. PMID:26288469

  10. Regulation of adenosine transport by acute and chronic ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.E.; Casso, D.; Diamond, I.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1989-02-09

    Chronic exposure to ethanol results in a desensitization of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP production. Since adenosine is released by cells and is known to desensitize its own as well as other receptors, it may be involved in ethanol-induced desensitization of adenosine receptor function. Therefore, we have examine the acute and chronic effects of ethanol on the transport of adenosine via the nucleoside transport. Acute exposure to ethanol caused an inhibition of adenosine uptake in S49 lymphoma cells. This decrease in uptake resulted in accumulation of extracellular adenosine after ethanol exposure. The effect of ethanol was specific to nucleoside transport. Uptake of uridine, also transported by the nucleoside transporter, was inhibited by ethanol to the same degree as adenosine uptake, while neither isoleucine nor deoxyglucose uptake was altered by ethanol treatment. Inhibition of adenosine uptake by ethanol was non-competitive and dependent on the concentration of ethanol. After chronic exposure to ethanol, cells became tolerant to the acute effects of ethanol. There was no longer an acute inhibition of adenosine uptake, nor was these accumulation of extracellular adenosine. Chronic ethanol exposure also resulted in a decrease in the absolute rate of adenosine uptake. Binding studies using a high affinity lignad for the nucleoside transporter, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), indicate that this decreased uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal number of binding sites. These ethanol-induced changes in adenosine transport may be important for the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

  11. Operant self-administration of ethanol in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Nizhnikov, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The review focuses on operant self-administration of ethanol in immature, infant rats. Several methods for the analysis of ethanol intake in infants are available, yet only oral self-administration models the typical pattern of ethanol consumption found in humans. The study of ethanol intake in infants is important for our understanding of how early alcohol experiences facilitate subsequent engagement with alcohol. It seems that sensitivity to ethanol-induced operant reinforcement is found very early in life, a few hours after birth, and throughout the first three weeks of life. Most of the studies reviewed complied with most, albeit not all, of the criteria for operant behavior (e.g., greater responding than yoked controls and persistence of this difference after withholding the reinforcer). Operant self-administration of ethanol in infant rats seems to be, at least partially, mediated by endogenous opioid transmission and can be enhanced by prior exposure to ethanol. Furthermore, acquisition of ethanol-mediated operant learning seems to facilitate drug self-administration during adolescence. Relative to older subjects, infants exhibit lower sensitivity to ethanol's sedative, hypnotic and motor impairing effects. On the other hand, they exhibit increased sensitivity to the motor stimulant and rewarding effects of ethanol. We suggest that this pattern of response to ethanol may favor the rapid acquisition of operant self-administration in infant rats.

  12. Reduced operant ethanol self-administration and in vivo mesolimbic dopamine responses to ethanol in PKCepsilon-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Olive, M F; Mehmert, K K; Messing, R O; Hodge, C W

    2000-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that individual protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes mediate specific effects of ethanol on the nervous system. In addition, multiple lines of evidence suggest that the mesoaccumbens dopamine reward system is critically involved in the rewarding and reinforcing effects of ethanol. Yet little is known about the role of individual PKC isozymes in ethanol reinforcement processes or in regulation of mesolimbic systems. In this study, we report that mice lacking the epsilon isoform of PKC (PKCepsilon) show reduced operant ethanol self-administration and an absence of ethanol-induced increase in extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. PKCepsilon null mice exhibited a 53% decrease in alcohol-reinforced operant responses under basal conditions, as well as following ethanol deprivation. Behavioural analysis revealed that while both genotypes had the same number of drinking bouts following deprivation, PKCepsilon null mice demonstrated a 61% reduction in number of ethanol reinforcers per bout and a 57% reduction in ethanol-reinforced response rate. In vivo microdialysis experiments showed that, in contrast to wild-type mice, PKCepsilon null mice exhibited no change in extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens following acute administration of ethanol (1 and 2 g/kg i.p.), while mesolimbic dopamine responses to cocaine (20 mg/kg i.p.) or high potassium (100 mM) in these mice were comparable with that of wild-types. These data provide further evidence that increases in extracellular mesolimbic dopamine levels contribute to the reinforcing effects of ethanol, and indicate that pharmacological agents inhibiting PKCepsilon may be useful in the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  13. Acute Ethanol Intake Induces NAD(P)H Oxidase Activation and Rhoa Translocation in Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Simplicio, Janaina A.; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Callera, Glaucia Elena; Pereira, Camila André; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita de Cássia; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying the vascular dysfunction induced by ethanol is not totally understood. Identification of biochemical/molecular mechanisms that could explain such effects is warranted. Objective To investigate whether acute ethanol intake activates the vascular RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in resistance arteries and the role of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) on such response. We also evaluated the requirement of p47phox translocation for ethanol-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Methods Male Wistar rats were orally treated with ethanol (1g/kg, p.o. gavage) or water (control). Some rats were treated with vitamin C (250 mg/kg, p.o. gavage, 5 days) before administration of water or ethanol. The mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) was collected 30 min after ethanol administration. Results Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in superoxide anion (O2-) generation and lipoperoxidation in the MAB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the reduced glutathione, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were not affected by ethanol. Vitamin C and 4-methylpyrazole prevented the increase on O2- generation induced by ethanol in cultured MAB vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol had no effect on phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B (Akt) and eNOS (Ser1177 or Thr495 residues) or MAB vascular reactivity. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in the membrane: cytosol fraction ratio of p47phox and RhoA expression in the rat MAB. Conclusion Acute ethanol intake induces activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by a mechanism that involves ROS generation. In resistance arteries, ethanol activates NAD(P)H oxidase by inducing p47phox translocation by a redox-sensitive mechanism. PMID:27812679

  14. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  15. ACUTE ETHANOL DISRUPTS PHOTIC AND SEROTONERGIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK PHASE-RESETTING IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired circadian rhythms and sleep. Ethanol administration disrupts circadian clock phase-resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on the circadian timing system. In this study, we extend previous work in C57BL/6J mice to: 1) characterize the SCN pharmacokinetics of acute systemic ethanol administration; 2) explore the effects of acute ethanol on photic and non-photic phase-resetting; and 2) determine if the SCN is a direct target for photic effects. Methods First, microdialysis was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of acute i.p. injections of 3 doses of ethanol (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) in the mouse suprachiasmatic (SCN) circadian clock. Second, the effects of acute i.p. ethanol administration on photic phase-delays and serotonergic ([+]8-OH-DPAT-induced) phase-advances of the circadian activity rhythm were assessed. Third, the effects of reverse-microdialysis ethanol perfusion of the SCN on photic phase-resetting were characterized. Results Peak ethanol levels from the 3 doses of ethanol in the SCN occurred within 20–40 min post-injection with half-lives for clearance ranging from 0.6–1.8 hr. Systemic ethanol treatment dose-dependently attenuated photic and serotonergic phase-resetting. This treatment also did not affect basal SCN neuronal activity as assessed by Fos expression. Intra-SCN perfusion with ethanol markedly reduced photic phase-delays. Conclusions These results confirm that acute ethanol attenuates photic phase-delay shifts and serotonergic phase-advance shifts in the mouse. This dual effect could disrupt photic and non-photic entrainment mechanisms governing circadian clock timing. It is also significant that the SCN clock is a direct target for disruptive effects of ethanol on photic shifting. Such actions by ethanol could underlie the disruptive effects of alcohol abuse on behavioral, physiological, and endocrine rhythms associated with alcoholism. PMID:21463340

  16. Silymarin Protects Against Acute Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenyuan; Deaciuc, Ion; Song, Ming; Lee, David Y.-W.; Liu, Yanze; Ji, Xiaosheng; McClain, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that both oxidative stress and abnormal cytokine production, especially tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), play important etiological roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Agents that have both antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties, particularly anti-TNF production, represent promising therapeutic interventions for ALD. We investigated the effects and the possible mechanism(s) of silymarin on liver injury induced by acute ethanol (EtOH) administration. Methods Nine-week-old mice were divided into 4 groups, control, silymarin treatment, EtOH treatment, and silymarin/EtOH treatment, with 6 mice in each group. Because control and silymarin values were virtually identical, only control treatment is shown for ease of viewing. Ethanol-treated mice received EtOH [5 g/kg body weight (BW)] by gavage every 12 hours for a total of 3 doses. Control mice received an isocalorical maltose solution. In the silymarin/EtOH group, silymarin was dissolved in the EtOH and gavaged simultaneously with EtOH at a dose of 200 mg/kg BW. At 4 hours after the last dosing, the mice were anesthetized and subsequent serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level, hepatic lipid peroxidation, enzymatic activity of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1, hepatic TNF-α, and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured. Histopathological change was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results Acute EtOH administration caused prominent hepatic microvesicular steatosis with mild necrosis and an elevation of serum ALT activity, induced a significant decrease in hepatic GSH in conjunction with enhanced lipid peroxidation, and increased hepatic TNF production. Supplementation with a standardized silymarin attenuated these adverse changes induced by acute EtOH administration. Conclusions Silymarin protects against the liver injury caused by acute EtOH administration. In view of its nontoxic nature, it may be developed as an effective therapeutic

  17. Ethanol co-administration moderates 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine effects on human physiology.

    PubMed

    Dumont, G J H; Kramers, C; Sweep, F C G J; Willemsen, J J; Touw, D J; Schoemaker, R C; van Gerven, J M A; Buitelaar, J K; Verkes, R J

    2010-02-01

    Alcohol is frequently used in combination with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Both drugs affect cardiovascular function, hydration and temperature regulation, but may have partly opposing effects. The present study aims to assess the acute physiologic effects of (co-) administration of MDMA and ethanol over time. A four-way, double blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (9 male and 7 female) between the ages of 18 and 29. MDMA (100 mg) was given orally and blood ethanol concentration was maintained at pseudo-steady state levels of 0.6 per thousand by a three-hour 10% intravenous ethanol clamp. Cardiovascular function, temperature and hydration measures were recorded throughout the study days. Ethanol did not significantly affect physiologic function, with the exception of a short lasting increase in heart rate. MDMA potently increased heart rate and blood pressure and induced fluid retention as well as an increase in temperature. Co-administration of ethanol with MDMA did not affect cardiovascular function compared to the MDMA alone condition, but attenuated the effects of MDMA on fluid retention and showed a trend for attenuation of MDMA-induced temperature increase. In conclusion, co-administration of ethanol and MDMA did not exacerbate physiologic effects compared to all other drug conditions, and moderated some effects of MDMA alone.

  18. Adolescent and adult rat cortical protein kinase A display divergent responses to acute ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Eduardo D.; Santerre, Jessica L.; Carter, Jenna M.; Werner, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent rats display reduced sensitivity to many dysphoria-related effects of alcohol (ethanol) including motor ataxia and sedative hypnosis, but the underlying neurobiological factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, particularly the type II regulatory subunit (RII), has been implicated in ethanol-induced molecular and behavioral responses in adults. Therefore, the current study examined cerebral cortical PKA in adolescent and adult ethanol responses. With the exception of early adolescence, PKA RIIα and RIIβ subunit levels largely did not differ from adult levels in either whole cell lysate or P2 synaptosomal expression. However, following acute ethanol exposure, PKA RIIβ P2 synaptosomal expression and activity were increased in adults, but not in adolescents. Behaviorally, intracerebroventricular administration of the PKA activator Sp-cAMP and inhibitor Rp-cAMP prior to ethanol administration increased adolescent sensitivity to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol compared to controls. Sp-cAMP was ineffective in adults whereas Rp-cAMP suggestively reduced loss of righting reflex (LORR) with paralleled increases in blood ethanol concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that PKA activity modulates the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and may potentially play a wider role in the differential ethanol responses observed between adolescents and adults. PMID:24874150

  19. Adolescent and adult rat cortical protein kinase A display divergent responses to acute ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Eduardo D; Santerre, Jessica L; Carter, Jenna M; Werner, David F

    2014-08-01

    Adolescent rats display reduced sensitivity to many dysphoria-related effects of alcohol (ethanol) including motor ataxia and sedative hypnosis, but the underlying neurobiological factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, particularly the type II regulatory subunit (RII), has been implicated in ethanol-induced molecular and behavioral responses in adults. Therefore, the current study examined cerebral cortical PKA in adolescent and adult ethanol responses. With the exception of early adolescence, PKA RIIα and RIIβ subunit levels largely did not differ from adult levels in either whole cell lysate or P2 synaptosomal expression. However, following acute ethanol exposure, PKA RIIβ P2 synaptosomal expression and activity were increased in adults, but not in adolescents. Behaviorally, intracerebroventricular administration of the PKA activator Sp-cAMP and inhibitor Rp-cAMP prior to ethanol administration increased adolescent sensitivity to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol compared to controls. Sp-cAMP was ineffective in adults whereas Rp-cAMP suggestively reduced loss of righting reflex (LORR) with paralleled increases in blood ethanol concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that PKA activity modulates the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and may potentially play a wider role in the differential ethanol responses observed between adolescents and adults.

  20. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects of Acute and Chronic Ethanol Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    No. 2 C4"ght 0 1967 by "he Amusca Soiety for Pharmacolog and Kxporuont Therpadu" Prud m U.S.A. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium ...inhibitory effect of ethanol in vitro on sodium benzoate binding to neuronal sodium channels were studi-d in uptake for up to 20 days after withdrawal...adapt rapidly to some sodium uptake in the absence of ethanol in vitro, however, a effects of ethanol and that chronic ethanol administration can

  1. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrell, M.F.; Nauss, J.M.; Donohue, T.M. Jr.; Tuma, D.J.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on protein and glycoprotein synthesis and secretion were studied in rat liver slices. Liver slices from rats fed ethanol for 4-5 wk showed a decreased ability to incorporate (/sup 14/C)glucosamine into medium trichloracetic acid-precipitable proteins when compared to the pair-fed controls; however, the labeling of hepatocellular glycoproteins was unaffected by chronic ethanol treatment. Immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled secretory (serum) glycoproteins with antiserum against rat serum proteins showed a similar marked inhibition in the appearance of glucosamine-labeled proteins in the medium of slices from ethanol-fed rats. Minimal effects, however, were noted in the labeling of intracellular secretory glycoproteins. Protein synthesis, as determined by measuring (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation into medium and liver proteins, was decreased in liver slices from ethanol-fed rats as compared to the pair-fed controls. This was the case for both total proteins as well as immunoprecipitable secretory proteins, although the labeling of secretory proteins retained in the liver slices was reduced to a lesser extent than total radiolabeled hepatic proteins. When the terminal sugar, (/sup 14/C)fucose, was employed as a precursor in order to more closely focus on the final steps of hepatic glycoprotein secretion, liver slices obtained from chronic ethanol-fed rats exhibited impaired secretion of fucose-labeled proteins into the medium. When ethanol (5 or 10 mM) was added to the incubation medium containing liver slices from the ethanol-fed rats, the alterations in protein and glycoprotein synthesis and secretion caused by the chronic ethanol treatment were further potentiated. The results of this study indicate that liver slices prepared from chronic ethanol-fed rats exhibit both impaired synthesis and secretion of proteins and glycoproteins, and these defects are further potentiated by acute ethanol administration.

  2. Peripheral oxytocin administration reduces ethanol consumption in rats

    PubMed Central

    MacFadyen, Kaley; Loveless, Rebecca; DeLucca, Brandon; Wardley, Krystal; Deogan, Sumeet; Thomas, Cameron; Peris, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin interacts with mesolimbic dopamine neurons to mediate reward associated with filial behaviors, but also other rewarding behaviors such as eating or taking drugs of abuse. Based on its efficacy to decrease intake of other abused substances, oxytocin administration is implicated as a possible treatment for excessive alcohol consumption. We tested this hypothesis by measuring ethanol intake in male Sprague–Dawley rats injected with oxytocin or saline using two different ethanol self-administration paradigms. First, a dose–response curve was constructed for oxytocin inhibition of fluid intake using a modified drinking-in-the-dark model with three bottles containing .05% saccharine, 10% ethanol in saccharine, and 15% ethanol in saccharine. Doses of oxytocin tested were 0.05, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg (I.P.). Next, rats received 0.3 mg/kg oxytocin preceding operant sessions in which they were trained to lever-press for either plain gelatin or ethanol gelatin in order to compare oxytocin inhibition of ethanol intake versus caloric intake. For the three-bottle choice study, rats consumed significantly less ethanol when treated with the three higher doses of oxytocin on the injection day. In the operant study, 0.3 mg/kg oxytocin significantly decreased ethanol gel consumption to a greater extent than plain gel consumption, both in terms of the amount of gel eaten and calories consumed. These data affirm oxytocin's efficacy for decreasing ethanol intake in rats, and confirm clinical studies suggesting oxytocin as a potential treatment for alcoholism. PMID:26519603

  3. Peripheral oxytocin administration reduces ethanol consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    MacFadyen, Kaley; Loveless, Rebecca; DeLucca, Brandon; Wardley, Krystal; Deogan, Sumeet; Thomas, Cameron; Peris, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin interacts with mesolimbic dopamine neurons to mediate reward associated with filial behaviors, but also other rewarding behaviors such as eating or taking drugs of abuse. Based on its efficacy to decrease intake of other abused substances, oxytocin administration is implicated as a possible treatment for excessive alcohol consumption. We tested this hypothesis by measuring ethanol intake in male Sprague-Dawley rats injected with oxytocin or saline using two different ethanol self-administration paradigms. First, a dose-response curve was constructed for oxytocin inhibition of fluid intake using a modified drinking-in-the-dark model with three bottles containing .05% saccharine, 10% ethanol in saccharine, and 15% ethanol in saccharine. Doses of oxytocin tested were 0.05, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5mg/kg (I.P.). Next, rats received 0.3mg/kg oxytocin preceding operant sessions in which they were trained to lever-press for either plain gelatin or ethanol gelatin in order to compare oxytocin inhibition of ethanol intake versus caloric intake. For the three-bottle choice study, rats consumed significantly less ethanol when treated with the three higher doses of oxytocin on the injection day. In the operant study, 0.3mg/kg oxytocin significantly decreased ethanol gel consumption to a greater extent than plain gel consumption, both in terms of the amount of gel eaten and calories consumed. These data affirm oxytocin's efficacy for decreasing ethanol intake in rats, and confirm clinical studies suggesting oxytocin as a potential treatment for alcoholism.

  4. In situ rat brain and liver spontaneous chemiluminescence after acute ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Boveris, A; Llesuy, S; Azzalis, L A; Giavarotti, L; Simon, K A; Junqueira, V B; Porta, E A; Videla, L A; Lissi, E A

    1997-09-19

    The influence of acute ethanol administration on the oxidative stress status of rat brain and liver was assessed by in situ spontaneous organ chemiluminescence (CL). Brain and liver CL was significantly increased after acute ethanol administration to fed rats, a response that is time-dependent and evidenced at doses higher than 1 g/kg. Ethanol-induced CL development is faster in liver compared with brain probably due to the greater ethanol metabolic capacity of the liver, whereas the net enhancement in brain light emission at 3 h after ethanol treatment is higher than that of the liver, which could reflect the greater susceptibility of brain to oxidative stress. The effect of ethanol on brain and liver CL seems to be mediated by acetaldehyde, due to its abolishment by the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole and exacerbation by the aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor disulfiram. In brain, these findings were observed in the absence of changes in the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. However, the content of brain glutathione was significantly decreased by 31%, by ethanol, thus establishing an enhanced oxidative stress in this tissue.

  5. Sex-dependent effects of maternal separation on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamines in response to chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, S E; Quadros, I M H; Machado, R B; Suchecki, D

    2013-12-03

    Prolonged and repeated periods of maternal separation produce behavioral phenotype of increased vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders and drug abuse. Most of the changes in behavior, corticosterone (CORT) and monoamine levels induced by long maternal separation (LMS) are observed after a challenge, but not in basal conditions. LMS increases ethanol-induced locomotor response and self-administration, possibly due to changes in CORT release and/or monoamine concentrations. This study examined the effects of LMS in association with chronic ethanol treatment on plasma CORT and brain monoamine concentrations in male and female Swiss mice, which were kept undisturbed (animal facility rearing - AFR) or separated from their mothers for 3h/day, from 2 to 14 days of age (LMS). As adults, one set of male and female mice received no drug treatment to assess the effect of LMS per se. Another set of animals received saline injections for 20 days and one ethanol injection (2.2g/kg, i.p.) on day 21 (acute) or ethanol for 21 days (chronic). Locomotor activity, plasma CORT levels and monoamines in the frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of AFR and LMS mice were evaluated in non-treated, acute and chronic ethanol-treated animals. In non-treated mice, no differences were found in CORT or locomotor activity, with small changes in monoamines content. In LMS females, chronic ethanol increased dopamine and serotonin concentrations in the frontal cortex, relative to acute ethanol LMS and to chronic ethanol-treated AFR groups (p<0.05). In LMS males, chronic ethanol increased hippocampal noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and metabolites when compared to respective AFR controls, as well as acute LMS. Moreover, chronic ethanol treatment resulted in higher CORT concentrations in LMS than in AFR males. Overall, these results indicate that LMS mice were more susceptible to the effects of chronic ethanol administration on CORT and brain monoamine concentrations, and that these effects

  6. Effects of acute acamprosate and homotaurine on ethanol intake and ethanol-stimulated mesolimbic dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Olive, M Foster; Nannini, Michelle A; Ou, Christine J; Koenig, Heather N; Hodge, Clyde W

    2002-02-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the acute effects of the anticraving compound acamprosate (calcium acetylhomotaurinate) and the closely related compound homotaurine on ethanol intake and ethanol-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Male rats were treated with acamprosate (200 or 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally, i.p.) or homotaurine (10, 50, or 100 mg/kg i.p.) 15 min prior to access to 10% ethanol and water for 1 h in a two-bottle choice restricted access paradigm. A separate group of rats was implanted with microdialysis probes in the nucleus accumbens and given an acute injection of ethanol (1.5 g/kg i.p.) that was preceded by saline, acamprosate, or homotaurine. Acamprosate and homotaurine dose-dependently reduced ethanol intake and preference. These compounds also delayed or suppressed ethanol-stimulated increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine release, suggesting that acamprosate and homotaurine may reduce ethanol intake by interfering with the ability of ethanol to activate the mesolimbic dopamine reward system.

  7. Increased brain nitric oxide levels following ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Niall; O'Riordan, Saidhbhe L; Klamer, Daniel; Lowry, John; Pålsson, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a ubiquitous messenger molecule, which at elevated concentrations has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders. Its role in oxidative stress, attributed in particular to the formation of peroxynitrite, proceeds through its high affinity for the superoxide radical. Alcoholism has recently been associated with the induction of oxidative stress, which is generally defined as a shift in equilibrium between pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant species in the direction of the former. Furthermore, its primary metabolite acetaldehyde, has been extensively associated with oxidative damage related toxic effects following alcohol ingestion. The principal objective of this study was the application of long term in vivo electrochemistry (LIVE) to investigate the effect of ethanol (0.125, 0.5 and 2.0 g kg(-1)) and acetaldehyde (12.5, 50 and 200 mg kg(-1)) on NO levels in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats. Systemic administrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde resulted in a dose-dependent increases in NO levels, albeit with very differing time courses. Subsequent to this the effect on accumbal NO levels, of subjecting the animal to different drug combinations, was also elucidated. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (20 mg kg(-1)) and acetaldehyde sequestering agent D-penicillamine (50 mg kg(-1)) both attenuated the increase in NO levels following ethanol (1 g kg(-1)) administration. Conversely, the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (25 mg kg(-1)) and catalase inhibitor sodium azide (10 mg kg(-1)) potentiated the increase in NO levels following ethanol administration. Finally, dual inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase and catalase by cyanamide (25 mg kg(-1)) caused an attenuation of ethanol effects on NO levels. Taken together these data highlight a robust increase in brain NO levels following systemic alcohol administration which is dependent on NO synthase activity and may involve both alcohol- and acetaldehyde

  8. Influence of an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched diet on the development of tolerance during chronic ethanol administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Meehan, E; Beaugé, F; Choquart, D; Leonard, B E

    1995-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), in the form of dietary Evening Primrose Oil (EPO) and safflower oil, on the development of tolerance to ethanol. The degree of fluorescence polarization of the fluoroprobes DPH, PROP-DPH, and TMA-DPH in isolated cortical synaptosomal membranes was measured. In addition, the development of tolerance, as shown by changes in synaptosomal membrane fluidity after an acute in vitro ethanol challenge, was also determined after 20 weeks of ethanol administration, either alone or together with a PUFA-enriched diet. Although the administration of EPO-enriched diet did not significantly render the inner core of the cortical synaptosomal membrane tolerant to the acute ethanol challenge, concomitant administration of ethanol and EPO was found to increase further the rigidity and tolerance to the acute ethanol challenge in the inner core. Chronic administration of safflower oil, which lacks gamma-linolenic acid (18:3, n-6) but like EPO contains linoleic acid, either alone or together with chronic ethanol had no effect on synaptosomal membrane fluidity after an acute ethanol challenge. The results suggest that gamma-linolenic acid or its metabolites may have an important role to play in the development of tolerance to chronic ethanol.

  9. Male adolescent rats display blunted cytokine responses in the CNS after acute ethanol or lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Gano, Anny; Paniccia, Jacqueline E; Deak, Terrence

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol induces widespread changes in cytokine expression, with recent data from our laboratory having demonstrated that, during acute ethanol intoxication, adult rats exhibit consistent increases in interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression in several brain regions, while showing reductions in IL-1 and TNFα expression. Given evidence indicating that adolescence may be an ontogenetic period in which some neuroimmune processes and cells may not yet have fully matured, the purpose of the current experiments was to examine potential age differences in the central cytokine response of adolescent (P31-33days of age) and adult (69-71days of age) rats to either an acute immune (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or non-immune challenge (ethanol). In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either sterile saline, LPS (250μg/kg), or ethanol (4-g/kg), and then trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 3h later for measurement of blood ethanol concentrations (BECs), plasma endotoxin, and central mRNA expression of several immune-related gene targets. In Experiment 2, the response to intragastrically (i.g.) administered ethanol was examined and compared to animals given tap water (i.g.). Results showed that LPS stimulated robust increases in expression of IL-1, IL-6, TNFα, and IκBα in the hippocampus, PVN, and amygdala, and that these increases were generally less pronounced in adolescents relative to adults. Following an i.p. ethanol challenge, IL-6 and IκBα expression was significantly increased in both ages in the PVN and amygdala, and adults exhibited even greater increases in IκBα than adolescents. I.g. administration of ethanol also increased IL-6 and IκBα expression in all three brain regions, with hippocampal IL-6 elevated even more so in adults compared to adolescents. Furthermore, assessment of plasma endotoxin concentrations revealed (i) whereas robust increases in plasma endotoxin were observed in adults injected with LPS

  10. Oral ethanol self-administration in inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats: gradual versus abrupt ethanol presentation.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Lidia; Gómez, M José; Callejas-Aguilera, José E; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Papini, Mauricio R; Torres, Carmen

    2012-12-25

    Outbred Roman high-avoidance rats are known to consume more ethanol than inbred Roman low-avoidance rats. To determine whether ethanol consumption in inbred strains could be modulated by experiential factors, preference for a target 10% ethanol concentration was tested after either the gradual introduction of ethanol in increasing concentrations or the abrupt introduction of the target concentration. Whereas high-avoidance rats consumed more ethanol at lower concentrations, consumption and preference for ethanol over water were not differential across strains and administration procedure (gradual vs. abrupt). At the 4% concentration, ethanol was preferred over water by Roman high-avoidance rats, but water was preferred over ethanol by Roman low-avoidance rats. Ethanol consumption and preference for a 10% concentration appear to be immune to modification by either the gradual or abrupt ethanol presentation.

  11. Rising taurine and ethanol concentrations in nucleus accumbens interact to produce dopamine release after ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Mia; Chau, PeiPei; Clarke, Rhona B; Adermark, Louise; Söderpalm, Bo

    2011-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that glycine receptors in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) are involved in modulating both basal and ethanol-induced dopamine output in the same brain region. Ethanol is known to induce a release of both taurine and dopamine in the nAc, but the relationship between these two neuromodulators has not been investigated thoroughly. In vivo microdialysis was used to measure the effects of systemic ethanol diluted in isotonic (0.9% NaCl) or hypertonic (3.6% NaCl) saline on accumbal taurine and dopamine levels. We found that ethanol given in a hypertonic solution, contrary to an isotonic solution, failed to increase concentrations both of taurine and dopamine in the nAc. However, a modest, non-dopamine elevating concentration of taurine in the nAc disclosed a dopamine-elevating effect of systemic ethanol also when given in a hypertonic solution. In a second experiment, we investigated the effects of ethanol on taurine and dopamine in normal rats and rats with decreased levels of endogenous taurine. Lowering the level of taurine, approximately 40% by adding 5% β-alanine in the drinking water, did not influence taurine or dopamine output over time. We conclude that the elevations of taurine and dopamine in the nAc are closely related, and that in order for ethanol to induce dopamine release, a simultaneous increase of extracellular taurine levels in the nAc is required. These data also provide support for the notion that the nAc is the primary target for ethanol in its dopamine-activating effect after systemic administration.

  12. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E.; Mecawi, André S.; Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase‐mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ► Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ► RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation.

  13. The sap of Acer okamotoanum decreases serum alcohol levels after acute ethanol ingestion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Ha-Young; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, we examined whether Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) sap decreased the serum alcohol and acetaldehyde levels after acute ethanol treatment in a rat model. Male rats were orally administered 25, 50 or 100% A. okamotoanum sap 30 min prior to oral challenge with 3 ml of ethanol (15 ml/kg of a 20% ethanol solution in water), and the blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde were analyzed up to 7 h after the treatment. Pre-treatment with the sap significantly decreased the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations after 5 h when compared with ethanol treatment alone (a negative control). The expression levels of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) mRNA were increased significantly in animals pre-treated with A. okamotoanum sap when compared with negative and positive controls. The data suggest that sap pre-treatment enhanced the alcohol metabolism rate in the rat liver. To investigate the involvement of mitochondrial regulation in the ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we carried out an immunohistochemical analysis of Bax and Bcl-2. Pre-treatment with sap significantly decreased Bax expression and increased Bcl-2 expression 7 h after ethanol administration when compared with the negative control. The data suggest that A. okamotoanum sap pre-treatment may reduce the alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the rat liver.

  14. Effect of acute ethanol and acute allopregnanolone on spatial memory in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Chin, Vivien S; Van Skike, Candice E; Berry, Raymond B; Kirk, Roger E; Diaz-Granados, Jamie; Matthews, Douglas B

    2011-08-01

    The effects of ethanol differ in adolescent and adult rats on a number of measures. The evidence of the effects of ethanol on spatial memory in adolescents and adults is equivocal. Whether adolescents are more or less sensitive to ethanol-induced impairment of spatial memory acquisition remains unclear; with regard to the effects of acute ethanol on spatial memory retrieval there is almost no research looking into any age difference. Thus, we examined the effects of acute ethanol on spatial memory in the Morris Watermaze in adolescents and adults. Allopregnanolone (ALLO) is a modulator of the GABA(A) receptor and has similar behavioral effects as ethanol. We sought to also determine the effects of allopreganolone on spatial memory in adolescent and adults. Male adolescent (post natal [PN]28-30) and adult (PN70-72) rats were trained in the Morris Watermaze for 6 days and acute doses of ethanol (saline, 1.5 and 2.0 g/kg) or ALLO (vehicle, 9 and 18 mg/kg) were administered on Day 7. A probe trial followed on Day 8. As expected, there were dose effects; higher doses of both ethanol and ALLO impaired spatial memory. However, in both the ethanol and ALLO conditions adolescents and adults had similar spatial memory impairments. The current results suggest that ethanol and ALLO both impair hippocampal-dependent spatial memory regardless of age in that once learning has occurred, ethanol or ALLO does not differentially impair the retrieval of spatial memory in adolescents and adults. Given the mixed results on the effect of ethanol on cognition in adolescent rats, additional research is needed to ascertain the factors critical for the reported differential results.

  15. Ethanol self-administration in mice under a second-order schedule.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Richard J; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C

    2015-09-01

    Long Fixed-Interval (FI) schedules, particularly second-order schedules, can engender substantial responding before drug or ethanol delivery that is uninfluenced by the direct effects of the drug or ethanol. Thus, these schedules can be used to study the effects of medications upon drug- or ethanol-seeking, uninfluenced by the direct effects of the self-administered drug or ethanol. Long FI second-order schedules are frequently used in primates and occasionally in rats. Under second-order schedules, completion of one response requirement, e.g., a Fixed Ratio 10 (FR10:S), produces a brief stimulus presentation, e.g., a 1-s 80-dB 4-kHZ tone, and this FR10:S serves as the response unit under another schedule, e.g., an FI 1800-s. Thus, the first FR10 completed after 1800 s would result in delivery both of the tone and of reinforcement, e.g., 10 × 0.01 mL 16% (w/v) ethanol. To examine if such schedules could be effectively used in mice, which have advantages in neurobiological and genetic studies, we trained eight C57BL/6J mice to respond under the schedule just described. This schedule maintained substantial responding. The temporal pattern of behavior was typical of an FI schedule with responding accelerating across the interval. We also examined the effects of acute and chronic administration of fluvoxamine on this responding, and these were modest. Finally, we examined responding when alcohol and/or tone deliveries were withheld, and found that extinction occurred most rapidly when both were withheld. This work demonstrates that long FI schedules of ethanol delivery may be useful in studying ethanol seeking in mice.

  16. Acute Ethanol Causes Hepatic Mitochondrial Depolarization in Mice: Role of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Rehman, Hasibur; Liu, Qinlong; Theruvath, Tom P.; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis. Methods Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT), and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), calcein, NAD(P)H, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1–6 g/kg). Results Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(P)H autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼70% and ∼20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis. Conclusions Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to

  17. Effect of acute ethanol ingestion on fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Boquillon, M

    1976-12-01

    A test meal (300 mg casein, 600 mg sucrose, 100 mg corn oil, tracer dose of 9.10(3)H oleic acid) was given to fasting adult rats with intestinal lymph fistulas. One group received an acute oral dose of ethanol (3.2 g/kg body weight) simultaneously with the test meal. Controls received 2.5 ml of water instead of ethanol. Ingestion of ethanol temporarily delayed the removal of lipid radioactivity from the stomachs. More than 25% of radioactivity fed remained 8 hr after feeding whereas with control rats less than 10% of lipid radioactivity fed remained 6 hr after feeding. In controls and ethanol-treated rats, the amounts of exogenous lipids in the intestinal lumen and mucosa were low and similar enough. Quantities of endogenous and exogenous lipids found in the lymph collected during 24 hr after feeding were similar in the two groups, but the fat absorption peak was found after 6 hr in alcoholic rats and before 6 hr in controls. This delay was probably due to the retention of lipids in the stomach. More of the exogenous lipid was always transported by small particles moving in the region of alpha1 globulins in cellulose acetate electrophoresis than by larger particles remaining at the origin. This proportion was enhanced in the ethanol-treated animals. The larger fat particles were richer in endogenous fatty acids in alcohol-treated rats than in controls.

  18. [The significance of ethanolemia for the diagnosis of death from acute ethanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A V; Panfilenko, O A; Serebriakova, V G

    2002-01-01

    Foci of myolysis of cardiac muscle fibers are suggested to be used for evaluation of thanatogenetic significance of ethanol concentration in cadaveric blood. This sign of acute ethanol poisoning is absent in case of other cause of death in a state of ethanol intoxication, even in the presence of high ethanolemia. Therefore, foci of myolysis are a sign of ethanol tolerance.

  19. Adaptations in Basal and Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Adrenal-Activated Deoxycorticosterone Responses Following Ethanol Self-administration in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Vanessa A.; Porcu, Patrizia; Morrow, A. Leslie; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2017-01-01

    Acute ethanol activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, while long-term exposure results in a blunted neuroendocrine state, particularly with regards to the primary endpoint, cortisol, the primary glucocorticoid produced in the adrenal cortex. However, it is unknown if this dampened neuroendocrine status also influences other adrenocortical steroids. Plasma concentration of the mineralocorticoid and neuroactive steroid precursor deoxycorticosterone (DOC) is altered by pharmacological challenges of the HPA axis in cynomolgus monkeys. The present study investigated HPA axis regulation of circulating DOC concentration over the course of ethanol (4% w/v) induction and self-administration in non-human primates (Macaca fasciculata, n = 10). Plasma DOC, measured by radioimmunoassay, was compared at baseline (ethanol naïve), during schedule-induced polydipsia, and following 6-months of 22 h/day access to ethanol and water. The schedule induction of ethanol drinking did not alter basal DOC levels but selectively dampened the DOC response to pharmacological challenges aimed at the anterior pituitary (ovine corticotrophin-releasing hormone) and adrenal gland (post-dexamethasone adrenocorticotropin hormone), while pharmacological inhibition of central opioid receptors with naloxone greatly enhanced the DOC response during induction. Following 6 months of ethanol self-administration, basal DOC levels were increased more than twofold, while responses to each of the challenges normalized somewhat but remained significantly different than baseline. These data show that HPA axis modulation of the neuroactive steroid precursor DOC is markedly altered by the schedule induction of ethanol drinking and long-term voluntary ethanol self-administration. The consequences of chronic ethanol consumption on HPA axis regulation of DOC point toward allostatic modification of hypothalamic and adrenal function. PMID:28220108

  20. Adaptations in Basal and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal-Activated Deoxycorticosterone Responses Following Ethanol Self-administration in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Vanessa A; Porcu, Patrizia; Morrow, A Leslie; Grant, Kathleen A

    2017-01-01

    Acute ethanol activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, while long-term exposure results in a blunted neuroendocrine state, particularly with regards to the primary endpoint, cortisol, the primary glucocorticoid produced in the adrenal cortex. However, it is unknown if this dampened neuroendocrine status also influences other adrenocortical steroids. Plasma concentration of the mineralocorticoid and neuroactive steroid precursor deoxycorticosterone (DOC) is altered by pharmacological challenges of the HPA axis in cynomolgus monkeys. The present study investigated HPA axis regulation of circulating DOC concentration over the course of ethanol (4% w/v) induction and self-administration in non-human primates (Macaca fasciculata, n = 10). Plasma DOC, measured by radioimmunoassay, was compared at baseline (ethanol naïve), during schedule-induced polydipsia, and following 6-months of 22 h/day access to ethanol and water. The schedule induction of ethanol drinking did not alter basal DOC levels but selectively dampened the DOC response to pharmacological challenges aimed at the anterior pituitary (ovine corticotrophin-releasing hormone) and adrenal gland (post-dexamethasone adrenocorticotropin hormone), while pharmacological inhibition of central opioid receptors with naloxone greatly enhanced the DOC response during induction. Following 6 months of ethanol self-administration, basal DOC levels were increased more than twofold, while responses to each of the challenges normalized somewhat but remained significantly different than baseline. These data show that HPA axis modulation of the neuroactive steroid precursor DOC is markedly altered by the schedule induction of ethanol drinking and long-term voluntary ethanol self-administration. The consequences of chronic ethanol consumption on HPA axis regulation of DOC point toward allostatic modification of hypothalamic and adrenal function.

  1. Acute and chronic ethanol intake: effects on spatial and non-spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Luis M; Cimadevilla, Jose M

    2012-12-01

    Abusive alcohol consumption produces neuronal damage and biochemical alterations in the mammal brain followed by cognitive disturbances. In this work rats receiving chronic and acute alcohol intake were evaluated in a spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample/position test. Chronic alcohol-treated rats had free access to an aqueous ethanol solution as the only available liquid source from the postnatal day 21 to the end of experiment (postnatal day 90). Acute alcoholic animals received an injection of 2 g/kg ethanol solution once per week. Subjects were evaluated in two tests (object recognition and spatial recognition) based on the spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample or to position paradigm using delays of 1 min, 15 min and 60 min. Results showed that chronic and acute alcohol intake impairs the rats' performance in both tests. Moreover, chronic alcohol-treated rats were more altered than acute treated animals in both tasks. Our results support the idea that chronic and acute alcohol administration during postnatal development caused widespread brain damage resulting in behavioral disturbances and learning disabilities.

  2. Effects of acute caffeine administration on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jennifer L; Dewey, Amber M; Briatico, Laura N

    2010-12-01

    Acute caffeine administration has physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects. Despite its widespread use, few studies have described the impact of caffeine consumption in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute caffeine administration in adolescents. We measured cardiovascular responses and snack food intake after acute administration of 0 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of caffeine. We also compared usual food intake and subjective effects of caffeine between high- and low-caffeine consumers. Finally, we conducted a detailed analysis of caffeine sources and consumption levels. We found main effects of caffeine dose on heart rate (HR) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), with HR decreasing and DBP increasing with increasing caffeine dose. There were significant interactions among gender, caffeine use, and time on DBP. High caffeine consumers (>50 mg/day) reported using caffeine to stay awake and drinking coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks more than low consumers (<50 mg/day). Boys were more likely than girls to report using getting a rush, more energy, or improved athletic performance from caffeine. Finally, when we examined energy and macronutrient intake, we found that caffeine consumption was positively associated with laboratory energy intake, specifically from high-sugar, low-fat foods and also positively associated with protein and fat consumption outside of the laboratory. When taken together, these data suggest that acute caffeine administration has a broad range of effects in adolescents and that the magnitude of these effects is moderated by gender and chronic caffeine consumption.

  3. [Experimental rationale for the use of enterosorbents in acute ethanol intoxication].

    PubMed

    Orbidans, A G; Terekhin, G A; Vladimirskiĭ, E V; Terekhina, N A

    2009-01-01

    The experiment on 83 rats has provided a rationale for the use of enterosorbents in acute ethanol intoxication. Polysorb reduces the halflife of ethanol, recovers physical fitness in the animals with acute poisoning. The enterosorbents polysorb, litovit, and sapropel have been found to have a corrective effect on the level of the major plasma antioxidant ceruloplasmin in acute ethanol intoxication. Enterosorbents are an effective detoxifying agent in this condition. Examining the mechanisms of toxic action of ethanol allows the most expedient treatment policy to be substantiated in acute poisonings.

  4. Acute and chronic tianeptine treatments attenuate ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kayir, Hakan; Celik, Turgay; Yüksel, Nevzat

    2006-05-01

    Effects of acute and chronic tianeptine treatments on ethanol withdrawal syndrome were investigated in rats. Ethanol (7.2% v/v) was given to adult male Wistar rats by a liquid diet for 30 days. Acute or chronic (twice daily) tianeptine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and saline were administered to rats intraperitoneally. Acute and last chronic tianeptine injections and saline were done 30 min before ethanol withdrawal testing. After 2nd, 4th and 6th hours of ethanol withdrawal, rats were observed for 5 min, and withdrawal signs which included locomotor hyperactivity, agitation, tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behavior and audiogenic seizures were recorded or rated. Locomotor activity in naive (no ethanol-dependent rats) was also tested after acute tianeptine treatments. Acute but not chronic tianeptine treatment attenuated locomotor hyperactivity and agitation in ethanol-dependent rats. Both acute and chronic tianeptine treatment produced some significant inhibitory effects on tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behaviors and audiogenic seizures during the ethanol withdrawal. Our results suggest that acute or chronic tianeptine treatment attenuates ethanol withdrawal syndrome in ethanol-dependent rats and this drug may be useful for treatment of ethanol-type dependence.

  5. Hepatoprotective Evaluation of Ganoderma lucidum Pharmacopuncture: In vivo Studies of Ethanol-induced Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sun-Hee; Cho, Sung-woo; Yoon, Hyun-Min; Jang, Kyung-Jeon; Song, Chun-Ho; Kim, Cheol-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Alcohol abuse is a public issue and one of the major causes of liver disease worldwide. This study was aimed at investigating the protective effect of Ganoderma lucidum pharmacopuncture (GLP) against hepatotoxicity induced by acute ethanol (EtOH) intoxication in rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 4 groups of 8 animals each: normal, control, normal saline pharmacopuncture (NP) and GLP groups. The control, NP and GLP groups received ethanol orally. The NP and the GLP groups were treated daily with injections of normal saline and Ganoderma lucidum extract, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The rats in all groups, except the normal group, were intoxicated for 6 hours by oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg BW). The same volume of distilled water was administered to the rats in the normal group. Two local acupoints were used: Qimen (LR14) and Taechung (LR3). A histopathological analysis was performed, and the liver function and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were assessed. Results: GLP treatment reduced the histological changes due to acute liver injury induced by EtOH and significantly reduced the increase in the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzyme; however, it had an insignificant effect in reducing the increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzyme. It also significantly ameliorated the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the catalase (CAT) activities. Conclusion: The present study suggests that GLP treatment is effective in protecting against ethanol-induced acute hepatic injury in SD rats by modulating the activities of ethanol-metabolizing enzymes and by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:25780705

  6. Protective effect of Allium neapolitanum Cyr. versus Allium sativum L. on acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Nencini, Cristina; Franchi, Gian Gabriele; Cavallo, Federica; Micheli, Lucia

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of Allium neapolitanum Cyr., a spontaneous species of the Italian flora, compared with garlic (Allium sativum L.) on liver injury induced by ethanol in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were orally treated with fresh Allium homogenates (leaves or bulbs, 250 mg/kg) daily for 5 days, whereas controls received vehicle only. At the end of the experimental 5-day period, the animals received an acute ethanol dose (6 mL/kg, i.p.) 2 hours before the last Allium administration and were sacrificed 6 hours after ethanol administration. The activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione reductase (GR) and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AA), and reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione in liver tissue were determined. Administration of both Allium species for 5 days (leaves or bulbs) led to no statistical variation of nonenzymatic parameters versus the control group; otherwise Allium treatment caused an increase of GSH and AA levels compared with the ethanol group and a diminution of MDA levels, showing in addition that A. neapolitanum bulb had the best protective effect. Regarding to enzymatic parameters, GR and CAT activities were enhanced significantly compared with the ethanol group, whereas SOD activity showed a trend different from other parameters estimated. However, the treatment with both Allium species followed by acute ethanol administration reestablished the nonenzymatic parameters similar to control values and enhanced the activities of the enzymes measured. These results suggest that fresh Allium homogenates (leaves or bulbs) possess antioxidant properties and provide protection against ethanol-induced liver injury.

  7. REPLACEMENT WITH GABAERGIC STEROID PRECURSORS RESTORES THE ACUTE ETHANOL WITHDRAWAL PROFILE IN ADX/GDX MICE

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, KR; Tanchuck, MA; Strong, MN; Finn, DA

    2010-01-01

    The neurosteroid allopregnanolone (ALLO) is a progesterone metabolite that is one of a family of neuroactive steroids (NAS) that are potent positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors. These GABAergic NAS are produced peripherally (in the adrenals and gonads) and centrally in the brain. Peripherally produced NAS modulate some effects of ethanol intoxication (e.g., anxiolytic, antidepressant, and anticonvulsant effects) in rodents. We have found that NAS also may be involved in the rebound neural hyperexcitability following a high ethanol dose. Removal of the adrenals and gonads (ADX/GDX) increased withdrawal severity following 4 g/kg ethanol, as measured by handling-induced convulsions (HICs) in male and female DBA/2J mice. NAS are produced through the metabolism of progesterone (PROG), deoxycorticosterone (DOC), or testosterone, which can be blocked with the administration of finasteride (FIN), a 5α-reductase enzyme inhibitor. The current investigation was undertaken to clarify the step(s) in the biosynthetic NAS pathway that were sufficient to restore the acute ethanol withdrawal profile in ADX/GDX mice to that seen in intact animals. Male and female DBA/2J mice underwent ADX/GDX or SHAM surgery. After recovery, separate groups of animals were administered PROG, DOC, PROG+FIN, DOC+FIN, FIN, ALLO, ganaxalone (a synthetic ALLO derivative), corticosterone, or vehicle. Animals were then administered a 4 g/kg ethanol dose and allowed to undergo withdrawal. HICs were measured for 12 hours and again at 24 hours. The results indicate that replacement with PROG and DOC restored the withdrawal profile in ADX/GDX animals to SHAM levels, and that this effect was blocked with co-administration of FIN. Administration of FIN alone increased the withdrawal profile in both SHAM and ADX/GDX males. These findings indicate that the increase in acute withdrawal severity after ADX/GDX may be due to the loss of GABAergic NAS, providing insight into the

  8. Neurobehavioral and neurochemical effects of prenatal ethanol administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S.; Briggs, F. )

    1992-01-01

    Effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in rats on the behavior and on the levels of multiple neurotransmitters in the brain have been investigated. Timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: ethanol-exposed, pair-fed control and nutritional control. Ethanol was administered through Leiber-DeCarli liquid diet containing 6% ethanol (v/v) throughout the gestation period in ethanol-exposed rats. Male offspring were tested for alternations in neurobehavioral and neurochemical parameters. Animals exposed to ethanol in utero exhibited lower birth weights, delayed motor development, delayed learning and no catch-up growth, as well as significant alterations in levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin and GABA in discrete brain areas.

  9. Electrolyzed-reduced water inhibits acute ethanol-induced hangovers in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Qi, Xu-Feng; Song, Soon-Bong; Kim, Dong-Heui; Teng, Yung-Chien; Yoon, Yang-Suk; Kim, Kwang-Yong; Li, Jian-Hong; Jin, Dan; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2009-10-01

    Ethanol consumption disturbs the balance between the pro- and anti-oxidant systems of the organism, leading to oxidative stress. Electrolyzed-reduced water (ERW) is widely used by people in East Asia for drinking purposes because of its therapeutic properties including scavenging effect of reactive oxygen species. This study was performed to investigate the effect of ERW on acute ethanol-induced hangovers in Sprague-Dawley rats. Alcohol concentration in serum of ERW-treated rats showed significant difference at 1 h, 3 h and 5 h respectively as compared with the rats treated with distilled water. Both alcohol dehydrogenase type 1 and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase related with oxidation of alcohol were significantly increased in liver tissue while the level of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in serum was markedly decreased 24 h after pre-oral administration of ERW. Moreover, oral administration of ERW significantly activated non-ezymatic (glutathione) and enzymatic (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and catalase) antioxidants in liver tissues compared with the control group. These results suggest that drinking ERW has an effect of alcohol detoxification by antioxidant mechanism and has potentiality for relief of ethanol-induced hangover symptoms.

  10. Repeated Binge Ethanol Administration During Adolescence Enhances Voluntary Sweetened Ethanol Intake in Young Adulthood in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M.; Alipour, Kent K.; Michael, Laura A.; Kirstein, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Binge alcohol consumption is a rising concern in the United States, especially among adolescents. During this developmental period alcohol use is usually initiated and has been shown to cause detrimental effects on brain structure and function as well as cognitive/behavioral impairments in rats. Binge models, where animals are repeatedly administered high doses of ethanol typically over a period of three or four days cause these effects. There has been little work conducted aimed at investigating the long-term behavioral consequences of repeated binge administration during adolescence on later ethanol-induced behavior in young adulthood and adulthood. The repeated four-day binge model may serve as a good approximate for patterns of human adolescent alcohol consumption as this is similar to a “bender” in human alcoholics. The present set of experiments examined the dose-response and sex-related differences induced by repeated binge ethanol administration during adolescence on sweetened ethanol (Experiment 1) or saccharin (Experiment 2) intake in young adulthood. In both experiments, on postnatal days (PND) 28–31, PND 35–38 and PND 42–45, ethanol (1.5, 3.0 or 5.0 g/kg) or water was administered intragastrically to adolescent rats. Rats underwent abstinence from PND 46–59. Subsequently, in young adulthood, ethanol and saccharin intake were assessed. Exposure to any dose of ethanol during adolescence significantly enhanced ethanol intake in adulthood. However, while female rats had higher overall g/kg intake, males appear to be more vulnerable to the impact of adolescent ethanol exposure on subsequently increased ethanol intake in young adulthood. Exposure to ethanol during adolescence did not alter saccharin consumption in young adulthood in male or female rats. Considering that adolescence is the developmental period in which ethanol experimentation and consumption is usually initiated, the present set of experiments demonstrate the importance of

  11. Gastroprotective Effects of PMK-S005 against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seo, Ji Hyung; Lee, Seonmin; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to examine the gastroprotective effects of PMK-S005, which is a synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC; a sulfur-containing amino acid), against acute ethanol-induced gastric damage in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups, including a nonethanol group, groups treated with absolute ethanol 1 hour after pretreatment with various doses of PMK-S005 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) or rebamipide (50 mg/kg), and an absolute ethanol-only group. Ethanol-induced gross ulcer and mucus levels were measured. Myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, PGE2, LTB4, cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), GCLC, and GCLM, were assessed. Results PMK-S005 significantly attenuated the ethanol-induced gastric damage; it reduced mucosal inflammatory cytokine production and increased mucus levels. The expression levels of cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 were decreased by PMK-S005. PMK-S005 did not affect PGE2 synthesis, but LTB4 production was significantly suppressed. In addition, long-term administration of PMK-S005 significantly increased the expression of HO-1, NQO-1, GCLC, and GCLM. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that PMK-S005 prevents gastric mucosal damage and that these gastroprotective activities are due to anti-inflammatory effects and enhancement of the gastric defense system, including antioxidant enzymes. PMID:26347516

  12. Neurochemical effects of prenatal ethanol administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, F.; Headings, V.; Pradhan, S. )

    1991-03-11

    Effect of prenatal ethanol exposure in rats on the regulation brain serotonin (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been investigated. Ethanol was administered in Sprague-Dawley rats through Lieber-DeCarli Liquid diet containing 6% ethanol (v/v) throughout the gestation period. The offspring of each group were sacrificed at four, seven and nine weeks of life by microwave radiation directed at the skull for one second. Each animal was decapitated and discrete areas of the brain were dissected out and analyzed for the neurotransmitter levels by HPLC technique. It was observed that the prenatal ethanol exposure significantly increased 5-HT level in pons medulla and GABA level in midbrain regions. No significant change was observed in those neurotransmitter levels between nutritional control and pair-fed control groups. These neurochemical changes were correlated with learning and behavior alterations in the same animal model.

  13. The potency of fluvoxamine to reduce ethanol self-administration decreases with concurrent availability of food.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Lamb, Richard J

    2012-04-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine reduces responding for ethanol at lower doses than responding for food when each is available in separate components or separate groups of rats. However, when both are available concurrently and deliveries earned per session are equal, this apparent selectivity inverts and food-maintained behavior is more sensitive than ethanol-maintained behavior to rate-decreasing effects of fluvoxamine. Here, we investigated further the impact that concurrent access to both food and ethanol has on the potency of fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine (5.6-17.8 mg/kg) potency was assessed under conditions in which food and ethanol were available concurrently and response rates were equal [average variable intervals (VIs) 405 and 14 s for food and ethanol, respectively], as well as when density of food delivery was increased (average VI 60 s for food and VI 14 s for ethanol). The potency of fluvoxamine was also determined when only ethanol was available (food extinction and average VI 14 s for ethanol) and under multiple VIs (VI 30 s for food and ethanol) wherein either food or ethanol was the only programmed reinforcement available during each component. Fluvoxamine was less potent at decreasing ethanol self-administration when food was available concurrently {ED50 [95% confidence limit (CL): 8.2 (6.5-10.3) and 10.7 (7.9-14.4)]} versus when ethanol was available in isolation [ED50: 4.0 (2.7-5.9) and 5.1 (4.3-6.0)]. Effects on food were similar under each condition in which food was available. The results demonstrate that the potency of fluvoxamine in reducing ethanol-maintained behavior depends on whether ethanol is available in isolation or in the context of concurrently scheduled food reinforcement.

  14. Acute ethanol-induced changes in edema and metabolite concentrations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Zheng, Wenbin; Yan, Gen; Liu, Baoguo; Kong, Lingmei; Ding, Yan; Shen, Zhiwei; Tan, Hui; Zhang, Guishan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the acute effects of EtOH on brain edema and cerebral metabolites, using diffusion weight imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at a 7.0T MR and to define changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain after acute EtOH intoxication. ADC values in each ROI decreased significantly at 1 h and 3 h after ethanol administration. ADC values in frontal lobe were decreased significantly compared with other regions at 3 h. For EtOH/Cr+PCr and cerebral metabolites (Cho, Tau, and Glu) differing over time, no significant differences for Ins, NAA, and Cr were observed in frontal lobes. Regression analysis revealed a significant association between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, TSGlu, and TSADC. The changes of ADC values in different brain regions reflect the process of the cytotoxic edema in vivo. The characterization of frontal lobes metabolites changes and the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, and TSGlu provide a better understanding for the biological mechanisms in neurotoxic effects of EtOH on the brain. In addition, the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSADC will help us to understand development of the ethanol-induced brain cytotoxic edema.

  15. Acute ethanol ingestion impairs appetitive olfactory learning and odor discrimination in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, Julie A; Wright, Geraldine A; Edgar, Elaina A; Mazade, Reece E.; Wu, Chen; Lillvis, Joshua L

    2008-01-01

    Invertebrates are valuable models for increasing our understanding of the effects of ethanol on the nervous system, but most studies on invertebrates and ethanol have focused on the effects of ethanol on locomotor behavior. In this work we investigate the influence of an acute dose of ethanol on appetitive olfactory learning in the honey bee (Apis mellifera), a model system for learning and memory. Adult worker honey bees were fed a range of doses (2.5, 5, 10 or 25%) of ethanol and then conditioned to associate an odor with a sucrose reward using either a simple or differential conditioning paradigm. Consumption of ethanol before conditioning significantly reduced both the rate of acquisition and the asymptotic strength of the association. Honey bees also exhibited a dose dependent reduction in arousal/attention during conditioning. Consumption of ethanol after conditioning did not affect recall 24 h later. The observed deficits in acquisition were not due to the affect of ethanol on gustatory sensitivity or motor function. However, honey bees given higher doses of ethanol had difficulty discriminating amongst different odors suggesting that ethanol consumption influences olfactory processing. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an acute dose of ethanol affects appetitive learning and olfactory perception in the honey bee. PMID:18723103

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of carob against acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Chehimi, Latifa; Rtibi, Kaïs; Tounsi, Haifa; Boubaker, Samir; Sakly, Mohsen; El-Benna, Jamel; Amri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether subacute treatment with aqueous extract of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pods (AECPs) protects against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Animals were divided into four groups: control, carob, EtOH and EtOH + carob. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with AECP (600 mg/kg body weight (bw)) during 7 days and intoxicated for 6 h by acute oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg bw) 24 h after the last injection. We found that acute administration of EtOH leads to hepatotoxicity as monitored by the increase in the levels of hepatic marker aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase as well as hepatic tissue injury. EtOH also increased the formation of malondialdehyde in the liver, indicating an increase in lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Subacute carob pretreatment prevented all the alterations induced by EtOH and returned their levels to near normal. Importantly, we showed that acute alcohol increased hepatic and plasmatic hydrogen peroxide and free iron levels. The carob pretreatment reversed EtOH effects to near control levels. These data suggest that carob could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting the oxidative damage induced by acute EtOH administration and that its mode of action may involve an opposite effect on plasma and tissue-free iron accumulation. Indeed, carob can be offered as a food additive to protect against EtOH-induced oxidative damage.

  17. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  18. Acute ethanol exposure affects spermatogonial stem cell homeostasis in pre-pubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Caires, Kyle C; Shima, Christina M; de Avila, Jeanene; McLean, Derek J

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is a known modulator of neural stem cell development, but the consequences of ethanol toxicity on the cell fate decisions of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is poorly understood. Using an in vivo treatment and stem cell transplantation approach, we investigated the effects of acute ethanol exposure on formation of the growing adult SSC population in neonatal and pre-pubertal mice. Treatment with a single dose of ethanol disrupted SSC homeostasis in vivo evidenced by a significant reduction (7-fold) of stem cell colonization efficiency in the testes of recipient mice following transplantation. Ethanol treatment also increased the rate of apoptosis in adult differentiating germ cells in situ. Gene expression analysis indicates that ethanol exposure has transient and long-term effects on the expression of GDNF and VEGF family molecules and supports the hypothesis that the niche microenvironment for SSCs is sensitive to ethanol toxicity during pre-pubertaland adult life.

  19. Operant self-administration models for testing the neuropharmacological basis of ethanol consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    June, Harry L; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2010-04-01

    Operant self-administration procedures are used to assess the neural basis of ethanol-seeking behavior under a wide range of experimental conditions. In general, rats do not spontaneously self-administer ethanol in pharmacologically meaningful amounts. This unit provides a step-by-step guide for training rats to self-administer quantities of ethanol that produce moderate to high blood-alcohol content. Different protocols are used for rats that are genetically heterogeneous versus rats that are selectively bred for high alcohol preference. Also, these protocols have different sets of advantages and disadvantages in terms of the ability to control for caloric intake and taste of solutions in operant testing. Basic self-administration protocols can also be altered to focus on different aspects of the motivational properties of ethanol (for example, those related to dependence). This unit provides multiple protocols that lead to alcohol intake in rats, which can be pharmacologically probed relative to a variety of control conditions.

  20. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. All rats in group 3 developed acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate.

  1. Conditioned place aversion induced by intragastric administration of ethanol in rats.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Tara L; Bakner, Lee; Cunningham, Christopher L

    2004-04-01

    Most experiments investigating ethanol-induced place conditioning in rats have produced conditioned place aversion (CPA). In one of the few reports of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats, selectively bred alcohol-preferring (msP) rats showed CPP in a biased procedure when ethanol was administered via intragastric (IG) catheter but not when ethanol was administered via intraperitoneal injection or by gavage. This finding suggests the importance of both route of administration and genetic variables to the outcome of place conditioning studies. We conducted three experiments examining place conditioning induced by IG ethanol in genetically heterogeneous rats to test the generality of the earlier finding. We employed an unbiased procedure that is more sensitive to detecting preference changes in either direction (preference or aversion). Ethanol-naive (Experiment 1) and ethanol-experienced Sprague-Dawley rats (Experiment 2) showed robust CPA. In Experiment 3, infusion rate was varied to see if the CPA observed in Experiments 1 and 2 was a result of the rapidity of the transition from the sober to the intoxicated states. Both groups showed strong CPA. Overall, the present findings are consistent with previous findings of CPA in heterogeneous rats, suggesting that the aversive postabsorptive effects of ethanol produce CPA.

  2. The effect of combined administration of ethanol and sertraline, fluoxetine and citalopram on rabbit EEG.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Bogusława; Czarnecka, Elzbieta

    2003-06-01

    In this study we have decided to examine acute interaction of ethanol with some drugs that belong to selective serotonin inhibitor (SSRI) group. Therefore, the influence of sertraline, fluoxetine and citalopram on the effect of ethanol on EEG of rabbits (frontal cortex, hippocampus, MRF) was tested. Sertraline (10mg/kg i.p.), fluoxetine (10mg/kg i.p.) and citalopram (5mg/kg i.p.) were given 30min before ethanol injection in a dose 0.8g/kg i.v. Ethanol caused the increase of the slow frequencies (0.5-4cps) in the recording, as well as a marked decrease of the fastest frequencies (13-30 and 30-45cps). Sertraline, fluoxetine and citalopram (given before ethanol) prevented the increase in the slow frequencies (0.5-4cps) in the recordings from the frontal cortex and hippocampus, which indicates on antagonism inhibitory action of ethanol. These drugs administered together with ethanol may increase its influence on fast frequencies. This effect depends on brain structure and drug.

  3. Seven-day ethanol administration influence on the rat brain histaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, Sergey M; Phedina, Ekaterina M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to clarify the effect of 7 days of ethanol administration upon brain histaminergic neurons in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 20% ethanol/saline (0.85% NaCl) daily, over 7 days, whereas control rats were given saline. The animals were decapitated 24 h after the 7th injection and samples of hypothalamus were prepared for light and electron microscopy, accompanied by morphometry to examine the histaminergic neurons. It was found that ethanol administration gradually decreased the duration of alcohol-induced sleep and decreased the total amount of histaminergic neurons and the amount of histologically normal neurons, but increased the amount of hypochromic neurons and shadow cells. The histaminergic neuron bodies and nuclei decreased in size. The ultrastructural changes in histaminergic neurons demonstrated activation of their nuclear apparatus, both destruction or hypertrophy and hyperplasia of organelles, especially lysosomes. The histochemical examination revealed the activation of lactate dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase, and inhibition of NADH-, NADPhH, and succinate dehydrogenases. Following 7 days of ethanol administration, histaminergic neurons exhibit the structural signs of hyperactivity, which can be related to neuronal adaptation to the actions of ethanol, and increased behavioral tolerance to ethanol.

  4. Betulinic acid and betulin ameliorate acute ethanol-induced fatty liver via TLR4 and STAT3 in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ying; Jiang, Shuang; Lian, Li-Hua; Bai, Ting; Cui, Peng-He; Sun, Xiao-Ting; Jin, Xue-Jun; Wu, Yan-Ling; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2013-10-01

    Ethanol consumption leads to many kinds of liver injury and suppresses innate immunity, but the molecular mechanisms have not been fully delineated. The present study was conducted to determine whether betulinic acid (BA) or betulin (BT) would ameliorate acute ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice, and to characterize whether Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were involved in ethanol-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). EtOH (5mg/kg) and BA or BT (20 or 50mg/kg) were applied in vivo, while EtOH (50mM) and BA or BT (12.5 or 25μM) were applied in vitro. Administration of BA or BT significantly prevented the increases of serum ALT and AST caused by ethanol, as well as serum TG. Supplement of BA or BT prevented ethanol-induced acidophilic necrosis, increased hepatocyte nuclei and stromal inflammation infiltration as indicated by liver histopathological studies. Administration of BA or BT significantly decreased CYP2E1 activities and expression of SREBP-1caused by ethanol, however, lower dosage of BA or BT showed slight effects on CYP2E1 activity or expression of SREBP-1c. BA or BT administration significantly decreased the expression of TLR4, and increased the phosphorylation of STAT3. In vitro, BA or BT treatment reduced the expressions of α-SMA and collagen-I in ethanol-stimulated HSCs via regulation of TLR4 and STAT3, coincided with in vivo. All of these findings demonstrated that BA or BT might ameliorate acute ethanol-induced fatty liver via TLR4 and STAT3 in vivo and in vitro, promising agents for ethanol-induced fatty liver therapies.

  5. Effects of naltrexone plus topiramate on ethanol self-administration and tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression changes.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Francisco; Rubio, Gabriel; Manzanares, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of naltrexone (0.7 mg/kg) and/or topiramate (25 mg/kg) on ethanol consumption and the motivation to drink in an oral-operant conditioning paradigm in C57BL/6 mice. Subsequent real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments were performed to analyze gene expression changes in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The administration of naltrexone significantly reduced ethanol consumption and the motivation to drink during the different stages of the experiment, whereas the treatment with topiramate resulted in a much lower effect. Interestingly, the administration of naltrexone plus topiramate reduced ethanol consumption markedly compared with single-drug treatment. The water self-administration paradigm was also performed using the same drugs and no differences were found between treatment groups. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that naltrexone significantly normalized the increase of TH gene expression in the VTA induced by ethanol, whereas the administration of topiramate did not produce any significant effect. In the ethanol self-administration procedure, the combination of both drugs further reduced TH gene expression, reaching statistical significance compared with the vehicle, naltrexone or topiramate groups. Taken together, these findings indicate that the administration of naltrexone plus topiramate further reduced ethanol consumption and the motivation to drink in comparison with single-drug treatment. This action may be due, at least in part, to a greater decrease in TH gene expression in the VTA. These results suggest that the combination of both drugs deserves further exploration for the treatment of problems related to alcohol consumption.

  6. Developmental changes in the acute ethanol sensitivity of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in the BNST.

    PubMed

    Wills, T A; Kash, T L; Winder, D G

    2013-11-01

    Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission undergo significant changes during adolescence. Receptors for both of these transmitters (NMDAR, and GABAA) are known to be key targets for the acute effects of ethanol in adults. The current study set out to investigate the acute effects of ethanol on both NMDAR-mediated excitatory transmission and GABAergic inhibitory transmission within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) across age. The BNST is an area of the brain implicated in the negative reinforcing properties associated with alcohol dependence, and the BNST plays a critical role in stress-induced relapse. Therefore, assessing the developmental regulation of ethanol sensitivity in this key brain region is important to understanding the progression of ethanol dependence. To do this, whole-cell recordings of isolated NMDAR-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) or evoked GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) were performed on BNST neurons in slices from 4- or 8-week-old male C57BL/6J mice. Ethanol (50 mm) produced greater inhibition of NMDAR-eEPSCs in adolescent mice than in adult mice. This enhanced sensitivity in adolescence was not a result of shifts in function of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDAR, measured by Ro25-6981 inhibition and decay kinetics measured across age. Adolescent mice also exhibited greater ethanol sensitivity of GABAergic transmission, as ethanol (50 mm) enhanced eIPSCs in the BNST of adolescent but not adult mice. Collectively, this work illustrates that a moderate dose of ethanol produces greater inhibition of transmission in the BNST (through greater excitatory inhibition and enhancement of inhibitory transmission) in adolescents compared to adults. Given the role of the BNST in alcohol dependence, these developmental changes in acute ethanol sensitivity could accelerate neuroadaptations that result from chronic ethanol use during the critical period of adolescence.

  7. Metabolic and structural consequences of ethanol and chloroquin administration during gestation on the developing fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.; Rawat, A.K.

    1987-05-01

    In the present study the effects of ethanol and chloroquin administration during gestation have been investigated on the developing rat fetus. Ethanol was given in liquid Sustacal diet as 30% of calories and controls were fed isocaloric sucrose-diet. Chloroquin was given intragastrically corresponding controls received saline. Chloroquin resulted in prenatal growth retardation leading to maximum decrease of 46% in body weight of the fetus. It also resulted in 30% higher incidence of hepatomegaly; 15% higher incidence of liquification of visceral organs; 34% decrease in the ossification of sternum; 9% higher defects of cleft palate, wrist drop, clubbed foot and brain liquification compared to the corresponding controls. Ethanol resulted in pre and post-natal growth retardation, cleft palate, still births and lowered brain weights. Fetuses from the ethanol-fed group also showed inhibited protein synthesis, RNA and DNA synthesis in the brain compared to the controls.

  8. Low and moderate doses of acute ethanol do not impair spatial cognition but facilitate accelerating rotarod performance in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Novier, Adelle; Van Skike, Candice E; Chin, Vivien S; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L; Matthews, Douglas B

    2012-03-14

    Adolescents and adult rodents have differing sensitivities to the acute effects of ethanol on a variety of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Often, these differences are revealed using high ethanol doses and consequently little is known about these age-related effects using lower ethanol doses. We sought to determine if low-dose ethanol produces differential effects on cognition and motor behavior in adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent (postnatal day PD 30-32) and adult (PD 70-72) male Sprague Dawley rats were trained on the standard version of the Morris Water Maze (MWM) for 5 days or received 5 training trials on an accelerating rotarod (ARR). Adolescents learned the location of the submerged platform in the MWM significantly slower than adults during training and, acute ethanol administration (0.5 g/kg, 0.75 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg) 30 min before testing did not impair spatial memory in either age group. On the ARR test, adolescent rats spent significantly more time on the rotarod compared to adults and, alcohol exposure (1.0 g/kg) significantly increased ARR performance 30 min following administration. Our findings address the utility of investigating low and moderate doses of ethanol during different developmental stages in rats.

  9. Further studies on the hepatoprotective effect of Antrodia camphorata in submerged culture on ethanol-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen-Ming; Tao, Wen-Yi; Xu, Hong-Yu; Ao, Zong-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2011-04-01

    To further understand the hepatoprotective activity of Antrodia camphorata in living systems and the possible mechanisms of this protection, the effects of fractions from A. camphorata in submerged culture on the liver and its antioxidative system in acute ethanol intoxicated rats were investigated. The results showed that the ethanolic extract (Fr-I) of A. camphorata was the most effective in the prevention of ethanol-induced acute liver injury and free radical generation in rats. The ethanolic extract administrated prior to ethanol significantly prevented the increase in serum levels of hepatic enzyme markers such as aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. It also normalised the increase of hepatic malondialdehyde concentration and the decrease of glutathione levels in the liver. Moreover, Fr-I improved the ethanol-induced decrease of hepatic glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities. On the basis of these results, the ethanolic extract of A. camphorata may exert its hepatoprotective activity by up-regulating GSH-dependent enzymes and inhibiting free radical formation in the liver.

  10. Systemic administration of D-penicillamine prevents the locomotor activation after intra-VTA ethanol administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Martí-Prats, Lucía; Sánchez-Catalán, María José; Hipólito, Lucía; Orrico, Alejandro; Zornoza, Teodoro; Polache, Ana; Granero, Luis

    2010-10-11

    Although recently published studies seem to confirm the important role displayed by acetaldehyde (ACH), the main metabolite of ethanol, in the behavioral effects of ethanol, the origin of ACH is still a matter of debate. While some authors confer more importance to the central (brain metabolism) origin of ACH, others indicate that the hepatic origin could be more relevant. In this study we have addressed this topic using an experimental approach that combines local microinjections of ethanol into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) (which guarantees the brain origin of the ACH) to induce motor activation in rats together with systemic administration (i.p.) of several doses (0, 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) of D-penicillamine (DP), a sequestering agent of ACH with contrasted efficiency to abolish the behavioral effects of the drug. Our results clearly show that DP prevented in a dose-dependent manner the motor activation induced by intra-VTA ethanol, being the 50 mg/kg dose the most efficient. DP per se did not affect the basal activity of the rats. In order to determine the specificity of the DP action, we also studied the effects of DP 50 mg/kg on the DAMGO-induced motor activation after the intra-VTA administration of this mu-opioid receptors agonist. DP did not significantly modify the motor activation induced by DAMGO thus confirming the specificity of the DP effects. Our results clearly suggest that the brain-derived ACH is necessary to manifest the activating effects resulting from ethanol administration.

  11. Acute Oral Ethanol Exposure Triggers Asthma In Cockroach Allergen–Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Jiyoun; Beal, Dominic R.; Vaickus, Louis J.; Craciun, Florin L.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma may be triggered by multiple mediators, including allergen-IgE cross-linking and non-IgE mechanisms. Several clinical studies have shown acute ethanol consumption exacerbates asthma, yet no animal model exists to study this process. We developed a model of ethanol-triggered asthma in allergen-sensitized mice to evaluate the mechanisms of ethanol inducing asthma-like responses. Outbred mice were exposed to cockroach allergens on Days 0 and 14; and on Day 21, mice received ethanol by oral gavage. Tracer studies confirmed alcohol aspiration did not occur. Within 30 minutes, alcohol induced degranulation of over 74% of mast cells, and multiple parameters of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation were triggered. Ethanol-gavaged mice had a fivefold increased production of eotaxin-2 (534 pg/mL) and a sevenfold increase in bronchoalveolar eosinophils (70,080 cells). Ethanol induced a 10-fold increase in IL-13, from 84 pg/mL in sensitized mice to 845 pg/mL in ethanol-gavaged sensitized mice. In cockroach allergen–sensitized mice, ethanol triggered asthma-like changes in respiratory physiology and a significant fivefold increase in airway mucin production. Importantly, none of these asthmatic exacerbations were observed in normal mice gavaged with ethanol. Cromolyn sodium effectively stabilized mast cells, yet increased mucin production and bronchoalveolar eosinophil recruitment. Together, these data show a single oral alcohol exposure will trigger asthma-like pulmonary inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice, providing a novel asthma model. PMID:22796441

  12. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission.

  13. Involvement of AMPK in Alcohol Dehydrogenase Accentuated Myocardial Dysfunction Following Acute Ethanol Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Scott, Glenda I.; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Binge alcohol drinking often triggers myocardial contractile dysfunction although the underlying mechanism is not fully clear. This study was designed to examine the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) on ethanol-induced change in cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, insulin and AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) signaling. Methods ADH transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3 days. Oral glucose tolerance test, cardiac AMP/ATP levels, cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ handling and AMPK signaling (including ACC and LKB1) were examined. Results Ethanol exposure led to glucose intolerance, elevated plasma insulin, compromised cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties, downregulated protein phosphatase PP2A subunit and PPAR-γ, as well as phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and LKB1, all of which except plasma insulin were overtly accentuated by ADH transgene. Interestingly, myocardium from ethanol-treated FVB mice displayed enhanced expression of PP2Cα and PGC-1α, decreased insulin receptor expression as well as unchanged expression of Glut4, the response of which was unaffected by ADH. Cardiac AMP-to-ATP ratio was significantly enhanced by ethanol exposure with a more pronounced increase in ADH mice. In addition, the AMPK inhibitor compound C (10 µM) abrogated acute ethanol exposure-elicited cardiomyocyte mechanical dysfunction. Conclusions In summary, these data suggest that the ADH transgene exacerbated acute ethanol toxicity-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, intracellular Ca2+ mishandling and glucose intolerance, indicating a role of ADH in acute ethanol toxicity-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly related to altered cellular fuel AMPK signaling cascade. PMID:20585647

  14. The relation of age to the acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition.

    PubMed

    Wynne, H A; Mutch, E; Williams, F M; James, O F; Rawlins, M D; Woodhouse, K W

    1989-03-01

    The activity of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes, the mono-oxygenases, can be inhibited by an acute dose of ethanol. We set out to determine whether age has any relation to the degree of inhibition produced by ethanol, using acetanilide as a model substrate. Eight healthy young subjects (mean age 26 years) and eight healthy elderly subjects (mean age 72 years) were studied on two occasions, once receiving acetanilide alone and once acetanilide with 75 ml vodka (30 g ethanol). The clearance of acetanilide was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in the elderly subjects at 27 +/- 3 l/h compared to 38 +/- 2 l/h in young subjects. No age-related differences in peak blood ethanol concentrations or ethanol elimination rates were noted. After ethanol, acetanilide clearance fell 18% to 31 +/- 3 l/h in young subjects (p = 0.05) and by 15% to 23 +/- 2 l/h in elderly subjects (p = 0.08). This suggests that the elderly do not suffer greater impairment of drug oxidation after acute ethanol ingestion than do the young.

  15. Oleoylethanolamide prevents neuroimmune HMGB1/TLR4/NF-kB danger signaling in rat frontal cortex and depressive-like behavior induced by ethanol binge administration.

    PubMed

    Antón, María; Alén, Francisco; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Leza, Juan Carlos; García-Bueno, Borja; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Orio, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Alcohol abuse is frequently characterized by a specific pattern of intake in binge drinking episodes, inducing neuroinflammation and brain damage. Here, we characterized the temporal profile of neuroinflammation in rats exposed to intragastric binge ethanol administrations (3 times/day × 4 days) and tested the anti-inflammatory/neuroprotective properties of the satiety factor oleoylethanolamide (OEA). Pre-treatment with OEA (5 mg/kg, i.p.) previous each alcohol gavage blocked the expression of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) danger signal and the innate immunity Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) in frontal cortex, and inhibited the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) proinflammatory cascade induced by alcohol binge administration. OEA reduced the levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and the enzymes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in ethanol binged animals. Elevations in plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β after ethanol were also inhibited by OEA. OEA also prevented ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation, caspase-8 and pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activation in frontal cortex. Additionally, OEA blocked the rise in blood corticosterone levels after ethanol with no alteration in blood ethanol levels and may affect ethanol-induced gut permeability for endotoxin. Finally, OEA, administered as a pre-treatment during the ethanol binge, exerted antidepressant-like effects during acute withdrawal. Altogether, results highlight a beneficial profile of OEA as a potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective and antidepressant-like compound to treat alcohol abuse.

  16. Acute Ethanol Inhibition of γ Oscillations Is Mediated by Akt and GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Wang, JianGang; Zhao, JingXi; Liu, ZhiHua; Guo, FangLi; Wang, Yali; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, RuiLing; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Chengbiao

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal network oscillations at gamma band frequency (γ, 30–80 Hz) are closely associated with higher brain functions such as learning and memory. Acute ethanol exposure at intoxicating concentrations (≥50 mM) impairs cognitive function. This study aimed to determine the effects and the mechanisms of acute ethanol exposure on γ oscillations in an in vitro model. Ethanol (25–100 mM) suppressed kainate-induced γ oscillations in CA3 area of the rat hippocampal slices, in a concentration-dependent, reversible manner. The ethanol-induced suppression was reduced by the D1R antagonist SCH23390 or the PKA inhibitor H89, was prevented by the Akt inhibitor triciribine or the GSk3β inhibitor SB415286, was enhanced by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5, but was not affected by the MAPK inhibitor U0126 or PI3K inhibitor wortmanin. Our results indicate that the intracellular kinases Akt and GSk3β play a critical role in the ethanol-induced suppression of γ oscillations and reveal new cellular pathways involved in the ethanol-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27582689

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Helicteres gardneriana Ethanol Extract on Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Juliana Oliveira; de Arruda, Laura Lícia Milani; Baroni, Silmara; Truiti, Maria da Conceição Torrado; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of an ethanol extract of Helicteres gardneriana (Nees) Castiglioni was assayed in experimental models of pleurisy and microcirculation in situ. Treatment of animals with 500 mg/kg body weight reduced the exudate volume (35% reduction) induced by intrapleural injection of carrageenan and the migration of polymorphonuclear cells into the inflamed pleural cavity of rats (40%). Additionally, rolling and adhesion of leukocytes and the number of leukocytes that migrated toward the perivascular space in response to the carrageenan injection were decreased by the extract (500 mg/kg). These data demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of the ethanol extract of Helicteres gardneriana and imply that inhibition of leukocyte-endothelial interactions is important in the extract's mechanism of action. PMID:22028731

  18. Serotonin-3 receptors in the posterior ventral tegmental area regulate ethanol self-administration of alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Zachary A; Bell, Richard L; Oster, Scott M; Toalston, Jamie E; Pommer, Tylene J; McBride, William J; Murphy, James M

    2010-05-01

    Several studies indicated the involvement of serotonin-3 ([5-hydroxy tryptamine] 5-HT(3)) receptors in regulating alcohol-drinking behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of 5-HT(3) receptors within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in regulating ethanol self-administration by alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Standard two-lever operant chambers (Coulbourn Instruments, Allentown, PA) were used to examine the effects of seven consecutive bilateral microinfusions of ICS 205-930 (ICS), a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, directly into the posterior VTA on the acquisition and maintenance of 15% (vol/vol) ethanol self-administration. P rats readily acquired ethanol self-administration by the fourth session. The three highest doses (0.125, 0.25, and 1.25 microg) of ICS prevented acquisition of ethanol self-administration. During the acquisition postinjection period, all rats treated with ICS demonstrated higher responding on the ethanol lever, with the highest dose producing the greatest effect. In contrast, during the maintenance phase, the three highest doses (0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 microg) of ICS significantly increased responding on the ethanol lever; after the 7-day dosing regimen, responding on the ethanol lever returned to control levels. Microinfusion of ICS into the posterior VTA did not alter the low responding on the water lever and did not alter saccharin (0.0125% wt/v) self-administration. Microinfusion of ICS into the anterior VTA did not alter ethanol self-administration. Overall, the results of this study suggest that 5-HT(3) receptors in the posterior VTA of the P rat may be involved in regulating ethanol self-administration. In addition, chronic operant ethanol self-administration and/or repeated treatments with a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist may alter neuronal circuitry within the posterior VTA.

  19. Altered prefrontal connectivity after acute heroin administration during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Borgwardt, Stefan; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Smieskova, Renata; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; Walter, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies have reported reduced activity in a broad network of brain regions during response inhibition in heroin-dependent patients. However, how heroin in an acute dose modulates the neural correlates of response inhibition and the underlying brain connectivity has not yet been investigated. In this double-blind placebo-controlled study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether acute heroin administration changed whole brain activity during response inhibition in 26 heroin-dependent patients. We then applied dynamic causal modelling to investigate the effect of an acute dose of heroin on the functional interactions between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFG). Heroin acutely reduced dACC activity, as well as the inhibition-induced modulation of connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG compared with placebo. Furthermore, dACC activity was positively related to false alarm rates after placebo but not heroin administration. These results suggest that acute heroin administration impairs cognitive control in dependent patients by reducing the activity in the dACC activity and the functional connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG.

  20. Assessment of Expression of Genes Coding GABAA Receptors during Chronic and Acute Intoxication of Laboratory Rats with Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Osechkina, N S; Ivanov, M B; Nazarov, G V; Batotsyrenova, E G; Lapina, N V; Babkin, A V; Berdinskikh, I S; Melekhova, A S; Voitsekhovich, K O; Lisitskii, D S; Kashina, T V

    2016-02-01

    Expression of genes encoding the individual subunits of ionotropic GABAA receptor was assessed after acute and chronic intoxication of rats with ethanol. The chronic 1-month-long exposure to ethanol signifi cantly decreased (by 38%) expression of Gabrb1 gene in the hippocampus. Acute exposure to ethanol elevated expression of genes Gabrb1 (by 1.7 times), Gabra1 (by 3.8 times), and Gabra4 (by 6.5 times), although it diminished expression of Gabra2 gene by 1.4 times. In preliminarily alcoholized rats, acute intoxication with ethanol enhanced expression of genes Gabrb1 and Gabra5 by 1.7 and 8.7 times, respectively. There was neither acute nor chronic effect of ethanol on expression of gene Gabra3.

  1. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A, a novel gastroprotective compound from Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, against ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Amir, Junaidah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hadi, A Hamid A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Teh, Xinsheng; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Rahmani, Mawardi; Mohan, Syam

    2013-07-15

    Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A (PA), a xanthone derived from the Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, belongs to the Moraceae family which is native to the tropical forest of Malaysia. In this study, the efficacy of PA as a gastroprotective compound was examined against ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. The rats were pretreated with PA and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol. The ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological analysis, glutathione (GSH) levels, malondialdehyde level (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NP-SH) contents were evaluated in vivo. The activities of PA as anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and free radical scavenger were also investigated in vitro. The results showed that the oral administration of PA protects gastric mucosa from ethanol-induced gastric lesions. PA pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) restored the depleted GSH, NP-SH and NO levels in the gastric homogenate. Moreover, PA significantly (p<0.05) reduced the elevated MDA level due to ethanol administration. The gastroprotective effect of PA was associated with an over expression of HSP70 and suppression of Bax proteins in the ulcerated tissue. In addition, PA exhibited a potent FRAP value and significant COX-2 inhibition. It also showed a significant minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against H. pylori bacterium. The efficacy of PA was accomplished safely without the presence of any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the gastroprotective effect of PA might contribute to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as well as the anti-apoptotic mechanism and antibacterial action against Helicobacter pylori.

  2. Acute ethanol intake attenuates inflammatory cytokines after brain injury in rats: a possible role for corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Gottesfeld, Zehava; Moore, Anthony N; Dash, Pramod K

    2002-03-01

    It has been reported that acute ethanol intoxication exerts dose-dependent effects, both beneficial and detrimental, on the outcome of traumatic brain injury (TBI), although the mechanism(s) has not been determined. Given that pro-inflammatory cytokines are either neuroprotective or neurotoxic, depending on their tissue levels, ethanol-induced alterations in brain cytokine production may be involved in determining the recovery after TBI. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of acute ethanol pretreatments (producing blood alcohol concentrations of 100+/-16 mg/dL, and 220+/-10 mg/dL, considered low and intoxicating doses, respectively) on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in discrete brain regions. In addition, serum corticosterone levels were also examined because the hormone is a modulator of cytokine production, its secretion is stimulated by ethanol, and it has been associated with the severity of post-injury neurologic dysfunction. The data presented in this report demonstrate that moderate cortical impact brain injury elicits a marked increase in IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in the injured cortex as well as in the hippocampus ipsilateral to the injury. Ethanol pretreatment lowered cytokine levels in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus in a dose-dependent manner after TBI compared to the untreated injured rats. Serum corticosterone levels were markedly increased in the injured rats, and were further augmented in the ethanol-pretreated injured animals in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ethanol-induced decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be linked to increased circulating corticosterone, both of which may contribute to the outcome of brain injury.

  3. Acute exposure to ethanol on gestational day 15 affects social motivation of female offspring.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Mooney, Sandra M

    2014-03-15

    Alterations in social behavior are a hallmark of many neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. In rodents, social behavior is affected by prenatal insults. The outcomes are dependent on the timing of the insult as well as the sex and age of the animal tested. The limbic system is particularly important for social behavior, and a peak of neurogenesis within this system occurs on gestational day (G)15. Neurons appear particularly vulnerable to ethanol insult around the time they become post-mitotic. We tested the hypothesis that acute exposure to ethanol on G15 would result in significant social behavior deficits. Accordingly, Long Evans pregnant females were injected with ethanol (2.9 g/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline on G15. Offspring were assessed in a modified social interaction test on postnatal day (P) 28, P42, or P75, i.e., during early adolescence, late adolescence, or young adulthood. Prenatal ethanol exposure decreased social investigation in P28 females and transformed social preference into social avoidance in 75-day-old females. Contact behavior, play fighting, and locomotor activity differed as a function of age, but were not significantly affected by ethanol exposure. Males demonstrated significantly more contact behavior and play fighting at P42 than at P28 or P70, whereas there were no age-related changes in females. Adult females showed more locomotor activity than adult males. Overall, prenatal ethanol exposure on G15 enhanced social anxiety in females, with these effects seen in adulthood only.

  4. Acute exposure of rabbit jejunum to ethanol. In vitro uptake of hexoses

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of acute exposure of rabbit jejunum to ethanol on the uptake of three hexoses was examined in vitro. With ethanol present in the preincubation medium for 30 min, or directly in the incubation medium for 6 min, glucose uptake was reduced. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that ethanol in the preincubation medium was associated with a rise in the value of the apparent Michaelis constant (Km*), whereas the inhibition of glucose uptake observed with ethanol present directly in the incubation medium was associated with a reduction in the apparent passive permeability coefficient (Pd*), a reduction in the maximal transport rate (Jdm), and an increase in Km*. When increasing concentrations of ethanol were added to the preincubation or to the incubation medium, there was a reduction in the uptake of both 1 mM and 40 mM glucose, galactose, and 3-O-methyl glucose. The addition of 40 mM galactose or 1 mM phloridzin to 40 mM glucose was associated with a 50% reduction in glucose uptake, but this uptake was not further inhibited by the addition of 6% ethanol (v/v). Similarly, the uptake of 3-O-methyl glucose was inhibited by the addition of 40 mM glucose or galactose but no further reduction in uptake was achieved by adding ethanol. Finally, galactose uptake was inhibited by adding 40 mM glucose or 40 mM 3-O-MG, but the addition of 6% ethanol was associated with no further decline in the uptake of galactose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-song; Li, Huan-zhou; Niu, Cong-cong; Pan, Su-hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200 mg/kg/d bw) for 30 d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-α and increased adiponectin, PPAR-α, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16 g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  6. Role of cannabinoidergic mechanisms in ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking in rat adult offspring following perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Economidou, Daina; Mattioli, Laura; Ubaldi, Massimo; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Soverchia, Laura; Hardiman, Gary; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2007-08-15

    The present study evaluated the consequences of perinatal {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol ({delta}{sup 9}-THC) treatment (5 mg/kg/day by gavage), either alone or combined with ethanol (3% v/v as the only fluid available), on ethanol self-administration and alcohol-seeking behavior in rat adult offspring. Furthermore, the effect of the selective cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist, SR-141716A, on ethanol self-administration and on reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced either by stress or conditioned drug-paired cues was evaluated in adult offspring of rats exposed to the same perinatal treatment. Lastly, microarray experiments were conducted to evaluate if perinatal treatment with {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol, ethanol or their combination causes long-term changes in brain gene expression profile in rats. The results of microarray data analysis showed that 139, 112 and 170 genes were differentially expressed in the EtOH, {delta}{sup 9}-THC, or EtOH + {delta}{sup 9}-THC group, respectively. No differences in alcohol self-administration and alcohol seeking were observed between rat groups. Intraperitoneal (IP) administration of SR-141716A (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) significantly reduced lever pressing for ethanol and blocked conditioned reinstatement of alcohol seeking. At the same doses SR-141716A failed to block foot-shock stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. The results reveal that perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-THC ethanol or their combination results in evident changes in gene expression patterns. However, these treatments do not significantly affect vulnerability to ethanol abuse in adult offspring. On the other hand, the results obtained with SR-141716A emphasize that endocannabinoid mechanisms play a major role in ethanol self-administration, as well as in the reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced by conditioned cues, supporting the idea that cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonists may represent interesting

  7. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially regulate CB1 receptor function at glutamatergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacey L; Alexander, Nancy J; Bluett, Rebecca J; Patel, Sachin; McCool, Brian A

    2016-09-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system has been suggested to play a key role in ethanol preference and intake, the acute effects of ethanol, and in the development of withdrawal symptoms following ethanol dependence. Ethanol-dependent alterations in glutamatergic signaling within the lateral/basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) are critical for the development and expression of withdrawal-induced anxiety. Notably, the eCB system significantly regulates both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic activity within the BLA. Chronic ethanol exposure significantly alters eCB system expression within regions critical to the expression of emotionality and anxiety-related behavior, including the BLA. Here, we investigated specific interactions between the BLA eCB system and its functional regulation of synaptic activity during acute and chronic ethanol exposure. In tissue from ethanol naïve-rats, a prolonged acute ethanol exposure caused a dose dependent inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic activity via a presynaptic mechanism that was occluded by CB1 antagonist/inverse agonists SR141716a and AM251. Importantly, this acute ethanol inhibition was attenuated following 10 day chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE). CIE exposure also significantly down-regulated CB1-mediated presynaptic inhibition at glutamatergic afferent terminals but spared CB1-inhibition of GABAergic synapses arising from local inhibitory-interneurons. CIE also significantly elevated BLA N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA or anandamide) levels and decreased CB1 receptor protein levels. Collectively, these data suggest a dynamic regulation of the BLA eCB system by acute and chronic ethanol.

  8. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Lowing, Jennifer L; Bosse, Kelly E; Hildebrandt, Clara C; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Conti, Alana C

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  9. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Susick, Laura L.; Lowing, Jennifer L.; Bosse, Kelly E.; Hildebrandt, Clara C.; Chrumka, Alexandria C.; Conti, Alana C.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  10. Methamphetamine Self-Administration Acutely Decreases Monoaminergic Transporter Function

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Stout, Kristen A.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Allen, Scott C.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that non-contingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of non-contingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence. PMID:22120988

  11. Methamphetamine self-administration acutely decreases monoaminergic transporter function.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Stout, Kristen A; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Allen, Scott C; Nielsen, Shannon M; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-03-01

    Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that noncontingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of noncontingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence.

  12. Microstructural Analysis of Rat Ethanol and Water Drinking Patterns Using a Modified Operant Self-administration Model

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Stacey L.; McCool, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol drinking pattern has emerged as an important factor in the development, maintenance, and health consequences of alcohol use disorders in humans. The goal of these studies was to further our understanding of this important factor through refinement of an operant rodent model of ethanol consumption capable of drinking pattern microstructural analysis. We evaluated measures of total consumption, appetitive behavior, and drinking microstructure for ethanol and water at baseline and assessed alterations induced by two treatments previously shown to significantly alter gross ethanol appetitive and consummatory behaviors in opposing directions. Methods Male Long Evans rats were trained on an FR1 operant paradigm which allowed for continuous liquid access until an 8 second pause in consumption resulted in termination of liquid access. Total appetitive and consummatory behaviors were assessed in addition to microstructural drinking pattern for both ethanol and water during a five day baseline drinking period, after chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure, and following administration of a cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716a. Results As in previous operant studies, ethanol vapor exposure resulted in increases in ethanol-directed responding, total consumption, and rate of intake. Further, striking differential alterations to ethanol and water bout size, duration, and lick pattern occurred consistent with alterations in hedonic evaluation. Vapor additionally specifically reduced the number of ethanol-directed lever presses which did not result in subsequent consumption. SR141716a administration reversed many of these effects. Conclusions The addition of microstructural analysis to operant self-administration by rodents provides a powerful and translational tool for the detection of specific alterations in ethanol drinking pattern which may enable insights into neural mechanisms underlying specific components of drug consumption. PMID:26037631

  13. Acute and Chronic Effects of Ethanol on Learning-Related Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zorumski, Charles F.; Mennerick, Steven; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism is associated with acute and long-term cognitive dysfunction including memory impairment, resulting in substantial disability and cost to society. Thus, understanding how ethanol impairs cognition is essential for developing treatment strategies to dampen its adverse impact. Memory processing is thought to involve persistent, use-dependent changes in synaptic transmission, and ethanol alters the activity of multiple signaling molecules involved in synaptic processing, including modulation of the glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmitter systems that mediate most fast excitatory and inhibitory transmission in the brain. Effects on glutamate and GABA receptors contribute to ethanol-induced changes in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory acquisition. In this paper, we review the effects of ethanol on learning-related forms of synaptic plasticity with emphasis on changes observed in the hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for encoding contextual and episodic memories. We also include studies in other brain regions as they pertain to altered cognitive and mental function. Comparison of effects in the hippocampus to other brain regions is instructive for understanding the complexities of ethanol’s acute and long-term pharmacological consequences. PMID:24447472

  14. Enhancement by glutathione depletion of ethanol-induced acute hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Younes, M; Pentz, R

    1987-08-01

    Ethanol at initial concentrations between 0.75 and 6 g/l produced a dose-dependent release of the enzymes glutamic-pyruvic-transaminase and sorbitol dehydrogenase (GPT, SDH) from the isolated perfused rat liver. At the concentration of 6 g/l, it also decreased the oxygen consumption and elevated the calcium content of the isolated livers. These toxic effects of ethanol were significantly enhanced in livers, the glutathione content of which had been depleted by pretreatment with phorone. Ethanol-induced toxicity in glutathione-depleted isolated livers could be prevented both by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase with 4-methylpyrazole and of xanthine oxidase with allopurinol. In rats, in vivo, 1.6 g/kg ethanol injected intravenously produced a small increase in serum GPT and SDH concentrations 4 h after its administration. This increase in enzyme activities was several-fold higher and longer lasting in rats pretreated with phorone. Glutathione depletion per se did not induce hepatotoxicity in vitro or in vivo. Since glutathione is involved in several lines of defense against oxidative damage, our results of an enhanced susceptibility of glutathione-depleted livers to ethanol toxicity favour the hypothesis that ethanol exerts its hepatotoxic action via an activation of molecular oxygen.

  15. [Acute ethanol intoxication among children and adolescents in Hamburg, Germany].

    PubMed

    Stolle, M; Sack, P-M; Spieles, H; Thomasius, R

    2010-09-01

    By using an anonymous postcard reporting system, data of n=358 children, adolescents, and young adults who were treated in 26 emergency departments because of acute alcohol intoxication were collected. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of acute alcohol intoxications in Hamburg, compare these data with the official hospital diagnosis register, and analyze the circumstances that led to the intoxication. A total of 358 cases were reported by the postcard system. Age ranged from 11-21 years, with 64.5% being 14-17 years old. Data were collected in the municipal area of Hamburg during the calendar year of 2008. The percentage of female patients was 65.6% in the age group from 11-17 years and decreased in the age group of patients being 18 years and older. A vast majority of patients were admitted by ambulance and were reported as being a"first offender". On average, male patients showed a higher level of blood alcohol when being admitted (2.02 ‰) than female patients (1.76 ‰). The older the age group, the higher the blood alcohol level. Among drinking circumstances, the situation"drank together with friends" was most frequently reported. In comparison with the official hospital diagnosis register, prevalence was 31.6% higher. This could mean that the prevalence reported in the official hospital diagnosis register is an underestimation of the actual case numbers.

  16. Lycopene Pretreatment Ameliorates Acute Ethanol Induced NAD+ Depletion in Human Astroglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Jade; Heng, Benjamin; Grant, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with reduced brain volume and cognition. While the mechanisms by which ethanol induces these deleterious effects in vivo are varied most are associated with increased inflammatory and oxidative processes. In order to further characterise the effect of acute ethanol exposure on oxidative damage and NAD+ levels in the brain, human U251 astroglioma cells were exposed to physiologically relevant doses of ethanol (11 mM, 22 mM, 65 mM, and 100 mM) for ≤ 30 minutes. Ethanol exposure resulted in a dose dependent increase in both ROS and poly(ADP-ribose) polymer production. Significant decreases in total NAD(H) and sirtuin 1 activity were also observed at concentrations ≥ 22 mM. Similar to U251 cells, exposure to ethanol (≥22 mM) decreased levels of NAD(H) in primary human astrocytes. NAD(H) depletion in primary astrocytes was prevented by pretreatment with 1 μM of lycopene for 3.5 hours. Unexpectedly, in U251 cells lycopene treatment at concentrations ≥ 5 μM resulted in significant reductions in [NAD(H)]. This study suggests that exposure of the brain to alcohol at commonly observed blood concentrations may cause transitory oxidative damage which may be at least partly ameliorated by lycopene. PMID:26075038

  17. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2007-09-15

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed {>=} 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1.

  18. Acute and subacute toxicity evaluation of ethanolic extract from fruits of Schinus molle in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Adriana; Minetti, Alejandra; Bras, Cristina; Zanetti, Noelia

    2007-09-25

    Ethanolic and hexanic extracts from fruits and leaves of Schinus molle showed ability to control several insect pests. Potential vertebrate toxicity associated with insecticidal plants requires investigation before institutional promotion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute and subacute toxicity of ethanolic extracts from fruits of Schinus molle in rats. The plant extract was added to the diet at 2g/kg body weight/day during 1 day to evaluate acute toxicity and at 1g/kg body weight/day during 14 days to evaluate subacute toxicity. At the end of the exposure and after 7 days, behavioral and functional parameters in a functional observational battery and motor activity in an open field were assessed. Finally, histopathological examinations were conducted on several organs. In both exposures, an increase in the arousal level was observed in experimental groups. Also, the landing foot splay parameter increased in the experimental group after acute exposure. Only the subacute exposure produced a significant increase in the motor activity in the open field. All these changes disappeared after 7 days. None of the exposures affected the different organs evaluated. Our results suggest that ethanolic extracts from fruits and leaves of Schinus molle should be relatively safe to use as insecticide.

  19. Quantification of ethanol methyl 1H magnetic resonance signal intensity following intravenous ethanol administration in primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Flory, Graham S.; O’Malley, Jean; Grant, Kathleen A.; Park, Byung; Kroenke, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to directly monitor brain ethanol. Previously, studies of human subjects have lead to the suggestion that the ethanol methyl 1H MRS signal intensity relates to tolerance to ethanol’s intoxicating effects. More recently, the ethanol 1H MRS signal intensity has been recognized to vary between brain gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to differences in T2 within these environments. The methods presented here extend ethanol MRS techniques to nonhuman primate subjects. Twelve monkeys were administered ethanol while sedated and positioned within a 3T MRI system. Chemical shift imaging (CSI) measurements were performed following intravenous infusion of 1g/kg ethanol. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were also recorded for each monkey to provide volume fractions of GM, WM, and CSF for each CSI spectrum. To estimate co-variance of ethanol MRS intensity with GM, WM, and CSF volume fractions, the relative contribution of each tissue subtype was determined following corrections for radiofrequency pulse profile non-uniformity, chemical shift artifacts, and differences between the point spread function in the CSI data and the imaging data. The ethanol MRS intensity per unit blood ethanol concentration was found to differ between GM, WM, and CSF. Individual differences in MRS intensity were larger in GM than WM. This methodology demonstrates the feasibility of ethanol MRS experiments and analysis in nonhuman primate subjects, and suggests GM may be a site of significant variation in ethanol MRS intensity between individuals. PMID:20018244

  20. Chronic ethanol self-administration in macaques shifts dopamine feedback inhibition to predominantly D2 receptors in nucleus accumbens core

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Calipari, Erin S.; Yorgason, Jordan T.; Mateo, Yolanda; Helms, Christa M.; Lovinger, David M.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the high level of homology between nonhuman primates and humans in regard to anatomy, physiology and ethanol drinking patterns, nonhuman primates represent an unparalleled preclinical model for examining the neurobiological basis of ethanol abuse. Methods Here we examined the neurochemical consequences of chronic daily ethanol use using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens core or dorsolateral caudate taken from male cynomolgus macaques following ethanol drinking. Results We found that in both regions the ability of ethanol to decrease dopamine release was unchanged, indicating that ethanol self-administration does not produce tolerance or sensitization to ethanol effects on dopamine release at the dopamine terminal at this time point. We also found that in the nucleus accumbens core, autoregulation of dopamine release was shifted from equal D2 and D3 receptor involvement in control animals to primarily D2 receptor-mediated in drinkers. Specifically, the effect quinpirole, a D2/D3 receptor agonist, on dopamine release was equal across groups; however, dopamine signals were reversed to a greater extent by the selective D3 receptor antagonist SB-277,011A in control animals, indicating a greater contribution of D2 receptors in quinpirole-induced inhibition following ethanol self-administration. In the dorsolateral caudate, the effects of quinpirole and reversal with SB-277,011A was not different between ethanol and control slices. Conclusions This work provides novel insight into the dopaminergic adaptations resulting from chronic ethanol use in nonhuman primates and indicates that alterations in D2/D3 dopamine autoreceptor signaling may be an important neurochemical adaptation to ethanol consumption during early use. PMID:26627912

  1. An ultrastructural analysis of the effects of ethanol self-administration on the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Vanessa A.; Helms, Christa M.; Cornea, Anda; Meshul, Charles K.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    A bidirectional relationship between stress and ethanol exists whereby stressful events are comorbid with problematic ethanol use and prolonged ethanol exposure results in adaptations of the physiological stress response. Endocrine response to stress is initiated in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) with the synthesis and release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine-vasopressin (AVP). Alterations in CRH and AVP following long-term ethanol exposure in rodents is well demonstrated, however little is known about the response to ethanol in primates or the mechanisms of adaptation. We hypothesized that long-term ethanol self-administration in nonhuman primates would lead to ultrastructural changes in the PVN underlying adaptation to chronic ethanol. Double-label immunogold electron microscopy (EM) was used to measure presynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate density within synaptic terminals contacting CRH- and AVP-immunoreactive dendrites. Additionally, pituitary-adrenal hormones (ACTH, cortisol, DHEA-s and aldosterone) under two conditions (low and mild stress) were compared before and after self-administration. All hormones were elevated in response to the mild stressor independent of ethanol consumption. The presynaptic glutamate density in recurrent (i.e., intra-hypothalamic) CRH terminals was highly related to ethanol intake, and may be a permissive factor in increased drinking due to stress. Conversely, glutamate density within recurrent AVP terminals showed a trend-level increase following ethanol, but was not related to average daily consumption. Glutamate density in non-recurrent AVP terminals was related to aldosterone under the low stress condition while GABAergic density in this terminal population was related to water consumption. The results reveal distinct populations of presynaptic terminals whose glutamatergic or GABAergic density were uniquely related to water and ethanol consumption and circulating

  2. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  3. Acute cor pulmonale and right heat failure complicating ethanol ablative therapy: anesthetic and radiologic considerations and management.

    PubMed

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H

    2013-10-01

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  4. Effects of simultaneous administration of ethanol on styrene metabolism under fed and fasted conditions in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sripaung, N; Motohashi, Y; Nakata, K; Nakamura, K; Takano, T

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the simultaneous administration of ethanol on styrene metabolism in the perfused rat liver under fed and fasted conditions. Styrene uptake rate, production rate of styrene glycol, oxygen consumption rate, and changes in reduced pyridine nucleotide fluorescence were monitored in the perfused rat liver. The effects of ethanol on parameters of styrene metabolism were observed in rat livers under fed and fasted conditions: fed (group I), fasted (group II), and fasted with xylitol in the perfusate (group III). The simultaneous administration of ethanol and styrene significantly decreased styrene uptake rate, production rate of styrene glycol, and oxygen consumption rate, and produced significant reduction of pyridine nucleotide fluorescence as compared with the single administration of styrene in groups I and III. In contrast, the simultaneous administration of ethanol and styrene significantly increased the production of styrene glycol and oxygen consumption as compared with the single administration of styrene in group II. Significant effects on the styrene uptake rate and the reduced pyridine nucleotide fluorescence were observed with regard to factors of both nutritional status and the interaction between ethanol and nutritional status by two-way analysis of variance. These findings showed that the effects of ethanol on styrene metabolism in the liver were dependent upon the nutritional status of the animal. The fed and fasted conditions affected the effect of ethanol on styrene metabolism by changing the supply of NADPH to the mixed-function oxidase system. In conclusion, ethanol suppressed styrene metabolism in the fed condition, but enhanced it in the fasted condition. This phenomenon should be considered in the prevention of occupational hazard of styrene exposure in industrial workers with alcohol drinking habits and nutritional problems.

  5. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Krutika T.; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M.; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N.; Richard, Zachary C.; O’Neil, Maura F.; Pritchard, Michele T.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl4-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl4 exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl4 and euthanized 24–96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl4-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl4 exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl4-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl4. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure. PMID:26751492

  6. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Krutika T; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N; Richard, Zachary C; O'Neil, Maura F; Pritchard, Michele T

    2016-01-06

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl₄-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl₄ exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl₄ and euthanized 24-96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl₄-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl₄ exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl₄-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl₄. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  7. κ opioid regulation of anxiety-like behavior during acute ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Glenn R; Harshberger, Erin

    2012-07-01

    Withdrawal is one of the defining characteristics of alcohol dependence, and is often characterized by impaired physiological function and enhanced negative affect. Recent evidence suggests that the dynorphin (DYN)/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system may be a key mediator in the negative affect often associated with drugs of abuse. The objective of the present experiments was to determine the role of the DYN/KOR system in the regulation of anxiety-related behavior during acute withdrawal from ethanol. Rats were fed an ethanol liquid diet and following removal, the ability of the KOR antagonist nor-BNI to attenuate the increased anxiogenic-like response characteristic of ethanol withdrawal was investigated using the elevated plus maze. A comparison study was also conducted examining anxiety-related behavior following direct activation of KORs via injections of the KOR agonist U50,488. Rats experiencing ethanol withdrawal showed a significant decrease in open arm exploration compared to controls, an effect that was blocked by nor-BNI. Similar decreases in open arm exploration were observed following injections with the KOR agonist, U50,488, an effect also reversed by pretreatment with nor-BNI. These results suggest that similar mechanisms are involved in the regulation of ethanol withdrawal- and KOR agonist-induced changes in behavior. Given the potential role of enhanced negative affect in persistent ethanol drinking, understanding the role of the DYN/KOR system in regulating anxiety associated with withdrawal may be critical in understanding the factors associated with the nature of alcohol dependence.

  8. Interactions of ethanol on the acute toxicity of cocaine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Trouve, R. ); Latour, C ); Nahas, G.G. Columbia Univ., New York, NY )

    1992-02-26

    Administration of 65 mg/kg in the awake rate, restrained and instrumented, is associated with cardiovascular toxicity, convulsions and lethality within 9 feet 44 inches {plus minus} 4 feet 56 inches. Such an outcome is prevented if selected Ca{sup 2+} antagonists are administered intraarterially 5 minutes following cocaine. Four additional groups of Sprague Dawley rats were studied. The first was administered I.P. ethanol 1.5-2.0 gr. Such doses were well tolerated only producing hypertension of 50 minutes duration and all animals survived without apparent ill effects. Second and third groups were first administered the same doses of ethanol and 15 minutes later 65 mg/kg of cocaine. Survival time was 5 feet 49 inches with 1.5 mg/kg ethanol and 5 feet 57 inches {plus minus} 1 foot 26 inches with 2 mg/kg, significantly less than after cocaine administration alone. In a fourth group, animals were treated intraarterially with nicardipine or flunarizine, 2 minutes after cocaine. Survival time was not different from saline control. Ethanol enhances significantly cocaine lethal toxicity in the rate and prevents the protective effects of antidotes to this alkaloid.

  9. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  10. Effect of acute and prolonged alcohol administration on Mg(2+) homeostasis in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Romani, Andrea M P

    2015-05-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy represents a major clinical complication in chronic alcoholics. Previous studies from our laboratory indicate that acute and chronic exposure of liver cells to ethanol results in a major loss of cellular Mg(2+) as a result of alcohol oxidation. We investigated whether exposure to ethanol induces a similar Mg(2+) loss in cardiac cells. The results indicate that chronic exposure to a 6% ethanol-containing diet depleted cardiac myocytes of >25% of their cellular Mg(2+) content. Acute ethanol exposure, instead, induced a time- and dose-dependent manner of Mg(2+) extrusion from perfused hearts and collagenase-dispersed cardiac ventricular myocytes. Pretreatment with chlormethiazole prevented ethanol-induced Mg(2+) loss to a large extent, suggesting a role of ethanol oxidation via cyP4502E1 in the process. Magnesium extrusion across the sarcolemma occurred via the amiloride-inhibited Na(+)/Mg(2+) exchanger. Taken together, our data indicate that Mg(2+) extrusion also occurs in cardiac cells exposed to ethanol as a result of alcohol metabolism by cyP4502E1. The extrusion, which is mediated by the Na(+)/Mg(2+) exchanger, only occurs at doses of ethanol ≥0.1%, and depends on ethanol-induced decline in cellular ATP. The significance of Mg(2+) extrusion for the onset of alcoholic cardiomyopathy remains to be elucidated.

  11. Stroke Code Improves Intravenous Thrombolysis Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with “Stroke Code” (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. Methods The study period was divided into the “pre-SC era” (January 2006 to July 2010) and “SC era” (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. Conclusion The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time. PMID:25111200

  12. A possible role of atrial natriuretic peptide in ethanol-induced acute diuresis

    SciTech Connect

    Colantonio, D.; Casale, R.; Mammarella, M.; Pasqualetti, P. ); Desiati, P.; De Michele, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol on plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels were investigated in 4 clinically healthy males, aged 24-26 years, consumed either 750 ml of water as a control study, or the same beverage with 1 ml/kg alcohol added, which increased the plasma alcohol concentration to 99.12{plus minus}15.10 mg/dl at 60 min. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels were significantly higher in the alcohol study compared to the control study at each time point, and with a peak at 10 min. Atrial natriuretic peptide levels showed a positive significant correlation with plasma antidiuretic hormone in the control group, while no relationship was found between the two peptides in the alcohol study. Moreover, a significant correlation exists between plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels and systolic arterial blood pressure, and heart rate, and between the variations in atrial natriuretic peptide values and the variations in plasma sodium, serum ethanol, and plasma osmolality in the alcohol study. Acute ethanol intake causes an increase in urinary volume, and a decrease in urinary potassium excretion and urinary osmolality, and no change in urinary sodium excretion.

  13. Endogenously elevated n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alleviate acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiangyong; Kang, Jing X

    2015-01-01

    Effective means for the prevention of alcohol-induced liver disease, a global health problem, have yet to be developed. We evaluated whether the high endogenous levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated acids (n-3 PUFA) in fat-1 transgenic mice could protect them against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis. We induced alcoholic liver steatosis in 9-week-old male heterozygous fat-1 mice and their wild-type (WT) male littermates through three oral gavages of 60% ethanol at 4.7 g/kg body weight. Hepatic lipid accumulation was significantly increased in both alcohol treatment groups, but by much less in the fat-1 group compared with the WT group. Fat-1 mice exhibited significantly lower levels of total hepatic/plasma TG and plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Accordingly, hepatic expression of lipogenesis-related genes (e.g., SREBP-1c, FAS, and SCD-1) and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1) were reduced in the fat-1 mice. Furthermore, decreased hepatic expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and increased hepatic levels of PPAR-α and HO-1 were observed in the fat-1 mice, compared to the WT mice. These findings show that elevated tissue n-3 PUFA protect against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis in fat-1 mice, possibly through the down-regulation of hepatic lipogenesis, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress.

  14. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  15. Modulation of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense systems in rat intestine by subchronic fluoride and ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Shailender Singh; Ojha, Sudarshan; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2011-11-01

    Excessive consumption of fluoride and ethanol has been identified as injurious to human health. Fluoride and ethanol co-exposures are commonly seen among the alcoholics residing in endemic fluoride areas worldwide. This study was undertaken to examine the modulation of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense systems in rat intestine by subchronic fluoride and ethanol administration. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: group I (control), group II (fluoride was given orally at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight), group III (30% ethanol was given orally at a dose of 1 mL/kg body weight), and group IV (a combination of fluoride and ethanol was administered orally at the dose described for groups II and III). Lipid peroxidation was elevated (P<.05) in intestine of rats by fluoride or ethanol treatments for 20 or 40 days. However, glutathione content was reduced by fluoride (32 and 44%) and ethanol (21 and 40%) treatments after 20 and 40 days, respectively. Fluoride-exposed animals showed reduction (P<.05) in the activities of superoxide dismutase (22 and 42%), catalase (30 and 37%), glutathione peroxidase (22 and 35%), glutathione reductase (32 and 34%), and glutathione-S-transferase (24 and 30%) after 20 and 40 days. A similar decrease (P<.05) in the activities of these enzymes was also noticed in animals exposed to ethanol for 20 or 40 days. The observed changes in lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels, and enzyme systems were further augmented in intestine of rats exposed to fluoride and ethanol together. Intestinal histology showed large reactive lymphoid follicles along with mild excess of lymphocytes in lamina propria of villi, villous edema, focal ileitis, and necrosis of villi in animals exposed to fluoride and ethanol for 40 days. These findings suggest that fluoride and ethanol exposure induces considerable changes in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defense, and morphology of rat intestine, which may affect its functions.

  16. The role of GABAA receptors in the acute and chronic effects of ethanol: a decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Porcu, Patrizia; Werner, David F.; Matthews, Douglas B.; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L.; Helfand, Rebecca S.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has brought many advances in our understanding of GABAA receptor-mediated ethanol action in the central nervous system. We now know that specific GABAA receptor subtypes are sensitive to ethanol at doses attained during social drinking while other subtypes respond to ethanol at doses attained by severe intoxication. Furthermore, ethanol increases GABAergic neurotransmission through indirect effects, including the elevation of endogenous GABAergic neuroactive steroids, presynaptic release of GABA, and dephosphorylation of GABAA receptors promoting increases in GABA sensitivity. Ethanol’s effects on intracellular signaling also influence GABAergic transmission in multiple ways that vary across brain regions and cell types. The effects of chronic ethanol administration are influenced by adaptations in GABAA receptor function, expression, trafficking, and subcellular localization that contribute to ethanol tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal hyperexcitability. Adolescents exhibit altered sensitivity to ethanol actions, the tendency for higher drinking and longer lasting GABAergic adaptations to chronic ethanol administration. The elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie adaptations to ethanol exposure are leading to a better understanding of the regulation of inhibitory transmission and new targets for therapies to support recovery from ethanol withdrawal and alcoholism. PMID:19455309

  17. Transgenic Mice with Increased Astrocyte Expression of IL-6 Show Altered Effects of Acute Ethanol on Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ruben V.; Puro, Alana C.; Manos, Jessica C.; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Reyes, Kenneth C.; Liu, Kevin; Vo, Khanh; Roberts, Amanda J.; Gruol, Donna L.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has revealed that resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS), and particularly the glial cells, comprise a neuroimmune system that serves a number of functions in the normal CNS and during adverse conditions. Cells of the neuroimmune system regulate CNS functions through the production of signaling factors, referred to as neuroimmune factors. Recent studies show that ethanol can activate cells of the neuroimmune system, resulting in the elevated production of neuroimmune factors, including the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Here we analyzed the consequences of this CNS action of ethanol using transgenic mice that express elevated levels of IL-6 through increased astrocyte expression (IL-6-tg) to model the increased IL-6 expression that occurs with ethanol use. Results show that increased IL-6 expression induces neuroadaptive changes that alter the effects of ethanol. In hippocampal slices from non-transgenic (non-tg) littermate control mice, synaptically evoked dendritic field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) and somatic population spike (PS) at the Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse were reduced by acute ethanol (20 or 60 mM). In contrast, acute ethanol enhanced the fEPSP and PS in hippocampal slices from IL-6 tg mice. Long-term synaptic plasticity of the fEPSP (i.e., LTP) showed the expected dose-dependent reduction by acute ethanol in non-tg hippocampal slices, whereas LTP in the IL-6 tg hippocampal slices was resistant to this depressive effect of acute ethanol. Consistent with altered effects of acute ethanol on synaptic function in the IL-6 tg mice, EEG recordings showed a higher level of CNS activity in the IL-6 tg mice than in the non-tg mice during the period of withdrawal from an acute high dose of ethanol. These results suggest a potential role for neuroadaptive effects of ethanol-induced astrocyte production of IL-6 as a mediator or modulator of the actions of ethanol on the CNS, including

  18. Transgenic mice with increased astrocyte expression of IL-6 show altered effects of acute ethanol on synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ruben V; Puro, Alana C; Manos, Jessica C; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Reyes, Kenneth C; Liu, Kevin; Vo, Khanh; Roberts, Amanda J; Gruol, Donna L

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has revealed that resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS), and particularly the glial cells, comprise a neuroimmune system that serves a number of functions in the normal CNS and during adverse conditions. Cells of the neuroimmune system regulate CNS functions through the production of signaling factors, referred to as neuroimmune factors. Recent studies show that ethanol can activate cells of the neuroimmune system, resulting in the elevated production of neuroimmune factors, including the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Here we analyzed the consequences of this CNS action of ethanol using transgenic mice that express elevated levels of IL-6 through increased astrocyte expression (IL-6-tg) to model the increased IL-6 expression that occurs with ethanol use. Results show that increased IL-6 expression induces neuroadaptive changes that alter the effects of ethanol. In hippocampal slices from non-transgenic (non-tg) littermate control mice, synaptically evoked dendritic field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) and somatic population spike (PS) at the Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse were reduced by acute ethanol (20 or 60 mM). In contrast, acute ethanol enhanced the fEPSP and PS in hippocampal slices from IL-6 tg mice. Long-term synaptic plasticity of the fEPSP (i.e., LTP) showed the expected dose-dependent reduction by acute ethanol in non-tg hippocampal slices, whereas LTP in the IL-6 tg hippocampal slices was resistant to this depressive effect of acute ethanol. Consistent with altered effects of acute ethanol on synaptic function in the IL-6 tg mice, EEG recordings showed a higher level of CNS activity in the IL-6 tg mice than in the non-tg mice during the period of withdrawal from an acute high dose of ethanol. These results suggest a potential role for neuroadaptive effects of ethanol-induced astrocyte production of IL-6 as a mediator or modulator of the actions of ethanol on the CNS, including

  19. Developmental lead exposure induces opposite effects on ethanol intake and locomotion in response to central vs. systemic cyanamide administration.

    PubMed

    Mattalloni, Mara Soledad; Deza-Ponzio, Romina; Albrecht, Paula Alejandra; Cancela, Liliana Marina; Virgolini, Miriam Beatriz

    2017-02-01

    Lead (Pb) is a developmental neurotoxicant that elicits differential responses to drugs of abuse. Particularly, ethanol consumption has been demonstrated to be increased as a consequence of environmental Pb exposure, with catalase (CAT) and brain acetaldehyde (ACD, the first metabolite of ethanol) playing a role. The present study sought to interfere with ethanol metabolism by inhibiting ALDH2 (mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase) activity in both liver and brain from control and Pb-exposed rats as a strategy to accumulate ACD, a substance that plays a major role in the drug's reinforcing and/or aversive effects. To evaluate the impact on a 2-h chronic voluntary ethanol intake test, developmentally Pb-exposed and control rats were administered with cyanamide (CY, an ALDH inhibitor) either systemically or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) on the last 4 sessions of the experiment. Furthermore, on the last session and after locomotor activity was assessed, all animals were sacrificed to obtain brain and liver samples for ALDH2 and CAT activity determination. Systemic CY administration reduced the elevated ethanol intake already reported in the Pb-exposed animals (but not in the controls) accompanied by liver (but not brain) ALDH2 inactivation. On the other hand, a 0.3 mg i.c.v. CY administration enhanced both ethanol intake and locomotor activity accompanied by brain ALDH2 inactivation in control animals, while an increase in ethanol consumption was also observed in the Pb-exposed group, although in the absence of brain ALDH2 blockade. No changes were observed in CAT activity as a consequence of CY administration. These results support the participation of liver and brain ACD in ethanol intake and locomotor activity, responses that are modulated by developmental Pb exposure.

  20. Effects of oral loperamide on efficacy of naltrexone, baclofen and AM-251 in blocking ethanol self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Dean, Reginald L; Eyerman, David; Todtenkopf, Mark S; Turncliff, Ryan Z; Bidlack, Jean M; Deaver, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone is a μ-opioid receptor antagonist that has been extensively studied for its ability to block the rewarding effects of ethanol. Opioid receptors are widely distributed within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Typically, naltrexone is administered by parenteral routes in nonclinical studies. We initially tested if opioid receptors within the GIT would influence the ability of oral naltrexone to inhibit ethanol oral self-administration in rats using the co-administration of oral loperamide, a peripherally restricted opioid agonist. As expected, oral naltrexone only had modest effects on ethanol intake, and the response was not dose-dependent. However in rats, treatment with loperamide prior to the administration of naltrexone resulted in a suppression of ethanol intake which approached that observed with naltrexone given by the subcutaneous (SC) route. Importantly, administration of loperamide prior to administration of naltrexone did not alter blood concentrations of naltrexone. We then evaluated if oral loperamide would enhance effects of baclofen (a GABA(B) receptor agonist) and AM-251 (a CB-1 receptor antagonist) and found that pre-treatment with loperamide did potentiate the action of both drugs to reduce ethanol self-administration. Finally, the specific opioid receptor type involved was investigated using selective μ- and κ-receptor antagonists to determine if these would affect the ability of the AM-251 and loperamide combination to block ethanol drinking behavior. The effect of loperamide was blocked by ALKS 37, a peripherally restricted μ-receptor antagonist. These data suggest an important role for opioid receptors within the GIT in modulating central reward pathways and may provide new insights into strategies for treating reward disorders, including drug dependency.

  1. Chronic ethanol administration increases the binding of sup 3 H Ro-15-4513 in primary cultured spinal cord neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Mlatre, M.; Ticku, M.K. )

    1989-02-09

    Ro 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5, 6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo (1,5{alpha}), (1,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) is reported to be a selective ethanol antagonist in biochemical and behavioral studies. The effect of chronic ethanol treatment on the binding of ({sup 3}H)Ro 15-4513 was investigated in cultured spinal cord neurons, which are shown to possess all the elements of GABA benzodiazepine receptor complex. Chronic ethanol treatment (50 mM for 6 hr, 12 hr, 18 hr, 3 days, and 5{sub 3} days) produced an increase in the specific binding of ({sub 3}H)Ro 15-4513. The increase in binding in these neurons was due to an increase in the number (B{sub max}) of receptor sites. This effect was specific for Ro 15-4513, since identical ethanol treatment did not alter the binding of benzodiazepine antagonist ({sup 3}H)Ro 15-1788 or agonist ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam or inverse agonist ({sup 3}H)methyl-{beta}-carboline-3-carboxylate. Similar results have been reported following chronic ethanol treatment to rats. These results suggest that the Ro 15-4513 binding sites on the oligomeric GABA receptor complex are altered following chronic ethanol administration, and support the notion of a unique role of Ro 15-4513 as an ethanol antagonist.

  2. Cerebral blood flow effects of acute intravenous heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Kosel, Markus; Noss, Roger S; Hämmig, Robert; Wielepp, Peter; Bundeli, Petra; Heidbreder, Rebeca; Kinser, Jane A; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Fisch, Hans-Ulrich; Kayser, Sarah; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2008-04-01

    We examined acute effects of intravenous diacetylmorphine (heroin) administration - which induces a characteristic biphasic response: A short rush-sensation associated with intense pleasurable feelings followed by a subjectively different period of euphoria on cerebral blood flow. This was assessed in nine male heroin dependent patients participating in a heroin maintenance program in a setting resembling everyday pattern of heroin abuse. 99mTc-HMPAO was administered 45 s (rush) and 15 min (euphoria) after administration of i.v. heroin and 45 s after administration of saline (placebo). Plasma concentration of diacetylmorphine and its metabolites were measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Compared to the euphoria condition, rush was associated with blood flow increase in the left posterior cerebellar lobe, left anterior cingulate gyrus and right precuneus. Our results are in line with recent reports indicating that the cerebellum is an important component in functional brain systems subserving sensory and motor integration, learning, modulation of affect, motivation and social behaviour, which all play important roles in reinforcing properties of opioids.

  3. Role of endogenous gastric mucosal prostaglandins in the formation of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol, HCl and CH3COOH.

    PubMed

    Amioka, I; Arima, T; Nagashima, H

    1987-06-01

    The role of endogenous mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) in the production of acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) was examined in rats. Aspirin, ethanol or 0.6 N-HCl was given intragastrically and 20% acetic acid was injected into the gastric wall. Endogenous gastric mucosal PG (A + B), PGE and PGF were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their gastric contents were markedly reduced by aspirin administration (p less than 0.001). The level of gastric mucosal PGs still remained low (p less than 0.001) after the aspirin-induced AGML began to heal. Furthermore, rats with AGML induced by ethanol, HCl or acetic acid, showed no decrease in endogenous gastric mucosal PGs compared with the controls. These findings indicated that endogenous PGs are not necessary for either the induction or healing of experimental AGML.

  4. Analyses of differentially expressed genes after exposure to acute stress, acute ethanol, or a combination of both in mice.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jessica A; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Diana; Yang, Ming; Cook, Melloni N; Jones, Byron C; Mulligan, Megan K; Hamre, Kristin M; Lu, Lu

    2017-02-01

    Alcohol abuse is a complex disorder, which is confounded by other factors, including stress. In the present study, we examined gene expression in the hippocampus of BXD recombinant inbred mice after exposure to ethanol (NOE), stress (RSS), and the combination of both (RSE). Mice were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 1.8 g/kg ethanol or saline, and subsets of both groups were exposed to acute restraint stress for 15 min or controls. Gene expression in the hippocampus was examined using microarray analysis. Genes that were significantly (p < 0.05, q < 0.1) differentially expressed were further evaluated. Bioinformatic analyses were predominantly performed using tools available at GeneNetwork.org, and included gene ontology, presence of cis-regulation or polymorphisms, phenotype correlations, and principal component analyses. Comparisons of differential gene expression between groups showed little overlap. Gene Ontology demonstrated distinct biological processes in each group with the combined exposure (RSE) being unique from either the ethanol (NOE) or stress (RSS) group, suggesting that the interaction between these variables is mediated through diverse molecular pathways. This supports the hypothesis that exposure to stress alters ethanol-induced gene expression changes and that exposure to alcohol alters stress-induced gene expression changes. Behavior was profiled in all groups following treatment, and many of the differentially expressed genes are correlated with behavioral variation within experimental groups. Interestingly, in each group several genes were correlated with the same phenotype, suggesting that these genes are the potential origins of significant genetic networks. The distinct sets of differentially expressed genes within each group provide the basis for identifying molecular networks that may aid in understanding the complex interactions between stress and ethanol, and potentially provide relevant therapeutic targets. Using Ptp4

  5. Carnosic acid attenuates acute ethanol-induced liver injury via a SIRT1/p66Shc-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinyao; Hu, Yan; Li, Mingzhu; Xia, Kun; Yin, Jiye; Chen, Juan; Liu, Zhaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that SIRT1/p66Shc pathway activation attenuates hepatocyte apoptosis in liver ischemia/reperfusion. The current study aimed to investigate whether carnosic acid (CA), a natural antioxidant, can inhibit acute ethanol-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes and to determine the effect of SIRT1/p66Shc on this process. Our results showed that CA pretreatment significantly reduced ethanol-induced histologic damage, serum aminotransferase activity, and oxidative stress in rats. Importantly, CA pretreatment increased SIRT1 expression following ethanol exposure. Furthermore, p66Shc expression was negatively correlated with SIRT1 expression. Consistent with the results demonstrating p66Shc inhibition, CA pretreatment inhibited the release of cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria. After exposing L02 cells to ethanol, the increased SIRT1 expression induced by CA was abrogated by pharmacologic SIRT1 inhibition or the use of siRNA against SIRT1. Additionally, SIRT1 inhibition significantly abrogated the suppression of p66Shc expression and mitochondrial translocation induced by CA. Accordingly, CA-induced decreases in the release of cytochrome C and AIF and in mitochondrial apoptosis were nearly abolished by SIRT1 knockdown. These data indicated that CA-activated SIRT1 is protective against ethanol treatment. In summary, CA attenuates acute ethanol-induced liver injury via a SIRT1/p66Shc-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  6. Effect of the consumption of ethanol on the microcirculation of the human optic nerve head in the acute phase

    PubMed

    Kojima; Sugiyama; Kojima; Azuma; Ito

    2000-05-01

    Purpose: The effect of the consumption of ethanol on the circulation of the optic nerve head (ONH) in the human eye in the acute phase and its mechanism were studied.Methods: Eleven volunteers drank a bottle of beer (633 mL) with or without ethanol (29.5 g). Normalized blur (NB), a quantitative index of blood flow velocity, was measured in the temporal site of the ONH. NB, blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate (PR) were measured before, immediately after, and every 15 minutes for 90 minutes after consumption. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and plasma ethanol concentration were measured before, and 30 and 90 minutes after consumption. Genotyping of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 gene was also performed.Results: NB in the ONH increased significantly from 15 to 45 minutes after consumption of ethanol and the maximum increase was 14% at 15 minutes. IOP was lowered at 90 minutes after consumption, but it was not significant. Mean BP was lowered significantly after 60 minutes. PR and ocular perfusion pressure did not change. A significant correlation was found between plasma ethanol concentration at 30 minutes and maximum NB. NB in the ALDH 2-deficient group was significantly larger from 15 to 45 minutes after consumption than in the proficient group.Conclusions: It appeared that the consumption of ethanol can increase the blood flow in the human ONH in the acute phase through decreased resistance in blood vessels induced by acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol.

  7. Impact of administrative technology on acute care bed need.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J B; Dahlstrom, G A; Johnston, C M

    1985-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of the impact of three administrative technologies--Admission Scheduling (AS) Systems, Outpatient Surgery (OPS) Programs, and Preadmission Testing (PAT) Programs--on the number of acute care beds required by a hospital. The evaluation mechanism reported here is called the ADTECH Computerized Planning Model. ADTECH uses parameters of each technology, identified from previous literature and discussions with health care professionals, to predict the changes in bed requirements resulting from implementation of these programs. Data from eight hospitals of various characteristics and sizes were run to test the ADTECH model. The results from these test runs indicate that the proper implementation of AS, OPS, and PAT can significantly influence a hospital's required bed complement. PMID:3988530

  8. The effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Elizabeth J.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Davenport, April T.; Hemby, Scott E.; Friedman, David P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic alcohol consumption reduces brain serotonin and alters the synaptic mechanisms involved in memory formation. Hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors modulate these mechanisms, but the neuroadaptive response of 5HT1A receptors to chronic alcohol self-administration is not well understood. METHODS Hippocampal tissue from monkeys that voluntarily self-administered ethanol for 12 months (n=9) and accompanying controls (n=8) were prepared for in vitro receptor autoradiography and laser capture microdissection. The 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, [3H]MPPF, and the agonist, [3H]8-OH-DPAT, were used to measure total and G-protein coupled 5-HT1A receptors respectively. The expression of the genes encoding the 5-HT1A receptor and its trafficking protein Yif1B was measured in microdissected dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells and CA1 pyramidal neurons. RESULTS An increase in G-protein coupled, but not total, receptors was observed in the posterior pyramidal cell layer of CA1 in ethanol drinkers compared to controls. Chronic ethanol self-administration was also associated with an up-regulation of total and G-protein coupled 5-HT1A receptors in the posterior DG polymorphic layer. Changes in receptor binding were not associated with concomitant changes in 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression. Chronic ethanol self-administration was associated with a significant increase in Yif1B gene expression in posterior CA1 pyramidal neurons. CONCLUSIONS Chronic, ethanol self-administration up-regulates hippocampal 5-HT1A receptor density in a region-specific manner that does not appear to be due to alterations at the level of transcription but instead may be due to increased receptor trafficking. Further exploration of the mechanisms mediating chronic ethanol-induced 5-HT1A receptor up-regulation and how hippocampal neurotransmission is altered is warranted. PMID:24467872

  9. Acute effects of ethanol on the transfer of nicotine and two dietary carcinogens in human placental perfusion.

    PubMed

    Veid, Jenni; Karttunen, Vesa; Myöhänen, Kirsi; Myllynen, Päivi; Auriola, Seppo; Halonen, Toivo; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2011-09-10

    Many mothers use, against instructions, alcohol during pregnancy. Simultaneously mothers are exposed to a wide range of other environmental chemicals. These chemicals may also harm the developing fetus, because almost all toxic compounds can go through human placenta. Toxicokinetic effects of ethanol on the transfer of other environmental compounds through human placenta have not been studied before. It is known that ethanol has lytic properties and increases the permeability and fluidity of cell membranes. We studied the effects of ethanol on the transfer of three different environmental toxins: nicotine, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine) and NDMA (N-nitrosodimethylamine) in placental perfusion. We tested in human breast cancer adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7 whether ethanol affects ABCG2/BCRP, which is also the major transporter in human placenta. We found that the transfer of ethanol is comparable to that of antipyrine, which points to passive diffusion as the transfer mechanism. Unexpectedly, ethanol had no statistically significant effect on the transfer of the other studied compounds. Neither did ethanol inhibit the function of ABCG2/BCRP. These experiments represent only the effects of acute exposure to ethanol and chronic exposure remains to be studied.

  10. Intranucleus accumbens amphetamine infusions enhance responding maintained by a stimulus complex paired with oral ethanol self-administration.

    PubMed

    Slawecki, C J; Samson, H H; Chappell, A

    1997-12-01

    Six male Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer 10% ethanol (v/v) during 30 min operant sessions. A licking response on an empty drinking tube resulted in the presentation of reinforcement from an automatic dipper. During the initiation of ethanol self-administration, a tone-light stimulus complex was paired with all ethanol presentations. When 10% ethanol maintained responding, guide cannulae aimed at the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) were implanted into the brain. The ability of the paired stimulus complex to reinforce a new operant response (i.e., a lever press) was then examined. To test for the development of the new response, responding on one lever resulted in presentation of only the paired tone-light stimulus complex (contingency-associated lever) while responding on an alternate lever had no programmed consequences (no contingency-associated lever). Prior to some new response sessions, amphetamine (5-20 microg/microl) was infused into the NAcc to examine the influence of dopamine on responding maintained by the stimulus complex. Ethanol intake during the sessions prior to new response testing averaged 0.49 +/- 0.07 g/g. During new response sessions no significant differences in lever pressure during no-drug conditions (control, sham, injection or vehicle injection) were observed between the contingency-associated and no contingency-associated levers. Intra-NAcc infusion of amphetamine (5-20 microg/microl) resulted in significant increases in lever pressing only on the contingency-associated lever. These data suggest that increasing NAcc dopamine levels with amphetamine enhanced the ability of the stimulus complex to function as a reinforcer. Further studies examining the ability of potentially more salient stimuli (i.e., taste of ethanol) to function as conditioned reinforcers associated with ethanol self-administration are warranted due to the apparent inability of the paired tone-light stimulus complex to function as a reinforcer without amphetamine

  11. Acute mild footshock alters ethanol drinking and plasma corticosterone levels in C57BL/6J male mice, but not DBA/2J or A/J male mice

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Douglas B.; Morrow, A. Leslie; Todd, O’Buckley; Flanigan, Timothy J.; Berry, Raymond B.; Cook, Melloni N.; Mittleman, Guy; Goldowitz, Dan; Tokunaga, Sayaka; Silvers, Janelle M.

    2008-01-01

    Stress is an often-reported cause for alcohol consumption in humans. Acute intermittent footshock is a frequently used paradigm to produce stress in laboratory animals including mice. The effect produced by intermittent footshock stress on ethanol self-administration has been inconsistent: both increases and decreases in ethanol consumption have been reported. The current set of studies further investigates, in three commonly studied mouse strains, the effect of footshock stress on ethanol self-administration. Furthermore, the effect of footshock on plasma corticosterone levels was determined to investigate potential biochemical correlates. Adult male C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and A/J mice were allowed to self-administer 10% (wt/vol) ethanol for 12 days in a standard 23-h two-bottle paradigm before receiving either 15 min of mild inescapable footshock or no footshock. Shock intensity was equal to the mean intensity at which each strain vocalized as previously determined. Following footshock, animals had the opportunity to self-administer ethanol for an additional 23 h. Separate animals were subjected to either footshock or no shock prior to collection of plasma for corticosterone. Mild footshock stress altered ethanol self-administration and increased plasma corticosterone levels in C57BL/6J mice. Footshock stress did not alter ethanol self-administration or plasma corticosterone levels in DBA/2J or A/J mice. These data demonstrate that mild footshock stress is a suboptimal method of modeling the stress-induced increases in ethanol consumption often reported by humans. PMID:18599253

  12. Varenicline, a partial agonist at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, reduces nicotine-induced increases in 20% ethanol operant self-administration in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Bito-Onon, Jade J; Simms, Jeffrey A; Chatterjee, Susmita; Holgate, Joan; Bartlett, Selena E

    2011-07-01

    Alcohol and nicotine use disorders are often treated as separate diseases, despite evidence that approximately 80-90% of alcohol dependent individuals are also heavy smokers. Both nicotine and ethanol have been shown to interact with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), suggesting these receptors are a common biological target for the effects of nicotine and ethanol in the brain. There are few studies that have examined the effects of co-administered nicotine and ethanol on the activity of nAChRs in rodents. In the present study, we show that Sprague-Dawley rats, a strain often used for nicotine studies but not as often for voluntary ethanol intake studies, will consume 20% ethanol using both the intermittent-access two-bottle-choice and operant self-administration models without the need for sucrose fading. We show that nicotine (0.2 mg/kg and 0.8 mg/kg, s.c.) significantly increases operant 20% ethanol self-administration and varenicline (2 mg/kg, s.c), a partial agonist at nAChRs, significantly decreases operant ethanol self-administration and nicotine-induced increases in ethanol self-administration. This suggests that nAChRs play an important role in increasing ethanol self-administration and that varenicline may be an efficacious treatment for alcohol and nicotine co-dependencies.

  13. Using monosodium glutamate to initiate ethanol self-administration in inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    McCool, Brian A; Chappell, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary oral ethanol consumption in rodents is generally limited by strong taste-aversion in these species. Historically, this has been overcome by combining ethanol with a sweetener, typically sucrose or saccharine, and then slowly 'fading' away the sweetener. While useful in most instances, this approach has not proven as successful for some inbred strains of mice (e.g. DBA/2J) despite consistent evidence in the literature that these same strains express strong conditioned place preference for intraperitoneal- or intragastric-administered ethanol. Importantly, DBA/2J mice express a polymorphism in a 'sweet' taste receptor subunit gene that reduces the potency of sweet substances in these mice. We hypothesized that the presence of this polymorphism might help explain the contrasting behavioral findings of weak voluntary oral ethanol consumption following sucrose-fade yet robust conditioned place preference for ethanol in this strain. To test this, we compared ethanol consumption initiated by either a 'traditional' sucrose-fade or a fade from an alternative tastant, monosodium glutamate (MSG). We found that in both C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, the MSG-fade produced robust increases in home cage ethanol consumption relative to the traditional sucrose-fade. This increased ethanol intake following MSG-fade was evident across a range of ethanol concentrations. Our findings suggest the potential utility of the MSG-fade to establish stable voluntary oral ethanol consumption in mice, particularly ethanol 'non-preferring' strains such as DBA/2J and lend additional support to the notion that ethanol consumption in DBA/2J mice is limited by pronounced taste aversion.

  14. Anti-ulcerogenic effect of a whey protein isolate and collagen hydrolysates against ethanol ulcerative lesions on oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Castro, G A; Carvalho, J E; Tinti, S V; Possenti, A; Sgarbieri, V C

    2010-02-01

    The effect of the administration of a whey protein isolate (WPI) and collagen hydrolysates on ethanol-induced ulcerative lesions was studied in rats. WPI and bovine or porcine collagen hydrolysate (BCH and PCH, respectively) were given to rats by gavage. In acute experiments, (single-dose) physiological saline (10 mL/kg of body weight) was used as the negative control, and carbenoxolone (200 mg/kg of body weight) was used as a positive control. Ethanol (1 mL per 250-g rat) was also given by gavage. These treatments reduced the ulcerative lesion index (ULI) in a range of 40-77%, depending on the dosage. Some mixtures of WPI with either PCH or BCH provided results that suggested synergisms between WPI and the collagen hydrolysates. For example, WPI/BCH (in the proportion of 375:375 mg/kg of body weight) decreased ULI by 64%. The mechanism for mucosal protection involved a decrease in plasma gastrin (approximately 40%), a significant increase (50-267%) in mucus production, and a reduction in ULI (percentage) when intragastric administrations were performed after in vivo alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide. Results suggest that gastrin, sulfhydryl substances, and some mechanisms related to mucus production are all involved in gastric ulcer protection against ethanol. The collagen hydrolysates (both PCH and BCH) presented a stronger effect on mucus production; on the other hand, the effect of WPI was also dependent on sulfhydryl compounds, resulting in a more protective effect when the two proteins were administered together.

  15. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling facilitates liver repair from acute ethanol-induced injury in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changwen; Ellis, Jillian L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) results from alcohol overconsumption and is among the leading causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors has been observed in ALD, but how it contributes to ALD pathophysiology is unclear. Here, we investigated the impact of VEGF signaling inhibition on an established zebrafish model of acute alcoholic liver injury. Kdrl activity was blocked by chemical inhibitor treatment or by genetic mutation. Exposing 4-day-old zebrafish larvae to 2% ethanol for 24 h induced hepatic steatosis, angiogenesis and fibrogenesis. The liver started self-repair once ethanol was removed. Although inhibiting Kdrl did not block the initial activation of hepatic stellate cells during ethanol treatment, it suppressed their proliferation, extracellular matrix protein deposition and fibrogenic gene expression after ethanol exposure, thus enhancing the liver repair. It also ameliorated hepatic steatosis and attenuated hepatic angiogenesis that accelerated after the ethanol treatment. qPCR showed that hepatic stellate cells are the first liver cell type to increase the expression of VEGF ligand and receptor genes in response to ethanol exposure. Both hepatic stellate cells and endothelial cells, but not hepatic parenchymal cells, expressed kdrl upon ethanol exposure and were likely the direct targets of Kdrl inhibition. Ethanol-induced steatosis and fibrogenesis still occurred in cloche mutants that have hepatic stellate cells but lack hepatic endothelial cells, and Kdrl inhibition suppressed both phenotypes in the mutants. These results suggest that VEGF signaling mediates interactions between activated hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes that lead to steatosis. Our study demonstrates the involvement of VEGF signaling in regulating sustained liver injuries after acute alcohol exposure. It also provides a proof of principle of using the zebrafish model

  16. Prolonged ethanol administration depletes mitochondrial DNA in MnSOD-overexpressing transgenic mice, but not in their wild type littermates

    SciTech Connect

    Larosche, Isabelle; Choumar, Amal; Fromenty, Bernard; Letteron, Philippe; Abbey-Toby, Adje; Van Remmen, Holly; Epstein, Charles J.; Richardson, Arlan; Feldmann, Gerard; Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah

    2009-02-01

    Alcohol consumption increases reactive oxygen species formation and lipid peroxidation, whose products can damage mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and alter mitochondrial function. A possible role of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) on these effects has not been investigated. To test whether MnSOD overexpression modulates alcohol-induced mitochondrial alterations, we added ethanol to the drinking water of transgenic MnSOD-overexpressing (TgMnSOD) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates for 7 weeks. In TgMnSOD mice, alcohol administration further increased the activity of MnSOD, but decreased cytosolic glutathione as well as cytosolic glutathione peroxidase activity and peroxisomal catalase activity. Whereas ethanol increased cytochrome P-450 2E1 and mitochondrial ROS generation in both WT and TgMnSOD mice, hepatic iron, lipid peroxidation products and respiratory complex I protein carbonyls were only increased in ethanol-treated TgMnSOD mice but not in WT mice. In ethanol-fed TgMnSOD mice, but not ethanol-fed WT mice, mtDNA was depleted, and mtDNA lesions blocked the progress of polymerases. The iron chelator, DFO prevented hepatic iron accumulation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation and mtDNA depletion in alcohol-treated TgMnSOD mice. Alcohol markedly decreased the activities of complexes I, IV and V of the respiratory chain in TgMnSOD, with absent or lesser effects in WT mice. There was no inflammation, apoptosis or necrosis, and steatosis was similar in ethanol-treated WT and TgMnSOD mice. In conclusion, prolonged alcohol administration selectively triggers iron accumulation, lipid peroxidation, respiratory complex I protein carbonylation, mtDNA lesions blocking the progress of polymerases, mtDNA depletion and respiratory complex dysfunction in TgMnSOD mice but not in WT mice.

  17. Prenatal exposure to ethanol during late gestation facilitates operant self-administration of the drug in 5-day-old rats

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure modifies postnatal affinity to the drug, increasing the probability of ethanol use and abuse. The present study tested developing rats (5-day-old) in a novel operant technique to assess the degree of ethanol self-administration as a result of prenatal exposure to low ethanol doses during late gestation. On a single occasion during each of gestational days 17–20, pregnant rats were intragastrically administered ethanol 1 g/kg, or water (vehicle). On postnatal day 5, pups were tested on a novel operant conditioning procedure in which they learned to touch a sensor to obtain 0.1% saccharin, 3% ethanol, or 5% ethanol. Immediately after a 15-min training session, a 6-min extinction session was given in which operant behavior had no consequence. Pups were positioned on a smooth surface and had access to a touch-sensitive sensor. Physical contact with the sensor activated an infusion pump, which served to deliver an intraoral solution as reinforcement (Paired group). A Yoked control animal evaluated at the same time received the reinforcer when its corresponding Paired pup touched the sensor. Operant behavior to gain access to 3% ethanol was facilitated by prenatal exposure to ethanol during late gestation. In contrast, operant learning reflecting ethanol reinforcement did not occur in control animals prenatally exposed to water only. Similarly, saccharin reinforcement was not affected by prenatal ethanol exposure. These results suggest that in 5-day-old rats, prenatal exposure to a low ethanol dose facilitates operant learning reinforced by intraoral administration of a low-concentration ethanol solution. This emphasizes the importance of intrauterine experiences with ethanol in later susceptibility to drug reinforcement. The present operant conditioning technique represents an alternative tool to assess self-administration and seeking behavior during early stages of development. PMID:24355072

  18. Autonomic activation associated with ethanol self-administration in adult female P rats.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Rodd, Zachary A; Toalston, Jamie E; McKinzie, David L; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai; McBride, William J; Murphy, James M

    2008-12-01

    The present study examined changes in heart rate (HR) prior to and during limited access ethanol drinking in adult female P rats. P rats were implanted with radio-telemetric transmitters to measure HR. Daily testing involved a 90-min pre-test period (water only available) and a subsequent 90-min test period [either water (W) or ethanol available]. After a week of habituation, one ethanol group had access to ethanol for 7 weeks (CE), and another ethanol group had access for 4 weeks, was deprived for 2 weeks and then had access for a final week (DEP). Analyses of HR revealed that CE and DEP rats had significantly higher HR than W rats during test periods that ethanol was present and that DEP rats displayed higher HR during the early test period of the ethanol deprivation interval, as well. These data indicate that ethanol drinking induces HR activation in adult female P rats, and that this activation can be conditioned to the test cage environment, paralleling reports on contextual conditioning and cue-reactivity in alcoholics exposed to alcohol-associated stimuli. Therefore, this behavioral test may prove advantageous in screening pharmacotherapies for reducing craving and relapse, which are associated with cue-reactivity in abstinent alcoholics.

  19. CYP2E1-dependent hepatotoxicity and oxidative damage after ethanol administration in human primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lie-Gang; Yan, Hong; Yao, Ping; Zhang, Wen; Zou, Li-Jun; Song, Fang-Fang; Li, Ke; Sun, Xiu-Fa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) activity, in order to address if inhibition of CYP2E1 could attenuate ethanol-induced cellular damage. METHODS: The dose-dependent (25-100 mmol/L) and time-dependent (0-24 h) exposures of primary human cultured hepatocytes to ethanol were carried out. CYP2E1 activity and protein expression were detected by spectrophotometer and Western blot analysis respectively. Hepatotoxicity was investigated by determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate transaminase (AST) level in hepatocyte culture supernatants, as well as the intracellular formation of malondialdehyde (MDA). RESULTS: A dose-and time-dependent response between ethanol exposure and CYP2E1 activity in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Moreover, there was a time-dependent increase of CYP2E1 protein after 100 mmol/L ethanol exposure. Meanwhile, ethanol exposure of hepatocytes caused a time-dependent increase of cellular MDA level, LDH, and AST activities in supernatants. Furthermore, the inhibitor of CYP2E1, diallyl sulfide (DAS) could partly attenuate the increases of MDA, LDH, and AST in human hepatocytes. CONCLUSION: A positive relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and CYP2E1 activity was exhibited, and the inhibition of CYP2E1 could partly attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative damage. PMID:16052683

  20. Hydroethanolic extract of Baccharis trimera promotes gastroprotection and healing of acute and chronic gastric ulcers induced by ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Ferreira, Daniele Maria; Galuppo, Larissa Favaretto; Borato, Debora Gasparin; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Acco, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol is a psychoactive substance highly consumed around the world whose health problems include gastric lesions. Baccharis trimera is used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, few studies have evaluated its biological and toxic effects. To validate the popular use of B. trimera and elucidate its possible antiulcerogenic and cytotoxic mechanisms, a hydroethanolic extract of B. trimera (HEBT) was evaluated in models of gastric lesions. Rats and mice were used to evaluate the protective and antiulcerogenic effects of HEBT on gastric lesions induced by ethanol, acetic acid, and chronic ethanol consumption. The effects of HEBT were also evaluated in a pylorus ligature model and on gastrointestinal motility. The LD50 of HEBT in mice was additionally estimated. HEBT was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and a high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was performed. Oral HEBT administration significantly reduced the lesion area and the oxidative stress induced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption. However, HEBT did not protect against gastric wall mucus depletion and did not alter gastric secretory volume, pH, or total acidity in the pylorus ligature model. Histologically, HEBT accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats, reflected by contractions of the ulcer base. Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids were detected in HEBT, which likely contributed to the therapeutic efficacy of HEBT, preventing or reversing ethanol- and acetic acid-induced ulcers, respectively. HEBT antiulcerogenic activity may be partially attributable to the inhibition of free radical generation and subsequent prevention of lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that HEBT has both gastroprotective and curative activity in animal models, with no toxicity.

  1. Long-term ethanol self-administration induces ΔFosB in male and female adolescent, but not in adult, Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wille-Bille, Aranza; de Olmos, Soledad; Marengo, Leonardo; Chiner, Florencia; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2017-03-06

    Early-onset ethanol consumption predicts later development of alcohol use disorders. Age-related differences in reactivity to ethanol's effects may underlie this effect. Adolescent rats are more sensitive and less sensitive than adults to the appetitive and aversive behavioral effects of ethanol, respectively, and more sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of experimenter-administered binge doses of ethanol. However, less is known about age-related differences in the neural consequences of self-administered ethanol. ΔFosB is a transcription factor that accumulates after chronic drug exposure and serves as a molecular marker of neural plasticity associated with the transition to addiction. We analyzed the impact of chronic (18 two-bottle choice intake sessions spread across 42days, session length: 18h) ethanol [or only vehicle (control group)] self-administration during adolescence or adulthood on the induction of ΔFosB in several brain areas, anxiety-like behavior, and ethanol-induced locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) in Wistar rats. Adolescent rats exhibited a progressive escalation of ethanol intake and preference, whereas adult rats exhibited a stable pattern of ingestion. Few behavioral differences in the open field or light-dark test were observed after the intake test. Furthermore, ethanol self-administration did not promote the expression of ethanol-induced CPP. There were, however, large age-related differences in the neural consequences of ethanol drinking: a significantly greater number of ethanol-induced ΔFosB-positive cells was found in adolescents vs. adults in the prelimbic cortex, dorsolateral striatum, nucleus accumbens core and shell, and central amygdala nucleus capsular and basolateral amygdala, with sex-related differences found at central amygdala. This greater ethanol-induced ΔFosB induction may represent yet another age-related difference in the sensitivity to ethanol that may put adolescents at higher risk for

  2. Detrimental effects of nicotine on the acute gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol: role of asymmetric dimethylarginine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Yuan; Zou, Yi-You; Wang, Li; Yang, Zhi-Chun; Guo, Ren; Li, Dai; Peng, Jun; Li, Yuan-Jian

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is responsible for the detrimental effects of nicotine on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury and its underlying mechanisms. Gastric mucosal injury was induced by an injection of ethanol in the stomach in rats. Animals were pretreated with nicotine for 28 days before ethanol injection. The gastric mucosal ulcer index (UI) and the levels of ADMA and NO in gastric juice were determined. In vitro, the cultured mucosal epithelial cells were treated with nicotine in the presence or absence of ethanol. The concentration of ADMA in the culture medium and the ratio of cell apoptosis were measured, and the effect of nicotine or ADMA alone on cell apoptosis was also examined. In rats treated with ethanol, the UI and ADMA levels were increased and the NO level was decreased, and these effects of ethanol were augmented by pretreatment with nicotine. Administration of nicotine alone did not show significant impact on UI, ADMA level, or NO level. In vitro, incubation of human epithelial cells with ethanol induced cell injury accompanied by increased ADMA levels in the culture medium, an effect which was amplified in the presence of nicotine. Similarly, ethanol was able to induce epithelial cell apoptosis that was exacerbated by nicotine. Incubation of epithelial cells with nicotine alone did not induce cell apoptosis, but administration of ADMA alone did induce cell apoptosis. The results suggest that the gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol is augmented by nicotine, which is related to the increased ADMA level.

  3. Cytokine Changes following Acute Ethanol Intoxication in Healthy Men: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Skulberg, Andreas; Skulberg, Knut Ragnvald; Aass, Hans Christian D.; Bramness, Jørgen G.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is a known modulator of the innate immune system. Owing to the absence of human studies, alcohol's effect on circulating cytokine profile remains unclear. We investigated the effect of acute high dose alcohol consumption on systemic cytokine release. After an overnight fasting, alcohol-experienced healthy male volunteers (N = 20) aged 25–45 years were given oral ethanol in the form of vodka (4.28 mL/kg) which they drank over a period of 30 minutes reaching peak blood alcohol concentration of 0.12% (SD 0.028). Blood samples were obtained prior to alcohol intake as well as 2, 7, and 12 hours thereafter. Serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and TNF-α were determined by the multibead-based assay. Baseline cytokine levels were not related to BMI, hepatic parameters, electrolytes, glucose, or morning cortisol levels. Within 2 hours of alcohol intake, levels of IL-1Ra were elevated and remained so throughout the assessment period (p for trend = 0.015). In contrast, the levels of the chemokine MCP-1 dropped acutely followed by steadily increasing levels during the observation period (p < 0.001). The impact of sustained elevated levels of MCP-1 even after the clearance of blood alcohol content deserves attention. PMID:28090151

  4. Ginger extract protects rat's kidneys against oxidative damage after chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Aireza; Rezaei, Farzaneh; Fard, Amin Abdollahzade; Afshari, Ali Taghizadeh; Gharalari, Farzaneh Hosseini; Rasmi, Yousef

    2016-12-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion is associated with pronounced detrimental effects on the renal system. In the current study, the protective effect of ginger extract on ethanol-induced damage was evaluated through determining 8-OHdG, cystatin C, glomerular filtration rate, and pathological changes such as cell proliferation and fibrosis in rats' kidneys. Male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups and were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) ethanol and (3) ginger extract treated ethanolic (GETE) groups. After a six weeks period of treatment, the results revealed proliferation of glomerular and tubular cells, fibrosis in glomerular and peritubular and a significant rise in the level of 8-OHdG, cystatin C, plasma urea and creatinine. Moreover, compared to the control group, the ethanol group showed a significant decrease in the urine creatinine and creatinine clearance. In addition, significant amelioration of changes in the structure of kidneys, along with restoration of the biochemical alterations were found in the ginger extract treated ethanolic group, compared to the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces kidneys abnormality by oxidative DNA damage and oxidative stress, and that these effects can be alleviated using ginger as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent.

  5. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. I. Acute effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Acute exposure to ethanol was found to enhance the ability of a benzodiazepine (BZ) inverse agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), to reduce muscimol-activated 36Cl- uptake by membranes isolated from mouse cerebral cortex. Pretreatment in vivo with a hypnotic dose of ethanol (but not a subhypnotic dose), or exposure to a corresponding concentration in vitro, was effective. This increase in sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-operated chloride channels to the actions of DMCM was due to an increase in both the potency and efficacy of DMCM. Sensitization to DMCM was reversible and was not observed 24 hr after a single injection of ethanol. Pretreatment with ethanol (10, 50 and 100 mM) in vitro produced sensitization to DMCM in a concentration-dependent manner, similar to that produced by in vivo exposure; this increase in sensitivity did not develop if the membranes were pretreated with ethanol at 0 degrees C. Similarly, in vitro exposure to pentobarbital (200 microM) or flunitrazepam (1 microM) enhanced the actions of the inverse agonist Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5a)(1,4)BZ-3- carboxylate). Acute ethanol exposure did not alter low-affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor binding or muscimol action, or the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-activated chloride flux. Ethanol exposure did not alter (3H)flumazenil (Ro15-1788) binding to central BZ receptors, its displacement by DMCM or allosteric modulation of DMCM binding by muscimol (muscimol-shift).

  6. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 decreases ethanol self-administration in both non-dependent and dependent animals.

    PubMed

    Houchi, Hakim; Persyn, Wolfgang; Legastelois, Rémi; Naassila, Mickaël

    2013-09-01

    There is emerging evidence that the adenosinergic system might be involved in drug addiction and alcohol dependence. We have already demonstrated the involvement of A2A receptors (A2AR) in ethanol-related behaviours in mice. Here, we investigated whether the A2AR agonist CGS 21680 can reduce ethanol operant self-administration in both non-dependent and ethanol-dependent Wistar rats. To rule out a potential involvement of the A1R in the effects of CGS 21680, we also tested its effectiveness to reduce ethanol operant self-administration in both heterozygous and homozygous A1R knockout mice. Our results demonstrated that CGS 21680 (0.065, 0.095 and 0.125 mg/kg, i.p.) had a bimodal effect on 10% ethanol operant self-administration in non-dependent rats. The intermediate dose was also effective in reducing 2% sucrose self-administration. Interestingly, the intermediate dose reduced 10% ethanol self-administration in dependent animals more effectively (75% decrease) when compared with non-dependent animals (57% decrease). These results suggest that the A2AR are involved in CGS 21680 effects since the reduction of ethanol self-administration was not dependent upon the presence of A1R in mice. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated the effectiveness of the A2AR agonist CGS 21680 in a preclinical model of alcohol addiction and suggested that the adenosinergic pathway is a promising target to treat alcohol addiction.

  7. Effects of ethanol administration on corticosterone levels in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Willey, Amanda Rachel; Anderson, Rachel Ivy; Morales, Melissa; Ramirez, Ruby Liane; Spear, Linda Patia

    2012-02-01

    Adolescent humans and rodents have been shown to consume more alcohol than their adult counterparts. Given that corticosterone (CORT) has been shown to be related to the intake of several drugs of abuse, this study assessed the ontogenetic effects of low-moderate doses of ethanol on CORT increases and recovery. Despite no significant differences in baseline (home cage) CORT levels, CORT responses to ethanol were greater in females than in males and in adult females than in adolescent females; males, however, showed less marked age differences in CORT levels after ethanol consumption. Adolescent blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) were lower than those of adults, although these BEC differences appear insufficient to account for the ontogenetic differences in CORT levels. Collectively, these findings suggest that it is unlikely that age differences in CORT elevations provide a major contribution to the ontogenetic differences in alcohol intake seen between adolescents and adults.

  8. Acute ethanol treatment induces a bimodal response of phospholipid acylation rates in rat red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verine, A.; Valette, A.; Richard, D.; Boyer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol in rats elicited a bimodal response of acylation rates in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine of intact red blood cells. Within an initial period, ethanol inhibited acylation rates. The inhibition then reversed, leading to increased values which persisted as long as ethanol was present in plasma. Acylation rates were not correlated to ethanol concentrations in plasma. The authors suggest that red cells first desensitize to, then overcompensate for the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acylation reactions. These adaptive changes may be one of the events mediating membrane tolerance to ethanol.

  9. Alterations in ethanol seeking and self-administration following yohimbine in selectively bred alcohol-preferring (P) and high alcohol drinking (HAD-2) rats.

    PubMed

    Bertholomey, Megan L; Verplaetse, Terril L; Czachowski, Cristine L

    2013-02-01

    Evidence suggests that stress increases alcohol drinking and promotes relapse in humans. Animal models that assess related behaviors include the sipper tube ethanol self-administration and the stress-induced reinstatement paradigms. While selectively bred for the same high-ethanol-drinking behavior, alcohol-preferring P rats appear to show greater sensitivity to ethanol reinforcement than high-alcohol-drinking HAD rats. The present experiment tested the effects of the pharmacological stressor, yohimbine, on the motivation to seek and consume ethanol implementing a combined sipper tube/reinstatement model using male P and HAD-2 rats. Following training to self-administer ethanol using the sipper tube procedure, rats were tested for the effects of yohimbine (0.625-2.5 mg/kg) on ethanol drinking. Subsequently, rats were tested for the effects of 1.25 mg/kg yohimbine on reinstatement of ethanol seeking. Yohimbine (0.625 and 1.25 mg/kg) increased ethanol self-administration, and the latter dose also decreased latency to complete the response requirement. Yohimbine elicited reinstatement of ethanol seeking in both lines. HAD-2 rats drank more ethanol, but showed similar responding on the ethanol-associated lever compared to P rats. These findings extend both the reinstatement and sipper tube models and justify further exploration of this unique combined paradigm. Despite prior evidence suggesting that P rats are more motivated to seek and consume ethanol, differences in these behaviors between P and HAD-2 rats were not systematic in the present experiment. Further investigation may elucidate whether either selected line may be more sensitive than other selectively bred or outbred rats to stress-related changes in ethanol's reinforcing effects.

  10. Glutamatergic Mechanisms of Comorbidity Between Acute Stress and Cocaine Self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Kupchik, Yonatan; Gipson, Cassandra D; Brown, Robyn M; Spencer, Sade; Bollati, Flavia; Esparza, Maria A; Roberts-Wolfe, Doug; Heinsbroek, Jasper; Bobadilla, Ana-Clara; Cancela, Liliana M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial comorbidity between stress disorders and substance use disorders (SUDs), and acute stress augments the locomotor stimulant effect of cocaine in animal models. Here we endeavor to understand the neural underpinnings of comorbid stress disorders and drug use by determining if the glutamatergic neuroadaptations that characterize cocaine self-administration are induced by acute stress. Rats were exposed to acute (2 h) immobilization stress and 3 weeks later the nucleus accumbens core was examined for changes in glutamate transport, glutamate mediated synaptic currents, and dendritic spine morphology. We also determined if acute stress potentiated the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Acute stress produced an enduring reduction in glutamate transport, and potentiated excitatory synapses on medium spiny neurons. Acute stress also augmented the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Importantly, by restoring glutamate transport in the accumbens core with ceftriaxone the capacity of acute stress to augment the acquisition of cocaine self-administration was abolished. Similarly, ceftriaxone treatment prevented stress-induced potentiation of cocaine-induced locomotor activity. However, ceftriaxone did not reverse stress-induced synaptic potentiation, indicating that this effect of stress exposure did not underpin the increased acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Reversing acute stress-induced vulnerability to self-administer cocaine by normalizing glutamate transport poses a novel treatment possibility for reducing comorbid SUDs in stress disorders. PMID:26821978

  11. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bahareh; Nakhsaz, Alireza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) were evaluated using forced swim test (FST). In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals), antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST). Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg) and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg) produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg). Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration. PMID:26468466

  12. Mode of ethanol administration influences the severity of hemorrhage-induced lactic acidemia in conscious guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Kathleen H; Swafford, Albert N; Giaimo, Mary E; Adamson, Trinka W; Miller, Harvey I

    2010-09-01

    Mechanisms that limit metabolic acidemia during shock are limited by ethanol (EtOH). This may be due to (1) loss of respiratory compensation, (2) a greater fall in cardiac output, (3) altered removal of plasma lactate by the liver, and (4) alterations in central nervous system orchestration of compensatory responses. We have previously shown that loss of metabolic compensation during hemorrhage is correlated with plasma EtOH concentrations. The present study determines if the mode of ethanol administration influences compensation during hemorrhage. Male guinea pigs were administered EtOH (1 g/kg, 30% wt/vol) via intraperitoneal (IP) or intragastric (IG) routes. After 30 minutes, 60% of the estimated blood volume was removed. Animals remained in shock for 30 minutes were resuscitated with lactated Ringer solution and monitored for 3 hours. Plasma EtOH levels were similar in the 2 groups at the initiation of, and during, hemorrhage and resuscitation. Animals given EtOH IP exhibited more severe acidemia. The mode of EtOH administration may affect hepatic ethanol and lactate metabolism, thus exacerbating acidemia. An altered central nervous system response may impact compensatory responses during shock. Our results indicate that the "history" of the EtOH episode may be an important determinant in the compensation for hemorrhage and resuscitation.

  13. Ethylphenidate formation in human subjects after the administration of a single dose of methylphenidate and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, J S; DeVane, C L; Boulton, D W; Nahas, Z; Risch, S C; Diamond, F; Patrick, K S

    2000-06-01

    Ethylphenidate was recently reported as a novel drug metabolite in two overdose fatalities where there was evidence of methylphenidate and ethanol coingestion. This study explores the pharmacokinetics of ethylphenidate relative to methylphenidate and the major metabolite ritalinic acid, in six healthy subjects who received methylphenidate and ethanol under controlled conditions. Subjects (three males, three females) received a single oral dose of methylphenidate (20 mg; two 10-mg tablets) followed by consumption of ethanol (0.6 g/kg) 30 min later. Methylphenidate, ritalinic acid, and ethylphenidate were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Ethylphenidate was detectable in the plasma and urine of all subjects after ethanol ingestion. The mean (+/-S.D.) area under the concentration versus time curve for ethylphenidate was 1.2 +/- 0.7 ng/ml/h, representing 2.3 +/- 1.3% that of methylphenidate (48 +/- 12 ng/ml/h). A significant correlation was observed between the area under the concentration versus time curve of methylphenidate and that of ethylphenidate. In view of the known dopaminergic activity of racemic ethylphenidate, it remains possible that under certain circumstances of higher level dosing, e.g., in the abuse of methylphenidate and ethanol, the metabolite ethylphenidate may contribute to drug effects.

  14. Supplemental choline does not attenuate the effects of neonatal ethanol administration on habituation of the heart rate orienting response in rats.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S; Jacobson, Sarah E; Kim, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Several studies using rodent subjects have now shown that extra dietary choline may prevent or even reverse the deleterious effects of pre- and early post-natal ethanol administration. Choline supplementation has been shown to attenuate many, although not all, of ethanol's effects on brain development and behavior. Our laboratory has consistently reported impaired habituation of the heart rate orienting response to a novel olfactory stimulus in animals exposed to ethanol on postnatal days (PD) 4-9. Here we examine whether supplemental choline given both during and after ethanol administration could alleviate these ethanol-induced deficits. Subjects were given 5g/kg/day ethanol or sham intubations on PD 4-9. Half of the subjects in each group were given a single daily s.c. injection of choline chloride on PD 4-20, while the other half were injected daily with saline. Pups were tested for heart rate orienting and response habituation in a single test session on PD 23. Results replicated the ethanol-induced impairment in response habituation. However, choline supplementation had no effect on orienting or habituation in either neonatal treatment group. These findings indicate that habituation deficits induced by ethanol are not alleviated by extra dietary choline using these parameters. Choline holds great promise as a treatment for some fetal alcohol effects, but is not an effective treatment for all ethanol-related deficits.

  15. Alternative Splicing of AMPA Subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys Following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Glen; Freidman, David P.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA) subunit variant and kainate (GRIK) subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) averaged over the 6 months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and BEC averaged over the 6 months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted. PMID:22291662

  16. Preliminary Results of a Phase I Trial of Prophylactic Ethanol-Lock Administration to Prevent Mediport Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kayton, Mark L.; Garmey, Edward G.; Ishill, Nicole M.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Kushner, Brian H.; Kramer, Kim; Modak, Shakeel; Rossetto, Carol; Hennelly, Courtney; Doyle, Melissa Parra; Rosenberg, Shoshana; Santoro, Olga; La Quaglia, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter-related bloodstream infections remain costly with no simple prevention. We report preliminary results of a phase I trial of ethanol-lock administration to prevent mediport catheter-related bloodstream infections in children. Methods Twelve patients receiving intravenous antibody treatments for neuroblastoma were enrolled. On 4 days of each 5-day antibody cycle, 70% ethanol was administered instead of heparin to dwell in each patient’s mediport overnight. We used clinical monitoring/questionnaires to assess symptoms; and measured blood ethanol levels and liver functions. Patients were tracked for positive blood cultures. Time-to-infection for ethanol-lock treated patients was compared with historical controls. Results We administered 123 ethanol-locks. No adverse symptoms attributable to ethanol occurred; one patient’s urticaria worsened. Blood ethanol levels averaged 11 mg/dL. The study was voluntarily suspended after 3 patients’ catheters became occluded, 1 of which fractured. A positive blood culture occurred in 1 of 12 patients (8%), but suspension of the study precluded statistical power to detect impact on time-to-infection. Conclusions Although children with mediport catheters exhibited nontoxic blood ethanol levels and a low rate of bloodstream infections following prophylactic ethanol-lock use, there was a high incidence of catheter occlusion. Adjustments are necessary before adopting ethanol-locks for routine prophylaxis against catheter infections in children. PMID:20920713

  17. Phytochemical and acute toxicity of ethanolic extract of Enantia chlorantha (oliv) stem bark in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Abatan, Mathew O.

    2013-01-01

    It is presumed that drugs sourced from herbs have lesser side effects than allopathic drugs. Enantia chlorantha is widely used in herbal medicine for the treatment of several ailments such as jaundice, malaria, fever, infective hepatitis, etc. However its toxicity profiles are not well documented. The effects of ethanolic extract of E. chlorantha stem bark on body weight changes, biochemical and haematological parameters as well as histology of vital organs (heart, kidneys and liver) were assessed. Also, the phytochemical constituent of the plant was analysed. Albino rats of both sexes were randomly divided into five groups (A–E) of five rats each and the ethanolic extract of E. chlorantha stem bark extract was administered by oral gavage in a single dose. Group A rats were administered 500 mg/kg of the extract, group B; 1000 mg/kg, group C; 2000 mg/kg, group D; 3000 mg/kg and group E rats received distilled water (10 ml/kg) and served as control. The extract caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in the levels of packed cell volume, haemoglobin concentration and red blood cell counts in a dose dependent manner. Further, significant alterations were not observed in the serum biochemical parameters analysed (AST, ALP, ALT, blood urea nitrogen, total protein, albumin, globulin and bilirubin). In addition, the extract at 1000, 2000 and 3000 mg/kg caused congestion in the heart and kidney of experimental rats. These results suggest that oral administration of E. chlorantha may produce severe toxic effects at relatively high doses, thus caution should be exercised in its use. PMID:24678252

  18. Acute ethanol exposure induces behavioural differences in two zebrafish (Danio rerio) strains: a time course analysis.

    PubMed

    Pannia, Emanuela; Tran, Steven; Rampersad, Mindy; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-02-01

    The zebrafish has been proposed as a model organism to study genetic effects influencing behaviour and also as a tool with which the mechanisms of the action of alcohol (ethanol or EtOH) in the vertebrate brain may be investigated. In the current study we exposed zebrafish from two genetically distinct strains (WIK and TU) to a computer animated image of a natural predator of this species, the Indian leaf fish. We measured the subjects' behavioural responses in the presence of different acute doses of alcohol (0.00, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00% vol/vol) using an observation based event-recording method. We found fish of both strains to exhibit an atypical predator inspection response during the presentation of the animated predator image coupled with a classical fear response, increased jumping frequency. We found numerous alcohol induced behavioural changes and more importantly also revealed alcohol induced strain dependent changes as well, including different dose-response trajectories for WIK vs. TU in predator inspection response, general swimming activity, location of swimming (top vs. bottom half of the tank) and freezing. The results suggest that zebrafish of the TU strain may be more tolerant at least to lower doses of alcohol as compared to WIK. The characterization of strain differences in zebrafish will aid the identification of possible molecular mechanisms involved in alcohol's actions in the vertebrate brain.

  19. Acute immune-mediated thrombocytopenia due to oxaliplatin administration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Buzzoni, Roberto; Bajetta, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced acute thrombocytopenia is an extremely rare side effect that may occur immediately after oxaliplatin infusion. This potentially fatal reaction is immune mediated and can be anticipated by mild hemorrhagic signs during previous administrations. This is the first report of acute thrombocytopenia occurring during adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer with oxaliplatin. Clinicians should be aware of this adverse event in order to prevent possible serious consequences and stop further oxaliplatin administration.

  20. Analysis of hepatic gene expression during fatty liver change due to chronic ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, H.-Q.; Je, Young-Tae; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-03-15

    Chronic consumption of ethanol can cause cumulative liver damage that can ultimately lead to cirrhosis. To explore the mechanisms of alcoholic steatosis, we investigated the global intrahepatic gene expression profiles of livers from mice administered alcohol. Ethanol was administered by feeding the standard Lieber-DeCarli diet, of which 36% (high dose) and 3.6% (low dose) of the total calories were supplied from ethanol for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Histopathological evaluation of the liver samples revealed fatty changes and punctate necrosis in the high-dose group and ballooning degeneration in the low-dose group. In total, 292 genes were identified as ethanol responsive, and several of these differed significantly in expression compared to those of control mice (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05). Specifically, the expression levels of genes involved in hepatic lipid transport and metabolism were examined. An overall net increase in gene expression was observed for genes involved in (i) glucose transport and glycolysis, (ii) fatty acid influx and de novo synthesis, (iii) fatty acid esterification to triglycerides, and (iv) cholesterol transport, de novo cholesterol synthesis, and bile acid synthesis. Collectively, these data provide useful information concerning the global gene expression changes that occur due to alcohol intake and provide important insights into the comprehensive mechanisms of chronic alcoholic steatosis.

  1. Effects of alcohol and saccharin deprivations on concurrent ethanol and saccharin operant self-administration by alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Toalston, Jamie E; Oster, Scott M; Kuc, Kelly A; Pommer, Tylene J; Murphy, James M; Lumeng, Lawrence; Bell, Richard L; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2008-06-01

    Consumption of sweet solutions has been associated with a reduction in withdrawal symptoms and alcohol craving in humans. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of ethanol and saccharin (SACC) deprivations on operant oral self-administration. Alcohol-preferring (P) rats were allowed to lever press concurrently self-administer ethanol (15% vol/vol) and SACC (0.0125% g/vol) for 8 weeks. Rats were then maintained on daily operant access (nondeprived), deprived of both fluids (2 weeks), deprived of SACC and given 2 ml of ethanol daily, or deprived of ethanol and given 2 ml of SACC daily. All groups were then given 2 weeks of daily operant access to ethanol and SACC, followed by an identical second deprivation period. P rats responded more for ethanol than SACC. All deprived groups increased responding on the ethanol lever, but not on the SACC lever. Daily consumption of 2 ml ethanol decreased the duration of the alcohol deprivation effect (ADE). Home cage access to 2 ml of SACC also decreased the ADE but to a lesser extent than access to ethanol. A second deprivation period further increased and prolonged the expression of an ADE. These results show ethanol is a more salient reinforcer than SACC. With concurrent access to ethanol and SACC, P rats do not display a saccharin deprivation effect. Depriving P rats of both ethanol and SACC had the most pronounced effect on the magnitude and duration of the ADE, suggesting that there may be some interactions between ethanol and SACC in their CNS reinforcing effects.

  2. Independent and combined effects of ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment on hepatic CYP2E1 in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C S; Miksys, S; Palmour, R; Tyndale, R F

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 2E1 metabolizes ethanol and also bioactivates many toxins and procarcinogens. Elevated levels of hepatic CYP2E1 are associated with an increased susceptibility to chemical toxicity and carcinogenesis. This study investigated the induction of hepatic CYP2E1 by ethanol and nicotine, alone and in combination, in a nonhuman primate model. Monkeys that self-administered ethanol and that received subcutaneous injections of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg b.i.d.), alone and in combination, were compared with control animals (four groups, n = 10/group). Chlorzoxazone (CZN) was used as a probe drug to phenotype in vivo CYP2E1 activity before and after chronic ethanol and/or nicotine exposure. CYP2E1 protein levels and in vitro chlorzoxazone metabolism were assessed in liver microsomes. Average daily ethanol consumption was ≈3.0 g/kg (blood ethanol levels ≈24 mM) and was unaffected by nicotine treatment. Ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment, alone and in combination, significantly increased in vivo CZN disposition compared with that in control animals. The effect of ethanol was only observed at higher levels of intake. Ethanol and nicotine increased CYP2E1 protein levels and in vitro CZN metabolism, with combined exposure to both drugs resulting in the greatest increase. The effect of ethanol was also dependent on level of intake. Chronic exposure to ethanol and nicotine induced hepatic CYP2E1 activity and protein levels, particularly when both drugs were used in combination and when ethanol intake was high. These results have important implications for public health, given the association between elevated CYP2E1 and disease, and the large proportion of individuals who are exposed to ethanol and nicotine, often in combination.

  3. Adolescent rats are resistant to the development of ethanol-induced chronic tolerance and ethanol-induced conditioned aversion.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Godoy, Juan Carlos; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of chronic tolerance to ethanol in adult and adolescent rats has yielded mixed results. Tolerance to some effects of ethanol has been reported in adolescents, yet other studies found adults to exhibit greater tolerance than adolescents or comparable expression of the phenomena at both ages. Another unanswered question is how chronic ethanol exposure affects subsequent ethanol-mediated motivational learning at these ages. The present study examined the development of chronic tolerance to ethanol's hypothermic and motor stimulating effects, and subsequent acquisition of ethanol-mediated odor conditioning, in adolescent and adult male Wistar rats given every-other-day intragastric administrations of ethanol. Adolescent and adult rats exhibited lack of tolerance to the hypothermic effects of ethanol during an induction phase; whereas adults, but not adolescents, exhibited a trend towards a reduction in hypothermia at a challenge phase (Experiment 1). Adolescents, unlike adults, exhibited ethanol-induced motor activation after the first ethanol administration. Adults, but not adolescents, exhibited conditioned odor aversion by ethanol. Subsequent experiments conducted only in adolescents (Experiment 2, Experiment 3 and Experiment 4) manipulated the context, length and predictability of ethanol administration. These manipulations did not promote the expression of ethanol-induced tolerance. This study indicated that, when moderate ethanol doses are given every-other day for a relatively short period, adolescents are less likely than adults to develop chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced hypothermia. This resistance to tolerance development could limit long-term maintenance of ethanol intake. Adolescents, however, exhibited greater sensitivity than adults to the acute motor stimulating effects of ethanol and a blunted response to the aversive effects of ethanol. This pattern of response may put adolescents at risk for early initiation of ethanol intake.

  4. Frontline Science: ATF3 is responsible for the inhibition of TNF-α release and the impaired migration of acute ethanol-exposed monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaojie; Meng, Xiaoming; Huang, Cheng; Shen, Chenlin; Li, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Binge drinking represses host innate immunity and leads to a high risk of infection. Acute EtOH-pretreated macrophages exhibit a decreased production of proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS. ATF3 is induced and counter-regulates the LPS/TLR4 inflammatory cascade. Here, we investigated the potential role of ATF3 in LPS tolerance in acute ethanol-pretreated macrophages. We found that there was an inverse correlation between ATF3 and LPS-induced TNF-α production in acute ethanol-pretreated murine monocytes and macrophages. The knockdown of ATF3 attenuated the inhibitory effects of acute ethanol treatment on LPS-induced TNF-α production. Furthermore, ChIP assays and co-IP demonstrated that ATF3, together with HDAC1, negatively modulated the transcription of TNF-α. In binge-drinking mice challenged with LPS, an up-regulation of ATF3 and HDAC1 and a concomitant decrease in TNF-α were observed. Given that HDAC1 was concomitantly induced in acute ethanol-exposed monocytes and macrophages, we used the HDACi TSA or silenced HDAC1 to explore the role of HDAC1 in acute ethanol-treated macrophages. Our results revealed that TSA treatment and HDAC1 knockdown prevented acute ethanol-induced ATF3 expression and the inhibition of TNF-α transcription. These data indicated a dual role for HDAC1 in acute ethanol-induced LPS tolerance. Furthermore, we showed that the induction of ATF3 led to the impaired migration of BM monocytes and macrophages. Overall, we present a novel role for ATF3 in the inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α and in the impairment of monocyte and macrophage migration.

  5. Influences of acute ethanol exposure on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae under different illumination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Lin, Jia; Peng, Xiaolan; Chen, Haojun; Zhang, Yinglan; Liu, Xiuyun; Li, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Larval zebrafish present unique opportunities to study the behavioral responses of a model organism to environmental challenges during early developmental stages. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the locomotor activities of AB strain zebrafish larvae at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) in response to light changes under the influence of ethanol, and to explore potential neurological mechanisms that are involved in ethanol intoxication. AB strain zebrafish larvae at both 5 and 7 dpf were treated with ethanol at 0% (control), 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (v/v%). The locomotor activities of the larvae during alternating light-dark challenges, as well as the locomotor responses immediately following the light transitions, were investigated. The levels of various neurotransmitters were also measured in selected ethanol-treated groups. The larvae at 5 and 7 dpf demonstrated similar patterns of locomotor responses to ethanol treatment. Ethanol treatment at 1% increased the swimming distances of the zebrafish larvae in the dark periods, but had no effect on the swimming distances in the light periods. In contrast, ethanol treatment at 2% increased the swimming distances in the light periods, but did not potentiate the swimming activity in the dark periods, compared to controls. Differences in the levels of neurotransmitters that are involved in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin pathways were also observed in groups with different ethanol treatments. These results indicated the behavioral studies concerning the ethanol effects on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae could be carried out as early as 5 dpf. The 1% and 2% ethanol-treated zebrafish larvae modeled ethanol effects at different intoxication states, and the differences in neurotransmitter levels suggested the involvement of various neurotransmitter pathways in different ethanol intoxication states.

  6. Self-administration of ethanol, cocaine, or nicotine does not decrease the soma size of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Mazei-Robison, Michelle S; Appasani, Raghu; Edwards, Scott; Wee, Sunmee; Taylor, Seth R; Picciotto, Marina R; Koob, George F; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Our previous observations show that chronic opiate administration, including self-administration, decrease the soma size of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rodents and humans, a morphological change correlated with increased firing rate and reward tolerance. Given that a general hallmark of drugs of abuse is to increase activity of the mesolimbic DA circuit, we sought to determine whether additional drug classes produced a similar morphological change. Sections containing VTA were obtained from rats that self-administered cocaine or ethanol and from mice that consumed nicotine. In contrast to opiates, we found no change in VTA DA soma size induced by any of these other drugs. These data suggest that VTA morphological changes are induced in a drug-specific manner and reinforce recent findings that some changes in mesolimbic signaling and neuroplasticity are drug-class dependent.

  7. 2D spatiotemporal visualization system of expired gaseous ethanol after oral administration for real-time illustrated analysis of alcohol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Ando, Eri; Takahashi, Daishi; Arakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Saito, Hirokazu; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2010-08-15

    A novel 2-dimensional spatiotemporal visualization system of expired gaseous ethanol after oral administration for real-time illustrated analysis of alcohol metabolism has been developed, which employed a low level light CCD camera to detect chemiluminescence (CL) generated by catalytic reactions of standard gaseous ethanol and expired gaseous ethanol after oral administration. First, the optimization of the substrates for visualization and the concentration of luminol solution for CL were investigated. The cotton mesh and 5.0 mmol L(-1) luminol solution were selected for further investigations and this system is useful for 0.1-20.0 mmol L(-1) of H(2)O(2) solution. Then, the effect of pH condition of Tris-HCl buffer solution was also evaluated with CL intensity and under the Tris-HCl buffer solution pH 10.1, a wide calibration range of standard gaseous ethanol (30-400 ppm) was obtained. Finally, expired air of 5 healthy volunteers after oral administration was measured at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 min after oral administration, and this system showed a good sensitivity on expired gaseous ethanol for alcohol metabolism. The peaks of expired gaseous ethanol concentration appeared within 30 min after oral administration. During the 30 min after oral administration, the time variation profile based on mean values showed the absorption and distribution function, and the values onward showed the elimination function. The absorption and distribution of expired gaseous ethanol in 5 healthy volunteers following first-order absorption process were faster than the elimination process, which proves efficacious of this system for described alcohol metabolism in healthy volunteers. This system is expected to be used as a non-invasive method to detect VOCs as well as several other drugs in expired air for clinical purpose.

  8. Low-Dose Prazosin Alone and in Combination with Propranolol or Naltrexone: Effects on Ethanol- and Sucrose-Seeking and Self-Administration in the P Rat

    PubMed Central

    Verplaetse, Terril L.; Czachowski, Cristine L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Evidence suggests that the noradrenergic system mediates ethanol-reinforcement. However, preclinical studies suggest that noradrenergic antagonists block other oral reinforcers indicating possible unwanted secondary medication effects. Methods This study examined combinations of low-dose prazosin with propranolol or naltrexone using a behavioral paradigm that separately assesses reinforcer-seeking and self-administration. Male alcohol-preferring (P) rats (n=20/experiment) were trained to complete a response requirement (RR) resulting in access to 1% sucrose (n=10) or 10% ethanol (n=10) for 20min. Rats received vehicle, prazosin alone (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg; intraperitoneally (IP)) or prazosin in combination with propranolol (5 mg/kg (IP); Exp1) or in combination with naltrexone (0.03 mg/kg (subcutaneously (SC); Exp2). Results For Exp1, prazosin alone effectively decreased sucrose-seeking more than ethanol-seeking, but decreased ethanol self-administration only. Propranolol alone effectively decreased ethanol-seeking more than sucrose-seeking and decreased ethanol intake only. At some dose combinations, there was a greater attenuation of ethanol and sucrose intake relative to either drug alone. For Exp2, prazosin alone and naltrexone alone were effective in decreasing ethanol-seeking and intake only. Combination treatment was more effective than either drug alone at decreasing ethanol-seeking and consumption and sucrose intake, but not sucrose-seeking. Conclusions Propranolol and naltrexone alone were specific to ethanol indicating that low doses of either medication may be beneficial in treating alcohol use disorders. Prazosin in combination with propranolol or naltrexone was more effective than either drug alone, but also reduced sucrose-reinforced behaviors. These data suggest that the noradrenergic system is a viable target for developing treatment approaches for problem drinkers. PMID:25743758

  9. Acute hepatopathy associated with mitotane administration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig B; Twedt, David C

    2006-01-01

    An adult dog with a persistent elevation in alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity was started on mitotane for suspected hyperadrenocorticism. One month later, the dog was presented for intermittent anorexia and acute icterus. The dog's liver enzyme activities and total bilirubin were markedly elevated, prothrombin time was prolonged, and blood urea nitrogen and glucose were low. Histopathology revealed marked, centrilobular, hepatocellular loss. After discontinuation of the mitotane, the dog recovered with supportive care and was normal 3 months later, which was consistent with mitotane-associated hepatic failure.

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of four solvent fractions of ethanol extract of Mentha spicata L. investigated on acute and chronic inflammation induced rats.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, P; Priya, N Gayatri; Subathra, M; Ramesh, A

    2008-07-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of four solvent fractions of ethanol extract of Mentha spicata were evaluated in acute and chronic inflammation induced in Wistar albino rats. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and some antioxidants produced during chronic inflammation were quantitated. Hexane (320mg/kg of body weight in 25% DMSO), chloroform (320mg/kg body weight in 25% DMSO), ethyl acetate (160mg/kg body weight in 25% DMSO), aqueous (320mg/kg of body weight in ddH(2)O) fractions, two negative control groups (25% DMSO and ddH(2)O) and two anti-inflammatory drugs (Diclofenac: 25mg/kg of body weight; Indomethacin: 10mg/kg of body weight both in ddH(2)O) were administered by oral intubations to the eight groups of rats consisting six animals, each. In acute study, 1% carrageenan was injected subcutaneously in the sub-plantar region of the right hind paw after 1h of administration of test doses. The increased paw edema was measured at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24h intervals. In the chronic study, the oral administration was carried out for seven consecutive days. On eighth day, four sterile cotton pellets (50mg each) were implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal region of the rats. On the sixteenth day, the rats were sacrificed and the cotton pellets with granulomatous tissue were dissected out and weighed (fresh and dry). Both in chronic and acute inflammation, ethyl acetate (EAF) and aqueous fraction (AF) were effective. EAF is comparable with the positive standards in chronic inflammation. The results indicate that EAF's anti-inflammatory activity is largely due to its ability to modulate in vivo antioxidants.

  11. Amelioration of alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity by the administration of ethanolic extract of Sida cordifolia Linn.

    PubMed

    Rejitha, S; Prathibha, P; Indira, M

    2012-10-01

    Sida cordifolia Linn. (Malvaceae) is a plant used in folk medicine for the treatment of the inflammation of oral mucosa, asthmatic bronchitis, nasal congestion and rheumatism. We studied the hepatoprotective activity of 50 % ethanolic extract of S. cordifolia Linn. against alcohol intoxication. The duration of the experiment was 90 d. The substantially elevated levels of toxicity markers such as alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transferase due to the alcohol treatment were significantly lowered in the extract-treated groups. The activity of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione content, which was lowered due to alcohol toxicity, was increased to a near-normal level in the co-administered group. Lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, total collagen and hydroxyproline, which were increased in the alcohol-treated group, were reduced in the co-administered group. The mRNA levels of cytochrome P450 2E1, NF-κB, TNF-α and transforming growth factor-β1 were found to be increased in the alcohol-treated rats, and their expressions were found to be decreased in the co-administered group. These observations were reinforced by histopathological analysis. Thus, the present study clearly indicates that 50 % ethanolic extract of the roots of S. cordifolia Linn. has a potent hepatoprotective action against alcohol-induced toxicity, which was mediated by lowering oxidative stress and by down-regulating the transcription factors.

  12. Tolerance to Ethanol or Nicotine Results in Increased Ethanol Self-Administration and Long-Term Depression in the Dorsolateral Striatum.

    PubMed

    Abburi, Chandrika; Wolfman, Shannon L; Metz, Ryan A E; Kamber, Rinya; McGehee, Daniel S; McDaid, John

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine are the most widely coabused drugs. Tolerance to EtOH intoxication, including motor impairment, results in greater EtOH consumption and may result in a greater likelihood of addiction. Previous studies suggest that cross-tolerance between EtOH and nicotine may contribute to the abuse potential of these drugs. Here we demonstrate that repeated intermittent administration of either EtOH or nicotine in adult male Sprague Dawley rats results in tolerance to EtOH-induced motor impairment and increased EtOH self-administration. These findings suggest that nicotine and EtOH cross-tolerance results in decreased aversive and enhanced rewarding effects of EtOH. Endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) has been implicated in both EtOH tolerance and reward, so we investigated whether nicotine or EtOH pretreatment might modulate endocannabinoid signaling in this region. Using similar EtOH and nicotine pretreatment methods resulted in increased paired-pulse ratios of evoked EPSCs in enkephalin-positive medium spiny neurons in DLS slices. Thus, EtOH and nicotine pretreatment may modulate glutamatergic synapses in the DLS presynaptically. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist Win 55,2-212 increased the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in control slices, while Win 55,2-212 had no effect on paired-pulse ratio in slices from either EtOH- or nicotine-pretreated rats. Consistent with these effects, nicotine pretreatment occluded LTD induction by high-frequency stimulation of the corticostriatal inputs to the dorsolateral striatum. These results suggest that nicotine and EtOH pretreatment modulates striatal synapses to induce tolerance to the motor-impairing effects of EtOH, which may contribute to nicotine and EtOH coabuse.

  13. Tolerance to Ethanol or Nicotine Results in Increased Ethanol Self-Administration and Long-Term Depression in the Dorsolateral Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Abburi, Chandrika; Wolfman, Shannon L.; Metz, Ryan A. E.; Kamber, Rinya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine are the most widely coabused drugs. Tolerance to EtOH intoxication, including motor impairment, results in greater EtOH consumption and may result in a greater likelihood of addiction. Previous studies suggest that cross-tolerance between EtOH and nicotine may contribute to the abuse potential of these drugs. Here we demonstrate that repeated intermittent administration of either EtOH or nicotine in adult male Sprague Dawley rats results in tolerance to EtOH-induced motor impairment and increased EtOH self-administration. These findings suggest that nicotine and EtOH cross-tolerance results in decreased aversive and enhanced rewarding effects of EtOH. Endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) has been implicated in both EtOH tolerance and reward, so we investigated whether nicotine or EtOH pretreatment might modulate endocannabinoid signaling in this region. Using similar EtOH and nicotine pretreatment methods resulted in increased paired-pulse ratios of evoked EPSCs in enkephalin-positive medium spiny neurons in DLS slices. Thus, EtOH and nicotine pretreatment may modulate glutamatergic synapses in the DLS presynaptically. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist Win 55,2-212 increased the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in control slices, while Win 55,2-212 had no effect on paired-pulse ratio in slices from either EtOH- or nicotine-pretreated rats. Consistent with these effects, nicotine pretreatment occluded LTD induction by high-frequency stimulation of the corticostriatal inputs to the dorsolateral striatum. These results suggest that nicotine and EtOH pretreatment modulates striatal synapses to induce tolerance to the motor-impairing effects of EtOH, which may contribute to nicotine and EtOH coabuse. PMID:27517088

  14. Cannabidiol reduces ethanol consumption, motivation and relapse in mice.

    PubMed

    Viudez-Martínez, Adrián; García-Gutiérrez, María S; Navarrón, Carmen María; Morales-Calero, María Isabel; Navarrete, Francisco; Torres-Suárez, Ana Isabel; Manzanares, Jorge

    2017-02-13

    This study evaluated the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on ethanol reinforcement, motivation and relapse in C57BL/6 J mice. The effects of CBD (60 mg/kg, i.p.) on blood ethanol concentration, hypothermia and handling-induced convulsions associated to acute ethanol administration were evaluated. The two-bottle choice paradigm was performed to assess the effects of CBD (30, 60 and 120 mg/kg/day, i.p.) on ethanol intake and preference. In addition, an oral ethanol self-administration experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of CBD [a single s.c. administration of a microparticle formulation providing CBD continuous controlled release (30 mg/kg/day)] on the reinforcement and motivation for ethanol. The effects of CBD (60 and 120 mg/kg/day, i.p.) on ethanol-induced relapse were also evaluated. Gene expression analyses of tyrosine hydroxylase in ventral tegmental area and μ-opioid (Oprm1), cannabinoid (CB1 r and CB2 r) and GPR55 receptors in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) were carried out by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cannabidiol reduced the ethanol-induced hypothermia and handling-induced convulsion but failed to modify blood ethanol concentration. CBD reduced ethanol consumption and preference in the two-bottle choice, significantly decreased ethanol intake and the number of effective responses in the oral ethanol self-administration, and reduced ethanol-induced relapse. Furthermore, the administration of CBD significantly reduced relative gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area, Oprm1, CB1 r and GPR55 in the NAcc and significantly increased CB2 r in the NAcc. Taken together, these results reveal that the administration of CBD reduced the reinforcing properties, motivation and relapse for ethanol. These findings strongly suggest that CBD may result useful for the treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  15. Probing the modulation of acute ethanol intoxication by pharmacological manipulation of the NMDAR glycine coagonist site

    PubMed Central

    Debrouse, Lauren; Hurd, Benita; Kiselycznyk, Carly; Plitt, Aaron; Todaro, Alyssa; Mishina, Masayoshi; Grant, Seth; Camp, Marguerite; Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Holmes, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Stimulating the glycineB binding site on the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) has been proposed as a novel mechanism for modulating behavioral effects of ethanol (EtOH) that are mediated via the NMDAR, including acute intoxication. Here, we pharmacologically interrogated this hypothesis in mice. METHODS Effects of systemic injection of the glycineB agonist, D-serine, the GlyT-1 glycine transporter inhibitor, ALX-5407, and the glycineB antagonist, L-701,324, were tested for effects on EtOH-induced ataxia, hypothermia, loss of righting reflex duration (LORR) in C57BL/6J (B6) and 129S1/SvImJ (S1) inbred mice. Effects of the glycineB partial agonist, D-cycloserine, the GlyT-1 inhibitor, NFPS, and the glycineB antagonist, DCKA, on EtOH-induced LORR duration were also tested. Interaction effects on EtOH-induced LORR duration were examined via combined treatment with D-serine and ALX-5407, D-serine and MK-801, D-serine and L-701,324, as well as L-701,324 and ALX-5407, in B6 mice, as D-serine in GluN2A and PSD-95 KO mice. The effect of dietary depletion of Magnesium (Mg), an element which interacts the glycineB site, was also tested. RESULTS Neither D-serine, D-cycloserine, ALX-5407, nor NFPS significantly affected EtOH intoxication on any of the measures or strains studied. L-701,324, but not DCKA, dose-dependently potentiated the ataxia-inducing effects of EtOH and increased EtOH-induced (but not pentobarbital-induced) LORR duration. D-serine did not have interactive effects on EtOH-induced LORR duration when combined with ALX-5407. The EtOH-potentiating effects of L-701,324, but not MK-801, on LORR duration were prevented by D-serine, but not ALX-5407. Mg depletion potentiated LORR duration in B6 mice and was lethal in a large proportion of S1 mice. CONCLUSIONS GlycineB site activation failed to produce the hypothesized reduction in EtOH intoxication across a range of measures and genetic strains, but blockade of the glycineB site potentiated Et

  16. Neuropeptide Y administration into the amygdala suppresses ethanol drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats following multiple deprivations.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Stewart, Robert B; Badia-Elder, Nancy E

    2008-09-01

    The present experiment examines the effects of NPY administered into the amygdala on ethanol drinking by alcohol-preferring P rats following long-term continuous ethanol access, with and without multiple periods of imposed ethanol abstinence. P rats had access to 15% (v/v) ethanol and water for 11 weeks followed by 2 weeks of ethanol abstinence, re-exposure to ethanol for 2 weeks, 2 more weeks of ethanol abstinence, and a final ethanol re-exposure. Immediately prior to the second ethanol re-exposure, 4 groups of rats received bilateral infusions NPY (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 microg) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) into the amygdala. Two additional groups were given uninterrupted ethanol access and were infused with a single NPY dose (1.0 microg) or aCSF. The highest NPY dose (1.0 microg) suppressed ethanol intake for 24 h in rats with a history of ethanol abstinence (i.e. deprivation) periods, but had no effect in rats with a history of continuous ethanol access. Water and food intakes were not altered. These results suggest that the amygdala mediates the suppressive effects of centrally administered NPY on ethanol drinking, and that NPY may block relapse-like drinking by opposing the anxiogenic effects of ethanol abstinence.

  17. Neuropeptide Y Administration into the Amygdala Suppresses Ethanol Drinking in Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats Following Multiple Deprivations

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Stewart, Robert B.; Badia-Elder, Nancy E.

    2008-01-01

    The present experiment examines the effects of NPY administered into the amygdala on ethanol drinking by alcohol-preferring P rats following long-term continuous ethanol access, with and without multiple periods of imposed ethanol abstinence. P rats had access to 15% (v/v) ethanol and water for 11 weeks followed by 2 weeks of ethanol abstinence, re-exposure to ethanol for 2 weeks, 2 more weeks of ethanol abstinence, and a final ethanol re-exposure. Immediately prior to the second ethanol re-exposure, 4 groups of rats received bilateral infusions NPY (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 μg) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) into the amygdala. Two additional groups were given uninterrupted ethanol access and were infused with a single NPY dose (1.0 μg) or aCSF. The highest NPY dose (1.0 μg) suppressed ethanol intake for 24 hrs in rats with a history of ethanol abstinence (i.e. deprivation) periods, but had no effect in rats with a history of continuous ethanol access. Water and food intakes were not altered. These results suggest that the amygdala mediates the suppressive effects of centrally administered NPY on ethanol drinking, and that NPY may block relapse-like drinking by opposing the anxiogenic effects of ethanol abstinence. PMID:18499241

  18. The effect of acute and prolonged ethanol treatment on the concentrations of coenzyme A, carnitine and their derivatives in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Kondrup, Jens; Grunnet, Niels

    1973-01-01

    1. CoA, acetyl-CoA, long-chain acyl-CoA, carnitine, acetylcarnitine and long-chain acylcarnitine were measured in rat liver under various conditions. 2. Starvation caused an increase in the contents of these intermediates, except that of carnitine. 3. A single dose of ethanol had no effect on CoA content, whereas those of acetyl-CoA, acetylcarnitine and carnitine were increased and those of long-chain acyl-CoA and acylcarnitine were decreased. 4. Four weeks' adaptation to ethanol consumption did not change the effect of ethanol administration on these metabolites. 5. It is suggested that ethanol directly increases hepatic fatty acid synthesis and esterification. It is also suggested that this change is reversible and limited to the period of ethanol oxidation. 6. It is demonstrated that ethanol-induced triglyceride accumulation is not related to carnitine deficiency. PMID:4737499

  19. Sex differences in sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol and social drinking during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Truxell, Eric M; Spear, Linda P

    2015-04-01

    In human adolescents, sociable males frequently drink to enhance positive emotional states, whereas anxious females often drink to avoid negative affective states. This study used a rat model of adolescence to provide information regarding possible sex differences in contributors to social drinking. The effects of ethanol (0, 0.5, and 0.75g/kg) on play fighting and social preference were assessed on P30, P32, and P34 using a within-subject design. Then animals were tested in a social drinking paradigm (P37-P40), with this testing revealing high drinkers and low drinkers. Sex differences in sensitivity to ethanol emerged among high and low drinkers. High socially drinking males, but not females, when tested prior to drinking sessions, showed significant increases in play fighting at both doses. In low drinking males, play fighting was increased by 0.5g/kg ethanol, whereas the higher dose of 0.75g/kg produced significant decreases in play fighting. High drinking females initially showed low levels of social preference than high drinking males and low drinking females and were extremely sensitive to ethanol-induced enhancement of this social measure. Low social drinkers, both males and females, were more sensitive to the suppressing effects of ethanol on social preference following 0.75g/kg ethanol. These findings indicate that during adolescence enhanced sensitivity to the facilitating effects of ethanol on play fighting is associated with heavy drinking among males, whereas low social preference together with high sensitivity to ethanol-induced enhancement of social preference is related to high social drinking in females.

  20. Sex differences in sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol and social drinking during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Truxell, Eric M.; Spear, Linda P.

    2015-01-01

    In human adolescents, sociable males frequently drink to enhance positive emotional states, whereas anxious females often drink to avoid negative affective states. This study used a rat model of adolescence to provide information regarding possible sex differences in contributors to social drinking. The effects of ethanol (0, 0.5, and 0.75 g/kg) on play fighting and social preference were assessed on P30, P32, and P34 using a within-subject design. Then animals were tested in a social drinking paradigm (P37-P40), with this testing revealing high drinkers and low drinkers. Sex differences in sensitivity to ethanol emerged among high and low drinkers. High socially drinking males, but not females, when tested prior to drinking sessions, showed significant increases in play fighting at both doses. In low drinking males, play fighting was increased by 0.5 g/kg ethanol, whereas the higher dose of 0.75 g/kg produced significant decreases in play fighting. High drinking females initially showed low levels of social preference than high drinking males and low drinking females and were extremely sensitive to ethanol-induced enhancement of this social measure. Low social drinkers, both males and females, were more sensitive to the suppressing effects of ethanol on social preference following 0.75 g/kg ethanol. These findings indicate that during adolescence enhanced sensitivity to the facilitating effects of ethanol on play fighting is associated with heavy drinking among males, whereas low social preference together with high sensitivity to ethanol-induced enhancement of social preference is related to high social drinking in females. PMID:25557799

  1. GM1 ganglioside reduces the motor incoordination and loss of righting reflex caused by acute ethanol in C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, C.; Rezazadeh, S.M.; Forster, M.J.; Lal, H. )

    1992-02-26

    Ethanol produces its intoxicating effects by modifying neuronal membranes. Gangliosides stabilize neuronal membranes and promote their recovery from a variety of insults. In this experiment, the efficacy of GM1(i.p.) to reverse ethanol intoxication was evaluated in male mice trained to run on a constantly accelerating rotorod. When mice were tested 15-min following saline or ethanol GM1 pre-treatment reduced rotorod performance by 15% but was ineffective in modifying the ethanol-impaired performance. However, when mice were tested at 15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 min intervals following ethanol, GM1 pre-treatments dose-dependently reduced the efficacy and duration of ethanol in producing motor incoordination. Further, GM1 given prior to ethanol significantly prolonged the time to onset of the loss of righting reflex from 1.4 to 1.9 min, and reduced the duration of the righting-reflex loss from 94 to 77 min. This GM1 effect was seen at 24 h, but not at 48 or 72 h after its administration. The blood ethanol concentration at awakening was significantly higher in 24h GM1-treated animals than in controls suggesting that the GM1 effect was not due to an alteration in ethanol clearance. These findings support the hypothesis that GM1 promotes recovery from ethanol intoxication via a neuroprotective mechanism.

  2. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  3. Neurocognitive performance following acute mephedrone administration, with and without alcohol.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Fernandes Perna, E B; Papaseit, E; Pérez-Mañá, C; Mateus, J; Theunissen, E L; Kuypers, Kpc; de la Torre, R; Farré, M; Ramaekers, J G

    2016-12-01

    Recreational use of mephedrone, alone and in combination with alcohol, has increased over the past years. Pharmacological properties of mephedrone share similarities with methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), but its effect on neurocognitive function has not been well established in humans. The present study assessed the effect of mephedrone alone and after co-administration with alcohol on neurocognitive function. It was hypothesised that mephedrone would improve psychomotor performance but impair memory performance, when administered alone. Neurocognitive performance was expected to be impaired following mephedrone when combined with alcohol. Eleven participants received single doses of 200 mg mephedrone or placebo combined with 0.8 g/kg alcohol or placebo. Neurocognitive performance was assessed at baseline (T0), at one hour (T1) and four hours after (T2) mephedrone administration, by means of the Divided Attention Task (DAT), Critical Tracking Task (CTT), and the Spatial Memory Test (SMT). Mephedrone intoxication impaired short-term spatial memory at T1 and improved critical tracking performance at T2 Mephedrone alone did not affect divided attention, but did show an interaction with alcohol on reaction time at T2 Reaction time decreased when mephedrone was combined with alcohol as compared to alcohol alone. Alcohol intoxication impaired both short- and long-term spatial memory at T1 and divided attention at T1 and T2 Critical tracking performance was not affected by alcohol intoxication. The current findings support the hypothesis that mephedrone improves psychomotor performance, impairs spatial memory and does not affect divided attention performance. Stimulatory effects of mephedrone were not sufficient to compensate for the impairing effects of alcohol on most performance parameters.

  4. Behavioural antecedents to pro re nata psychotropic medication administration on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Robson, Deborah; Chaplin, Robert; Quirk, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the antecedents to administration of pro re nata (PRN) psychotropic medication on acute psychiatric wards, with a particular focus on its use in response to patient aggression and other conflict behaviours. A sample of 522 adult in-patients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in England. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2  weeks of admission. Two-thirds of patients received PRN medication during this period, but only 30% of administrations were preceded by patient conflict (usually aggression). Instead, it was typically administered to prevent escalation of patient behaviour and to help patients sleep. Overall, no conflict behaviours or further staff intervention occurred after 61% of PRN administrations. However, a successful outcome was less likely when medication was administered in response to patient aggression. The study concludes that improved monitoring, review procedures, training for nursing staff, and guidelines for the administration of PRN medications are needed.

  5. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, G; Fernandes-Santos, J; Moreira-Silva, D; Marin, M T

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30-35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a "three-bottle choice" paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors.

  6. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, G.; Fernandes-Santos, J.; Moreira-Silva, D.; Marin, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30–35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a “three-bottle choice” paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors. PMID:26628398

  7. The effects of acute exposure to ethanol on neurotensin and guanine nucleotide-stimulation of phospholipase C activity in intact NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Both ethanol and neurotensin produce sedation and hypothermia. When administered in combination the behavioral effects of these two substances are potentiated. In order to better understand the biochemical nature of this interaction, the direct effects of ethanol on neurotensin receptors and an associated signal transduction process were determined in NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells. Ethanol in physiologically relevant concentrations significantly reduced neurotensin stimulated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production while having no effect on the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)neurotensin. In addition, ethanol up to 200 mM had no effect on GTPYS mediated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production. The results indicate that acute exposure ethanol partially disrupts the normal coupling of activated neurotensin receptors to the guanine nucleotide binding protein associated with phospholipase C.

  8. Acute ethanol exposure suppresses the repair of O6-methylguanine DNA lesions in castrated adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D M; Tentler, J J; Carney, J P; Wilson, T M; Kelley, M R

    1994-10-01

    Alcohol has clearly been associated with an increase of cancers in numerous tissue, including the respiratory tract, colon, rectum, liver, but especially the esophagus, larynx, pharynx, and mouth. Alcohol alone has not been shown to be a mutagen until it is converted to acetaldehyde and, therefore, alcohol presumably acts as a cocarcinogen. Previous data has shown that alcohol concentrations of 2% or greater inhibits DNA repair, and in light of the widespread consumption of alcoholic beverages with alcohol contents ranging from 4 to 5% (beer and wine coolers) to 50% (whiskey), interest in determining the mechanism(s) responsible for alcohol-induced carcinogenesis has heightened. Although previous studies, in intact rats, have investigated the effects of chronic alcohol exposure on some aspects of DNA repair, we have begun to address the effects of acute or "binge" alcohol exposure on mammalian DNA repair. Toward this end, we report the inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) by a single intraperitoneal injection of 30% ethanol in adult male castrated rats. This inhibition lasted for at least 24 hr. We also observed a dose-response effect of ethanol on MGMT activity, again only in the castrated rats. The finding of ethanol's effect on MGMT activity in castrated and not intact rats implies a hormonal component of MGMT DNA repair response, which has only been alluded to in past research.

  9. Adolescent and adult rats differ in the amnesic effects of acute ethanol in two hippocampus-dependent tasks: Trace and contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S; Barnet, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Experience-produced deficits in trace conditioning and context conditioning have been useful tools for examining the role of the hippocampus in learning. It has also been suggested that learning in these tasks is especially vulnerable to neurotoxic effects of alcohol during key developmental periods such as adolescence. In five experiments we systematically examined the presence and source of age-dependent vulnerability to the memory-disrupting effects of acute ethanol in trace conditioning and contextual fear conditioning. In Experiment 1a pre-training ethanol disrupted trace conditioning more strongly in adolescent (postnatal day, PD30-35) than adult rats (PD65-75). In Experiment 1b when pre-training ethanol was accompanied by pre-test ethanol no deficit in trace conditioning was observed in adolescents, suggesting that state-dependent retrieval failure mediated ethanol's disruption of trace conditioning at this age. Experiment 2a and b examined the effect of ethanol pretreatment on context conditioning. Here, adult but not adolescent rats were impaired in conditioned freezing to context cues. Experiment 2c explored state-dependency of this effect. Pre-training ethanol continued to disrupt context conditioning in adults even when ethanol was also administered prior to test. Collectively these findings reveal clear age-dependent and task-dependent vulnerabilities in ethanol's disruptive effects on hippocampus-dependent memory. Adolescents were more disrupted by ethanol in trace conditioning than adults, and adults were more disrupted by ethanol in context conditioning than adolescents. We suggest that adolescents may be more susceptible to changes in internal state (state-dependent retrieval failure) than adults and that ethanol disrupted performance in trace and context conditioning through different mechanisms. Relevance of these findings to theories of hippocampus function is discussed.

  10. Adolescent and Adult Rats Differ in the Amnesic Effects of Acute Ethanol in Two Hippocampus-Dependent Tasks: Trace and Contextual Fear Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Pamela S.; Barnet, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-produced deficits in trace conditioning and context conditioning have been useful tools for examining the role of the hippocampus in learning. It has also been suggested that learning in these tasks is especially vulnerable to neurotoxic effects of alcohol during key developmental periods such as adolescence. In five experiments we systematically examined the presence and source of age-dependent vulnerability to the memory-disrupting effects of acute ethanol in trace conditioning and contextual fear conditioning. In Experiment 1a pre-training ethanol disrupted trace conditioning more strongly in adolescent (postnatal day, PD30-35) than adult rats (PD65-75). In Experiment 1b when pre-training ethanol was accompanied by pre-test ethanol no deficit in trace conditioning was observed in adolescents, suggesting that state-dependent retrieval failure mediated ethanol's disruption of trace conditioning at this age. Experiments 2a and 2b examined the effect of ethanol pretreatment on context conditioning. Here, adult but not adolescent rats were impaired in conditioned freezing to context cues. Experiment 2c explored state-dependency of this effect. Pre-training ethanol continued to disrupt context conditioning in adults even when ethanol was also administered prior to test. Collectively these findings reveal clear age-dependent and task-dependent vulnerabilities in ethanol's disruptive effects on hippocampus-dependent memory. Adolescents were more disrupted by ethanol in trace conditioning than adults, and adults were more disrupted by ethanol in context conditioning than adolescents. We suggest that adolescents may be more susceptible to changes in internal state (state-dependent retrieval failure) than adults and that ethanol disrupted performance in trace and context conditioning through different mechanisms. Relevance of these findings to theories of hippocampus function is discussed. PMID:26192910

  11. Chronic ethanol ingestion impairs alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function and predisposes to endotoxin-mediated acute edematous lung injury in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Holguin, F; Moss, I; Brown, L A; Guidot, D M

    1998-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases the incidence and mortality of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in septic patients. To examine a potential mechanism, we hypothesized that ethanol ingestion predisposes to sepsis-mediated acute lung injury by decreasing alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function. Lungs isolated from rats fed ethanol (20% in water for >/= 3 wk), compared with lungs from control-fed rats, had greater (P < 0. 05) edematous injury (reflected by nonhydrostatic weight gain) after endotoxin (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and subsequent perfusion ex vivo with n-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP, 10(-7) M). Ethanol ingestion decreased (P < 0.05) glutathione levels in the plasma, lung tissue, and lung lavage fluid, and increased (P < 0.05) oxidized glutathione levels in the lung lavage fluid. Furthermore, ethanol ingestion decreased type II cell glutathione content by 95% (P < 0.05), decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell surfactant synthesis and secretion, and decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell viability, in vitro. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursors S-adenosyl-L-methionine and N-acetylcysteine in the final week of ethanol ingestion significantly reduced lung edema during perfusion ex vivo. We conclude that ethanol ingestion in rats alters alveolar type II cell glutathione levels and function, thereby predisposing the lung to acute edematous injury after endotoxemia. We speculate that chronic alcohol abuse in humans predisposes to ARDS through similar mechanisms. PMID:9466970

  12. Brain and Muscle Redox Imbalance Elicited by Acute Ethylmalonic Acid Administration

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Milanez, Ana Paula; Felisberto, Francine; Galant, Leticia Selinger; Machado, Jéssica Luca; Furlanetto, Camila Brulezi; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Ethylmalonic acid (EMA) accumulates in tissues and biological fluids of patients affected by short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) and ethylmalonic encephalopathy, illnesses characterized by neurological and muscular symptoms. Considering that the mechanisms responsible for the brain and skeletal muscle damage in these diseases are poorly known, in the present work we investigated the effects of acute EMA administration on redox status parameters in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle from 30-day-old rats. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of EMA (6 μmol/g; 90 min interval between injections) and were killed 1 h after the last administration. Control animals received saline in the same volumes. EMA administration significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, indicating increased lipid peroxidation. In addition, carbonyl content was increased in EMA-treated animal skeletal muscle when compared to the saline group. EMA administration also significantly increased 2’,7’-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and superoxide production (reactive species markers), and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex, while glutathione levels were decreased only in skeletal muscle. On the other hand, respiratory chain complex I-III activity was altered by acute EMA administration neither in cerebral cortex nor in skeletal muscle. The present results show that acute EMA administration elicits oxidative stress in rat brain and skeletal muscle, suggesting that oxidative damage may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain and muscle symptoms found in patients affected by SCADD and ethylmalonic encephalopathy. PMID:26010931

  13. Brain and muscle redox imbalance elicited by acute ethylmalonic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Milanez, Ana Paula; Felisberto, Francine; Galant, Leticia Selinger; Machado, Jéssica Luca; Furlanetto, Camila Brulezi; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Ethylmalonic acid (EMA) accumulates in tissues and biological fluids of patients affected by short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) and ethylmalonic encephalopathy, illnesses characterized by neurological and muscular symptoms. Considering that the mechanisms responsible for the brain and skeletal muscle damage in these diseases are poorly known, in the present work we investigated the effects of acute EMA administration on redox status parameters in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle from 30-day-old rats. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of EMA (6 μmol/g; 90 min interval between injections) and were killed 1 h after the last administration. Control animals received saline in the same volumes. EMA administration significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, indicating increased lipid peroxidation. In addition, carbonyl content was increased in EMA-treated animal skeletal muscle when compared to the saline group. EMA administration also significantly increased 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and superoxide production (reactive species markers), and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex, while glutathione levels were decreased only in skeletal muscle. On the other hand, respiratory chain complex I-III activity was altered by acute EMA administration neither in cerebral cortex nor in skeletal muscle. The present results show that acute EMA administration elicits oxidative stress in rat brain and skeletal muscle, suggesting that oxidative damage may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain and muscle symptoms found in patients affected by SCADD and ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

  14. Formation of a fibrin based gelatinous coat over repairing rat gastric epithelium after acute ethanol damage: interaction with adherent mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, L A; Allen, A; Bennett, M K

    1987-01-01

    A gelatinous coat, heterogeneous in appearance, was formed over damaged rat gastric mucosa recovering from acute ethanol injury. This coat, in places 1.6 mm thick (median thickness 680 microns), was 10 times thicker than the translucent layer of adherent mucus (median thickness 70 microns) covering the undamaged mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and periodic acid Schiff staining showed this gelatinous coat to be predominantly a fibrin gel with an exterior layer rich in mucus and necrotic cells. The plasma clotting time was significantly decreased in vitro by pig gastric mucus gel and soluble mucus glycoprotein (90% and 13% respectively) suggesting that in vivo the mucus layer remaining after epithelial damage could act as a template for fibrinogen-fibrin conversion. These results show that a fibrin based gelatinous coat, quite distinct from the adherent mucus layer and with considerable protective potential could be formed over the repairing rat gastric mucosa after acute ethanol damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3653751

  15. Antidepressant Effect of Aminophylline After Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Escudeiro, Sarah Souza; Soares, Paula Matias; Almeida, Anália Barbosa; de Freitas Guimarães Lobato, Rodrigo; de Araujo, Dayane Pessoa; Macedo, Danielle Silveira; Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço; Patrocínio, Manoel Cláudio Azevedo; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2013-01-01

    This work investigated the association of acute ethanol and aminophylline administration on behavioral models of depression and prefrontal monoamine levels (i.e. norepinephrine and dopamine) in mice. The animals received a single dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) or aminophylline (5 or 10 mg/kg) alone or in association. Thirty minutes after the last drug administration, the animals were assessed in behavioral models by the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. After these tests, the animals were sacrificed and the prefrontal cortices dissected to measure monoamine content. Results showed that ethanol presented depression-like activity in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. These effects were reversed by the association with aminophylline in all tests. Norepinephrine and dopamine levels decreased, while an increase in the dopamine metabolite, (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acetic acid (DOPAC), after ethanol administration was observed. On the contrary, the association of ethanol and aminophylline increased the norepinephrine and dopamine content, while it decreased DOPAC when compared to the ethanol group, confirming the alterations observed in the behavioral tests. These data reinforce the involvement of the adenosinergic system on ethanol effects, highlighting the importance of the norepinephrine and dopamine pathways in the prefrontal cortex to the effects of ethanol. PMID:23641339

  16. Effects of Acute Prenatal Exposure to Ethanol on microRNA Expression are Ameliorated by Social Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Cherry; Mooney, Sandra M.; Middleton, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are associated with abnormal social behavior. These behavioral changes may resemble those seen in autism. Rats acutely exposed to ethanol on gestational day 12 show decreased social motivation at postnatal day 42. We previously showed that housing these ethanol-exposed rats with non-exposed controls normalized this deficit. The amygdala is critical for social behavior and regulates it, in part, through connections with the basal ganglia, particularly the ventral striatum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, hairpin-derived RNAs that repress mRNA expression. Many brain disorders, including FASD, show dysregulation of miRNAs. In this study, we tested if miRNA and mRNA networks are altered in the amygdala and ventral striatum as a consequence of prenatal ethanol exposure and show any evidence of reversal as a result of social enrichment. RNA samples from two different brain regions in 72 male and female adolescent rats were analyzed by RNA-Seq and microarray analysis. Several miRNAs showed significant changes due to prenatal ethanol exposure and/or social enrichment in one or both brain regions. The top predicted gene targets of these miRNAs were mapped and subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. Several miRNA changes caused by ethanol were reversed by social enrichment, including mir-204, mir-299a, miR-384-5p, miR-222-3p, miR-301b-3p, and mir-6239. Moreover, enriched gene networks incorporating the targets of these miRNAs also showed reversal. We also extended our previously published mRNA expression analysis by directly examining all annotated brain-related canonical pathways. The additional pathways that were most strongly affected at the mRNA level included p53, CREB, glutamate, and GABA signaling. Together, our data suggest a number of novel epigenetic mechanisms for social enrichment to reverse the effects of ethanol exposure through widespread influences on gene expression. PMID:25309888

  17. Effects of concomitant methylphenidate and ethanol administration on working and reference memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Anthony R; McGovern, Robin; Buffalari, Deanne M

    Recent studies have suggested that college students are heavily engaged in non-medical use of stimulant drugs prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This age group is also at high risk for alcohol use. Despite their potential co-abuse, little work has examined how these drugs interact to affect cognitive abilities. In fact, these drugs have opposing effects on working memory, which brings into question how they may interact to affect this particular behavior. The purpose of this research was to examine the concomitant effects of methylphenidate (MPH) and ethanol (EtOH) on working and reference memory. Rats were first trained on the radial arm maze task to establish a baseline performance rate measured as average number of reference and working memory errors. Performance was then assessed after injections of saline, MPH alone, EtOH alone, and MPH+EtOH combined. While both doses of MPH caused nonsignificant improvements in working memory, when combined with EtOH, there was an overall impairment in working and reference memory compared to other conditions. EtOH alone also decreased memory. These data indicate increased impairment of memory function with combined MPH and EtOH use. By understanding how the combination of methylphenidate and alcohol affects memory, we can better assess the risks of taking both substances simultaneously.

  18. Differential effects of nicotine treatment and ethanol self-administration on CYP2A6, CYP2B6 and nicotine pharmacokinetics in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C S; Miksys, S; Palmour, R M; Tyndale, R F

    2012-12-01

    In primates, nicotine is metabolically inactivated in the liver by CYP2A6 and possibly CYP2B6. Changes in the levels of these two enzymes may affect nicotine pharmacokinetics and influence smoking behaviors. This study investigated the independent and combined effects of ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment (0.5 mg/kg b.i.d. s.c.) on hepatic CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 levels (mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity), in vitro nicotine metabolism, and in vivo nicotine pharmacokinetics in monkeys. CYP2A6 mRNA and protein levels and in vitro coumarin (selective CYP2A6 substrate) and nicotine metabolism were decreased by nicotine treatment but unaffected by ethanol. CYP2B6 protein levels and in vitro bupropion (selective CYP2B6 substrate) metabolism were increased by ethanol but unaffected by nicotine treatment; CYP2B6 mRNA levels were unaltered by either treatment. Combined ethanol and nicotine exposure decreased CYP2A6 mRNA and protein levels, as well as in vitro coumarin and nicotine metabolism, and increased CYP2B6 protein levels and in vitro bupropion metabolism, with no change in CYP2B6 mRNA levels. Chronic nicotine resulted in higher nicotine plasma levels achieved after nicotine administration, consistent with decreased CYP2A6. Ethanol alone, or combined with nicotine, resulted in lower nicotine plasma levels by a mechanism independent of the change in these enzymes. Thus, nicotine can decrease hepatic CYP2A6, reducing the metabolism of its substrates, including nicotine, whereas ethanol can increase hepatic CYP2B6, increasing the metabolism of CYP2B6 substrates. In vivo nicotine pharmacokinetics are differentially affected by ethanol and nicotine, but when both drugs are used in combination the effect more closely resembles ethanol alone.

  19. TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE
    AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    Michael F. Hughes, Ph.D., Brenda C. Edwards, Carol T. Mitchell and Elaina M. Kenyon, Ph.D. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Nation...

  20. Chronic and acute alcohol administration induced neurochemical changes in the brain: comparison of distinct zebrafish populations.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Diptendu; Shams, Soaleha; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The zebrafish is increasingly utilized in the analysis of the effects of ethanol (alcohol) on brain function and behavior. We have shown significant population-dependent alcohol-induced changes in zebrafish behavior and have started to analyze alterations in dopaminergic and serotoninergic responses. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on levels of selected neurochemicals using a 2 × 3 (chronic × acute) between-subject alcohol exposure paradigm randomized for two zebrafish populations, AB and SF. Each fish first received the particular chronic treatment (0 or 0.5 vol/vol% alcohol) and subsequently the acute exposure (0, 0.5 or 1.0% alcohol). We report changes in levels of dopamine, DOPAC, serotonin, 5HIAA, glutamate, GABA, aspartate, glycine and taurine as quantified from whole brain extracts using HPLC. We also analyze monoamine oxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase enzymatic activity. The results demonstrate that compared to SF, AB is more responsive to both acute alcohol exposure and acute alcohol withdrawal at the level of neurochemistry, a finding that correlates well with prior behavioral observations and one which suggests the involvement of genes in the observed alcohol effects. We discuss correlations between the current results and prior behavioral findings, and stress the importance of characterization of zebrafish strains for future behavior genetic and psychopharmacology studies.

  1. The effects of acute alcohol administration on the human brain: insights from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bjork, James M; Gilman, Jodi M

    2014-09-01

    Over the last quarter century, researchers have peered into the living human brain to develop and refine mechanistic accounts of alcohol-induced behavior, as well as neurobiological mechanisms for development and maintenance of addiction. These in vivo neuroimaging studies generally show that acute alcohol administration affects brain structures implicated in motivation and behavior control, and that chronic intoxication is correlated with structural and functional abnormalities in these same structures, where some elements of these decrements normalize with extended sobriety. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about acute human brain responses to alcohol using neuroimaging techniques, and how they might explain behavioral effects of alcohol intoxication. We then briefly address how chronic alcohol intoxication (as inferred from cross-sectional differences between various drinking populations and controls) may yield individual brain differences between drinking subjects that may confound interpretation of acute alcohol administration effects. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'.

  2. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  3. Association of Geographical Factors With Administration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Susumu; Morishima, Toshitaka; Ukawa, Naoto; Ikai, Hiroshi; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Koichi B.; Yokota, Chiaki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke if administered within a few hours of stroke onset. Because of this time restriction, tPA administration remains infrequent. Ambulance use is an effective strategy for increasing tPA administration but may be influenced by geographical factors. The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between tPA administration and ambulance use and to examine how patient travel distance and population density affect tPA utilization. Methods and Results We analyzed administrative claims data from 114 194 acute ischemic stroke cases admitted to 603 hospitals between July 2010 and March 2012. Mixed‐effects logistic regression models of patients nested within hospitals with a random intercept were generated to analyze possible predictive factors (including patient characteristics, ambulance use, and driving time from home to hospital) of tPA administration for different population density categories to investigate differences in these factors in various regional backgrounds. Approximately 5.1% (5797/114 194) of patients received tPA. The composition of baseline characteristics varied among the population density categories, but adjustment for covariates resulted in all factors having similar associations with tPA administration in every category. The administration of tPA was associated with patient age and severity of stroke symptoms, but driving time showed no association. Ambulance use was significantly associated with tPA administration even after adjustment for covariates. Conclusion The association between ambulance use and tPA administration suggests the importance of calling an ambulance for suspected stroke. Promoting ambulance use for acute ischemic stroke patients may increase tPA use. PMID:24045119

  4. GM1 ganglioside reduces ethanol intoxication and the development of ethanol dependence.

    PubMed

    Wallis, C J; Rezazadeh, S M; Lal, H

    1995-01-01

    The monosialoganglioside, GM1, protects the nervous system against a variety of insults. In this study, we evaluated the protective properties of GM1 on ethanol intoxication and development of dependence. GM1 (20-40 mg/kg, IP) reduced the extent and duration of ataxia produced by ethanol (2 g/kg, IP, 15-95 min), and delayed the onset of loss and reduced the duration of the righting reflex (LORR) produced by ethanol (4.2 g/kg, IP). GM1 did not alter ethanol-induced hypothermia or the rate of ethanol clearance. Rather, GM1 increased the waking blood ethanol concentration. In animals fed a complete liquid diet containing 4.5% ethanol, concurrent administration of GM1 (40 mg/kg/day) blocked the tremors, hypolocomotion, and anxiety-like behavior associated with ethanol withdrawal. These findings demonstrate that GM1 reduces both ethanol's acute intoxication and the signs and symptoms of ethanol withdrawal by a mechanism not related to ethanol pharmacokinetics.

  5. Nicotine decreases ethanol-induced dopamine signaling and increases self-administration via stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Doyon, William M; Dong, Yu; Ostroumov, Alexey; Thomas, Alyse M; Zhang, Tao A; Dani, John A

    2013-08-07

    Tobacco smoking is a well-known risk factor for subsequent alcohol abuse, but the neural events underlying this risk remain largely unknown. Alcohol and nicotine reinforcement involve common neural circuitry, including the mesolimbic dopamine system. We demonstrate in rodents that pre-exposure to nicotine increases alcohol self-administration and decreases alcohol-induced dopamine responses. The blunted dopamine response was due to increased inhibitory synaptic transmission onto dopamine neurons. Blocking stress hormone receptors prior to nicotine exposure prevented all interactions with alcohol that we measured, including the increased inhibition onto dopamine neurons, the decreased dopamine responses, and the increased alcohol self-administration. These results indicate that nicotine recruits neuroendocrine systems to influence neurotransmission and behavior associated with alcohol reinforcement.

  6. Adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure diminishes anhedonia during ethanol withdrawal in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nathalie; Semenova, Svetlana; Markou, Athina

    2014-06-01

    Adolescent alcohol use may interfere with neurodevelopment, increasing the likelihood of adult alcohol use disorders (AUDs). We investigated whether adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) exposure alters the adult reward response to ethanol. Adolescent rats were administered ethanol once (moderate exposure; Cohort 1) or three times per day (severe exposure; Cohort 2) in a 2 days on/2 days off pattern. In adulthood, subjects responded for electrical stimulation directed at the posterior lateral hypothalamus in a discrete-trial intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure that provides current-intensity thresholds as a measure of brain reward function. The effects of ethanol administration and withdrawal were assessed. Control rats showed dose-dependent threshold elevations after acute ethanol, indicating reward deficits. A majority of moderately AIE-exposed rats (Cohort 1) showed threshold lowering after ethanol, suggesting ethanol-induced reward enhancement in this sub-set of rats. Rats exposed to severe AIE (Cohort 2) showed no threshold elevation or lowering, suggesting a blunted affective ethanol response. Daily ethanol induced threshold elevations 24h after administration in control rats but not in either group of AIE-exposed rats, suggesting decreased sensitivity to the negative affective state of ethanol withdrawal. Withdrawal from a 4-day ethanol binge produced robust and enduring threshold elevations in all rats, although threshold elevations were diminished in rats exposed to severe AIE. These results indicate that AIE exposure diminished reward deficits associated with ethanol intoxication and withdrawal and may have increased ethanol-induced reward enhancement in a sub-set of rats. In humans, enhanced ethanol reward accompanied by reduced withdrawal severity may contribute to the development of AUDs.

  7. [Pecularities of correction of alcohol affctions of liver in patients with acute ethanol poisoning in the setting of consequence of toxic effect of ethanol].

    PubMed

    Shilov, V V; batotsyrenov, B V; Vasil'ev, S A; Shikalova, I A; Kuznetsov, O A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to test the usage of infusion of hepatoprotector "remaxol" in intensive therapy of acute ethanol poisoning accompanied with severe alcohol affections of the lever. In the result of the examination and treatment of 130 patients it was established that severe alcohol poisonings registered on alcohol abused patients with toxic hepatopathy, are always accompanied with serious metabolic violations. In the process of a comparative valuation of the using of heptral (ademethionin) and remaxol in the intensive therapy of alcohol poisonings it has been revealed that the using of remaxol led to improvement of the clinic of that poisonings, what had been registered as a decrease of frequency and duration of an alcohol delirium from 33,9% to 10,8%, a decrease of frequency of secondary lung complication from 18,5 to 3,1%, a decrease of a duration of treatment in intensive care unit from 7,3 +/- 0,6 to 5,6 +/- 0,3 and a hospital treatment duration from 11,8 +/- 0,5 to 9,0 +/- 0,3 days. Biochemical investigation has shown that using as heptral, as remaxol led to improvement of lever damages due to alcohol. However remaxol compared with heptral was better in the treatment of metabolic violations.

  8. CHOLINE AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN BALANCE CAUSED BY ACUTE NEONATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, Cynthia F.; Wellmann, Kristen A.; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1% of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits, but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of 8 treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1-5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid® on P5, C or S post-treatment from P6-20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol. PMID:26085462

  9. Acute effect of ethanol on the pattern of behavioural specialization of neurons in the limbic cortex of the freely moving rabbit.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov YuI; Grinchenko YuV; Laukka, S; Järvilehto, T; Maz, V N; Svetlajev, I A

    1990-10-01

    Single-unit activity was studied in the limbic cortex of eight freely moving rabbits in order to find out what kind of changes in the organization of unit activity correlate with behavioural disturbances following an acute administration of ethanol (1 g kg-1). The rabbits were taught to acquire food by pressing pedals in the experimental cage. Unit activity was recorded during this behaviour in a control experiment and the alcohol experiment took place the next day. The number of behavioural mistakes significantly increased in the alcohol experiments. The pattern of behavioural specialization of the units also differed between the control and alcohol experiments. In the control experiments 55% of units did not show any constant activations in relation to the behavioural phases (non-involved units), 28% of the units were constantly activated in relation to one or more behavioural phases learned in the cage (e.g. use of pedals; L units) and 17% of units showed activations in relation to the behaviour learned before the teaching of food acquisition (e.g. movements in general; M units). In the alcohol experiments the number of active units decreased by one-third compared with that found in the control experiments. The relative number of non-involved units did not change, whereas the relation between L and M units was reversed (11% L units and 34% M units). This was the result of a decrease in the number of active L units, mainly in the upper layers of the cortex. The results indicate that ethanol has a selective depressing effect on cortical neurons with different behavioural specialization, which could explain the behavioural disturbances observed in the alcohol experiments.

  10. RAB GTPASES ASSOCIATE WITH ISOLATED LIPID DROPLETS (LDS) AND SHOW ALTERED CONTENT AFTER ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION: POTENTIAL ROLE IN ALCOHOL-IMPAIRED LD METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Rasineni, Karuna; McVicker, Benita L.; Tuma, Dean J.; McNiven, Mark A.; Casey, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease is manifested by the presence of fatty liver, primarily due to accumulation of hepatocellular lipid droplets (LDs). The presence of membrane-trafficking proteins (e.g. Rab GTPases) with LDs indicates that LDs may be involved in trafficking pathways known to be altered in ethanol damaged hepatocytes. Since these Rab GTPases are crucial regulators of protein trafficking, we examined the effect ethanol administration has on hepatic Rab protein content and association with LDs. Methods Male Wistar rats were pair-fed Lieber-DeCarli diets for 5 to 8 weeks. Whole liver and isolated LD fractions were analyzed. Identification of LDs and associated Rab proteins was performed in frozen liver or paraffin-embedded sections followed by immunohistochemical analysis. Results Lipid accumulation was characterized by larger LD vacuoles and increased total triglyceride content in ethanol-fed rats. Rabs 1, 2, 3d, 5, 7 and 18 were analyzed in post-nuclear supernatant (PNS) as well as LDs. All of the Rabs were found in the PNS, and Rabs 1, 2, 5 and 7 did not show alcohol-altered content, while Rab 3d content was reduced by over 80%, and Rab 18 also showed ethanol-induced reduction in content. Rab 3d was not found to associate with LDs, while all other Rabs were found in the LD fractions, and several showed an ethanol-related decrease (Rabs 2, 5, 7, 18). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the enhanced content of a LD-associated protein, perilipin 2 (PLIN2) that was paralleled with an associated decrease of Rab 18 in ethanol-fed rat sections. Conclusion Chronic ethanol feeding was associated with increased PLIN2 and altered Rab GTPase content in enriched LD fractions. Although mechanisms driving these changes are not established, further studies on intracellular protein trafficking and LD biology after alcohol administration will likely contribute to our understanding of fatty liver disease. PMID:24117505

  11. Effects of calcium antagonists on central actions of ethanol: comparative studies with nifedipine, verapamil and cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, E; Kubik-Bogucka, E

    1993-11-01

    The effects of nifedipine (17.5 and 50 mg/kg), verapamil (5 and 15 mg/kg) and cinnarizine (75 and 200 mg/kg) on acute toxicity and central actions of ethanol (i.e. ethanol-induced sleep and hypothermia, disturbances of rota-rod performance and spontaneous activity) were investigated in mice. Additionally, effects of these drugs on the development of tolerance to hypothermic and sleep-inducing action of ethanol were studied in rats. Calcium antagonists were given acutely 30 min before ethanol administration, or chronically once daily (lower dose) for 10 days, and on the 11th day the animals received an ethanol injection. Single doses of nifedipine increased the acute toxicity of ethanol and potentiated its central effects. After long-term administration of nifedipine no significant alterations in the central actions of ethanol were observed. Verapamil and cinnarizine antagonized the ethanol-induced sleep and impairment of locomotor activity. Nifedipine did not affect the development of tolerance to hypnotic and hypothermic action of ethanol. Verapamil prevents the development of tolerance to hypnotic action of ethanol, whereas cinnarizine prevents the development of tolerance to the hypnotic and hypothermic action of ethanol.

  12. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of ethyl palmitate calibration and resolution with ethyl oleate as biomarker ethanol sub acute in urine application study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaniti, Ni Made; Manurung, Manuntun

    2016-03-01

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry is used to separate two and more compounds and identify fragment ion specific of biomarker ethanol such as palmitic acid ethyl ester (PAEE), as one of the fatty acid ethyl esters as early detection through conyugated reaction. This study aims to calibrate ethyl palmitate and develop analysis with oleate acid. This methode can be used analysis ethanol and its chemistry biomarker in ethanol sub-acute consumption as analytical forensic toxicology. The result show that ethanol level in urine rats Wistar were 9.21 and decreased 6.59 ppm after 48 hours consumption. Calibration curve of ethyl palmitate was y = 0.2035 x + 1.0465 and R2 = 0.9886. Resolution between ethyl palmitate and oleate were >1.5 as good separation with fragment ion specific was 88 and the retention time was 18 minutes.

  14. Protective effect of Matricaria chamomilla on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cemek, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Ezgi; Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin

    2010-07-01

    The antiulcerogenic and antioxidant properties of Matricaria chamomilla L. (Compositae) hydroalcoholic extract (MCE) on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury were investigated in rats. After the induction of gastric mucosal injury, all groups were sacrificed; the gastric ulcer index was calculated, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in whole blood and gastric tissue, and serum ascorbic acid, retinol, and beta-carotene levels were measured in all groups. Pretreatment with MCE at some doses significantly reduced gastric lesions. Again, some doses of MCE significantly reduced the MDA, and significantly increased GSH levels in gastric tissue or whole blood. Serum beta-carotene and retinol levels were significantly higher in the 200 mg/kg MCE-administered group with respect to control. As a result, MCE clearly has a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions, and this effect, at least in part, depends upon the reduction in lipid peroxidation and augmentation in antioxidant activity.

  15. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Copper (II) Complex against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; A. Hadi, A. Hamid; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Majid, Nazia; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential element in various metabolisms. The investigation was carried out to evaluate acute gastroprotective effects of the Copper (II) complex against ethanol-induced superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Rats were divided into 7 groups. Groups 1 and 2 were orally administered with Tween 20 (10% v/v). Group 3 was orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole (10% Tween 20). Groups 4–7 received 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg of the complex (10% Tween 20), respectively. Tween 20 (10% v/v) was given orally to group 1 and absolute ethanol was given orally to groups 2–7, respectively. Rats were sacrificed after 1 h. Group 2 exhibited severe superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Gastric wall mucus was significantly preserved by the pre-treatment complex. The results showed a significant increase in glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) activities and a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Histology showed marked reduction of hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in groups 4–7. Immunohistochemical staining showed up-regulation of Hsp70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. PAS staining of groups 4–7 showed intense stain uptake of gastric mucosa. The acute toxicity revealed the non-toxic nature of the compound. Conclusions/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the Copper (II) complex may possibly be due to preservation of gastric wall mucus; increase in PGE2 synthesis; GSH, SOD, and NO up-regulation of Hsp70 protein; decrease in MDA level; and down-regulation of Bax protein. PMID:23251568

  16. A Standardized Composition from Extracts of Myristica Fragrans, Astragalus Membranaceus, and Poria Cocos Protects Liver from Acute Ethanol Insult.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Despite the promising advances in therapeutic discovery, there still is a major challenge in the development of a safe, effective, and economical intervention for managing alcohol-related liver disorders. In this study, we describe the potential use of "MAP," a standardized composition comprising three extracts from Myristica fragrans, Astragalus membranaceus, and Poria cocos, in ameliorating alcohol-induced acute liver toxicity. Ethanol-induced acute hepatotoxicity as an animal model of binge drinking was utilized. Mice received oral doses of MAP at 300 mg/kg for four consecutive days. Mice were orally gavaged with 50% ethanol in 12 mL/kg dosing volume following the third dose of MAP every 12 h thereafter for a total of three doses. Hepatic functional tests from serum collected at T12, and hepatic glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutases (SODs), and triglyceride from liver homogenates were evaluated. Histopathology analysis and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) scoring were also determined. Excessive increases of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly inhibited at 46.3% and 43.6%, respectively, when mice were treated with MAP. MAP replenished the depleted SOD by more than 60%, while causing significant stimulation of GSH productions. MAP showed statistically significant reduction in ballooning degeneration, vascular steatosis, cytoplasmic or nuclear condensation, and shrinkage, as well as inflammations when compared to vehicle-treated alcohol-induced liver toxicity model. Mice treated with MAP showed statistically significant reduction in ASH scoring when compared to vehicle control. Therefore, the composition MAP could be potentially utilized as an effective hepatic-detoxifying agent for the protection of liver damage caused by alcohol consumptions.

  17. Both acute and prolonged administration of EPO reduce cerebral and systemic vascular conductance in humans.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Peter; Kim, Yu-Sok; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels V; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2012-03-01

    Administration of erythropoietin (EPO) has been linked to cerebrovascular events. EPO reduces vascular conductance, possibly because of the increase in hematocrit. Whether EPO in itself affects the vasculature remains unknown; here it was evaluated in healthy males by determining systemic and cerebrovascular variables following acute (30,000 IU/d for 3 d; n=8) and chronic (5000 IU/week for 13 wk; n=8) administration of EPO, while the responsiveness of the vasculature was challenged during cycling exercise, with and without hypoxia. Prolonged administration of EPO increased hematocrit from 42.5 ± 3.7 to 47.6 ± 4.1% (P<0.01), whereas hematocrit was unaffected following acute EPO administration. Yet, the two EPO regimes increased arterial pressure similarly (by 8±4 and 7±3 mmHg, respectively; P=0.01) through reduced vascular conductance (by 7±3 and 5±2%; P<0.05). Also, both EPO regimes widened the arterial-to-jugular O(2) differences at rest as well as during normoxic and hypoxic exercise (P<0.01), which indicated reduced cerebral blood flow despite preserved dynamic cerebral autoregulation, and an increase in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity (P<0.05), therefore, reflected vasoconstriction. Thus, administration of EPO to healthy humans lowers systemic and cerebral conductance independent of its effect on hematocrit.

  18. Ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment induce brain levels of CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Charmaine S; Miksys, Sharon; Palmour, Roberta M; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2013-09-01

    CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 are enzymes responsible for the metabolism of many centrally acting drugs, toxins and endogenous compounds. Human smokers and alcoholics have elevated levels of CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 in certain brain regions, which may contribute to altered drug efficacy, neurotoxicity and metabolic tolerance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment, alone and in combination, on brain CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 levels in monkeys. Monkeys were randomized into four groups (N = 10/group): an ethanol-only group, a nicotine-only group, an ethanol + nicotine group and a control (no drug) group. Ethanol (10% alcohol in sucrose solution) was voluntarily self-administered by the monkeys and nicotine was given as subcutaneous injections (0.5 mg/kg bid). Immunocytochemistry revealed induction of both CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 protein in certain brain regions and cells within monkey brain as a result of ethanol self-administration, nicotine treatment and combined exposure to both drugs. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated CYP2B6 induction by ethanol in the caudate, putamen and cerebellum (1.5-3.2 fold, P < 0.05), and CYP2E1 induction by nicotine in the frontal cortex and putamen (1.6-2.0 fold, P < 0.05). Combined ethanol and nicotine exposure induced CYP2B6 in the caudate, putamen, thalamus and cerebellum (1.4-2.4 fold, P < 0.05), and CYP2E1 in the frontal cortex and putamen (1.5-1.8, P < 0.05). CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 mRNA levels were unaffected by ethanol or nicotine exposure. In summary, ethanol and nicotine can induce CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 protein in the primate brain, which could potentially result in altered sensitivity to centrally acting drugs and toxins.

  19. Acute Toxicity and Cytotoxicity Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Spondias tuberosa Arruda Bark: Hematological, Biochemical and Histopathological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Humberto M; Nascimento, Jailson N DO; Araújo, Thiago A S; Duarte, Filipe S; Albuquerque, Ulysses P; Vieira, Jeymesson R C; Santana, Edson R B DE; Yara, Ricardo; Lima, Cláudia S A; Gomes, Dayane A; Lira, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Spondias tuberosa Arruda, popularly named as umbu, is native from savanna-like vegetation and widely used for medicinal purposes, however, the toxicological profile is not available yet. This study evaluated the phytochemical profile and acute toxicity and citoxicity of Ethanolic Extract of Spondias tuberosa Arruda Bark (EEStb) in hematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters. Female Wistar rats were divided into: control (C) and animal treated single doses of 300mg/Kg (EEStb300) or 2.000mg/kg body weight (ESStb2.000) of the EEStb. After 24 hours and 14 days from gavage, the behavior, hematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters were assayed. Cytotoxicity effect was evaluated on HEp-2 cell lines. Neither EEStb300 nor EEStb2.000 produced mortality nor changes in body weight during the 14-days of observation, but EEStb2.000 reduced quietly the food and water intake as well as locomotor activity at first day. There were no changes in macroscopic, histopathological, biochemical and hematological parameters. EEStb in concentrations of 6.25- 50μg ml-1 on HEp-2 cell did not produce cytotoxic effect. These results suggest that EEStb did not cause acute toxicity and cytotoxic, suggesting a good safety rate for Spondias tuberosa Arruda.

  20. Acute and 28-Day Subchronic Oral Toxicity of an Ethanol Extract of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia Ju; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Liu, I-Min

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute and subacute toxicity (28 days) of the ethanol extract of Z. zerumbet rhizomes (EEZZ) via the oral route in Wistar rats of both sexes. In the acute toxicity study, Wistar rats were administered a single dose of 15 g kg−1 of body weight by gavage, and were monitored for 14 days. EEZZ did not produce any toxic signs or deaths; the 50% lethal dose must be higher than 15 g kg−1. In the subchronic toxicity study, EEZZ was administered by gavage at doses of 1000, 2000 and 3000 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks to Wistar rats. The subacute treatment with EEZZ did not alter either the body weight gain or the food and water consumption. The hematological and biochemical analysis did not show significant differences in any of the parameters examined in female or male groups. Necropsy and histopathological examination, did not reveal any remarkable and treatment related changes. A no-observed adverse-effect level for EEZZ is 3000 mg kg−1 for rats under the conditions of this study. Hence, consumption of EEZZ for various medicinal purposes is safe. PMID:22536288

  1. Ethanol conditioned place preference and alterations in ΔFosB following adolescent nicotine administration differ in rats exhibiting high or low behavioral reactivity to a novel environment.

    PubMed

    Philpot, Rex M; Engberg, Melanie E; Wecker, Lynn

    2014-04-01

    This study determined the effects of adolescent nicotine administration on adult alcohol preference in rats exhibiting high or low behavioral reactivity to a novel environment, and ascertained whether nicotine altered ΔFosB in the ventral striatum (vStr) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) immediately after drug administration or after rats matured to adulthood. Animals were characterized as exhibiting high (HLA) or low (LLA) locomotor activity in the novel open field on postnatal day (PND) 31 and received injections of saline (0.9%) or nicotine (0.56 mg free base/kg) from PND 35 to 42. Ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was assessed on PND 68 following 8 days conditioning in a biased paradigm; ΔFosB was measured on PND 43 or PND 68. Following adolescent nicotine exposure, HLA animals demonstrated a CPP when conditioned with ethanol; LLA animals were unaffected. Further, adolescent nicotine exposure for 8 days increased levels of ΔFosB in limbic regions in both HLA and LLA rats, but this increase persisted into adulthood only in LLA animals. Results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure facilitates the establishment of an ethanol CPP in HLA rats, and that sustained elevations in ΔFosB are not necessary or sufficient for the establishment of an ethanol CPP in adulthood. These studies underscore the importance of assessing behavioral phenotype when determining the behavioral and cellular effects of adolescent nicotine exposure.

  2. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on expression of BDNF and trkB mRNAs in rat hippocampus after experimental brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Dhillon, H S; Barron, S; Hicks1, R R; Prasad, R M; Seroogy, K B

    2000-06-23

    Previous evidence indicates that both chronic alcohol treatment and traumatic brain injury modulate expression of certain neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors in cortical tissue. However, the combined effects of chronic alcohol and brain trauma on expression of neurotrophins and their receptors have not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration on lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury-induced alterations in expression of mRNAs for the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor, trkB, in rat hippocampus. In both the control- (pair-fed isocaloric sucrose) diet and the chronic ethanol-diet groups, unilateral FP brain injury induced a bilateral increase in levels of both BDNF and trkB mRNAs in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, and of BDNF mRNA in hippocampal region CA3. However, no significant differences in expression were found between the control-diet and ethanol-diet groups, in either the sham-injured or FP-injured animals. These findings suggest that 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration does not alter the plasticity of hippocampal BDNF/trkB expression in response to experimental brain injury.

  3. Moderate ingestion of alcohol is associated with acute ethanol-induced suppression of circulating CTX in a PTH-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Sripanyakorn, Supannee; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Mander, Adrian; Davidson, Sarah L; Thompson, Richard Ph; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-08-01

    The "J shape" curve linking the risk of poor bone health to alcohol intake is now well recognized from epidemiological studies. Ethanol and nonethanol components of alcoholic beverages could influence bone remodeling. However, in the absence of a solid underlying mechanism, the positive association between moderate alcoholic intake and BMD remains questionable because of confounding associated social factors. The objective of this work was to characterize the short-term effects of moderate alcohol consumption on circulating bone markers, especially those involved in bone resorption. Two sequential blood-sampling studies were undertaken in fasted healthy volunteers (age, 20-47 yr) over a 6-h period using beer of different alcohol levels (<0.05-4.6%), solutions of ethanol or orthosilicic acid (two major components of beer), and water +/- calcium chloride (positive and negative controls, respectively). Study 1 (24 subjects) assessed the effects of the different solutions, whereas study 2 (26 subjects) focused on ethanol/beer dose. Using all data in a "mixed effect model," we identified the contributions of the individual components of beer, namely ethanol, energy, low-dose calcium, and high-dose orthosilicic acid, on acute bone resorption. Markers of bone formation were unchanged throughout the study for all solutions investigated. In contrast, the bone resorption marker, serum carboxy terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), was significantly reduced after ingestion of a 0.6 liters of ethanol solution (>2% ethanol; p ethanol; p < 0.02), or a solution of calcium (180 mg calcium; p < 0.001), but only after calcium ingestion was the reduction in CTX preceded by a significant fall in serum PTH (p < 0.001). Orthosilicic acid had no acute effect. Similar reductions in CTX, from baseline, were measured in urine after ingestion of the test solutions; however, the biological variability in urine CTX was greater

  4. Ethanol Acutely Inhibits Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor-mediated Responses and Long-Term Potentiation in the Developing CA1 Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Puglia, Michael P.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Background Developmental ethanol (EtOH) exposure damages the hippocampus, causing long-lasting alterations in learning and memory. Alterations in glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity may play a role in the mechanism of action of EtOH. This signaling is fundamental for synaptogenesis, which occurs during the third-trimester of human pregnancy (first 12 days of life in rats). Methods Acute coronal brain slices were prepared from 7–9 day-old rats. Extracellular and patch-clamp electrophysiological recording techniques were used to characterize the acute effects of EtOH on α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated responses and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 hippocampal region. Results EtOH (40 and 80 mM) inhibited AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs). EtOH (80 mM) also reduced AMPAR-mediated fEPSPs in presence of an inhibitor of Ca2+ permeable AMPARs. The effect of 80 mM EtOH on NMDAR-mediated fEPSPs was significantly greater in presence of Mg2+. EtOH (80 mM) neither affected the paired-pulse ratio of AMPAR-mediated fEPSPs nor the presynaptic volley. The paired-pulse ratio of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents was not affected either, and the amplitude of these currents was inhibited to a lesser extent than that of fEPSPs. EtOH (80 mM) inhibited LTP of AMPAR-mediated fEPSPs. Conclusions Acute EtOH exposure during the third-trimester equivalent of human pregnancy inhibits hippocampal glutamatergic transmission and LTP induction, which could alter synapse refinement and ultimately contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. PMID:20102565

  5. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  6. Acute d-Amphetamine Pretreatment Does Not Alter Stimulant Self-Administration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Vansickel, Andrea R.; Lile, Joshua A.; Rush, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent clinical research indicates that d-amphetamine is effective in treating cocaine and methamphetamine dependence. There is concern, however, with the use of d-amphetamine as a pharmacotherapy because acute administration of d-amphetamine decreases inhibition in cocaine-using individuals and may increase drug-taking behavior. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether acute d-amphetamine pretreatment would alter the reinforcing, subject-rated, and cardiovascular effects of d-amphetamine. To this end, 7 human volunteers first sampled doses of oral d-amphetamine (0, 8, and 16 mg). These doses engender moderate drug taking and were selected to avoid a ceiling or floor effect. Volunteers were then allowed to self-administer these sampled doses using a modified-progressive ratio procedure in two sessions in which they received pretreatments with either 0 or 15 mg oral d-amphetamine 2 hours prior to completing the modified progressive-ratio procedure. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical stimulant-like effects (e.g., increased ratings of stimulated, elevated blood pressure) and maintained responding on the modified progressive-ratio schedule. Pretreatment with 15 mg oral d-amphetamine also produced prototypical stimulant-like effects, but failed to alter break points for d-amphetamine on the modified progressive-ratio procedure relative to placebo pretreatment. These results indicate that acute d-amphetamine pretreatment does not increase stimulant self-administration. PMID:17490738

  7. Ethanol and Acetaldehyde After Intraperitoneal Administration to Aldh2-Knockout Mice-Reflection in Blood and Brain Levels.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Ito, Asuka; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, on the analysis of ethanol (EtOH) and acetaldehyde (AcH) concentrations in the blood and brains of Aldh2-knockout (Aldh2-KO) and C57B6/6J (WT) mice. Animals were administrated EtOH (1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 g/kg) or 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP, 82 mg/kg) plus AcH (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. During the blood tests, samples from the orbital sinus of the eye were collected. During the brain tests, dialysates were collected every 5 min (equal to a 15 µl sample) from the striatum using in vivo brain microdialysis. Samples were collected at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 60 min intervals post-EtOH and -AcH injection, and then analyzed by head-space GC. In the EtOH groups, high AcH levels were found in the blood and brains of Aldh2-KO mice, while only small traces of AcH were seen in the blood and brains of WT mice. No significant differences in EtOH levels were observed between the WT and the Aldh2-KO mice for either the EtOH dose. EtOH concentrations in the brain were comparable to the EtOH concentrations in the blood, but the AcH concentrations in the brain were four to five times lower compared to the AcH concentrations in the blood. In the AcH groups, high AcH levels were found in both WT and Aldh2-KO mice. Levels reached a sharp peak at 5 min and then quickly declined for 60 min. Brain AcH concentrations were almost equal to the concentrations found in the blood, where the AcH concentrations were approximately two times higher in the Aldh2-KO mice than in the WT mice, both in the blood and the brain. Our results suggest that systemic EtOH and AcH administration can cause a greater increase in AcH accumulation in the blood and brains of Aldh2-KO mice, where EtOH concentrations in the Aldh2-KO mice were comparable to the EtOH concentrations in the WT mice. Furthermore, detection of EtOH and AcH in the blood and brain was found to be dose-dependent in both genotypes.

  8. Anticataleptic activity of cathinone and MDMA (Ecstasy) upon acute and subchronic administration in rat.

    PubMed

    Banjaw, Mehret Yerdaw; Mayerhofer, Andreas; Schmidt, Werner J

    2003-09-15

    It was recently demonstrated that acute administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphet-amine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is capable of counteracting haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. The present study was done with another psychostimulant, S-(-)-cathinone. In these experiments, 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats, 225 +/- 25 g, were used. They were divided into three groups. All groups received 0.5 mg/kg haloperidol in normal saline (s.c.) as a first injection. Then 30 min later each group received either isotonic phosphate-buffered saline, 1 mg/kg S-(-)-cathinone, or 2.5 mg/kg (RS)-MDMA (s.c.) as a second injection. The results of descent latency on both the horizontal bar and vertical grid showed that S-(-)-cathinone or (RS)-MDMA upon acute administration induces a strong anticataleptic activity (P < 0.0001) compared to rats treated with haloperidol plus vehicle. The effect of both drugs was later masked upon subchronic administration (days 2-7, 26-29). This is probably due to sensitization of cataleptic behavior. However, when the same groups of rats were tested on day 8 in a different task, i.e., open-field, they showed a significant difference (P < 0.05). The detailed mechanism of the observed strong anticataleptic activity of S-(-)-cathinone (which is considered a potent dopamine releaser) requires further investigation.

  9. Acute coronary vasospasm in a patient with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis following NSAID administration

    PubMed Central

    Benallegue, Naïl; Lozach, Pierre; Belizna, Cristina; Lavigne, Christian; Urbanski, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eosinophilic with polyangiitis (EGPA, formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic disease characterized by a small-vessel necrotizing vasculitis. Cardiac manifestations are broad-ranging and are associated with a poor prognosis. Coronary vasospasm is uncommon. Here, we report a case of an acute coronary vasospasm in a patient with EGPA after corticosteroids withdrawal and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) introduction. This patient was initially misdiagnosed as bradykinin-mediated angioedema. A 30-year-old man presented with recurrence of abdominal pain and acute dyspnea. NSAID administration for pain during a flare was followed by coronary vasospasms leading to cardiac arrest. Corticosteroid treatment was recently interrupted by the patient. This case reports a rare cardiac complication of EGPA. NSAID might contribute to coronary vasospasm by eosinophilic degranulation in EGPA. Moreover, corticosteroid compliance must be emphasized among patients who display EGPA with high cardiac risk to prevent fatal issues. PMID:27893661

  10. [Albuminuria after acute oral administration of proteins in patients with renovascular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Stríbrná, J; Růzicka, M; Englis, M; Peregrín, J; Lánská, V

    1993-02-05

    In a group of 19 patients with renovascular hypertension the effect of a morning snack comprising meat (1 g protein per 1 kg body weight) on urinary albumin excretion was assessed. Concurrently the plasma creatinine concentration (Pcr) was examined which varied between normal and 260 mumol/l and the creatinine clearance (Ccr). After administration of an acute protein load the mean Ccr value increased by 23%. The albumin excretion, however, did not change substantially, as compared with the previous collection period (mean 17 and 18 micrograms/min). Microalbuminuria was recorded in 31% of the patients and its prevalence was directly related to the increasing Pcr value. The results revealed that an acute protein load did not increase albuminuria although the rise of Ccr was significant. The variability of albumin excretion in the course of the day is, however, influenced also by other factors and for assessment of microalbuminuria therefore examination of 24-hour urine samples should be preferred.

  11. Acute effects of nicotine administration during prospective memory, an event related fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Rusted, Jennifer; Ruest, Torsten; Gray, Marcus A

    2011-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that stimulating neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulates prospective memory (PM), the ability to remember and implement a prior intention. Here we used fMRI to explore the neuronal correlates of acute nicotinic (1mg) modulation during PM, employing a double blind, valence-matched placebo-controlled design, and a solely event-related analysis. Eight healthy adults completed on two occasions (1 week washout) a simple attentional task containing infrequent PM trials. PM activated bilateral parietal, prefrontal (BA10) and anterior cingulate, and deactivated genual cingulate and medial prefrontal regions. Further, acute nicotine administration decreased activity within a largely overlapping right parietal region. This data validates a purely event-related approach to exploring PM, and suggests procholinergic modulation of PM by parietal rather than BA10/frontal regions.

  12. Corticosteroid Administration and Outcome of Adolescents and Adults With Acute Bacterial Meningitis: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Abdullah M.; Alasmari, Faisal A.; Zimmerman, Valerie A.; Baddour, Larry M.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Tleyjeh, Imad M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess the effect of the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute bacterial meningitis. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching several databases for reports (published from January 1966 through February 2008) of placebo-controlled randomized trials of corticosteroid use in the treatment of adolescents and adults with acute bacterial meningitis. We used random-effects models. Sources of heterogeneity were explored by preplanned subgroup analyses. RESULTS: The 4 eligible trials (published between 1999 and 2007) were of high methodological quality and included 1261 adult patients. Overall, the short-term mortality rate associated with corticosteroid administration was not significantly lower than that associated with placebo (relative risk [RR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.20; I2=54%). A significant interaction was found between the effect of corticosteroids and the income status of the country (P=.02) and the prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among study populations (P=.03). The administration of corticosteroids resulted in a lower short-term mortality rate than did the administration of placebo in high-income countries (pooled RR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92; I2=0%) and in the studies with a low prevalence of infection with HIV (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.44-0.99; I2=0%). In studies from high-income countries, the number needed to treat with corticosteriods to prevent 1 death and 1 neurologic sequela was 12.5 (95% CI, 7.1-100.0) and 11.0 (95% CI, 5.6-100.0), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis suggests that the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids is beneficial in the treatment of adolescents and adults with bacterial meningitis in patient populations similar to those seen in high-income countries and in areas with a low prevalence of HIV infection. PMID:19411436

  13. [A case of acute ethanol intoxication with remarkable hyperglycemia by "ume-shu", a Japanese apricot liquor made with a large amount of sugar].

    PubMed

    Sugano, Takayuki; Kojima, Naoki; Kaneko, Susumu; Ishida, Junro; Terada, Taizo; Inagawa, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasusei

    2002-07-01

    A 19-year-old woman ingested 2.2 L of "umeshu", a Japanese apricot liquor made with a large amount of sugar. She was unconscious and in shock. The estimated blood ethanol concentration was 607 mg/dl, and the blood glucose level was 576 mg/dl. Because her respiration and circulation was highly suppressed, blood purification was indicated. Continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) was performed instead of hemodialysis because her hemodynamics was unstable. After CHDF was instituted, her blood glucose level reduced to normal range, and her consciousness became alert. CHDF was effective in eliminating ethanol and stabilizing her hemodynamics within an early stage. Though acute ethanol intoxication is known to inhibit glucogenesis, leading to hypoglycemia, marked hyperglycemia was seen in this case. Ingestion of a large amount of glucose-rich liquor and being in shock seemed to be the causes of hyperglycemia.

  14. Maternal administration of melatonin prevents spatial learning and memory deficits induced by developmental ethanol and lead co-exposure.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Elham; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is a radical scavenger with the ability to remove reactive oxidant species. There is report that co-exposure to lead and ethanol during developmental stages induces learning and memory deficits and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effect of melatonin, with strong antioxidant properties, on memory deficits induced by lead and ethanol co-exposure and oxidative stress in hippocampus. Pregnant rats in lead and ethanol co-exposure group received lead acetate of 0.2% in distilled drinking water and ethanol (4g/kg) by oral gavages once daily from the 5th day of gestation until weaning. Rats received 10mg/kg melatonin by oral gavages. On postnatal days (PD) 30, rats trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 37, a probe test was done and oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were evaluated. Results demonstrated lead and ethanol co-exposed rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency in probe trial test and had significantly higher malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, significantly lower superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in the hippocampus. Melatonin treatment could improve memory deficits, antioxidants activity and reduced MDA levels in the hippocampus. We conclude, co-exposure to lead and ethanol impair memory and melatonin can prevent from it by oxidative stress modulation.

  15. MOTIVATIONAL EFFECTS OF INTRAORALLY-INFUSED ETHANOL IN RAT PUPS IN AN OPERANT SELF-ADMINISTRATION TASK

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo M; Truxell, Eric; Molina, Juan C; Spear, Norman E

    2008-01-01

    Motivational effects of self-administered ethanol have rarely been studied in preweanling rats due primarily to the lack of age-appropriate operant tasks. The present experiments assessed the hedonic effects of intraoral ethanol in infant rats self-administered by activating a touch sensor. On postnatal day (PD) 13 pups were pre-exposed to the drug's pharmacological and/or sensory effects. Operant sessions were conducted during PDs 14-16 (Experiments 1 and 2). Paired animals were placed in chambers equipped with a touch-sensitive disk and received an intraoral infusion of ethanol (3 or 5% v/v, 5 uls) after each sensor contact. Yoked controls were equated for number and distribution of ethanol infusions but had no control over the contingency between operant behavior and intraoral infusion. In Experiment 2, training trials were preceded by a non-reinforced phase. Paired pups performed fewer operant responses than controls and decreased their operant responses across sessions. These results suggest that intraoral self-administered ethanol has an aversive hedonic value in two-week old rats. Operant behavior seems to have been associated with aversive orosensory effects derived from intraoral ethanol infusion. PMID:17854847

  16. Sustained antagonism of acute ethanol-induced ataxia following microinfusion of cyclic AMP and cpt-cAMP in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2011-05-01

    Ataxia is a conspicuous physical manifestation of alcohol consumption in humans and laboratory animals. Previously we reported possible involvement of cAMP in ethanol-induced ataxia. We now report a sustained antagonism of ataxia due to multiple ethanol injections following intracerebellar (ICB) cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion. Adenylyl cyclase drugs cAMP, cpt-cAMP, Sp-cAMP, Rp-cAMP, adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) and GABA(A) agonist muscimol were directly microinfused into the cerebellum of CD-1 male mice to evaluate their effect on ethanol (2 g/kg; i.p.) ataxia. Drug microinfusions were made via stereotaxically implanted stainless steel guide cannulas. Rotorod was used to evaluate the ethanol's ataxic response. Intracerebellar cAMP (0.1, 1, 10 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (0.5, 1, 2 fmol) 60 min before ethanol treatment, dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia in general agreement with previous observations. Intracerebellar microinfusion of cAMP (100 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (2 fmol) produced a sustained attenuation of ataxia following ethanol administration at 1, 4, 7 and 25 h or 31 h post-cAMP/cpt-cAMP microinfusion. At 31 h post-cAMP, the ataxic response of ethanol reappeared. Additionally, marked antagonism to the accentuation of ethanol-induced ataxia by adenosine A₁ and GABA(A) agonists, CHA (34 pmol) and muscimol (88 pmol), respectively, was noted 24h after cAMP and cpt-cAMP treatment. This indicated possible participation of AC/cAMP/PKA signaling in the co-modulation of ethanol-induced ataxia by A₁ adenosinergic and GABAergic systems. No change in normal motor coordination was noted when cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion was followed by saline. Finally, Rp-cAMP (PKA inhibitor, 22 pmol) accentuated ethanol-induced ataxia and antagonized its attenuation by cAMP whereas Sp-cAMP (PKA activator, 22 pmol) produced just the opposite effects, further indicating participation of cAMP-dependent PKA downstream. Overall, the results support a role of

  17. Reversing gastric mucosal alterations during ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in rats by oral administration of Opuntia ficus-indica mucilage

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Ramírez, Ricardo; Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of mucilage obtained from cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) on the healing of ethanol-induced gastritis in rats. METHODS: Chronic gastric mucosa injury was treated with mucilage (5 mg/kg per day) after it was induced by ethanol. Lipid composition, activity of 5’-nucleotidase (a membrane-associated ectoenzyme) and cytosolic activities of lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases in the plasma membrane of gastric mucosa were determined. Histological studies of gastric samples from the experimental groups were included. RESULTS: Ethanol elicited the histological profile of gastritis characterized by loss of the surface epithelium and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased and cholesterol content increased in plasma membranes of the gastric mucosa. In addition, cytosolic activity increased while the activity of alcohol dehydrogenases decreased. The administration of mucilage promptly corrected these enzymatic changes. In fact, mucilage readily accelerated restoration of the ethanol-induced histological alterations and the disturbances in plasma membranes of gastric mucosa, showing a univocal anti-inflammatory effect. The activity of 5’-nucleotidase correlated with the changes in lipid composition and the fluidity of gastric mucosal plasma membranes. CONCLUSION: The beneficial action of mucilage seems correlated with stabilization of plasma membranes of damaged gastric mucosa. Molecular interactions between mucilage monosaccharides and membrane phospholipids, mainly PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), may be the relevant features responsible for changing activities of membrane-attached proteins during the healing process after chronic gastric mucosal damage. PMID:16865772

  18. Salvianolic acid B protects against acute ethanol-induced liver injury through SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of p53 in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhu; Lu, Yang; Hu, Yan; Zhai, Xiaohan; Xu, Wei; Jing, Huirong; Tian, Xiaofeng; Lin, Yuan; Gao, Dongyan; Yao, Jihong

    2014-07-15

    Salvianolic acid B (SalB) is isolated from the traditional Chinese medical herb salvia miltiorrhiza. It has many biological and pharmaceutical activities. This study aimed to investigate the effect of SalB on acute ethanol-induced hepatic injury in rats and to explore the role of SIRT1 in this process. The results showed that pretreatment with SalB significantly reduced ethanol-induced elevation in aminotransferase activities, decreased hepatotoxic cytokine levels such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and increased the antioxidant enzyme activity. Moreover, SalB pretreatment reversed the increase in NF-κB, cleaved caspase-3 and decrease in B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) caused by ethanol exposure. Importantly, SalB pretreatment significantly increased the expression of SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, whereas the increase in SIRT1 was accompanied by decreased acetyl-p53 expression. In HepG2 cells, SalB pretreatment increased SIRT1 expression in a time and dose-dependent manner and such an increase was abrogated by siRNA knockdown of SIRT1. Additionally, inhibition of SIRT1 significantly increased the acetylation of p53, and blocked SalB-induced acetylation of p53 down-regulation. Collectively, this study indicated that SalB can alleviate acute ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis through SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of p53 pathway.

  19. Antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory effects and acute toxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Myrtus communis L. Aerial parts in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Khoshdel, Mohammad; Ghorbani, Maryam

    2011-12-01

    Myrtus communis L. aerial parts have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disease. In this study 350 mice were divided into three main groups: negative (saline), positive (morphine or diclofenac) controls, and test groups. The acute toxicity was assessed for 2 days. Antinociceptive activity was performed using hot plate and writhing tests. The anti-inflammatory effect was investigated using xylene-induced ear edema and a cotton pellet test. According to phytochemical screening, the extracts contained tannins, alkaloids, and flavonoids. The LD50 values of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts were 0.473 and 0.79 g/kg, respectively. In hot plate test, the aqueous and ethanolic extracts showed significant antinociceptive activity that was inhibited by naloxone. The extracts exhibited antinociceptive activity against acetic acid-induced writhing and also showed significant activity against acute inflammation which was dose dependent for aqueous extract. The ethanolic (0.05 g/kg) and aqueous extracts (0.005, 0.015, and 0.03 g/kg) demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects against chronic inflammation. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the aerial parts of M communis L. showed antinociceptive effects and these may be mediated by opioid receptors.

  20. Serotonin and suicidality: the impact of acute fluoxetine administration. I: Serotonin and suicide.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Segman, R H; Anderson, G M

    1994-01-01

    The general enhancement of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission following long-term administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to play an important role in these drugs' anti-depressant efficacy. Because suicide and/or aggression appear linked to diminished levels of brain 5-HT and its metabolites, it has been suggested that SSRIs may be particularly effective in reducing suicidality. Case reports of increased or new suicidal ideation following administration of fluoxetine and other SSRIs, however, raise questions about how these potential side effects may relate to the SSRI's acute effects on 5-HT transmission. Part I of this review examines fluoxetine's effects on suicidality and related behaviors and reviews the relationship of suicidality to serotonergic dysregulation.

  1. The sigma-receptor antagonist BD-1063 decreases ethanol intake and reinforcement in animal models of excessive drinking.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro; Zhao, Yu; Iyer, Malliga R; Steardo, Luca; Steardo, Luca; Rice, Kenner C; Conti, Bruno; Koob, George F; Zorrilla, Eric P

    2009-05-01

    Sigma-Receptors (SigRs) have been implicated in behavioral and appetitive effects of psychostimulants and may also modulate the motivating properties of ethanol. This study tested the hypothesis that SigRs modulate ethanol reinforcement and contribute to excessive ethanol intake. The effects of subcutaneous treatment with the potent, selective Sig-1R antagonist BD-1063 on operant ethanol self-administration were studied in two models of excessive drinking-Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats and acutely withdrawn ethanol-dependent Wistar rats-and compared to ethanol self-administration in nondependent Wistar controls. To assess the specificity of action, the effects of BD-1063 on self-administration of an equally reinforcing saccharin solution were determined in Wistar and sP rats. Gene expression of Sig-1R in reward-related brain areas implicated in ethanol reinforcement was compared between ethanol-naive sP and Wistar rats and withdrawn ethanol-dependent Wistar rats. BD-1063 dose dependently reduced ethanol self-administration in sP rats (3.3-11 mg/kg) and withdrawn, dependent Wistar rats (4-11 mg/kg) at doses that did not modify mean ethanol self-administration in nondependent Wistar controls. BD-1063 did not reduce concurrent water self-administration and did not comparably suppress saccharin self-administration, suggesting selectivity of action. BD-1063 also reduced the breakpoints of sP rats to work for ethanol under a progressive-ratio reinforcement schedule. Ethanol-naive sP rats and 24-h withdrawn, dependent Wistar rats showed reduced Sig-1R mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens. The results suggest that SigR systems may contribute to innate or ethanol-induced increases in susceptibility to self-administer high ethanol levels, identifying a potential neuroadaptive mechanism contributing to excessive drinking and a therapeutic target for alcohol abuse and dependence.

  2. Chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of monocyte chemoattractant protein – 1 leads to a persistent increase in sweetened ethanol consumption during operant self-administration but does not influence sucrose consumption in Long-Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Valenta, John P.; Gonzales, Rueben A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Among the evidence implicating neuroimmune signaling in alcohol use disorders are increased levels of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in the brains of human alcoholics and animal models of alcohol abuse. However, it is not known whether neuroimmune signaling can directly increase ethanol consumption, and whether MCP-1 is involved in that mechanism. We designed experiments to determine if MCP-1 signaling itself is sufficient to accelerate or increase ethanol consumption. Our hypothesis was that increasing MCP-1 signaling by directly infusing it into the brain would increase operant ethanol self-administration. Methods We implanted osmotic minipumps to chronically infuse either one of several doses of MCP-1 or vehicle into the cerebral ventricles of Long-Evans rats and then tested them in the operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution for 8 weeks. Results There was a significant interaction between dose of MCP-1 and sweetened ethanol consumed across the first 4 weeks (while pumps were flowing) and across the 8-week experiment. Animals receiving the highest dose of MCP-1 (2 μg/day) were the highest consumers of ethanol during weeks 3 through 8. MCP-1 did not influence the acquisition of self-administration (measured across the first 5 days), the motivation to consume ethanol (time to lever press or progressive ratio), withdrawal-induced anxiety, or the consumption of sucrose alone. Conclusion We provide novel evidence that neuroimmune signaling can directly increase chronic operant ethanol self-administration, and that this increase persists beyond the administration of the cytokine. These data suggest that ethanol-induced increases in MCP-1, or increases in MCP-1 due to various other neuroimmune mechanisms, may further promote ethanol consumption. Continued research into this mechanism, particularly using models of alcohol dependence, will help determine if targeting MCP-1 signaling has therapeutic potential in

  3. Effects of S-Adenosylmethionine and Its Combinations With Taurine and/or Betaine on Glutathione Homeostasis in Ethanol-induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seo Yeon; Ko, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure to ethanol abuse and severe oxidative stress are risk factors for hepatocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and its combinations with taurine and/or betaine on the level of glutathione (GSH), a powerful antioxidant in the liver, in acute hepatotoxicity induced by ethanol. Methods To examine the effects of SAMe and its combinations with taurine and/or betaine on ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity, AML12 cells and C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with SAMe, taurine, and/or betaine, followed by ethanol challenge. Cell viability was detected with an MTT assay. GSH concentration and mRNA levels of GSH synthetic enzymes were measured using GSH reductase and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were measured with commercially available kits. Results Pretreatment of SAMe, with or without taurine and/or betaine, attenuated decreases in GSH levels and mRNA expression of the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), the rate-limiting enzyme for GSH synthesis, in ethanol-treated cells and mice. mRNA levels of the modifier subunit of GCL and glutathione synthetase were increased in mice treated with SAMe combinations. SAMe, taurine, and/or betaine pretreatment restored serum ALT and AST levels to control levels in the ethanol-treated group. Conclusions Combinations of SAMe with taurine and/or betaine have a hepatoprotective effect against ethanol-induced liver injury by maintaining GSH homeostasis. PMID:27722142

  4. DARPP-32 and Akt regulation in ethanol-preferring AA and ethanol-avoiding ANA rats.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Panula, Pertti

    2011-09-26

    Ethanol and other addictive drugs affect many intracellular phosphorylation and dephosphorylation cascades. These cascades are thought to be highly important in the regulation of neuronal activity. The present experiments characterized the regulation of three key signaling molecules, DARPP-32 (dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein, 32kDa), Akt kinase and ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2) in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, alcohol) and ethanol-avoiding ANA (Alko, non-alcohol) rat lines. Radioactive in situ hybridization was used in drug naïve animals and Western blotting after acute ethanol administration in striatum, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The mRNA levels of DARPP-32 in striatal areas were higher in ANA rats than in AA rats. There was no difference in the striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP61), the downstream target of DARPP-32 expression between the rat lines. Ethanol (1.5g/kg) increased phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at threonine 34 in both AA and in ANA rats indicating that acute ethanol activates DARPP-32 similarly in these rat lines. The expression of Akt kinase was higher in the CA1 of hippocampus in ANA than in AA rats and acute ethanol activated Akt in hippocampus in ANA but not in AA rats. No significant alterations in the regulation of ERK1/2 were found in either rat line. Our findings suggest that DARPP-32 and Akt are regulated by ethanol and differences in the regulation of these molecules might contribute to the dramatically different ethanol drinking patterns seen in AA and ANA rats.

  5. Hibiscus sabdariffa ethanolic extract protects against dyslipidemia and oxidative stress induced by chronic cholesterol administration in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ekor, M; Adesanoye, O A; Udo, I E; Adegoke, O A; Raji, J; Farombi, E O

    2010-12-01

    Excessive intake of cholesterol (CHOL) and induction of free radical production play a critical role in the pathophysiology of several human diseases. Dietary therapy with plant products rich in flavonoids has been shown to provide benefits without the adverse effects of agents used in clinical practice. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) has been used for various purposes due to myriads of flavonoids present in it. In this study, the chemopreventive property of HS ethanolic extract (HSE) was investigated in dyslipidemia and oxidant stress associated with prolonged CHOL administration in rabbits. Twenty-five (25) adult male rabbits weighing between 1.5 and 1.7 kg were used and randomly divided into five groups of five rabbits per group. The CHOL-fed rabbits received 1 g/kg/day of CHOL suspended in 1 ml of corn oil for 8 weeks. Group 1 received 1 ml of corn oil and served as control. Group 2 was fed with CHOL only while groups 3, 4 and 5 received daily doses ofcholestyramine (questran, 260 mg/kg), HSE 200 mg/kg and HSE 300 mg/kg respectively along with CHOL. Animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation 24-hours after last dose. Enzymic and non-enzymic markers of oxidative stress and lipid profile were analysed in serum, liver, kidney and heart of rabbits. HSE significantly attenuated the alteration in lipid levels and antioxidant status induced by high CHOL intake in rabbits in this study. Both serum and tissue levels of low density lipoprotein-CHOL, triglycerides, phospholipids, and total CHOL decreased with increase in high density lipoprotein-CHOL except in the heart, following treatment with HSE in CHOL-fed rabbits when compared with the untreated group (p<0.05). Similarly, HSE prevented CHOL-induced depletion of enzymic (superoxide dismutase, catalase) and non-enzymic (reduced glutathione, vitamin C) antioxidants with the attendant increases in lipid peroxidation and xanthine oxidase activity in these animals. The effectiveness of HSE in this condition was comparable

  6. Dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose uptake in jejunal epithelium of broilers after acute exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Awad, Wageha A; Kröger, Susan; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of ethanol on gastrointestinal tract of chicken. In this study, we investigated the effects of low levels of ethanol on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of commercial broilers. Jejunal tissues from 35- to 39-day-old broilers were exposed to either 0 or 0.1% ethanol in Ussing chambers, and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 40 min. After 40 and 60 min of incubation, glucose (20 mM) and carbamoylcholine (200 μM), respectively, were introduced into the chambers. The absolute and percent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (Vt) induced by glucose were increased significantly with 0.1% ethanol. There was no significant effect of 0.1% ethanol on carbamoylcholine-induced electrophysiological variables. To investigate if higher levels of ethanol have similar effects, we tested the effects of 0, 0.33, and 0.66% ethanol under similar experimental conditions until the glucose-addition step. Contrary to 0.1% ethanol, both the 0.33 and 0.66% ethanol levels significantly decreased the basal and glucose-induced Isc and Vt. Tissue conductivity remained unaffected in all cases. These results indicate that intestinal epithelia of chicken may be more sensitive to the effects of ethanol as compared with other species. This is the first report indicating dose-dependent increase and decrease in active glucose absorption in intestinal epithelia in the presence of ethanol.

  7. The role of excessive versus acute administration of erythropoietin in attenuating hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Pappo, Orit; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Shevtsov, Evgeni; Avlas, Orna; Gassmann, Max; Ravid, Amiram; Cheporko, Yelena; Hochhauser, Edith

    2010-12-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R) is the main cause of primary graft nonfunction. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of excessive versus acute administration of erythropoietin (EPO) in attenuating the hepatic injury induced by I/R in mice. The effect of segmental (70%) hepatic ischemia was evaluated in a transgenic mouse line with constitutive overexpression of human EPO cDNA and in wild-type (WT) mice. Mice were randomly allocated to 5 main experimental groups: (i) WT-sham, (ii) WT ischemia, (iii) WT ischemia + recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), (iv) transgenic-sham, and (v) transgenic ischemia. The EPO-pretreated mice showed a significant reduction in liver enzyme levels and intrahepatic caspase-3 activity and fewer apoptotic hepatocytes (p < 0.05 for all) compared with the WT untreated I/R group. EPO decreased c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression during I/R. In transgenic I/R livers, baseline histology showed diffused hepatic injury, and no significant beneficial effect was noted between the WT untreated and the transgenic I/R mice. In conclusion, acute pretreatment with EPO in WT mice attenuated in vivo I/R liver injury. However, in excessive EPO overexpression, the initial liver injury abolished the beneficial effect of EPO. These findings have important implications for the potential use of acute EPO in I/R injury during liver transplantation.

  8. Acute Clinical Worsening after Steroid Administration in Cervical Myelitis May Reveal a Subdural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Udding, Jan; Broere, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Subdural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare condition characterized by clinical manifestations ranging from mild bilateral sensory deficits to quadriplegia. The diagnosis is often delayed due to unspecific neurological symptoms, initially diagnosed as polyneuropathy or myelopathy. The diagnosis can be delayed for as long as 1–15 years. The following report describes a cervical SDAVF case initially misdiagnosed as myelitis transversa and treated with intravenous steroids. A 56-year-old male presented with sensory deficits and mild leg and right arm weakness. Cervical MRI showed a central medullary hyperintense lesion with contrast enhancement. After metabolic, infectious, and malignant causes were excluded, myelitis transversa was presumed and the patient was treated intravenously with methylprednisolone. Shortly after that, he developed quadriplegia. Cervical MRI imaging showed engorged cervical perimedullary vessels, which were not visible on the initial MRI. The diagnosis was revised and a SDAVF identified. Prompt surgical treatment led to a complete recovery. The effect of intravenous steroids in SDAVF is controversial. Acute clinical worsening after steroid administration is previously reported in several publications; however, due to the paucity of clinical studies on SDAVF, this effect remains mostly overlooked or unknown. The findings in this patient support the causative relation between SDAVF clinical worsening and steroid administration. We propose that acute clinical worsening under steroids in patients initially diagnosed with myelitis should raise suspicion of an SDAVF. PMID:27920716

  9. Acute kidney function and morphology following topload administration of recombinant hemoglobin solution.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Alexandre Fabricio; Abreu Martucci, Ana Carolina Carvalho Ferreira; Cabrales, Pedro; Nascimento, Paulo do; Intaglietta, Marcos; Tsai, Amy G; Castiglia, Yara Marcondes Machado

    2017-02-01

    There is a 0.138% incidence of adverse reactions related to blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury, immunosuppression, fever, pathogen transmission, and hemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common ones. Synthetic oxygen carriers have been developed to deal with blood shortages and for use in the field where stored blood was not available. They were also designed to be pathogen free, including unknown viruses. In this study, we used Male Golden Syrian Hamsters implemented with a dorsal window chamber to determine how infusion of three different, genetically crosslinked recombinant acellular hemoglobin (rHb) solutions with different oxygen affinities and nitric oxide kinetics affect mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), kidney function, and kidney structure. We found that the administration of all three rHb solutions caused mild hypertension and bradycardia 30 minutes after infusion. However, acute changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were not detected, even though histological analysis was performed 72 hours after treatment revealed some structural changes. All the rHb solutions resulted in hypertension 30 minutes after a 10% topload administration. Regardless of their properties, the presence of acellular Hb causes significant alterations to kidney tissue.

  10. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  11. Effect of acute and chronic cobalt administration on carotid body chemoreceptors responses.

    PubMed

    Morelli, L; Di Giulio, C; Iezzi, M; Data, P G

    1994-06-30

    Chronic cobalt exposure leads to release and production of erythropoietin and consequently to polycythemia. Accordingly, cellular elements sensitive to oxygen in the carotid body, would manifest responses during acute and chronic cobalt administration. The carotid body, detects gas changes (PO2, PCO2/pH) in the arterial blood and regulates ventilation and circulation by the afferent nerve discharge. We hypothesized that cobalt interacts with an oxygen sensitive mechanism in the carotid chemoreception and in erythropoietin producing cells. Twelve cats were anesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated; few fiber preparation of carotid sinus nerve were recorded during close intraarterial injection of cobalt. In another protocol, 12 rats received an intraperitoneal dose of CoCl2 (10 mg/kg) daily for 6 weeks. At the end, the carotid body was fixed in situ by superfusion. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies were made. Acute administration (0.08-2.3 mumol) promptly stimulated the chemoreceptor afferents. Type I cells increased significantly along with erythropoiesis in the chronic cobalt treated rats. The stimulatory effects of cobalt on the carotid body chemoreceptor showed that sensitive mechanisms in the kidney and in the carotid body are similar, and cobalt interacts with the physiological responses of oxygen.

  12. Cyproheptadine resembles clozapine in vivo following both acute and chronic administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew J; Cooper, Gillian D; Cole, Jon C; Sumnall, Harry R

    2007-03-01

    Cyproheptadine is a cheap, widely available anti-allergy drug with a broad receptor binding profile which resembles that of clozapine. In rats discriminating clozapine from vehicle cyproheptadine mimicked clozapine very closely. Acutely it induced full generalization in the absence of response suppression, as observed with clozapine. Chronic administration of clozapine and cyproheptadine induced tolerance and cross-tolerance respectively to the clozapine stimulus. This was characterized by circa 3.5-fold parallel shifts to the right in the clozapine generalization curves. Such tolerance and cross-tolerance was spontaneously reversible, suggesting that it was pharmacodynamic, and that clozapine and cyproheptadine induce similar neuroadaptations when administered chronically. Administration of chlordiazepoxide at a very high dose induced no cross-tolerance to the clozapine stimulus showing the pharmacological specificity of tolerance. The clozapine stimulus is a compound cue involving actions at various receptors, and various clozapine-like antipsychotic (APD) drugs generalize fully to it. These data demonstrate that in vivo cyproheptadine resembles clozapine both acutely and chronically. Our findings, in conjunction with other actions of cyproheptadine -- induction of weight gain, alleviation of clozapine withdrawal, anxiolytic actions, alleviation of 'typical' APD-induced motoric side effects, and some preliminary clinical findings -- suggest that further study of cyproheptadine in conjunction with a 'typical' APD for the possible treatment of schizophrenia is merited at both pre-clinical and clinical levels.

  13. Ethanol-induced GABAA receptor alpha4 subunit plasticity involves phosphorylation and neuroactive steroids.

    PubMed

    Werner, David F; Porcu, Patrizia; Boyd, Kevin N; O'Buckley, Todd K; Carter, Jenna M; Kumar, Sandeep; Morrow, A Leslie

    2016-04-01

    GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits are widely implicated in acute ethanol sensitivity, and their spatial and temporal regulation prominently contributes to ethanol-induced neuroplasticity in hippocampus and cortex. However, it is unknown if α4-containing GABAA receptors in the thalamus, an area of high α4 expression, display similar regulatory patterns following ethanol administration, and if so, by which molecular mechanisms. In the current study, thalamic GABAA receptor α4 subunit levels were increased following a 6-week-, but not a 2-week chronic ethanol diet. Following acute high-dose ethanol administration, thalamic GABAA receptor α4 subunit levels were regulated in a temporal fashion, as a decrease was observed at 2h followed by a delayed transient increase. PKCγ and PKCδ levels paralleled α4 temporal expression patterns following ethanol exposure. Initial decreases in α4 subunit expression were associated with reduced serine phosphorylation. Delayed increases in expression were not associated with a change in phosphorylation state, but were prevented by inhibiting neuroactive steroid production with the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Overall, these studies indicate that thalamic GABAA receptor α4 subunit expression following acute and chronic ethanol administration exhibits similar regulatory patterns as other regions and that transient expression patterns following acute exposure in vivo are likely dependent on both subunit phosphorylation state and neuroactive steroids.

  14. Operant ethanol self-administration increases extracellular-signal regulated protein kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in reward-related brain regions: selective regulation of positive reinforcement in the prefrontal cortex of C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Faccidomo, Sara; Salling, Michael C; Galunas, Christina; Hodge, Clyde W

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Extracellular-signal regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) is activated by ethanol in reward-related brain regions. Accordingly, systemic inhibition of ERK1/2 potentiates ethanol reinforcement. However, the brain region(s) that mediate this effect are unknown. Objective To pharmacologically inhibit ERK1/2 in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAC) and amygdala (AMY) prior to ethanol or sucrose self-administration, and evaluate effects of operant ethanol self-administration on ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK1/2). Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were trained to lever press on a fixed-ratio-4 schedule of 9% ethanol+2% sucrose (ethanol) or 2% sucrose (sucrose) reinforcement. Mice were sacrificed immediately after the 30th self-administration session and pERK1/2 immunoreactivity was quantified in targeted brain regions. Additional groups of mice were injected with SL 327 (0–1.7 μg/side) in PFC, NAC or AMY prior to self-administration. Results pERK1/2 immunoreactivity was significantly increased by operant ethanol (g/kg=1.21 g/kg; BAC=54.9 mg/dl) in the PFC, NAC (core and shell), and AMY (central nucleus) as compared to sucrose. Microinjection of SL 327 (1.7 μg) into the PFC selectively increased ethanol self-administration. Intra-NAC injection of SL 327 had no effect on ethanol- but suppressed sucrose-reinforced responding. Intra-AMY microinjection of SL 327 had no effect on either ethanol- or sucrose-reinforced responding. Locomotor activity was unaffected under all conditions. Conclusions Operant ethanol self-administration increases pERK1/2 activation in the PFC, NAC and AMY. However, ERK1/2 activity only in the PFC mechanistically regulates ethanol self-administration. These data suggest that ethanol-induced activation of ERK1/2 in the PFC is a critical pharmacological effect that mediates the reinforcing properties of the drug. PMID:26123321

  15. Differential peptidomics assessment of strain and age differences in mice in response to acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Elena V; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Ossyra, John R; Zombeck, Jonathan A; Nosek, Michael R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-12-01

    Neurochemical differences in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis between individuals and between ages may contribute to differential susceptibility to cocaine abuse. This study measured peptide levels in the pituitary gland (Pit) and lateral hypothalamus (LH) in adolescent (age 30 days) and adult (age 65 days) mice from four standard inbred strains, FVB/NJ, DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and BALB/cByJ, which have previously been characterized for acute locomotor responses to cocaine. Individual peptide profiles were analyzed using mass spectrometric profiling and principal component analysis. Sequences of assigned peptides were verified by tandem mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis classified all strains according to their distinct peptide profiles in Pit samples from adolescent mice, but not adults. Select pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were significantly higher in adolescent BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J mice than in FVB/NJ or C57BL/6J mice. A subset of peptides in the LH, but not in the Pit, was altered by cocaine in adolescents. A 15 mg/kg dose of cocaine induced greater peptide alterations than a 30 mg/kg dose, particularly in FVB/NJ animals, with larger differences in adolescents than adults. Neuropeptides in the LH affected by acute cocaine administration included pro-opiomelanocortin-, myelin basic protein-, and glutamate transporter-derived peptides. The observed peptide differences could contribute to differential behavioral sensitivity to cocaine among strains and ages. Peptides were measured using mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) in individual lateral hypothalamus and pituitary samples from four strains and two ages of inbred mice in response to acute cocaine administration. Principal component analyses (PCA) classified the strains according to their peptide profiles from adolescent mice, and a subset of peptides in the lateral hypothalamus was altered by cocaine in adolescents.

  16. Berberine protects C57BL/6J mice against ethanol withdrawal-induced hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Bhutada, Pravinkumar; Mundhada, Yogita; Bansod, Kuldeep; Hiware, Rahul; Rathod, Sumit; Dixit, Pankaj; Mundhada, Dharmendra

    2011-02-01

    Berberine ([C20H18NO4](+) ), one of the major constituents of the Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, is an isoquinoline alkaloid. Plethora of recent reports has indicated its ability to modulate several neurotransmitter systems, especially those implicated in ethanol dependence. Thus, the influence of berberine treatment on the development and expression of ethanol dependence was tested by using the ethanol withdrawal-induced hyperexcitability paradigm. Mice were provided with a nutritionally balanced control liquid diet as the sole nutrient source on day 0; from day 1-4 (ethanol, 3% v/v), from day 5-7 (ethanol, 6% v/v) and from day 8-10 (ethanol, 10% v/v) was incorporated into the liquid diet. On day 11, the ethanol liquid diet was replaced with nutritionally balanced control liquid diet, and ethanol withdrawal-induced hyperexcitability signs were recorded. The results revealed that acute administration of berberine (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently attenuated ethanol withdrawal-induced hyperexcitability signs, and these results were comparable to diazepam (1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Further, chronic administration of berberine (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) to the ethanol diet fed mice markedly attenuated the ethanol withdrawal-induced hyperexcitability signs. In conclusion, the results and evidence suggest that berberine exhibited an inhibitory influence against ethanol withdrawal-induced hyperexcitability signs, which could be mediated through its neuromodulatory action.

  17. Use of Bioimpedance to Assess Changes in Hemodynamics During Acute Administration of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Digby, Genevieve C.; Driver, Helen S.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Ropchan, Glorianne; Parker, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Attempts to investigate the mechanisms by which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy improves heart function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been limited by the lack of non-invasive methods to assess cardiac performance. We used transthoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) to assess acute hemodynamic changes including heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) during PAP titration in (1) post-operative cardiac surgery patients, (2) patients with severe OSA, and (3) normal healthy volunteers. Methods Post-operative cardiac surgery patients were studied via TEB and pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) during acute titration of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) while mechanically ventilated. Patients with severe OSA were studied non-invasively by TEB during acute CPAP titration in supine stage 2 sleep, and normal subjects while awake and recumbent. Results In post-operative cardiac surgery patients (n = 3), increasing PEEP to 18 cmH2O significantly reduced SV and CI relative to baseline. There was no difference between TEB and PAC in terms of ability to assess variations in hemodynamic parameters. In patients with severe OSA (n = 3), CPAP titration to optimal pressure to alleviate obstructive apneas reduced HR, SV, CO and CI significantly compared to without CPAP. In three healthy subjects, maximal tolerated CPAP reduced SV and CO significantly compared to baseline. Conclusions Acute administration of CPAP causes a decrease in CO and CI, apparently a consequence of a reduction in SV. TEB appears to be an accurate and reproducible non-invasive method of detecting changes in hemodynamics.

  18. Acute caffeine administration effect on brain activation patterns in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Haller, Sven; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Moser, Dominik; Toma, Simona; Hofmeister, Jeremy; Sinanaj, Indrit; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that acute caffeine administration enhances task-related brain activation in elderly individuals with preserved cognition. To explore the effects of this widely used agent on cognition and brain activation in early phases of cognitive decline, we performed a double-blinded, placebo-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study during an n-back working memory task in 17 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) compared to 17 age-matched healthy controls (HC). All individuals were regular caffeine consumers with an overnight abstinence and given 200 mg caffeine versus placebo tablets 30 minutes before testing. Analyses included assessment of task-related activation (general linear model), functional connectivity (tensorial-independent component analysis, TICA), baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling, ASL), grey matter density (voxel-based morphometry, VBM), and white matter microstructure (tract-based spatial statistics, TBSS). Acute caffeine administration induced a focal activation of the prefrontal areas in HC with a more diffuse and posteromedial activation pattern in MCI individuals. In MCI, TICA documented a significant caffeine-related enhancement in the prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, ventral premotor and parietal cortex as well as the basal ganglia and cerebellum. The absence of significant group differences in baseline ASL perfusion patterns supports a neuronal rather than a purely vascular origin of these differences. The VBM and TBSS analyses excluded potentially confounding differences in grey matter density and white matter microstructure between MCI and HC. The present findings suggest a posterior displacement of working memory-related brain activation patterns after caffeine administration in MCI that may represent a compensatory mechanism to counterbalance a frontal lobe dysfunction.

  19. Effects of long term ethanol administration in a rat total enteral nutrition model of alcoholic liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically fed a high unsaturated fat diet for 130 d using total enteral nutrition (TEN), or the same diet in which ethanol (EtOH) isocalorically replaced carbohydrate calories. Additional control and EtOH-treated groups were supplemented with the antioxidant N-acetylc...

  20. Lethal acute lung injury and hypoglycemia after subcutaneous administration of monochloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junko; Dote, Tomotaro; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Shimbo, Yukari; Fujihara, Michiko; Kono, Koichi

    2006-06-01

    Hypoglycemia is suspected in the acute lethal toxicity induced by cutaneous exposure to monochloroacetic acid (MCA). Although it has been shown that hepato-renal dysfunction is involved, the mechanism and the target organs that directly affect mortality remain to be determined. We suspected respiratory failure as a main cause of death in some reported cases. We investigated dose-response effects, hypoglycemia, and lung injury in rats exposed to MCA. Serum glucose, blood gases, and parameters of alveolar injury in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analysed 2 and 4 h after subcutaneous administration of MCA (108, 135 or 163 mg/kg). Apparent pulmonary injury and hypoglycemia were not identified 2 h after administration, but lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total cells in BALF were dose-dependently increased; and severe hypoglycemia was identified 4 h after administration. Blood gas analysis showed remarkable alveolar gas dysfunction as exchange in the 163 mg/kg group. Thus, hypoglycemia and lung injury appear to cause death in response to MCA exposure.

  1. Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2015-03-01

    In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are disregarded by subjects scoring high on depressive mood who are low in reward drive. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mixed mu-opioid agonist/kappa-antagonist, buprenorphine, would influence short-term memory for happy, angry or fearful expressions relative to neutral faces. Healthy human subjects (n38) participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, and performed an emotional face relocation task after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. We show that, compared to placebo, buprenorphine administration results in a significant improvement of memory for happy faces. Our data demonstrate that acute manipulation of the opioid system by buprenorphine increases short-term memory for social reward cues.

  2. Lateral/basolateral amygdala serotonin type-2 receptors modulate operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution via inhibition of principal neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    McCool, Brian A.; Christian, Daniel T.; Fetzer, Jonathan A.; Chappell, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral/basolateral amygdala (BLA) forms an integral part of the neural circuitry controlling innate anxiety and learned fear. More recently, BLA dependent modulation of self-administration behaviors suggests a much broader role in the regulation of reward evaluation. To test this, we employed a self-administration paradigm that procedurally segregates “seeking” (exemplified as lever-press behaviors) from consumption (drinking) directed at a sweetened ethanol solution. Microinjection of the nonselective serotonin type-2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (α-m5HT) into the BLA reduced lever pressing behaviors in a dose-dependent fashion. This was associated with a significant reduction in the number of response-bouts expressed during non-reinforced sessions without altering the size of a bout or the rate of responding. Conversely, intra-BLA α-m5HT only modestly effected consumption-related behaviors; the highest dose reduced the total time spent consuming a sweetened ethanol solution but did not inhibit the total number of licks, number of lick bouts, or amount of solution consumed during a session. In vitro neurophysiological characterization of BLA synaptic responses showed that α-m5HT significantly reduced extracellular field potentials. This was blocked by the 5-HT2A/C antagonist ketanserin suggesting that 5-HT2-like receptors mediate the behavioral effect of α-m5HT. During whole-cell patch current-clamp recordings, we subsequently found that α-m5HT increased action potential threshold and hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential of BLA pyramidal neurons. Together, our findings show that the activation of BLA 5-HT2A/C receptors inhibits behaviors related to reward-seeking by suppressing BLA principal neuron activity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the BLA modulates reward-related behaviors and provides specific insight into BLA contributions during operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution

  3. Acute effects of ethanol on action potential and intracellular Ca(2+) transient in cardiac ventricular cells: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Pásek, Michal; Bébarová, Markéta; Christé, Georges; Šimurdová, Milena; Šimurda, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    Alcohol consumption may result in electrocardiographic changes and arrhythmias, at least partly due to effects of ethanol on cardiac ionic currents. Contractility and intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics seem to be altered as well. In this study, we integrated the available (mostly animal) experimental data into previously published models of the rat and human ventricular myocytes to assess the share of ionic current components in ethanol-induced changes in AP configuration and cytosolic Ca(2+) transient in ventricular cardiomyocytes. The rat model reproduced well the experimentally observed changes in AP duration (APD) under ethanol (slight prolongation at 0.8 mM and shortening at ≥8 mM). These changes were almost exclusively caused by the ethanol-induced alterations of I K1. The cytosolic Ca(2+) transient decreased gradually with the increasing ethanol concentration as a result of the ethanol-induced inhibition of I Ca. In the human model, ethanol produced a dose-dependent APD lengthening, dominated by ethanol effect on I Kr, the key repolarising current in human ventricles. This effect might contribute to the clinically observed proarrhythmic effects of ethanol in predisposed individuals.

  4. Effects of acute administration of brotizolam in subjects with disturbed sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roehrs, T.; Zorick, F.; Koshorek, G. L.; Wittig, R.; Roth, T.

    1983-01-01

    1 Effects of ingestion of brotizolam (0.25 and 0.50 mg) over 1-3 days on polysomnographic measures of sleep were assessed in patients complaining of insomnia. 2 Brotizolam reduced latency to sleep, number of awakenings and wake during sleep, and increased total sleep time. It also increased stage 2 sleep and decreased slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. 3 Increasing the dose from 0.25 to 0.50 mg increased hypnotic efficacy, and there was a more consistent and reliable effect. 4 Discontinuation of brotizolam had minimal effects on sleep compared with placebo over the 3 nights after acute administration. 5 No side-effects or disruption of daytime function was found using questionnaires and objective tests of performance. PMID:6661383

  5. Behavioral consequences of chelator administration in acute cadmium toxicity (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Peele, D.B.; Farmer, J.D.; MacPhail, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The conditioned flavor-aversion paradigm was used to assess the toxicity of acutely administered cadmium and the interaction of cadmium with the heavy-metal chelating agents dimercaprol (BAL) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Shortly after consuming saccharin, rats received cadmium either alone or in combination with BAL or DMSA. When compared to rats receiving either nothing or the vehicle, rats receiving cadmium displayed significant reductions in saccharin preference (i.e., conditioned flavor aversions). BAL and DMSA were also capable of producing conditioned flavor aversions when given alone. Rats receiving cadmium in combination with either BAL or DMSA displayed significant, but not complete, attenuations of conditioned flavor aversions when compared to rats receiving cadmium alone. Chelator-induced blockade of cadmium-induced flavor-aversion conditioning was not obtained when BAL or DMSA administration was delayed by 4 hrs.

  6. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiradentes, R.V.; Pires, J.G.P.; Silva, N.F.; Ramage, A.G.; Santuzzi, C.H.; Futuro, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central. PMID:25003632

  7. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Tiradentes, R V; Pires, J G P; Silva, N F; Ramage, A G; Santuzzi, C H; Futuro Neto, H A

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33 ± 4.7 and -31 ± 5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35 ± 5.4 and -31 ± 5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3 ± 2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4 ± 8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  8. Acute Sodium Arsenite-Induced Hematological and Biochemical Changes in Wistar Rats: Protective Effects of Ethanol Extract of Ageratum conyzoides

    PubMed Central

    Ola-Davies, Olufunke Eunice; Akinrinde, Akinleye Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ageratum conyzoides L. (Asteraceae) is an annual herbaceous plant used in folklore medicine for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. Objective: To investigate the protective effect of the ethanol leaf extract of A. conyzoides (EEAC) against hematological, serum biochemical and histological alterations induced by Sodium arsenite administration to Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups of five rats each. Group I received propylene glycol and Group II rats were given the (EEAC, 100 mg/kg b.w.) orally for 7 days. Group III were given a single oral dose of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 2.5 mg/kg b.w.). Animals in Group IV were pretreated with 100 mg/kg EEAC for 7 days followed by a single oral dose of sodium arsenite. Results: Arsenic exposure resulted in significant reductions (P < 0.05) in values of packed cell volume (PCV), hemoglobin concentration (Hb) and red blood cell (RBC) count, and elevation in total white blood cell (WBC) count with insignificant reductions in serum total protein, albumin, and globulin levels. Alterations in aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma glutamyl transferase activities, as well as in serum levels of urea, creatinine, glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, were not statistically significant. EEAC significantly restored (P < 0.05) the PCV, Hb, RBC, and WBC as well as serum albumin, globulin, and total protein to normal values. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that EEAC possess strong potentials to protect against toxicities induced by sodium arsenite. SUMMARY Ageratum conyzoides produced significant reversal of the reduction in the erythrocytic indices (packed cell volume, red blood cell, and Hb) caused by sodium arseniteSodium arsenite-induced slight elevations in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), correlating with the

  9. Central nervous insulin administration does not potentiate the acute glucoregulatory impact of concurrent mild hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ott, Volker; Lehnert, Hendrik; Staub, Josefine; Wönne, Kathrin; Born, Jan; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Experiments in rodents suggest that hypothalamic insulin signaling essentially contributes to the acute control of peripheral glucose homeostasis. Against this background, we investigated in healthy humans whether intranasal (IN) insulin, which is known to effectively reach the brain compartment, impacts systemic glucose metabolism. Twenty overnight-fasted healthy, normal-weight men were IN administered 210 and 420 international units [IU] (10 and 20 IU every 15 min) of the insulin analog aspart (ins-asp) and placebo, respectively, during experimental sessions lasting 6 h. The use of ins-asp rather than human insulin enabled us to disentangle exogenous and endogenous insulin kinetics. IN insulin dose-dependently decreased plasma glucose concentrations while reducing C-peptide and attenuating endogenous insulin levels. However, we also observed a slight dose-dependent permeation of ins-asp into the circulation. In control experiments mimicking the systemic but not the central nervous uptake of the IN 210 IU dose via intravenous infusion of ins-asp at a dose of 0.12 IU/kg/24 h (n = 10), we obtained essentially identical effects on fasting plasma glucose concentrations. This pattern indicates that sustained IN insulin administration to the human brain to enhance central nervous insulin signaling does not acutely alter systemic glucose homeostasis beyond effects accounted for by concurrent mild hyperinsulinemia.

  10. GABAergic modulation of human social interaction in a prisoner's dilemma model by acute administration of alprazolam.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Gowin, Joshua L

    2009-10-01

    Recent work in neuroeconomics has used game theory paradigms to examine neural systems that subserve human social interaction and decision making. Attempts to modify social interaction through pharmacological manipulation have been less common. Here we show dose-dependent modification of human social behavior in a prisoner's dilemma model after acute administration of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A modulating benzodiazepine alprazolam. Nine healthy adults received doses of placebo, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg alprazolam in a counterbalanced within-subject design, while completing multiple test blocks per day on an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. During test blocks in which peak subjective effects of alprazolam were reported, cooperative choices were significantly decreased as a function of dose. Consistent with previous reports showing that high acute doses of GABA-modulating drugs are associated with violence and other antisocial behavior, our data suggest that at sufficiently high doses, alprazolam can decrease cooperation. These behavioral changes may be facilitated by changes in inhibitory control facilitated by GABA. Game theory paradigms may prove useful in behavioral pharmacology studies seeking to measure social interaction, and may help inform the emerging field of neuroeconomics.

  11. Oral operant ethanol self-administration in the absence of explicit cues, food restriction, water restriction and ethanol fading in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Alexandra M.; Anderson, Shawn M.; Shelton, Keith L.; Brunzell, Darlene H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Mouse models of EtOH self-administration are useful to identify genetic and biological underpinnings of alcohol use disorder. Objectives These experiments developed a novel method of oral operant EtOH self-administration in mice without explicitly paired cues, food/water restriction, or EtOH fading. Methods Following magazine and lever training for 0.2% saccharin (SAC), mice underwent 9 weekly overnight sessions with lever pressing maintained by dipper presentation of 0, 3, 10 or 15% EtOH in SAC or water vehicle. Ad libitum water was available from a bottle. Results Water vehicle mice ingested most fluid from the water bottle in contrast to SAC vehicle mice, which despite lever pressing demands, drank most of their fluid from the liquid dipper. Although EtOH in SAC vehicle mice showed concentration-dependent increases of g/kg EtOH intake, lever pressing decreased with increasing EtOH concentration and did not exceed that of SAC vehicle alone at any EtOH concentration. Mice reinforced with EtOH in water ingested less EtOH than mice reinforced with EtOH in SAC. EtOH in water mice, however, showed concentration-dependent increases in g/kg EtOH intake and lever presses. 15% EtOH in water mice showed significantly greater levels of lever pressing than water vehicle mice and a significant escalation of responding across weeks of exposure. Naltrexone pretreatment reduced EtOH self-administration and intake in these mice without altering responding in the vehicle control condition during the first hour of the session. Conclusions SAC facilitated EtOH intake but prevented observation of EtOH reinforcement. Water vehicle unmasked EtOH's reinforcing effects. PMID:26268145

  12. Oral administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 ameliorates alcoholic liver disease in ethanol-containing diet-fed C57BL/6N mice.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Shuichi; Wakita, Yoshihisa; Hirata, Hiroshi; Watari, Junji

    2008-12-10

    We examined the effect of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis (L. brevis) SBC8803 on the development of alcoholic liver disease using ethanol-containing diet-fed mice. Heat-killed L. brevis was orally administered at a dose of 100 or 500 mg/kg once a day for 35 days. Alcoholic liver injury was examined by measuring the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in a serum, and the alcoholic fatty liver was assessed from the content of triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol in the liver. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to examine mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, SREBP-2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) in the liver, as well as E-cadherin, Zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), and heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 in the small intestine. Oral administration of L. brevis significantly inhibited an increase in the level of serum ALT and AST, as well as the content of TG and total cholesterol in the liver caused by ethanol intake. L. brevis supplementation suppressed the overexpression of TNF-alpha, SREBP-1, and SREBP-2 mRNA in the liver induced by ethanol intake and up-regulated the expression of Hsp25 mRNA in the small intestine. These results suggest that L. brevis ameliorated the ethanol-induced liver injury and the fatty liver by suppressing the up-regulation of TNF-alpha and SREBPs in the liver. We speculate that the inhibition of TNF-alpha and SREBPs up-regulation by L. brevis is due to the inhibition of gut-derived endotoxin migration into the liver through the enhancement of intestinal barrier function by the induction of cytoprotective Hsps.

  13. A comparison of dehydroepiandrosterone and 7-keto dehydroepiandrosterone with other drugs that modulate ethanol intake in rats responding under a multiple schedule

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Russell J.; Hulin, Mary W.; Winsauer, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 7-keto DHEA, and several comparison drugs (ethanol, chlordiazepoxide, rauwolscine, and RO15-4513) were administered to male rats responding under a multiple schedule of food and ethanol presentation to determine their selectively for decreasing ethanol-maintained responding. DHEA and 7-keto DHEA significantly decreased both ethanol- and food-maintained responding, compared to control, while also decreasing blood ethanol concentration (BEC). Acute ethanol administration also decreased responding for both food and ethanol; however, ethanol-maintained responding was more potently decreased than food-maintained responding. BEC remained relatively stable after increasing ethanol doses. Among the other drugs tested, RO15-4513 was the most selective for decreasing ethanol-maintained responding compared to food-maintained responding, and it decreased BECs as ethanol-maintained responding decreased. The largest dose of rauwolscine significantly decreased responding for food, while not affecting ethanol-maintained responding compared to control. Low to intermediate doses of rauwolscine produced small, non-significant increases in ethanol-maintained responding and BECs. Chlordiazepoxide produced significant decreases in food-maintained responding and the dose of ethanol presented, but only at the highest dose tested. Although DHEA and 7-keto DHEA did not decrease ethanol-maintained responding as selectively as ethanol or RO15-4513 under the multiple schedule, these neurosteroids may be valuable pharmacological tools in the development of new treatments for alcohol abuse and dependence. PMID:22473025

  14. Effects of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microflora and antimicrobial susceptibility profile in acute periodontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Kasai, Shunsuke; Ihara, Yuichiro; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Saito, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect(s) of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microbial profiles of acute periodontal lesions. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates was also investigated. Patients with acute phases of chronic periodontitis were subjected to clinical examination and microbiological assessment of their subgingival plaque samples by culture technique. Sitafloxacin was then administered (100 mg/day for 5 days) systemically. The clinical and microbiological examinations were repeated 6-8 days after administration. Susceptibilities of clinical isolates to various antimicrobials were determined using the broth and agar dilution methods. From the sampled sites in 30 participants, a total of 355 clinical isolates (34 different bacterial species) were isolated and identified. Parvimonas micra, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus mitis were the most prevalent cultivable bacteria in acute sites. Systemic administration of sitafloxacin yielded a significant improvement in clinical and microbiological parameters. Among the antimicrobials tested, sitafloxacin was the most potent against the clinical isolates with an MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml at baseline. After administration, most clinical isolates were still highly susceptible to sitafloxacin although some increase in MICs was observed. The results suggest that systemic administration of sitafloxacin is effective against subgingival bacteria isolated from acute periodontal lesions.

  15. Relations among acute and chronic nicotine administration, short-term memory, and tactics of data analysis.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Branch, Marc N

    2012-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that nicotine may enhance short-term memory. Some of this evidence comes from nonhuman primate research using a procedure called delayed matching-to-sample, wherein the monkey is trained to select a comparison stimulus that matches some physical property of a previously presented sample stimulus. Delays between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset are manipulated and accuracy is measured. The present research attempted to systematically replicate these enhancement effects with pigeons. In addition, the effects of nicotine were assessed under another, more dynamic, memory task called titrating-delay matching-to-sample. In this procedure, the delay between sample offset and comparison onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Correct matches increase the delay, mismatches decrease the delay, and titrated delay values serve as the primary dependent measure. Both studies examined nicotine's effects under acute and chronic administration. Neither provided clear or compelling evidence of memory enhancement following nicotine administration despite reliable and systematic dose-related changes in response latency measures. A modest dose-related effect on accuracy was found, but the magnitude of the effect appears to be directly related to tactics of data analysis involving best-dose analyses of a very circumscribed subset of trial types.

  16. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hui, Maria; Masiello, Kurt; Saito, Mitsuo

    2016-08-16

    Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy). Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7) mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain.

  17. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hui, Maria; Masiello, Kurt; Saito, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy). Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7) mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain. PMID:27537918

  18. The effect of acute stress and long-term corticosteroid administration on plasma metabolites in an urban and desert songbird.

    PubMed

    Davies, Scott; Rodriguez, Natalie S; Sweazea, Karen L; Deviche, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In response to stressful stimuli, animals activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which can result in transition to the "emergency life history stage." A key adaptive characteristic of this life history stage is the mobilization of energy stores. However, few data are available on the metabolic response to acute stress in wild-caught, free-ranging birds. We quantified the effect of acute capture and restraint stress on plasma glucose, free fatty acid, and uric acid in free-ranging Abert's towhees Melozone aberti. Furthermore, birds were caught from urban and desert localities of Phoenix, Arizona, to investigate potential effects of urban versus desert habitats on the corticosterone (CORT) and metabolic response to acute stress. Complementing work on free-ranging birds, captive towhees received CORT-filled Silastic capsules to investigate the response of urban and desert conspecifics to long-term CORT administration. We quantified the effect of CORT administration on baseline plasma glucose and uric acid, liver and pectoralis muscle glycogen stores, kidney phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C, a key gluconeogenic enzyme), and body mass. Acute stress increased plasma CORT and glucose and decreased plasma uric acid but had no effect on plasma free fatty acid. There was no difference between urban and desert localities in body mass, fat scores, and the response to acute stress. CORT administration decreased body mass but had no effect on glucose and uric acid, pectoral muscle glycogen, or kidney PEPCK-C. However, liver glycogen of CORT-treated urban birds increased compared with corresponding controls, whereas glycogen decreased in CORT-treated desert birds. This study suggests that Abert's towhees principally mobilize glucose during acute stress but urban and desert towhees do not differ in their CORT and metabolic response to acute stress or long-term CORT administration.

  19. Delayed administration of darbepoetin or erythropoietin protects against ischemic acute renal injury and failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D W; Pat, B; Vesey, D A; Guan, Z; Endre, Z; Gobe, G C

    2006-05-01

    Administration of human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) at time of acute ischemic renal injury (IRI) inhibits apoptosis, enhances tubular epithelial regeneration, and promotes renal functional recovery. The present study aimed to determine whether darbepoetin-alfa (DPO) exhibits comparable renoprotection to that afforded by EPO, whether pro or antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins are involved, and whether delayed administration of EPO or DPO 6 h following IRI ameliorates renal dysfunction. The model of IRI involved bilateral renal artery occlusion for 45 min in rats (N = 4 per group), followed by reperfusion for 1-7 days. Controls were sham-operated. Rats were treated at time of ischemia or sham operation (T0), or post-treated (6 h after the onset of reperfusion, T6) with EPO (5000 IU/kg), DPO (25 mug/kg), or appropriate vehicle by intraperitoneal injection. Renal function, structure, and immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bax were analyzed. DPO or EPO at T0 significantly abrogated renal dysfunction in IRI animals (serum creatinine for IRI 0.17 +/- 0.05 mmol/l vs DPO-IRI 0.08 +/- 0.03 mmol/l vs EPO-IRI 0.04 +/- 0.01 mmol/l, P = 0.01). Delayed administration of DPO or EPO (T6) also significantly abrogated subsequent renal dysfunction (serum creatinine for IRI 0.17 +/- 0.05 mmol/l vs DPO-IRI 0.06 +/- 0.01 mmol/l vs EPO-IRI 0.03 +/- 0.03 mmol/l, P = 0.01). There was also significantly decreased tissue injury (apoptosis, P < 0.05), decreased proapoptotic Bax, and increased regenerative capacity, especially in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, with DPO or EPO at T0 or T6. These results reaffirm the potential clinical application of DPO and EPO as novel renoprotective agents for patients at risk of ischemic acute renal failure or after having sustained an ischemic renal insult.

  20. Effect of early administration of exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor on acute edematous pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiang; Yao, Xing; Dai, Li-Cheng; Zhang, Guo-Lei; Ping, Jin-Liang; He, Jian-Fang; Han, Chun-Fan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the therapeutic effect of early administration of exogenous Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) in rats. METHODS: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three (n = 10): normal control group (group I), AEP group (group II) and AEP with bFGF treatment group (group III). AEP was induced by subcutaneous injection of cerulein (5.5 μg/kg and 7.5 μg/kg) at 1 h interval into rats of groups II and III. Three hours after induction of AEP, 100 μg/kg bFGF was administrated intraperitoneally for 1h to group III rats. For test of DNA synthesis in acinar cells, 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling solution was intraperitoneally injected into the rats of groups II and III 24 h after bFGF treatment. The changes in serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic tissue wet/dry ratio were detected. RESULTS: In bFGF treatment group, there was a significant decrease in the volume of serum amylase, lipase and the pancreatic wet/dry weight ratio(1383.0 ± 94.6 U/L, 194.0 ± 43.6 U/L, 4.32 ± 0.32) compared to AEP group (3464 ± 223.7 U/L, 456 ±68.7 U/L, 6.89 ± 0.47) (P < 0.01), and no significant difference was found between bFGF treatment and control group (1289 ± 94.0 U/L, 171 ± 23.4 U/L, 4.12 ± 0.26, P > 0.05). The inflammatory changes such as interstitial edema, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and vacuolization were significantly ameliorated compared to AEP group (P < 0.01). A small number of BrdU-labeled nuclei were observed in acinar cells of AEP rats (1.8 ± 0.3 nuclei/microscopic field, n = 10) while diffuse BrdU-labeled nuclei were found in bFGF-treated rats (18.9 ± 1.4 nuclei/microscopic field, n = 10) (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical study showed increased DNA synthesis in pancreatic acinar cells. CONCLUSION: Early administration of exogenous bFGF has significant therapeutic effect on cerulein-induced acute edematous pancreatitis in rats. Its mechanism is related to the amelioration of inflammation

  1. Pleiotrophin differentially regulates the rewarding and sedative effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Sánchez-Alonso, María G; Ramos, María P; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2014-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a cytokine with important roles in dopaminergic neurons. We found that an acute ethanol (2.0 g/kg, i.p.) administration causes a significant up-regulation of PTN mRNA and protein levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex, suggesting that endogenous PTN could modulate behavioural responses to ethanol. To test this hypothesis, we studied the behavioural effects of ethanol in PTN knockout (PTN(-/-) ) mice and in mice with cortex- and hippocampus-specific transgenic PTN over-expression (PTN-Tg). Ethanol (1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) induced an enhanced conditioned place preference in PTN(-/-) compared to wild type mice, suggesting that PTN prevents ethanol rewarding effects. Accordingly, the conditioning effects of ethanol were completely abolished in PTN-Tg mice. The ataxic effects induced by ethanol (2.0 g/kg) were not affected by the genotype. However, the sedative effects of ethanol (3.6 g/kg) tested in a loss of righting reflex paradigm were significantly reduced in PTN-Tg mice, suggesting that up-regulation of PTN levels prevents the sedative effects of ethanol. These results indicate that PTN may be a novel genetic factor of importance in alcohol use disorders, and that potentiation of the PTN signalling pathway may be a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of these disorders.

  2. [Administration of Palonosetron and Phenotropil for Prophylaxis of the N-V-D Stage of Acute Radiation Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Drachouv, I S; Bykov, V N; Seleznev, A B

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on small (rats) and large (dogs) animals have shown that a sequential administration of Palonosetron and Phenotropil decreases the intensity of the main manifestations of the N-V-D stage of acute radiation syndrome. These data show the appropriateness of a combined administration of Palonosetron and Phenotropil to prevent a reduced work capacity in the individuals participating in elimination of the consequences of accidents associated with overexposure to radiation.

  3. Acute and subacute IL-1β administrations differentially modulate neuroimmune and neurotrophic systems: possible implications for neuroprotection and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and brain injuries, activated microglia can release proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β. These cytokines may change astrocyte and neurotrophin functions, which influences neuronal survival and induces apoptosis. However, the interaction between neuroinflammation and neurotrophin functions in different brain conditions is unknown. The present study hypothesized that acute and subacute elevated IL-1β differentially modulates glial and neurotrophin functions, which are related to their role in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. Method Rats were i.c.v. injected with saline or IL-1β for 1 or 8 days and tested in a radial maze. mRNA and protein expressions of glial cell markers, neurotrophins, neurotrophin receptors, β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured in the hippocampus. Results When compared to controls, memory deficits were found 4 days after IL-1 administrations, however the deficits were attenuated by IL-1 receptor antagonist (RA). Subacute IL-1 administrations increased expressions of APP, microglial active marker CD11b, and p75 neurotrophin receptor, and the concentration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β, but decreased expressions of astrocyte active marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrK B. By contrast, up-regulations of NGF, BDNF and TrK B expressions were found after acute IL-1 administration, which are associated with the increase in both glial marker expressions and IL-10 concentrations. However, TrK A was down-regulated by acute and up-regulated by subacute IL-1 administrations. Subacute IL-1-induced changes in the glial activities, cytokine concentrations and expressions of BDNF and p75 were reversed by IL-1RA treatment. Conclusion These results indicate that acute and subacute IL-1 administrations induce different changes toward neuroprotection

  4. Comparison of ethanol toxicity to Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia tested at two different temperatures: static acute toxicity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, I.T.; Cowgill, U.M.; Murphy, P.G.

    1987-08-01

    Ethanol is a commonly used solvent in toxicity testing, yet there are few studies in the literature devoted to its toxicity to zooplankton. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of Daphnia magna Straus 1820 and Ceriodaphnia dubia J. Richard 1894 to ethanol. Two temperatures were selected because most toxicity data involving D. magna has been carried out at 20/sup 0/C while all discussions concerning C. dubia appear to relate to temperatures oscillating around 25/sup 0/C. Thus, the response of these two organisms to ethanol was examined at 20/sup 0/C and at 24/sup 0/C.r

  5. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake

    PubMed Central

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction. PMID:27378852

  6. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake.

    PubMed

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction.

  7. Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 Modulation of Adolescent Rat Ethanol-Induced Protein Kinase C Translocation and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Santerre, J. L.; Kolitz, E. B.; Pal, R.; Rogow, J. A.; Werner, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol consumption typically begins during adolescence, a developmental period which exhibits many age-dependent differences in ethanol behavioral sensitivity. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity is largely implicated in ethanol-behaviors, and our previous work indicates that regulation of novel PKC isoforms likely contributes to decreased high-dose ethanol sensitivity during adolescence. The cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) signaling cascade selectivity modulates novel and atypical PKC isoform activity, as well as adolescent ethanol hypnotic sensitivity. Therefore, the current study was designed to ascertain adolescent cPLA2 activity both basally and in response to ethanol, as well as it's involvement in ethanol-induced PKC isoform translocation patterns. cPLA2 expression was elevated during adolescence, and activity was increased only in adolescents following high-dose ethanol administration. Novel, but not atypical PKC isoforms translocate to cytosolic regions following high-dose ethanol administration. Inhibiting cPLA2 with AACOCF3 blocked ethanol-induced PKC cytosolic translocation. Finally, inhibition of novel, but not atypical, PKC isoforms when cPLA2 activity was elevated, modulated adolescent high-dose ethanol-sensitivity. These data suggest that the cPLA2/PKC pathway contributes to the acute behavioral effects of ethanol during adolescence. PMID:25791059

  8. Effect of chronic estradiol administration on the acute pressor response to aortic coarctation in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Salgado, M C; Castania, J A; Ballejo, G; Salgado, H C

    1995-08-01

    We investigated the effect of chronic estradiol administration on the pressor response elicited by acute (45 min) partial aortic constriction in conscious Wistar rats and on vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and vasopressin in vitro. Estradiol (10 micrograms kg-1 day-1, sc) or vehicle was administered for 7 days to young castrated male and female rats and to female rats that had stopped cycling (14-16 months of age). In the acute experiment of aortic coarctation in conscious rats, carotid pressure was monitored continuously before and for 45 min after partial abdominal aortic coarctation. In ovariectomized females the mean carotid pressure and heart rate before aortic coarctation were significantly lower in estradiol-treated animals (107 +/- 3 vs 119 +/- 3 mmHg and 360 +/- 31 vs 494 +/- 12 bpm). Estradiol did not affect the pressor response (145-150 mmHg) to aortic coarctation of castrated male rats or ovariectomized female rats but blunted the reflex bradycardia of ovariectomized rats. The onset of the pressor response to aortic coarctation was delayed in aged female rats as compared to the other groups. While estradiol treatment significantly accelerated the onset of hypertension in aged rats, it did not affect the pressor response of castrated animals. Full dose-response curves to angiotensin II and vasopressin were constructed in vitro in the isolated mesenteric arterial bed obtained from similarly treated groups. Estradiol did not affect the vasopressin sensitivity or responsiveness of any group, but caused a significant increase in angiotensin II sensitivity in ovariectomized rats only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Albumin Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Safety Analysis of the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Michael D.; Martin, Renee H.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Moy, Claudia S.; Tamariz, Diego; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Jones, Elizabeth B.; Weisman, David; Pettigrew, Creed; Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Albumin treatment of ischemic stroke was associated with cardiopulmonary adverse events in previous studies and a low incidence of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to describe the neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events in the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial. Methods Ischemic stroke patients, aged 18–83 and a baseline NIHSS ≥ 6, were randomized to treatment with ALB or saline control within 5 hours of stroke onset. Neurological adverse events included symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, hemicraniectomy, neurological deterioration and neurological death. Cardiopulmonary adverse events included pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, atrial fibrillation, pneumonia and pulmonary thromboembolism. Results Among 830 patients, neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events were not differentially associated with poor outcome between ALB and saline control subjects. The rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the first 24h was low overall (2.9%, 24/830) but more common in the ALB treated subjects (RR = 2.4, CI95 1.01–5.8). The rate of pulmonary edema/CHF in the first 48h was 7.9% (59/830) and was more common among ALB treated subjects (RR = 10.7, CI95 4.3–26.6); this complication was expected and was satisfactorily managed with mandated diuretic administration and intravenous fluid guidelines. Troponin elevations in the first 48h were common, occurring without ECG change or cardiac symptoms in 52 subjects (12.5%). Conclusions ALB therapy was associated with an increase in symptomatic ICH and pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure but this did not affect final outcomes. Troponin elevation occurs routinely in the first 48 hours after acute ischemic stroke. Trial Registration ClincalTrials.gov NCT00235495 PMID:26325387

  10. Reversed Scototaxis during Withdrawal after Daily-Moderate, but Not Weekly-Binge, Administration of Ethanol in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Adam; Howorko, Adam; Powell, Russell A.; Schalomon, Melike; Hamilton, Trevor J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse can lead to severe psychological and physiological damage. Little is known, however, about the relative impact of a small, daily dose of alcohol (daily-moderate schedule) versus a large, once per week dose (weekly-binge schedule). In this study, we examined the effect of each of these schedules on behavioural measures of anxiety in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Adult wild-type zebrafish were administered either 0.2% ethanol on a daily-moderate schedule or 1.4% ethanol on a weekly-binge schedule for a period of 21 days, and then tested for scototaxis (preference for darkness) during withdrawal. Compared to a control group with no alcohol exposure, the daily-moderate group spent significantly more time on the light side of the arena (indicative of decreased anxiety) on day two of withdrawal, but not day 9 of withdrawal. The weekly-binge group was not significantly different from the control group on either day of withdrawal and showed no preference for either the light or dark zones. Our results indicate that even a small dose of alcohol on a daily basis can cause significant, though reversible, changes in behaviour. PMID:23675478

  11. Effects of Gelam and Acacia honey acute administration on some biochemical parameters of Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since ancient times, honey has been used for medicinal purposes in many cultures; it is one of the oldest and most enduring substances used in wound management. Scientific evidence for its efficacy is widely studied, but systemic safety studies are still lacking. It is essential to study the impact of consumption of honey on the health and proper development of the consumer. Therefore, the present study was designed to observe the effects of acute administration (14 days) of Gelam honey (GH), a wild harvesting honey and Acacia honey (AH), a beekeeping honey, on male and female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Methods An acute oral study was performed following OECD test guideline 423, with minor modifications. In the study, GH, AH and sucrose (S) were administered at 2000 mg/kg body weight. Animals were observed for the next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Clinical biochemistry, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results Rats fed with honey did not exhibit any abnormal signs or deaths. Results showed a decrease in weight gain and energy efficiency, but significantly increased in total food intake and total calories in female rats fed with GH, compared to control (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, a significant increase in body weight was observed in male rats in all honey-treated groups. Male rats fed with AH significantly decreased in total food intake, total calories and energy efficiency. Both male and female rats fed with GH displayed a significant decrease in triglycerides compared to control group. Hepatic and renal function levels were within acceptable range. The gross necropsy analysis did not reveal changes in any of the organs examined. Conclusions Our results suggest that acute consumption of GH and AH at 2000 mg/kg body weight of male and female SD rats has some discrepancy

  12. Effects of early pregnancy and acute 17 beta-estradiol administration on porcine uterine secretion, cyclic nucleotides, and catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Young, K H; Bazer, F W; Simpkins, J W; Roberts, R M

    1987-01-01

    This study investigated acute effects of 17 beta-estradiol (E) on ions, cyclic nucleotides, and catecholamines and their association with temporal changes in uterine secretory products in pregnant, cyclic, and nonpregnant gilts. Uterine flushings (UTF) and endometrium (ENDOM) from one uterine horn of nonpregnant and pregnant gilts (n = 9) were collected on days 10, 12, and 14 (n = 3). Protein, plasma inhibitor (P less than 0.05), Na+, and K+ (P less than 0.01) increased linearly in UTF of pregnant gilts. Ca2+ changed biphasically, with higher concentrations (P less than 0.01) in pregnant gilts on day 12. Endometrial cAMP and cGMP (P less than 0.05) increased between days 12 and 14 of pregnancy. The UTF norepinephrine (NE) concentrations increased (P less than 0.01) in cyclic gilts between days 12 and 14, while endometrial NE increased between days 10 and 12 and then decreased on day 14. The UTF of pregnant gilts had higher (P less than 0.05) concentrations of dopamine (DA), which peaked on day 12 and then decreased (P less than 0.01) by day 14. DA in UTF of nonpregnant gilts decreased between days 10 and 12 and remained low on day 14. A catecholamine metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol, in ENDOM (P less than 0.05) and UTF (P less than 0.01) decreased linearly between days 10 and 14. The turnover rate of endometrial catecholamines was 2.4-fold higher (P less than 0.05) during early pregnancy compared with that in cyclic gilts. Effects of acute administration of exogenous E (0.5 mg) were also studied. The UTF and ENDOM were from day 11 nonpregnant gilts 0, 30, 60, and 360 min (n = 3) post-E or post-saline-ethanol (C) injection (n = 9). Potassium, plasma inhibitor (P less than 0.01), and cGMP (P less than 0.05) increased rapidly (30 min) after E injection. The K+ level changed biphasically, with increased concentrations again at 360 min. Plasmin inhibitor returned to levels similar to controls by 60 min, whereas cGMP remained elevated until 360 min postinjection

  13. Acute and chronic administration of gold nanoparticles cause DNA damage in the cerebral cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Eria; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Zanoni, Elton Torres; de Souza Notoya, Frederico; Leffa, Daniela Dimer; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Daumann, Francine; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos Ortiz; Benavides, Roberto; da Silva, Luciano; Andrade, Vanessa M; da Silva Paula, Marcos Marques

    2014-01-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles is increasing in medicine; however, their toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Studies show that gold nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier, as well as accumulate in the brain. Therefore, this study was undertaken to better understand the effects of gold nanoparticles on rat brains. DNA damage parameters were evaluated in the cerebral cortex of adult rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of gold nanoparticles of two different diameters: 10 and 30nm. During acute administration, adult rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of either gold nanoparticles or saline solution. During chronic administration, adult rats received a daily single injection for 28 days of the same gold nanoparticles or saline solution. Twenty-four hours after either single (acute) or last injection (chronic), the rats were euthanized by decapitation, their brains removed, and the cerebral cortices isolated for evaluation of DNA damage parameters. Our study showed that acute administration of gold nanoparticles in adult rats presented higher levels of damage frequency and damage index in their DNA compared to the control group. It was also observed that gold nanoparticles of 30nm presented higher levels of damage frequency and damage index in the DNA compared to the 10nm ones. When comparing the effects of chronic administration of gold nanoparticles of 10 and 30nm, we observed that occurred significant different index and frequency damage, comparing with control group. However, there is no difference between the 10 and 30nm groups in the levels of DNA damage for both parameters of the Comet assay. Results suggest that gold nanoparticles for both sizes cause DNA damage for chronic as well as acute treatments, although a higher damage was observed for the chronic one.

  14. Mode of inhibitory actions of acute and chronic chloroquine administration on the electrically stimulated mouse diaphragm in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Okwuasaba, F. K.; Otubu, J. A.; Udoh, F. V.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of bath applied chloroquine (Chlo) and of acute and chronic Chlo administration on skeletal muscle reactivity to electrical stimulation and to drugs have been studied on mouse hemidiaphragm preparations in vitro. 2. Chlo (0.15-150 micrograms) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition twitch and tetanic contractions due to direct muscle stimulation (MS). Acute and chronic administration of Chlo (45 mg kg-1, i.p. daily, for 3-28 days) progressively shifted the concentration-response curve to bath-applied Chlo to the right, with maximum effect occurring from day 14 of Chlo pretreatment. 3. Acute and chronic administration of Chlo decreased the twitch and tetanus tension, raised the minimal fusion frequency (MFR) for tetanic contraction to occur and did not alter the twitch/tetanus tension ratio. Tetanus tension unlike twitch tension was not significantly decreased on day 3. 4. Caffeine (5-500 microM)--and isoprenaline (0.001-0.8 microM)-induced potentiations of twitch contraction were attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by bath-applied Chlo and by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. Higher concentrations of caffeine (0.1-5 microM) and KCl (10 mM-130 mM) produced contracture of the muscle which was sensitive to inhibition by Chlo (50-150 microM). Moreover, the spike contractions superimposed on caffeine contracture were more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of Chlo than the contracture. 5. The inhibitory effects of dantrolene sodium and (+)-tubocurarine on MS and on indirectly stimulated hemidiaphragm respectively were not significantly altered by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. In contrast, the inhibitory concentration-response curve to procaine was shifted to the right.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2282456

  15. Adolescent alcohol exposure reduces behavioral flexibility, promotes disinhibition, and increases resistance to extinction of ethanol self-administration in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gass, Justin T; Glen, William Bailey; McGonigal, Justin T; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Lopez, Marcelo F; Randall, Patrick K; Yaxley, Richard; Floresco, Stan B; Chandler, L Judson

    2014-10-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a brain region that is critically involved in cognitive function and inhibitory control of behavior, and adolescence represents an important period of continued PFC development that parallels the maturation of these functions. Evidence suggests that this period of continued development of the PFC may render it especially vulnerable to environmental insults that impact PFC function in adulthood. Experimentation with alcohol typically begins during adolescence when binge-like consumption of large quantities is common. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated cycles of adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) exposure (postnatal days 28-42) by vapor inhalation on different aspects of executive functioning in the adult rat. In an operant set-shifting task, AIE-exposed rats exhibited deficits in their ability to shift their response strategy when the rules of the task changed, indicating reduced behavioral flexibility. There were no differences in progressive ratio response for the reinforcer suggesting that AIE did not alter reinforcer motivation. Examination of performance on the elevated plus maze under conditions designed to minimize stress revealed that AIE exposure enhanced the number of entries into the open arms, which may reflect either reduced anxiety and/or disinhibition of exploratory-like behavior. In rats that trained to self-administer ethanol in an operant paradigm, AIE increased resistance to extinction of ethanol-seeking behavior. This resistance to extinction was reversed by positive allosteric modulation of mGluR5 during extinction training, an effect that is thought to reflect promotion of extinction learning mechanisms within the medial PFC. Consistent with this, CDPPB was also observed to reverse the deficits in behavioral flexibility. Finally, diffusion tensor imaging with multivariate analysis of 32 brain areas revealed that while there were no differences in the total brain volume, the volume of

  16. Acute oral administration of low doses of methylphenidate targets calretinin neurons in the rat septal area

    PubMed Central

    García-Avilés, Álvaro; Albert-Gascó, Héctor; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Elhajj, Ebtisam; Sanjuan-Arias, Julio; Sanchez-Perez, Ana María; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a commonly administered drug to treat children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alterations in septal driven hippocampal theta rhythm may underlie attention deficits observed in these patients. Amongst others, the septo-hippocampal connections have long been acknowledged to be important in preserving hippocampal function. Thus, we wanted to ascertain if MPD administration, which improves attention in patients, could affect septal areas connecting with hippocampus. We used low and orally administered MPD doses (1.3, 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg) to rats what mimics the dosage range in humans. In our model, we observed no effect when using 1.3 mg/Kg MPD; whereas 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg induced a significant increase in c-fos expression specifically in the medial septum (MS), an area intimately connected to the hippocampus. We analyzed dopaminergic areas such as nucleus accumbens and striatum, and found that only 5 mg/Kg induced c-fos levels increase. In these areas tyrosine hydroxylase correlated well with c-fos staining, whereas in the MS the sparse tyrosine hydroxylase fibers did not overlap with c-fos positive neurons. Double immunofluorescence of c-fos with neuronal markers in the septal area revealed that co-localization with choline acethyl transferase, parvalbumin, and calbindin with c-fos did not change with MPD treatment; whereas, calretinin and c-fos double labeled neurons increased after MPD administration. Altogether, these results suggest that low and acute doses of methylphenidate primary target specific populations of caltretinin medial septal neurons. PMID:25852493

  17. Neuroendocrine and neurochemical effects of acute ibogaine administration: a time course evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Rothman, R B; Baumann, M H

    1996-10-21

    Ibogaine (IBO) is an indole alkaloid that is reported to facilitate drug abstinence in substance abusers. Despite considerable investigation, the mechanism of IBO action in vivo and its suitability as a treatment for drug addiction remains unclear. The present study was designed to evaluate the time-course effects of acute IBO on neuroendocrine and neurochemical indices. Adult male rats were treated with i.p. saline or 50 mg/kg IBO and sacrificed 15, 30, 60, 120 min and 24 h later. Trunk blood was collected for hormone measures and brains were dissected for neurochemical analyses. IBO produced a rapid elevation in plasma prolactin that declined to control levels by 60 min. Corticosterone levels increased 15 min after drug administration, continued to increase for 120 min, but returned to control levels 24 h after dosing. IBO decreased dopamine (DA) concentrations in the striatum and frontal cortex at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection while DA metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), were elevated over the same time period. 24 h after IBO, DOPAC concentrations in striatum and HVA levels in the frontal cortex were below control values. Serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) were decreased at 60 min after IBO administration only in the striatum. These data indicate that a single injection of IBO produces a spectrum of effects that includes: (1) elevation of plasma prolactin and corticosterone, (2) short- and long-term effects on DA neurotransmission, and (3) modest, transient effects of 5-HT neurotransmission. The effects of IBO reported herein may have relevance to the anti-addictive properties of this drug, and this proposal warrants further investigation.

  18. Alpha and beta EEG power reflects L-dopa acute administration in parkinsonian patients

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Jean-Marc; Curcio, Giuseppe; Mastrolilli, Francesca; Salomone, Gaetano; Trotta, Laura; Tombini, Mario; di Biase, Lazzaro; Scrascia, Federica; Fini, Rita; Fabrizio, Emma; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of an acute L-dopa administration on eye-closed resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) activity of cognitively preserved Parkinsonian patients. Methods: We examined 24 right-handed patients diagnosed as uncomplicated probable Parkinson’s disease (PD). Each patient underwent Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)-part-III evaluation before and 60 min after an oral load of L-dopa-methyl-ester/carbidopa 250/25 mg. Resting condition eyes-closed EEG data were recorded both pre- and post L-dopa load. Absolute EEG power values were calculated at each scalp derivation for Delta, Theta, Alpha and Beta frequency bands. UPDRS scores (both global and subscale scores) and EEG data (power values of different frequency bands for each scalp derivation) were submitted to a statistical analysis to compare Pre and Post L-Dopa conditions. Finally, a correlation analysis was carried out between EEG spectral content and UPDRS scores. Results: Considering EEG power spectral analysis, no statistically significant differences arose on Delta and Theta bands after L-dopa intake. Conversely, Alpha and Beta rhythms significantly increased on centro-parietal scalp derivations, as a function of L-dopa administration. Correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between Beta power increase on centro-parietal areas and UPDRS subscores (Rigidity of arms and Bradykinesia). A minor significant negative correlation was also found between Alpha band increase and resting tremor. Conclusions: Assuming that a significant change in EEG power spectrum after L-dopa intake may be related to dopaminergic mechanisms, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that dopaminergic defective networks are implicated in cortical oscillatory abnormalities at rest in non-demented PD patients. PMID:25452725

  19. Effects of acute cortisol administration on perceptual priming of trauma-related material.

    PubMed

    Holz, Elena; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Streb, Markus; Pfaltz, Monique; Michael, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Intrusive memories are a hallmark symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They reflect excessive and uncontrolled retrieval of the traumatic memory. Acute elevations of cortisol are known to impair the retrieval of already stored memory information. Thus, continuous cortisol administration might help in reducing intrusive memories in PTSD. Strong perceptual priming for neutral stimuli associated with a "traumatic" context has been shown to be one important learning mechanism that leads to intrusive memories. However, the memory modulating effects of cortisol have only been shown for explicit declarative memory processes. Thus, in our double blind, placebo controlled study we aimed to investigate whether cortisol influences perceptual priming of neutral stimuli that appeared in a "traumatic" context. Two groups of healthy volunteers (N = 160) watched either neutral or "traumatic" picture stories on a computer screen. Neutral objects were presented in between the pictures. Memory for these neutral objects was tested after 24 hours with a perceptual priming task and an explicit memory task. Prior to memory testing half of the participants in each group received 25 mg of cortisol, the other half received placebo. In the placebo group participants in the "traumatic" stories condition showed more perceptual priming for the neutral objects than participants in the neutral stories condition, indicating a strong perceptual priming effect for neutral stimuli presented in a "traumatic" context. In the cortisol group this effect was not present: Participants in the neutral stories and participants in the "traumatic" stories condition in the cortisol group showed comparable priming effects for the neutral objects. Our findings show that cortisol inhibits perceptual priming for neutral stimuli that appeared in a "traumatic" context. These findings indicate that cortisol influences PTSD-relevant memory processes and thus further support the idea that administration

  20. Microglia activation and cell death in response to diethyl-dithiocarbamate acute administration.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, Gigliola Grassi; Laurenzi, Maria Assunta; Semprevivo, Massimo; Torni, Federica; Lindgren, Jan Ake; Marinucci, Eva

    2002-04-29

    An increasing body of evidence suggests a role for activated microglia in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, it would be useful to have a better understanding of the significance of microglial activation for neuronal damage. Unfortunately, most models of microglial activation use invasive or long-lasting insults, which make it difficult to evaluate the role played by microglia. We have instead developed a model for microglial activation by using brief exposure to the widely available neurotoxin diethyl-dithiocarbamate (DDTC). Despite evidence for the neurotoxic nature of this substance, microglia involvement has not been hitherto investigated. After acute i.p. administration of DDTC at two different doses, microglia were already activated in selected areas of the rat brain (hippocampal dentate gyrus, entorhinal-pyriform cortex and hypothalamus) after 1 hour, reaching a peak at 3-6 hours and subsided within 6-48 hours, depending on the brain region. Microglia activation was associated with interleukin-1 beta immunopositivity between 3 and 6 hours and with up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II expression between 24 and 48 hours. No significant changes in astrocyte immunostaining were detected between 6 hours and 6 days. The TUNEL procedure revealed the death of a limited number of cells in the above-mentioned structures that peaked at 6h and then declined rapidly. Cell death was detected in sites with major, minor, or no microglial activation, indicating that these two events can occur concomitantly or independently. The study shows that the administration of DDTC provides a useful model for studying the implications of region-specific reactivity of microglia and its differential interaction with neuronal damage.

  1. Acute but not chronic administration of pioglitazone promoted behavioral and neurochemical protective effects in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbiero, Janaína K; Santiago, Ronise M; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ariza, Deborah; Morais, Lívia H; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the neurochemical, motor and cognitive effects of pioglitazone in a rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In the first experiment, we administered MPTP, and 1h later administered a single oral dose of pioglitazone (5, 15 and 30 mg/kg). The following day, we performed the open-field test and neurochemical dose response curve. We demonstrated that 30 mg/kg of pioglitazone was capable of restoring striatal dopamine (DA) concentrations and motor behaviors. A second experiment was conducted to test the effects of two protocols (acute and chronic) of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) administration in the open-field test, two-way active avoidance task and in the DA and metabolites levels. The acute protocol consisted of a single oral administration 1 h after MPTP, whereas the chronic protocol was performed with daily administrations starting 1 h after MPTP and ending 22 days after that. Results showed that neither protocol was able to reverse the cognitive impairment promoted by MPTP. We also demonstrated that acute treatment generated some level of neuroprotection, as confirmed by the absence of DA reduction in the group treated with pioglitazone in comparison to the sham group. By contrast, chronic treatment leaded to a reduction of striatal DA, close to MPTP administration alone. These findings suggest that acute administration of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) was more efficient in generating beneficial effects on motor behaviors and in striatal DA levels. Nevertheless, we failed to demonstrate that pioglitazone administration improved performance on a dopamine-related cognitive task after MPTP.

  2. Effects of acute and 2-week administration of oral salbutamol on exercise performance and muscle strength in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hostrup, M; Kalsen, A; Auchenberg, M; Bangsbo, J; Backer, V

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate effects of acute and 2-week administration of oral salbutamol on repeated sprint ability, exercise performance, and muscle strength in elite endurance athletes. Twenty male elite athletes [VO2max: 69.4 ± 1.8 (Mean ± SE) mL/min/kg], aged 25.9 ± 1.4 years, were included in a randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled parallel study. At baseline, after acute administration, and again after 2-week administration of the study drugs (8 mg salbutamol or placebo), subjects' maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of m. quadriceps and isometric endurance of m. deltoideus were measured, followed by three repeated Wingate tests. Exercise performance at 110% of VO2max was determined on a bike ergometer. Acute administration of salbutamol increased peak power during first Wingate test by 4.1 ± 1.7% (P < 0.05). Two-week administration of salbutamol increased (P < 0.05) peak power during first and second Wingate test by 6.4 ± 2.0 and 4.2 ± 1.0%. Neither acute nor 2-week administration of salbutamol had any effect on MVC, exercise performance at 110% of VO2max or on isometric endurance. No differences were observed in the placebo group. In conclusion, salbutamol benefits athletes' sprint ability. Thus, the present study supports the restriction of oral salbutamol in competitive sports.

  3. Effects of acute and repeated administration of salvinorin A on dopamine function in the rat dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Acute systemic administration of salvinorin A, a naturally occurring κ-opioid receptor (KOPr) agonist, decreases locomotion and striatal dopamine (DA) overflow. Objectives Conventional and quantitative microdialysis techniques were used to determine whether salvinorin A infusion into the dorsal striatum (DSTR) decreases DA overflow by altering DA uptake or release. The influence of repeated salvinorin A administration on basal DA dynamics and cocaine-evoked alterations in DA overflow and locomotion was also assessed. Materials and methods Salvinorin A was administered via the dialysis probe (0; 20–200 nM) or via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection (1.0 or 3.2 mg/kg per day×5 days). The effects of a challenge dose of cocaine were examined 48 h after repeated salvinorin treatment. Results Retrodialysis of salvinorin A produced a dose-related, KOPr antagonist reversible, decrease in DA levels. Extracellular DA levels were decreased whereas DA extraction fraction, which provides an estimate of DA uptake, was unaltered. In contrast to its acute administration, repeated salvinorin A administration did not modify dialysate DA levels. Similarly, neither basal extracellular DA levels nor DA uptake was altered. Unlike synthetic KOPr agonists, prior repeated administration of salvinorin A did not attenuate the locomotor activating effects of an acute cocaine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) challenge. However, cocaine-evoked DA overflow was enhanced. Conclusions These data demonstrate that acute, but not repeated, salvinorin A administration decreases mesostriatal neurotransmission and that activation of DSTR KOPr is sufficient for this effect. Differences in the interaction of salvinorin and synthetic KOPr agonists with cocaine suggest that the pharmacology of these agents may differ. PMID:18246329

  4. Acetate as an active metabolite of ethanol: studies of locomotion, loss of righting reflex, and anxiety in rodents.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Marta; Betz, Adrienne J; San Miguel, Noemí; López-Cruz, Laura; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2013-01-01

    IT HAS BEEN POSTULATED THAT A NUMBER OF THE CENTRAL EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ARE MEDIATED VIA ETHANOL METABOLITES: acetaldehyde and acetate. Ethanol is known to produce a large variety of behavioral actions such anxiolysis, narcosis, and modulation of locomotion. Acetaldehyde contributes to some of those effects although the contribution of acetate is less known. In the present studies, rats and mice were used to assess the acute and chronic effects of acetate after central or peripheral administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the comparison between central (intraventricular, ICV) and peripheral (intraperitoneal, IP) administration of acute doses of acetate on locomotion. CD1 male mice were used to study acute IP effects of acetate on locomotion, and also the effects of chronic oral consumption of acetate (0, 500, or 1000 mg/l, during 7, 15, 30, or 60 days) on ethanol- (1.0, 2.0, 4.0, or 4.5 g/kg, IP) induced locomotion, anxiolysis, and loss of righting reflex (LORR). In rats, ICV acetate (0.7-2.8 μmoles) reduced spontaneous locomotion at doses that, in the case of ethanol and acetaldehyde, had previously been shown to stimulate locomotion. Peripheral acute administration of acetate also suppressed locomotion in rats (25-100 mg/kg), but not in mice. In addition, although chronic administration of acetate during 15 days did not have an effect on spontaneous locomotion in an open field, it blocked ethanol-induced locomotion. However, ethanol-induced anxiolysis was not affected by chronic administration of acetate. Chronic consumption of acetate (up to 60 days) did not have an effect on latency to, or duration of LORR induced by ethanol, but significantly increased the number of mice that did not achieve LORR. The present work provides new evidence supporting the hypothesis that acetate should be considered a centrally-active metabolite of ethanol that contributes to some behavioral effects of this alcohol, such as motor suppression.

  5. Changes in mouse hippocampal EEG characteristics after oral administration of Ro 41-3696, nitrazepam, or zopiclone alone and in combination with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, M; Tanaka, Y; Himori, N

    1994-11-01

    Ro 41-3696, a benzoquinolizinone derivative, is a partial agonist to the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor and is expected to be a nonsedative hypnotic. The present comparative study was performed to examine the effects of the oral administration of Ro 41-3696, nitrazepam or zopiclone alone and in combination with a 'social' dose of ethanol on mouse hippocampal EEG. Ro 41-3696 (1-10 mg/kg), nitrazepam (0.1 and 1 mg/kg), and zopiclone (1 and 10 mg/kg) each alone caused an increase in the drowsy EEG pattern associated with a decrease in the duration of hippocampal rhythmic slow-wave activity (RSA). On the other hand, nitrazepam markedly lowered, while Ro 41-3696 and zopiclone slightly lowered the RSA frequency during waking mobility. In combination with a noneffective oral dose (1 g/kg) of ethanol, the reductions in both total duration and peak frequency of RSA caused by nitrazepam, unlike those by Ro 41-3696 and zopiclone, were significantly potentiated. In addition, only nitrazepam produced motor impairment. These results suggest that Ro 41-3696 acts more selectively than nitrazepam to promote the drowsy EEG pattern, and the partial agonistic properties may minimize the residual effects during waking mobility similar to the short-acting agent zopiclone.

  6. Antibiotic treatment for acute haematogenous osteomyelitis of childhood: moving towards shorter courses and oral administration.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, M; Peltola, H

    2011-10-01

    Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) of childhood usually affects the long bones of the lower limbs. Although almost any agent may cause AHOM, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterium, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and, in some countries, Salmonella spp. and Kingella kingae. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has improved the diagnostic accuracy of traditional radiography and scintigraphy. Except for the pre-treatment diagnostic sample from bone before the institution of antibiotic therapy, no other surgery is usually required. Traditionally, non-neonatal AHOM has been treated with a 1-3-month course of antibiotics, including an intravenous (i.v.) phase for the first weeks, but recent prospective randomised studies challenge this approach. For most uncomplicated cases, a course of 20 days including an i.v. period of 2-4 days suffices, provided large enough doses of a well-absorbed agent (clindamycin or a first-generation cephalosporin, local resistance permitting) are used, administration is four times daily and most symptoms and signs subside within a few days. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is a good guide in monitoring the course of illness, and the antimicrobial can usually be discontinued if CRP has decreased to <20 mg/L. Newer and costly agents, such as linezolid, should be reserved for cases due to resistant S. aureus strains. AHOM in neonates and immunocompromised patients probably requires a different approach. Because sequelae may develop slowly, follow-up for at least 1 year post hospitalisation is recommended.

  7. Effects of Acute Administration of Ketorolac on Mammalian Vestibular Sensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP. PMID:23562034

  8. Prevention of reflex natriuresis after acute unilateral nephrectomy by neonatal administration of MSG

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.Y.; Wiedemann, E.; Deschepper, C.F.; Alper, R.H.; Humphreys, M.H.

    1987-02-01

    Acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN) results in natriuresis from the remaining kidney through reflex pathways involving the central nervous system and requiring an intact pituitary gland. The natriuresis is accompanied by an increase in the plasma concentration of a peptide or peptides derived from the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of proopiomelanocortin. The authors measured plasma immunoreactive NTF-like material (IR-NTF) by radioimmunoassay, before and after AUN in control rats and rats treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG), a procedure that produces neuroendocrine dysfunction by destroying cell bodies in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, median eminence, and other brain regions. In control rats, IR-NTF increased from 85.8 +/- 54.9 (SD) to 207 +/- 98.1 fmol/ml after AUN as sodium excretion (U/sub Na/V) doubled. In MSG-treated rats, AUN produced no change in plasma IR-NTF concentration, nor did U/sub Na/V increase. Tissue content of IR-NTF was reduced in the arcuate nucleus and anterior lobe of pituitaries from MSG-treated rats compared with controls, but was no different in the neurointermediate lobe. These results indicate that the hypothalamic lesion produced by neonatal administration of MSG prevents both the increase in plasma IR-NTF concentration and the natruiuresis after AUN, and therefore lend further support to the concept of a casual relationship between these two consequences of AUN.

  9. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and coagulopathy in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following administration of the rodenticide diphacinone.

    PubMed

    Rattner, Barnett A; Horak, Katherine E; Warner, Sarah E; Day, Daniel D; Meteyer, Carol U; Volker, Steven F; Eisemann, John D; Johnston, John J

    2011-05-01

    The acute oral toxicity of the anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was found to be over 20 times greater in American kestrels (Falco sparverius; median lethal dose 96.8 mg/kg body weight) compared with Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Modest evidence of internal bleeding was observed at necropsy, although histological examination of heart, liver, kidney, lung, intestine, and skeletal muscle revealed hemorrhage over a wide range of doses (35.1-675 mg/kg). Residue analysis suggests that the half-life of diphacinone in the liver of kestrels that survived was relatively short, with the majority of the dose cleared within 7 d of exposure. Several precise and sensitive clotting assays (prothrombin time, Russell's viper venom time, thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in this species, and oral administration of diphacinone at 50 mg/kg increased prothrombin time and Russell's viper venom time at 48 and 96 h postdose compared with controls. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and generally corresponded with the onset of overt signs of toxicity and lethality. In view of the toxicity and risk evaluation data derived from American kestrels, the involvement of diphacinone in some raptor mortality events, and the paucity of threshold effects data following short-term dietary exposure for birds of prey, additional feeding trials with captive raptors are warranted to characterize more fully the risk of secondary poisoning.

  10. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and coagulopathy in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following administration of the rodenticie diphacinone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Day, Daniel D.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Voler, Steven F.; Eisemann, John D.; Johnston, John J.

    2011-01-01

    The acute oral toxicity of the anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was found to be over 20 times greater in American kestrels (Falco sparverius; median lethal dose 96.8 mg/kg body weight) compared with Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Modest evidence of internal bleeding was observed at necropsy, although histological examination of heart, liver, kidney, lung, intestine, and skeletal muscle revealed hemorrhage over a wide range of doses (35.1-675 mg/kg). Residue analysis suggests that the half-life of diphacinone in the liver of kestrels that survived was relatively short, with the majority of the dose cleared within 7 d of exposure. Several precise and sensitive clotting assays (prothrombin time, Russell's viper venom time, thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in this species, and oral administration of diphacinone at 50 mg/kg increased prothrombin time and Russell?s viper venom time at 48 and 96 h postdose compared with controls. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and generally corresponded with the onset of overt signs of toxicity and lethality. In view of the toxicity and risk evaluation data derived from American kestrels, the involvement of diphacinone in some raptor mortality events, and the paucity of threshold effects data following short-term dietary exposure for birds of prey, additional feeding trials with captive raptors are warranted to characterize more fully the risk of secondary poisoning.

  11. Effects of acute administration of ketorolac on mammalian vestibular sensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP.

  12. Effects of acute and chronic administration of venlafaxine and desipramine on extracellular monoamine levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosuke; Ago, Yukio; Umehara, Masato; Kita, Yuki; Fujita, Kazumi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-04-15

    Prefrontal catecholamine neurotransmission plays a key role in the therapeutic actions of drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have recently shown that serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine attenuated horizontal hyperactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats, an animal model of ADHD, and that these drugs are potential pharmacotherapeutics for ADHD. In this study, we used in vivo microdialysis to study the effects of acute and chronic (once daily for 3 weeks) administration of the serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine on noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels, and the expression of the neuronal activity marker c-Fos in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels and striatal noradrenaline and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic desipramine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline and dopamine levels and striatal noradrenaline levels, with chronic administration yielding stronger increase. Chronic desipramine did not affect striatal dopamine and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex, whereas chronic, but not acute, desipramine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the striatal c-Fos expression to some degree, whereas desipramine administration did not. These results suggest that acute and chronic venlafaxine and chronic desipramine administration maximally activate the prefrontal adrenergic and dopaminergic systems without affecting striatal dopaminergic systems in mice.

  13. The acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition in normal subjects, and in patients with liver disease.

    PubMed

    McKay, J; Rawlings, M D; Cobden, I; James, O F

    1982-10-01

    1 The effects of single doses (25 g and 50 g) oral ethanol on the disposition of acetanilide (50 mg/kg metabolic active mass) has been studied in normal subjects, and in patients with chronic non-alcoholic liver disease. 2 In normal subjects, ethanol produced a dose-dependent increase in acetanilide half-life, and a decrease in acetenilide clearance. There was a significant correlation (rs = 0.71, P less than 0.01) between the 90 min blood ethanol concentration and the reduction in acetanilide clearance. 3 In patients with liver disease, ethanol produced a similar proportional change in acetanilide half-life and clearance, but these were less consistent. Moreover, liver disease itself was associated with an increase in acetenilide half-life, and a reduction in clearance. 4 It is concluded that single oral doses of ethanol, comparable to those consumed during social drinking, may inhibit some forms of microsomal oxidation and thus have important clinical implications.

  14. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  15. Full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol augments nicotine self-administration by altering ventral tegmental dopaminergic function due to NMDA receptors in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Emily E; Sharp, Burt M; Chen, Hao; Matta, Shannon G

    2014-03-01

    In adult rats, we have shown full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol (Nic + EtOH) augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) (increased nicotine intake) compared to pair-fed (PF) offspring. Therefore, we hypothesized that full-gestational exposure to Nic + EtOH disrupts control of dopaminergic (DA) circuitry by ventral tegmental area (VTA) NMDA receptors, augmenting nicotine SA and DA release in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of adolescents. Both NAcc DA and VTA glutamate release were hyper-responsive to intra-VTA NMDA in Nic + EtOH offspring versus PF (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Similarly, DA release was more responsive to i.v. nicotine in Nic + EtOH offspring (p = 0.02). Local DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid sodium salt (AP5) (NMDA receptor antagonist) infusion into the VTA inhibited nicotine-stimulated DA release in Nic + EtOH and PF offspring. Nicotine SA was augmented in adolescent Nic + EtOH versus PF offspring (p = 0.000001). Daily VTA microinjections of AP5 reduced nicotine SA by Nic + EtOH offspring, without affecting PF (p = 0.000032). Indeed, nicotine SA in Nic + EtOH offspring receiving AP5 was not different from PF offspring. Both VTA mRNA transcripts and NMDA receptor subunit proteins were not altered in Nic + EtOH offspring. In summary, adolescent offspring exposed to gestational Nic + EtOH show markedly increased vulnerability to become dependent on nicotine. This reflects the enhanced function of a subpopulation of VTA NMDA receptors that confer greater nicotine-induced DA release in NAcc. We hypothesized that concurrent gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol would disrupt the control of VTA dopaminergic circuitry by NMDA receptors. Resulting in the augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) in adolescent offspring.

  16. Acute and chronic administration of ibogaine to the rat results in astrogliosis that is not confined to the cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Rogers, T S; Rodman, L E; Page, J G

    1996-10-31

    Acute administration of high doses of ibogaine (IBG) to the male rat results in degeneration of Purkinje cells and reactive gliosis in the cerebellar vermis. We examined whether acute and chronic administration of IBG to male and female rats results in gliosis as determined by quantification of the astroglial intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). After acute administration of IBG, rats of both sexes showed dose-related increases in GFAP that were not confined to the cerebellar vermis. After chronic administration of IBG, female, but not male rats, showed large (as much as 200% of control), dose-related increases in GFAP in hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, brain stem and striatum, but not cerebellum. In hippocampus, the cytoskeletal proteins, neurofilament 68 (NF-68) and beta-tubulin were increased in females treated chronically with IBG, findings consistent with a damage-induced sprouting response. Together, the data indicate that IBG damages areas of the brain outside the cerebellum and that the sites damaged are dependent on sex and dosage regimen.

  17. Acute ethanol effects on sensory responses of single units in the somatosensory cortex of rats during different behavioral states.

    PubMed

    Chapin, J K; Sorensen, S M; Woodward, D J

    1986-09-01

    We have investigated the dose-dependence and time-course of ethanol effects on the activity of single neurons in the somatosensory (SI) cortex of behaving, unanesthetized rats. Sensory responses of neurons recorded in the forepaw area of the SI cortex were quantitatively measured by constructing post-stimulus histograms to repetitive stimulation through electrodes chronically implanted in the forepaw. Single units were isolated and held throughout a protocol involving: (1) a control period, (2) intoxication produced by a single dose of ethanol administered IP or IV and (3) recovery for 60 minutes or more. Post-stimulus histograms were generated during three standard behaviors: (1) REST, (2) IMMOBILE AROUSAL (produced by holding the animal), and (3) MOVEMENT (running on a treadmill). In pre-ethanol controls, the immobile arousal condition slightly increased both excitatory and inhibitory components of the sensory response, while the movement condition strongly inhibited them. Ethanol reduced both of these types of behavioral modulation of sensory responses by abolishing the facilitation normally seen during immobile arousal, as well as the inhibitory gating normally seen during movement. Different latency response epochs of post-stimulus histograms were also used to compare the effect of ethanol on fast vs. slow conducting pathways to the SI cortex. Ethanol at low doses (0.3 g/kg bw, IP) was found to selectively reduce the longer latency excitatory response peaks, while sparing the shortest latency response peak. At moderate doses (1.0 g/kg), however, the shortest latency response peak was also reduced. This contrasted with the effects of halothane which, at anesthetic doses, exerted a much more selective reduction of the longer latency responses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Overexpression of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage in the ventral tegmental area increases 3α,5α-THP and reduces long-term operant ethanol self-administration.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jason B; Werner, David F; Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Leonard, Maggie N; Fisher, Kristen R; O'Buckley, Todd K; Porcu, Patrizia; McCown, Thomas J; Besheer, Joyce; Hodge, Clyde W; Morrow, A Leslie

    2014-04-23

    Neuroactive steroids are endogenous neuromodulators capable of altering neuronal activity and behavior. In rodents, systemic administration of endogenous or synthetic neuroactive steroids reduces ethanol self-administration. We hypothesized this effect arises from actions within mesolimbic brain regions that we targeted by viral gene delivery. Cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) converts cholesterol to pregnenolone, the rate-limiting enzymatic reaction in neurosteroidogenesis. Therefore, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 2 viral vector (rAAV2), which drives P450scc expression and neuroactive steroid synthesis. The P450scc-expressing vector (rAAV2-P450scc) or control GFP-expressing vector (rAAV2-GFP) were injected bilaterally into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or nucleus accumbens (NAc) of alcohol preferring (P) rats trained to self-administer ethanol. P450scc overexpression in the VTA significantly reduced ethanol self-administration by 20% over the 3 week test period. P450scc overexpression in the NAc, however, did not alter ethanol self-administration. Locomotor activity was unaltered by vector administration to either region. P450scc overexpression produced a 36% increase in (3α,5α)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP, allopregnanolone)-positive cells in the VTA, but did not increase 3α,5α-THP immunoreactivity in NAc. These results suggest that P450scc overexpression and the resultant increase of 3α,5α-THP-positive cells in the VTA reduces ethanol reinforcement. 3α,5α-THP is localized to neurons in the VTA, including tyrosine hydroxylase neurons, but not astrocytes. Overall, the results demonstrate that using gene delivery to modulate neuroactive steroids shows promise for examining the neuronal mechanisms of moderate ethanol drinking, which could be extended to other behavioral paradigms and neuropsychiatric pathology.

  19. Lack of effect of nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptor blockade on consumption during the first two days of operant self-administration of sweetened ethanol in adult Long-Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, James M.; Gonzales, Rueben A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying ethanol self-administration are not fully understood; however, it is clear that ethanol self-administration stimulates nucleus accumbens dopamine release in well trained animals. During operant sweetened ethanol self-administration behavior, an adaptation in the nucleus accumbens dopamine system occurs between the first and second exposure paralleling a dramatic increase in sweetened ethanol intake, which suggests a single exposure to sweetened ethanol may be sufficient to learn the association between sweetened ethanol cues and its reinforcing properties. In the present experiment, we test the effects of blockade of nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptors on operant sweetened ethanol self-administration behavior during the first two days of exposure. Adult male Long-Evans rats were first trained to self-administer 10% sucrose (10S) across six days in an appetitive and consummatory operant model (appetitive interval: 10 min pre-drinking wait period and a lever response requirement of 4; consummatory interval: 20 min access to the drinking solution). After training on 10S, the drinking solution was switched to 10% sucrose plus 10% ethanol (10S10E); control rats remained drinking 10S throughout the experiment. Bilateral nucleus accumbens microinjections of the dopamine D1 antagonist, SCH-23390 (0, 1.0, or 3.0 μg/side), immediately preceded the first two sessions of drinking 10S10E. Results show that blocking nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptors has little or no influence on consumption during the first two days of exposure to the sweetened ethanol solution or maintenance of sucrose only drinking. Furthermore, the high dose of SCH-23390, 3.0 μg/side, reduced open field locomotor activity. In conclusion, we found no evidence to suggest that nucleus accumbens D1 receptor activation is involved in consumption of a sweetened ethanol solution during the first two days of exposure or maintenance of sucrose drinking, but rather D1 receptors

  20. Lack of effect of nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptor blockade on consumption during the first two days of operant self-administration of sweetened ethanol in adult Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Doherty, James M; Gonzales, Rueben A

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying ethanol self-administration are not fully understood; however, it is clear that ethanol self-administration stimulates nucleus accumbens dopamine release in well-trained animals. During operant sweetened ethanol self-administration behavior, an adaptation in the nucleus accumbens dopamine system occurs between the first and second exposure, paralleling a dramatic increase in sweetened ethanol intake, which suggests a single exposure to sweetened ethanol may be sufficient to learn the association between sweetened ethanol cues and its reinforcing properties. In the present experiment, we test the effects of blockade of nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptors on operant sweetened ethanol self-administration behavior during the first 2 days of exposure. Adult male Long-Evans rats were first trained to self-administer 10% sucrose (10S) across 6 days in an appetitive and consummatory operant model (appetitive interval: 10-min pre-drinking wait period and a lever response requirement of 4; consummatory interval: 20-min access to the drinking solution). After training on 10S, the drinking solution was switched to 10% sucrose plus 10% ethanol (10S10E); control rats continued drinking 10S throughout the experiment. Bilateral nucleus accumbens microinjections of the dopamine D1 antagonist, SCH-23390 (0, 1.0, or 3.0 μg/side), immediately preceded the first two sessions of drinking 10S10E. Results show that blocking nucleus accumbens dopamine D1 receptors has little or no influence on consumption during the first 2 days of exposure to the sweetened ethanol solution or maintenance of sucrose-only drinking. Furthermore, the high dose of SCH-23390, 3.0 μg/side, reduced open-field locomotor activity. In conclusion, we found no evidence to suggest that nucleus accumbens D1 receptor activation is involved in consumption of a sweetened ethanol solution during the first 2 days of exposure or maintenance of sucrose drinking, but rather D1 receptors seem

  1. Binge ethanol exposure in late gestation induces ethanol aversion in the dam but enhances ethanol intake in the offspring and affects their postnatal learning about ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Chotro, M. Gabriela; Arias, Carlos; Spear, Norman E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to 1 or 2 g/kg ethanol during the last days of gestation increases ethanol acceptance in infant rats. We tested whether prenatal exposure to 3 g/kg, a relatively high ethanol dose, generates an aversion to ethanol in both the dam and offspring, and whether this prenatal experience affects the expression of learning derived from ethanol exposure postnatally. The answer was uncertain, since postnatal administration of a 3 g/kg ethanol dose induces an aversion to ethanol after postnatal day 10 but increases ethanol acceptance when administered during the first postnatal week. In the present study pregnant rats received intragastric administrations of water or ethanol (3 g/kg) on gestation days 17-20. On postnatal days 7-8 or 10-11 the offspring were administered water or ethanol (3 g/kg). Intake of ethanol and water, locomotor activity in an open-field and ethanol odor preference were evaluated in the pups, while the mothers were evaluated in terms of ethanol intake. Results indicated an aversion to ethanol in dams that had been administered ethanol during gestation, despite a general increase in ethanol intake observed in their pups relative to controls. The prenatal ethanol exposure also potentiated the increase in ethanol intake observed after intoxication on postnatal days 7-8. Ethanol intoxication on postnatal days 10-11 reduced ethanol consumption; this ethanol aversion was still evident in infant rats exposed prenatally to ethanol despite their general increase in ethanol intake. No effects of prenatal ethanol exposure were observed in terms of motor activity or odor preference. It is concluded that prenatal exposure to ethanol, even in a dose that induces ethanol aversion in the gestating dam, increases ethanol intake in infant rats and that this experience modulates age-related differences in subsequent postnatal learning about ethanol. PMID:19801275

  2. REPEATED ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION MODIFIES THE TEMPORAL STRUCTURE OF SUCROSE INTAKE PATTERNS IN MICE: EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH BEHAVIORAL SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Raúl; Kamens, Helen M.; McKinnon, Carrie S.; Ford, Matthew M.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroadaptations supporting behavioral sensitization to abused drugs are suggested to underlie pathological, excessive motivation toward drugs and drug-associated stimuli. Drug-induced sensitization has also been linked to increased appetitive responses for non-drug, natural reinforcers. The present research investigated whether ethanol (EtOH)-induced neural changes, inferred from psychomotor sensitization, can modify consumption and intake dynamics for the natural reinforcer, sucrose. The effects of EtOH-induced sensitization in mice on the temporal structure of sucrose intake patterns were measured using a lickometer system. Sucrose intake dynamics were measured after sensitization for 1 h daily for 7 days and indicated more rapid initial approach and consumption of sucrose in EtOH-sensitized groups; animals showed a shorter latency to the first intake bout and an increased number of sucrose bottle licks during the initial 15 min of the 1-h sessions. This effect was associated with increased frequency and size of bouts. For the total 1-h session, sucrose intake and bout dynamics were not different between groups, indicating a change in patterns of sucrose intake but not total consumption. When sensitization was prevented by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen, the increased rate of approach and consumption of sucrose were also prevented. Thus, EtOH-induced sensitization, and not the mere exposure to EtOH, was associated with changes in sucrose intake patterns. These data are consistent with current literature suggesting an enhancing effect of drug-induced sensitization on motivational processes involved in reinforcement. PMID:20624153

  3. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D O; Scholey, Andrew B; Tildesley, N T J; Perry, E K; Wesnes, K A

    2002-07-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) is a traditional herbal medicine, which enjoys contemporary usage as a mild sedative, spasmolytic and antibacterial agent. It has been suggested, in light of in vitro cholinergic binding properties, that Melissa extracts may effectively ameliorate the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. To date, no study has investigated the effects on cognition and mood of administration of Melissa to healthy humans. The present randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced-crossover study investigated the acute effects on cognition and mood of a standardised extract of M. officinalis. Twenty healthy, young participants received single doses of 300, 600 and 900 mg of M. officinalis (Pharmaton) or a matching placebo at 7-day intervals. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) computerised test battery and two serial subtraction tasks immediately prior to dosing and at 1, 2.5, 4 and 6 h thereafter. In vitro IC(50) concentrations for the displacement of [3H]-(N)-nicotine and [3H]-(N)-scopolamine from nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in human occipital cortex tissue were also calculated. Results, utilising the cognitive factors previously derived from the CDR battery, included a sustained improvement in Accuracy of Attention following 600 mg of Melissa and time- and dose-specific reductions in both Secondary Memory and Working Memory factors. Self-rated "calmness," as assessed by Bond-Lader mood scales, was elevated at the earliest time points by the lowest dose, whilst "alertness" was significantly reduced at all time points following the highest dose. Both nicotinic and muscarinic binding were found to be low in comparison to the levels found in previous studies.

  4. An example of US Food and Drug Administration device regulation: medical devices indicated for use in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Peña, Carlos; Li, Khan; Felten, Richard; Ogden, Neil; Melkerson, Mark

    2007-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has established requirements for protecting the public health by assuring the safety and effectiveness of a variety of medical products including drugs, devices, and biological products, and for promoting public health by expediting the approval of treatments that are safe and effective. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health is the center within the agency that is responsible for pre- and postmarket regulation of medical devices. In this article, we review current regulation of medical devices, research and development programs, pre- and postmarket perspectives, and future considerations of medical devices, particularly as they relate to devices targeting acute ischemic stroke as an example of the process. We also review the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's historical perspective of acute ischemic stroke trials and clinical trial design considerations used in prior studies that have led to US market clearance as they are related to currently marketed devices indicated for acute ischemic stroke.

  5. An evaluation process for an electronic bar code medication administration information system in an acute care unit.

    PubMed

    Bargren, Michelle; Lu, Der-Fa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to present an evaluation process and recommendations for addressing the gaps found with the implementation of a new bar code medication administration (BCMA) technology in a busy acute care hospital unit. The case study analyzes workflow procedures associated with administration of medications in an inpatient labor and delivery care unit before and one year after implementation of BCMA technology. The comparison reveals a twofold increase in workflow procedures for nursing staff because of the new technology. System gaps are identified from a nursing user's perspective, and recommendations are offered to close those gaps.

  6. Effect of an acute intraluminal administration of capsaicin on oesophageal motor pattern in GORD patients with ineffective oesophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Grossi, L; Cappello, G; Marzio, L

    2006-08-01

    Ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) is a functional disorder affecting about 50% of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. This disease in a severe form limits the clearing ability of the oesophagus and is considered one of the predictive factors for poorer GORD resolution. Capsaicin, the active compound of red pepper, exerts a prokinetic effect on oesophageal motility in healthy subjects by increasing the amplitude of body waves, even if no evidence exists on its possible role in situations of reduced motility. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an acute administration of capsaicin on the oesophageal motor pattern in a group of GORD patients affected by severe IOM. Twelve GORD patients with severe IOM received an intra-oesophageal administration of 2 mL of a red pepper-olive oil mixture and 2 mL of olive oil alone serving as a control during a stationary manometry. The motor patterns of the oesophageal body and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) were analysed at baseline and after the infusion of the two stimuli. The administration of capsaicin induced a significant improvement in oesophageal body contractility when compared with baseline. The velocity of propagation of waves and the LOS basal tone remained unchanged. The motor pattern was unaltered by the administration of olive oil alone. An acute administration of capsaicin seems to improve the motor performance of the oesophageal body in patients with ineffective motility. Whether this could represent the basis for further therapeutic approaches of GORD patients needs further study.

  7. Enhancement of acute ethanol hepatotoxicity under conditions of low oxygen supply and ischemia/reperfusion. The role of oxygen radicals.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Wagner, H; Strubelt, O

    1989-10-15

    Using isolated hemoglobin-free perfused rat livers we studied the effect of low oxygen supply on ethanol hepatotoxicity in two models. In the first model resembling low blood supply, perfusion rate was lowered from 60 to 10 ml/min after a 30 min-equilibration phase and kept low for 60 min. As a consequence, oxygen consumption fell from 1.76 +/- 0.15 mumol/min/g to 0.51 +/- 0.02 mumol/min/g. In the second model, total ischemia was accomplished by interruption of the perfusion for 30 min and was followed by reperfusion at a perfusion rate of 60 ml/min for a further 30 min. In this model, oxygen consumption returned immediately to normal values upon reperfusion. In both models, low oxygen supply had no toxic effects of its own on livers from fed rats. While ethanol (3 g/l) given under normoxic conditions led to a moderate hepatotoxicity, its application in both models of partial as well as total ischemia and reperfusion resulted in a marked liver damage as evidenced by a strong release of sorbitol dehydrogenase, glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione, as well as by an increase in hepatic calcium content. Inhibition of ethanol metabolism by 4-methylpyrazol prevented liver damage in both models indicating that metabolism of ethanol is a prerequisite for its toxicity to occur. Also, hepatotoxicity was inhibited partially by catalase and superoxide dismutase and nearly totally by deferrioxamine and allopurinol. Thus, reactive oxygen species which are produced during ethanol metabolism as well as under conditions of low oxygen supply are mediators of hepatic damage in both models employed.

  8. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  9. Inhibitory effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol breakdown in pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, S.J.; Peppin, J.F.; Tsukamoto, H.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the physiological relationship between the phospholipid effect and secretagogue-induced cellular function has begun to be understood. In this study, the authors investigated acute and chronic effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini. Five pairs of male Wistar rats were intragastrically infused for 30 days with high fat diet (25% total calories) plus ethanol or isocaloric dextrose. After intoxication, isolated in HEPES media, followed by 30 min incubation with CCK-8 (0, 100, 300 or 600 pM) and ethanol (0 or 100 mM). Acinar lipids were extracted and counted for labeled PI. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-inositol into alcoholic acinar PI was reduced to 38.2% of that in controls. A percent maximal PI break down by CCK-8 was similar in the two groups (13-24% of basal). However, the magnitude of PI breakdown was markedly lower in alcoholic acini (482 vs 1081 dpm) due to the decreased PI synthesis rate. The presence of 100 mM ethanol in the media further inhibited the breakdown by 50% in this group. These results strongly indicate that chronic ethanol intoxication inhibits PI synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini, and that this inhibition can be potentiated by acute ethanol administration.

  10. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  11. Noribogaine, but not 18-MC, exhibits similar actions as ibogaine on GDNF expression and ethanol self-administration.

    PubMed

    Carnicella, Sebastien; He, Dao-Yao; Yowell, Quinn V; Glick, Stanley D; Ron, Dorit

    2010-10-01

    Ibogaine is a naturally occurring alkaloid that has been reported to decrease various adverse phenotypes associated with exposure to drugs of abuse and alcohol in human and rodent models. Unfortunately, ibogaine cannot be used as a medication to treat addiction because of severe side effects. Previously, we reported that the desirable actions of ibogaine to reduce self-administration of, and relapse to, alcohol consumption are mediated via the upregulation of the expression of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the consequent activation of the GDNF pathway. The ibogaine metabolite, noribogaine, and a synthetic derivative of ibogaine, 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), possess a similar anti-addictive profile as ibogaine in rodent models, but without some of its adverse side effects. Here, we determined whether noribogaine and/or 18-MC, like ibogaine, increase GDNF expression, and whether their site of action to reduce alcohol consumption is the VTA. We used SH-SY5Y cells as a cell culture model and found that noribogaine, like ibogaine, but not 18-MC, induces a robust increase in GDNF mRNA levels. Next, we tested the effect of intra-VTA infusion of noribogaine and 18-MC on rat operant alcohol self-administration and found that noribogaine, but not 18-MC, in the VTA decreases responding for alcohol. Together, our results suggest that noribogaine and 18-MC have different mechanisms and sites of action.

  12. Opposite effects of acute ethanol exposure on GAP-43 and BDNF expression in the hippocampus versus the cerebellum of juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Kulkarny, V V; Wiest, N E; Marquez, C P; Nixon, S C; Valenzuela, C F; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I

    2011-08-01

    The adolescent brain is particularly vulnerable to the effects of alcohol, with intoxications at this developmental age often producing long-lasting effects. The present study addresses the effects of a single acute ethanol exposure on growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression in neurons in the cerebellum and hippocampus of adolescent rats. Male postnatal day 23 (P23) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to ethanol vapors for 2h and after a recovery period of 2h, the cerebellum and hippocampus were harvested and samples were taken for blood alcohol concentration (BAC) determinations. We found that this exposure resulted in a mean BAC of 174 mg/dL, which resembles levels in human adolescents after binge drinking. Analyses of total RNA and protein by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and western blotting, respectively, revealed that this single ethanol exposure significantly decreased the levels of GAP-43 mRNA and protein in the cerebellum but increased the levels of mRNA and protein in the hippocampus. BDNF mRNA and protein levels were also increased in the hippocampus but not in the cerebellum of these animals. In situ hybridizations revealed that GAP-43 and BDNF mRNA levels were primarily increased by alcohol exposure in hippocampal dentate granule cells and CA3 neurons. Overall, the reported alterations in the expression of the plasticity-associated genes GAP-43 and BDNF in juvenile rats are consistent with the known deleterious effects of binge drinking on motor coordination and cognitive function.

  13. Gastroprotective effect of the ethanolic extract of Parkia platycephala Benth. leaves against acute gastric lesion models in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hélio B; Silva, Francilene V; Passos, Flávia Franceli B; Bezerra, Roosevelt D S; Chaves, Mariana H; Oliveira, Francisco A; Oliveira, Rita C Meneses

    2010-01-01

    Parkia platycephala Benth. (Leguminosae--Mimosoideae), popularly known as "visgueira", fava bean tree or "fava-de-bolota", is widely found in the Northern and Northeastern regions of Brazil. Its pods are used as cattle food supplement in the drought period. Compounds with a gastroprotective activity were obtained from the genus Parkia. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the gastroprotective effect of the ethanolic extract of Parkia platycephala Benth. leaves (Pp-EtOH), as well as evaluating its possible mechanisms of action in experimental ulcer induction models. Lesions were induced by absolute ethanol, ethanol-HCl, ischemia-reperfusion and indomethacin in rodents. Pp-EtOH showed a protective effect in the lesion models (66, 48 and 52%, respectively), but it was not able to protect gastric mucosa against indomethacin-induced lesions. Results show a possible participation of the NO-synthase pathway in the gastroprotection and an antioxidant activity, by the increase of the catalase activity. The participation of prostaglandins and potassium channels sensitive to ATP in the gastroprotective effect of Pp-EtOH seems less likely to occur. More comprehensive studies, therefore, should be carried out to elucidate the antiulcerative effects of this promising natural product against this gastrointestinal disorder.

  14. Sex differences in acute ethanol withdrawal severity after adrenalectomy and gonadectomy in Withdrawal Seizure-Prone and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant mice.

    PubMed

    Strong, Moriah N; Kaufman, Katherine R; Crabbe, John C; Finn, Deborah A

    2009-08-01

    Recent findings suggest that the ability of ethanol (EtOH) to increase the levels of neurosteroids with potent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic properties can influence measures of EtOH sensitivity. Earlier studies determined that removal of the adrenals and gonads diminished the steroidogenic effect of EtOH and significantly increased acute EtOH withdrawal severity in two inbred mouse strains that differed in withdrawal severity, suggesting the contribution of anticonvulsant GABAergic steroids to acute withdrawal in intact animals. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate the consequence of steroid removal on acute EtOH withdrawal through excision of the adrenals and gonads, in another genetic animal model of EtOH withdrawal differences, the Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR) selected lines. Male and female WSP and WSR mice underwent surgical removal of the adrenals and gonads or no organ removal (SHAM). One to 2 weeks later, baseline handling-induced convulsions (HICs) were assessed, mice were given a 4 g/kg dose of EtOH, and HICs were measured hourly for 12 h and then at 24 h. The combination surgery significantly increased EtOH withdrawal in WSP and WSR female mice, as measured by area under the curve (AUC) and peak HIC scores. The AUC was significantly positively correlated with plasma corticosterone levels and significantly negatively correlated with progesterone levels. In contrast, surgical status did not alter withdrawal severity in male WSP and WSR mice. Overall, the increase in acute EtOH withdrawal severity in female WSP and WSR mice after adrenalectomy and gonadectomy corroborate our recent evidence that withdrawal from a high dose of EtOH can be modulated by anticonvulsant steroids produced in the periphery.

  15. Pilot study of the safety of starting administration of low-dose aspirin and cilostazol in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Keishi; Komatsu, Yoji; Sato, Naoaki; Higuchi, Osamu; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Kamezaki, Takao; Suzuki, Kensuke; Matsumura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Progressive stroke is a serious problem due to the associated morbidity and mortality. Aspirin is recommended for acute ischemic stroke, but does not reduce the frequency of stroke progression. No standard treatment has been approved for the prevention of stroke progression. Cilostazol, which reduces platelet aggregation about 3 hours after single administration, does not increase the frequency of bleeding events when compared with aspirin or a placebo. Moreover, the combination of 100 mg aspirin and 200 mg cilostazol does not increase the frequency of bleeding events compared with only 100 mg aspirin, and thus is expected to prevent stroke progression with a high degree of safety. The present study investigated the safety of this combination of two drugs administered at the above concentrations in 54 patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours of stroke onset. Modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) measurements were performed at baseline and again on day 4 to 7. Progressive stroke was defined as an increase greater than or equal to 1 point on NIHSS. Patient scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after enrollment. Stroke progression occurred in 11.1% of the patients. The percentages of patients with mRS score from 0 to 2 were 42.6% and 75% at baseline and 3 months, respectively. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or major extracranial hemorrhage occurred. These results suggest that administration of aspirin and cilostazol is safe for acute ischemic stroke.

  16. Ethanol administration dampens the prolactin response to psychosocial stress exposure in sons of alcohol-dependent fathers.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Buchmann, Arlette F; Spring, Constance; Uhr, Manfred; Holsboer, Florian; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Genetic predisposition and exposure to alcohol and stress increase the risk for alcoholism, possibly by forming a threefold interaction. This is suggested by various aspects of alcohol-induced stress response dampening in offspring of alcoholics. We tested whether such an interaction is also revealed by prolactin secretion, which is predominantly controlled by hypothalamic dopamine. Plasma prolactin was measured during four experimental days in 26 young males with a paternal history of alcoholism (PHA) and in 22 family history negative (FHN) controls. A public speaking stress paradigm was applied on the first 2 days, and a non-stress acoustic startle experiment on the others. Before the tests, subjects drank alcohol (0.6 g/kg) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. During placebo experiments, prolactin levels significantly increased after stress, but not after startle, and did not differ between risk groups. Alcohol administration significantly increased prolactin before stress and during startle in both groups, did not alter stress-induced prolactin stimulation in FHN, but significantly attenuated the prolactin stress response in PHA subjects. The alcohol effects on prolactin, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropin stress response were positively interrelated with each other. These data confirm that alcohol specifically dampens the stress response in PHA but not FHN subjects. Since prolactin responses to stress alone and alcohol alone were normal in PHA, we conclude that this genetic effect is not related to altered physiology of the hypothalamic dopaminergic system, but to risk-group specific alcohol effects on hierarchically higher brain areas controlling the stress response in general.

  17. Acute oral 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) decreases both alcohol intake and IV nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Amir H; Cauley, Marty C; Slade, Susan; Wells, Corinne; Glick, Stanley; Rose, Jed E; Levin, Edward D

    The ibogaine derivative 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) has been found to decrease self-administration of morphine, nicotine and alcohol in rats after systemic injection. However oral dosing is the preferred route clinically. The current study evaluated the effect of oral 18-MC dosing in rats on alcohol and nicotine self-administration. For the nicotine study, young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with IV jugular infusion catheters and trained for nicotine self-administration in 45min. sessions. At weekly intervals they were administered by oral gavage doses of 18-MC (0, 10, 20 and 40mg/kg) following a repeated measures counterbalanced design twice. Acute oral 18-MC, at the 40mg/kg dosage, significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. There was a differential effect of 18-MC with rats above or below the median level of nicotine self-administration during the pretreatment baseline performance. Rats with lower baseline performance showed a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration with the 40mg/kg dosage, while those in the higher baseline group did not show a significant effect of 18-MC. In alcohol studies, the effects of the same doses of 18-MC were tested in both male and female alcohol preferring (P) rats that had free access to water and alcohol (10% v/v) 6h/day. The results show that 18-MC dose-dependently reduced alcohol intake in both male and female rats. All doses caused significant reductions in alcohol self-administration. These data reinforce previous findings that 18-MC is significantly effective in reducing alcohol intake and nicotine self-administration. The finding that 18-MC is also effective orally makes it advantageous for further development as a possible new therapy for treating alcoholism as well as smoking addiction.

  18. Acute jugular vein thrombosis during rituximab administration: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dada, Reyad; Zekri, Jamal; Ramal, Bilal; Ahmad, Kamel

    2016-02-01

    Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody is licensed for the treatment of CD20 positive lymphomas. Previous studies have found rituximab, in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy, is superior to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone alone in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and many other B-cell lymphomas. Acute hypersensitivity reactions have been reported in patients receiving rituximab infusion and usually manifesting as headache, fever, chills, sweats, skin rash, dyspnea, mild hypotension, and nausea. Acute major venous thrombosis and seizures have not been reported as manifestation of acute hypersensitivity reaction. We report on a 22-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with stage III B CD20 positive B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. During the first cycle of treatment, she developed grand-mal seizure while receiving rituximab infusion without any other features of acute hypersensitivity reaction. Imaging confirmed new onset jugular vein thrombosis with normal coagulation parameters. These events were managed by anticonvulsants and anticoagulation therapy. The patient completed eight cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone without rituximab and achieved complete remission. No further complications were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature describing grand-mal seizures and acute thrombosis while on rituximab treatment. Clinicians should be aware of this rare side effect, as stopping rituximab can prevent recurrence of these complications.

  19. Acute Severe Thrombocytopenia Occurring After Administration of Eptifibatide Postpones Emergent Coronary Artery Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Brent T.; Olund, Timothy J.; Pagel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Eptifibatide is a platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) receptor antagonist that inhibits fibrinogen binding to the activated GP IIb/IIIa site and prevents platelet-platelet interaction and clot formation. GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors improve outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome. Thrombocytopenia is a complication of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors, but severe thrombocytopenia is unusual. Most reported cases of severe thrombocytopenia after eptifibatide occurred in patients with acute coronary syndrome. The authors describe a patient who developed acute profound thrombocytopenia after receiving eptifibatide before emergent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Case Presentation A 67-year-old man with a normal platelet count (220 K/uL) developed atrial fibrillation, left bundle branch block, and respiratory insufficiency consistent with acute coronary syndrome two days after colectomy. He received eptifibatide during cardiac catheterization, where three-vessel coronary artery disease was encountered. Emergent coronary artery surgery was planned, but the platelet count before surgery was 2 K/uL. Eptifibatide was discontinued, surgery was postponed, and acute coronary syndrome was treated with intraaortic balloon counterpulsation. Conclusions The authors describe the second reported case of eptifibatide-induced severe thrombocytopenia associated with cardiac surgery. In this case, discontinuation of eptifibatide and transfusion of apheresis platelets increased the platelet count (137 K/uL) the following day, and the patient subsequently underwent successful coronary artery surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:27843778

  20. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  1. Differential action for ethanol on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate and sympathetic efferent discharge in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Z.; Abdel-Rahman, A.R.A.; Wooles, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol (0.33, 0.66, or 1 g/kg) on baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and sympathetic efferent discharge (SED) were investigated in rats. The two higher doses of ethanol caused a progressive and significant increase in baseline SED and a slight increase in HR. The findings suggest that the sensitivity of the reflex control of SED was preserved whereas that of HR was impaired after acute ethanol administration. Since these findings were obtained in the same animals, the data suggest that acute ethanol has a differential action on reflex control of SED and HR. Further, the significant increase in SED after moderate and high doses of ethanol suggests an increased central sympathetic tone as recordings were made from preganglionic nerve fibers (splanchnic nerve). The absence of an increase in baseline MAP, in spite of a significant increase in baseline SED following acute ethanol injection, could be explained, at least in part, by an ethanol-evoked reduction in pressor responsiveness to phenylephrine, an ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist.

  2. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mojadadi, Shafi; Jamali, Abbas; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Bamdad, Taravat

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. PMID:19403060

  3. Drug withdrawal convulsions and susceptibility to convulsants after short-term selective breeding for acute ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Metten, P; Belknap, J K; Crabbe, J C

    1998-09-01

    High Alcohol Withdrawal (HAW) and Low Alcohol Withdrawal (LAW) mice were selectively bred from a foundation population of C57BL6/J (B6) x DBA/2J (D2) F2 intercross progeny for display of intense or mild handling-induced withdrawal convulsions, respectively, following a single injection of a hypnotic dose of ethanol (alcohol; 4 g/kg). The HAW line had significantly greater alcohol withdrawal severity scores compared to the LAW line after only a single generation of selection; the magnitude of the line difference was 8-fold by the fourth selected generation. We tested these lines for severity of withdrawal convulsions following the benzodiazepine, diazepam; the gaseous anesthetic, nitrous oxide; the imidazopyridine, zolpidem and the barbiturate, pentobarbital. In all cases, HAW mice had significantly greater withdrawal severity than mice of the LAW line. These results indicate that some genes influencing withdrawal convulsion severity following ethanol also affect withdrawal from other CNS depressants. D2 mice are more sensitive to a variety of convulsants than B6 mice (and have more severe withdrawal convulsions). We, therefore, tested separate groups of mice of both selectively bred lines for threshold sensitivity to pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid (KA). No line differences were detected. These results indicate that genes influencing severity of withdrawal from several depressant drugs are largely different from those affecting susceptibility to GABAergic or glutamatergic convulsants.

  4. The validity of ICD codes coupled with imaging procedure codes for identifying acute venous thromboembolism using administrative data.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ghazi S; Wu, Cynthia; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; McMurtry, M Sean

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of using a combination of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnostic codes and imaging procedure codes for identifying deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) within administrative databases. Information from the Alberta Health (AH) inpatients and ambulatory care administrative databases in Alberta, Canada was obtained for subjects with a documented imaging study result performed at a large teaching hospital in Alberta to exclude venous thromboembolism (VTE) between 2000 and 2010. In 1361 randomly-selected patients, the proportion of patients correctly classified by AH administrative data, using both ICD diagnostic codes and procedure codes, was determined for DVT and PE using diagnoses documented in patient charts as the gold standard. Of the 1361 patients, 712 had suspected PE and 649 had suspected DVT. The sensitivities for identifying patients with PE or DVT using administrative data were 74.83% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 67.01-81.62) and 75.24% (95% CI: 65.86-83.14), respectively. The specificities for PE or DVT were 91.86% (95% CI: 89.29-93.98) and 95.77% (95% CI: 93.72-97.30), respectively. In conclusion, when coupled with relevant imaging codes, VTE diagnostic codes obtained from administrative data provide a relatively sensitive and very specific method to ascertain acute VTE.

  5. Suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by acute heroin challenge in rats during acute and chronic withdrawal from chronic heroin administration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    It is known that heroin dependence and withdrawal are associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The objective of these studies in rats was to systematically investigate the level of HPA activity and response to a heroin challenge at two time points during heroin withdrawal, and to characterize the expression of associated stress-related genes 30 minutes after each heroin challenge. Rats received chronic (10-day) intermittent escalating-dose heroin administration (3×2.5 mg/kg/day on day 1; 3×20 mg/kg/day by day 10). Hormonal and neurochemical assessments were performed in acute (12 hours after last heroin injection) and chronic (10 days after the last injection) withdrawal. Both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were elevated during acute withdrawal, and heroin challenge at 20 mg/kg (the last dose of chronic escalation) at this time point attenuated this HPA hyperactivity. During chronic withdrawal, HPA hormonal levels returned to baseline, but heroin challenge at 5 mg/kg decreased ACTH levels. In contrast, this dose of heroin challenge stimulated the HPA axis in heroin naïve rats. In the anterior pituitary, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels were increased during acute withdrawal and retuned to control levels after chronic withdrawal. In the medial hypothalamus, however, the POMC mRNA levels were decreased during acute withdrawal, and increased after chronic withdrawal. Our results suggest a long-lasting change in HPA abnormal responsivity during chronic heroin withdrawal. PMID:23771528

  6. Acute intravenous administration of dietary constituent theanine suppresses noxious neuronal transmission of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    PubMed

    Takehana, Shiori; Kubota, Yoshiko; Uotsu, Nobuo; Yui, Kei; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Takeda, Mamoru

    2017-03-15

    Theanine is a non-dietary amino acid linked to the modulation of synaptic transmission in the central nervous system, although the acute effects of theanine in vivo, particularly on nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal system, remain to be determined. The present study investigated whether acute intravenous theanine administration to rats attenuates the excitability of wide dynamic range (WDR) spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neurons in response to nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation in vivo. Extracellular single unit recordings were made from 15 SpVc neurons in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and responses to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli were analyzed. The mean firing frequency of SpVc WDR neurons in response to all mechanical stimuli was dose-dependently inhibited by theanine (10, 50, and 100mM, i.v.) with the maximum inhibition of discharge frequency reached within 5min. These inhibitory effects were reversed after approximately 10min. The relative magnitude of theanine's inhibition of SpVc WDR neuronal discharge frequency was significantly greater for noxious than non-noxious stimulation. Iontophoretic application of l-glutamate induced the mean firing frequency of SpVc WDR neuron responding to noxious mechanical stimulation was also inhibited by intravenous administration of 100mM theanine. These results suggest that acute intravenous theanine administration suppresses glutaminergic noxious synaptic transmission in the SpVc, implicating theanine as a potential complementary and alternative therapeutic agent for the treatment of trigeminal nociceptive pain.

  7. Effect of age increase on metabolism and toxicity of ethanol in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young C; Kim, Sung Y; Sohn, Young R

    2003-12-12

    Age-dependent change in the effects of acute ethanol administration on female rat liver was investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats, each aged 4, 12, or 50 weeks, received ethanol (2 g/kg) via a catheter inserted into a jugular vein. Ethanol elimination rate (EER), most rapid in the 4 weeks old rats, was decreased as the age advanced. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity was not altered by age, but microsomal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity was significantly greater in the 4 weeks old rats. Relative liver weight decreased with age increase in proportion to reduction of EER. Hepatic triglyceride and malondialdehyde concentrations increased spontaneously in the 50 weeks old nai;ve rats. Ethanol administration (3 g/kg, ip) elevated malondialdehyde and triglyceride contents only in the 4 and the 12 weeks old rats. Hepatic glutathione concentration was increasingly reduced by ethanol with age increase. Ethanol decreased cysteine concentration in the 4 weeks old rats, but elevated it significantly in the older rats. Inhibition of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity by ethanol was greater with age increase, which appeared to be responsible for the increase in hepatic cysteine. The results indicate that age does not affect the ethanol metabolizing capacity of female rat liver, but the overall ethanol metabolism is decreased in accordance with the reduction of relative liver size. Accordingly induction of acute alcoholic fatty liver is less significant in the old rats. However, progressively greater depletion of glutathione by ethanol in older rats suggests that susceptibility of liver to oxidative damage would be increased as animals grow old.

  8. Acute effects of ethanol or d-amphetamine on the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish in a microtiter plate format.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. We are assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that are known to act on the central ...

  9. N-Acetylcysteine Administration Prevents Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vidart, Josi; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Leite, Rogério Sarmento; Manica, André; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Larsen, P. Reed

    2014-01-01

    Context: The acute phase of the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is characterized by low T3 and high rT3 levels, affecting up to 75% of critically ill patients. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a causative factor of the disturbed peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent intracellular antioxidant, can prevent NTIS in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Design: This was a randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Settings: Consecutive patients admitted to the emergency and intensive care units of two tertiary hospitals in southern Brazil were recruited. Patients and intervention included 67 patients were randomized to receive NAC or placebo during 48 hours. Baseline characteristics and blood samples for thyroid hormones and oxidative parameters were collected. Main Outcome: Variation of serum T3 and rT3 levels was measured. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between groups (all P > .05). T3 levels decreased in the placebo group at 12 hours of follow-up (P = .002) but not in NAC-treated patients (P = .10). Baseline rT3 levels were elevated in both groups and decreased over the initial 48 hours in the NAC-treated patients (P = .003) but not in the control group (P = .75). The free T4 and TSH levels were virtually identical between the groups throughout the study period (P > .05). Measurement of total antioxidant status and total carbonyl content demonstrated that oxidative balance was deranged in acute myocardial infarction patients, whereas NAC corrected these alterations (P < .001). Conclusions: NAC administration prevents the derangement in thyroid hormone concentrations commonly occurring in the acute phase of acute myocardial infarction, indicating that oxidative stress is involved in the NTIS pathophysiology. PMID:25148231

  10. Acute alcohol exposure, acidemia or glutamine administration impacts amino acid homeostasis in ovine maternal and fetal plasma.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Shannon E; Sawant, Onkar B; Lunde, Emilie R; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A

    2013-09-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a significant problem in human reproductive medicine. Maternal alcohol administration alters maternal amino acid homeostasis and results in acidemia in both mother and fetus, causing fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that administration of glutamine, which increases renal ammoniagenesis to regulate acid-base balance, may provide an intervention strategy. This hypothesis was tested using sheep as an animal model. On day 115 of gestation, ewes were anesthetized and aseptic surgery was performed to insert catheters into the fetal abdominal aorta as well as the maternal abdominal aorta and vena cava. On day 128 of gestation, ewes received intravenous administration of saline, alcohol [1.75 g/kg body weight (BW)/h], a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, or received CO2 administration to induce acidemia independent of alcohol. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the mother and the fetus at times 0 and 60 min (the time of peak blood alcohol concentration) of the study. Administration of alcohol to pregnant ewes led to a reduction in concentrations of glutamine and related amino acids in plasma by 21-30%. An acute administration of glutamine to ewes, concurrent with alcohol administration, improved the profile of most amino acids (including citrulline and arginine) in maternal and fetal plasma. We suggest that glutamine may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced metabolic disorders and FAS in the ovine model.

  11. Acute alcohol exposure, acidemia or glutamine administration impacts amino acid homeostasis in ovine maternal and fetal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Shannon E.; Sawant, Onkar B.; Lunde, Emilie R.; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a significant problem in human reproductive medicine. Maternal alcohol administration alters maternal amino acid homeostasis and results in acidemia in both mother and fetus, causing fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that administration of glutamine, which increases renal ammoniagenesis to regulate acid-base balance, may provide an intervention strategy. This hypothesis was tested using sheep as an animal model. On day 115 of gestation, ewes were anesthetized and aseptic surgery was performed to insert catheters into the fetal abdominal aorta as well as the maternal abdominal aorta and vena cava. On day 128 of gestation, ewes received intravenous administration of saline, alcohol [1.75 g/kg body weight (BW)/h], a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, or received CO2 administration to induce acidemia independent of alcohol. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the mother and the fetus at times 0 and 60 min (the time of peak blood alcohol concentration) of the study. Administration of alcohol to pregnant ewes led to a reduction in concentrations of glutamine and related amino acids in plasma by 21–30%. An acute administration of glutamine to ewes, concurrent with alcohol administration, improved the profile of most amino acids (including citrulline and arginine) in maternal and fetal plasma. We suggest that glutamine may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced metabolic disorders and FAS in the ovine model. PMID:23315157

  12. Acute effects of intravenous administration of pamidronate in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mie Jin; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Park, Shin-Goo; Park, Won

    2010-09-01

    We investigated acute effects of intermittent large dose bisphosphonate therapy in osteoporotic patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were incubated with alendronate (100 microM) for 18 hr, in vitro and cytokine expressions were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Pamidronate 30 mg was administered on 26 osteoporotic patients; and acute phase reactants, inflammatory cytokines and bone biomarkers were measured. The in vitro study showed significant increase in mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. A notable rise in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was observed over 3 days after pamidronate infusion (P=0.026). Serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma were also significantly increased (P=0.009, 0.014, 0.035, respectively) and the increase in IL-6 levels were strongly correlated with CRP levels (P=0.04). Serum calcium and c-telopeptide levels rapidly decreased after the treatment (P=0.02, <0.001, respectively). This study showed that mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines at peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) level were observed within 18 hr and marked elevation of inflammatory cytokines and acute phase reactants were demonstrated after pamidronate infusion at the dose for osteoporosis. Our studies confirmed that intermittent large dose aminobisphosphonate causes acute inflammation.

  13. [Ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis after semax administration].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu V

    2000-01-01

    Semax favorably affects ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis (AP): a single introduction of semax (0.1 mg/kg) into the pancreatic duct of rats with AP model prevents increased necrosis of the acinar tissues and inhibits purulent inflammation of the necrotised lobules by inducing their sclerosis and atrophy, thus retaining large areas of the pancreas intact.

  14. Prophylactic Administration of Silybin Ameliorates L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uçmak, Feyzullah; Ekin, Nazım; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Arslan, Serkan; Kaplan, İbrahim; Şenateş, Ebubekir

    2016-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of silybin, a potent antioxidant, on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in an experimental rat model. Material/Methods Forty female Wistar Albino rats were divided into 5 groups as follows: Group 1 (C): control group (n=8), Group 2 (SL): silybin group (n=8), Group 3 (LA): acute pancreatitis group (n=8), Group 4 (SLLA): prophylaxis group (n=8), and Group 5 (LASL): treatment group (n=8). Group C (control) received 2 intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of physiological saline at an interval of 1 h. Group SL received only a single i.p. injection of silybin. The SLLA group received a single i.p. injection of silybin before the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine, whereas the LASL group received the same injection after the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine. Pancreatic tissues were histopathologically examined. Levels of amylase and oxidative stress markers (total oxidant status and total anti-oxidant status) were determined in the blood samples. Oxidative stress index was calculated. Results In comparison to the LA, the prophylaxis and treatment groups showed significant improvements in serum oxidative stress parameters (p=0.001 and p=0.005, respectively). Histopathological analysis showed that the treatment group had significant improvements in edema scores only (p=0.006), whereas the prophylaxis group had the same improvements in inflammation and necrosis scores as well as in total scores (p=0.004, 0.006, and 0.004, respectively). Conclusions When used for prophylactic rather than therapeutic purposes, silybin ameliorates serum oxidative stress parameters and improves histopathological results via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27725627

  15. The effects of age at the onset of drinking to intoxication and chronic ethanol self-administration in male rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Christa M.; Rau, Andrew; Shaw, Jessica; Stull, Cara; Gonzales, Steven W.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Consumption of alcohol begins during late adolescence in a majority of humans, and the greatest drinking occurs at 18–25 years then decreases with age. Objectives The present study measured differences in ethanol intake in relation to age at the onset of ethanol access among non-human primates to control for self-selection in humans and isolate age effects on heavy drinking. Methods Male rhesus macaques were assigned first access to ethanol during late adolescence (n = 8), young adulthood (n = 8) or early middle age (n = 11). The monkeys were induced to drink ethanol (4% w/v in water) in increasing doses (water, 0.5 g/kg, 1.0 g/kg, 1.5 g/kg) using a fixed-time (FT) 300-s schedule of food delivery, followed by 22 hours/day concurrent access to ethanol and water for 12 months. Age-matched controls consumed isocaloric maltose-dextrin solution yoked to the late adolescents, expected to be rapidly maturing (n = 4). Results Young adult monkeys had the greatest daily ethanol intake and blood-ethanol concentration (BEC). Only late adolescents escalated their intake (ethanol, not water) during the second compared to the first 6 months of access. On average, testosterone was consistent with age differences in maturation, and tended to increase throughout the experiment more for control than ethanol-drinking adolescent monkeys. Conclusions Young adulthood in non-human primates strongly disposes toward heavy drinking independently of sociocultural factors present in humans. Drinking ethanol to intoxication during the critical period of late adolescence is associated with escalation to heavy drinking. PMID:24448900

  16. Prevalence of contraindications and conditions for precaution for prasugrel administration in a real world acute coronary syndrome population.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Mylona, Panagiota; Perperis, Angelos; Panagiotou, Aggeliki; Dimitropoulos, Gerasimos; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George; Davlouros, Periklis

    2011-10-01

    The prevalence of prasugrel contraindications and specific conditions requiring precaution for its use in a real world acute coronary syndrome (ACS) population is not known. We performed a prospective descriptive study in 1016 consecutive moderate to high risk ACS patients. In 646 patients (63.6%) subjected to percutaneous coronary intervention, analysis of absolute contraindications (history of stroke/transient ischemic attack or active bleeding), relative contraindications and specific conditions (age ≥ 75 years and/or weight < 60 kg) for prasugrel theoretical administration was performed. In 242 (37.5%) patients there was at least one absolute or relative contraindication or specific condition requiring attention for its use. Overall, 23.1% of patients in our cohort had a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack and/or specific condition to be considered for prasugrel administration. Specifically, the prevalence of stroke/TIA was 3.6%, the prevalence of patients ≥75 years 20% and the prevalence of patients weighing <60 kg 2.2%. Among patients ≥75 years old, 63 (9.8%) had diabetes mellitus or previous myocardial infarction, consisting a high risk subgroup that might benefit from prasugrel administration. In a real world ACS population a relatively high proportion of patients have a potential contraindication for prasugrel administration or necessitate special attention for its use.

  17. Effects of acute or chronic administration of novel 3,4-dimethoxyphenylethylamine derivates on anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fedotova, Julia; Barishpolec, Victoria; Zulli, Anthony; Büsselberg, Dietrich; Gaspar, Ludovit; Kruzliak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Novel anxiolytic medications are necessary to broaden treatment therapy. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare the clinically effective anxiolytic, diazepam with the novel 3,4-dimethoxyphenylethylamine derivates. The novel 3,4-dimethoxyphenylethylamine derivates (PK, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and diazepam (1.0 mg/kg) were injected acutely or chronically in animals subjected to the black-white model and the open field test. The acute administration of PK-2122 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) exerted anxiogenic-like effect, while in the middle or high doses PK-2122 exerted anxiolytic-like effect compared with the control group (p<0.05). The repeated treatment with PK-2111 was followed by anxiolytic-like effect in doses of 0.1 or 1.0 mg/kg which was more significant compared not only with control group, but with comparison to group treated with diazepam (p<0.05). Chronic treatment with PK-2123 or PK-2122 in all tested doses produced anxiolytic-like effect (p<0.05), compared with control group and diazepam group. These results demonstrate that PK-2126, but not PK-2122, is dose independent and may be effective in experimental model of anxiety in rats when administered acutely or repeatedly. PMID:26807191

  18. AMPA receptor potentiation can prevent ethanol-induced intoxication.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicholas; Messenger, Marcus J; O'Neill, Michael J; Oldershaw, Anna; Gilmour, Gary; Simmons, Rosa M A; Iyengar, Smriti; Libri, Vincenzo; Tricklebank, Mark; Williams, Steve C R

    2008-06-01

    We present a substantial series of behavioral and imaging experiments, which demonstrate, for the first time, that increasing AMPA receptor-mediated neurotransmission via administration of potent and selective biarylsulfonamide AMPA potentiators LY404187 and LY451395 reverses the central effects of an acutely intoxicating dose of ethanol in the rat. Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI), we observed that LY404187 attenuated ethanol-induced reductions in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) in the anesthetized rat brain. A similar attenuation was apparent when measuring local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) via C14-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography in freely moving conscious rats. Both LY404187 and LY451395 significantly and dose-dependently reversed ethanol-induced deficits in both motor coordination and disruptions in an operant task where animals were trained to press a lever for food reward. Both prophylactic and acute intervention treatment with LY404187 reversed ethanol-induced deficits in motor coordination. Given that LY451395 and related AMPA receptor potentiators/ampakines are tolerated in both healthy volunteers and elderly patients, these data suggest that such compounds may form a potential management strategy for acute alcohol intoxication.

  19. Acute adverse event signalling scheme using the Saskatchewan Administrative health care utilization datafiles: results for two benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Rawson, N S; Rawson, M J

    1999-01-01

    Linked administrative health care utilization databases offer potential benefits for postmarketing surveillance. The value of the Saskatchewan datafiles in an acute adverse event signalling scheme has been evaluated using two benzodiazepines. The first 20,000 patients dispensed lorazepam and the first 8525 patients dispensed alprazolam were followed through the datafiles over the year after their initial prescription of the relevant drug, and all medical services occurring during treatment were recorded. The most frequent adverse drug reactions to benzodiazepines are drowsiness, depression, impaired intellectual function and memory, lethargy, impaired coordination, dizziness, nausea and/or vomiting, skin rash, and respiratory disturbance. Data from our study showed that sleep disorders, depressive disorders, dizziness and/or vertigo, respiratory symptoms, esophagus and stomach disorders, and inflammatory skin conditions occurred significantly more often in the first 30 days after the initial prescription than in the succeeding six months in both drug groups, indicating that they are important adverse events. There are several limitations to the methodology; however, the results of the analysis indicate that the use of administrative health care utilization datafiles in a systematic assessment to signal potential acute adverse drug reactions is a feasible proposition, but further studies are required to assess whether events are real adverse reactions.

  20. Effect of sub-acute oral cyanide administration in rats: protective efficacy of alpha-ketoglutarate and sodium thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Tulsawani, R K; Debnath, M; Pant, S C; Kumar, Om; Prakash, A O; Vijayaraghavan, R; Bhattacharya, R

    2005-09-10

    Chronic toxicity of cyanide in humans and animals has been previously described. Alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG) and sodium thiosulfate (STS) are known to confer remarkable protection against acute cyanide poisoning in rodents. Their efficacy against sub-acute or chronic cyanide exposure is not known. The objective of the present study was to assess the sub-acute toxicity of potassium cyanide (KCN) in female rats following oral administration of 7.0 mg/kg (0.5 LD50) for 14 d. The effect of alpha-KG (oral; 1.0 g/kg) and/or STS (intraperitoneal, 1.0 g/kg) on cyanide toxicity was also evaluated. Various hematological and biochemical indices were determined after 7 d of treatment and additional parameters like organ-body weight index (OBI) and histology of brain, heart, lung, liver, kidney and spleen were performed after 14 and 21 d (recovery group) of cyanide exposure. Sub-acute exposure of KCN did not produce any significant change in body weight of the animals, OBI, hematology and the levels of blood urea, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, triiodothyronine (T3) and tetraiodothyronine (T4). The levels of temporal glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and GSSG were unaffected. However, in KCN treated animals elevated levels of blood glucose and reduced levels of alanine aminotransferase were observed. Activities of cytochrome c oxidase in the brain and rhodanese in the liver were diminished. Reduced levels of GSH and enhanced levels of MDA in brain were observed. Increased levels of blood thiocyanate were observed in all the treatments of KCN. Additionally, KCN also produced various histological changes in the brain, heart, liver and kidney. Although, treatment of alpha-KG and STS alone significantly blunted the toxicity of KCN, concomitant use of both interventions afforded to maximum protection. This study indicates a promising role of alpha-KG and STS for the treatment of prolonged cyanide exposures.

  1. Ethanol Increases Mechanical Pain Sensitivity in Rats via Activation of GABAA Receptors in Medial Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Geng, Kai-Wen; He, Ting; Wang, Rui-Rui; Li, Chun-Li; Luo, Wen-Jun; Wu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Yan; Li, Zhen; Lu, Yun-Fei; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol is widely known for its ability to cause dramatic changes in emotion, social cognition, and behavior following systemic administration in humans. Human neuroimaging studies suggest that alcohol dependence and chronic pain may share common mechanisms through amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) interactions. However, whether acute administration of ethanol in the mPFC can modulate pain perception is unknown. Here we showed that bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the prelimbic and infralimbic areas of the mPFC lowered the bilateral mechanical pain threshold for 48 h without influencing thermal pain sensitivity in adult rats. However, bilateral microinjections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid into the mPFC or bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the dorsolateral PFC (also termed as motor cortex area 1 in Paxinos and Watson's atlas of The Rat Brain. Elsevier Academic Press, Amsterdam, 2005) failed to do so, suggesting regional selectivity of the effects of ethanol. Moreover, bilateral microinjections of ethanol did not change the expression of either pro-apoptotic (caspase-3 and Bax) or anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, suggesting that the dose was safe and validating the method used in the current study. To determine whether γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors are involved in mediating the ethanol effects, muscimol, a selective GABAA receptor agonist, or bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, was administered alone or co-administered with ethanol through the same route into the bilateral mPFC. The results showed that muscimol mimicked the effects of ethanol while bicuculline completely reversed the effects of ethanol and muscimol. In conclusion, ethanol increases mechanical pain sensitivity through activation of GABAA receptors in the mPFC of rats.

  2. Effects of oral acute administration and subchronic feeding of several levels of D-psicose in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tatsuhiro; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Hashiguchi, Mineo; Izumori, Ken; Suzuki, Hiroo

    2002-12-01

    The effects of oral acute administration and subchronic (34 d) feeding of several levels of D-psicose, a C3-epimer of D-fructose, were studied in rats. In the acute administration test, five groups of eight male Wistar rats (3 wk old) were orally given D-psicose in doses of 8, 11, 14, 17, and 20 g/kg. Three rats receiving 14 g/kg, three rats receiving 17 g/kg and eight rats receiving 20 g/kg of D-psicose died within 2 d after administration. The calculated LD50 values were 16.3 g/kg by the Behrens-Karber method and 15.8 g/kg by the Litchfield-Wilcoxon method. In the subcronic feeding test, eight groups of seven male Wistar rats (3 wk old) were fed diets containing 0 (control), 10, 20, 30, and 40% for 34 d. One rat fed 30% D-psicose diet and five rats fed 40% D-psicose diet died during the experimental period. Body weight gain, food intake and food efficiency were more extensively suppressed by the higher D-psicose diets. The weights of heart, spleen and abdominal adipose tissue were smaller in the order of dietary D-psicose concentration. Cecal weight increased with increasing D-psicose concentration in the diets. Cecal hypertrophy was observed in rats fed 10-40% D-psicose diets. These results suggest that D-psicose differs in nutritional characteristics from D-glucose or D-fructose. The feeding of diets extremely high in D-psicose seems to be harmful to the intestinal tract.

  3. Antioxidant Properties and Gastroprotective Effects of 2-(Ethylthio)Benzohydrazones on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ariffin, Azhar; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Abdullah, Zanariah

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 2-(ethylthio)benzohydrazone derivatives (1–6) were prepared and characterised by IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The newly prepared compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Among them, most powerful antioxidant, compound 1 has been selected in order to illustrate anti-ulcer effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were respectively treated with 10% Tween 20 as ulcer control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole as reference group, 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg compound 1 as experimental animals. Macroscopically, ulcer control group showed extensive hemorrhagic lesions of gastric mucosa compared with omeprazole or compound 1. Rats pre-treated with compound 1 showed increased in gastric pH and gastric mucus. Histologically, ulcer control group showed severe damage to gastric mucosa with edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer. In immunohistochemical analysis, rats which were pre-treated with compound 1 showed up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effect of compound 1 may be due to its antioxidant activity, and/or due to up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax protein in stained tissue section. PMID:27272221

  4. Reversal of ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity by cinnamic and syringic acids in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sheng-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Hong; Yen, Hsiu-Fang; Lee, Yi-Ju; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2016-12-01

    Ethanol was used to induce acute hepatotoxicity in mice. Effects of cinnamic acid (CA) and syringic acid (SA) post-intake for hepatic recovery from alcoholic injury was investigated. Ethanol treated mice were supplied by CA or SA at 40 or 80 mg/kg BW/day for 5 days. Results showed that ethanol stimulated protein expression of CYP2E1, p47(phox), gp91(phox), cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear factor kappa B in liver. CA or SA post-intake restricted hepatic expression of these molecules. Ethanol suppressed nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) expression, and CA or SA enhanced Nrf2 expression in cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Ethanol increased the release of reactive oxygen species, oxidized glutathione, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nitric acid and prostaglandin E2. CA or SA lowered hepatic production of these oxidative and inflammatory factors. Histological data revealed that ethanol administration caused obvious foci of inflammatory cell infiltration, and CA or SA post-intake improved hepatic inflammatory infiltration. These findings support that cinnamic acid and syringic acid are potent nutraceutical agents for acute alcoholic liver disease therapy. However, potential additive or synergistic benefits of cinnamic and syringic acids against ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity need to be investigated.

  5. Ethanol Metabolism and Osmolarity Modify Behavioral Responses to Ethanol in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Joseph T.; Davis, Scott J.; Song, Sam S.; Burnette, Christopher R.; Grotewiel, Mike; Shelton, Keith L.; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.; Davies, Andrew G.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is metabolized by a two-step process in which alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) oxidizes ethanol to acetaldehyde, which is further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Although variation in ethanol metabolism in humans strongly influences the propensity to chronically abuse alcohol, few data exist on the behavioral effects of altered ethanol metabolism. Here, we used the nematode C. elegans to directly examine how changes in ethanol metabolism alter behavioral responses to alcohol during an acute exposure. Additionally, we investigated ethanol solution osmolarity as a potential explanation for contrasting published data on C. elegans ethanol sensitivity. Methods We developed a gas chromatography assay and validated a spectrophotometric method to measure internal ethanol in ethanol-exposed worms. Further, we tested the effects of mutations in ADH and ALDH genes on ethanol tissue accumulation and behavioral sensitivity to the drug. Finally, we tested the effects of ethanol solution osmolarity on behavioral responses and tissue ethanol accumulation. Results Only a small amount of exogenously applied ethanol accumulated in the tissues of C. elegans and consequently their tissue concentrations were similar to those that intoxicate humans. Independent inactivation of an ADH-encoding gene (sodh-1) or an ALDH-encoding gene (alh-6 or alh-13) increased the ethanol concentration in worms and caused hypersensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol on locomotion. We also found that the sensitivity to the depressive effects of ethanol on locomotion is strongly influenced by the osmolarity of the exogenous ethanol solution. Conclusions Our results indicate that ethanol metabolism via ADH and ALDH has a statistically discernable but surprisingly minor influence on ethanol sedation and internal ethanol accumulation in worms. In contrast, the osmolarity of the medium in which ethanol is delivered to the animals has a more substantial effect on

  6. Ethanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  7. Increase in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in specific areas of the mouse brain by acute caffeine administration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Hyo Young; Cha, Seung Ha; Ryu, Hyun; Jang, Wooyoung; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Caffeine produces a variety of behavioral effects including increased alertness, reduced food intake, anxiogenic effects, and dependence upon repeated exposure. Although many of the effects of caffeine are mediated by its ability to block adenosine receptors, it is possible that other neural substrates, such as cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), may be involved in the effects of caffeine. Indeed, a recent study demonstrated that repeated caffeine administration increases CART in the mouse striatum. However, it is not clear whether acute caffeine administration alters CART in other areas of the brain. To explore this possibility, we investigated the dose- and time-dependent changes in CART immunoreactivity (CART-IR) after a single dose of caffeine in mice. We found that a high dose of caffeine (100 mg/kg) significantly increased CART-IR 2 h after administration in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc), and locus coeruleus (LC), and returned to control levels after 8 h. But this increase was not observed in other brain areas. In addition, caffeine administration at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg appears to produce dose-dependent increases in CART-IR in these brain areas; however, the magnitude of increase in CART-IR observed at a dose of 50 mg/kg was similar or greater than that observed at a dose of 100 mg/kg. This result suggests that CART-IR in AcbSh, dBNST, CeA, PVN, Arc, and LC is selectively affected by caffeine administration.

  8. Impairment of electron transfer chain induced by acute carnosine administration in skeletal muscle of young rats.

    PubMed

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I-III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I-III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α , and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients.

  9. Impairment of Electron Transfer Chain Induced by Acute Carnosine Administration in Skeletal Muscle of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macarini, José Roberto; Maravai, Soliany Grassi; Cararo, José Henrique; Dimer, Nádia Webber; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I–III, II, and II-III), malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM) in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I–III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients. PMID:24877122

  10. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in acute kidney injury is affected by administration timing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Cai, Jieru; Jiao, Xiaoyan; Yu, Xiaofang; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2017-03-10

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a promising therapy for acute kidney injury; however, the efficacy is limited due to poor survival after transplantation. In this study, we investigated how MSC transplantation timing affected the survival and therapeutic potential of MSCs in the kidney ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury model. After kidney I/R injury, the inflammatory process and tissue damage were characterized over 1 week post-I/R, we found that inflammation peaked at 12-24 h post-I/R (h.p.i.), and urine  neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) measurements correlated highly with measures of inflammation. We cultured MSCs with supernatants from I/R injured kidney tissue homogenates collected at different time points and found that kidney homogenates from 12 and 24 h.p.i. were most toxic to MSCs, whereas homogenates from 1 h.p.i. were not as cytotoxic as those from 12 and 24 h.p.i. Compared with MSCs administered at 12, or 24 h.p.i., cells administered immediately after ischemia or 1 h.p.i. yielded the highest renoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Our findings indicate that MSC treatment for acute kidney injury is most effective when applied prior to the development of a potent inflammatory microenvironment, and urine NGAL may be helpful for detecting inflammation and selecting MSC transplantation timing in I/R kidney injury.

  11. Deletion of mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells blunts renal vascular resistance following acute cyclosporine administration

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Cristian A.; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Andre-Gregoire, Gwennan; Placier, Sandrine; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Berger, Stefan; Warnock, David G.; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rieu, Philippe; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine A (CsA) are still commonly used after renal transplantation, despite CsA–induced nephrotoxicity (CIN), which is partly related to vasoactive mechanisms. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is now recognized as a key player in the control of vascular tone, and both endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-MR modulate the vasoactive responses to vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Here we tested whether vascular MR is involved in renal hemodynamic changes induced by CsA. The relative contribution of vascular MR in acute CsA treatment was evaluated using mouse models with targeted deletion of MR in endothelial cell or SMC. Results indicate that MR expressed in SMC, but not in endothelium, contributes to the increase of plasma urea and creatinine, the appearance of isometric tubular vacuolization, and overexpression of a kidney injury biomarker (neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin) after CsA treatment. Inactivation of MR in SMC blunted CsA–induced phosphorylation of contractile proteins. Finally, the in vivo increase of renal vascular resistance induced by CsA was blunted when MR was deleted from SMC cells, and this was associated with decreased L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Thus, our study provides new insights into the role of vascular MR in renal hemodynamics during acute CIN, and provides rationale for clinical studies of MR antagonism to manage the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:26422501

  12. Acute administration of diosgenin or dioscorea improves hyperglycemia with increases muscular steroidogenesis in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Fujita, S; Iemitsu, M

    2014-09-01

    Acute dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration improves hyperglycemia in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus. Diosgenin, a steroid structurally similar to DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), is contained highly levels in dioscorea; however, it is still unclear whether this natural product improves hyperglycemia in the type 1 diabetes model rats through an increase muscular GLUT4 signaling. After 1 week of STZ injection, fasting glucose level was measured in blood taken from the tail vein every 30 min for 150 min after injection of diosgenin or dioscorea (3mg/kg). On another day, muscle was resected 150 min after diosgenin or dioscorea injections. Serum DHEA level increased significantly 120 min after diosgenin or dioscorea injections; concomitantly, blood glucose level decreased significantly. Moreover, GLUT4 translocation, as well as phosphorylation of Akt and PKC ζ/λ, increased significantly by diosgenin or dioscorea administration. However, these effects of diosgenin and dioscorea were blocked by a 5α-reductase inhibitor that inhibits synthesizing dehydrotestosterone (DHT) from testosterone. Additionally, significant correlations were observed between blood glucose level, GLUT4 translocation level, and muscular sex steroid hormone level 150 min after the administrations. These results suggest that the diosgenin-induced increase in the DHEA level may contribute to the improvement of hyperglycemia by activating the muscular GLUT4 signaling pathway in type 1 diabetes model rats.

  13. Ethanol extract of Synurus deltoides (Aiton) Nakai suppresses in vitro LPS-induced cytokine production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo acute inflammatory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunyao

    2014-01-01

    Synurus deltoides (Aiton) Nakai, belonging to the Compositae family, is an edible plant widely distributed in Northeast Asia. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulative effects of the ethanol extract of S. deltoides (SDE). The SDE extract strongly down-regulated the mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, thereby inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and TNF-α in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, SDE also suppressed the nuclear translocation of the activation protein (AP)-1 and the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and simultaneously decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK), p38, and Akt. In agreement with the in vitro observations, the orally administered SDE ameliorated the acute inflammatory symptoms in the arachidonic acid-induced ear edema and the EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Therefore, S. deltoides have a potential anti-inflammatory capacity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the potential therapeutic use in the inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:24611100

  14. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  15. Pre-exposure to ethanol, but not to caffeine and nicotine, induced place preference and self-administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist-benzodiazepine combination, Zoletil®.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, June Bryan I; dela Peña, Irene Joy I; Lee, Hye Lim; dela Peña, Ike; Shin, Chan Young; Sohn, Aee Ree; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2013-09-01

    Zoletil® is an equal amount combination of the NMDA receptor antagonist, tiletamine, and the benzodiazepine, zolazepam, usually used as a veterinary anesthetic. Previous studies have shown that pre-exposure to Zoletil® and other psychoactive drugs (e.g. ketamine, diazepam) plays a significant role in the abuse liability of the compound. However, these studies were only focused on illicit psychoactive drugs and not on the more widely used licit psychoactive substances. Thus, the goal of the present work is to investigate whether pre-exposure to the three most commonly used licit psychoactive substances (caffeine, nicotine, and ethanol) affects the rewarding and reinforcing effects of Zoletil®. Rats were pretreated with caffeine (1.25 or 2.5 mg/kg), nicotine (125 or 250 μg/kg), ethanol (0.5, 2, or 4 g/kg), or saline (1 ml/kg) for 14 days, and evaluated for subsequent Zoletil® place preference (2.5 mg/kg) and self-administration (250 μg/kg). Zoletil® produced neither place preference nor self-administration in saline-pretreated rats. Pre-exposure to caffeine or nicotine does not have significant effects on Zoletil®'s abuse potential. However, pretreatment of ethanol significantly produced Zoletil® place preference and self-administration. These results suggest that individuals who are exposed to ethanol may have a high propensity to use/abuse Zoletil®. More importantly, the present result advocates the careful monitoring on the use and dispensation of Zoletil® or related substances.

  16. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway.

  17. Effect of acute treatment with cadmium on ethanol anesthesia, body termperature, and synaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Magour, S.; Kristof, V.; Baumann, M.; Assmann, G.

    1981-12-01

    The effect of a single intraperitoneal dose of 0.56, 1.12, and 1.68 mg cadmium/kg on the duration of ethanol-induced sleep was investigated in male rats. Cadmium potentiated ethanol sleeping time in a dose dependent manner up to 300% over controls. No significant difference in the elimination rate of ethanol from blood and brain and observed between control and cadmium-pretreated rats. Cadmium slightly inhibited the hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase in vivo and also potentiated ethanol hypothermia but these changes did not play a significant role in the observed prolongation of ethanol sleeping time. However, cadmium and ethanol additively inhibited brain synaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase in a noncompetitive manner. The results so far indicate that cadmium may increase brain responsiveness toward ethanol partly through inhibition of snaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase.

  18. Hyperalgesic and hypoalgesic mechanisms evoked by the acute administration of CCL5 in mice.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Sara; Álvarez, Miguel G; García-Domínguez, Mario; Lastra, Ana; Cernuda-Cernuda, Rafael; Folgueras, Alicia R; Fernández-García, María Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2017-05-01

    We show here that the intraplantar administration of CCL5 in mice produces hyperalgesia at low doses but activates compensatory antinociceptive mechanisms at doses slightly higher. Thus, the injection of 3-10ng of CCL5 evoked thermal hyperalgesia through the activation of CCR1 and CCR5 receptors, as demonstrated by the inhibitory effect exerted by the selective antagonists J113863 (0.01-0.1μg) and DAPTA (0.3-3μg), respectively. The prevention of this hyperalgesia by diclofenac (1-10μg), the inhibitors of COX-1 SC-560 (0.1-1μg) or COX-2 celecoxib (1-5μg), the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (0.03-0.3μg) or the TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 (10-50μg) demonstrates the involvement of prostaglandin synthesis and TRP sensitization in CCL5-evoked hyperalgesia. Doses of CCL5 higher than 17μg did not evoke hyperalgesia. However, this effect was restored by the administration of naloxone-methiodide (5μg), nor-binaltorphimine (10mg/kg) or an anti-dynorphin A antibody (0.62-2.5ng). The administration of 30ng of CCL5 also induced hyperalgesia in mice with reduced number of circulating white blood cells in response to cyclophosphamide or with selective neutrophil depletion induced by an anti-Ly6G antibody. In fact, the number of neutrophils present in paws treated with 30ng of CCL5 was greater than in paws receiving the administration of the hyperalgesic dose of 10ng. Finally, the expression of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin A was demonstrated by double immunofluorescence assays in these neutrophils attracted by CCL5. These results support previous data describing the hyperalgesic properties of CCL5 and constitute the first indication that a chemokine of the CC group can activate endogenous analgesic mechanisms.

  19. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fredenburgh, Laura E; Kraft, Bryan D; Hess, Dean R; Harris, R Scott; Wolf, Monroe A; Suliman, Hagir B; Roggli, Victor L; Davies, John D; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M; Thompson, B Taylor; Choi, Augustine M; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2015-10-15

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (10(8)-10(9) CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100-300 ppm × 60-90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6-8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model.

  20. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Bryan D.; Hess, Dean R.; Harris, R. Scott; Wolf, Monroe A.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Roggli, Victor L.; Davies, John D.; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Choi, Augustine M.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (108-109 CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100–300 ppm × 60–90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6–8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model. PMID:26320156

  1. Cycling efficiency and time to exhaustion are reduced after acute passive stretching administration.

    PubMed

    Esposito, F; Cè, E; Limonta, E

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute passive stretching on cycling efficiency during an exercise of heavy intensity. After maximum aerobic power (VO(2max)) assessment, nine active males (24 ± 5 years; stature 1.71 ± 0.09 m; body mass 69 ± 7 kg; mean ± standard deviation) performed tests at 85% of VO(2max) (W(85)) until exhaustion, with and without pre-exercise stretching. During the tests, we determined the gas exchange, metabolic and cardiorespiratory parameters. With stretching, no differences in VO(2max) occurred (3.64 ± 0.14 vs 3.66 ± 0.07 L/min for stretching and control, respectively). During W(85), pre-exercise stretching (i) decreased time to exhaustion (t(lim)) by 26% (P<0.05); (ii) increased average VO(2) by 4% (3.24 ± 0.07 and 3.12 ± 0.07 L/min in stretching and control, respectively; P<0.05); and (iii) reduced net mechanical efficiency (e(net) ) by 4% (0.185 ± 0.006 and 0.193 ± 0.006 in stretching and control, respectively; P<0.05). Although acute passive stretching did not have an effect on VO(2max), t(lim) and e(net) during heavy constant load exercise were significantly affected. These results are suggestive of an impairment in cycling efficiency due to changes in muscle neural activation and viscoelastic characteristics induced by stretching.

  2. Acute and chronic caffeine administration increases physical activity in sedentary adults.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Patrick; Panek, Leah M; Temple, Jennifer L

    2013-06-01

    Caffeine is a commonly used stimulant thought to have ergogenic properties. Most studies on the ergogenic effects of caffeine have been conducted in athletes. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that caffeine reduces ratings of perceived exertion and increases liking of physical activity in sedentary adults. Participants completed treadmill walking at 60% to 70% of their maximal heart rate at baseline and for 6 subsequent visits, during which half of the participants were given caffeine (3 mg/kg) and half given placebo in a sports drink vehicle. To investigate the potential synergistic effects of acute and chronic caffeine on self-determined exercise duration, participants were rerandomized to either the same or different condition for the last visit, creating 4 chronic/acute treatment groups (placebo/placebo, placebo/caffeine, caffeine/placebo, caffeine/caffeine). Participants rated how much they liked the activity and perceived exertion at each visit. There was a main effect of time on liking of physical activity, with liking increasing over time and an interaction of sex and caffeine treatment on liking, with liking of activity increasing in female participants treated with caffeine, but not with placebo. There was no effect of caffeine on ratings of perceived exertion. Individuals who received caffeine on the final test day exercised for significantly longer than those who received placebo. These data suggest that repeated exposure to physical activity significantly increases liking of exercise and reduces ratings of perceived exertion and that caffeine does little to further modify these effects.

  3. Efficacy of Intravenous Administration of Landiolol in Patients With Acute Heart Failure and Supraventricular Tachyarrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Shunsuke; Aikawa, Hiroto; Hisatake, Shinji; Kabuki, Takayuki; Oka, Takashi; Dobashi, Shintaro; Fujii, Takahiro; Ikeda, Takanori

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with acute heart failure (HF) complicated by supraventricular tachyarrhythmia (SVT) often receive continuous intravenous infusion of landiolol or diltiazem for rate control. It is unclear whether the interval from initiation of infusion to commencement of oral beta-blocker (BB) therapy differs for these two drugs. Methods From January 2013 to July 2015, 94 consecutive patients were hospitalized for acute HF complicated by SVT. After 35 patients were excluded, the remaining 59 were divided into groups treated with diltiazem or landiolol. We investigated the blood pressure, heart rate, New York Heart Association classification, brain natriuretic peptide, chest X-ray film, echocardiographic findings (ejection fraction (EF)), time until commencement of oral BB therapy, and hospital stay. Results There were no significant between-group differences of heart rate, blood pressure, or the severity of HF. The time until commencing oral BB therapy was significantly shorter in the landiolol group compared with the diltiazem group (median: 2 vs. 4 days, P = 0.002), but there was no significant difference in hospital stay. This interval was significantly shorter in patients with a reduced EF in the landiolol group (median: 2 days) compared with those with a reduced EF in the diltiazem group (median: 5 days, P = 0.008), and patients with a preserved EF in the landiolol group tended to have a shorter interval (median: 2 days) than those with a preserved EF in the diltiazem group (median: 4 days, P = 0.092). Conclusions Switching to oral BBs was accomplished earlier with landiolol than with diltiazem. PMID:28392863

  4. Memantine enhances the inhibitory effects of naltrexone on ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Alexander; Stenback, Tove; Liljequist, Sture

    2008-04-28

    Effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.1; 0.3; 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) on operant ethanol self-administration alone and in combination with the non-competitive NMDA antagonist memantine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were studied in rats. Acute administration of naltrexone (0.1; 0.3; 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) inhibited ethanol self-administration in a dose-dependent manner. Memantine (1.0 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the effects of naltrexone at 0.1 mg/kg, failing per se to inhibit ethanol consumption. Thus, low, sub-effective dose of memantine in combination with low doses of naltrexone blocked the reinforcing properties of ethanol in rats. It is suggested that the combination of sub-effective doses of memantine and naltrexone may have therapeutic value in the treatment of alcoholism particularly in a subgroup of alcoholic patients who have high sensitivity to the adverse side effects of naltrexone.

  5. Neuroprotection & mechanism of ethanol in stroke and traumatic brain injury therapy: new prospects for an ancient drug.

    PubMed

    Asmaro, Karam; Fu, Paul; Ding, Yuchuan

    2013-01-01

    Effective efforts to screen for agents that protect against the devastating effects of stroke have not produced viable results thus far. As a result this article reviews the possible role of ethanol as a neuroprotective agent in stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous studies have associated ethanol consumption with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke, suggesting a neuroprotective mechanism. The translation of this clinical knowledge into basic science research with the goal of new therapy for acute stroke patients remains in its initial stages. In a recent study involving rats, we have shown that ethanol administration, in the correct dose after stroke onset, protects against ischemia-induced brain injury. The purpose of this paper is to discuss ethanol's neuroprotective properties in stroke when consumed as a preconditioning agent, in TBI with a positive blood alcohol content, and finally in stroke treatment, with the goal of using post-ischemia ethanol (PIE) therapy to ameliorate brain damage in the future.

  6. Acute Effect of Central Administration of Urotensin II on Baroreflex and Blood Pressure in Conscious Normotensive Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyungjoon; Sata, Yusuke; Jackson, Kristy L.; Burke, Sandra L.; Head, Geoffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of central administration of Urotensin II on blood pressure, heart rate, and baroreceptor heart rate reflexes in conscious normotensive rabbits. Preliminary operations were undertaken to implant a balloon cuff on the inferior vena cava for baroreflex assessments and to implant cannula into the lateral and fourth ventricle. After 2 weeks of recovery cumulative dose response curves to Urotensin II (10, 100 ng, 1, 10, and 100 μg) given into the ventricles, or Ringer's solution as a vehicle were performed on separate days. Injections were given each hour and baroreflex assessments were made 30 min after each administration. Analysis of the dose response curves to Urotensin II compared to vehicle administered into the lateral or fourth ventricle, indicated little change to blood pressure or heart rate. Analysis of the time course to the highest dose over a 30 min period revealed a small (−5 mmHg) depressor response maximal at 10 min when injected into the fourth ventricle but no effect when injected into the lateral ventricle. Baroreflex assessments made at each dose showed that there was no change in baroreflex sensitivity but that an increase in the upper plateau was observed when Urotensin was injected into the lateral ventricle and a tendency for a reduced lower heart rate plateau was observed after fourth ventricle administration. Clonidine administration in the fourth ventricle decreased blood pressure and heart rate, thus confirming catheter patency. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Urotensin II in the forebrain and brainstem may play a role in modulating cardiac sympathetic and vagal baroreflexes but only during large acute changes in blood pressure. PMID:28280470

  7. A Study of Intravenous Administration of Vitamin C in the Treatment of Acute Herpetic Pain and Postherpetic Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Dong Jin; Na, Chan Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there are several available management strategies for treatment of both acute pain of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), it is difficult to treat them adequately. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenously administrated vitamin C on acute pain and its preventive effects on PHN in patients with HZ. Methods Between September 2011 and May 2013 eighty-seven patients who were admitted for HZ were assessed according to age, sex, underlying diseases, duration of pain and skin lesion, dermatomal distribution, and PHN. It was a randomized controlled study, in which 87 patients were randomly allocated into the ascorbic acid group and control group. Each patient received normal saline infusion with or without 5 g of ascorbic acid on days 1, 3, and 5 then answered questionnaires that included side effects and pain severity using visual analogue scale on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. After discharge, the severity of pain was obtained at out-patient clinic or by telephone on weeks 2, 4, 8, and 16. Results There was no differences in severity of pain on patients' age, sex, underlying diseases, duration of pain and skin lesion and dermatomal distribution between two groups (p>0.05). Since 8th week, pain score in ascorbic acid treatment group was significantly lower than control group (p <0.05). The incidence of PHN was significantly lower in the treatment group compared to control group (p=0.014). The changes of overall pain score was significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Intravenously administered ascorbic acid did not relieve acute HZ pain; but is effective for reducing the incidence of PHN. PMID:27904265

  8. Effects of Intracoronary Administration of Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Park, Jong Ha; Kim, Bo Won; Ahn, Jinhee; Kim, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Sup; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong; Park, Tae Sik; Kim, Sang-Pil; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Mi Hwa; Jung, Jin Sup

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are known to be potentially effective in regeneration of damaged tissue. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of intracoronary administration of ADSCs in reducing the infarction area and improving function after acute transmural myocardial infarction (MI) in a porcine model. Materials and Methods ADSCs were obtained from each pig's abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue by simple liposuction. After 3 passages of 14-days culture, 2 million ADSCs were injected into the coronary artery 30 min after acute transmural MI. At baseline and 4 weeks after the ADSC injection, 99mTc methoxyisobutylisonitrile-single photon emission computed tomography (MIBI-SPECT) was performed to evaluate the left ventricular volume, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; %), and perfusion defects as well as the myocardial salvage (%) and salvage index. At 4 weeks, each pig was sacrificed, and the heart was extracted and dissected. Gross and microscopic analyses with specific immunohistochemistry staining were then performed. Results Analysis showed improvement in the perfusion defect, but not in the LVEF in the ADSC group (n=14), compared with the control group (n=14) (perfusion defect, -13.0±10.0 vs. -2.6±12.0, p=0.019; LVEF, -8.0±15.4 vs. -15.9±14.8, p=0.181). There was a tendency of reducing left ventricular volume in ADSC group. The ADSCs identified by stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) staining were well co-localized by von Willebrand factor and Troponin T staining. Conclusion Intracoronary injection of cultured ADSCs improved myocardial perfusion in this porcine acute transmural MI model. PMID:26446632

  9. TRAIL administration down-modulated the acute systemic inflammatory response induced in a mouse model by muramyldipeptide or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Secchiero, Paola; Crovella, Sergio; Zauli, Giorgio

    2012-10-01

    The potent inducer of apoptosis TRAIL/Apo2 ligand is now under considerations in clinical trials for the treatment of different types of cancer. Since the natural history of cancer is often characterized by microbial infections, we have investigated the effect of recombinant human TRAIL in a mouse model of systemic acute inflammation of microbial origin represented by BALB/c mice treated with either bacterial muramyldipeptide (MDP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), these inflammatory bacterial compounds triggered a severe systemic inflammatory response within 2h, represented by body temperature elevation, increase of circulating serum amyloid-A (SAA) and of the number of leukocytes in the peritoneal cavity. Moreover, both MDP and LPS induced a significant elevation of the circulating levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Noteworthy, pre-treatment with recombinant human TRAIL 48 and 72 h before administration of either MDP or LPS, significantly counteracted all acute inflammatory responses, including the elevation of key pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as IL-1α, IL-6, G-CSF, MCP-1. These data demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL has a potent anti-inflammatory activity, which might be beneficial for the anti-tumoral activity of TRAIL.

  10. Intra-Peritoneal Administration of Mitochondrial DNA Provokes Acute Lung Injury and Systemic Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 9

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lemeng; Deng, Songyun; Zhao, Shuangping; Ai, Yuhang; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of sepsis is complex. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which is responsible for energy metabolism, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammatory responses, is closely related with severe sepsis induced death. Mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) contain un-methylated cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) motifs, which exhibit immune stimulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of mtDNA release on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic inflammation. Following LPS injection, plasma mtDNA copies peak at 8 h. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, mtDNA in toll like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were significantly decreased. MtDNA intra-peritoneal administration causes apparent ALI as demonstrated by increased lung injury score, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total protein and wet/dry (W/D) ratio; mtDNA injection also directly provokes systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by increased IL-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) level; while nuclear DNA (nDNA) could not induce apparent ALI and systemic inflammation. However, compared with WT mice, TLR4 KO could not protect from mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation. Specific TLR9 inhibitor, ODN 2088 pretreatment can significantly attenuate mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by improved lung injury score, decreased lung wet/dry ratio, BALF total protein concentration, and decreased systemic level of IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1. MtDNA administration activates the expression of p-P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in lung tissue and specific TLR9 inhibitor pretreatment can attenuate this activation. Thus, LPS-induced mtDNA release occurs in a TLR4-dependent manner, and mtDNA causes acute lung injury and systemic inflammation in a TLR9-dependent and TLR4-independent manner. PMID:27589725

  11. Impact of Timing of Eptifibatide Administration on Preprocedural Infarct-Related Artery Patency in Acute STEMI Patients Undergoing Primary PCI.

    PubMed

    Dharma, Surya; Firdaus, Isman; Danny, Siska Suridanda; Juzar, Dafsah A; Wardeh, Alexander J; Jukema, J Wouter; van der Laarse, Arnoud

    2014-09-01

    The appropriate timing of eptifibatide initiation for acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remains unclear. This study aimed to analyze the impact of timing of eptifibatide administration on infarct-related artery (IRA) patency in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI. Acute STEMI patients who underwent primary PCI (n = 324) were enrolled in this retrospective study; 164 patients received eptifibatide bolus ≤ 30 minutes after emergency department (ED) admission (group A) and 160 patients received eptifibatide bolus > 30 minutes after ED admission (group B). The primary endpoint was preprocedural IRA patency. Most patients in group A (90%) and group B (89%) were late presenters (> 2 hours after symptom onset). The two groups had similar preprocedural thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 2 or 3 flow of the IRA (26 vs. 24%, p = not significant [NS]), similar creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) levels at 8 hours after admission (339 vs. 281 U/L, p = NS), similar left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (52 vs. 50%, p = NS), and similar 30-day mortality (2 vs. 7%, p = NS). Compared with group B, patients in group A had shorter door-to-device time (p < 0.001) and shorter procedural time (p = 0.004), without increased bleeding risk (13 vs. 18%, p = NS). Earlier intravenous administration of eptifibatide before primary PCI did not improve preprocedural IRA patency, CK-MB level at 8 hours after admission, LVEF and 30-day mortality compared with patients who received intravenous eptifibatide that was administered later.

  12. Ethanol disruption of synaptic neurotransmission. Midterm report, 22 September 1994-21 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Aronstam, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of this research is to understand how acute and chronic ethanol administration disrupts synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. The underlying hypothesis is that ethanol depresses neurotransmission at neurotransmitter receptors by altering receptor- G protein interactions. The results provide partial support for our hypothesis. However, ethanol`s actions were not universal, and receptor subtypes were not equally affected. The significance of ethanol`s actions is indicated by the disruption of signaling processes (adenylate cyclase, intracellular Ca2+, cell adhesion). Ethanol disrupted the following processes: (1) receptor-G protein interactions as seen in ligand binding studies in receptors expressed by stably transfected CHO cells; (2) muscarinic receptor control of G protein GTPase activity and guanine nucleotide binding in brain tissues; (3) the balance between inhibitory and stimulatory G protein influences on adenylate cyclase, (4) Ca2+ responses of ml and m5 receptors; (5) muscarinic mediated cell adhesion response in a non-neuronal cell line. The quantity of experimental material has been a limiting factor in studies with cultured cells. We initiated studies on the influence of chronic ethanol treatment on neurotransmitter receptors, including the adoption of Western blots (G proteins) and Northern blots for receptor niRNA. To analyze control of receptor expression, the promoter regions of ml-m5 were cloned, sequenced and characterized.

  13. Involvement of ceramide in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hegde, Medha; Ohsie, Jason; Paik, Sun-Mee; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mitsuo

    2010-10-01

    Acute administration of ethanol to 7-day-old mice is known to cause robust apoptotic neurodegeneration in the brain. Our previous studies have shown that such ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is accompanied by increases in lipids, including ceramide, triglyceride (TG), cholesterol ester (ChE), and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) in the brain. In this study, the effects of ethanol on lipid profiles as well as caspase 3 activation were examined in the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and inferior colliculus of the postnatal day 7 mouse brain. We found that the cortex, hippocampus, and inferior colliculus, which showed substantial caspase 3 activation by ethanol, manifested significant elevations in ceramide, TG, and NAPE. In contrast, the cerebellum, with the least caspase 3 activation, failed to show significant changes in ceramide and TG, and exhibits much smaller increases in NAPE than other brain regions. Ethanol-induced increases in ChE were observed in all brain regions tested. Inhibitors of serine palmitoyltransferase effectively blocked ethanol-induced caspase 3 activation as well as elevations in ceramide, ChE, and NAPE. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that the expression of serine palmitoyltransferase was mainly localized in neurons and was enhanced in activated caspase 3-positive neurons generated by ethanol. These results indicate that de novo ceramide synthesis has a vital role in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing brain.

  14. Ethanol-Induced Increase of Agouti-Related Protein (AgRP) Immunoreactivity in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus of C57BL/6J, but not 129/SvJ, Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cubero, Inmaculada; Navarro, Montserrat; Carvajal, Francisca; Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel; Thiele, Todd E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The melanocortin (MC) system is composed of peptides that are cleaved from the polypeptide precursor, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Previous research has shown that MC receptor (MCR) agonists reduce, and MCR antagonists increase, ethanol consumption in rats and mice. Consistently, genetic deletion of the endogenous MCR antagonist, agouti-related protein (AgRP), causes reductions of ethanol-reinforced lever pressing and binge-like ethanol drinking in C57BL/6J mice. Ethanol also has direct effects on the central MC system, as chronic exposure to an ethanol-containing diet causes significant reductions of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) immunoreactivity in specific brain regions of Sprague-Dawley rats. Together, these observations suggest that the central MC system modulates neurobiological responses to ethanol. To further characterize the role of the MC system in responses to ethanol, here we compared AgRP and α-MSH immunoreactivity in response to an acute injection of saline or ethanol between high ethanol drinking C57BL/6J mice and moderate ethanol drinking 129/SvJ mice. Methods Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ethanol (1.5 g/kg or 3.5 g/kg; mixed in 0.9% saline) or an equivolume of 0.9% saline. Two hours after injection, animals were sacrificed and their brains were processed for AgRP and α-MSH immunoreactivity. Results Results indicated that acute ethanol administration triggered a dose-dependent increase in AgRP immunoreactivity in the arcuate (ARC) of C57BL/6J mice, an effect that was not evident in the 129/SvJ strain. Although acute administration of ethanol did not influence α-MSH immunoreactivity, C57BL/6J mice had significantly greater overall α-MSH immunoreactivity in the ARC, dorsomedial, and lateral regions of the hypothalamus relative to the 129/SvJ strain. In contrast, C57BL/6J mice displayed significantly lower α-MSH immunoreactivity in the medial amygdala. Conclusions The results show that acute ethanol

  15. Changes in cerebral neurotransmitters and metabolites induced by acute donepezil and memantine administrations: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Shearman, E; Rossi, S; Szasz, B; Juranyi, Z; Fallon, S; Pomara, N; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    2006-03-31

    Cholinesterase inhibitors including donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, memantine are the medications currently approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to their beneficial effects on cognitive and functional domains typically disrupted in AD, these agents have also been shown to slow down the emergence of behavioral and psychotic symptoms associated with this disease. However, the underlying mechanisms for these therapeutic effects remain poorly understood and could involve effects of these medications on non-cholinergic or non-glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems respectively. These considerations prompted us to initiate a series of investigations to examine the acute and chronic effects of donepezil (Aricept (+/-)-2,3-dihydro-5,6-dimethoxy-2-[[1-(phenylmethyl)-4-piperidinyl]methyl]-1H-inden-1-1 hydrochloride and memantine (1-amino-3,5-dimethyladamantane hydrochloride C12H21N.HCl)). The present study focuses on the acute effects of donepezil and memantine on brain extracellular levels of acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine and their metabolites. We assayed changes in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus and the prefrontal and medial temporal cortex by microdialysis. Memantine resulted in significant increases in extracellular dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and their metabolites, in the cortical regions, and in a reduction of DA in the hippocampus. Donepezil produced an increase in extracellular DA in the cortex and in the dorsal hippocampus. Norepinephrine increased in the cortex; with donepezil it increased in the dorsal hippocampus and the medial temporal cortex, and decreased in the ventral hippocampus. Interestingly both compounds decreased extracellular serotonin (5HT) levels. The metabolites of the neurotransmitters were increased in most areas. We also found an increase in extracellular acetylcholine (ACh) by memantine in the nucleus accumbens and the

  16. Improved outcomes from the administration of progesterone for patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guomin; Wei, Jing; Yan, Weiqi; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Zhenhui

    2008-01-01

    injury were lower in the progesterone group than in the placebo group, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups (P > 0.05). Instances of complications and adverse events associated with the administration of progesterone were not found. Conclusion Our data suggest that acute severe TBI patients with administration of progesterone hold improved neurologic outcomes for up to 6 months. These results provide information important for further large and multicenter clinical trials on progesterone as a promising neuroprotective drug. Trial Registration ACTRN12607000545460. PMID:18447940

  17. Weight-based contrast administration in the computerized tomography evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Lisa; Zamfirova, Ina; Sulo, Suela; Baral, Pesach

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Compare individualized contrast protocol, or weight-based protocol, to standard methodology in evaluating acute pulmonary embolism. Retrospective chart review was performed on patients undergoing computed tomography angiography with standard contrast protocol (n = 50) or individualized protocol (n = 50). Computerized tomography images were assessed for vascular enhancement and image quality. Demographics were comparable, however, more patients in the individualized group were admitted to intensive care unit (48% vs 16%, P = 0.004). Vascular enhancement and image quality were also comparable, although individualized protocol had significantly fewer contrast and motion artifact limitations (28% vs 48%, P = 0.039). Fifteen percent decrease in intravenous contrast volume was identified in individualized group with no compromise in image quality. Individualized contrast protocol provided comparable vascular enhancement and image quality to the standard, yet with fewer limitations and lower intravenous contrast volume. Catheter-gauge flow rate restrictions resulting in inconsistent technologist exam execution were identified, supporting the need for further investigation of this regimen. PMID:28151887

  18. Paradoxical glucose-sensitizing yet proinflammatory effects of acute ASP administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Fisette, Alexandre; Poursharifi, Pegah; Oikonomopoulou, Katerina; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Lapointe, Marc; Cianflone, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipokine derived from the immune complement system, which stimulates fat storage and is typically increased in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, the acute effects of ASP on energy metabolism and inflammatory processes in vivo were evaluated. We hypothesized that ASP would specifically exert proinflammatory effects. C57Bl/6 wild-type mice were put on a high-fat-high-sucrose diet for 12 weeks. Mice were then subjected to both glucose and insulin tolerance tests, each manipulation being preceded by recombinant ASP or vehicle (control) bolus injection. ASP supplementation increased whole-body glucose excursion, and this was accomplished with reduced concomitant insulin levels. However, ASP did not directly alter insulin sensitivity. ASP supplementation induced a proinflammatory phenotype, with higher levels of cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α in plasma and in adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle mRNA. Additionally, ASP increased M1 macrophage content of these tissues. ASP exerted a direct concentration-dependent role in the migration and M1 activation of cultured macrophages. Altogether, the in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that ASP plays a role in both energy metabolism and inflammation, with paradoxical whole-body glucose-sensitizing yet proinflammatory effects.

  19. Innate BDNF expression is associated with ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats.

    PubMed

    Raivio, Noora; Miettinen, Pekka; Kiianmaa, Kalervo

    2014-09-04

    We have shown recently that acute administration of ethanol modulates the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in several rat brain areas known to be involved in the development of addiction to ethanol and other drugs of abuse, suggesting that BDNF may be a factor contributing to the neuroadaptive changes set in motion by ethanol exposure. The purpose of the present study was to further clarify the role of BDNF in reinforcement from ethanol and in the development of addiction to ethanol by specifying the effect of acute administration of ethanol (1.5 or 3.0 g/kg i.p.) on the expression profile of BDNF mRNA in the ventral tegmental area and in the terminal areas of the mesolimbic dopamine pathway in the brain of alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats, selected for high and low voluntary ethanol intake, respectively. The level of BDNF mRNA expression was higher in the amygdala and ventral tegmental area of AA than in those of ANA rats, and there was a trend for a higher level in the nucleus accumbens. In the amygdala and hippocampus, a biphasic change in the BDNF mRNA levels was detected: the levels were decreased at 3 and 6h but increased above the basal levels at 24h. Furthermore, there was a difference between the AA and ANA lines in the effect of ethanol, the ANA rats showing an increase in BDNF mRNA levels while such a change was not seen in AA rats. These findings suggest that the innate levels of BDNF expression may play a role in the mediation of the reinforcing effects of ethanol and in the control of ethanol intake.

  20. Immobilization-induced increases of systolic blood pressure and dysregulation of electrolyte balance in ethanol-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Farzana; Haque, Zeba; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2015-07-01

    Clinical and experimental studies revealed that alcohol drinking and life event stresses are predisposing factors to hypertension. Intra and extra cellular levels of electrolytes may play important role in the pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension. Dietary intake of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium is suggested to have a role in the regulation of blood pressure. The present study was designed to monitor the effects of acute exposure to 2h immobilization stress and ethanol administration at a dose of 2.5 g/kg body weight (i.p.) and combined effect of acute administration of ethanol and immobilization stress on systolic blood pressure (SBP), intraerythrocyte, serum and tissue electrolytes in rats. Results showed that acute exposure to 2h immobilization increased SBP, intraerythrocyte sodium and decreased intraerythrocyte potassium in water as well as in ethanol injected rats. The concentration of Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ increased while that of K⁺ and Mg²⁺ decreased in the heart and kidney tissue. Ethanol administration also increased Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ levels and decreased K⁺ and Mg²⁺ levels in the heart and kidney tissue. Restraint stress decreased serum levels of Na⁺, K⁺, Ca²⁺, P, and Cl⁻ and increased serum Mg²⁺, glucose and haematocrit. Ethanol administration also decreased serum levels of Na⁺, K⁺, Ca²⁺, P, and Cl⁻ and increased serum Mg²⁺, glucose and haematocrit. The effects of ethanol and stress on the changes of blood and tissues electrolytes were additive and may be involved in the greater occurrence of hypertension in alcoholics. Our results suggested an important role of intra and extra cellular electrolytes in both stress and ethanol-induced hypertension. The findings may help to develop strategies for the treatment of hypertension in alcoholics.

  1. Acute intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid affects the expression of the coat protein AP-2 and its interaction with membranes.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Janina; Seltzer, Alicia; Sosa, Miguel Angel

    2009-10-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis is thought to be crucial for the maintenance of synaptic transmission and for the cell plasticity at the nervous system. In this study, we demonstrated that acute intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid (QUIN), an agonist of the N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor, induces a decrease of the coat protein AP-2 expression and affects their interaction with membranes. By western blot analysis we observed that at 24 h after QUIN intrastriatal injection, alpha1 subunit of AP-2 and alpha2, at lesser extent, were reduced in the striatal membranes. The decrease of both subunits expression was extended to 48 h after treatment, although the soluble proteins were mostly affected. Other areas of the brain were not affected by the treatment, except the cerebellum, where a significant increase of soluble AP-2 (both subunits) was observed at 48 h after injection. Another coat protein, as the phosphoprotein AP-180, was not affected by the injection of QUIN. We also confirmed that QUIN injection causes increasing loss of striatal neurons after the administration of the toxin. We concluded that QUIN may affect the endocytotic machinery of the striatum, by inducing changes in the AP-2 behaviour. Consequently, the internalization of NMDAR and/or AMPAR may be affected, by QUIN, contributing to the excitotoxic effect of the drug.

  2. Lycopene treatment prevents hematological, reproductive and histopathological damage induced by acute zearalenone administration in male Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Boeira, Silvana Peterini; Filho, Carlos Borges; Del'Fabbro, Lucian; Roman, Silvane Souza; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Jessé, Cristiano Ricardo; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Furian, Ana Flávia

    2014-07-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a mycotoxin commonly found as a contaminant in cereals. ZEA toxicity targets mainly the reproductive system, and oxidative stress plays an etiological role in its toxic effects. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of lycopene, a potent carotenoid antioxidant, on markers of oxidative stress in liver, kidney and testes, and on reproductive, hematological and histopathological parameters after ZEA administration. Adult Swiss albino male mice received lycopene (20mg/kg, p.o.) for ten days before a single oral administration of ZEA (40mg/kg, p.o.), and 48h thereafter tissues (liver, kidney, testes and blood) were collected for biochemical, hematological and histological analyses. Lycopene prevented ZEA-induced changes in hematological parameters (increased number of leukocytes, segmented neutrophils, sticks, eosinophils and monocytes and decreased number of red blood cells (RBC), number of lymphocytes and platelets). Moreover, lycopene prevented the reduction in the number and motility of spermatozoa and the testicular tissue damage induced by ZEA. In addition, lycopene prevented the decrease in glutathione-S-transferase activity in kidney and testes and increased glutathione-S-transferase activity per se in the liver, kidneys and testes as well as superoxide dismutase activity in the liver. In summary, lycopene was able to prevent ZEA-induced acute toxic effects in male mice, suggesting that this antioxidant carotenoid may represent a promising prophylactic strategy against ZEA toxicity.

  3. Acute-Onset Type 1 Diabetes that Developed During the Administration of Olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Iwaku, Kenji; Otuka, Fumiko; Taniyama, Matsuo

    2017-01-01

    The patient was 32-ye