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Sample records for acute ethanol intake

  1. Effects of acute acamprosate and homotaurine on ethanol intake and ethanol-stimulated mesolimbic dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Olive, M Foster; Nannini, Michelle A; Ou, Christine J; Koenig, Heather N; Hodge, Clyde W

    2002-02-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the acute effects of the anticraving compound acamprosate (calcium acetylhomotaurinate) and the closely related compound homotaurine on ethanol intake and ethanol-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Male rats were treated with acamprosate (200 or 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally, i.p.) or homotaurine (10, 50, or 100 mg/kg i.p.) 15 min prior to access to 10% ethanol and water for 1 h in a two-bottle choice restricted access paradigm. A separate group of rats was implanted with microdialysis probes in the nucleus accumbens and given an acute injection of ethanol (1.5 g/kg i.p.) that was preceded by saline, acamprosate, or homotaurine. Acamprosate and homotaurine dose-dependently reduced ethanol intake and preference. These compounds also delayed or suppressed ethanol-stimulated increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine release, suggesting that acamprosate and homotaurine may reduce ethanol intake by interfering with the ability of ethanol to activate the mesolimbic dopamine reward system.

  2. Acute Ethanol Intake Induces NAD(P)H Oxidase Activation and Rhoa Translocation in Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Simplicio, Janaina A.; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Callera, Glaucia Elena; Pereira, Camila André; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita de Cássia; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying the vascular dysfunction induced by ethanol is not totally understood. Identification of biochemical/molecular mechanisms that could explain such effects is warranted. Objective To investigate whether acute ethanol intake activates the vascular RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in resistance arteries and the role of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) on such response. We also evaluated the requirement of p47phox translocation for ethanol-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Methods Male Wistar rats were orally treated with ethanol (1g/kg, p.o. gavage) or water (control). Some rats were treated with vitamin C (250 mg/kg, p.o. gavage, 5 days) before administration of water or ethanol. The mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) was collected 30 min after ethanol administration. Results Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in superoxide anion (O2-) generation and lipoperoxidation in the MAB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the reduced glutathione, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were not affected by ethanol. Vitamin C and 4-methylpyrazole prevented the increase on O2- generation induced by ethanol in cultured MAB vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol had no effect on phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B (Akt) and eNOS (Ser1177 or Thr495 residues) or MAB vascular reactivity. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in the membrane: cytosol fraction ratio of p47phox and RhoA expression in the rat MAB. Conclusion Acute ethanol intake induces activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by a mechanism that involves ROS generation. In resistance arteries, ethanol activates NAD(P)H oxidase by inducing p47phox translocation by a redox-sensitive mechanism. PMID:27812679

  3. Soymilk products affect ethanol absorption and metabolism in rats during acute and chronic ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Kano, M; Ishikawa, F; Matsubara, S; Kikuchi-Hayakawa, H; Shimakawa, Y

    2002-02-01

    In this study we evaluated the effects of soy products on ethanol metabolism during periods of acute and chronic consumption in rats. Gastric ethanol content and blood ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations were investigated after the oral administration of ethanol (34 mmol/kg) plus soy products such as soymilk (SM) or fermented soymilk (FSM). The gastric ethanol concentration of the FSM group was greater than that of the control group, whereas portal and aortal blood ethanol concentrations of the FSM group were lower than in controls. The aortal acetaldehyde concentration in the FSM group was lower than that of the control group. The direct effect of isoflavones on liver function was investigated by using hepatocytes isolated from untreated rats. Genistein (5 micromol/L) decreased ethanol (P = 0.045) and tended to decrease acetaldehyde (P = 0.10) concentrations in the culture filtrate. Some variables of ethanol metabolism in the liver were investigated after chronic ethanol exposure for 25 d. Rats consumed a 5% ethanol fluid plus the SM diet, the FSM diet or a control diet. Microsomal ethanol oxidizing activity was significantly lower in the FSM group than the control group. Furthermore, cytosolic glutathione S-transferase activity was higher in the SM and FSM groups than in the control group. Acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (low K(m)) in the FSM group (P = 0.15), but not in the SM group (P = 0.31), tended to be greater than in the control group. The amount of thiobarbituric acid reacting substances in the liver of the SM and FSM groups tended to be less than that of the control group (P = 0.18 and 0.10, respectively). These results demonstrate that soymilk products inhibit ethanol absorption and enhance ethanol metabolism in rats.

  4. Acute and chronic ethanol intake: effects on spatial and non-spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Luis M; Cimadevilla, Jose M

    2012-12-01

    Abusive alcohol consumption produces neuronal damage and biochemical alterations in the mammal brain followed by cognitive disturbances. In this work rats receiving chronic and acute alcohol intake were evaluated in a spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample/position test. Chronic alcohol-treated rats had free access to an aqueous ethanol solution as the only available liquid source from the postnatal day 21 to the end of experiment (postnatal day 90). Acute alcoholic animals received an injection of 2 g/kg ethanol solution once per week. Subjects were evaluated in two tests (object recognition and spatial recognition) based on the spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample or to position paradigm using delays of 1 min, 15 min and 60 min. Results showed that chronic and acute alcohol intake impairs the rats' performance in both tests. Moreover, chronic alcohol-treated rats were more altered than acute treated animals in both tasks. Our results support the idea that chronic and acute alcohol administration during postnatal development caused widespread brain damage resulting in behavioral disturbances and learning disabilities.

  5. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E.; Mecawi, André S.; Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase‐mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ► Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ► RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation.

  6. Acute ethanol and taurine intake affect absolute alpha power in frontal cortex before and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Paulucio, Dailson; da Costa, Bruno M; Santos, Caleb G; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Gongora, Mariana; Cagy, Mauricio; Alvarenga, Renato L; Pompeu, Fernando A M S

    2017-09-14

    Taurine and alcohol has been popularly ingested through energy drinks. Reports from both compounds shows they are active on nervous system but little is known about the acute effect of these substances on the frontal cortex in an exercise approach. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 0,6mldL(-1) of ethanol (ET), 6g of taurine (TA), and taurine with ethanol (TA+ET) intake on absolute alpha power (AAP) in the frontal region, before and after exercise. Nine participants were recruited, five women (22±3years) and four men (26±5years), for a counterbalanced experimental design. For each treatment, the tests were performed considering three moments: "baseline", "peak" and "post-exercise". In the placebo treatment (PL), the frontal areas showed AAP decrease at the post-exercise. However, in the TA, AAP decreased at peak and increased at post-exercise. In the ET treatment, AAP increased at the peak moment for the left frontal electrodes. In the TA+ET treatment, an AAP increase was observed at peak, and it continued after exercise ended. These substances were able to produce electrocortical activity changes in the frontal regions after a short duration and low intensity exercise. Left and right regions showed different AAP dynamics during peak and post-exercise moments when treatments were compared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Ethanol Intake Induces NAD(P)H Oxidase Activation and Rhoa Translocation in Resistance Arteries.

    PubMed

    Simplicio, Janaina A; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; Vale, Gabriel Tavares do; Callera, Glaucia Elena; Pereira, Camila André; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita de Cássia; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism underlying the vascular dysfunction induced by ethanol is not totally understood. Identification of biochemical/molecular mechanisms that could explain such effects is warranted. To investigate whether acute ethanol intake activates the vascular RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in resistance arteries and the role of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) on such response. We also evaluated the requirement of p47phox translocation for ethanol-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with ethanol (1g/kg, p.o. gavage) or water (control). Some rats were treated with vitamin C (250 mg/kg, p.o. gavage, 5 days) before administration of water or ethanol. The mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) was collected 30 min after ethanol administration. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in superoxide anion (O2-) generation and lipoperoxidation in the MAB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the reduced glutathione, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were not affected by ethanol. Vitamin C and 4-methylpyrazole prevented the increase on O2- generation induced by ethanol in cultured MAB vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol had no effect on phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B (Akt) and eNOS (Ser1177 or Thr495 residues) or MAB vascular reactivity. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in the membrane: cytosol fraction ratio of p47phox and RhoA expression in the rat MAB. Acute ethanol intake induces activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by a mechanism that involves ROS generation. In resistance arteries, ethanol activates NAD(P)H oxidase by inducing p47phox translocation by a redox-sensitive mechanism. O mecanismo da disfunção vascular induzido pelo consumo de etanol não é totalmente compreendido. Justifica-se, assim a identificação de mecanismos bioquímicos e moleculares que poderiam explicar tais efeitos. Investigar se a ingestão aguda de etanol ativa a via vascular RhoA/Rho quinase

  8. In situ rat brain and liver spontaneous chemiluminescence after acute ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Boveris, A; Llesuy, S; Azzalis, L A; Giavarotti, L; Simon, K A; Junqueira, V B; Porta, E A; Videla, L A; Lissi, E A

    1997-09-19

    The influence of acute ethanol administration on the oxidative stress status of rat brain and liver was assessed by in situ spontaneous organ chemiluminescence (CL). Brain and liver CL was significantly increased after acute ethanol administration to fed rats, a response that is time-dependent and evidenced at doses higher than 1 g/kg. Ethanol-induced CL development is faster in liver compared with brain probably due to the greater ethanol metabolic capacity of the liver, whereas the net enhancement in brain light emission at 3 h after ethanol treatment is higher than that of the liver, which could reflect the greater susceptibility of brain to oxidative stress. The effect of ethanol on brain and liver CL seems to be mediated by acetaldehyde, due to its abolishment by the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole and exacerbation by the aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor disulfiram. In brain, these findings were observed in the absence of changes in the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. However, the content of brain glutathione was significantly decreased by 31%, by ethanol, thus establishing an enhanced oxidative stress in this tissue.

  9. Acute ethanol intake attenuates inflammatory cytokines after brain injury in rats: a possible role for corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Gottesfeld, Zehava; Moore, Anthony N; Dash, Pramod K

    2002-03-01

    It has been reported that acute ethanol intoxication exerts dose-dependent effects, both beneficial and detrimental, on the outcome of traumatic brain injury (TBI), although the mechanism(s) has not been determined. Given that pro-inflammatory cytokines are either neuroprotective or neurotoxic, depending on their tissue levels, ethanol-induced alterations in brain cytokine production may be involved in determining the recovery after TBI. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of acute ethanol pretreatments (producing blood alcohol concentrations of 100+/-16 mg/dL, and 220+/-10 mg/dL, considered low and intoxicating doses, respectively) on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in discrete brain regions. In addition, serum corticosterone levels were also examined because the hormone is a modulator of cytokine production, its secretion is stimulated by ethanol, and it has been associated with the severity of post-injury neurologic dysfunction. The data presented in this report demonstrate that moderate cortical impact brain injury elicits a marked increase in IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in the injured cortex as well as in the hippocampus ipsilateral to the injury. Ethanol pretreatment lowered cytokine levels in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus in a dose-dependent manner after TBI compared to the untreated injured rats. Serum corticosterone levels were markedly increased in the injured rats, and were further augmented in the ethanol-pretreated injured animals in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ethanol-induced decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be linked to increased circulating corticosterone, both of which may contribute to the outcome of brain injury.

  10. Chronic Ethanol Intake Alters Circadian Phase Shifting and Free-Running Period in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seggio, Joseph A.; Fixaris, Michael C.; Reed, Jeffrey D.; Logan, Ryan W.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic and acute ethanol treatments alter fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker—including free-running period and responsiveness to photic and nonphotic phase-shifting stimuli—in rats and hamsters. In the present work, the authors extend these observations to the C57BL/6J mouse, an inbred strain characterized by very high levels of voluntary ethanol intake and by reliable and stable free-running circadian activity rhythms. Mice were housed individually in running-wheel cages under conditions of either voluntary or forced ethanol intake, whereas controls were maintained on plain water. Forced ethanol intake significantly attenuated photic phase delays (but not phase advances) and shortened free-running period in constant darkness, but voluntary ethanol intake failed to affect either of these parameters. Thus, high levels of chronic ethanol intake, beyond those normally achieved under voluntary drinking conditions, are required to alter fundamental circadian pacemaker properties in C57BL/6J mice. These observations may be related to the relative ethanol insensitivity displayed by this strain in several other phenotypic domains, including ethanol-induced sedation, ataxia, and withdrawal. Additional experiments will investigate chronobiological sensitivity to ethanol in a range of inbred strains showing diverse ethanol-related phenotypes. PMID:19625732

  11. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in adolescent and adult male rats: Effects on tolerance, social behavior and ethanol intake

    PubMed Central

    Broadwater, Margaret; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Given the prevalence of alcohol use in adolescence, it is important to understand the consequences of chronic ethanol exposure during this critical period in development. The purpose of the present study was to assess possible age-related differences in susceptibility to tolerance development to ethanol-induced sedation and withdrawal-related anxiety, as well as voluntary ethanol intake after chronic exposure to relatively high doses of ethanol during adolescence or adulthood. Methods Adolescent and adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five 10 day exposure conditions: chronic ethanol (4 g/kg every 48 hours), chronic saline (equivalent volume every 24 hours), chronic saline/acutely challenged with ethanol (4 g/kg on day 10), non-manipulated/acutely challenged with ethanol (4 g/kg on day 10) or non-manipulated. For assessment of tolerance development, loss of righting reflex was tested on the first and last ethanol exposure days in the chronic ethanol group, with both saline and non-manipulated animals likewise challenged on the last exposure day. Withdrawal-induced anxiety was indexed in a social interaction test 24 hrs after the last ethanol exposure, with ethanol-naïve chronic saline and non-manipulated animals serving as controls. Voluntary intake was assessed 48 hours after the chronic exposure period in chronic ethanol, chronic saline and non-manipulated animals using an 8 day 2 bottle choice, limited access ethanol intake procedure. Results Adolescents were less sensitive to the sedative effects of ethanol than adults. Adults, but not adolescents, developed chronic tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol, tolerance that appeared to be metabolic in nature. Social deficits were observed after chronic ethanol in both adolescents and adults. Adolescents drank significantly more ethanol than adults on a g/kg basis, with intake uninfluenced by prior ethanol exposure at both ages. Conclusion Adolescents and adults may differ in

  12. Opioids in the nucleus accumbens stimulate ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Barson, Jessica R; Carr, Ambrose J; Soun, Jennifer E; Sobhani, Nasim C; Leibowitz, Sarah F; Hoebel, Bartley G

    2009-10-19

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) participates in the control of both motivation and addiction. To test the possibility that opioids in the NAc can cause rats to select ethanol in preference to food, Sprague-Dawley rats with ethanol, food, and water available, were injected with two doses each of morphine, the mu-receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO), the delta-receptor agonist D-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-NH2 (DALA), the k-receptor agonist (+/-)-trans-U-50488 methanesulfonate (U-50,488H), or the opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide (m-naloxone). As an anatomical control for drug reflux, injections were also made 2mm above the NAc. The main result was that morphine in the NAc significantly increased ethanol and food intake, whereas m-naloxone reduced ethanol intake without affecting food or water intake. Of the selective receptor agonists, DALA in the NAc increased ethanol intake in preference to food. This is in contrast to DAMGO, which stimulated food but not ethanol intake, and the k-agonist U-50,488H, which had no effect on intake. When injected in the anatomical control site 2mm dorsal to the NAc, the opioids had no effects on ethanol intake. These results demonstrate that ethanol intake produced by morphine in the NAc is driven in large part by the delta-receptor. In light of other studies showing ethanol intake to increase enkephalin expression in the NAc, the present finding of enkephalin-induced ethanol intake suggests the existence of a positive feedback loop that fosters alcohol abuse. Naltrexone therapy for alcohol abuse may then act, in part, in the NAc by blocking this opioid-triggered cycle of alcohol intake.

  13. Binge ethanol exposure in late gestation induces ethanol aversion in the dam but enhances ethanol intake in the offspring and affects their postnatal learning about ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Chotro, M. Gabriela; Arias, Carlos; Spear, Norman E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to 1 or 2 g/kg ethanol during the last days of gestation increases ethanol acceptance in infant rats. We tested whether prenatal exposure to 3 g/kg, a relatively high ethanol dose, generates an aversion to ethanol in both the dam and offspring, and whether this prenatal experience affects the expression of learning derived from ethanol exposure postnatally. The answer was uncertain, since postnatal administration of a 3 g/kg ethanol dose induces an aversion to ethanol after postnatal day 10 but increases ethanol acceptance when administered during the first postnatal week. In the present study pregnant rats received intragastric administrations of water or ethanol (3 g/kg) on gestation days 17-20. On postnatal days 7-8 or 10-11 the offspring were administered water or ethanol (3 g/kg). Intake of ethanol and water, locomotor activity in an open-field and ethanol odor preference were evaluated in the pups, while the mothers were evaluated in terms of ethanol intake. Results indicated an aversion to ethanol in dams that had been administered ethanol during gestation, despite a general increase in ethanol intake observed in their pups relative to controls. The prenatal ethanol exposure also potentiated the increase in ethanol intake observed after intoxication on postnatal days 7-8. Ethanol intoxication on postnatal days 10-11 reduced ethanol consumption; this ethanol aversion was still evident in infant rats exposed prenatally to ethanol despite their general increase in ethanol intake. No effects of prenatal ethanol exposure were observed in terms of motor activity or odor preference. It is concluded that prenatal exposure to ethanol, even in a dose that induces ethanol aversion in the gestating dam, increases ethanol intake in infant rats and that this experience modulates age-related differences in subsequent postnatal learning about ethanol. PMID:19801275

  14. Ethanol intake and motor sensitization: the role of brain catalase activity in mice with different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Pastor, R; Aragon, C M G

    2004-09-15

    The C57BL/6J strain of inbred mice shows a characteristic pattern of ethanol-induced behaviors: very weak acute locomotor stimulation, a lack of locomotor-sensitizing effect of ethanol, and a high level of ethanol intake. This strain has relatively low levels of activity of the ethanol metabolizing enzyme catalase, and it has been proposed that brain catalase plays a role in the modulation of some behavioral effects of ethanol. In the first study of the present paper, we investigated the effects of pharmacological manipulations of brain catalase activity on C57BL/6J mice in acute ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol intake. Results indicated that the reduction in motor activity produced by ethanol was reversed by pretreatment with catalase potentiators and it was enhanced by catalase inhibitors. In addition, ethanol intake was highly correlated with brain catalase activity in mice treated with a catalase potentiator. In the second study, F1 hybrid mice (SWXB6) from the outbred Swiss-Webster mice and the inbred C57BL/6J mice were used. Basal brain catalase activity levels of F1 mice were intermediate between to those of the two progenitor genotypes. That profile of catalase activity was parallel to the acute-ethanol-induced locomotion and to repeated-ethanol-induced motor sensitization effects observed across the three types of mice. These data suggest that brain catalase activity modifications in the C57BL/6J strain change the pattern of several ethanol-related behaviors in this inbred mouse.

  15. Binge ethanol intoxication heightens subsequent ethanol intake in adolescent, but not adult, rats.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2014-04-01

    A question still to be answered is whether ethanol initiation has a greater effect on ethanol consumption if it occurs during adolescence than in adulthood. This study assessed the effect of ethanol initiation during adolescence or adulthood on voluntary ethanol consumption when animals were still within the same age range. Adolescent or adult rats were given 5, 2, or 0 ethanol exposures. The animals were tested for ethanol consumption through two-bottle choice tests, before undergoing a 1-week deprivation. A two-bottle assessment was conducted after the deprivation. Adolescents, but not adults, given two ethanol administrations during initiation exhibited significantly higher ethanol intake during the pre-deprivation period. These adolescents also exhibited a threefold increase in ethanol intake after 7 days of drug withdrawal, when compared with controls. These findings suggest that very brief experience with binge ethanol intoxication in adolescence, but not in adulthood, impacts later predisposition to drink.

  16. Evaluation of acute effects of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Zahoor Ahmad; Chowta, Mukta N.; Bolumbu, Ganaraja; Rakesh, K. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the acute effect of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats and to determine the specificity of the effect of melatonin on ethanol intake as compared to an intake of plain tap water or sugar water. Materials and Methods: A total of three experiments (2 weeks duration each) using different drinking solutions (ethanol, plain tap water, sugar water) was conducted in individually housed male wistar rats of 5 weeks age. Each animal had access to bottles containing drinking solutions for 2 h a day. In each experiment, on day 1, day 2, day 4, day 5, day 8, day 9, day 11, day 12 rats received drinking solutions. Each individual rat received single doses of saline, melatonin (50 mg and 100 mg/kg), and naltrexone on day 2, 5, 9, and 12, 1-h before receiving drinking solution. The order of drug administration is permuted such a way that each animal received the drugs in a different order in different experiments. Results: Melatonin has significantly decreased ethanol consumption by the rats and effect is dose-dependent. Naltrexone also has caused a significant reduction in the ethanol consumption. The maximum reduction in ethanol consumption was seen with melatonin 100 mg/kg dose compared to melatonin 50 mg/kg and naltrexone. There was no statistically significant effect of melatonin on plain water and sugar solution intake. Conclusions: Melatonin decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol naïve rats. The effect of melatonin is similar to naltrexone affecting selectively ethanol consumption, but not plain water and sugar water consumption. PMID:26288469

  17. Fetal ethanol exposure increases ethanol intake by making it smell and taste better.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, Steven L; Glendinning, John I

    2009-03-31

    Human epidemiologic studies reveal that fetal ethanol exposure is highly predictive of adolescent ethanol avidity and abuse. Little is known about how fetal exposure produces these effects. It is hypothesized that fetal ethanol exposure results in stimulus-induced chemosensory plasticity. Here, we asked whether gestational ethanol exposure increases postnatal ethanol avidity in rats by altering its taste and odor. Experimental rats were exposed to ethanol in utero via the dam's diet, whereas control rats were either pair-fed an iso-caloric diet or given food ad libitum. We found that fetal ethanol exposure increased the taste-mediated acceptability of both ethanol and quinine hydrochloride (bitter), but not sucrose (sweet). Importantly, a significant proportion of the increased ethanol acceptability could be attributed directly to the attenuated aversion to ethanol's quinine-like taste quality. Fetal ethanol exposure also enhanced ethanol intake and the behavioral response to ethanol odor. Notably, the elevated intake of ethanol was also causally linked to the enhanced odor response. Our results demonstrate that fetal exposure specifically increases ethanol avidity by, in part, making it taste and smell better. More generally, they establish an epigenetic chemosensory mechanism by which maternal patterns of drug use can be transferred to offspring. Given that many licit (e.g., tobacco products) and illicit (e.g., marijuana) drugs have noteworthy chemosensory components, our findings have broad implications for the relationship between maternal patterns of drug use, child development, and postnatal vulnerability.

  18. Brucine suppresses ethanol intake and preference in alcohol-preferring Fawn-Hooded rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ling; Liu, Qing; Gong, Qi; Li, Jun-Xu; Wei, Shou-Peng; Wang, Yan-Ting; Liang, Hui; Zhang, Min; Jing, Li; Yong, Zheng; Lawrence, Andrew J; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2014-07-01

    Brucine (BRU) extracted from the seeds of Strychnos nux-vomica L is glycine receptor antagonist. We hypothesize that BRU may modify alcohol consumption by acting at glycine receptors, and evaluated the pharmacodynamic profiles and adverse effects of BRU in rat models of alcohol abuse. Alcohol-preferring Fawn-Hooded (FH/Wjd) rats were administered BRU (10, 20 or 30 mg/kg, sc). The effects of BRU on alcohol consumption were examined in ethanol 2-bottle-choice drinking paradigm, ethanol/sucrose operant self-administration paradigm and 5-d ethanol deprivation test. In addition, open field test was used to assess the general locomotor activity of FH/Wjd rats, and conditioned place preference (CPP) was conducted to assess conditioned reinforcing effect. In ethanol 2-bottle-choice drinking paradigm, treatment with BRU for 10 consecutive days dose-dependently decreased the ethanol intake associated with a compensatory increase of water intake, but unchanged the daily total fluid intake and body weight. In ethanol/sucrose operant self-administration paradigms, BRU (30 mg/kg) administered before each testing session significantly decreased the number of lever presses for ethanol and the ethanol intake, without affecting the number of sucrose (10%) responses, total sucrose intake, and the number of lever presses for water. Acute treatment with BRU (30 mg/kg) completely suppressed the deprivation-induced elevation of ethanol consumption. Treatment with BRU (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) did not alter locomotion of FH/Wjd rats, nor did it produce place preference or aversion. BRU selectively decreases ethanol consumption with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, BRU may represent a new pharmacotherapy for alcoholism.

  19. Low frequency electroacupuncture selectively decreases voluntarily ethanol intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zou, Yihuai; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2011-11-25

    Although there is increasing clinical acceptance of acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) as a treatment of substance abuse-related disorders, our understanding of this treatment remains incomplete. Previous clinical and pre-clinical studies have shown that acupuncture and EA are effective in reducing ethanol consumption. Recent studies have shown that Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats under an intermittent-access two-bottle choice drinking procedure (IE procedure) voluntarily drank high amounts of ethanol. However, an effect of EA on ethanol consumption of the SD rats under this drinking procedure has not been demonstrated. In the present study, we demonstrated that SD rats escalated their ethanol intake and subsequently developed ethanol dependence under the IE procedure. A single low (2 Hz), but not high frequency (100 Hz) EA treatment applied at the bilateral acupoint Zusanli (ST36), but not at the tail reduced voluntary intake of, and preference for ethanol, but not sucrose. Furthermore, repeated EA treatments decreased the intake of and preference for ethanol, without resulting in a rebound increase in ethanol intake when the EA treatments were terminated. These observations indicate that EA may be a useful treatment for alcohol abuse.

  20. Chronic voluntary ethanol intake hypersensitizes 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kelaï, Sabah; Renoir, Thibault; Chouchana, Laurent; Saurini, Françoise; Hanoun, Naïma; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2008-12-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disorder involving, among others, the serotoninergic (5-HT) system, mainly regulated by 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus. 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor desensitization induced by chronic 5-HT reuptake inactivation has been associated with a decrease in ethanol intake in mice. We investigated here whether, conversely, chronic ethanol intake could induce 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor supersensitivity, thereby contributing to the maintenance of high ethanol consumption. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a progressive ethanol intake procedure in a free-choice paradigm (3-10% ethanol versus tap water; 21 days) and 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor functional state was assessed using different approaches. Acute administration of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist ipsapirone decreased the rate of tryptophan hydroxylation in striatum, and this effect was significantly larger (+75%) in mice that drank ethanol than in those drinking water. Furthermore, ethanol intake produced both an increased potency (+45%) of ipsapirone to inhibit the firing of 5-HT neurons, and a raise (+35%) in 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus. These data showed that chronic voluntary ethanol intake in C57BL/6J mice induced 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor supersensitivity, at the origin of a 5-HT neurotransmission deficit, which might be causally related to the addictive effects of ethanol intake.

  1. Opioids in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Stimulate Ethanol Intake

    PubMed Central

    Barson, Jessica R.; Carr, Ambrose J.; Soun, Jennifer E.; Sobhani, Nasim C.; Rada, Pedro; Leibowitz, Sarah F.; Hoebel, Bartley G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Specialized hypothalamic systems that increase food intake might also increase ethanol intake. To test this possibility, morphine and receptor-specific opioid agonists were microinjected in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rats that had learned to drink ethanol. To cross-validate the results, naloxone methiodide (m-naloxone), an opioid antagonist, was microinjected with the expectation that it would have the opposite effect of morphine and the specific opioid agonists. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were trained, without sugar, to drink 4% or 7% ethanol and were then implanted with chronic brain cannulas aimed at the PVN. After recovery, those drinking 7% ethanol, with food and water available, were injected with two doses each of morphine or m-naloxone. To test for receptor specificity, two doses each of the μ-receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO), δ-receptor agonist D-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-NH2 (DALA), or k-receptor agonist U-50,488H were injected. DAMGO was also tested in rats drinking 4% ethanol without food or water available. As an anatomical control for drug reflux, injections were made 2 mm dorsal to the PVN. Results A main result was a significant increase in ethanol intake induced by PVN injection of morphine. The opposite effect was produced by m-naloxone. The effects of morphine and m-naloxone were exclusively on intake of ethanol, even though food and water were freely available. In the analysis with specific receptor agonists, PVN injection of the δ-agonist DALA significantly increased 7% ethanol intake without affecting food or water intake. This is in contrast to the k-agonist U-50,488H, which decreased ethanol intake, and the μ-agonist DAMGO, which had no effect on ethanol intake in the presence or absence of food and water. In the anatomical control location 2 mm dorsal to the PVN, no drug caused any significant changes in ethanol, food, or water intake, providing evidence that the active site was close to the

  2. Ethanol-mediated operant learning in the infant rat leads to increased ethanol intake during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Luciano Federico; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the infant rat has high affinity for ethanol ingestion and marked sensitivity to the drug’s reinforcing effects (Spear & Molina, 2005). A novel operant technique was developed to analyze reinforcing effects of ethanol delivery during the third postnatal week. The impact of this ethanol-reinforcement experience upon subsequent ethanol consumption during adolescence (postnatal weeks 5–6 was also examined. In Experiment 1, pups (postnatal days 14–17 were given an explicit contingency between nose-poking behavior and intraoral delivery of either water or 3.75% v/v ethanol (paired groups). Yoked controls (pups receiving either reinforcer independently of their behavior) were also included. Paired subjects reinforced with ethanol exhibited rapid and robust operant conditioning leading to blood ethanol concentrations in the 25–48 mg% range. In Experiment 2, a higher ethanol concentration (7.5% v/v) provided significant reinforcement. During adolescence, animals originally reinforced with 3.75% v/v ethanol exhibited greater ingestion of ethanol than control animals without prior ethanol reinforcement. These results indicate that, without extensive initiation to ethanol, infant rats rapidly learn to gain access to ethanol and that this experience has a significant impact upon later ethanol intake patterns. PMID:18571224

  3. Effects of caffeine and Bombesin on ethanol and food intake

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, M.A.; Kulkosky, P.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The methylxanthine caffeine and ethyl alcohol are widely used and powerful psychotropic drugs, but their interactions are not well understood. Bombesin is a brain-gut neuropeptide which is thought to function as a neurochemical factor in the inhibitory control of voluntary alcohol ingestion. We assessed the effects of combinations of intraperitoneal doses of caffeine and bombesin on 5% w/v ethanol solution and food intake in deprived rats. Deprived male and female Wistar rats received access to 5% ethanol or Purina chow for 30 minutes after i.p. injections. In single doses, CAF and BBS significantly decreased both ethanol and food consumption, at 50 mg/kg and 10 {mu}g/kg, respectively. CAF and BBS combinations produced infra-additive, or less-than-expected inhibitory effects on ethanol intake, but simple additive inhibitory effects on food intake. This experimental evidence suggests a reciprocal blocking of effects of CAF and BBS on ethanol intake but not food intake. Caffeine, when interacting and bombesin, increases alcohol consumption beyond expected values. Caffeine could affect the operation of endogenous satisfy signals for alcohol consumption.

  4. HIGH ETHANOL DOSE DURING EARLY ADOLESCENCE INDUCES LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION AND INCREASES SUBSEQUENT ETHANOL INTAKE DURING LATE ADOLESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, María Belén; Molina, Juan Carlos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent initiation of ethanol consumption is associated with subsequent heightened probability of ethanol-use disorders. The present study examined the relationship between motivational sensitivity to ethanol initiation in adolescent rats and later ethanol intake. Experiment 1 determined that ethanol induces locomotor activation shortly after administration but not if tested at a later post-administration interval. In Experiment 2, adolescents were assessed for ethanol-induced locomotor activation on postnatal day 28. These animals were then evaluated for ethanol-mediated conditioned taste aversion and underwent a 16-day-long ethanol intake protocol. Ethanol-mediated aversive effects were unrelated to ethanol locomotor stimulation or subsequent ethanol consumption patterns. Ethanol intake during late adolescence was greatest in animals initiated to ethanol earliest at postnatal day 28. Females that were more sensitive to ethanol’s locomotor-activating effects showed a transient increase in ethanol self-administration. Blood ethanol concentrations during initiation were not related to ethanol-induced locomotor activation. Adolescent rats appeared sensitive to the locomotor-stimulatory effects of ethanol. Even brief ethanol exposure during adolescence may promote later ethanol intake. PMID:20373327

  5. Sexual deprivation increases ethanol intake in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Shohat-Ophir, G; Kaun, K R; Azanchi, R; Mohammed, H; Heberlein, U

    2012-03-16

    The brain's reward systems reinforce behaviors required for species survival, including sex, food consumption, and social interaction. Drugs of abuse co-opt these neural pathways, which can lead to addiction. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the relationship between natural and drug rewards. In males, mating increased, whereas sexual deprivation reduced, neuropeptide F (NPF) levels. Activation or inhibition of the NPF system in turn reduced or enhanced ethanol preference. These results thus link sexual experience, NPF system activity, and ethanol consumption. Artificial activation of NPF neurons was in itself rewarding and precluded the ability of ethanol to act as a reward. We propose that activity of the NPF-NPF receptor axis represents the state of the fly reward system and modifies behavior accordingly.

  6. Acute Ethanol Causes Hepatic Mitochondrial Depolarization in Mice: Role of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Rehman, Hasibur; Liu, Qinlong; Theruvath, Tom P.; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis. Methods Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT), and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), calcein, NAD(P)H, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1–6 g/kg). Results Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(P)H autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼70% and ∼20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis. Conclusions Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to

  7. PRENATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE INCREASES ETHANOL INTAKE AND REDUCES C-FOS EXPRESSION IN INFRALIMBIC CORTEX OF ADOLESCENT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Fabio, Maria Carolina; March, Samanta M.; Molina, Juan Carlos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure significantly increases later predisposition for alcohol intake, but the mechanisms associated with this phenomenon remain hypothetical. This study analyzed (Exp. 1) ethanol intake in adolescent inbred WKAH/Hok Wistar rats prenatally exposed to ethanol (2.0 g/kg) or vehicle, on gestational days 17–20. Subsequent Experiments (2, 3 and 4) tested several variables likely to underlie the effect of gestational ethanol on adolescent ethanol preference, including ethanol-induced locomotor activation (LMA), ethanol-induced emission of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) after exposure to a rough exteroceptive stimulus, and induction of the immediate early gene C-fos in brain areas associated with processing of reward stimuli and with the retrieval and extinction of associative learning. Prenatal ethanol induced a two-fold increase in ethanol intake. Adolescents exhibited significant ethanol-induced LMA, emitted more aversive than appetitive USVs, and postnatal ethanol administration significantly exacerbated the emission of USVs. These effects, however, were not affected by prenatal ethanol. Adolescents prenatally exposed to ethanol as fetuses exhibited reduced neural activity in infralimbic cortex (but not in prelimbic cortex or nucleus accumbens core or shell), an area that has been implicated in the extinction of drug-mediated associative memories. Ethanol metabolism was not affected by prenatal ethanol. Late gestational exposure to ethanol significantly heightened drinking in the adolescent offspring of an inbred rat strain. Ethanol-induced LMA and USVs were not associated with differential ethanol intake due to prenatal ethanol exposure. Prenatal ethanol, however, altered basal neural activity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex. Future studies should analyze the functionality of medial prefrontal cortex after prenatal ethanol and its potential association with predisposition for heightened ethanol intake. PMID:23266368

  8. Prenatal ethanol exposure increases ethanol intake and reduces c-Fos expression in infralimbic cortex of adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Fabio, Maria Carolina; March, Samanta M; Molina, Juan Carlos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2013-02-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure significantly increases later predisposition for alcohol intake, but the mechanisms associated with this phenomenon remain hypothetical. This study analyzed (Experiment 1) ethanol intake in adolescent inbred WKAH/Hok Wistar rats prenatally exposed to ethanol (2.0g/kg) or vehicle, on gestational days 17-20. Subsequent Experiments (2, 3 and 4) tested several variables likely to underlie the effect of gestational ethanol on adolescent ethanol preference, including ethanol-induced locomotor activation (LMA), ethanol-induced emission of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) after exposure to a rough exteroceptive stimulus, and induction of the immediate early gene C-fos in brain areas associated with processing of reward stimuli and with the retrieval and extinction of associative learning. Prenatal ethanol induced a two-fold increase in ethanol intake. Adolescents exhibited significant ethanol-induced LMA, emitted more aversive than appetitive USVs, and postnatal ethanol administration significantly exacerbated the emission of USVs. These effects, however, were not affected by prenatal ethanol. Adolescents prenatally exposed to ethanol as fetuses exhibited reduced neural activity in infralimbic cortex (but not in prelimbic cortex or nucleus accumbens core or shell), an area that has been implicated in the extinction of drug-mediated associative memories. Ethanol metabolism was not affected by prenatal ethanol. Late gestational exposure to ethanol significantly heightened drinking in the adolescent offspring of an inbred rat strain. Ethanol-induced LMA and USVs were not associated with differential ethanol intake due to prenatal ethanol exposure. Prenatal ethanol, however, altered basal neural activity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex. Future studies should analyze the functionality of medial prefrontal cortex after prenatal ethanol and its potential association with predisposition for heightened ethanol intake.

  9. Central Urocortin 3 Administration Decreases Limited Access Ethanol Intake in Non-Dependent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Amanda L.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2010-01-01

    Stress and alcohol abuse are co-related. Acute alcohol is anxiolytic, and stress is cited as a factor in relapse to alcohol use. A primary mediator of the stress response is the neuropeptide corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF). The CRF family of endogenous ligands includes urocortin 3 (Ucn 3), which binds selectively to the CRF2 receptor and has been implicated in ethanol consumption in dependent and withdrawing rats. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of Ucn 3, delivered centrally to non-dependent mice, on limited-access ethanol consumption. Adult C57BL/6J mice were trained to self-administer 10% ethanol during daily, 2-hr limited access sessions using lickometers to assess drinking patterns for both ethanol and water. Sterile saline or 0.3, 1, or 3 nmol of Ucn 3 was microinjected into the lateral ventricle immediately before the limited-access session in a within-subjects design. There was a significant decrease in ethanol (both ml and g/kg), but not water, intake following Ucn 3 treatment, explained by a change in size of the largest lick run. Food intake at both 2- and 24-hours after injection was statistically unaffected by Ucn 3 administration. These results establish a role for CRF2R in a non-dependent, mouse model of ethanol self-administration. PMID:19581799

  10. Positive relationship between dietary fat, ethanol intake, triglycerides, and hypothalamic peptides: counteraction by lipid-lowering drugs.

    PubMed

    Barson, Jessica R; Karatayev, Olga; Chang, Guo-Qing; Johnson, Deanne F; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Hoebel, Bartley G; Leibowitz, Sarah F

    2009-09-01

    Studies in both humans and animals suggest a positive relationship between the intake of ethanol and intake of fat, which may contribute to alcohol abuse. This relationship may be mediated, in part, by hypothalamic orexigenic peptides such as orexin (OX), which stimulate both consumption of ethanol and fat, and circulating triglycerides (TGs), which stimulate these peptides and promote consummatory behavior. The present study investigated this vicious cycle between ethanol and fat, to further characterize its relation to TGs and to test the effects of lowering TG levels. In Experiment 1, the behavioral relationship between fat intake and ethanol was confirmed. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, chronically injected intraperitoneally with ethanol (1g/kg) and tested in terms of their preference for a high-fat diet (HFD) compared with low-fat diet (LFD), showed a significant increase in their fat preference, compared with rats injected with saline, in measures of 2h and 24h intake. Experiment 2 tested the relationship of circulating TGs in this positive association between ethanol and fat, in rats chronically consuming 9% ethanol versus water and given acute meal tests (25kcal) of a HFD versus LFD. Levels of TGs were elevated in response to both chronic drinking of ethanol versus water and acute eating of a high-fat versus low-fat meal. Most importantly, ethanol and a HFD showed an interaction effect, whereby their combination produced a considerably larger increase in TG levels (+172%) compared to ethanol with a LFD (+111%). In Experiment 3, a direct manipulation of TG levels was found to affect ethanol intake. After intragastric administration of gemfibrozil (50mg/kg) compared with vehicle, TG levels were lowered by 37%, and ethanol intake was significantly reduced. In Experiment 4, the TG-lowering drug gemfibrozil also caused a significant reduction in the expression of the orexigenic peptide, OX, in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus. These results support the

  11. Effects of ethanol exposure in a familiar or isolated context during infancy on ethanol intake during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Haymal, Beatriz; Pautassi, Ricardo M

    2016-12-01

    Early exposure to ethanol affects ethanol intake later in life. This early experience encompasses exposure to social stimuli and the pharmacological and orosensory properties of ethanol. The specific contribution of each type of stimulus to subsequent ethanol intake remains unknown. We assessed the intake of various concentrations of ethanol in a familiar or isolated context during infancy and the lingering effects of this experience on ethanol intake during adolescence. On postnatal day 3 (PD3), PD7, and PD11, rats were given 5% ethanol or water in a nursing or isolated context (Experiments 1 and 2). Intake tests (ethanol vs. water) were conducted during adolescence. Experiment 2 matched the amount of fluid ingested during infancy in both contexts and subsequently tested ethanol consumption during adolescence. The results revealed a facilitative effect of the nursing context on fluid intake during the tests in infancy. Pups stimulated with ethanol but not water in the isolated context exhibited an increase in ethanol consumption during adolescence. This effect disappeared when the isolated infants were matched to receive the same amount of ethanol ingested by their nursed counterparts. In Experiment 3, isolated infant rats were exposed to different ethanol concentrations (.0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, and 10.0%), and drug consumption was tested during adolescence. This exposure increased adolescent ethanol intake, regardless of the alcohol concentration (Experiment 3). The common denominators that resulted in enhanced ethanol intake during adolescence were preexposure to ethanol via active consumption of the drug that induced a low-to-moderate level of intoxication in an isolated context.

  12. Regulation of adenosine transport by acute and chronic ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.E.; Casso, D.; Diamond, I.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1989-02-09

    Chronic exposure to ethanol results in a desensitization of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP production. Since adenosine is released by cells and is known to desensitize its own as well as other receptors, it may be involved in ethanol-induced desensitization of adenosine receptor function. Therefore, we have examine the acute and chronic effects of ethanol on the transport of adenosine via the nucleoside transport. Acute exposure to ethanol caused an inhibition of adenosine uptake in S49 lymphoma cells. This decrease in uptake resulted in accumulation of extracellular adenosine after ethanol exposure. The effect of ethanol was specific to nucleoside transport. Uptake of uridine, also transported by the nucleoside transporter, was inhibited by ethanol to the same degree as adenosine uptake, while neither isoleucine nor deoxyglucose uptake was altered by ethanol treatment. Inhibition of adenosine uptake by ethanol was non-competitive and dependent on the concentration of ethanol. After chronic exposure to ethanol, cells became tolerant to the acute effects of ethanol. There was no longer an acute inhibition of adenosine uptake, nor was these accumulation of extracellular adenosine. Chronic ethanol exposure also resulted in a decrease in the absolute rate of adenosine uptake. Binding studies using a high affinity lignad for the nucleoside transporter, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), indicate that this decreased uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal number of binding sites. These ethanol-induced changes in adenosine transport may be important for the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

  13. The effect of gestational ethanol exposure on voluntary ethanol intake in early postnatal and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, Steven L; Molina, Juan C; Spear, Norman E; Youngentob, Lisa M

    2007-12-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies provide strong data for a relationship between prenatal ethanol exposure and the risk for abuse in adolescent and young adult humans. However, drug-acceptance results in response to fetal exposure have differed by study, age at evaluation, and experimental animal. In the present study, the authors tested whether voluntary ethanol intake was enhanced in both the infantile and adult rat (15 and 90 days of age, respectively), as a consequence of chronic fetal drug experience. Experimental rats were exposed in utero by administering ethanol to a pregnant dam in a liquid diet during gestational Days 6-20. Compared with those for isocaloric pair-fed and ad lib chow control animals, the results for experimental animals demonstrated that fetal exposure significantly increased infantile affinity for ethanol ingestion without affecting intake patterns of an alternative fluid (water). Heightened affinity for ethanol was absent in adulthood. Moreover, the results argue against malnutrition as a principal factor underlying the infantile phenomenon. These data add to a growing literature indicative of heightened early postnatal acceptance patterns resulting from maternal use or abuse of ethanol during pregnancy.

  14. The sigma-receptor antagonist BD-1063 decreases ethanol intake and reinforcement in animal models of excessive drinking.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro; Zhao, Yu; Iyer, Malliga R; Steardo, Luca; Steardo, Luca; Rice, Kenner C; Conti, Bruno; Koob, George F; Zorrilla, Eric P

    2009-05-01

    Sigma-Receptors (SigRs) have been implicated in behavioral and appetitive effects of psychostimulants and may also modulate the motivating properties of ethanol. This study tested the hypothesis that SigRs modulate ethanol reinforcement and contribute to excessive ethanol intake. The effects of subcutaneous treatment with the potent, selective Sig-1R antagonist BD-1063 on operant ethanol self-administration were studied in two models of excessive drinking-Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats and acutely withdrawn ethanol-dependent Wistar rats-and compared to ethanol self-administration in nondependent Wistar controls. To assess the specificity of action, the effects of BD-1063 on self-administration of an equally reinforcing saccharin solution were determined in Wistar and sP rats. Gene expression of Sig-1R in reward-related brain areas implicated in ethanol reinforcement was compared between ethanol-naive sP and Wistar rats and withdrawn ethanol-dependent Wistar rats. BD-1063 dose dependently reduced ethanol self-administration in sP rats (3.3-11 mg/kg) and withdrawn, dependent Wistar rats (4-11 mg/kg) at doses that did not modify mean ethanol self-administration in nondependent Wistar controls. BD-1063 did not reduce concurrent water self-administration and did not comparably suppress saccharin self-administration, suggesting selectivity of action. BD-1063 also reduced the breakpoints of sP rats to work for ethanol under a progressive-ratio reinforcement schedule. Ethanol-naive sP rats and 24-h withdrawn, dependent Wistar rats showed reduced Sig-1R mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens. The results suggest that SigR systems may contribute to innate or ethanol-induced increases in susceptibility to self-administer high ethanol levels, identifying a potential neuroadaptive mechanism contributing to excessive drinking and a therapeutic target for alcohol abuse and dependence.

  15. Drug-induced reductions in ethanol intake in alcohol preferring and Fawn-Hooded rats.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, A H; Overstreet, D H; Janowsky, D S

    1991-01-01

    The ethanol intake of Fawn-Hooded rats, a serotonin deficient strain, was examined under a two bottle choice between ethanol (10%) and tap water. The Fawn-Hooded rats drank as much ethanol as the alcohol preferring strain of rats (approximately 6 times that of the control Wistar rats), but drank more fluid and ate more. In general, direct and indirect serotonin agonists, reduced ethanol intake to a smaller degree in the Fawn-Hooded rats compared to the P rats. In contrast the centrally acting antimuscarinic scopolamine reduced ethanol intake to a similar degree in the two strains.

  16. Innate BDNF expression is associated with ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats.

    PubMed

    Raivio, Noora; Miettinen, Pekka; Kiianmaa, Kalervo

    2014-09-04

    We have shown recently that acute administration of ethanol modulates the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in several rat brain areas known to be involved in the development of addiction to ethanol and other drugs of abuse, suggesting that BDNF may be a factor contributing to the neuroadaptive changes set in motion by ethanol exposure. The purpose of the present study was to further clarify the role of BDNF in reinforcement from ethanol and in the development of addiction to ethanol by specifying the effect of acute administration of ethanol (1.5 or 3.0 g/kg i.p.) on the expression profile of BDNF mRNA in the ventral tegmental area and in the terminal areas of the mesolimbic dopamine pathway in the brain of alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats, selected for high and low voluntary ethanol intake, respectively. The level of BDNF mRNA expression was higher in the amygdala and ventral tegmental area of AA than in those of ANA rats, and there was a trend for a higher level in the nucleus accumbens. In the amygdala and hippocampus, a biphasic change in the BDNF mRNA levels was detected: the levels were decreased at 3 and 6h but increased above the basal levels at 24h. Furthermore, there was a difference between the AA and ANA lines in the effect of ethanol, the ANA rats showing an increase in BDNF mRNA levels while such a change was not seen in AA rats. These findings suggest that the innate levels of BDNF expression may play a role in the mediation of the reinforcing effects of ethanol and in the control of ethanol intake.

  17. Ethanol metabolites: their role in the assessment of alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Wurst, Friedrich M; Thon, Natasha; Yegles, Michel; Schrück, Alexandra; Preuss, Ulrich W; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Alcohol-related disorders are common, expensive in their course, and often underdiagnosed. To facilitate early diagnosis and therapy of alcohol-related disorders and to prevent later complications, questionnaires and biomarkers are useful. Indirect state markers like gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase, mean corpuscular volume, and carbohydrate deficient transferrin are influenced by age, gender, various substances, and nonalcohol-related illnesses, and do not cover the entire timeline for alcohol consumption. Ethanol (EtOH) metabolites, such as ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, phosphatidylethanol, and fatty acid ethyl esters have gained enormous interest in the last decades as they are detectable after EtOH intake. For each biomarker, pharmacological characteristics, detection methods in different body tissues, sensitivity/specificity values, cutoff values, time frames of detection, and general limitations are presented. Another focus of the review is the use of the markers in special clinical and forensic samples. Depending on the biological material used for analysis, ethanol metabolites can be applied in different settings such as assessment of alcohol intake, screening, prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of alcohol use disorders. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. Model of voluntary ethanol intake in zebrafish: effect on behavior and hypothalamic orexigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sterling, M E; Karatayev, O; Chang, G-Q; Algava, D B; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies in zebrafish have shown that exposure to ethanol in tank water affects various behaviors, including locomotion, anxiety and aggression, and produces changes in brain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine. Building on these investigations, the present study had two goals: first, to develop a method for inducing voluntary ethanol intake in individual zebrafish, which can be used as a model in future studies to examine how this behavior is affected by various manipulations, and second, to characterize the effects of this ethanol intake on different behaviors and the expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides, galanin (GAL) and orexin (OX), which are known in rodents to stimulate consumption of ethanol and alter behaviors associated with alcohol abuse. Thus, we first developed a new model of voluntary intake of ethanol in fish by presenting this ethanol mixed with gelatin, which they readily consume. Using this model, we found that individual zebrafish can be trained in a short period to consume stable levels of 10% or 20% ethanol (v/v) mixed with gelatin and that their intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture leads to pharmacologically relevant blood ethanol concentrations which are strongly, positively correlated with the amount ingested. Intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture increased locomotion, reduced anxiety, and stimulated aggressive behavior, while increasing expression of GAL and OX in specific hypothalamic areas. These findings, confirming results in rats, provide a method in zebrafish for investigating with forward genetics and pharmacological techniques the role of different brain mechanisms in controlling ethanol intake.

  19. "Binge" drinking experience in adolescent mice shows sex differences and elevated ethanol intake in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Strong, Moriah N; Yoneyama, Naomi; Fretwell, Andrea M; Snelling, Chris; Tanchuck, Michelle A; Finn, Deborah A

    2010-06-01

    Binge drinking, defined as achieving blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) of 80 mg%, has been increasing in adolescents and was reported to predispose later physical dependence. The present experiments utilized an animal model of binge drinking to compare the effect of ethanol "binge" experience during adolescence or adulthood on subsequent ethanol intake in male and female C57BL/6 mice. Adolescent and adult mice were initially exposed to the scheduled high alcohol consumption procedure, which produces BECs that exceed the levels for binge drinking following a 30-min ethanol session every third day. Ethanol intake and BECs were significantly higher in the adolescent ( approximately 3 g/kg, 199 mg%) versus adult ( approximately 2 g/kg, 135 mg%) mice during the first three ethanol sessions, but were more equivalent during the final two ethanol sessions (1.85-2.0 g/kg, 129-143 mg%). Then, separate groups of the ethanol-experienced mice were tested with ethanol naïve adolescent and adult mice for 2-h limited access (10% and 20% solutions) or 24-h (5%, 10% and 20% solutions) ethanol preference drinking. Limited access ethanol intake was significantly higher in female versus male mice, but was not altered by age or ethanol experience. In contrast, 24-h ethanol intake was significantly higher in the adolescent versus adult mice and in female versus male mice. Furthermore, binge drinking experience in the adolescent mice significantly increased subsequent ethanol intake, primarily due to intake in female mice. Thus, adolescent binge drinking significantly increased unlimited ethanol intake during adulthood, with female mice more susceptible to this effect.

  20. Ethanol exposure during late gestation and nursing in the rat: Effects upon maternal care, ethanol metabolism and infantile milk intake

    PubMed Central

    Pueta, Mariana; Abate, Paula; Haymal, Olga B.; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol experiences, during late gestation as well as during nursing, modify the behavioral dynamics of the dam/pup dyad, and leads to heightened ethanol intake in the offspring. This study focuses on: a) behavioral and metabolic changes in intoxicated dams with previous exposure to ethanol during pregnancy and b) infantile consumption of milk when the dam is either under the effects of ethanol or sober. Pregnant rats received water, 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol, and were administered with water or ethanol during the postpartum period. Intoxication during nursing disrupted the capability of the dam to retrieve the pups and to adopt a crouching posture. These disruptions were attenuated when dams had exposure to ethanol during pregnancy. Ethanol experiences during gestation did not affect pharmacokinetic processes during nursing, whereas progressive postpartum ethanol experience resulted in metabolic tolerance. Pups suckling from intoxicated dams, with previous ethanol experiences, ingested more milk than did infants suckling from ethanol-intoxicated dams without such experience. Ethanol gestational experience results in subsequent resistance to the drug’s disruptions in maternal care. Consequently, better maternal care by an intoxicated dam with ethanol experience during gestation facilitates access of pups to milk which could be contaminated with ethanol. PMID:18602418

  1. Trait anxiety and ethanol: anxiolysis in high-anxiety mice and no relation to intake behavior in an addiction model.

    PubMed

    Correia, Diego; Ribeiro, Andrea Frozino; Brunialti Godard, Ana Lúcia; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli

    2009-08-01

    Anxiety has been proposed to play a role in the development of alcohol addiction, but the exact mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. The present study aimed to verify the relationship between basal anxiety levels, the anxiolytic-like effect of ethanol, and ethanol intake in mice exposed to an addiction model. In one experiment Swiss mice were characterized as high-anxiety (HA), medium-anxiety (MA), or non-anxiety (NA) in the elevated plus maze and then received saline or ethanol 2 g/kg acutely and chronically and were again exposed to the same test. NA mice decreased while MA mice maintained anxiety indices over the test days, regardless of treatment. HA ethanol-treated mice showed an anxiolytic-like effect, both acutely and chronically, while the saline-treated ones maintained their basal anxiety levels. In another experiment HA and MA mice were exposed to an addiction model based on a 3-bottle free-choice paradigm (ethanol 5% and 10%, and water) consisting of four phases: acquisition (10 weeks), withdrawal (W, 2 weeks), reexposure (2 weeks), and quinine-adulteration (2 weeks). HA and MA control mice had access only to water. Mice were characterized as addicted, heavy-drinker and light-drinker [Fachin-Scheit DJ, Ribeiro AF, Pigatto G, Goeldner FO, Boerngen-Lacerda R. Development of a mouse model of ethanol addiction: naltrexone efficacy in reducing consumption but not craving. J Neural Transm 2006;113:1305-21.]. No difference was observed between HA and MA mice in their preference for and intake of ethanol. No correlation was observed between ethanol intake, during any phase, and anxiety indices measured in the basal tests and during the W phase. The differences in anxiety indices between HA and MA groups persisted in the test performed during ethanol withdrawal, suggesting a "trait" anxiety profile. The data suggest that despite the fact that high anxiety trait levels are important for the anxiolytic-like effects of ethanol, they are not a determining

  2. REM-sleep deprivation-induced increase in ethanol intake: role of brain monoaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Aalto, J; Kiianmaa, K

    1986-01-01

    The ethanol intake of Long-Evans male rats was recorded before, during and after deprivation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep produced with the flowerpot technique modified by using a cuff pedestal and electrified grid floor instead of water. Ethanol intake increased significantly during REM-sleep deprivation. A rebound decrease in ethanol drinking was then observed during the REM-rebound phase immediately after the termination of REM-sleep deprivation. Because REM-sleep deprivation has been reported to impair the function of central monoamine neuronal systems and because some studies have implicated these systems in the control of voluntary ethanol intake, we studied whether different monoamine uptake blocking agents could antagonize the increase in ethanol intake caused by REM-sleep deprivation. After three days of REM-sleep deprivation, the rats were given uptake blocking agents for serotonin (citalopram, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day, IP), dopamine (GBR 12909, 5 mg/kg/day, IP) and noradrenaline (talsupram, 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg/day, IP). Citalopram and GBR 12909 did not modify the increased level of ethanol intake, but talsupram decreased ethanol intake to the levels seen prior to deprivation, and during the REM-rebound phase amplified the decrease found. These effects of talsupram could be antagonized by blocking mg/kg/day, IP). Prazosin alone tended to increase ethanol consumption. These findings suggest that functional alterations in central noradrenergic neurons during REM-sleep deprivation may contribute to the concurrent increase in ethanol intake.

  3. Circadian activity rhythms and voluntary ethanol intake in male and female ethanol-preferring rats: effects of long-term ethanol access.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; McCulley, Walter D; Fecteau, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Chronic alcohol (ethanol) intake alters fundamental properties of the circadian clock. While previous studies have reported significant alterations in free-running circadian period during chronic ethanol access, these effects are typically subtle and appear to require high levels of intake. In the present study we examined the effects of long-term voluntary ethanol intake on ethanol consumption and free-running circadian period in male and female, selectively bred ethanol-preferring P and HAD2 rats. In light of previous reports that intermittent access can result in escalated ethanol intake, an initial 2-week water-only baseline was followed by either continuous or intermittent ethanol access (i.e., alternating 15-day epochs of ethanol access and ethanol deprivation) in separate groups of rats. Thus, animals were exposed to either 135 days of continuous ethanol access or to five 15-day access periods alternating with four 15-day periods of ethanol deprivation. Animals were maintained individually in running-wheel cages under continuous darkness throughout the experiment to allow monitoring of free-running activity and drinking rhythms, and 10% (v/v) ethanol and plain water were available continuously via separate drinking tubes during ethanol access. While there were no initial sex differences in ethanol drinking, ethanol preference increased progressively in male P and HAD2 rats under both continuous and intermittent-access conditions, and eventually exceeded that seen in females. Free-running period shortened during the initial ethanol-access epoch in all groups, but the persistence of this effect showed complex dependence on sex, breeding line, and ethanol-access schedule. Finally, while females of both breeding lines displayed higher levels of locomotor activity than males, there was little evidence for modulation of activity level by ethanol access. These results are consistent with previous findings that chronic ethanol intake alters free-running circadian

  4. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  5. Effects of fenfluramine, 8-OH-DPAT, and tryptophan-enriched diet on the high-ethanol intake by rats bred for susceptibility to stress.

    PubMed

    West, Charles H K; Boss-Williams, Katherine A; Weiss, Jay M

    2011-12-01

    The swim-test susceptible (SUS) line of rats has been bred in our laboratory for the characteristic of reduced motor activity in the swim test following exposure to an acute stressor. Testing of multiple generations of SUS rats has also revealed that they consume large amounts of ethanol voluntarily. As reported for lines of rats that show a propensity for high-ethanol intake, the SUS rats show evidence of low serotonergic function. Because serotonergic function has often been shown to be involved in the regulation of alcohol consumption, here we examined the effects of manipulations of serotonin transmission on intake of ethanol by SUS rats. Fenfluramine, a serotonin-releasing drug, was injected at various doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0mg/kg) twice per day and ethanol intake was measured using a two-bottle free-choice method. The 8-OH-DPAT, a 5‑HT(1A) agonist, was injected at various doses (0.03125, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0mg/kg) before a 1-h session of exposure to ethanol (single-bottle test, water available the other 23h per day). A diet enriched with 3% tryptophan (TRP), the amino acid precursor for serotonin synthesis, was administered in a restricted feeding schedule (5h per day) with ethanol intake measured the last 4h. Fenfluramine decreased ethanol intake at all doses tested. The 8-OH-DPAT increased ethanol intake at lower doses, presumably acting at autoreceptors, which inhibit serotonergic neurons, and decreased intake at higher doses, presumably acting at postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. TRP-enriched diet also significantly decreased ethanol intake. Food and water intake were less or unaffected by these three manipulations. With all three manipulations, ethanol intake remained suppressed one or more days after the day of tests that decreased ethanol intake. These data suggest that SUS rats, like many other lines/strains of rodents that consume large amounts of alcohol, show an inverse relationship between serotonin transmission and

  6. Effect of different stressors on voluntary ethanol intake in ethanol-dependent and nondependent C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Anderson, Rachel I; Becker, Howard C

    2016-03-01

    Several animal models have evaluated the effect of stress on voluntary ethanol intake with mixed results. The experiments reported here examined the effects of different stressors on voluntary ethanol consumption in dependent and nondependent adult male C57BL/6J mice. In Experiment 1, restraint, forced swim, and social defeat stress procedures all tended to reduce ethanol intake in nondependent mice regardless of whether the stress experience occurred 1 h or 4 h prior to ethanol access. The reduction in ethanol consumption was most robust following restraint stress. Experiment 2 examined the effects of forced swim stress and social defeat stress on drinking in a dependence model that involved repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure. Repeated exposure to forced swim stress prior to intervening test drinking periods that followed repeated cycles of CIE exposure further increased ethanol consumption in CIE-exposed mice while not altering intake in nondependent mice. In contrast, repeated exposure to the social defeat stressor in a similar manner reduced ethanol consumption in CIE-exposed mice while not altering drinking in nondependent mice. Results from Experiment 3 confirmed this selective effect of forced swim stress increasing ethanol consumption in mice with a history of CIE exposure, and also demonstrated that enhanced drinking is only observed when the forced swim stressor is administered during each test drinking week, but not if it is applied only during the final test week. Collectively, these studies point to a unique interaction between repeated stress experience and CIE exposure, and also suggest that such an effect depends on the nature of the stressor. Future studies will need to further explore the generalizability of these results, as well as mechanisms underlying the ability of forced swim stress to selectively further enhance ethanol consumption in dependent (CIE-exposed) mice but not alter intake in nondependent animals.

  7. Modulation of ethanol-intake by morphine: Evidence for a central site of action

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, K.D.; Reid, L.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that subcutaneous administration of low doses of morphine increase, while subcutaneous naloxone decreases, ethanol-intake in rats. However, the site of action of morphine modulation of ethanol-intake remains unclear. In an attempt to elucidate this issue, seven graded doses of morphine were given intracerebroventricularly to rats 15 min prior to an opportunity to consume water and sweetened alcoholic beverage for 2 hr. Two lower doses of intracerebroventricular morphine reliably increased ethanol-intake, while higher doses decreased intake of water. Preference ratios were reliably increased by morphine doses of 1 {mu}g and higher. The present data provide support for a central site of morphine modulation of ethanol-intake.

  8. Ghrelin alters the stimulatory effect of cocaine on ethanol intake following mesolimbic or systemic administration.

    PubMed

    Cepko, Leah C S; Selva, Joaquín A; Merfeld, Emily B; Fimmel, Anna I; Goldberg, Sana A; Currie, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that ghrelinergic and dopaminergic signaling interact in the neural control of motivation and ethanol reward. To further investigate a possible interaction between these two neurochemical systems, we examined the impact of ghrelin, cocaine and combined injections of ghrelin with cocaine, on voluntary ethanol intake. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were habituated to an 8% ethanol solution until intakes stabilized. Rats were then injected with ghrelin (2.5-10 nmol IP), cocaine (0.625-10 mg/kg IP) or ghrelin paired with cocaine. We also examined the impact of direct ghrelin (30-300 pmol) injections into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) co-administered with systemic cocaine. Ethanol consumption was measured at 2 and 6 h postinjection. While ghrelin and cocaine reliably increased ethanol intake, peripheral administration of the peptide elicited a dose-dependent differential effect on cocaine-induced intake. Pretreatment with ghrelin potentiated the effect of cocaine on ethanol intake at a low dose of 2.5 nmol, whereas 10 nmol suppressed cocaine-induced ethanol intake. This same 10 nmol dose was found to induce anxiogenic behavior as measured using an elevated plus maze paradigm. Finally, when injected directly into the VTA, ghrelin (300 pmol) potentiated the effect of systemic cocaine on ethanol intake. Combined subthreshold dosing of VTA ghrelin with a subthreshold dose of cocaine also evoked reliable increases in intake compared to vehicle. Overall, our data suggest that low doses of ghrelin elicit a stimulatory effect on cocaine-induced ethanol consummatory behavior and provide further support for an interactive role of dopaminergic and ghrelinergic transmission in ethanol reward. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain DNA damage and behavioral changes after repeated intermittent acute ethanol withdrawal by young rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Priscila A; Poli, Jefferson H Z; Sperotto, Nathalia D M; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Nin, Maurício S; Barros, Helena M T

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol addiction causes severe problems, and its deprivation may potentiate symptoms such as anxiety. Furthermore, ethanol is a neurotoxic agent that induces degeneration and the consequences underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. This study assessed the behavioral changes during acute ethanol withdrawal periods and determined the levels of DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in multiple brain areas. Male Wistar rats were subjected to an oral ethanol self-administration procedure with a forced diet where they were offered 8% (v/v) ethanol solution for 21 days followed by five repeated 24-h cycles alternating between ethanol withdrawal and re-exposure. Control animals received an isocaloric control diet without ethanol. Behavioral changes were analyzed on ethanol withdrawal days in the open-field (OF) and elevated plus-maze (EPM) tests within the first 6 h of ethanol deprivation. The pre-frontal cortex, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum were dissected for alkaline and neutral comet assays and for dichlorofluorescein ROS testing. The repeated intermittent ethanol access enhanced solution intake and alcohol-seeking behavior. Decreased exploratory activity was observed in the OF test, and the animals stretched less in the EPM test. DNA single-strand breaks and ROS production were significantly higher in all structures evaluated in the ethanol-treated rats compared with controls. The animal model of repeated intermittent ethanol access induced behavioral changes in rats, and this ethanol exposure model induced an increase in DNA single-strand breaks and ROS production in all brain areas. Our results suggest that these brain damages may influence future behaviors.

  10. Repeated binge ethanol administration during adolescence enhances voluntary sweetened ethanol intake in young adulthood in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Alipour, Kent K; Michael, Laura A; Kirstein, Cheryl L

    2010-10-01

    Binge alcohol consumption is a rising concern in the United States, especially among adolescents. During this developmental period alcohol use is usually initiated and has been shown to cause detrimental effects on brain structure and function as well as cognitive/behavioral impairments in rats. Binge models, where animals are repeatedly administered high doses of ethanol typically over a period of three or four days cause these effects. There has been little work conducted aimed at investigating the long-term behavioral consequences of repeated binge administration during adolescence on later ethanol-induced behavior in young adulthood and adulthood. The repeated four-day binge model may serve as a good approximate for patterns of human adolescent alcohol consumption as this is similar to a "bender" in human alcoholics. The present set of experiments examined the dose-response and sex-related differences induced by repeated binge ethanol administration during adolescence on sweetened ethanol (Experiment 1) or saccharin (Experiment 2) intake in young adulthood. In both experiments, on postnatal days (PND) 28-31, PND 35-38 and PND 42-45, ethanol (1.5, 3.0 or 5.0 g/kg) or water was administered intragastrically to adolescent rats. Rats underwent abstinence from PND 46-59. Subsequently, in young adulthood, ethanol and saccharin intake were assessed. Exposure to any dose of ethanol during adolescence significantly enhanced ethanol intake in adulthood. However, while female rats had higher overall g/kg intake, males appear to be more vulnerable to the impact of adolescent ethanol exposure on subsequently increased ethanol intake in young adulthood. Exposure to ethanol during adolescence did not alter saccharin consumption in young adulthood in male or female rats. Considering that adolescence is the developmental period in which ethanol experimentation and consumption is usually initiated, the present set of experiments demonstrate the importance of elucidating the

  11. Repeated Binge Ethanol Administration During Adolescence Enhances Voluntary Sweetened Ethanol Intake in Young Adulthood in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M.; Alipour, Kent K.; Michael, Laura A.; Kirstein, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Binge alcohol consumption is a rising concern in the United States, especially among adolescents. During this developmental period alcohol use is usually initiated and has been shown to cause detrimental effects on brain structure and function as well as cognitive/behavioral impairments in rats. Binge models, where animals are repeatedly administered high doses of ethanol typically over a period of three or four days cause these effects. There has been little work conducted aimed at investigating the long-term behavioral consequences of repeated binge administration during adolescence on later ethanol-induced behavior in young adulthood and adulthood. The repeated four-day binge model may serve as a good approximate for patterns of human adolescent alcohol consumption as this is similar to a “bender” in human alcoholics. The present set of experiments examined the dose-response and sex-related differences induced by repeated binge ethanol administration during adolescence on sweetened ethanol (Experiment 1) or saccharin (Experiment 2) intake in young adulthood. In both experiments, on postnatal days (PND) 28–31, PND 35–38 and PND 42–45, ethanol (1.5, 3.0 or 5.0 g/kg) or water was administered intragastrically to adolescent rats. Rats underwent abstinence from PND 46–59. Subsequently, in young adulthood, ethanol and saccharin intake were assessed. Exposure to any dose of ethanol during adolescence significantly enhanced ethanol intake in adulthood. However, while female rats had higher overall g/kg intake, males appear to be more vulnerable to the impact of adolescent ethanol exposure on subsequently increased ethanol intake in young adulthood. Exposure to ethanol during adolescence did not alter saccharin consumption in young adulthood in male or female rats. Considering that adolescence is the developmental period in which ethanol experimentation and consumption is usually initiated, the present set of experiments demonstrate the importance of

  12. Model of voluntary ethanol intake in zebrafish: Effect on behavior and hypothalamic orexigenic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, M.E.; Karatayev, O.; Chang, G.-Q.; Algava, D.B.; Leibowitz, S.F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in zebrafish have shown that exposure to ethanol in tank water affects various behaviors, including locomotion, anxiety and aggression, and produces changes in brain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine. Building on these investigations, the present study had two goals: first, to develop a method for inducing voluntary ethanol intake in individual zebrafish, which can be used as a model in future studies to examine how this behavior is affected by various manipulations, and second, to characterize the effects of this ethanol intake on different behaviors and the expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides, galanin (GAL) and orexin (OX), which are known in rodents to stimulate consumption of ethanol and alter behaviors associated with alcohol abuse. Thus, we first developed a new model of voluntary intake of ethanol in fish by presenting this ethanol mixed with gelatin, which they readily consume. Using this model, we found that individual zebrafish can be trained in a short period of time to consume stable levels of 10% or 20% ethanol (v/v) mixed with gelatin and that their intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture leads to pharmacologically-relevant blood ethanol concentrations which are strongly, positively correlated with the amount ingested. Intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture increased locomotion, reduced anxiety, and stimulated aggressive behavior, while increasing expression of GAL and OX in specific hypothalamic areas. These findings, confirming results in rats, provide a method in zebrafish for investigating with forward genetics and pharmacological techniques the role of different brain mechanisms in controlling ethanol intake. PMID:25257106

  13. Daidzin and daidzein suppress free-choice ethanol intake by Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M; Vallee, B L

    1993-11-01

    Syrian Golden hamsters prefer and consume large and remarkably constant amounts of ethanol in a simple two-bottle free-choice regimen. Ethanol intake is significantly suppressed by zimelidine, bromocriptine, buspirone, and lithium carbonate, pharmacological agents that have been shown to be beneficial in controlling ethanol intake in alcohol-dependent humans. These results suggest that this ethanol-drinking animal model has high "predictive validity" and can be used effectively in the search for and identification of new agents for the treatment of alcohol abuse. The model has enabled us to confirm the putative antidipsotropic effect of Radix puerariae (RP), an herb long used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of patients who abuse alcohol. A crude extract of RP at a dose of 1.5 g.kg-1 x day-1 significantly suppresses (> 50%) the free-choice ethanol intake of Golden hamsters. Moreover, two major constituents of RP, daidzein (4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone) and daidzin (the 7-glucoside of daidzein), were also shown to suppress free-choice ethanol intake. Daidzin and daidzein, at doses of 150 and 230 mg.kg-1 x day-1, respectively, suppress ethanol intake by > 50%. RP, daidzein, and daidzin treatment do not significantly affect the body weight and water or food intake of the hamsters. These findings identify a class of compounds that offer promise as safe and effective therapeutic agents for alcohol abuse.

  14. Ethanol intake increases during continuous administration of amphetamine and nicotine, but not several other drugs.

    PubMed

    Potthoff, A D; Ellison, G; Nelson, L

    1983-04-01

    Groups of rats, acclimated to drinking both water and 10% v/v ethanol were implanted with a variety of slow-release devices containing d-amphetamine (d-amp), nicotine, caffeine, phencyclidine (PCP), secobarbital, LSD, mescaline or haloperidol. Ethanol intake was elevated only during treatment with d-amp or nicotine; none of the other drugs affected ethanol consumption even though the amounts of all drugs released were pharmacologically sufficient to affect behavior. Nicotine treated rats were not simply seeking calories provided by the EtOH solution, since nicotine treatment did not enhance intake of a distinctively flavored solution isocaloric to 10% ethanol. These results support a self-medication model of ethanol intake.

  15. Jodina rhombifolia leaves lyophilized aqueous extract decreases ethanol intake and preference in adolescent male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Roberto Teves, Mauricio; Wendel, Graciela Haydée; Pelzer, Lilian Eugenia

    2015-11-04

    The leaves of Jodina rhombifolia (Hook. & Arn.) Reissek (Santalaceae) are utilized as anti-alcoholic in Argentine folk medicine. This study was designed to investigate the anti-alcohol properties in adolescent male Wistar rats (postnatal day 29; 83-105 g of weight). We utilized the "self-administration model", which ethanol was offered in the standard home-cage through two-bottle free-choice regimen between an ethanolic solution (20% in tap water, v/v) and tap water with unlimited access for 24h per day for 10 consecutive days. The results obtained show that repeated administration of J. rhombifolia lyophilized extract, markedly reduced ethanol voluntary intake on dose dependent bases. The magnitude in reduction of daily ethanol intake was approximately 29%, 44% and 68%, for the rat groups treated with 62.5, 125 and 250 mg/kg of extract, respectively. Ethanol preference (proportion of ethanol intake versus total fluid intake) was significantly reduced: 21.37% ± 0.79 (0 mg/kg); 15.83% ± 0.93 (62.5 mg/kg); 15.22% ± 1.30 (125 mg/kg) and 9.38% ± 0.57 (250 mg/kg). Daily food intake was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the group treated with 250 mg/kg of JRLE in comparison with vehicle-dose group; the reduction in ethanol intake was associated with a compensatory increase in food intake, probably because in the control group animals a part of the total caloric intake was supplied by ethanol. Treatment was very well tolerated by all animals and without apparent side-effects. These results contribute to the scientific validation of the antialcoholic indication of this botanic species in Argentine folk medicine.

  16. Effects of voluntary access to sweetened ethanol during adolescence on intake in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Broadwater, Margaret; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of alcohol use during adolescence is concerning given that early age of alcohol initiation is correlated with development of alcohol-related problems later in life. The purpose of this series of studies was to assess whether voluntary ethanol exposure during adolescence would influence ethanol drinking behavior in adulthood using an animal model. Methods Pair-housed Sprague-Dawley adolescent (P28-42) rats of both sexes were given single bottle access to one of three solutions in their home cages--10% ethanol in "supersac" (0.125% saccharin and 3% sucrose) (EtOH/SS), supersac without ethanol (SS), or water-- for 30 min. every other day for a total of 8 drinking days, or were left non-manipulated. Animals were non-manipulated thereafter until adulthood (P70) at which time they were given one-bottle, 30 min. limited access tests with 20% ethanol every other day (Exp 1), 10% ethanol in SS (Exp 2) or SS without ethanol (Exp 3). Results Adolescent EtOH/SS exposure increased adulthood consumption of EtOH/SS (Exp 2), but not 20% unsweetened ethanol (Exp 1) or SS (Exp 3), with this increase most pronounced at the beginning of the 8 intake day procedure. Access to SS (without EtOH) during adolescence produced an analogous effect, with increased adult SS consumption during the first two intake days, but no increases in either of the ethanol test solutions. Conclusion Solution-specific increases in adulthood intake after adolescent exposure are most likely associated with solution acceptance due to familiarity. This is an important consideration for future intake studies assessing the influence of ethanol exposure during adolescence on intake of ethanol in adulthood. PMID:23278242

  17. Daidzin inhibits mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and suppresses ethanol intake of Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M; Klyosov, A A; Vallee, B L

    1997-03-04

    Daidzin is the major active principle in extracts of radix puerariae, a traditional Chinese medication that suppresses the ethanol intake of Syrian golden hamsters. It is the first isoflavone recognized to have this effect. Daidzin is also a potent and selective inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). To establish a link between these two activities, we have tested a series of synthetic structural analogs of daidzin. The results demonstrate a direct correlation between ALDH-2 inhibition and ethanol intake suppression and raise the possibility that daidzin may, in fact, suppress ethanol intake of golden hamsters by inhibiting ALDH-2. Hamster liver contains not only mitochondrial ALDH-2 but also high concentrations of a cytosolic form, ALDH-1, which is a very efficient catalyst of acetaldehyde oxidation. Further, the cytosolic isozyme is completely resistant to daidzin inhibition. This unusual property of the hamster ALDH-1 isozyme accounts for the fact we previously observed that daidzin can suppress ethanol intake of this species without blocking acetaldehyde metabolism. Thus, the mechanism by which daidzin suppresses ethanol intake in golden hamsters clearly differs from that proposed for the classic ALDH inhibitor disulfiram. We postulate that a physiological pathway catalyzed by ALDH-2, so far undefined, controls ethanol intake of golden hamsters and mediates the antidipsotropic effect of daidzin.

  18. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially regulate CB1 receptor function at glutamatergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacey L; Alexander, Nancy J; Bluett, Rebecca J; Patel, Sachin; McCool, Brian A

    2016-09-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system has been suggested to play a key role in ethanol preference and intake, the acute effects of ethanol, and in the development of withdrawal symptoms following ethanol dependence. Ethanol-dependent alterations in glutamatergic signaling within the lateral/basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) are critical for the development and expression of withdrawal-induced anxiety. Notably, the eCB system significantly regulates both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic activity within the BLA. Chronic ethanol exposure significantly alters eCB system expression within regions critical to the expression of emotionality and anxiety-related behavior, including the BLA. Here, we investigated specific interactions between the BLA eCB system and its functional regulation of synaptic activity during acute and chronic ethanol exposure. In tissue from ethanol naïve-rats, a prolonged acute ethanol exposure caused a dose dependent inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic activity via a presynaptic mechanism that was occluded by CB1 antagonist/inverse agonists SR141716a and AM251. Importantly, this acute ethanol inhibition was attenuated following 10 day chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE). CIE exposure also significantly down-regulated CB1-mediated presynaptic inhibition at glutamatergic afferent terminals but spared CB1-inhibition of GABAergic synapses arising from local inhibitory-interneurons. CIE also significantly elevated BLA N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA or anandamide) levels and decreased CB1 receptor protein levels. Collectively, these data suggest a dynamic regulation of the BLA eCB system by acute and chronic ethanol.

  19. Acamprosate-responsive brain sites for suppression of ethanol intake and preference

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison; Prosser, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    Acamprosate suppresses alcohol intake and craving in recovering alcoholics; however, the central sites of its action are unclear. To approach this question, brain regions responsive to acamprosate were mapped using acamprosate microimplants targeted to brain reward and circadian areas implicated in alcohol dependence. mPer2 mutant mice with nonfunctional mPer2, a circadian clock gene that gates endogenous timekeeping, were included, owing to their high levels of ethanol intake and preference. Male wild-type (WT) and mPer2 mutant mice received free-choice (15%) ethanol/water for 3 wk. The ethanol was withdrawn for 3 wk and then reintroduced to facilitate relapse. Four days before ethanol reintroduction, mice received bilateral blank or acamprosate-containing microimplants releasing ∼50 ng/day into reward [ventral tegmental (VTA), peduculopontine tegmentum (PPT), and nucleus accumbens (NA)] and circadian [intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)] areas. The hippocampus was also targeted. Circadian locomotor activity was measured throughout. Ethanol intake and preference were greater in mPer2 mutants than in wild-type (WT) mice (27 g·kg−1·day−1 vs. 13 g·kg−1·day−1 and 70% vs. 50%, respectively; both, P < 0.05). In WTs, acamprosate in all areas, except hippocampus, suppressed ethanol intake and preference (by 40–60%) during ethanol reintroduction. In mPer2 mutants, acamprosate in the VTA, PPT, and SCN suppressed ethanol intake and preference by 20–30%. These data are evidence that acamprosate's suppression of ethanol intake and preference are manifest through actions within major reward and circadian sites. PMID:21697518

  20. Short-term selection for high and low ethanol intake yields differential sensitivity to ethanol's motivational effects and anxiety-like responses in adolescent Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Macarena Soledad; Báez, Bárbara; Bordón, Ana; Espinosa, Laura; Martínez, Eliana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2017-10-03

    Alcohol use disorders are modulated by genetic factors, but the identification of specific genes and their concomitant biological changes that are associated with a higher risk for these disorders has proven difficult. Alterations in the sensitivity to the motivational effects of ethanol may be one way by which genes modulate the initiation and escalation of ethanol intake. Rats and mice have been selectively bred for high and low ethanol consumption during adulthood. However, selective breeding programs for ethanol intake have not focused on adolescence. This phase of development is associated with the initiation and escalation of ethanol intake and characterized by an increase in the sensitivity to ethanol's appetitive effects and a decrease in the sensitivity to ethanol's aversive effects compared with adulthood. The present study performed short-term behavioral selection to select rat lines that diverge in the expression of ethanol drinking during adolescence. A progenitor nucleus of Wistar rats (F0) and filial generation 1 (F1), F2, and F3 adolescent rats were derived from parents that were selected for high (STDRHI) and low (STDRLO) ethanol consumption during adolescence and were tested for ethanol intake and responsivity to ethanol's motivational effects. STDRHI rats exhibited significantly greater ethanol intake and preference than STDRLO rats. Compared with STDRLO rats, STDRHI F2 and F3 rats exhibited a blunted response to ethanol in the conditioned taste aversion test. F2 and F3 STDRHI rats but not STDRLO rats exhibited ethanol-induced motor stimulation. STDRHI rats exhibited avoidance of the white compartment of the light-dark box, a reduction of locomotion, and a reduction of saccharin consumption, suggesting an anxiety-prone phenotype. The results suggest that the genetic risk for enhanced ethanol intake during adolescence is associated with lower sensitivity to the aversive effects of ethanol, heightened reactivity to ethanol's stimulating effects

  1. Regulation of ethanol intake under chronic mild stress: roles of dopamine receptors and transporters

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Foteini; Rombola, Christina; Bellezza, Robert; Rosko, Lauren; Grandy, David K.; Volkow, Nora D.; Thanos, Panayotis K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that exposure to chronic mild stress decreases ethanol intake and preference in dopamine D2 receptor wild-type mice (Drd2+/+), while it increases intake in heterozygous (Drd2+/−) and knockout (Drd2−/−) mice. Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the basal forebrain plays a major role in the reinforcing actions of ethanol as well as in brain responses to stress. In order to identify neurochemical changes associated with the regulation of ethanol intake, we used in vitro receptor autoradiography to measure the levels and distribution of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors and dopamine transporters (DAT). Receptor levels were measured in the basal forebrain of Drd2+/+, Drd2+/−, and Drd2−/− mice belonging to one of four groups: control (C), ethanol intake (E), chronic mild stress exposure (S), and ethanol intake under chronic mild stress (ES). D2 receptor levels were higher in the lateral and medial striatum of Drd2+/+ ES mice, compared with Drd2+/+ E mice. Ethanol intake in Drd2+/+ mice was negatively correlated with striatal D2 receptor levels. D2 receptor levels in Drd2+/− mice were the same among the four treatment groups. DAT levels were lower in Drd2+/− C and Drd2−/− C mice, compared with Drd2+/+ C mice. Among Drd2+/− mice, S and ES groups had higher DAT levels compared with C and E groups in most regions examined. In Drd2−/− mice, ethanol intake was positively correlated with DAT levels in all regions studied. D1 receptor levels were lower in Drd2+/− and Drd2−/− mice, compared with Drd2+/+, in all regions examined and remained unaffected by all treatments. The results suggest that in normal mice, ethanol intake is associated with D2 receptor-mediated neurotransmission, which exerts a protective effect against ethanol overconsumption under stress. In mice with low Drd2 expression, where DRD2 levels are not further modulated, ethanol intake is associated with DAT function which is upregulated under stress leading to ethanol

  2. Inflexible ethanol intake: A putative link with the Lrrk2 pathway.

    PubMed

    da Silva E Silva, Daniel Almeida; Frozino Ribeiro, Andrea; Damasceno, Samara; Rocha, Cristiane S; Berenguer de Matos, Alexandre H; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli; Correia, Diego; Brunialti Godard, Ana Lúcia

    2016-10-15

    Alcoholism is a complex multifactorial disorder with a strong genetic influence. Although several studies have shown the impact of high ethanol intake on the striatal gene expression, few have addressed the relationship between the patterns of gene expression underlying the compulsive behaviour associated with the two major concerns in addiction: the excessive drug consumption and relapsing. In this study, we used a chronic three-bottle free-choice murine model to address striatal transcript regulation among animals with different ethanol intakes and preferences: Light Drinkers (preference for water throughout the experiment), Heavy Drinkers (preference for ethanol with a non-compulsive intake) and Inflexible Drinkers (preference for ethanol and simultaneous loss of control over the drug intake). Our aim was to correlate the intake patterns observed in this model with gene expression changes in the striatum, a brain region critical for the development of alcohol addiction. We found that the transcripts of the Lrrk2 gene, which encodes a multifunctional protein with kinase and GTPase activities, is upregulated only in Inflexible Drinkers suggesting, for the first time, that the Lrrk2 pathway plays a major role in the compulsive ethanol intake behaviour of addicted subjects.

  3. Prenatal ethanol increases ethanol intake throughout adolescence, alters ethanol-mediated aversive learning, and affects μ but not δ or κ opioid receptor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2015-06-01

    Animal models of prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) have indicated a facilitatory effect of PEE on adolescent ethanol intake, but few studies have assessed the effects of moderate PEE throughout adolescence. The mechanisms underlying this facilitatory effect remain largely unknown. In the present study, we analysed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats with or without PEE (2.0 g/kg, gestational days 17-20) from postnatal days 37 to 62. The results revealed greater ethanol consumption in PEE rats than in controls, which persisted throughout adolescence. By the end of testing, ethanol ingestion in PEE rats was nearly 6.0 g/kg. PEE was associated with insensitivity to ethanol-induced aversion. PEE and control rats were further analysed for levels of μ, δ and κ opioid receptor mRNA in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and ventral tegmental area. Similar levels of mRNA were observed across most areas and opioid receptors, but μ receptor mRNA in the ventral tegmental area was significantly increased by PEE. Unlike previous studies that assessed the effects of PEE on ethanol intake close to birth, or in only a few sessions during adolescence, the present study observed a facilitatory effect of PEE that lasted throughout adolescence. PEE was associated with insensitivity to the aversive effect of ethanol, and increased levels of μ opioid receptor transcripts. PEE is a prominent vulnerability factor that probably favors the engagement of adolescents in risky trajectories of ethanol use. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Acute ethanol administration inhibits Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in rat intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Zhao, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Haiying; Tang, Chengwei

    2013-05-01

    Excess alcohol intake, as in binge drinking, increases susceptibility to microbial pathogens. Alcohol impairs macrophage function by suppression of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. This study investigated the effects of acute ethanol intake on the TLR4 pathway in rat intestinal epithelia, which usually encounters luminal antigens at first and participates in the development of intestinal immunity. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to an ethanol group given ethanol as a 25% (v/v) solution in water at 7.5 g/kg, or a control group given saline, by oral gavage daily for 3 days. The epithelial histology and ultrastructure, the intestinal microflora, peripheral and portal venous plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, and somatostatin (SST) levels in the peripheral plasma and small intestine were evaluated. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), TLR4, TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1), activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the intestinal mucosa were assayed. LPS responsiveness with or without SST pretreatment was assayed in vitro by quantification of TLR4, TBK1, activated NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia. Mucosal damage was observed in the ethanol group by light and electron microscopy. Escherichia coli cultures were unchanged in rat intestine of the ethanol group compared with controls, but lactobacilli cultures were reduced (p < 0.05). LPS levels increased in peripheral and portal venous plasma (p < 0.05), but mucosal TLR4, TBK1, nuclear NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α were unchanged in the ethanol group. LPS treatment in vitro up-regulated the level of TLR4, TBK1 and nuclear NF-κB as well as the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia in the control (p < 0.05), but not the ethanol group. The stimulatory effects of LPS on intestinal epithelia isolated from the control group were significantly inhibited by SST pretreatment (p < 0.05). The

  5. Refeeding after acute food restriction: differential reduction in preference for ethanol and ethanol-paired flavors in selectively bred rats.

    PubMed

    Dess, Nancy K; Chapman, Clinton D; Cousins, Laura A; Monroe, Derek C; Nguyen, Phuong

    2013-01-17

    Rats' voluntary ethanol intake varies with dispositional factors and energy status. The joint influences of these were of interest here. We previously reported that rats selectively bred for high voluntary saccharin intake (HiS) consume more ethanol and express more robust conditioning of preference for flavors paired with voluntarily consumed ethanol than do low-saccharin consuming counterparts (LoS). Three new experiments examined the effect of refeeding after an episode of food restriction on ethanol intake and on preference for ethanol-paired flavors in HiS and LoS rats. A 48-h episode of food restriction with wheel running reduced intake of and preference for 4% ethanol (Exp. 1a) and preference for an ethanol-paired flavor (Exp. 1b) during refeeding. Food restriction alone was sufficient to reduce the flavor preference (Exp. 2). Adding fat to the refeeding diet or extending the food restriction period exacerbated the effect (Exp. 3), yielding a frank aversion to ethanol-paired flavors in LoS rats. These studies indicate that rebound from negative energy balance shifts responses to ethanol-associated cues from preference toward aversion. Analyses of bodyweight changes and caloric intake during refeeding support this conclusion and further suggest that lower metabolic efficiency may be a marker for enhanced preference mutability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ONTOGENY OF ETHANOL INTAKE IN ALCOHOL PREFERRING (P) AND ALCOHOL NON-PREFERRING (NP) RATS

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Truxell, Eric; Varlinskaya, Elena I; Spear, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    There is a scarcity of research on ethanol affinity in alcohol-preferring (P) rats before weaning and it is unknown if neonate P rats exhibit ethanol intake preferences comparable to those observed in adult P rats. This study examined ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring and non-preferring (NP) rats 3 hours after birth (Experiment 1, surrogate nipple test), at postnatal days (PD) 8, 12 and 18 (Experiment 2, consumption off the floor procedure) and at adolescence (Experiment 3, two-bottle choice test at PD32). The high-preference genotype was readily expressed three hours after birth. P neonates drank twice as much ethanol as their NP counterparts. This heightened ethanol preference transiently reversed at P8, reemerged as weaning approached (P18) and was fully expressed during adolescence. These results help clarify the ontogeny of genetic predisposition for ethanol. Genetic predisposition for higher ethanol intake in P than in NP rats seems to be present immediately following birth. PMID:21400486

  7. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of (14)C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  8. Actions of Acute and Chronic Ethanol on Presynaptic Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Marisa; Treistman, Steven N.; Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Weiner, Jeff; Galindo, Rafael; Mameli, Manuel; Valenzuela, Fernando; Zhu, Ping Jun; Lovinger, David; Zhang, Tao A.; Hendricson, Adam H.; Morrisett, Richard; Siggins, George Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium entitled “The Tipsy Terminal: Presynaptic Effects of Ethanol” (held at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, in Santa Barbara, CA, June 27, 2005). The objective of this symposium was to focus on a cellular site of ethanol action underrepresented in the alcohol literature, but quickly becoming a “hot” topic. The chairs of the session were Marisa Roberto and George Robert Siggins. Our speakers were chosen on the basis of the diverse electrophysiological and other methods used to discern the effects of acute and chronic ethanol on presynaptic terminals and on the basis of significant insights that their data provide for understanding ethanol actions on neurons in general, as mechanisms underlying problematic behavioral effects of alcohol. The 5 presenters drew from their recent studies examining the effects of acute and chronic ethanol using a range of sophisticated methods from electrophysiological analysis of paired-pulse facilitation and spontaneous and miniature synaptic currents (Drs. Weiner, Valenzuela, Zhu, and Morrisett), to direct recording of ion channel activity and peptide release from acutely isolated synaptic terminals (Dr. Treistman), to direct microscopic observation of vesicular release (Dr. Morrisett). They showed that ethanol administration could both increase and decrease the probability of release of different transmitters from synaptic terminals. The effects of ethanol on synaptic terminals could often be correlated with important behavioral or developmental actions of alcohol. These and other novel findings suggest that future analyses of synaptic effects of ethanol should attempt to ascertain, in multiple brain regions, the role of presynaptic terminals, relevant presynaptic receptors and signal transduction linkages, exocytotic mechanisms, and their involvement in alcohol’s behavioral actions. Such studies could lead to new treatment strategies for alcohol

  9. Chronic ethanol intake leads to structural and molecular alterations in the rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marcelo; Milton, Flora A; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda F; Almeida-Francia, Camila C D; Cagnon-Quitete, Valeria H A; Tirapelli, Luiz F; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    We described the effects of low- and high-dose ethanol intake on the structure and apoptosis signaling of the uterine endometrium of UChA and UChB rats (animals with voluntary ethanol consumption). Thirty adult female rats, 90 days old, were divided into three groups (n = 10/group): UChA rats fed with 10% (v/v) ethanol ad libitum (free choice for water or ethanol) drinking < 1.9 g/kg/day; UChB rats fed with 10% (v/v) ethanol ad libitum (free choice for water or ethanol) drinking from 2 to 5 g/kg/day; control rats without ethanol (only water). After 120 days of treatment, rats displaying estrus were euthanized. Uterine epithelial cells of the UCh rats showed dilated cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, presence of lipid droplets, altered nuclear chromatin, and disrupted mitochondria. The UCh rats exhibited intense atrophied epithelial cells with smaller areas and perimeters of cytoplasm and nuclei. The endometrium of UChA rats showed higher levels of caspase-3 while Xiap and Bcl2 varied from moderate to weak. Both UChA and UChB rats exhibited a stronger immunoreaction to Ki-67 and IGFR-1 on epithelial and stromal cells. Chronic ethanol intake leads to structural and molecular alterations in the uterine endometrium of UCh rats, regardless of low- or high-dose consumption, promoting reproductive disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute Ethanol Withdrawal Impairs Contextual Learning and Enhances Cued Learning

    PubMed Central

    Tipps, Megan E.; Raybuck, Jonathan D.; Buck, Kari J.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol affects many of the brain regions and neural processes that support learning and memory, and these effects are thought to underlie, at least in part, the development of addiction. Although much work has been done regarding the effects of alcohol intoxication on learning and memory, little is known about the effects of acute withdrawal from a single alcohol exposure. Methods We assess the effects of acute ethanol withdrawal (6 h post-injection with 4 g/kg ethanol) on two forms of fear conditioning (delay and trace fear conditioning) in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. The influence of a number of experimental parameters (pre- and post-training withdrawal exposure; foreground/background processing; training strength; non-associative effects) is also investigated. Results Acute ethanol withdrawal during training had a bidirectional effect on fear conditioned responses, decreasing contextual responses and increasing cued responses. These effects were apparent for both trace and delay conditioning in DBA/2J mice and for trace conditioning in C57BL/6J mice; however, C57BL/6J mice were selectively resistant to the effects of acute withdrawal on delay cued responses. Conclusions Our results show that acute withdrawal from a single, initial ethanol exposure is sufficient to alter long-term learning in mice. In addition, the differences between the strains and conditioning paradigms used suggest that specific learning processes can be differentially affected by acute withdrawal in a manner that is distinct from the reported effects of both alcohol intoxication and withdrawal following chronic alcohol exposure. Thus, our results suggest a unique effect of acute alcohol withdrawal on learning and memory processes. PMID:25684050

  11. Acute ethanol withdrawal impairs contextual learning and enhances cued learning.

    PubMed

    Tipps, Megan E; Raybuck, Jonathan D; Buck, Kari J; Lattal, K Matthew

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol affects many of the brain regions and neural processes that support learning and memory, and these effects are thought to underlie, at least in part, the development of addiction. Although much work has been done regarding the effects of alcohol intoxication on learning and memory, little is known about the effects of acute withdrawal from a single alcohol exposure. We assess the effects of acute ethanol withdrawal (6 hours postinjection with 4 g/kg ethanol) on 2 forms of fear conditioning (delay and trace fear conditioning) in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. The influence of a number of experimental parameters (pre- and post training withdrawal exposure; foreground/background processing; training strength; and nonassociative effects) is also investigated. Acute ethanol withdrawal during training had a bidirectional effect on fear-conditioned responses, decreasing contextual responses and increasing cued responses. These effects were apparent for both trace and delay conditioning in DBA/2J mice and for trace conditioning in C57BL/6J mice; however, C57BL/6J mice were selectively resistant to the effects of acute withdrawal on delay cued responses. Our results show that acute withdrawal from a single, initial ethanol exposure is sufficient to alter long-term learning in mice. In addition, the differences between the strains and conditioning paradigms used suggest that specific learning processes can be differentially affected by acute withdrawal in a manner that is distinct from the reported effects of both alcohol intoxication and withdrawal following chronic alcohol exposure. Thus, our results suggest a unique effect of acute alcohol withdrawal on learning and memory processes. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  12. Long-term effects of repeated maternal separation and ethanol intake on HPA axis responsiveness in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Odeon, María Mercedes; Yamauchi, Laura; Grosman, Mauricio; Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz

    2017-02-15

    It has been shown that early life manipulations produce behavioral, neural, and hormonal effects. The long term consequences of repeated maternal separation (RMS) plus cold stress and ethanol intake were evaluated during adolescence and adult rats on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in male adult Wistar rats. RMS+ cold stress was applied from postnatal day (PD) 2 in which the pups were separated from their mothers and exposed to cold stress (4°C) 1h per day for 20days; controls remained with their mothers. Then they were exposed to either voluntary ethanol (6%) or dextrose (1%) intake for 7days: PD22-29 and PD59-66. Half of the animals were sacrificed, while the others were exposed to acute stress (AS) for 2h and then they were killed. RMS+ cold stress: a) increased voluntary ethanol intake in adolescent and adult rats; b) reduced protein expression (Western measurements) in corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in hypothalamus (Hyp) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in hippocampus (Hic) while increased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in Hic; c) decreased plasmatic levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and increased corticosterone (COR) levels in HPA axis, d) adult rats exposure a new AS incremented ACTH and COR levels. However, this modification did not alter the HPA axis capacity to respond to a new type of stressor. These results demonstrate the consequences of early life stress on the vulnerability of ethanol consumption and HPA axis responsiveness to a stressor in adult rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Contribution of P2X4 receptors to ethanol intake in male C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Letisha R; Finn, Deborah A; Khoja, Sheraz; Yardley, Megan M; Asatryan, Liana; Alkana, Ronald L; Davies, Daryl L

    2014-06-01

    P2X receptors (P2XRs) are a family of cation-permeable ligand-gated ion channels activated by synaptically released extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate. The P2X4 subtype is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and is sensitive to low intoxicating ethanol concentrations. Genetic meta-analyses identified the p2rx4 gene as a candidate gene for innate alcohol intake and/or preference. The current study used mice lacking the p2rx4 gene (knockout, KO) and wildtype (WT) C57BL/6 controls to test the hypothesis that P2X4Rs contribute to ethanol intake. The early acquisition and early maintenance phases of ethanol intake were measured with three different drinking procedures. Further, we tested the effects of ivermectin (IVM), a drug previously shown to reduce ethanol's effects on P2X4Rs and to reduce ethanol intake and preference, for its ability to differentially alter stable ethanol intake in KO and WT mice. Depending on the procedure and the concentration of the ethanol solution, ethanol intake was transiently increased in P2X4R KO versus WT mice during the acquisition of 24-h and limited access ethanol intake. IVM significantly reduced ethanol intake in P2X4R KO and WT mice, but the degree of reduction was 50 % less in the P2X4R KO mice. Western blot analysis identified significant changes in γ-aminobutyric acidA receptor α1 subunit expression in brain regions associated with the regulation of ethanol behaviors in P2X4R KO mice. These findings add to evidence that P2X4Rs contribute to ethanol intake and indicate that there is a complex interaction between P2X4Rs, ethanol, and other neurotransmitter receptor systems.

  14. Gestational ethanol and nicotine exposure: effects on maternal behavior, oxytocin, and offspring ethanol intake in the rat.

    PubMed

    McMurray, M S; Williams, S K; Jarrett, T M; Cox, E T; Fay, E E; Overstreet, D H; Walker, C H; Johns, J M

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and smoking during pregnancy is common, despite the known adverse effects of these drugs on fetal development. Though studies on the effects of each drug separately are published, little is known about the effect of concurrent use of alcohol and nicotine in humans or in preclinical models. In this report, we examined the impact of continuous gestational exposure to both ethanol via liquid diet and nicotine via an osmotic minipump on maternal behavior, offspring ethanol intake, and oxytocin levels in a rat model. Dams were tested for the onset of maternal behavior with litters of unexposed surrogate pups and then killed to examine oxytocin levels within specific brain regions. Drug-exposed offspring reared by surrogate dams were tested for ethanol intake at either adolescence or adulthood, and oxytocin levels were measured in relevant brain regions after behavioral tests. Dams exhibited minor deficits in maternal care, which were associated with lower oxytocin levels in both the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic areas compared to control dams. Prenatal exposure altered sex-specific ethanol intake, with differential effects at adolescence and adulthood. Oxytocin system changes were also apparent in the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic regions of drug-exposed adolescent and adult offspring. These results suggest that dam treatment with ethanol and nicotine can somewhat negatively affect the early rearing environment, and that prenatal exposure to both of these drugs results in drinking behavior differing from what would be expected from either drug alone. Oxytocin's possible involvement in the mediation of these effects is highlighted.

  15. Gestational Ethanol and Nicotine Exposure: Effects on Maternal Behavior, Oxytocin, and Offspring Ethanol Intake in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, M.S.; Williams, S.K.; Jarrett, T.M.; Cox, E.T.; Fay, E.E.; Overstreet, D.H.; Walker, C.H.; Johns, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and smoking during pregnancy is common, despite the known adverse effects of these drugs on fetal development. Though studies on the effects of each drug separately are published, little is known about the effect of concurrent use of alcohol and nicotine in humans or in preclinical models. In this report, we examined the impact of continuous gestational exposure to both ethanol via liquid diet and nicotine via an osmotic minipump on maternal behavior, offspring ethanol intake, and oxytocin levels in a rat model. Dams were tested for the onset of maternal behavior with litters of unexposed surrogate pups and then killed to examine oxytocin levels within specific brain regions. Drug-exposed offspring reared by surrogate dams were tested for ethanol intake at either adolescence or adulthood, and oxytocin levels were measured in relevant brain regions after behavioral tests. Dams exhibited minor deficits in maternal care, which were associated with lower oxytocin levels in both the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic areas compared to control dams. Prenatal exposure altered sex-specific ethanol intake, with differential effects at adolescence and adulthood. Oxytocin system changes were also apparent in the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic regions of drug-exposed adolescent and adult offspring. These results suggest that dam treatment with ethanol and nicotine can somewhat negatively affect the early rearing environment, and that prenatal exposure to both of these drugs results in drinking behavior differing from what would be expected from either drug alone. Oxytocin’s possible involvement in the mediation of these effects is highlighted. PMID:18664381

  16. Neonatal experiences with ethanol intoxication modify respiratory and thermoregulatory plasticity and affect subsequent ethanol intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, María Belén; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Anunziata, Florencia; Haymal, Olga Beatriz; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Different studies have focused on the deleterious consequences of binge-like or chronic exposure to ethanol during the brain growth spurt period (third human gestational trimester) that in the rat corresponds to postnatal days (PDs) 3-10. The present study analyzed behavioral and physiological disruptions caused by relatively brief binge-like exposures (PDs 3, 5, and 7) with an ethanol dose lower (3.0 g/kg) than those frequently employed to examine teratological effects during this stage in development. At PD 9, pups were exposed to ethanol doses ranging between .0-3.0 g/kg and tested in terms of breathing patterns and thermoregulation. At PDs 11 and 12, ethanol intake was examined. The main findings were as follows: i) pre-exposure to the drug resulted in brief depressions in breathing frequencies and an exacerbated predisposition toward apneic episodes; ii) these effects were not dependent upon thermoregulatory alterations; iii) early ethanol treatment increased initial consumption of the drug which also caused a marked hypothermia that appeared to regulate a subsequent decrement in ethanol consumption; and iv) ethanol exposure retarded overall body growth and even one exposure to the drug (PD 9) was sufficient to reduce brain weights although there were no indications of microcephaly. In conjunction with studies performed during the late gestational period in the rat, the results indicate that relatively brief binge-like episodes during a critical window of brain vulnerability disrupts the respiratory network and exacerbates initial acceptance of the drug. In addition, ethanol treatments were not found to induce tolerance relative to respiratory and thermal disruptions.

  17. Effect of acute ethanol and acute allopregnanolone on spatial memory in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Chin, Vivien S; Van Skike, Candice E; Berry, Raymond B; Kirk, Roger E; Diaz-Granados, Jamie; Matthews, Douglas B

    2011-08-01

    The effects of ethanol differ in adolescent and adult rats on a number of measures. The evidence of the effects of ethanol on spatial memory in adolescents and adults is equivocal. Whether adolescents are more or less sensitive to ethanol-induced impairment of spatial memory acquisition remains unclear; with regard to the effects of acute ethanol on spatial memory retrieval there is almost no research looking into any age difference. Thus, we examined the effects of acute ethanol on spatial memory in the Morris Watermaze in adolescents and adults. Allopregnanolone (ALLO) is a modulator of the GABA(A) receptor and has similar behavioral effects as ethanol. We sought to also determine the effects of allopreganolone on spatial memory in adolescent and adults. Male adolescent (post natal [PN]28-30) and adult (PN70-72) rats were trained in the Morris Watermaze for 6 days and acute doses of ethanol (saline, 1.5 and 2.0 g/kg) or ALLO (vehicle, 9 and 18 mg/kg) were administered on Day 7. A probe trial followed on Day 8. As expected, there were dose effects; higher doses of both ethanol and ALLO impaired spatial memory. However, in both the ethanol and ALLO conditions adolescents and adults had similar spatial memory impairments. The current results suggest that ethanol and ALLO both impair hippocampal-dependent spatial memory regardless of age in that once learning has occurred, ethanol or ALLO does not differentially impair the retrieval of spatial memory in adolescents and adults. Given the mixed results on the effect of ethanol on cognition in adolescent rats, additional research is needed to ascertain the factors critical for the reported differential results.

  18. Voluntary Ethanol Intake Predicts κ-Opioid Receptor Supersensitivity and Regionally Distinct Dopaminergic Adaptations in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Calipari, Erin S.; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C.; Helms, Christa M.; Lovinger, David M.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    The dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the striatum have long been implicated in mediating motivated behaviors and addiction. Previously it was demonstrated that κ-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling in the striatum plays a critical role in the increased reinforcing efficacy of ethanol following ethanol vapor exposure in rodent models. Although rodents have been used extensively to determine the neurochemical consequences of chronic ethanol exposure, establishing high levels of voluntary drinking in these models has proven difficult. Conversely, nonhuman primates exhibit similar intake and pattern to humans in regard to drinking. Here we examine the effects of chronic voluntary ethanol self-administration on dopamine neurotransmission and the ability of KORs to regulate dopamine release in the dorsolateral caudate (DLC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. Using voltammetry in brain slices from cynomolgus macaques after 6 months of ad libitum ethanol drinking, we found increased KOR sensitivity in both the DLC and NAc. The magnitude of ethanol intake predicted increases in KOR sensitivity in the NAc core, but not the DLC. Additionally, ethanol drinking increased dopamine release and uptake in the NAc, but decreased both of these measures in the DLC. These data suggest that chronic daily drinking may result in regionally distinct disruptions of striatal outputs. In concert with previous reports showing increased KOR regulation of drinking behaviors induced by ethanol exposure, the strong relationship between KOR activity and voluntary ethanol intake observed here gives further support to the hypothesis that KORs may provide a promising pharmacotherapeutic target in the treatment of alcoholism. PMID:25878269

  19. Sexual experience affects ethanol intake in Drosophila through Neuropeptide F

    PubMed Central

    Shohat-Ophir, G.; Kaun, K.R.; Azanchi, R.; Mohammed, H; Heberlein, U.

    2014-01-01

    The brain's reward systems evolved to reinforce behaviors required for species survival, including sex, food consumption, and social interaction. Drugs of abuse co-opt these neural pathways, which can lead to addiction. Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the relationship between natural and drug rewards. In males, mating increased Neuropeptide F (NPF) levels, whereas sexual deprivation reduced NPF. Activation or inhibition of the NPF system in turn enhanced or reduced ethanol preference. These results thus link sexual experience, NPF system activity, and ethanol consumption. Artificial activation of NPF neurons was in itself rewarding and precluded the ability of ethanol to act as a reward. We propose that activity of the NPF/NPF receptor axis represents the state of the fly reward system and modifies behavior accordingly. PMID:22422983

  20. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  1. Effect of concurrent saccharin intake on ethanol consumption by high-alcohol-drinking (UChB) rats.

    PubMed

    Tampier, Lutske; Quintanilla, Maria Elena

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the effect of concurrent presentation of a highly palatable saccharin solution on ethanol consumption during the acquisition or maintenance of ethanol drinking by high-alcohol-drinking (UChB) rats. Rats were exposed to ethanol (10% v/v) and water under a home cage, two-bottle, free-choice regimen with unlimited access for 24 hours/day. After 7 days (acquisition) of ethanol exposure, a third bottle containing saccharin (0.2% w/v) was concomitantly offered for an additional seven consecutive days, and the same process was repeated after 3 months (maintenance) of ethanol exposure. We found that concurrent saccharin intake significantly reduced ethanol intake by UChB rats after 7 days of ethanol exposure indicating that preference for sweet taste tends to override the preference for ethanol. However, the concurrent saccharin presentation to rats after 3 months of stable ethanol consumption did not reduce ethanol intake, whereas their saccharin consumption reached polydipsic-like values. These results support the notion that in UChB rats, a time-dependent sensitization to the rewarding effects of ethanol is developed that may account for the increases in ethanol volition seen following chronic ethanol intake.

  2. Contribution of P2X4 receptors to ethanol intake in male C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Letisha R.; Finn, Deborah A.; Khoja, Sheraz; Yardley, Megan M; Asatryan, Liana; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2014-01-01

    P2X receptors (P2XRs) are a family of cation-permeable ligand-gated ion channels activated by synaptically released extracellular ATP. The P2X4 subtype is abundantly expressed in the CNS and is sensitive to low intoxicating ethanol concentrations. Genetic meta-analyses identified the p2rx4 gene as a candidate gene for innate alcohol intake and/or preference. The current study used mice lacking the p2rx4 gene (knockout, KO) and wildtype (WT) C57BL/6 controls to test the hypothesis that P2X4Rs contribute to ethanol intake. The early acquisition and early maintenance phases of ethanol intake were measured with three different drinking procedures. Further, we tested the effects of ivermectin (IVM), a drug previously shown to reduce ethanol’s effects on P2X4Rs and to reduce ethanol intake and preference, for its ability to differentially alter stable ethanol intake in KO and WT mice. Depending on the procedure and the concentration of the ethanol solution, ethanol intake was transiently increased in P2X4R KO versus WT mice during the acquisition of 24-hr and limited access ethanol intake. IVM significantly reduced ethanol intake in P2X4R KO and WT mice, but the degree of reduction was 50% less in the P2X4R KO mice. Western blot analysis identified significant changes in -γ aminobutyric acidA receptor (GABAAR) α1 subunit expression in brain regions associated with the regulation of ethanol behaviors in P2X4R KO mice. These findings add to evidence that P2X4Rs contribute to ethanol intake and indicate that there is a complex interaction between P2X4Rs, ethanol, and other neurotransmitter receptor systems. PMID:24671605

  3. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake

    PubMed Central

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction. PMID:27378852

  4. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake.

    PubMed

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction.

  5. Nicotinic receptor ligands reduce ethanol intake by high alcohol-drinking HAD-2 rats.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Eiler, Bill J A; Cook, Jason B; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2009-12-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are implicated in the reinforcing effects of many drugs of abuse, including ethanol. The present study examined the efficacy of cytisine, a nAChR partial agonist, and lobeline, a putative nAChR antagonist, on the maintenance of ethanol drinking by HAD-2 rats. Adult male HAD-2 rats were given access to ethanol (15 and 30%, with ad libitum access to water and food) 22 h/day for 12 weeks, beginning at 60 days of age, after which cytisine (0.0, 0.5, and 1.5 mg/kg) was tested for 3 consecutive days. The rats were given an 18-day washout period and were then tested with lobeline (0.0, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg) for 3 consecutive days. Ethanol intake was measured at 1, 4, and 22 h postinjection. Rats were injected intraperitoneally just before lights out (1200 h). There was a significant main effect of cytisine treatment on the second test day, with the 1.5 mg/kg dose significantly reducing ethanol intake at the 1- and 4-h time-points, relative to saline, and the 0.5 mg/kg dose inducing a significant reduction at the 4-h time-point. Conversely, lobeline treatment resulted in significant main effects of treatment for all three time-points within each test day, with the 5.0 mg/kg dose significantly reducing ethanol intake, relative to saline, at each time-point within each test day. These findings provide further evidence that activity at the nAChR influences ethanol intake and is a promising target for pharmacotherapy development for the treatment of alcohol dependence and relapse.

  6. Anxiety response and restraint-induced stress differentially affect ethanol intake in female adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, María Belén; Fabio, Maria Carolina; Fernández, Macarena Soledad; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2016-10-15

    Anxiety disorders are more likely to occur in women than in men, usually emerge during adolescence and exhibit high comorbidity with alcohol use disorders (AUD). Adolescents with high levels of anxiety or heightened reactivity to stress may be at-risk for developing AUD. An approach to analyze if high levels of inborn anxiety predict greater ethanol drinking is to assess the latter variable in subjects classified as high- or low-anxiety responders. The present study assessed ethanol drinking in adolescent, female Wistar, rats classified as high-, low- or average-anxiety responders and exposed or not to restraint stress (RS, Exp. 1). Classification was made through a multivariate index derived from testing anxiety responses in an elevated plus maze and a light-dark box tests. RS was applied after animals had been initiated to ethanol drinking. Intake of sweetened ethanol was unaffected by level of anxiety response. Adolescents with high levels of inborn anxiety exhibited significantly higher intake of unsweetened ethanol than counterparts with standard levels of anxiety, yet this effect was inhibited by RS exposure. Experiment 2 assessed FOS immunoreactivity after RS. Stress induced a significant increase in FOS immunoreactivity at the paraventricular nucleus, yet this effect was unaffected by level of anxiety response. Female adolescents with high levels of basal anxiety may be at-risk for exhibiting increased predisposition for ethanol intake and preference. The study also indicates that stress may exert differential effects on adolescent ethanol intake as a function of the level of anxiety response. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Ethanol administration increased GPD1 mRNA expression. • Ethanol administration increased glucose incorporation into TG glycerol moieties. • No increase in hepatic TG levels was observed in ethanol-injected GPD1 null mice. • We propose that GPD1 is required for ethanol-induced TG accumulation in the liver. - Abstract: Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2 h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6 h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2 h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6 h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of {sup 14}C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  8. Effects of 7-keto Dehydroepiandrosterone on Voluntary Ethanol Intake in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Worrel, Mary E.; Gurkovskaya, Olga V.; Leonard, Stuart T.; Lewis, Peter B.; Winsauer, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a neurosteroid that can negatively modulate the GABAA receptor, has been shown to decrease voluntary intake of ethanol in rats. In vivo, DHEA can be metabolized to a variety of metabolites, including 7-keto DHEA, a metabolite without the prohormonal effects of DHEA. This study compared the effectiveness of 7-keto DHEA to DHEA for reducing ethanol intake in the same group of rats. The subjects, previously trained to drink ethanol using a saccharin-fading procedure, had access to ethanol for thirty minutes daily, and the amount consumed was recorded. Subjects were administered 10 and 56 mg/kg of DHEA or 7-keto DHEA intraperitoneally 15 minutes prior to drinking sessions. Subjects received each particular dose daily until one of two criteria was met; that is, either ethanol intake did not differ by more than 20% of the mean for three consecutive days, or for a maximum of eight days. Both 10 and 56 mg/kg of 7-keto DHEA significantly reduced the dose of ethanol consumed. While 10 mg/kg of 7-keto DHEA produced decreases similar to those found with DHEA, the 56-mg/kg dose of 7-keto DHEA was significantly more effective at decreasing the dose of ethanol consumed than the same dose of DHEA. These results show that 7-keto DHEA is comparable to, or possibly more effective than, DHEA at decreasing ethanol consumption in rats, and that 7-keto DHEA is a compound deserving further investigation as a possible clinical treatment for alcohol abuse without the prohormonal effects of DHEA. PMID:21051179

  9. Ethanol concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract after intake of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Rubbens, Jari; Brouwers, Joachim; Wolfs, Kris; Adams, Erwin; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2016-04-30

    The goal of this study was to monitor gastric and duodenal ethanol concentrations arising from the consumption of commonly used alcoholic beverages. In a cross-over study, five fasting volunteers were asked to drink two standard consumptions of commercially available alcoholic beverages, including beer (Stella Artois®, 500 mL, 5.2% ethanol), wine (Blanc du Blanc®, 200 mL, 11% ethanol) and whisky (Gallantry Whisky®, 80 mL, 40% ethanol). The volunteers finished drinking beer within 10 min and wine or whisky within 5 min. Ethanol concentrations in gastric and duodenal fluids, aspirated as a function of time, were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography. In all three conditions, the average gastric profile shows a maximum ethanol concentration (Cmax) at 7 min, while the mean duodenal profiles have a Tmax at 20, 7 and 12 min for beer, wine and whisky, respectively. The median gastric ethanol Cmax (min-max) for the beer, wine and whisky conditions amounts to 4.1% (3.1-4.1), 4.1% (2.6-7.3) and 11.4% (6.3-21.1), respectively. The mean duodenal profiles follow the same pattern as their corresponding gastric profiles, albeit with lower percentages of ethanol. Median duodenal ethanol Cmax (min-max) for beer, wine and whisky are 1.97% (0.89-4.3), 2.39% (2.02-5.63) and 5.94% (3.55-17.71), respectively. Intraluminal ethanol concentrations appear to decline relatively rapidly in fasting conditions: both stomach and duodenum contained less than 0.05% of ethanol after 120 min. This in vivo study is the first to present intraluminal ethanol concentrations in man after the intake of alcoholic beverages. Relatively low and fast declining gastric ethanol concentrations were observed, contrasting with the current Food and Drug Administration guidelines for the in vitro testing of formulations with respect to ethanol resistance. The presented gastric and duodenal ethanol concentrations and their variation may serve as reference data to design relevant models for predicting (i

  10. Beneficial Effect of Low Ethanol Intake on the Cardiovascular System: Possible Biochemical Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Sudesh; Gill, Vicki; Singal, Pawan K

    2006-01-01

    Low ethanol intake is known to have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease. In cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance leads to altered glucose and lipid metabolism resulting in an increased production of aldehydes, including methylglyoxal. Aldehydes react non-enzymatically with sulfhydryl and amino groups of proteins forming advanced glycation end products (AGEs), altering protein structure and function. These alterations cause endothelial dysfunction with increased cytosolic free calcium, peripheral vascular resistance, and blood pressure. AGEs produce atherogenic effects including oxidative stress, platelet adhesion, inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and modification of lipoproteins. Low ethanol intake attenuates hypertension and atherosclerosis but the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Ethanol at low concentrations is metabolized by low Km alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, both reactions resulting in the production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). This creates a reductive environment, decreasing oxidative stress and secondary production of aldehydes through lipid peroxidation. NADH may also increase the tissue levels of the antioxidants cysteine and glutathione, which bind aldehydes and stimulate methylglyoxal catabolism. Low ethanol improves insulin resistance, increases high-density lipoprotein and stimulates activity of the antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase. In conclusion, we suggest that chronic low ethanol intake confers its beneficial effect mainly through its ability to increase antioxidant capacity and lower AGEs. PMID:17326332

  11. Gastric and Duodenal Ethanol Concentrations after Intake of Alcoholic Beverages in Postprandial Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rubbens, Jari; Riethorst, Danny; Brouwers, Joachim; Wolfs, Kris; Adams, Erwin; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-08-11

    This study determined intraluminal ethanol concentrations (stomach and duodenum) in fed healthy volunteers after the consumption of common alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, and whisky). The results of this study were compared with a previous study in fasted volunteers. Five healthy volunteers were recruited in a crossover study. The fed state was simulated by ingestion of 250 mL of Nutridrink Compact Neutral. Volunteers subsequently consumed two standard units of beer (Stella Artois, 500 mL, 5.2% ethanol), wine (Blanc du Blanc, 200 mL, 11% ethanol), or whisky (Gallantry Whisky, 80 mL, 40% ethanol). Gastric and duodenal fluids were aspirated through two catheters over time and analyzed for ethanol content by head space gas chromatography. The capability of ethanol to permeate gastric and duodenal rat mucosa was examined in an Ussing chambers setup. A similar average gastric Cmax was observed in the beer and the wine conditions: 3.3% and 3.7% ethanol, respectively. The gastric Cmax in the whisky condition amounted to 8.5% ethanol. Lower ethanol concentrations were observed in the duodenum compared to the stomach. The duodenal Cmax was similar in all three conditions: 1.3%, 1.2%, and 1.6% ethanol for beer, wine, and whisky, respectively. Compared to the fasted state (reported in a previous study), higher gastric ethanol concentrations were observed during a longer time period. In the beer and wine conditions, similar concentrations were observed in the intestine regardless of the prandial state. After intake of whisky, however, the ethanol concentration was lower in the fed intestine. Alcohol was observed to permeate both gastric and duodenal rat mucosa. Higher intragastric ethanol concentrations were maintained for a longer period of time in fed compared to fasted state conditions. However, the observed concentration profiles were not in line with current FDA guidelines for alcohol resistance testing of formulations, stating that in vitro tests should investigate the

  12. [The significance of ethanolemia for the diagnosis of death from acute ethanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A V; Panfilenko, O A; Serebriakova, V G

    2002-01-01

    Foci of myolysis of cardiac muscle fibers are suggested to be used for evaluation of thanatogenetic significance of ethanol concentration in cadaveric blood. This sign of acute ethanol poisoning is absent in case of other cause of death in a state of ethanol intoxication, even in the presence of high ethanolemia. Therefore, foci of myolysis are a sign of ethanol tolerance.

  13. Effect of acute ethanol ingestion on fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Boquillon, M

    1976-12-01

    A test meal (300 mg casein, 600 mg sucrose, 100 mg corn oil, tracer dose of 9.10(3)H oleic acid) was given to fasting adult rats with intestinal lymph fistulas. One group received an acute oral dose of ethanol (3.2 g/kg body weight) simultaneously with the test meal. Controls received 2.5 ml of water instead of ethanol. Ingestion of ethanol temporarily delayed the removal of lipid radioactivity from the stomachs. More than 25% of radioactivity fed remained 8 hr after feeding whereas with control rats less than 10% of lipid radioactivity fed remained 6 hr after feeding. In controls and ethanol-treated rats, the amounts of exogenous lipids in the intestinal lumen and mucosa were low and similar enough. Quantities of endogenous and exogenous lipids found in the lymph collected during 24 hr after feeding were similar in the two groups, but the fat absorption peak was found after 6 hr in alcoholic rats and before 6 hr in controls. This delay was probably due to the retention of lipids in the stomach. More of the exogenous lipid was always transported by small particles moving in the region of alpha1 globulins in cellulose acetate electrophoresis than by larger particles remaining at the origin. This proportion was enhanced in the ethanol-treated animals. The larger fat particles were richer in endogenous fatty acids in alcohol-treated rats than in controls.

  14. Chronic ethanol exposure increases voluntary home cage intake in adult male, but not female, Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Melissa; McGinnis, Molly M; McCool, Brian A

    2015-12-01

    The current experiment examined the effects of 10 days of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on anxiety-like behavior and home cage ethanol intake using a 20% intermittent access (M, W, F) paradigm in male and female Long-Evans rats. Withdrawal from alcohol dependence contributes to relapse in humans and increases in anxiety-like behavior and voluntary ethanol consumption in preclinical models. Our laboratory has shown that 10 days of CIE exposure produces both behavioral and neurophysiological alterations associated with withdrawal in male rats; however, we have yet to examine the effects of this exposure regime on ethanol intake in females. During baseline, females consumed more ethanol than males but, unlike males, did not show escalations in intake. Rats were then exposed to CIE and were again given intermittent access to 20% ethanol. CIE males increased their intake compared to baseline, whereas air-exposed males did not. Ethanol intake in females was unaffected by CIE exposure. Notably, both sexes expressed significantly elevated withdrawal-associated anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Finally, rats were injected with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, SR141716A (0, 1, 3, 10mg/kg, i.p.) which reduced ethanol intake in both sexes. However, females appear to be more sensitive to lower doses of this CB1 receptor antagonist. Our results show that females consume more ethanol than males; however, they did not escalate their intake using the intermittent access paradigm. Unlike males, CIE exposure had no effect on drinking in females. It is possible that females may be less sensitive than males to ethanol-induced increases in drinking after a short CIE exposure. Lastly, our results demonstrate that males and females may have different pharmacological sensitivities to CB1 receptor blockade on ethanol intake, at least under the current conditions.

  15. Chronic ethanol exposure increases voluntary home cage intake in adult male, but not female, Long-Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Melissa; McGinnis, Molly M.; McCool, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    The current experiment examined the effects of 10 days of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on anxiety-like behavior and home cage ethanol intake using a 20% intermittent access (M, W, F) paradigm in male and female Long-Evans rats. Withdrawal from alcohol dependence contributes to relapse in humans and increases in anxiety-like behavior and voluntary ethanol consumption in preclinical models. Our laboratory has shown that 10 days of CIE exposure produces both behavioral and neurophysiological alterations associated with withdrawal in male rats; however, we have yet to examine the effects of this exposure regime on ethanol intake in females. During baseline, females consumed more ethanol than males but, unlike males, did not show escalations in intake. Rats were then exposed to CIE and were again given intermittent access to 20% ethanol. CIE males increased their intake compared to baseline, whereas air-exposed males did not. Ethanol intake in females was unaffected by CIE exposure. Notably, both sexes expressed significantly elevated withdrawal-associated anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Finally, rats were injected with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, SR141716A (0, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) which reduced ethanol intake in both sexes. However, females appear to be more sensitive to lower doses of this CB1 receptor antagonist. Our results show that females consume more ethanol than males; however, they did not escalate their intake using the intermittent access paradigm. Unlike males, CIE exposure had no effect on drinking in females. It is possible that females may be less sensitive than males to ethanol-induced increases in drinking after a short CIE exposure. Lastly, our results demonstrate that males and females may have different pharmacological sensitivities to CB1 receptor blockade on ethanol intake, at least under the current conditions. PMID:26515190

  16. A possible role of atrial natriuretic peptide in ethanol-induced acute diuresis

    SciTech Connect

    Colantonio, D.; Casale, R.; Mammarella, M.; Pasqualetti, P. ); Desiati, P.; De Michele, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol on plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels were investigated in 4 clinically healthy males, aged 24-26 years, consumed either 750 ml of water as a control study, or the same beverage with 1 ml/kg alcohol added, which increased the plasma alcohol concentration to 99.12{plus minus}15.10 mg/dl at 60 min. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels were significantly higher in the alcohol study compared to the control study at each time point, and with a peak at 10 min. Atrial natriuretic peptide levels showed a positive significant correlation with plasma antidiuretic hormone in the control group, while no relationship was found between the two peptides in the alcohol study. Moreover, a significant correlation exists between plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels and systolic arterial blood pressure, and heart rate, and between the variations in atrial natriuretic peptide values and the variations in plasma sodium, serum ethanol, and plasma osmolality in the alcohol study. Acute ethanol intake causes an increase in urinary volume, and a decrease in urinary potassium excretion and urinary osmolality, and no change in urinary sodium excretion.

  17. Relationship between ethanol-induced activity and anxiolysis in the open field, elevated plus maze, light-dark box, and ethanol intake in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, María Belén; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Molina, Juan C; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2014-05-15

    It is yet unclear if ethanol-induced motor stimulation in the open field (OF) merely reflects psychomotor stimulating effects of the drug or if this stimulation is driven or modulated by ethanol's antianxiety properties. In the present study, adolescent rats were administered with different ethanol doses or remained untreated. They were sequentially assessed in the OF, elevated plus maze (EPM), and light-dark box (LDB) and then assessed for ethanol intake. The aims were to assess the relationship between measures of ethanol-induced activity and anxiolysis, analyze ethanol intake as a function of prior ethanol exposure, and associate behavioral responsiveness in these apparatus with ethanol intake during adolescence. The results suggested that the enhanced exploration of the OF observed after 2.5 and 3.25 g/kg ethanol reflected a motor-stimulating effect that appeared to be relatively independent of anxiolysis. The 1.25 g/kg dose induced motor stimulation in the OF and anti-anxiety effects in the EPM, but these effects were relatively independent. The 0.5 g/kg ethanol dose exerted significant anxiolytic effects in the EPM in the absence of stimulating effects in the OF. A multivariate regression analysis indicated that adolescents with a higher frequency of rearing behavior in the OF, higher percentage of open arm entries in the EPM, and lower propensity to enter the central area of the OF exhibited greater ethanol intake. These results indicate that the OF is a valid procedure for the measurement of ethanol-induced stimulation, and provide information toward characterizing subpopulations of adolescents at risk for initiating alcohol drinking.

  18. Effects of Cagemate Gender and the Cagemate's access to ethanol on ethanol and water intake of the proximal male or the proximal female CD-1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Tomie, Arthur; DeFuria, Alyssa A; Jones, Heather A; Edwards, Sara D; Yu, Lei

    2014-02-01

    The effects of social stimulation on ethanol drinking in humans may depend on the gender of the drinker, the gender of the social stimulus, and the availability of ethanol provided to the social stimulus. The present study employed the Proximal Cagemate Drinking (PCD) Procedures to evaluate the effects of the gender of the social stimulus Cagemate mouse and the effects of providing ethanol to the Cagemate mouse on the drinking of ethanol and water by the male or female CD-1 Drinker mouse. Twelve groups of subjects were arranged in a 3 × 2 × 2 factorial design with 3 levels of Cagemate Gender (Male vs. Female vs. None), 2 levels of Drinker Gender (Male vs. Female), and 2 levels of Cagemate Ethanol (Ethanol vs. No Ethanol). In the 8 groups assigned to social housing conditions, each Drinker mouse was housed with a Cagemate mouse on opposite sides of a clear plastic shoebox cage equipped with a clear plastic barrier that divided the cage lengthwise into 2 equal compartments. Six groups of Drinkers and 4 groups of Cagemates were provided with continuous access to 2 bottles (ethanol vs. water), while the 4 groups of Cagemates in the No Ethanol condition were provided with 2 bottles containing water. Results revealed that providing the Cagemate with ethanol elevated ethanol intake and ethanol preference but reduced water intake in Drinkers in Other-Gender Pairings (Male Drinker-Female Cagemate or Female Drinker-Male Cagemate) relative to Drinkers in Same-Gender Pairings (Male Drinker-Male Cagemate or Female Drinker-Female Cagemate). In contrast, when the Cagemate was not provided with access to ethanol, the opposite effects were observed. These novel PCD procedures reveal that the gender of the Cagemate and the Cagemate's access to ethanol influenced ethanol drinking in proximal-housed CD-1 Drinker mice.

  19. Relationship between ethanol-induced activity and anxiolysis in the open field, elevated plus maze, light-dark box, and ethanol intake in adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, María Belén; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Molina, Juan C.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2014-01-01

    It is yet unclear if ethanol-induced motor stimulation in the open field (OF) merely reflects psychomotor stimulating effects of the drug or if this stimulation is driven or modulated by ethanol’s antianxiety properties. In the present study, adolescent rats were administered with different ethanol doses or remained untreated. They were sequentially assessed in the OF, elevated plus maze (EPM), and light-dark box (LDB) and then assessed for ethanol intake. The aims were to assess the relationship between measures of ethanol-induced activity and anxiolysis, analyze ethanol intake as a function of prior ethanol exposure, and associate behavioral responsiveness in these apparatus with ethanol intake during adolescence. The results suggested that the enhanced exploration of the OF observed after 2.5 and 3.25 g/kg ethanol reflected a motor-stimulating effect that appeared to be relatively independent of anxiolysis. The 1.25 g/kg dose induced motor stimulation in the OF and anti-anxiety effects in the EPM, but these effects were relatively independent. The 0.5 g/kg ethanol dose exerted significant anxiolytic effects in the EPM in the absence of stimulating effects in the OF. A multivariate regression analysis indicated that adolescents with a higher frequency of rearing behavior in the OF, higher percentage of open arm entries in the EPM, and lower propensity to enter the central area of the OF exhibited greater ethanol intake. These results indicate that the OF is a valid procedure for the measurement of ethanol-induced stimulation, and provide information towards characterizing subpopulations of adolescents at risk for initiating alcohol drinking. PMID:24583190

  20. [Experimental rationale for the use of enterosorbents in acute ethanol intoxication].

    PubMed

    Orbidans, A G; Terekhin, G A; Vladimirskiĭ, E V; Terekhina, N A

    2009-01-01

    The experiment on 83 rats has provided a rationale for the use of enterosorbents in acute ethanol intoxication. Polysorb reduces the halflife of ethanol, recovers physical fitness in the animals with acute poisoning. The enterosorbents polysorb, litovit, and sapropel have been found to have a corrective effect on the level of the major plasma antioxidant ceruloplasmin in acute ethanol intoxication. Enterosorbents are an effective detoxifying agent in this condition. Examining the mechanisms of toxic action of ethanol allows the most expedient treatment policy to be substantiated in acute poisonings.

  1. Psychomotor performance after intake of zopiclone compared with intake of ethanol: a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial.

    PubMed

    Gustavsen, Ingebjørg; Hjelmeland, Knut; Bernard, Jean Paul; Mørland, Jørg

    2011-08-01

    The sleep medicine zopiclone (eszopiclone) is commonly used in most Western countries. The focus on legislation for possible traffic-impairing nonalcohol drugs have caused a need for comparing traffic relevant behavior after intake of commonly used psychoactive drugs to blood alcohol concentrations (BACs). We aimed to compare psychomotor effects at 3 levels of behavior at different blood zopiclone concentrations to effects seen at different BACs. We performed a randomized double-blinded trial on 16 healthy volunteers who received either 10 or 5 mg zopiclone, 50 g ethanol or placebo in a crossover design. The volunteers performed computerized tests at baseline, 1, 3.5, and 6.5 hours after intake, accompanied by blood sampling. Impairment was found at all 3 behavior levels. For zopiclone, impairment was most pronounced at behavior level 1 (automotive behavior); a mean blood zopiclone concentration at 39 μg/L achieved 1 hour after intake of 10 mg zopiclone was accompanied by more impairment than BAC 0.074 %. At behavior levels 2 (control behavior) and 3 (executive planning), the psychomotor impairment accompanying approximately 39 μg/L zopiclone seemed comparable to a BAC of approximately 0.074%. No test components were impaired at 6.5 hours after intake.

  2. Acute and chronic tianeptine treatments attenuate ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kayir, Hakan; Celik, Turgay; Yüksel, Nevzat

    2006-05-01

    Effects of acute and chronic tianeptine treatments on ethanol withdrawal syndrome were investigated in rats. Ethanol (7.2% v/v) was given to adult male Wistar rats by a liquid diet for 30 days. Acute or chronic (twice daily) tianeptine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and saline were administered to rats intraperitoneally. Acute and last chronic tianeptine injections and saline were done 30 min before ethanol withdrawal testing. After 2nd, 4th and 6th hours of ethanol withdrawal, rats were observed for 5 min, and withdrawal signs which included locomotor hyperactivity, agitation, tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behavior and audiogenic seizures were recorded or rated. Locomotor activity in naive (no ethanol-dependent rats) was also tested after acute tianeptine treatments. Acute but not chronic tianeptine treatment attenuated locomotor hyperactivity and agitation in ethanol-dependent rats. Both acute and chronic tianeptine treatment produced some significant inhibitory effects on tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behaviors and audiogenic seizures during the ethanol withdrawal. Our results suggest that acute or chronic tianeptine treatment attenuates ethanol withdrawal syndrome in ethanol-dependent rats and this drug may be useful for treatment of ethanol-type dependence.

  3. Acute exercise and subsequent energy intake. A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Matthew M; Desbrow, Ben; Sabapathy, Surendran; Leveritt, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The precise magnitude of the effect of acute exercise on subsequent energy intake is not well understood. Identifying how large a deficit exercise can produce in energy intake and whether this is compensated for, is important in design of long-term exercise programs for weight loss and weight maintenance. Thus, this paper sought to review and perform a meta-analysis on data from the existing literature. Twenty-nine studies, consisting of 51 trials, were identified for inclusion. Exercise duration ranged from 30 to 120min at intensities of 36-81% VO(2)max, with trials ranging from 2 to 14h, and ad libitum test meals offered 0-2h post-exercise. The outcome variables included absolute energy intake and relative energy intake. A random effects model was employed for analysis due to expected heterogeneity. Results indicated that exercise has a trivial effect on absolute energy intake (n=51; ES=0.14, 95% CI: -0.005 to 0.29) and a large effect on relative energy intake (creating an energy deficit, n=25; ES=-1.35, 95% CI: -1.64 to -1.05). Despite variability among studies, results suggest that exercise is effective for producing a short-term energy deficit and that individuals tend not to compensate for the energy expended during exercise in the immediate hours after exercise by altering food intake. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exposure to ethanol on prenatal days 19-20 increases ethanol intake and palatability in the infant rat: involvement of kappa and mu opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cenzano, Elena; Gaztañaga, Mirari; Gabriela Chotro, M

    2014-09-01

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol on gestation Days 19-20, but not 17-18, increases ethanol acceptance in infant rats. This effect seems to be a conditioned response acquired prenatally, mediated by the opioid system, which could be stimulated by ethanol's pharmacological properties (mu-opioid receptors) or by a component of the amniotic fluid from gestation-day 20 (kappa-inducing factor). The latter option was evaluated administering non-ethanol chemosensory stimuli on gestation Days 19-20 and testing postnatal intake and palatability. However, prenatal exposure to anise or vanilla increased neither intake nor palatability of these tastants on postnatal Day 14. In experiment 2, the role of ethanol's pharmacological effect was tested by administering ethanol and selective antagonists of mu and kappa opioid receptors prenatally. Blocking the mu-opioid receptor system completely reversed the effects on intake and palatability, while antagonizing kappa receptors only partially reduced the effects on palatability. This suggests that the pharmacological effect of ethanol on the fetal mu opioid system is the appetitive reinforcer, which induces the prenatally conditioned preference detected in the preweanling period.

  5. Brain impairment in well-nourished chronic alcoholics is related to ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, J M; Estruch, R; Salamero, M; Orteu, N; Fernandez-Solà, J; Sacanella, E; Urbano-Márquez, A

    1997-05-01

    To determine the influence of chronic ethanol intake on the central nervous system, we studied 40 asymptomatic, well-nourished, chronic alcoholics (mean age, 42.6 +/- 9.1 years) and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched control subjects. Studies included neuropsychological testing, visual and short-latency auditory evoked potentials, and morphometric analysis of computed tomography scans. The mean daily ethanol consumption of the alcoholics was 204 gm over an average of 26.4 years. Compared to control subjects, chronic alcoholics exhibited a significant prolongation of the P100 latency of visual evoked potentials, and a prolongation and reduction in the amplitude of the latency of the V wave of short-latency auditory evoked potentials. These abnormalities were related to the lifetime dose of ethanol consumed. Brain morphometric analysis showed that alcoholics had a significantly greater degree of brain shrinkage with age, compared to control subjects. The cortical atrophy index correlated significantly with the lifetime ethanol consumption. Neuropsychological testing in alcoholics compared to controls revealed a significant impairment of frontal skills that was related to age, degree of scholarship, and the presence of frontal atrophy. In conclusion, well-nourished chronic alcoholics exhibited significant brain impairment, as demonstrated by neuropsychological testing, evoked potentials, and brain morphometric analysis, which was correlated with the lifetime dose of ethanol consumed.

  6. IMPACT OF WHEEL RUNNING ON CHRONIC ETHANOL INTAKE IN AGED SYRIAN HAMSTERS

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Hammer, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dependence in aging populations is seen as a public health concern, most recently because of the significant proportion of heavy drinking among “Baby Boomers.” Basic animal research on the effects of aging on physiological and behavioral regulation of ethanol (EtOH) intake is sparse, since most of this research is limited to younger models of alcoholism. Here, EtOH drinking and preference were measured in groups of aged Syrian hamsters. Further, because voluntary exercise (wheel-running) is a rewarding substitute for EtOH in young adult hamsters, the potential for such reward substitution was also assessed. Methods Aged (24 month-old) male hamsters were subjected to a three-stage regimen of free-choice EtOH (20% v/v) or water and unlocked or locked running wheels to investigate the modulatory effects of voluntary wheel running on EtOH intake and preference. Levels of fluid intake and activity were recorded daily across 60 days of experimentation. Results Prior to wheel running, levels of EtOH intake were significantly less than levels of water intake, resulting in a low preference for EtOH (30%). Hamsters with access to an unlocked running wheel had decreased EtOH intake and preference compared with hamsters with access to a locked running wheel. These group differences in EtOH intake and preference were sustained for up to 10 days after running wheels were re-locked. Discussion These results extend upon those of our previous work in young adult hamsters, indicating that aging dampens EtOH intake and preference. Voluntary wheel running further limited EtOH intake, suggesting that exercise could offer a practical approach for managing late-life alcoholism. PMID:23022151

  7. Brewing complications: the effect of acute ethanol exposure on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Radek, Katherine A.; Ranzer, Matthew J.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol consumption is linked to a higher incidence of traumatic wounds and increases the risk for morbidity and mortality following surgical or traumatic injury. One of the most profound effects of acute ethanol exposure on wound healing occurs during the inflammatory response, and altered cytokine production is a primary component. Acute ethanol exposure also impairs the proliferative response during healing, causing delays in epithelial coverage, collagen synthesis, and blood vessel regrowth. The accumulated data support the paradigm that acute ethanol intoxication prior to injury significantly diminishes a patient’s ability to heal efficiently. PMID:19675208

  8. Post-weaning Environmental Enrichment, But Not Chronic Maternal Isolation, Enhanced Ethanol Intake during Periadolescence and Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Luciana R; Fabio, María C; Pautassi, Ricardo M

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats exposed to maternal separation (MS) during infancy (postnatal days 1-21, PD1-21) and environmental enrichment (EE) during adolescence (PD 21-42). Previous work revealed that MS enhances ethanol consumption during adulthood. It is still unknown if a similar effect is found during adolescence. Several studies, in turn, have revealed that EE reverses stress experiences, and reduces ethanol consumption and reinforcement; although others reported greater ethanol intake after EE. The interactive effects between these treatments upon ethanol's effects and intake have yet to be explored. We assessed chronic ethanol intake and preference (12 two-bottle daily sessions, spread across 30 days, 1st session on PD46) in rats exposed to MS and EE. The main finding was that male - but not female - rats that had been exposed to EE consumed more ethanol than controls given standard housing, an effect that was not affected by MS. Subsequent experiments assessed several factors associated with heightened ethanol consumption in males exposed to MS and EE; namely taste aversive conditioning and hypnotic-sedative consequences of ethanol. We also measured anxiety response in the light-dark box and in the elevated plus maze tests; and exploratory patterns of novel stimuli and behaviors indicative of risk assessment and risk-taking, via a modified version of the concentric square field (CSF) test. Aversive conditioning, hypnosis and sleep time were similar in males exposed or not to EE. EE males, however, exhibited heightened exploration of novel stimuli and greater risk taking behaviors in the CSF test. It is likely that the promoting effect of EE upon ethanol intake was due to these effects upon exploratory and risk-taking behaviors.

  9. Cytokine Changes following Acute Ethanol Intoxication in Healthy Men: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Skulberg, Andreas; Skulberg, Knut Ragnvald; Aass, Hans Christian D.; Bramness, Jørgen G.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is a known modulator of the innate immune system. Owing to the absence of human studies, alcohol's effect on circulating cytokine profile remains unclear. We investigated the effect of acute high dose alcohol consumption on systemic cytokine release. After an overnight fasting, alcohol-experienced healthy male volunteers (N = 20) aged 25–45 years were given oral ethanol in the form of vodka (4.28 mL/kg) which they drank over a period of 30 minutes reaching peak blood alcohol concentration of 0.12% (SD 0.028). Blood samples were obtained prior to alcohol intake as well as 2, 7, and 12 hours thereafter. Serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and TNF-α were determined by the multibead-based assay. Baseline cytokine levels were not related to BMI, hepatic parameters, electrolytes, glucose, or morning cortisol levels. Within 2 hours of alcohol intake, levels of IL-1Ra were elevated and remained so throughout the assessment period (p for trend = 0.015). In contrast, the levels of the chemokine MCP-1 dropped acutely followed by steadily increasing levels during the observation period (p < 0.001). The impact of sustained elevated levels of MCP-1 even after the clearance of blood alcohol content deserves attention. PMID:28090151

  10. Acute sensitivity and acute tolerance to ethanol in preweanling rats with or without prenatal experience with the drug

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Carlos; Molina, Juan Carlos; Mlewski, Cecilia; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Spear, Norman

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined behavioral sensitivity and acute tolerance to ethanol in infants with or without a moderate prenatal ethanol experience. During gestational days 17–20 dams received 0.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. On postnatal day 13 pups were administered 0.0, 0.5 or 2.5 g/kg ethanol prior to assessment of locomotion. One third of the pups were evaluated at 5–10, 30–35 and 60–65 min after ethanol administration; another third was tested only during the last two post-administration periods; and the remaining third was tested only at 60–65 min. At 30–35 min blood ethanol levels were similar to those attained at 60–65 min. The main results of the study were: (a) The 2.5 g/kg ethanol dose induced biphasic motor effects: stimulation 5–10 minutes after drug administration and sedation after 30–35 or 60–65 minutes. (b) Infants exhibited acute tolerance to ethanol’s sedative effects. (c) Although pups prenatally treated with ethanol exhibited heightened locomotor activity levels, acute sensitivity and tolerance were not affected by prenatal treatment. In summary, infants are sensitive to biphasic motor consequences of ethanol and readily exhibit acute tolerance to ethanol’s sedative effects. In addition, moderate prenatal ethanol exposure was sufficient to induce hyper-reactivity in the offspring without affecting habituation. PMID:18374972

  11. The calcium channel agonist BAY k 8644 reduces ethanol intake and preference in alcohol-preferring AA rats.

    PubMed

    de Beun, R; Schneider, R; Klein, A; Lohmann, A; Schreiber, R; De Vry, J

    1996-10-01

    Applying a 12-h limited access, two-bottle choice procedure, antialcohol effects of the 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) L-type calcium (Ca2+) channel agonist BAY k 8644 were investigated in alcohol-preferring AA rats. In this Wistar line, selectively bred for a high 10% v/v ethanol (EtOH) preference in a free choice situation, effects on EtOH preference and intake, as well as on food and total fluid intake were evaluated for racemic BAY k 8644 (0.1-1 mg/kg IP; 0.25-2 mg/kg PO), its agonistic (-)-enantiomer (0.1-1 mg/kg IP and PO) and its antagonistic (+)-enantiomer (10-50 mg/kg IP and PO). Irrespective of route of application, BAY k 8644 was found to be effective in reducing both EtOH intake and preference (minimal effective dose: 0.5 mg/kg; maximum effect: approximately 60% of baseline levels). The (+)-enantiomer, acting as a low-potency Ca2+ channel antagonist, also reduced EtOH intake and preference, but the effects were not very selective as food intake was also substantially reduced. Moreover, the effects were only obtained at relatively high doses (50 mg/kg). The essential enantiomer involved in the antialcohol effects of BAY k 8644 seems to be the (-)-enantiomer, acting as a strong Ca2+ channel agonist. This latter compound was potent (minimal effective dose: 0.3 mg/kg), very effective in reducing EtOH intake (maximum effect: 29% of baseline level) and preference (26% of baseline) and apparently more selective. Although slightly decreasing over days, effects of (-)-BAY k 8644 on EtOH intake and preference were shown to remain after repeated treatment (10 successive days, 0.3 mg/kg IP). Interestingly, the acute antialcohol effects of (-)-BAY k 8644 (0.3-1 mg/kg IP) could not be antagonized with the DHP L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists nimodipine (0.01-1 mg/kg IP) and (-)-nimodipine (1-30 mg/kg IP). The present results suggest that a mechanism of action other than L-type Ca2+ channel agonism is involved in the antialcohol effects of (+/-)- and (-)-BAY k 8644

  12. Intake of Ethanol, Sodium Chloride, Sucrose, Citric Acid, and Quinine Hydrochloride Solutions by Mice: A Genetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, A. A.; Reed, D. R.; Tordoff, M. G.; Price, R. A.; Beauchamp, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    Mice of the 129/J (129) and C57BL/6ByJ (B6) strains and their reciprocal F1 and F2 hybrids were offered solutions of ethanol, sucrose, citric acid, quinine hydrochloride, and NaCI in two-bottle choice tests. Consistent with earlier work, the B6 mice drank more ethanol, sucrose, citric acid, and quinine hydrochloride solution and less NaCI solution than did 129 mice. Analyses of each generation’s means and distributions showed that intakes of ethanol, quinine, sucrose, and NaCI were influenced by a few genes. The mode of inheritance was additive in the case of ethanol and quinine, for sucrose the genotype of the 129 strain was recessive, and for NaCI it was dominant. Citric acid intake appeared to be influenced by many genes with small effects, with the 129 genotype dominant. Correlations of sucrose consumption with ethanol and citric acid consumption were found among mice of the F2 generation, and the genetically determined component of these correlations was stronger than the component related to environmental factors. The genetically determined correlation between sucrose and ethanol intakes is consistent with the hypothesis that the higher ethanol intake by B6 mice depends, in part, on higher hedonic attractiveness of its sweet taste component. PMID:8990535

  13. [Acute renal failure after intake of mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Rojas Feria, P; González Rodríguez, J D; Canalejo González, D; Sánchez Moreno, A; Cabrera, R; Martín Govantes, J

    2008-01-01

    The picking and consumption of wild mushrooms is a frequent practice in our region and may lead to accidental poisoning when confused with edible mushrooms. We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy who, following the ingestion of a poisonous mushroom, presented with uncontrollable vomiting and subsequent hepatic, haematological and renal failure some hours later. The patient required haemodialysis. The clinical course, laboratory findings and renal histology, which showed tubular necrosis with basal membrane preserved and lymphocytic interstitial infiltrate, confirmed the diagnosis of a severe mixed syndrome. The patient evolved favourably after the poisoning, recovering renal and liver function. In any case of acute renal failure of unknown cause in children, it would be necessary to rule out ingestion of mushrooms, since the patient could benefit from early treatment with haemoperfusion and thus prevent the deterioration of the renal function and other organs. In our patient, haemoperfusion was not carried out due to the lengthy period of latency since the ingestion of the toxic substance until diagnosis.

  14. Early ethanol and water intake: choice mechanism and total fluid regulation operate in parallel in male alcohol preferring (P) and both Wistar and Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Azarov, Alexey V; Woodward, Donald J

    2014-01-17

    The goal of this study was to clarify similar and distinctly different parameters of fluid intake during early phases of ethanol and water choice drinking in alcohol preferring P-rat vs. non-selected Wistar and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Precision information on the drinking amounts and timing is needed to analyze micro-behavioral components of the acquisition of ethanol intake and to enable a search for its causal activity patterns within individual CNS circuits. The experiment followed the standard ethanol-drinking test used in P-rat selective breeding, with access to water, then 10% ethanol (10E) as sole fluids, and next to ethanol/water choice. The novelty of the present approach was to eliminate confounding prandial elevations of fluid intake, by time-separating daily food from fluid access. P-rat higher initial intakes of water and 10E as sole fluids suggest adaptations to ethanol-induced dehydration in P vs. Wistar and SD rats. P-rat starting and overall ethanol intake during the choice period were the highest. The absolute extent of ethanol intake elevation during choice period was greatest in Wistar and their final intake levels approached those of P-rat, contrary to the hypothesis that selection would produce the strongest elevation of ethanol intake. The total daily fluid during ethanol/water choice period was strikingly similar between P, Wistar and SD rats. This supports the hypothesis for a universal system that gauges the overall intake volume by titrating and integrating ethanol and water drinking fluctuations, and indicates a stable daily level of total fluid as a main regulated parameter of fluid intake across the three lines in choice conditions. The present findings indicate that a stable daily level of total fluid comprises an independent physiological limit for daily ethanol intake. Ethanol drinking, in turn, stays under the ceiling of this limit, driven by a parallel mechanism of ethanol/water choice.

  15. Early Ethanol and Water Intake: Choice Mechanism and Total Fluid Regulation Operate in Parallel in Male Alcohol Preferring (P) and both Wistar and Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Alexey V.; Woodward, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify similar and distinctly different parameters of fluid intake during early phases of ethanol and water choice drinking in alcohol preferring P-rat vs. non-selected Wistar and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Precision information on the drinking amounts and timing is needed to analyze micro-behavioral components of the acquisition of ethanol intake and to enable a search for its causal activity patterns within individual CNS circuits. The experiment followed the standard ethanol-drinking test used in P-rat selective breeding, with access to water, then 10% ethanol (10E) as sole fluids, and next to ethanol / water choice. The novelty of the present approach was to eliminate confounding prandial elevations of fluid intake, by time-separating daily food from fluid access. P-rat higher initial intakes of water and 10E as sole fluids suggest adaptations to ethanol-induced dehydration in P vs. Wistar and SD rats. P-rat starting and overall ethanol intake during the choice period were the highest. The absolute extent of ethanol intake elevation during choice period was greatest in Wistar and their final intake levels approached those of P-rat, contrary to the hypothesis that selection would produce the strongest elevation of ethanol intake. The total daily fluid during ethanol / water choice period was strikingly similar between P, Wistar and SD rats. This supports the hypothesis for a universal system that gauges the overall intake volume by titrating and integrating ethanol and water drinking fluctuations, and indicates a stable daily level of total fluid as a main regulated parameter of fluid intake across the three lines in choice conditions. The present findings indicate that a stable daily level of total fluid comprises an independent physiological limit for daily ethanol intake. Ethanol drinking, in turn, stays under the ceiling of this limit, driven by a parallel mechanism of ethanol / water choice. PMID:24095933

  16. Stress-Induced Enhancement of Ethanol Intake in C57BL/6J Mice with a History of Chronic Ethanol Exposure: Involvement of Kappa Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rachel I; Lopez, Marcelo F; Becker, Howard C

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that daily forced swim stress (FSS) prior to ethanol drinking sessions facilitates enhanced ethanol consumption in mice with a history of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure without altering ethanol intake in air-exposed controls. Because both stress and chronic ethanol exposure have been shown to activate the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system, the present study was designed to explore a potential role for KORs in modulating stress effects on ethanol consumption in the CIE model of dependence and relapse drinking. After stable baseline ethanol intake was established in adult male C57BL/6J mice, subjects received chronic intermittent exposure (16 h/day × 4 days/week) to ethanol vapor (CIE group) or air (CTL group). Weekly cycles of inhalation exposure were alternated with 5-day limited access drinking tests (1 h access to 15% ethanol). Experiment 1 compared effects of daily FSS and KOR activation on ethanol consumption. CIE and CTL mice were either exposed to FSS (10 min), the KOR agonist U50,488 (5 mg/kg), or a vehicle injection (non-stressed condition) prior to each daily drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased drinking in CIE mice. U50,488 mimicked this effect in CIE mice, but also increased drinking in CTL mice. Experiment 2 assessed effects of KOR blockade on stress-induced drinking in CIE and CTL mice. Stressed and non-stressed mice were administered the short-acting KOR antagonist LY2444296 (0 or 5 mg/kg) 30 min prior to each drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased ethanol consumption in CIE mice, an effect that was abolished by LY2444296 pretreatment. In Experiment 3, CIE and CTL mice were administered one of four doses of U50,488 (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg) 1 h prior to each daily drinking test (in lieu of FSS). All doses of U50,488 increased ethanol consumption in both CIE and CTL mice. The U50,488-induced increase in drinking was blocked by LY

  17. Stress-Induced Enhancement of Ethanol Intake in C57BL/6J Mice with a History of Chronic Ethanol Exposure: Involvement of Kappa Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rachel I.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Becker, Howard C.

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that daily forced swim stress (FSS) prior to ethanol drinking sessions facilitates enhanced ethanol consumption in mice with a history of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure without altering ethanol intake in air-exposed controls. Because both stress and chronic ethanol exposure have been shown to activate the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system, the present study was designed to explore a potential role for KORs in modulating stress effects on ethanol consumption in the CIE model of dependence and relapse drinking. After stable baseline ethanol intake was established in adult male C57BL/6J mice, subjects received chronic intermittent exposure (16 h/day × 4 days/week) to ethanol vapor (CIE group) or air (CTL group). Weekly cycles of inhalation exposure were alternated with 5-day limited access drinking tests (1 h access to 15% ethanol). Experiment 1 compared effects of daily FSS and KOR activation on ethanol consumption. CIE and CTL mice were either exposed to FSS (10 min), the KOR agonist U50,488 (5 mg/kg), or a vehicle injection (non-stressed condition) prior to each daily drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased drinking in CIE mice. U50,488 mimicked this effect in CIE mice, but also increased drinking in CTL mice. Experiment 2 assessed effects of KOR blockade on stress-induced drinking in CIE and CTL mice. Stressed and non-stressed mice were administered the short-acting KOR antagonist LY2444296 (0 or 5 mg/kg) 30 min prior to each drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased ethanol consumption in CIE mice, an effect that was abolished by LY2444296 pretreatment. In Experiment 3, CIE and CTL mice were administered one of four doses of U50,488 (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg) 1 h prior to each daily drinking test (in lieu of FSS). All doses of U50,488 increased ethanol consumption in both CIE and CTL mice. The U50,488-induced increase in drinking was blocked by LY

  18. Avermectins differentially affect ethanol intake and receptor function: Implications for developing new therapeutics for alcohol use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Asatryan, Liana; Yardley, Megan M.; Khoja, Sheraz; Trudell, James R.; Hyunh, Nhat; Louie, Stan G.; Petasis, Nicos A.; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory is investigating ivermectin (IVM) and other members of the avermectin family as new pharmaco-therapeutics to prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Prior work found that IVM significantly reduced ethanol intake in mice and that this effect likely reflects IVM’s ability to modulate ligand-gated ion channels. We hypothesized that structural modifications that enhance IVM’s effects on key receptors and/or increase its brain concentration should improve its anti-alcohol efficacy. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the abilities of IVM and two other avermectins, abamectin (ABM) and selamectin (SEL), to reduce ethanol intake in mice, to alter modulation of GABA ARs and P2X4Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes and to increase their ability to penetrate the brain. IVM and ABM significantly reduced ethanol intake and antagonized the inhibitory effects of ethanol on P2X4R function. In contrast, SEL did not affect either measure, despite achieving higher brain concentrations than IVM and ABM. All three potentiated GABAA receptor function. These findings suggest that chemical structure and effects on receptor function play key roles in the ability of avermectins to reduce ethanol intake and that these factors are more important than brain penetration alone. The direct relationship between the effect of these avermectins on P2X4R function and ethanol intake suggest that the ability to antagonize ethanol-mediated inhibition of P2X4R function may be a good predictor of the potential of an avermectin to reduce ethanol intake and support the use of avermectins as a platform for developing novel drugs to prevent and/or treat AUDs. PMID:24451653

  19. Avermectins differentially affect ethanol intake and receptor function: implications for developing new therapeutics for alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Liana; Yardley, Megan M; Khoja, Sheraz; Trudell, James R; Hyunh, Nhat; Louie, Stan G; Petasis, Nicos A; Alkana, Ronald L; Davies, Daryl L

    2014-06-01

    Our laboratory is investigating ivermectin (IVM) and other members of the avermectin family as new pharmaco-therapeutics to prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Earlier work found that IVM significantly reduced ethanol intake in mice and that this effect likely reflects IVM's ability to modulate ligand-gated ion channels. We hypothesized that structural modifications that enhance IVM's effects on key receptors and/or increase its brain concentration should improve its anti-alcohol efficacy. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the abilities of IVM and two other avermectins, abamectin (ABM) and selamectin (SEL), to reduce ethanol intake in mice, to alter modulation of GABAARs and P2X4Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes and to increase their ability to penetrate the brain. IVM and ABM significantly reduced ethanol intake and antagonized the inhibitory effects of ethanol on P2X4R function. In contrast, SEL did not affect either measure, despite achieving higher brain concentrations than IVM and ABM. All three potentiated GABAAR function. These findings suggest that chemical structure and effects on receptor function play key roles in the ability of avermectins to reduce ethanol intake and that these factors are more important than brain penetration alone. The direct relationship between the effect of these avermectins on P2X4R function and ethanol intake suggest that the ability to antagonize ethanol-mediated inhibition of P2X4R function may be a good predictor of the potential of an avermectin to reduce ethanol intake and support the use of avermectins as a platform for developing novel drugs to prevent and/or treat AUDs.

  20. Post-weaning Environmental Enrichment, But Not Chronic Maternal Isolation, Enhanced Ethanol Intake during Periadolescence and Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Berardo, Luciana R.; Fabio, María C.; Pautassi, Ricardo M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats exposed to maternal separation (MS) during infancy (postnatal days 1–21, PD1–21) and environmental enrichment (EE) during adolescence (PD 21–42). Previous work revealed that MS enhances ethanol consumption during adulthood. It is still unknown if a similar effect is found during adolescence. Several studies, in turn, have revealed that EE reverses stress experiences, and reduces ethanol consumption and reinforcement; although others reported greater ethanol intake after EE. The interactive effects between these treatments upon ethanol’s effects and intake have yet to be explored. We assessed chronic ethanol intake and preference (12 two-bottle daily sessions, spread across 30 days, 1st session on PD46) in rats exposed to MS and EE. The main finding was that male – but not female – rats that had been exposed to EE consumed more ethanol than controls given standard housing, an effect that was not affected by MS. Subsequent experiments assessed several factors associated with heightened ethanol consumption in males exposed to MS and EE; namely taste aversive conditioning and hypnotic-sedative consequences of ethanol. We also measured anxiety response in the light-dark box and in the elevated plus maze tests; and exploratory patterns of novel stimuli and behaviors indicative of risk assessment and risk-taking, via a modified version of the concentric square field (CSF) test. Aversive conditioning, hypnosis and sleep time were similar in males exposed or not to EE. EE males, however, exhibited heightened exploration of novel stimuli and greater risk taking behaviors in the CSF test. It is likely that the promoting effect of EE upon ethanol intake was due to these effects upon exploratory and risk-taking behaviors. PMID:27790100

  1. The effects of acute ethanol administration on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety-like syndrome in rats: A biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya; Hapidin, Hermizi; Get Bee, Yvonne-Tee; Ismail, Zalina

    2016-02-01

    Withdrawal from long-term ethanol consumption results in overexcitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the amygdala, which induces an anxiety-like syndrome. Most alcoholics that suffer from such symptoms frequently depend on habitual drinking as self-medication to alleviate their symptoms. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) and protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon have been reported to mediate acute and chronic effects of ethanol. This study explores the changes in mGlu5 and PKC epsilon in the amygdala following acute administration of ethanol during ethanol withdrawal (EW) induced anxiety. Male Wistar rats were fed a modified liquid diet containing low-fat cow milk, sucrose, and maltodextrin, with a gradual introduction of 2.4%, 4.8% and 7.2% ethanol for 20 days. Six hours into EW, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline and ethanol (2.5 g/kg, 20% v/v), and exposed to open-field and elevated plus maze tests. Then, amygdala tissue was dissected from the rat brain for Western blot and gene expression studies. EW-induced anxiety was accompanied by a significant increase in mGlu5, total PKC epsilon, and phosphorylated PKC epsilon protein levels, and also of mRNA of mGlu5 (GRM5) in the amygdala. Acute administration of ethanol significantly attenuated EW-induced anxiety as well as an EW-induced increase in GRM5. The acute challenge of ethanol to EW rats had little effect on the phosphorylated and total protein levels of PKC epsilon in the amygdala. Our results demonstrate that amygdala PKC epsilon may not be directly involved in the development of anxiety following EW.

  2. Chronic pain causes a persistent anxiety state leading to increased ethanol intake in CD1 mice.

    PubMed

    González-Sepúlveda, Marta; Pozo, Oscar J; Marcos, Josep; Valverde, Olga

    2016-02-01

    Mood disorders and chronic pain are closely linked, but limited progress has been made in understanding the role of chronic and neuropathic pain in the aetiopathogenesis of depression. To explore the pathological mechanisms that mediate the association between pain and depressive-like behaviours, we studied the time-dependent effect of neuropathic pain on the development of anxiety-like and despair behaviours in CD1 mice. We analysed behavioural data, neuroinflammation reactions and changes in neurotransmitter (glutamate and serotonin) levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Sciatic-operated mice displayed long-lasting anxiety-like and despair behaviours, starting 5 and 20 days after partial sciatic nerve ligation, respectively. Glutamatergic neurotransmission and IL-1β cytokine expression were enhanced in the prefrontal cortex of mice with neuropathic pain. We found no change in serotonin metabolism, cytokine IL-6 or brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. While sciatic-operated mice exposed to intermittent ethanol intake (20% v/v) using the drinking in the dark procedure consumed higher amounts of ethanol than sham-operated mice, thermal allodynia and despair behaviour were not attenuated by ethanol consumption. Our findings reveal an association between glutamatergic neurotransmission and pain-induced mood disorders, and indicate that moderate ethanol consumption does not relieve nociceptive and depressive behaviours associated with chronic pain in mice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Non-oxidative ethanol metabolites as a measure of alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Maenhout, Thomas M; De Buyzere, Marc L; Delanghe, Joris R

    2013-01-16

    Recent alcohol intake can be monitored by the measurement of indirect biomarkers. Elevated levels of liver enzymes (i.e. gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST)) in blood are commonly used in clinical practice as an indicator of alcohol-induced liver damage. With the exception of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), the specificity of indirect markers is only moderate because many cases of elevated levels are unrelated to alcohol consumption. Because of their intermediate half-life and tendency to accumulate in hair, non-oxidative ethanol metabolites can be used as markers with an intermediate timeframe between ethanol measurements and GGT and CDT with regard to recent alcohol consumption occurring between hours to 1 week. Additionally, these biomarkers offer a high ethanol-specificity in combination with approximately a two-fold higher sensitivity in comparison with indirect alcohol markers. In case of forensic use of direct ethanol metabolites, caution has to be taken in interpretation and pre-analytical pitfalls should be considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Deposition of ethyl glucuronide in WHP rat hair after chronic ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Małkowska, Anna; Szutowski, Mirosław; Dyr, Wanda

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between ethanol intake in rats and the resulting level of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in rat hair. Rats (n = 50) consumed a 10% ethanol solution for 4 weeks, then EtG was extracted from samples of their hair using a novel extraction procedure involving freezing and thawing. The EtG concentration was measured using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The animals voluntarily drank ethanol, with daily consumption in most rats exceeding 5 g/kg b.w. The silylated EtG was stable for at least 28 h. The limit of detection was 0.03 ng/mg, and the limit of quantification was 0.1 ng/mg. Hair samples from rats that consumed ethanol had EtG levels ranging from 0.17-20.72 ng/mg in female rats and 0.15-13.72 ng/mg in males. There was a correlation between the amount of alcohol consumed and the EtG levels in hair from female (p < 0.01), but not male, rats. The method presented allows detection and quantification of EtG in rat hair. We also observed differences in EtG deposition in male and female rats.

  5. Catabolism of salivary glycoconjugates in acute ethanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szajda, Sławomir D; Jankowska, Anna; Waszkiewicz, Magdalena; Kepka, Alina; Konarzewska, Beata; Szulc, Agata; Snarska, Jadwiga; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2009-08-01

    The aim was to study the effects of a single large dose of ethanol (approximately 2.0 g/kg of body weight, as 40% vodka) on the specific activities of alpha-mannosidase, alpha-fucosidase, beta-glucuronidase, and beta-galactosidase as well as on the total protein concentration in saliva in eight healthy young volunteers. Resting whole saliva samples were collected 12 hours prior to and 36 and 108 hours after alcohol consumption. Exoglycosidase activities were assayed in the supernatants by the colorimetric method. Protein content was determined by the Lowry method. Thirty-six hours after alcohol consumption the specific activities of alpha-fucosidase and beta-glucuronidase were significantly higher than before drinking. The specific activity of beta-galactosidase showed a greater tendency to increase than alpha-mannosidase after the drinking session. The total protein concentration was significantly lower after alcohol consumption than at baseline, even at 108 hr. Significant inverse correlations between total protein content and the specific activities of the exoglycosidases in saliva were found after the drinking session. Acute ingestion of a large dose of ethanol increased the activity of salivary exoglycosidases, which might be followed by subsequent degradation of proteins in saliva. The observed changes might contribute to salivary defense system malfunction as well as to oral malodor production.

  6. Chronic ethanol feeding alters hepatocyte memory which is not altered by acute feeding.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, F; Oliva, Joan; Dedes, Jennifer; Li, Jun; French, Barbara A; French, Samuel W

    2009-04-01

    Gene expression changes in the liver after acute binge drinking may differ from the changes seen in chronic ethanol feeding in the rat. The changes in gene expression after chronic ethanol feeding may sensitize the liver to alcohol-induced liver damage, which is not seen after acute binge drinking. To test this hypothesis, gene microarray analysis was performed on the livers of rats (n = 3) fed an acute binge dose of ethanol (6 g/kg body wt) and killed at 3 and 12 hours after ethanol by gavage. The gene microarrays were compared with those made on the liver of rats from a previous study, in which the rats were fed ethanol by intragastric tube for 1 month (36% of calories derived from ethanol). Microarray analysis data varied between the acute and chronic models in several important respects. Growth factors increased mainly in the chronic alcohol fed rat. Changes in enzymes involved in oxidative stress were noted only with chronic ethanol feeding. Gene expression of fat metabolism was increased only with chronic ethanol feeding. Most importantly, epigenetic related enzymes and acetylation and methylation of histones changed only after chronic ethanol feeding. The results support the concept that chronic ethanol ingestion induces altered gene expression as a result of changes in epigenetic mechanisms, where acetylation and methylation of histones were altered.

  7. Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Louise; Dragsted, Lars O; Olsen, Anja; Christensen, Jane; Tjønneland, Anne; Schmidt, Erik B; Overvad, Kim

    2010-07-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have reported that a higher fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a lower risk of CHD. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between fruit and vegetable consumption, in particular the subgroupings citrus fruits, apples and cruciferous vegetables, and the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). During a median follow-up of 7.7 years, 1075 incident ACS cases were identified among 53 383 men and women, aged 50-64 years at recruitment into the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study in 1993-7. Fruit and vegetable intake was estimated from a validated FFQ, and ACS incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, a tendency towards a lower risk of ACS was observed for both men and women with higher fruit and vegetable consumption. For men, we found an inverse association for apple intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 0.97; 95 % CI 0.94, 0.99). This association was also seen among women, albeit borderline significant. However, a higher risk was seen among women with higher fruit juice intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 1.04; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.08). The present results provide some support for previously observed inverse associations between fresh fruit intake, particularly apples, and ACS risk.

  8. Silymarin Protects Against Acute Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenyuan; Deaciuc, Ion; Song, Ming; Lee, David Y.-W.; Liu, Yanze; Ji, Xiaosheng; McClain, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that both oxidative stress and abnormal cytokine production, especially tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), play important etiological roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Agents that have both antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties, particularly anti-TNF production, represent promising therapeutic interventions for ALD. We investigated the effects and the possible mechanism(s) of silymarin on liver injury induced by acute ethanol (EtOH) administration. Methods Nine-week-old mice were divided into 4 groups, control, silymarin treatment, EtOH treatment, and silymarin/EtOH treatment, with 6 mice in each group. Because control and silymarin values were virtually identical, only control treatment is shown for ease of viewing. Ethanol-treated mice received EtOH [5 g/kg body weight (BW)] by gavage every 12 hours for a total of 3 doses. Control mice received an isocalorical maltose solution. In the silymarin/EtOH group, silymarin was dissolved in the EtOH and gavaged simultaneously with EtOH at a dose of 200 mg/kg BW. At 4 hours after the last dosing, the mice were anesthetized and subsequent serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level, hepatic lipid peroxidation, enzymatic activity of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1, hepatic TNF-α, and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured. Histopathological change was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results Acute EtOH administration caused prominent hepatic microvesicular steatosis with mild necrosis and an elevation of serum ALT activity, induced a significant decrease in hepatic GSH in conjunction with enhanced lipid peroxidation, and increased hepatic TNF production. Supplementation with a standardized silymarin attenuated these adverse changes induced by acute EtOH administration. Conclusions Silymarin protects against the liver injury caused by acute EtOH administration. In view of its nontoxic nature, it may be developed as an effective therapeutic

  9. Binge ethanol withdrawal: Effects on post-withdrawal ethanol intake, glutamate-glutamine cycle and monoamine tissue content in P rat model

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sujan C.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Alshehri, Fahad S.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a medical emergency situation which appears after abrupt cessation of ethanol intake. Decreased GABA-A function and increased glutamate function are known to exist in the AWS. However, the involvement of glutamate transporters in the context of AWS requires further investigation. In this study, we used a model of ethanol withdrawal involving abrupt cessation of binge ethanol administration (4 g/kg/gavage three times a day for three days) using male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. After 48 hours of withdrawal, P rats were re-exposed to voluntary ethanol intake. The amount of ethanol consumed was measured during post-withdrawal phase. In addition, the expression of GLT-1, GLAST and xCT were determined in both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We also measured glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and the tissue content of glutamate, glutamine, dopamine and serotonin in both mPFC and NAc. We found that binge ethanol withdrawal escalated post-withdrawal ethanol intake, which was associated with downregulation of GLT-1 expression in both mPFC and NAc. The expression of GLAST and xCT were unchanged in the ethanol-withdrawal (EW) group compared to control group. Tissue content of glutamate was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of glutamine was higher in mPFC but unchanged in NAc in the EW group compared to control group. The GS activity was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. The tissue content of DA was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of serotonin was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. These findings provide important information of the critical role of GLT-1 in context of AWS. PMID:26821293

  10. Binge ethanol withdrawal: Effects on post-withdrawal ethanol intake, glutamate-glutamine cycle and monoamine tissue content in P rat model.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujan C; Althobaiti, Yusuf S; Alshehri, Fahad S; Sari, Youssef

    2016-04-15

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a medical emergency situation which appears after abrupt cessation of ethanol intake. Decreased GABA-A function and increased glutamate function are known to exist in the AWS. However, the involvement of glutamate transporters in the context of AWS requires further investigation. In this study, we used a model of ethanol withdrawal involving abrupt cessation of binge ethanol administration (4 g/kg/gavage three times a day for three days) using male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. After 48 h of withdrawal, P rats were re-exposed to voluntary ethanol intake. The amount of ethanol consumed was measured during post-withdrawal phase. In addition, the expression of GLT-1, GLAST and xCT were determined in both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We also measured glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and the tissue content of glutamate, glutamine, dopamine and serotonin in both mPFC and NAc. We found that binge ethanol withdrawal escalated post-withdrawal ethanol intake, which was associated with downregulation of GLT-1 expression in both mPFC and NAc. The expression of GLAST and xCT were unchanged in the ethanol-withdrawal (EW) group compared to control group. Tissue content of glutamate was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of glutamine was higher in mPFC but unchanged in NAc in the EW group compared to control group. The GS activity was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. The tissue content of DA was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of serotonin was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. These findings provide important information of the critical role of GLT-1 in context of AWS.

  11. Role of Adrenal Glucocorticoid Signaling in Prefrontal Cortex Gene Expression and Acute Behavioral Responses to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Blair N.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Fitting, Sylvia; Shelton, Keith L.; Miles, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid hormones modulate acute and chronic behavioral and molecular responses to drugs of abuse including psychostimulants and opioids. There is growing evidence that glucocorticoids might also modulate behavioral responses to ethanol. Acute ethanol activates the HPA axis, causing release of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones. Our prior genomic studies suggest glucocorticoids play a role in regulating gene expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of DBA2/J (D2) mice following acute ethanol administration. However, few studies have analyzed the role of glucocorticoid signaling in behavioral responses to acute ethanol. Such work could be significant, given the predictive value for level of response to acute ethanol in the risk for alcoholism. Methods We studied whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, RU-486, or adrenalectomy (ADX) altered male D2 mouse behavioral responses to acute (locomotor activation, anxiolysis or loss-of-righting reflex (LORR)) or repeated (sensitization) ethanol treatment. Whole genome microarray analysis and bioinformatics approaches were used to identify PFC candidate genes possibly responsible for altered behavioral responses to ethanol following ADX. Results ADX and RU-486 both impaired acute ethanol (2 g/kg) induced locomotor activation in D2 mice without affecting basal locomotor activity. However, neither ADX nor RU-486 altered initiation of ethanol sensitization (locomotor activation or jump counts), ethanol-induced anxiolysis or LORR. ADX mice showed microarray gene expression changes in PFC that significantly overlapped with acute ethanol-responsive gene sets derived by our prior microarray studies. Q-rtPCR analysis verified that ADX decreased PFC expression of Fkbp5 while significantly increasing Gpr6 expression. In addition, high dose RU-486 pre-treatment blunted ethanol-induced Fkbp5 expression. Conclusions Our studies suggest that ethanol’s activation of adrenal glucocorticoid release and subsequent

  12. Ethanol intake and sup 3 H-serotonin uptake I: A study in Fawn-Hooded rats

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.; Compagnon, P.; Legrand, E.; Boucly, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol intake and synaptosomal {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake were studied in male Fawn-Hooded and Sprague-Dawley rats. Fawn-Hooded rats consumed more alcohol and more water than Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma alcohol levels of Sprague-Dawley rats were not detectable but were about 5 mg/dl in Fawn-Hooded rats. Ethanol intake increased the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex, but not in thalamus. In Fawn-Hooded rats, serotonin uptake (Vmax) was higher than in Sprague-Dawley rats cortex. Ethanol intake reduced the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex. In cortex, the carrier affinity for serotonin was increased in alcoholized Fawn-Hooded rats. These results indicate that synaptosomal {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake is affected by ethanol intake. In Fawn-Hooded rats, high ethanol consumption is associated with high serotonin uptake. In rats presenting high serotonin uptake, alcoholization reduces {sup 3}H-serotonin internalization in synaptosomes, indicating a specific sensitivity to alcohol intake of serotonin uptake system.

  13. Reduction in voluntary ethanol intake following repeated oral administration of Jodina rhombifolia lyophilized aqueous extract in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Teves, Mauricio Roberto; Wendel, Graciela Haydée; Pelzer, Lilian Eugenia

    2015-02-23

    The leaves of Jodina rhombifolia (Hook. & Arn.) Reissek (SANTALACEAE) is utilized in Argentine folk medicine for the treatment of alcoholism. To evaluate the antialcoholic activity of Jodina rhombifolia lyophilized aqueous extract (JRLE) in male Wistar rats. Rats were housed individually in standard plastic cages with wood chip bedding. Throughout the duration of experiment, ethanol was offered in the standard home-cage; two-bottle free-choice regimen between an ethanolic solution (20% in tap water, v/v) and tap water with unlimited access for 24h per day for 10 consecutive days. Rats were administrated intragastrically twice daily (1 ml/200 g) for 10 consecutive days, with the control vehicle (distilled water) or one of the doses of JRLE (125, 250 and 500 mg/Kg weight). Body weight, ethanol, water and food intake were measured every day at the same hour during the 10 days of experimentation. The reducing effect of JRLE on daily ethanol intake was evidenced from the first day of treatment and persisted throughout the entire treatment period. The treatment did not significantly affect daily water intake neither the body weight gain. Daily food intake was higher in rat groups treated with JRLE. The results obtained in the present preliminary study show that repeated administration of JRLE, markedly reduces ethanol voluntary intake in male Wistar rats. The reduction of consumption was of remarkable magnitude and stable during the treatment 10-days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long term intake of 0.1% ethanol decreases serum adiponectin by suppressing PPARγ expression via p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chong; Jin, Xin; Ye, Xiaolei; Wu, Hongmei; Ren, Weiye; Zhang, Rui; Long, Jia; Ying, Chenjiang

    2014-03-01

    Light alcohol consumption was reported to be negatively associated with insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular diseases; however, the results were inconsistent. We here investigate whether long term intake of low-concentration ethanol can affect adiponectin levels. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0.1% ethanol in drinking water for 26weeks. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) was cultured and treated with ethanol, SB203580, GW9662, or rosiglitazone. Adiponectin in serum and culture supernatant were measured by ELISA, mRNA levels of adiponectin and PPARγ were determined by RT-PCR, and protein expressions of PPARγ, p38 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK were determined by Western blot. In vivo, ethanol decreased the mRNA of adiponectin in VAT and serum adiponectin significantly. Decreased PPARγ and increased activation of p38 MAPK were observed in ethanol treated group. In vitro, SB203580 increased the adiponectin and PPARγ levels in normal DMEM cultured VAT and ameliorated ethanol-induced decrease of adiponectin and PPARγ expressions. GW9662 also decreased the adiponectin levels; Both ethanol and GW9662 weakened the rosiglitazone-induced elevation of adiponectin levels in cultured VAT. These data suggest that long term intake of 0.1% ethanol down-regulated adiponectin levels, and the regulation of PPARγ via p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in the mechanism underneath. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Roux en Y Gastric Bypass Increases Ethanol Intake in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Andrea L.; Schurdak, Jennifer D.; Magrisso, Irwin J.; Grayson, Bernadette E.; Seeley, Randy J.; Benoit, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Roux en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is currently the most effective therapy employed to treat obesity and its associated complications. In addition to weight loss and resolution of metabolic syndromes, such as diabetes, the RYGB procedure has been reported to increase alcohol consumption in humans. Using an outbred rodent model, we demonstrate that RYGB increases postsurgical ethanol consumption, that this effect cannot be explained solely by postsurgical weight loss and that it is independent of presurgical body weight or dietary composition. Altered ethanol metabolism and postsurgical shifts in release of ghrelin were also unable to account for changes in alcohol intake. Further investigation of the potential physiological factors underlying this behavioral effect identified altered patterns of gene expression in brain regions associated with reward following RYGB surgery. These findings have important clinical implications as they demonstrate that RYGB surgery leads directly to increased alcohol intake in otherwise alcohol nonpreferring rat and induces neurobiological changes in brain circuits that mediate a variety of appetitive behaviors. PMID:23440511

  16. Acute ethanol ingestion impairs appetitive olfactory learning and odor discrimination in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, Julie A; Wright, Geraldine A; Edgar, Elaina A; Mazade, Reece E.; Wu, Chen; Lillvis, Joshua L

    2008-01-01

    Invertebrates are valuable models for increasing our understanding of the effects of ethanol on the nervous system, but most studies on invertebrates and ethanol have focused on the effects of ethanol on locomotor behavior. In this work we investigate the influence of an acute dose of ethanol on appetitive olfactory learning in the honey bee (Apis mellifera), a model system for learning and memory. Adult worker honey bees were fed a range of doses (2.5, 5, 10 or 25%) of ethanol and then conditioned to associate an odor with a sucrose reward using either a simple or differential conditioning paradigm. Consumption of ethanol before conditioning significantly reduced both the rate of acquisition and the asymptotic strength of the association. Honey bees also exhibited a dose dependent reduction in arousal/attention during conditioning. Consumption of ethanol after conditioning did not affect recall 24 h later. The observed deficits in acquisition were not due to the affect of ethanol on gustatory sensitivity or motor function. However, honey bees given higher doses of ethanol had difficulty discriminating amongst different odors suggesting that ethanol consumption influences olfactory processing. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an acute dose of ethanol affects appetitive learning and olfactory perception in the honey bee. PMID:18723103

  17. Developmental lead exposure induces opposite effects on ethanol intake and locomotion in response to central vs. systemic cyanamide administration.

    PubMed

    Mattalloni, Mara Soledad; Deza-Ponzio, Romina; Albrecht, Paula Alejandra; Cancela, Liliana Marina; Virgolini, Miriam Beatriz

    2017-02-01

    Lead (Pb) is a developmental neurotoxicant that elicits differential responses to drugs of abuse. Particularly, ethanol consumption has been demonstrated to be increased as a consequence of environmental Pb exposure, with catalase (CAT) and brain acetaldehyde (ACD, the first metabolite of ethanol) playing a role. The present study sought to interfere with ethanol metabolism by inhibiting ALDH2 (mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase) activity in both liver and brain from control and Pb-exposed rats as a strategy to accumulate ACD, a substance that plays a major role in the drug's reinforcing and/or aversive effects. To evaluate the impact on a 2-h chronic voluntary ethanol intake test, developmentally Pb-exposed and control rats were administered with cyanamide (CY, an ALDH inhibitor) either systemically or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) on the last 4 sessions of the experiment. Furthermore, on the last session and after locomotor activity was assessed, all animals were sacrificed to obtain brain and liver samples for ALDH2 and CAT activity determination. Systemic CY administration reduced the elevated ethanol intake already reported in the Pb-exposed animals (but not in the controls) accompanied by liver (but not brain) ALDH2 inactivation. On the other hand, a 0.3 mg i.c.v. CY administration enhanced both ethanol intake and locomotor activity accompanied by brain ALDH2 inactivation in control animals, while an increase in ethanol consumption was also observed in the Pb-exposed group, although in the absence of brain ALDH2 blockade. No changes were observed in CAT activity as a consequence of CY administration. These results support the participation of liver and brain ACD in ethanol intake and locomotor activity, responses that are modulated by developmental Pb exposure.

  18. Genetic Dissection of Acute Ethanol Responsive Gene Networks in Prefrontal Cortex: Functional and Mechanistic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wolen, Aaron R.; Phillips, Charles A.; Langston, Michael A.; Putman, Alex H.; Vorster, Paul J.; Bruce, Nathan A.; York, Timothy P.; Williams, Robert W.; Miles, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Individual differences in initial sensitivity to ethanol are strongly related to the heritable risk of alcoholism in humans. To elucidate key molecular networks that modulate ethanol sensitivity we performed the first systems genetics analysis of ethanol-responsive gene expression in brain regions of the mesocorticolimbic reward circuit (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral midbrain) across a highly diverse family of 27 isogenic mouse strains (BXD panel) before and after treatment with ethanol. Results Acute ethanol altered the expression of ∼2,750 genes in one or more regions and 400 transcripts were jointly modulated in all three. Ethanol-responsive gene networks were extracted with a powerful graph theoretical method that efficiently summarized ethanol's effects. These networks correlated with acute behavioral responses to ethanol and other drugs of abuse. As predicted, networks were heavily populated by genes controlling synaptic transmission and neuroplasticity. Several of the most densely interconnected network hubs, including Kcnma1 and Gsk3β, are known to influence behavioral or physiological responses to ethanol, validating our overall approach. Other major hub genes like Grm3, Pten and Nrg3 represent novel targets of ethanol effects. Networks were under strong genetic control by variants that we mapped to a small number of chromosomal loci. Using a novel combination of genetic, bioinformatic and network-based approaches, we identified high priority cis-regulatory candidate genes, including Scn1b, Gria1, Sncb and Nell2. Conclusions The ethanol-responsive gene networks identified here represent a previously uncharacterized intermediate phenotype between DNA variation and ethanol sensitivity in mice. Networks involved in synaptic transmission were strongly regulated by ethanol and could contribute to behavioral plasticity seen with chronic ethanol. Our novel finding that hub genes and a small number of loci exert major influence

  19. Acute ethanol exposure affects spermatogonial stem cell homeostasis in pre-pubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Caires, Kyle C; Shima, Christina M; de Avila, Jeanene; McLean, Derek J

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is a known modulator of neural stem cell development, but the consequences of ethanol toxicity on the cell fate decisions of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is poorly understood. Using an in vivo treatment and stem cell transplantation approach, we investigated the effects of acute ethanol exposure on formation of the growing adult SSC population in neonatal and pre-pubertal mice. Treatment with a single dose of ethanol disrupted SSC homeostasis in vivo evidenced by a significant reduction (7-fold) of stem cell colonization efficiency in the testes of recipient mice following transplantation. Ethanol treatment also increased the rate of apoptosis in adult differentiating germ cells in situ. Gene expression analysis indicates that ethanol exposure has transient and long-term effects on the expression of GDNF and VEGF family molecules and supports the hypothesis that the niche microenvironment for SSCs is sensitive to ethanol toxicity during pre-pubertaland adult life.

  20. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  1. Acute ethanol administration reduces the cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Janis, L S; Hoane, M R; Conde, D; Fulop, Z; Stein, D G

    1998-02-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether a low dose of acute ethanol administration could attenuate cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury. Adult male rats received oral administration of ethanol or drinking water 2 h prior to surgery to produce a blood ethanol concentration of 100 mg% and then received bilateral contusion injuries of the medial prefrontal cortex. Seven days after surgery, the rats began 10 days of testing for acquisition of spatial localization in the Morris water maze where they were required to find a hidden platform to escape from the water. The results indicate that the rats given ethanol at the time of injury later spent significantly less time searching for the hidden platform than their water-treated counterparts. On a memory probe test given on the final day of testing, in which the platform was removed from the pool, rats given the ethanol spent more time in the area where the platform had been located indicating that they learned its location better than the lesion/water controls. In addition, acute ethanol treatment reduced some of the histopathology that typically occurs following severe contusion of the medial frontal cortex but did not attenuate post-traumatic formation of edema. These results indicate that acute ethanol intoxication can reduce the severity of cognitive impairments caused by contusive traumatic brain injury and support the contention that there is a dose-response relationship of acute ethanol intoxication in the setting of traumatic brain injury.

  2. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  3. Moderate ingestion of alcohol is associated with acute ethanol-induced suppression of circulating CTX in a PTH-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Sripanyakorn, Supannee; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Mander, Adrian; Davidson, Sarah L; Thompson, Richard Ph; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-08-01

    The "J shape" curve linking the risk of poor bone health to alcohol intake is now well recognized from epidemiological studies. Ethanol and nonethanol components of alcoholic beverages could influence bone remodeling. However, in the absence of a solid underlying mechanism, the positive association between moderate alcoholic intake and BMD remains questionable because of confounding associated social factors. The objective of this work was to characterize the short-term effects of moderate alcohol consumption on circulating bone markers, especially those involved in bone resorption. Two sequential blood-sampling studies were undertaken in fasted healthy volunteers (age, 20-47 yr) over a 6-h period using beer of different alcohol levels (<0.05-4.6%), solutions of ethanol or orthosilicic acid (two major components of beer), and water +/- calcium chloride (positive and negative controls, respectively). Study 1 (24 subjects) assessed the effects of the different solutions, whereas study 2 (26 subjects) focused on ethanol/beer dose. Using all data in a "mixed effect model," we identified the contributions of the individual components of beer, namely ethanol, energy, low-dose calcium, and high-dose orthosilicic acid, on acute bone resorption. Markers of bone formation were unchanged throughout the study for all solutions investigated. In contrast, the bone resorption marker, serum carboxy terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), was significantly reduced after ingestion of a 0.6 liters of ethanol solution (>2% ethanol; p ethanol; p < 0.02), or a solution of calcium (180 mg calcium; p < 0.001), but only after calcium ingestion was the reduction in CTX preceded by a significant fall in serum PTH (p < 0.001). Orthosilicic acid had no acute effect. Similar reductions in CTX, from baseline, were measured in urine after ingestion of the test solutions; however, the biological variability in urine CTX was greater

  4. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  5. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects of Acute and Chronic Ethanol Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    No. 2 C4"ght 0 1967 by "he Amusca Soiety for Pharmacolog and Kxporuont Therpadu" Prud m U.S.A. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium ...inhibitory effect of ethanol in vitro on sodium benzoate binding to neuronal sodium channels were studi-d in uptake for up to 20 days after withdrawal...adapt rapidly to some sodium uptake in the absence of ethanol in vitro, however, a effects of ethanol and that chronic ethanol administration can

  6. Effects of acute salbutamol intake during a Wingate test.

    PubMed

    Collomp, K; Le Panse, B; Portier, H; Lecoq, A-M; Jaffre, C; Beaupied, H; Richard, O; Benhamou, L; Courteix, D; De Ceaurriz, J

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the impact of acute salbutamol intake on performance and selected hormonal and metabolic variables during supramaximal exercise, 13 recreational male athletes performed two 30-second Wingate tests after either placebo (PLA, lactose) or salbutamol (SAL, 4 mg) oral administration, according to a double-blind and randomized protocol. Blood samples collected at rest, end of the Wingate test, recovery (5, 10, 15 min) were tested for growth hormone (GH), insulin (INS), blood glucose (GLU), and lactate determination. We found the peak and mean power performed significantly increased after SAL vs. PLA (PPSAL: 896 +/- 46; PPPLA: 819 +/- 57 W; MPSAL: 585 +/- 27; MPPLA: 534 +/- 35 W, p < 0.05), whereas no change was observed in the fatigue index. Blood glucose and INS were significantly increased by SAL at rest, at the end of the Wingate test, and during the 5 first minutes of recovery (p < 0.05). Plasma GH was significantly decreased by SAL (p < 0.05) during the recovery whereas end-exercise and recovery blood lactate tended but were not significantly increased after SAL vs. PLA. From these data, acute salbutamol intake at therapeutical dosage did appear to improve peak power and mean power during a supramaximal exercise, but the mechanisms involved need further investigation.

  7. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. All rats in group 3 developed acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate.

  8. Glutathione recycling is attenuated by acute ethanol feeding in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, S. I.; Kim, C. I.; Chun, H. J.; Lee, M. S.; Park, S. C.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism for ethanol-induced oxidative stress has been disputed because of the controversies on modulation of radical generating and scavenging activities by ethanol. In the present work, we attempted to clarify the acute effect of ethanol on the radical generating system as well as the radical scavenging system. For that purpose, chow-fed rats were given ethanol (5 g/kg) or isocaloric glucose solution by intragastric intubation and placed at 32 degrees C for 6 hr. Acute ethanol administration enhanced the expression of cytochrome P450 II E1(CYP II E1) in the liver and attenuated the activities of hepatic glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reductase (GR). It also caused a significant increase in the level of hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), an indicator of lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, acute ethanol feeding had no effect on the activities of catalase, xanthine oxidase (XO), glutathione transferase (GST) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). From this result, it is suggested that acute ethanol administration causes the oxidative tissue damage by CYP II E1-associated radical generation and the decreased radical scavenging function due to the reduced activities of hepatic glutathione recycling system such as GPx and GR. PMID:9288631

  9. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  10. Ethanol acutely modulates mGluR1-dependent long-term depression in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Su, Li-Da; Sun, Cheng-Long; Shen, Ying

    2010-07-01

    Acute and chronic ethanol exposure produces profound impairments in motor functioning. Individuals with lower sensitivity to the acute motor impairing effects of ethanol have an increased risk of developing alcohol dependence and abuse, and infants with subtle delays in motor coordination development may have an increased risk for subsequently developing alcoholism. Thus, understanding the mechanism by which ethanol disrupts motor functioning is very important. Parasagittal slices of the cerebellar vermis (250 microM thick) were prepared from P17 to 20 Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole-cell recordings of Purkinje cells were obtained with an Axopatch 200B amplifier. Parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic currents were sampled at 1 kHz and digitized at 10 kHz, and synaptic long-term depression (LTD) was observed in either external or internal application of ethanol for comparison. We determined whether ethanol acutely affects parallel fiber LTD using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from Purkinje cells. Application of ethanol both externally (50 mM) and internally (17 and 10 mM) significantly suppressed mGluR-mediate slow currents. Short-term external ethanol exposure (50 but not 17 mM) during tetanus blocked mGluR-dependent parallel fiber LTD. Furthermore, internal 17 and 10 mM ethanol completely inhibited this LTD. The results of the current study demonstrate that ethanol acutely suppresses parallel fiber LTD and may influence the mGluR-mediated slow current intracellularly. This study, plus previous evidence by Carta and colleagues (2006) and Belmeguenai and colleagues (2008), suggests significant actions of ethanol on mGluR-mediated currents and its dependent plasticity in brain.

  11. Male sexual behaviour and ethanol consumption from an evolutionary perspective: A comment on "Sexual Deprivation Increases Ethanol Intake in Drosophila".

    PubMed

    Guevara-Fiore, Palestina; Endler, John A

    2014-01-01

    Shohat-Ophir et al. (1) demonstrate a connection between sexual behaviour and ethanol consumption in male Drosophila flies, and how the neuropeptide F system regulates ethanol preference. Their results are rightly discussed only in a physiological context, but this has facilitated erroneous anthropomorphic interpretations by the media. Here we discuss the link between male sexual behaviour and ethanol consumption from an evolutionary perspective, providing a broader context to interpret their results.

  12. ACUTE ETHANOL DISRUPTS PHOTIC AND SEROTONERGIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK PHASE-RESETTING IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired circadian rhythms and sleep. Ethanol administration disrupts circadian clock phase-resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on the circadian timing system. In this study, we extend previous work in C57BL/6J mice to: 1) characterize the SCN pharmacokinetics of acute systemic ethanol administration; 2) explore the effects of acute ethanol on photic and non-photic phase-resetting; and 2) determine if the SCN is a direct target for photic effects. Methods First, microdialysis was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of acute i.p. injections of 3 doses of ethanol (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) in the mouse suprachiasmatic (SCN) circadian clock. Second, the effects of acute i.p. ethanol administration on photic phase-delays and serotonergic ([+]8-OH-DPAT-induced) phase-advances of the circadian activity rhythm were assessed. Third, the effects of reverse-microdialysis ethanol perfusion of the SCN on photic phase-resetting were characterized. Results Peak ethanol levels from the 3 doses of ethanol in the SCN occurred within 20–40 min post-injection with half-lives for clearance ranging from 0.6–1.8 hr. Systemic ethanol treatment dose-dependently attenuated photic and serotonergic phase-resetting. This treatment also did not affect basal SCN neuronal activity as assessed by Fos expression. Intra-SCN perfusion with ethanol markedly reduced photic phase-delays. Conclusions These results confirm that acute ethanol attenuates photic phase-delay shifts and serotonergic phase-advance shifts in the mouse. This dual effect could disrupt photic and non-photic entrainment mechanisms governing circadian clock timing. It is also significant that the SCN clock is a direct target for disruptive effects of ethanol on photic shifting. Such actions by ethanol could underlie the disruptive effects of alcohol abuse on behavioral, physiological, and endocrine rhythms associated with alcoholism. PMID:21463340

  13. The effect of acute ethanol intoxication on salivary proteins of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Piotr; Czernikiewicz, Andrzej; Szulc, Agata; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-04-01

    Human salivary proteins: peroxidase, lysozyme, lactoferrin, and IgA, participate in the protection of oral tissues, as well as upper digestive and respiratory tracts, against a number of microbial pathogens. In the current study, we investigated the effect of acute consumption of a large dose of ethanol on representative human salivary proteins of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Eight healthy male volunteers drank an average of 2.0 g (1.4 to 2.5 g/kg) body weight of ethanol, in the form of vodka, in the 6-hour period. Samples of resting whole saliva were collected 12 hours before, then 36 and 108 hours after, the alcohol consumption. The levels of total protein, immunoglobulin A, lysozyme and lactoferrin as well as peroxidase activity were determined in saliva. At 36 hours after alcohol consumption, salivary protein and lysozyme concentrations as well as peroxidase activity were significantly decreased (p = 0.002, p = 0.043, and p = 0.003, respectively), in comparison to the values obtained at 12 hours before drinking. Between 36 and 108 hours after alcohol consumption, the salivary protein and lysozyme concentrations, as well as peroxidase activity showed a tendency to increase, although at 108 hours after the drinking session, the concentration of protein and peroxidase activity were still significantly lower than before drinking. There was no significant change in the level of lactoferrin, after the drinking session. The salivary concentration of IgA tended to increase at 36 hours after alcohol consumption, and at 108 hours it was significantly higher (p = 0.028), when compared to IgA concentration in the saliva collected before drinking (from 8% to 26% and 32% of total protein content, respectively). Our report is the first to show that acute ingestion of relatively large, yet tolerable dose of alcohol, significantly disturbs salivary antimicrobial defense system. Reduced lysozyme level and decreased peroxidase activity may contribute to increased

  14. Development of tolerance to the inhibitory effects of ethanol in the rat isolated vas deferens: effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    DeTurck, K. H.; Pohorecky, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Contractions of the rat vas deferens elicited by the addition of noradrenaline (NA), K+-depolarizing solutions or by electrical stimulation were recorded before and after incubation with ethanol 181 mM. In tissues from untreated rats, the contractions were inhibited 40-50% by such exposure. Injection of ethanol (2 g kg-1) significantly attenuated ethanol's reduction of peak tension generated by the lowest concentration of NA (10(-4) mM). Chronic administration of ethanol, 18-14 g kg-1 daily for two weeks, resulted in significant tolerance to ethanol. Tissues of treated animals demonstrated ethanol-induced decreases of roughly one-half those of the maltose dextrin (isocaloric) and water (fluid control) groups. This tolerance persisted for at least 48 h after ethanol treatment had been terminated. Overall, the data suggest that ethanol acts both pre- and postsynaptically to produce acute inhibition of smooth muscle contractions or tolerance to these actions upon chronic exposure. PMID:3730699

  15. Developmental changes in the acute ethanol sensitivity of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in the BNST.

    PubMed

    Wills, T A; Kash, T L; Winder, D G

    2013-11-01

    Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission undergo significant changes during adolescence. Receptors for both of these transmitters (NMDAR, and GABAA) are known to be key targets for the acute effects of ethanol in adults. The current study set out to investigate the acute effects of ethanol on both NMDAR-mediated excitatory transmission and GABAergic inhibitory transmission within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) across age. The BNST is an area of the brain implicated in the negative reinforcing properties associated with alcohol dependence, and the BNST plays a critical role in stress-induced relapse. Therefore, assessing the developmental regulation of ethanol sensitivity in this key brain region is important to understanding the progression of ethanol dependence. To do this, whole-cell recordings of isolated NMDAR-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) or evoked GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) were performed on BNST neurons in slices from 4- or 8-week-old male C57BL/6J mice. Ethanol (50 mm) produced greater inhibition of NMDAR-eEPSCs in adolescent mice than in adult mice. This enhanced sensitivity in adolescence was not a result of shifts in function of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDAR, measured by Ro25-6981 inhibition and decay kinetics measured across age. Adolescent mice also exhibited greater ethanol sensitivity of GABAergic transmission, as ethanol (50 mm) enhanced eIPSCs in the BNST of adolescent but not adult mice. Collectively, this work illustrates that a moderate dose of ethanol produces greater inhibition of transmission in the BNST (through greater excitatory inhibition and enhancement of inhibitory transmission) in adolescents compared to adults. Given the role of the BNST in alcohol dependence, these developmental changes in acute ethanol sensitivity could accelerate neuroadaptations that result from chronic ethanol use during the critical period of adolescence.

  16. Changes in gastrointestinal DNA synthesis produced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption in the rat: a biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H K; Czygan, P; Kienapfel, H; Veith, S; Schmidt-Gayk, H; Kommerell, B

    1983-02-01

    The effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration on DNA synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat was investigated. Acute intragastric ethanol administration (3 g/kg; 50%) decreased significantly in vivo DNA synthesis when measured 1 hour after alcohol application in the stomach and in the upper small intestine, whereas acute intravenous ethanol administration had no significant effect. In contrast, chronic ethanol ingestion resulted in a significant increase of in vivo and in vitro DNA synthesis in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In addition, even a more enhanced stimulation of DNA synthesis after chronic ethanol consumption was found in isolated intestinal cells. These results indicate an inhibition of gastrointestinal cell regeneration directly after the oral application of ethanol. The enhanced cellular regenerativity observed after chronic ethanol consumption may be secondary to the ethanol induced damage of the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Evaluation of Ethyl Glucuronide and Ethyl Sulfate in Calliphora Vicina as Potential Biomarkers for Ethanol Intake.

    PubMed

    Lambiase, Simonetta; Groppi, Angelo; Gemmellaro, Denise; Morini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) are specific and sensitive biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute or chronic alcohol abuse. Due to postmortem alcohol production in biological tissues, they have recently been evaluated as potential biomarkers of ethanol ingestion. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate all developmental stages of the fly Calliphora vicina L. (Calliphoridae). Different pig substrates were used during the in vitro experiments to rear C. vicina Experiments were performed to: (i) assess the presence of EtG and EtS in larvae, pupae and insects; (ii) study variability due to the substrates characteristics; (iii) evaluate the possibility of false positives due to external alcohol contamination; and (iv) estimate the potential metabolism of ethanol by the insects. EtS was found in all of the samples where the standard was added to the substrate. Muscle provided the most reliable results. EtS was found in larvae, pupae and puparia. EtG and EtS were found in larvae and pupae collected from the body of an alcoholic found dead in his home. This study showed that maggots, pupae and puparia could be a useful matrix for the evaluation of antemortem alcohol ingestion. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Ethanol intake-induced apoptosis in glial cells and axonal disorders in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats (voluntary ethanol consumers).

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marcelo; Sauce, Rafael; Oliveira, Suelen Alves; de Almeida Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo; Stefanini, Maíra Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol intake may cause alterations in cellular metabolism altering motricity, learning and cognition. The cerebellum is one of the most susceptible organs to ethanol-related disorders during development, and is associated with oxidative stress-induced apoptosis being crucial for pathogenic consequences. The UChA variety is a special strain of Wistar rat genetically selected and represents a rare model for the studies related to genetic, biochemical, physiological, nutritional, and pharmacological effects of ethanol. We evaluated the structure and apoptosis in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats. There were two groups of 09 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol, and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (v/v) (<2 g ethanol/kg body weight/day). At 120 days old, rats were anaesthetized followed by decapitation, and their cerebella were collected and fixed. Cerebellar sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry for Caspase-3 and XIAP and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UChA group showed more glial cells immunoreactive for caspase-3 and less for XIAP than control group. Alcohol consumption affected myelin integrity. Severe ultrastructural damages in UChA group were observed such as disruption of the myelin sheath, disorganization and deformation of its components, and an increase in the interaxonal spaces. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that ethanol induced apoptosis in the glial cells and promoted an intense change in the myelin sheath of UChA rats, which may cause functional disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute Oral Ethanol Exposure Triggers Asthma In Cockroach Allergen–Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Jiyoun; Beal, Dominic R.; Vaickus, Louis J.; Craciun, Florin L.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma may be triggered by multiple mediators, including allergen-IgE cross-linking and non-IgE mechanisms. Several clinical studies have shown acute ethanol consumption exacerbates asthma, yet no animal model exists to study this process. We developed a model of ethanol-triggered asthma in allergen-sensitized mice to evaluate the mechanisms of ethanol inducing asthma-like responses. Outbred mice were exposed to cockroach allergens on Days 0 and 14; and on Day 21, mice received ethanol by oral gavage. Tracer studies confirmed alcohol aspiration did not occur. Within 30 minutes, alcohol induced degranulation of over 74% of mast cells, and multiple parameters of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation were triggered. Ethanol-gavaged mice had a fivefold increased production of eotaxin-2 (534 pg/mL) and a sevenfold increase in bronchoalveolar eosinophils (70,080 cells). Ethanol induced a 10-fold increase in IL-13, from 84 pg/mL in sensitized mice to 845 pg/mL in ethanol-gavaged sensitized mice. In cockroach allergen–sensitized mice, ethanol triggered asthma-like changes in respiratory physiology and a significant fivefold increase in airway mucin production. Importantly, none of these asthmatic exacerbations were observed in normal mice gavaged with ethanol. Cromolyn sodium effectively stabilized mast cells, yet increased mucin production and bronchoalveolar eosinophil recruitment. Together, these data show a single oral alcohol exposure will trigger asthma-like pulmonary inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice, providing a novel asthma model. PMID:22796441

  20. Adolescent and adult rat cortical protein kinase A display divergent responses to acute ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Eduardo D.; Santerre, Jessica L.; Carter, Jenna M.; Werner, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent rats display reduced sensitivity to many dysphoria-related effects of alcohol (ethanol) including motor ataxia and sedative hypnosis, but the underlying neurobiological factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, particularly the type II regulatory subunit (RII), has been implicated in ethanol-induced molecular and behavioral responses in adults. Therefore, the current study examined cerebral cortical PKA in adolescent and adult ethanol responses. With the exception of early adolescence, PKA RIIα and RIIβ subunit levels largely did not differ from adult levels in either whole cell lysate or P2 synaptosomal expression. However, following acute ethanol exposure, PKA RIIβ P2 synaptosomal expression and activity were increased in adults, but not in adolescents. Behaviorally, intracerebroventricular administration of the PKA activator Sp-cAMP and inhibitor Rp-cAMP prior to ethanol administration increased adolescent sensitivity to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol compared to controls. Sp-cAMP was ineffective in adults whereas Rp-cAMP suggestively reduced loss of righting reflex (LORR) with paralleled increases in blood ethanol concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that PKA activity modulates the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and may potentially play a wider role in the differential ethanol responses observed between adolescents and adults. PMID:24874150

  1. Adolescent and adult rat cortical protein kinase A display divergent responses to acute ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Eduardo D; Santerre, Jessica L; Carter, Jenna M; Werner, David F

    2014-08-01

    Adolescent rats display reduced sensitivity to many dysphoria-related effects of alcohol (ethanol) including motor ataxia and sedative hypnosis, but the underlying neurobiological factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, particularly the type II regulatory subunit (RII), has been implicated in ethanol-induced molecular and behavioral responses in adults. Therefore, the current study examined cerebral cortical PKA in adolescent and adult ethanol responses. With the exception of early adolescence, PKA RIIα and RIIβ subunit levels largely did not differ from adult levels in either whole cell lysate or P2 synaptosomal expression. However, following acute ethanol exposure, PKA RIIβ P2 synaptosomal expression and activity were increased in adults, but not in adolescents. Behaviorally, intracerebroventricular administration of the PKA activator Sp-cAMP and inhibitor Rp-cAMP prior to ethanol administration increased adolescent sensitivity to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol compared to controls. Sp-cAMP was ineffective in adults whereas Rp-cAMP suggestively reduced loss of righting reflex (LORR) with paralleled increases in blood ethanol concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that PKA activity modulates the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and may potentially play a wider role in the differential ethanol responses observed between adolescents and adults.

  2. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening.

  3. Applications of schedule-induced polydipsia in rodents for the study of an excessive ethanol intake phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) is generated by subjecting a highly motivated animal to a sub-optimal rate of food reinforcement while also providing access to a fluid. SIP is one of several adjunctive (or displacement) behaviors that are expressed in an exaggerated form that is deemed ‘excessive’. This feature makes SIP an attractive model for studying an excessive ethanol drinking phenotype in rodents. Multiple experimental variables are crucial for the full manifestation of adjunctive drinking, including the degree of food deprivation, the inter-pellet interval selected, and the size of the food reward offered. Although these variables were extensively studied and optimized for water polydipsia in rats, a similarly customized approach to ethanol SIP and application of the procedure in mice have largely been curtailed in favor of the default variable values historically used for water SIP in rats. Further, ethanol SIP also requires careful consideration of variables such as taste and ethanol concentration. Investigation of the stress axis and neurochemical systems such as dopamine and serotonin in mediating adjunctive drinking stemmed from two leading hypotheses regarding the underlying mechanisms of SIP generation: 1) SIP as a coping strategy to mitigate stress associated with the aversive environmental condition, and 2) SIP as a displacement of reward in a highly motivated animal. Ethanol SIP is a powerful model of excessive intake because it can generate an ethanol-dependent state and sustain frequent and intoxicating levels of blood ethanol with voluntary oral consumption. The required food deprivation and the loss of the excessive drinking phenotype following removal of the generator schedule are the two main limitations of the model. Future utility of ethanol SIP will be enhanced by more fully dissecting the underlying hormonal and neurochemical mechanisms and optimizing experimental variables for ethanol SIP on a per species and strain basis. PMID

  4. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.A.; Rudeen, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effect upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity.

  5. Involvement of AMPK in Alcohol Dehydrogenase Accentuated Myocardial Dysfunction Following Acute Ethanol Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Scott, Glenda I.; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Binge alcohol drinking often triggers myocardial contractile dysfunction although the underlying mechanism is not fully clear. This study was designed to examine the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) on ethanol-induced change in cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, insulin and AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) signaling. Methods ADH transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3 days. Oral glucose tolerance test, cardiac AMP/ATP levels, cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ handling and AMPK signaling (including ACC and LKB1) were examined. Results Ethanol exposure led to glucose intolerance, elevated plasma insulin, compromised cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties, downregulated protein phosphatase PP2A subunit and PPAR-γ, as well as phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and LKB1, all of which except plasma insulin were overtly accentuated by ADH transgene. Interestingly, myocardium from ethanol-treated FVB mice displayed enhanced expression of PP2Cα and PGC-1α, decreased insulin receptor expression as well as unchanged expression of Glut4, the response of which was unaffected by ADH. Cardiac AMP-to-ATP ratio was significantly enhanced by ethanol exposure with a more pronounced increase in ADH mice. In addition, the AMPK inhibitor compound C (10 µM) abrogated acute ethanol exposure-elicited cardiomyocyte mechanical dysfunction. Conclusions In summary, these data suggest that the ADH transgene exacerbated acute ethanol toxicity-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, intracellular Ca2+ mishandling and glucose intolerance, indicating a role of ADH in acute ethanol toxicity-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly related to altered cellular fuel AMPK signaling cascade. PMID:20585647

  6. Involvement of AMPK in alcohol dehydrogenase accentuated myocardial dysfunction following acute ethanol challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Scott, Glenda I; Ren, Jun

    2010-06-23

    Binge alcohol drinking often triggers myocardial contractile dysfunction although the underlying mechanism is not fully clear. This study was designed to examine the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) on ethanol-induced change in cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, insulin and AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) signaling. ADH transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3 days. Oral glucose tolerance test, cardiac AMP/ATP levels, cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling and AMPK signaling (including ACC and LKB1) were examined. Ethanol exposure led to glucose intolerance, elevated plasma insulin, compromised cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties, downregulated protein phosphatase PP2A subunit and PPAR-gamma, as well as phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and LKB1, all of which except plasma insulin were overtly accentuated by ADH transgene. Interestingly, myocardium from ethanol-treated FVB mice displayed enhanced expression of PP2Calpha and PGC-1alpha, decreased insulin receptor expression as well as unchanged expression of Glut4, the response of which was unaffected by ADH. Cardiac AMP-to-ATP ratio was significantly enhanced by ethanol exposure with a more pronounced increase in ADH mice. In addition, the AMPK inhibitor compound C (10 microM) abrogated acute ethanol exposure-elicited cardiomyocyte mechanical dysfunction. In summary, these data suggest that the ADH transgene exacerbated acute ethanol toxicity-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, intracellular Ca(2+) mishandling and glucose intolerance, indicating a role of ADH in acute ethanol toxicity-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly related to altered cellular fuel AMPK signaling cascade.

  7. The relation of age to the acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition.

    PubMed

    Wynne, H A; Mutch, E; Williams, F M; James, O F; Rawlins, M D; Woodhouse, K W

    1989-03-01

    The activity of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes, the mono-oxygenases, can be inhibited by an acute dose of ethanol. We set out to determine whether age has any relation to the degree of inhibition produced by ethanol, using acetanilide as a model substrate. Eight healthy young subjects (mean age 26 years) and eight healthy elderly subjects (mean age 72 years) were studied on two occasions, once receiving acetanilide alone and once acetanilide with 75 ml vodka (30 g ethanol). The clearance of acetanilide was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in the elderly subjects at 27 +/- 3 l/h compared to 38 +/- 2 l/h in young subjects. No age-related differences in peak blood ethanol concentrations or ethanol elimination rates were noted. After ethanol, acetanilide clearance fell 18% to 31 +/- 3 l/h in young subjects (p = 0.05) and by 15% to 23 +/- 2 l/h in elderly subjects (p = 0.08). This suggests that the elderly do not suffer greater impairment of drug oxidation after acute ethanol ingestion than do the young.

  8. Liver necrosis induced by acute intraperitoneal ethanol administration in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Giavarotti, Leandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Giavarotti, Karin A S; Azzalis, Ligia A; Rodrigues, Luciano; Cravero, Amerys A M; Videla, Luis A; Koch, Osvaldo R; Junqueira, Virginia B C

    2002-03-01

    It is generally agreed that the deleterious pathophysiological effects of ethanol are caused, at least partially by an increase in free radical production. However, little attention has been directed to the effects of ethanol upon elderly organisms. Male Wistar rats at ages 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months were treated either with a single i.p. dose of 35% ethanol (v/v) at 3 g ethanol/kg body weight or an isovolumetric amount of 0.9% saline solution. We then assessed the plasma levels of transaminases and hepatic levels of oxidative stress-related parameters, followed by liver histological evaluation. The younger rats (3 months old) were not affected by the treatment with ethanol with respect to any of the studied parameters except for a lowering of total hepatic GSH and an increase in hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBARS) formation, while animals older than 3 months were increasingly more affected by the treatment. Acute ethanol treatment elicited the similar responses to those in the 3 months-old group, plus a decrease in the hepatic and plasma levels of beta-carotene and the plasma level of alpha-tocopherol, as well as an increase in the activity of plasma transaminases. In the 12,18 and 24 months old groups, there was increasing liver necrosis. These findings suggest that liver damage induced by acute ethanol administration in elderly rats may involve a lack of antioxidants.

  9. Transgenic Over Expression of Nicotinic Receptor Alpha 5, Alpha 3, and Beta 4 Subunit Genes Reduces Ethanol Intake in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Xavier; Ruiz, Jessica; Valverde, Olga; Molas, Susanna; Robles, Noemí; Sabrià, Josefa; Crabbe, John C.; Dierssen, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and smoking are extensively co-morbid. Some studies suggest partial commonality of action of alcohol and nicotine mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We tested mice with transgenic over expression of the alpha 5, alpha 3, beta 4 receptor subunit genes, which lie in a cluster on human chromosome 15, that were previously shown to have increased nicotine self-administration, for several responses to ethanol. Transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to several acute behavioral responses to ethanol. However, transgenic mice drank less ethanol than wild-type in a two-bottle (ethanol vs. water) preference test. These results suggest a complex role for this receptor subunit gene cluster in the modulation of ethanol’s as well as nicotine’s effects. PMID:22459873

  10. Evaluation of acute and subacute oral toxicity of the ethanol extract from Antidesma acidum Retz.

    PubMed

    Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Thamaree, Sopit; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Piyabhan, Pritsana; Vannasiri, Supaporn; Khonsung, Parirat; Singhalak, Tipaya; Jaijoy, Kanjana

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity tests of 95% ethanol extract of the root of Antidesma acidum were studied in male and female rats. The oral acute toxicity test at 5,000 mg/kg revealed that the ethanol extract did not produce toxic effects on signs, general behavious, mortality and gross appearance of internal organs of rats. Furthermore, the oral sub-acute toxicity test at the dose of 1,000 mg/kg/day displayed no significant changes in body and internal organs' weights, normal hematological and clinical blood chemistry values. Histological examination also showed normal architecture of all internal organs. In conclusion, the ethanol extract of Antidesma acidum did not produce any toxicity in oral acute and suba-cute toxicity studies.

  11. Chronic ethanol intake modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Mayas, M D; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; García, M J; Carrera, M P; Cobo, M; Camacho, B; Martínez Martos, J M

    2005-04-01

    In developing cerebellum, where critical periods of vulnerability have been established for several basic substances, it has been extensively studied the wide array of abnormalities induced by exposure to ethanol (EtOH). However, little is known about the effects of EtOH consumption on cerebellar functions in adult individuals. Several studies show participation in cognitive activities to be concentrated in the lateral cerebellum (hemispheres), whereas basic motor functions such as balance and coordination are represented in the medial parts of the cerebellum (vermis and paravermis). In addition to the circulating renin angiotensin system (RAS), a local system has been postulated in brain. The effector peptides of the RAS are formed via the activity of several aminopeptidases (AP). The present work analyses the effect of chronic EtOH intake on the RAS-regulating AP activities in the soluble and membrane-bound fractions of two cerebellar locations: the hemispheres and the vermis. We hypothesize that cerebellar RAS is involved in basic motor functions rather than in cognitive activities.

  12. A comparison of dehydroepiandrosterone and 7-keto dehydroepiandrosterone with other drugs that modulate ethanol intake in rats responding under a multiple schedule

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Russell J.; Hulin, Mary W.; Winsauer, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 7-keto DHEA, and several comparison drugs (ethanol, chlordiazepoxide, rauwolscine, and RO15-4513) were administered to male rats responding under a multiple schedule of food and ethanol presentation to determine their selectively for decreasing ethanol-maintained responding. DHEA and 7-keto DHEA significantly decreased both ethanol- and food-maintained responding, compared to control, while also decreasing blood ethanol concentration (BEC). Acute ethanol administration also decreased responding for both food and ethanol; however, ethanol-maintained responding was more potently decreased than food-maintained responding. BEC remained relatively stable after increasing ethanol doses. Among the other drugs tested, RO15-4513 was the most selective for decreasing ethanol-maintained responding compared to food-maintained responding, and it decreased BECs as ethanol-maintained responding decreased. The largest dose of rauwolscine significantly decreased responding for food, while not affecting ethanol-maintained responding compared to control. Low to intermediate doses of rauwolscine produced small, non-significant increases in ethanol-maintained responding and BECs. Chlordiazepoxide produced significant decreases in food-maintained responding and the dose of ethanol presented, but only at the highest dose tested. Although DHEA and 7-keto DHEA did not decrease ethanol-maintained responding as selectively as ethanol or RO15-4513 under the multiple schedule, these neurosteroids may be valuable pharmacological tools in the development of new treatments for alcohol abuse and dependence. PMID:22473025

  13. REPEATED ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION MODIFIES THE TEMPORAL STRUCTURE OF SUCROSE INTAKE PATTERNS IN MICE: EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH BEHAVIORAL SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Raúl; Kamens, Helen M.; McKinnon, Carrie S.; Ford, Matthew M.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroadaptations supporting behavioral sensitization to abused drugs are suggested to underlie pathological, excessive motivation toward drugs and drug-associated stimuli. Drug-induced sensitization has also been linked to increased appetitive responses for non-drug, natural reinforcers. The present research investigated whether ethanol (EtOH)-induced neural changes, inferred from psychomotor sensitization, can modify consumption and intake dynamics for the natural reinforcer, sucrose. The effects of EtOH-induced sensitization in mice on the temporal structure of sucrose intake patterns were measured using a lickometer system. Sucrose intake dynamics were measured after sensitization for 1 h daily for 7 days and indicated more rapid initial approach and consumption of sucrose in EtOH-sensitized groups; animals showed a shorter latency to the first intake bout and an increased number of sucrose bottle licks during the initial 15 min of the 1-h sessions. This effect was associated with increased frequency and size of bouts. For the total 1-h session, sucrose intake and bout dynamics were not different between groups, indicating a change in patterns of sucrose intake but not total consumption. When sensitization was prevented by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen, the increased rate of approach and consumption of sucrose were also prevented. Thus, EtOH-induced sensitization, and not the mere exposure to EtOH, was associated with changes in sucrose intake patterns. These data are consistent with current literature suggesting an enhancing effect of drug-induced sensitization on motivational processes involved in reinforcement. PMID:20624153

  14. ACUTE ETHANOL MODULATES GLUTAMATERGIC AND SEROTONERGIC PHASE SHIFTS OF THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN LOCK IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Rebecca A.; Mangrum, Charles A.; Glass, J. David

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with sleep problems, which are often linked to circadian rhythm disturbances. However, there is no information on the direct effects of ethanol on the mammalian circadian clock. Acute ethanol inhibits glutamate signaling, which is the primary mechanism through which light resets the mammalian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Glutamate and light also inhibit circadian clock resetting induced by non-photic signals, including serotonin. Thus, we investigated the effects of acute ethanol on both glutamatergic and serotoninergic resetting of the SCN clock in vitro. We show that ethanol dose-dependently inhibits glutamate-induced phase shifts and enhances serotonergic phase shifts. The inhibition of glutamate-induced phase shifts is not affected by excess glutamate, glycine or D-serine, but is prevented by excess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is known to augment glutamate signaling in the SCN and to be necessary for glutamate/light-induced phase shifts. Thus, ethanol may inhibit glutamate-induced clock resetting at least in part by blocking BDNF enhancement of glutamate signaling. Ethanol enhancement of serotonergic phase shifts is mimicked by treatments that suppress glutamate signaling in the SCN, including antagonists of glutamate receptors, BDNF signaling and nitric oxide synthase. The combined effect of ethanol with these treatments is not additive, suggesting they act through a common pathway. Our data indicate further that the interaction between serotonin and glutamate in the SCN may occur downstream from nitric oxide synthase activation. Thus, acute ethanol disrupts normal circadian clock phase regulation, which could contribute to the physiological and psychological problems associated with alcohol abuse. PMID:18313227

  15. Acute behavioural comparisons of toluene and ethanol in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, D; Fine, L; Langolf, G; Schork, T; Sampaio, C

    1991-11-01

    A comparison of toluene and ethanol (EtOH) induced changes in central nervous system (CNS) function and symptoms were evaluated in two studies, and when possible the effects of toluene were expressed in EtOH equivalent units. The toluene concentrations were 0, 75, and 150 ppm, bracketing the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value (ACGIH TLV) of 100 ppm. The socially relevant EtOH doses were 0.00, 0.33, and 0.66 g EtOH/kg body weight, equivalent to two and four 3.5% 12 ounce beers. Forty two paid college students were used in each study. In the first study, subjects were exposed to toluene and an odour masking agent menthol (0.078 ppm) for seven hours over three days. In the second study EtOH or a placebo was administered at 1530 across three days also in the presence of menthol. Verbal and visual short term memory (Sternberg, digit span, Benton, pattern memory), perception (pattern recognition), psychomotor skill (simple reaction time, continuous performance, symbol-digit, hand-eye coordination, finger tapping, and critical tracking), manual dexterity (one hole), mood (profile on mood scales (POMS), fatigue (fatigue checklist), and verbal ability were evaluated at 0800, 1200, and 1600. Voluntary symptoms and observations of sleep were collected daily. A 3 x 3 latin square design evaluated solvent effects simultaneously controlling for learning and dose sequence. An analysis of variance and test for trend were performed on am-pm differences reflecting an eight hour workday and on pm scores for each solvent, in which subjects were their own control Intersubject variation in absorbance was monitored in breath. A 5 to 10% decrement was considered meaningful if consistent with a linear trend at p less than 0.05. At 150 ppm toluene, losses in performance were 6.0% for digit span, 12.1% for pattern recognition (latency), 5% for pattern memory (number correct), 6.5% for one hole, and 3% for critical tracking. The number of headaches

  16. Differences of acute versus chronic ethanol exposure on anxiety-like behavioral responses in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Priya; Guo, Su

    2011-06-01

    Zebrafish, a vertebrate model organism amenable to high throughput screening, is an attractive system to model and study the mechanisms underlying human diseases. Alcoholism and alcoholic medical disorders are among the most debilitating diseases, yet the mechanisms by which ethanol inflicts the disease states are not well understood. In recent years zebrafish behavior assays have been used to study learning and memory, fear and anxiety, and social behavior. It is important to characterize the effects of ethanol on zebrafish behavioral repertoires in order to successfully harvest the strength of zebrafish for alcohol research. One prominent effect of alcohol in humans is its effect on anxiety, with acute intermediate doses relieving anxiety and withdrawal from chronic exposure increasing anxiety, both of which have significant contributions to alcohol dependence. In this study, we assess the effects of both acute and chronic ethanol exposure on anxiety-like behaviors in zebrafish, using two behavioral paradigms, the Novel Tank Diving Test and the Light/Dark Choice Assay. Acute ethanol exposure exerted significant dose-dependent anxiolytic effects. However, withdrawal from repeated intermittent ethanol exposure disabled recovery from heightened anxiety. These results demonstrate that zebrafish exhibit different anxiety-like behavioral responses to acute and chronic ethanol exposure, which are remarkably similar to these effects of alcohol in humans. Because of the accessibility of zebrafish to high throughput screening, our results suggest that genes and small molecules identified in zebrafish will be of relevance to understand how acute versus chronic alcohol exposure have opposing effects on the state of anxiety in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute Ethanol Inhibition of γ Oscillations Is Mediated by Akt and GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Wang, JianGang; Zhao, JingXi; Liu, ZhiHua; Guo, FangLi; Wang, Yali; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, RuiLing; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Chengbiao

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal network oscillations at gamma band frequency (γ, 30–80 Hz) are closely associated with higher brain functions such as learning and memory. Acute ethanol exposure at intoxicating concentrations (≥50 mM) impairs cognitive function. This study aimed to determine the effects and the mechanisms of acute ethanol exposure on γ oscillations in an in vitro model. Ethanol (25–100 mM) suppressed kainate-induced γ oscillations in CA3 area of the rat hippocampal slices, in a concentration-dependent, reversible manner. The ethanol-induced suppression was reduced by the D1R antagonist SCH23390 or the PKA inhibitor H89, was prevented by the Akt inhibitor triciribine or the GSk3β inhibitor SB415286, was enhanced by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5, but was not affected by the MAPK inhibitor U0126 or PI3K inhibitor wortmanin. Our results indicate that the intracellular kinases Akt and GSk3β play a critical role in the ethanol-induced suppression of γ oscillations and reveal new cellular pathways involved in the ethanol-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27582689

  18. Effect of ethanol intake during lactation on male and female pups' liver and brain metabolism during the suckling-weaning transition period.

    PubMed

    Oyama, L M; Oller Do Nascimento, C M

    2003-06-01

    In rats, a high degree of brain development and myelination occurs during the first 15 days after birth. Ethanol intake by lactating rats modified 12 day-old pups' brain development and metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion during lactation on prepubertal (24-day-old) pups' brain and liver metabolism. Lactating rats (4 male and 4 female litters) were divided into 2 groups: control--received control liquid diet, and ethanol--received liquid diet containing 4% of ethanol. On postnatal day 24, the pups were killed by decapitation. Liver and brain were utilized for measuring Adenosine Tri-phosphate-citrate lyase and malic enzymes activities. Brain slices were incubated in medium containing glucose to determine glucose consumption and oxidation, and lipid synthesis. The ethanol intake decreased male and female pups' body, brain and liver weight. Liver Adenosine Tri-phosphate-citrate lyase activity was decreased only in male pups of the ethanol group. The intake of ethanol solution by the dams increased glucose consumption and oxidation by the incubated female pups' brain slices and decreased glucose oxidation by the male pups' brain slices. It can be concluded that the effects of maternal ethanol intake on pups' development and metabolism are gender-related.

  19. Male adolescent rats display blunted cytokine responses in the CNS after acute ethanol or lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Gano, Anny; Paniccia, Jacqueline E; Deak, Terrence

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol induces widespread changes in cytokine expression, with recent data from our laboratory having demonstrated that, during acute ethanol intoxication, adult rats exhibit consistent increases in interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression in several brain regions, while showing reductions in IL-1 and TNFα expression. Given evidence indicating that adolescence may be an ontogenetic period in which some neuroimmune processes and cells may not yet have fully matured, the purpose of the current experiments was to examine potential age differences in the central cytokine response of adolescent (P31-33days of age) and adult (69-71days of age) rats to either an acute immune (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or non-immune challenge (ethanol). In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either sterile saline, LPS (250μg/kg), or ethanol (4-g/kg), and then trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 3h later for measurement of blood ethanol concentrations (BECs), plasma endotoxin, and central mRNA expression of several immune-related gene targets. In Experiment 2, the response to intragastrically (i.g.) administered ethanol was examined and compared to animals given tap water (i.g.). Results showed that LPS stimulated robust increases in expression of IL-1, IL-6, TNFα, and IκBα in the hippocampus, PVN, and amygdala, and that these increases were generally less pronounced in adolescents relative to adults. Following an i.p. ethanol challenge, IL-6 and IκBα expression was significantly increased in both ages in the PVN and amygdala, and adults exhibited even greater increases in IκBα than adolescents. I.g. administration of ethanol also increased IL-6 and IκBα expression in all three brain regions, with hippocampal IL-6 elevated even more so in adults compared to adolescents. Furthermore, assessment of plasma endotoxin concentrations revealed (i) whereas robust increases in plasma endotoxin were observed in adults injected with LPS

  20. Acute versus repeated chocolate exposure: effects on intake and cravings in restrained and unrestrained eaters.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Jennifer S; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    The cue-reactivity model, which is based on conditioning processes, posits that repeated food exposure (in the absence of consumption) should decrease cue reactivity. To examine whether repeated chocolate exposure attenuates cravings and intake, relative to those exposed to an acute cue, a 2 (repeated vs acute cue) × 2 (restrained vs unrestrained eaters) design was employed. Fifty female participants were recruited. Repeated exposure reduced cravings in unrestrained eaters (relative to acute exposure), but increased cravings in restrained eaters. An interaction between restraint and exposure emerged on intake, such that restrained eaters ate less after acute exposure than did unrestrained eaters.

  1. Acute and subacute toxicity study of the ethanol extract from Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Thanabhorn, S; Jaijoy, K; Thamaree, S; Ingkaninan, K; Panthong, A

    2006-10-11

    The ethanol extract from the leaves of Lonicera japonica Thunb. was evaluated for acute and subacute toxicity. The single oral dose of the ethanol extract at 5,000 mg/kg did not produce mortality or significant changes in the general behaviour and gross appearance of the internal organs of rats. In subacute toxicity study, the ethanol extract was administered orally at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg/day for a period of 14 days. The satellite group was treated with the ethanol extract at the same dose and the same period and kept for another 14 days after treatment. There were no significant differences in the body and organ weights between the control and the treated group of both sexes. Hematological analysis and clinical blood chemistry revealed no toxicity effects of the extract. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed.

  2. The influence of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on acute and chronic ethanol administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Blagaic, Vladimir; Romic, Zeljko; Sikiric, Predrag

    2004-09-24

    The stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W.1419), which was promising in inflammatory bowel disease (PL-10, PLD-116, PL-14736, Pliva) trials, protects against both acute and chronic alcohol-induced lesions in stomach and liver, but also, given peripherally, affects various centrally mediated disturbances. Now, in male NMRI mice BPC 157 (10 pg intraperitoneally, 10 ng and 10 microg, intraperitoneally or intragastrically) (i) strongly opposed acute alcohol (4 g/kg intraperitoneally) intoxication (i.e., quickly produced and sustained anesthesia, hypothermia, increased ethanol blood values, 25% fatality, 90-min assessment period) given before or after ethanol, and (ii) when given after abrupt cessation of ethanol (at 0 or 3 or 7 h withdrawal time), attenuated withdrawal (assessed through 24 hours) after 20%-alcohol drinking (7.6 g/kg) through 13 days, with provocation on the 14th day.

  3. The sap of Acer okamotoanum decreases serum alcohol levels after acute ethanol ingestion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Ha-Young; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, we examined whether Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) sap decreased the serum alcohol and acetaldehyde levels after acute ethanol treatment in a rat model. Male rats were orally administered 25, 50 or 100% A. okamotoanum sap 30 min prior to oral challenge with 3 ml of ethanol (15 ml/kg of a 20% ethanol solution in water), and the blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde were analyzed up to 7 h after the treatment. Pre-treatment with the sap significantly decreased the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations after 5 h when compared with ethanol treatment alone (a negative control). The expression levels of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) mRNA were increased significantly in animals pre-treated with A. okamotoanum sap when compared with negative and positive controls. The data suggest that sap pre-treatment enhanced the alcohol metabolism rate in the rat liver. To investigate the involvement of mitochondrial regulation in the ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we carried out an immunohistochemical analysis of Bax and Bcl-2. Pre-treatment with sap significantly decreased Bax expression and increased Bcl-2 expression 7 h after ethanol administration when compared with the negative control. The data suggest that A. okamotoanum sap pre-treatment may reduce the alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the rat liver.

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Helicteres gardneriana Ethanol Extract on Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Juliana Oliveira; de Arruda, Laura Lícia Milani; Baroni, Silmara; Truiti, Maria da Conceição Torrado; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of an ethanol extract of Helicteres gardneriana (Nees) Castiglioni was assayed in experimental models of pleurisy and microcirculation in situ. Treatment of animals with 500 mg/kg body weight reduced the exudate volume (35% reduction) induced by intrapleural injection of carrageenan and the migration of polymorphonuclear cells into the inflamed pleural cavity of rats (40%). Additionally, rolling and adhesion of leukocytes and the number of leukocytes that migrated toward the perivascular space in response to the carrageenan injection were decreased by the extract (500 mg/kg). These data demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of the ethanol extract of Helicteres gardneriana and imply that inhibition of leukocyte-endothelial interactions is important in the extract's mechanism of action. PMID:22028731

  5. Ethanol intake under social circumstances or alone in Sprague-Dawley rats: Impact of age, sex, social activity and social anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Truxell, Eric M.; Spear, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    Background In human adolescents, heavy drinking is often predicted by high sociability in males and high social anxiety in females. This study assessed the impact of baseline levels of social activity and social anxiety-like behavior in group-housed adolescent and adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats on ethanol intake when drinking alone or in a social group. Methods Social activity and anxiety-like behavior initially were assessed in a modified social interaction test, followed by six drinking sessions that occurred every other day in animals given ad libitum food and water. Sessions consisted of 30-min access to 10% ethanol in a “supersac” (3% sucrose + 0.1% saccharin) solution given alone as well as in groups of five same-sex littermates, with order of the alternating session types counterbalanced across animals. Results Adolescent males and adults of both sexes overall consumed more ethanol under social than alone circumstances, whereas adolescent females ingested more ethanol when alone. Highly socially active adolescent males demonstrated elevated levels of ethanol intake relative to their low and medium socially active counterparts when drinking in groups, but not when tested alone. Adolescent females with high levels of social anxiety-like behavior demonstrated the highest ethanol intake under social, but not alone circumstances. Among adults, baseline levels of social anxiety-like behavior did not contribute to individual differences in ethanol intake in either sex. Conclusions The results clearly demonstrate that in adolescent rats, but not their adult counterparts, responsiveness to a social peer predicts ethanol intake in a social setting – circumstances under which drinking typically occurs in human adolescents. High levels of social activity in males and high levels of social anxiety-like behavior in females were associated with elevated social drinking, suggesting that males ingest ethanol for its socially enhancing properties, whereas

  6. Effects of ceftriaxone on ethanol intake: a possible role for xCT and GLT-1 isoforms modulation of glutamate levels in P rats.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Das, Sujan C; Sari, Youssef

    2014-10-01

    Evidence suggests that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine/glutamate exchanger transporter (xCT) are critical in maintaining glutamate homeostasis. We have recently demonstrated that ceftriaxone treatment induced upregulation of GLT1 levels and attenuated ethanol intake; however, less is known about the involvement of xCT on ethanol intake. In this study, we investigated the effects of ceftriaxone on the levels of xCT in both continuous and relapse-like ethanol drinking, as well as GLT-1 isoforms, and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in relapse-like ethanol intake. P rats received free choice of 15 and 30 % ethanol and water for 5 weeks and then deprived of ethanol for 2 weeks. Rats were treated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline during the last 5 days of the 2-week deprivation period. After deprivation period, P rats were re-exposed to free choice of 15 and 30 % ethanol and water for nine consecutive days. A second group of P rats was given continuous ethanol access for 5 weeks, then ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline throughout the week 6. Ceftriaxone significantly attenuated relapse-like ethanol intake. Importantly, this effect of ceftriaxone was associated in part with upregulation of the levels of GLT-1a and GLT-1b isoforms and xCT in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). There were no significant differences in GLAST expression among all groups. We also found that ceftriaxone treatment increased xCT levels in both PFC and NAc in continuous ethanol intake. These findings suggest that xCT and GLT-1 isoforms might be target proteins for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  7. Distribution of methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine in acute and subacute ethanol-methamphetamine combination abuse model rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Man; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Na; Ananda, Sunnassee; Liu, Liang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the distribution of methamphetamine (MA) and its metabolite amphetamine (AP) in rat models of acute and subacute MA-ethanol combination abuse. Rats were fed with 20% ethanol for 4 weeks (chronic active-drinking group), and MA was injected intraperitoneally into chronically drinking and normal rats over 5 and 14 days, respectively. Then the rats from the acute and subacute combination abuse groups were euthanized, and ethanol, MA, and AP concentrations in samples were quantified. Except for the similar ethanol concentrations among acute and subacute groups, the MA and AP levels between groups were quite different. The concentrations of MA and AP in rats' liver, lung, kidney, and brain were much higher than other tissues, regardless of combination with ethanol. Also, MA and AP levels in subacute rats groups were higher than those in acute groups, and the levels of MA and the formation of AP in rats subjected to the combination abuse with ethanol were higher than in MA-only intoxicated rats. We conclude that ethanol has no bearing on the MA and AP distribution in body fluids and tissues, yet it can increase MA levels and markedly accelerate the formation of AP in combination-abuse rats. Comparing the acute and subacute combination-abuse rats' samples, it can be deduced that various accumulated amounts of MA and AP were unaffected by ethanol, even after multi-dose injection, regardless of acute or subacute use.

  8. Assessment of Expression of Genes Coding GABAA Receptors during Chronic and Acute Intoxication of Laboratory Rats with Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Osechkina, N S; Ivanov, M B; Nazarov, G V; Batotsyrenova, E G; Lapina, N V; Babkin, A V; Berdinskikh, I S; Melekhova, A S; Voitsekhovich, K O; Lisitskii, D S; Kashina, T V

    2016-02-01

    Expression of genes encoding the individual subunits of ionotropic GABAA receptor was assessed after acute and chronic intoxication of rats with ethanol. The chronic 1-month-long exposure to ethanol signifi cantly decreased (by 38%) expression of Gabrb1 gene in the hippocampus. Acute exposure to ethanol elevated expression of genes Gabrb1 (by 1.7 times), Gabra1 (by 3.8 times), and Gabra4 (by 6.5 times), although it diminished expression of Gabra2 gene by 1.4 times. In preliminarily alcoholized rats, acute intoxication with ethanol enhanced expression of genes Gabrb1 and Gabra5 by 1.7 and 8.7 times, respectively. There was neither acute nor chronic effect of ethanol on expression of gene Gabra3.

  9. The effect of consumption of ethanol on subfoveal choroidal thickness in acute phase.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hae Min; Woo, Young Jae; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Lee, Christopher Seungkyu; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the acute effect of ethanol consumption on subfoveal choroidal thickness. This prospective interventional study included the right eyes of 30 healthy subjects (30 eyes). Ethanol (1.0 g/kg) was administered orally on the first visit. A matching volume of water was administered orally on the second visit. Oral administration of ethanol and water was performed at 14:00, and choroidal thickness was measured every 30 min until 16:00. Change of choroidal thickness after oral administration of ethanol and water was the main outcome measure. At baseline, choroidal mean subfoveal thickness was 299.0±73.4 µm (range, 186.5-472.5 µm) before ethanol consumption and 297.1±71.1 µm (range, 187.0-470.5 µm) before water consumption. After consumption of ethanol, mean subfoveal choroidal thickness increased during the first 60 min and then decreased during the next 60 min, which was a significant change over time (p<0.001). After consumption of water, there was no significant change in mean subfoveal choroidal thickness over time (p=0.310). Comparison of changes in the mean subfoveal choroidal thickness during 120 min showed significant difference between ethanol and water consumption (p<0.001). The results of current study show that consumption of ethanol significantly affected the choroidal thickness. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness increased during the first 60 min and then decreased during the next 120 min after ethanol consumption. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Dietary β-conglycinin prevents acute ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikaga, Reina; Li, Dongyang; Yamazaki, Tomomi

    2017-09-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is the earliest stage of alcohol-induced liver disease leading to liver cirrhosis. β-Conglycinin, one of the soy proteins, is known to prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver, hyperlipidemia and obesity. Therefore, we examined whether β-conglycinin feeding has an effect on the prevention of acute ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed with 20 energy% β-conglycinin or casein for 4 weeks prior to ethanol administration and were then given ethanol or glucose, as a control, by gavage. Ethanol significantly increased liver triglyceride (TG) in mice fed casein due to the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ2, a nuclear transcription factor known for regulating lipid metabolism and de novo lipogenesis. The liver TG of ethanol-administered β-conglycinin-fed mice was significantly lower than that in those fed casein, although ethanol increased the amount of liver TG in mice fed β-conglycinin. The increased levels of PPARγ2 protein and its target gene CD36 in response to an ethanol were not observed in mice fed β-conglycinin. Moreover, β-conglycinin decreased the basal expression of de novo lipogenesis-related genes such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, and therefore, the expressions of these genes were lower in the ethanol-administered β-conglycinin-fed mice than in the casein-fed mice. In conclusion, β-conglycinin supplementation appears to prevent the development of fatty liver in mice caused by ethanol consumption via the suppression of alcohol-induced activation of PPARγ2 and the downregulation of the basal expression of de novo lipogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Impact of social isolation and enriched environment during adolescence on voluntary ethanol intake and anxiety in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Laber, Kathy

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the impact of an enriched environment in a previously established stress model of isolation during early development that induces high alcohol (ethanol) self-administration. The study was conducted with male and female C57BL/6J mice housed in isolation or in groups that were either provided or withheld enrichment during adolescence. The impact of these housing conditions was assessed during adulthood by measuring weight gain, quantifying voluntary ethanol intake, measuring plasma corticosterone levels, and assessing anxiety-like behavior. Results showed that, regardless of sex, mice that were single-housed during adolescence showed a significant increase in voluntary ethanol intake, which was not observed in isolated mice that were provided with nesting material during adolescence (compared to group-housed non-enriched control group). Basal corticosterone was not affected by housing, enrichment conditions, or sex. Corticosterone levels did not relate to levels of voluntary ethanol intake. However, corticosterone levels were higher after three weeks of ethanol intake. Surprisingly, mice that were group-housed during adolescence showed higher levels of anxiety-like behavior in the light/dark test. Overall, these results indicate that housing conditions during a critical developmental period can significantly modulate voluntary ethanol intake later in life.

  12. Acutely Decreased Thermoregulatory Energy Expenditure or Decreased Activity Energy Expenditure Both Acutely Reduce Food Intake in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaiyala, Karl J.; Morton, Gregory J.; Thaler, Joshua P.; Meek, Thomas H.; Tylee, Tracy; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Wisse, Brent E.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the suggestion that reduced energy expenditure may be a key contributor to the obesity pandemic, few studies have tested whether acutely reduced energy expenditure is associated with a compensatory reduction in food intake. The homeostatic mechanisms that control food intake and energy expenditure remain controversial and are thought to act over days to weeks. We evaluated food intake in mice using two models of acutely decreased energy expenditure: 1) increasing ambient temperature to thermoneutrality in mice acclimated to standard laboratory temperature or 2) exercise cessation in mice accustomed to wheel running. Increasing ambient temperature (from 21°C to 28°C) rapidly decreased energy expenditure, demonstrating that thermoregulatory energy expenditure contributes to both light cycle (40±1%) and dark cycle energy expenditure (15±3%) at normal ambient temperature (21°C). Reducing thermoregulatory energy expenditure acutely decreased food intake primarily during the light cycle (65±7%), thus conflicting with the delayed compensation model, but did not alter spontaneous activity. Acute exercise cessation decreased energy expenditure only during the dark cycle (14±2% at 21°C; 21±4% at 28°C), while food intake was reduced during the dark cycle (0.9±0.1 g) in mice housed at 28°C, but during the light cycle (0.3±0.1 g) in mice housed at 21°C. Cumulatively, there was a strong correlation between the change in daily energy expenditure and the change in daily food intake (R2 = 0.51, p<0.01). We conclude that acutely decreased energy expenditure decreases food intake suggesting that energy intake is regulated by metabolic signals that respond rapidly and accurately to reduced energy expenditure. PMID:22936977

  13. Assessment of voluntary ethanol consumption and the effects of a melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist on ethanol intake in mutant C57BL/6J mice lacking the MC-4 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Montserrat; Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel; Carvajal, Francisca; Lowery, Emily G.; Cubero, Inmaculada; Thiele, Todd E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The melanocortin (MC) system is composed of peptides that are cleaved from the polypeptide precursor proopiomelanocortin (POMC). Recent evidence shows that chronic exposure to ethanol significantly blunts central MC peptide immunoreactivity and MC receptor (MCR) agonists protect against high ethanol intake characteristic of C57BL/6J mice. Here we assessed the role of the MC-4 receptor (MC4R) in voluntary ethanol intake and in modulating the effects of the non-selective MCR agonist melanotan-II (MTII) on ethanol consumption. Methods To assess the role of the MC4R, MC4R knockout (Mc4r-/-) and littermate wildtype (Mc4r+/+) mice on a C57BL/6J background were used. Voluntary ethanol (3, 5, 8, 10, 15, and 20%, v/v) and water intake were assessed using standard two-bottle procedures. In separate experiments, Mc4r-/- and Mc4r+/+ mice were given intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of MTII (0, 0.5, or 1.0 μg/1 μl) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of MTII (0 or 5 mg/kg/5 ml). The effects of MTII (0 or 0.5 μg/1 μl, i.c.v.) on 10% sucrose and 0.15% saccharin intake were assessed in C57BL/6J mice. Results Mc4r-/- mice showed normal consumption of ethanol over all concentrations tested. I.c.v. infusion of MTII significantly reduced ethanol drinking in Mc4r+/+ mice, but failed to influence ethanol intake in Mc4r-/- mice. When administered in an i.p. injection, MTII significantly reduced ethanol drinking in both Mc4r-/- and Mc4r+/+ mice. MTII attenuated consumption of caloric (ethanol, sucrose and food) and non-caloric (saccharin) reinforcers. Conclusions When given centrally, the MCR agonist MTII reduced ethanol drinking by signaling through the MC4R. On the other hand, MTII-induced reduction of ethanol drinking did not require the MC4R when administered peripherally. Together, the present observations show that the MC4R is necessary for the central actions of MCR agonists on ethanol drinking, and that MTII blunts the consumption natural reinforcers

  14. The effects of ghrelin antagonists [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 or JMV2959 on ethanol, water, and food intake in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan L.; Ryabinin, Andrey E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol use and abuse patterns have created a need for novel treatment models. Current research has turned its focus on reward pathways associated with intrinsic necessities, such as feeding. Theories suggest that drugs of abuse seize control of natural reward pathways and disregulate normal function, leading to chronic addiction. One such pathway involving the hunger stimulating peptide, ghrelin, is the focus of our study. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to groups and treated with vehicle or a ghrelin antagonist, either [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (DLys) or JMV2959. Three experiments tested ghrelin antagonism using different doses; Experiment 1 – 12mg/kg JMV2959; Experiment 2 – 15mg/kg DLys; Experiment 3 – 9mg/kg JMV2959. Using a two-bottle choice 24-hour access paradigm, data was collected for ethanol intake, preference, water intake, and food intake at 4- and 24-hours after injection. Results Experiment 1 showed that 12mg/kg of JMV2959 decreased ethanol, water, and food intake, without affecting preference. Experiment 2 showed that 15mg/kg of DLys decreased ethanol intake, preference, and water intake only on the first day of treatment. Experiment 3 showed that 9mg/kg of JMV2959 decreased only ethanol and food intake. No change was seen during deprivation and JMV2959 was still effective at reducing ethanol intake upon reintroduction. Despite the change in food intake, there were no differences in body weight throughout the experiments. It should be noted that the majority of significant effects were only found 4-hours post injection. Conclusion The results show that compounds that block ghrelin receptor activity are effective at decreasing ethanol intake. However, DLys was only effective at reducing intake and preference on the first day, suggesting a quick tolerance and selectivity for ethanol. JMV2959 consistently reduced ethanol intake, but at the higher dose also reduced all other consummatory behaviors. Thus, ghrelin antagonists

  15. The effects of ghrelin antagonists [D-Lys(3) ]-GHRP-6 or JMV2959 on ethanol, water, and food intake in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Juan L; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2014-09-01

    Alcohol use and abuse patterns have created a need for novel treatment models. Current research has turned its focus on reward pathways associated with intrinsic necessities, such as feeding. Theories suggest that drugs of abuse seize control of natural reward pathways and dysregulate normal function, leading to chronic addiction. One such pathway involving the hunger stimulating peptide, ghrelin, is the focus of our study. Male C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to groups and treated with vehicle or a ghrelin antagonist, either [D-Lys(3) ]-GHRP-6 (DLys) or JMV2959. Three experiments tested ghrelin antagonism using different doses; experiment 1 tested 12 mg/kg JMV2959; experiment 2 tested 15 mg/kg DLys; experiment 3 tested 9 mg/kg JMV2959. Using a 2-bottle choice 24-hour access paradigm, data were collected for ethanol intake, preference, water intake, and food intake at 4 and 24 hours after injection. Experiment 1 showed that 12 mg/kg of JMV2959 decreased ethanol, water, and food intake, without affecting preference. Experiment 2 showed that 15 mg/kg of DLys decreased ethanol intake, preference, and water intake only on the first day of treatment. Experiment 3 showed that 9 mg/kg of JMV2959 decreased only ethanol and food intake. No change was seen during deprivation, and JMV2959 was still effective at reducing ethanol intake upon reintroduction. Despite the change in food intake, there were no differences in body weight throughout the experiments. It should be noted that the majority of significant effects were only found 4 hours postinjection. The results show that compounds that block ghrelin receptor activity are effective at decreasing ethanol intake. However, DLys was only effective at reducing intake and preference on the first day, suggesting a quick tolerance and selectivity for ethanol. JMV2959 consistently reduced ethanol intake, but at the higher dose also reduced all other consummatory behaviors. Thus, ghrelin antagonists provide a viable potential

  16. Acute and chronic effects of ethanol on learning-related synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2014-02-01

    Alcoholism is associated with acute and long-term cognitive dysfunction including memory impairment, resulting in substantial disability and cost to society. Thus, understanding how ethanol impairs cognition is essential for developing treatment strategies to dampen its adverse impact. Memory processing is thought to involve persistent, use-dependent changes in synaptic transmission, and ethanol alters the activity of multiple signaling molecules involved in synaptic processing, including modulation of the glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmitter systems that mediate most fast excitatory and inhibitory transmission in the brain. Effects on glutamate and GABA receptors contribute to ethanol-induced changes in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory acquisition. In this paper, we review the effects of ethanol on learning-related forms of synaptic plasticity with emphasis on changes observed in the hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for encoding contextual and episodic memories. We also include studies in other brain regions as they pertain to altered cognitive and mental function. Comparison of effects in the hippocampus to other brain regions is instructive for understanding the complexities of ethanol's acute and long-term pharmacological consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic ethanol intake induces partial microglial activation that is not reversed by long-term ethanol withdrawal in the rat hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Catarina; Meireles, Manuela; Silva, Susana M

    2017-04-10

    Neuroinflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several disorders. Activation of microglia leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and microglial-mediated neuroinflammation has been proposed as one of the alcohol-induced neuropathological mechanisms. The present study aimed to examine the effect of chronic ethanol exposure and long-term withdrawal on microglial activation and neuroinflammation in the hippocampal formation. Male rats were submitted to 6 months of ethanol treatment followed by a 2-month withdrawal period. Stereological methods were applied to estimate the total number of microglia and activated microglia detected by CD11b immunohistochemistry in the hippocampal formation. The expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, COX-2 and IL-15 were measured by qRT-PCR. Alcohol consumption was associated with an increase in the total number of activated microglia but morphological assessment indicated that microglia did not exhibit a full activation phenotype. These data were supported by functional evidence since chronic alcohol consumption produced no changes in the expression of TNF-α or COX-2. The levels of IL-15 a cytokine whose expression is increased upon activation of both astrocytes and microglia, was induced by chronic alcohol treatment. Importantly, the partial activation of microglia induced by ethanol was not reversed by long-term withdrawal. This study suggests that chronic alcohol exposure induces a microglial phenotype consistent with partial activation without significant increase in classical cytokine markers of neuroinflammation in the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, long-term cessation of alcohol intake is not sufficient to alter the microglial partial activation phenotype induced by ethanol.

  18. β-Lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid, attenuates ethanol intake and increases glial glutamate transporters expression in alcohol preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Alqassem Y; Sari, Youssef

    2017-09-14

    Studies from our laboratory showed that upregulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine-glutamate exchanger (xCT) expression with ceftriaxone, β-lactam antibiotic, in the brain was associated with attenuation of ethanol consumption. In this study, we tested clavulanic acid, which is another β-lactam compound with negligible antimicrobial activity, on ethanol consumption and expression of GLT-1, xCT and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Clavulanic acid has the central β-lactam pharmacophore that is critical for the upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression. We found that clavulanic acid, at 5mg/kg (i.p.) dose, significantly attenuated ethanol consumption and ethanol preference in P rats as compared to vehicle-treated group. This effect was associated with a significant increase in water intake in clavulanic acid treated group. Importantly, we found that clavulanic acid increased the expression of GLT-1 and xCT in nucleus accumbens. However, there was no effect of clavulanic acid on GLAST expression in the nucleus accumbens. Clavulanic acid treatment did not upregulate the expression of GLT-1, xCT and GLAST in prefrontal cortex. These findings revealed that clavulanic acid at 20-40 fold lower dose than ceftriaxone can attenuate ethanol consumption, in part through upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression in the nucleus accumbens. Thus, we suggest that clavulanic acid might be used as an alternative option to ceftriaxone to attenuate ethanol drinking behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute neuropsychological effects of MDMA and ethanol (co-)administration in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wezenberg, E.; Valkenberg, M. M. G. J.; de Jong, C. A. J.; Buitelaar, J. K.; van Gerven, J. M. A.; Verkes, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale In Western societies, a considerable percentage of young people expose themselves to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”). Commonly, ecstasy is used in combination with other substances, in particular alcohol (ethanol). MDMA induces both arousing as well as hallucinogenic effects, whereas ethanol is a general central nervous system depressant. Objective The aim of the present study is to assess the acute effects of single and co-administration of MDMA and ethanol on executive, memory, psychomotor, visuomotor, visuospatial and attention function, as well as on subjective experience. Materials and methods We performed a four-way, double-blind, randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (nine male, seven female) between the ages of 18–29. MDMA was given orally (100 mg) and blood alcohol concentration was maintained at 0.6‰ by an ethanol infusion regime. Results Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol was well tolerated and did not show greater impairment of performance compared to the single-drug conditions. Impaired memory function was consistently observed after all drug conditions, whereas impairment of psychomotor function and attention was less consistent across drug conditions. Conclusions Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol did not exacerbate the effects of either drug alone. Although the impairment of performance by all drug conditions was relatively moderate, all induced significant impairment of cognitive function. PMID:18305926

  20. Acute exposure to ethanol on gestational day 15 affects social motivation of female offspring.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Mooney, Sandra M

    2014-03-15

    Alterations in social behavior are a hallmark of many neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. In rodents, social behavior is affected by prenatal insults. The outcomes are dependent on the timing of the insult as well as the sex and age of the animal tested. The limbic system is particularly important for social behavior, and a peak of neurogenesis within this system occurs on gestational day (G)15. Neurons appear particularly vulnerable to ethanol insult around the time they become post-mitotic. We tested the hypothesis that acute exposure to ethanol on G15 would result in significant social behavior deficits. Accordingly, Long Evans pregnant females were injected with ethanol (2.9 g/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline on G15. Offspring were assessed in a modified social interaction test on postnatal day (P) 28, P42, or P75, i.e., during early adolescence, late adolescence, or young adulthood. Prenatal ethanol exposure decreased social investigation in P28 females and transformed social preference into social avoidance in 75-day-old females. Contact behavior, play fighting, and locomotor activity differed as a function of age, but were not significantly affected by ethanol exposure. Males demonstrated significantly more contact behavior and play fighting at P42 than at P28 or P70, whereas there were no age-related changes in females. Adult females showed more locomotor activity than adult males. Overall, prenatal ethanol exposure on G15 enhanced social anxiety in females, with these effects seen in adulthood only.

  1. Male adolescent rats display blunted cytokine responses in the CNS after acute ethanol or lipopolysaccharide exposure

    PubMed Central

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L.; Gano, Anny; Paniccia, Jacqueline E.; Deak, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol induces widespread changes in cytokine expression, with recent data from our laboratory having demonstrated that, during acute ethanol intoxication, adult rats exhibit consistent increases in interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression in several brain regions, while showing reductions in IL-1 and TNFα expression. Given evidence indicating that adolescence may be an ontogenetic period in which some neuroimmune processes and cells may not yet have fully matured, the purpose of the current experiments was to examine potential age differences in the central cytokine response of adolescent (P31–33 days of age) and adult (69–71 days of age) rats to either an acute immune (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or non-immune challenge (ethanol). In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either sterile saline, LPS (250 µg/kg), or ethanol (4-g/kg), and then trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 3 hr later for measurement of blood EtOH concentrations (BECs), plasma endotoxin, and central mRNA expression of several immune-related gene targets. In Experiment 2, the response to intragastrically (i.g.) administered ethanol was examined and compared to animals given tap water (i.g.). Results showed that LPS stimulated robust increases in expression of IL-1, IL-6, TNFα, and IκBα in the hippocampus, PVN, and amygdala, and that these increases were generally less pronounced in adolescents relative to adults. Following an i.p. EtOH challenge, IL-6 and IκBα expression were significantly increased in both ages in the PVN and amygdala, and adults exhibited even greater increases in IκBα than adolescents. I.g. administration of ethanol also increased IL-6 and IκBα expression in all three brain regions, with hippocampal IL-6 expression elevated even more so in adults compared to adolescents. Furthermore, assessment of plasma endotoxin concentrations revealed (i) whereas robust increases in plasma endotoxin were observed in adults

  2. The ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde induces water and salt intake via two distinct pathways in the central nervous system of rats.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Izumi; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ono, Kentaro; Kakinoki, Yasuaki; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Ueta, Yoichi; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The sensation of thirst experienced after heavy alcohol drinking is widely regarded as a consequence of ethanol (EtOH)-induced diuresis, but EtOH in high doses actually induces anti-diuresis. The present study was designed to investigate the introduction mechanism of water and salt intake after heavy alcohol drinking, focusing on action of acetaldehyde, a metabolite of EtOH and a toxic substance, using rats. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibitor cyanamide was used to mimic the effect of prolonged acetaldehyde exposure because acetaldehyde is quickly degraded by ALDH. Systemic administration of a high-dose of EtOH at 2.5 g/kg induced water and salt intake with anti-diuresis. Cyanamide enhanced the fluid intake following EtOH and acetaldehyde administration. Systemic administration of acetaldehyde with cyanamide suppressed blood pressure and increased plasma renin activity. Blockade of central angiotensin receptor AT1R suppressed the acetaldehyde-induced fluid intake and c-Fos expression in the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which form part of dipsogenic mechanism in the brain. In addition, central administration of acetaldehyde together with cyanamide selectively induced water but not salt intake without changes in blood pressure. In electrophysiological recordings from slice preparations, acetaldehyde specifically excited angiotensin-sensitive neurons in the CVO. These results suggest that acetaldehyde evokes the thirst sensation following heavy alcohol drinking, by two distinct and previously unsuspected mechanisms, independent of diuresis. First acetaldehyde indirectly activates AT1R in the dipsogenic centers via the peripheral renin-angiotensin system following the depressor response and induces both water and salt intake. Secondly acetaldehyde directly activates neurons in the dipsogenic centers and induces only water intake.

  3. Increased loss and decreased synthesis of hepatic glutathione after acute ethanol administration. Turnover studies.

    PubMed Central

    Speisky, H; MacDonald, A; Giles, G; Orrego, H; Israel, Y

    1985-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on rates of synthesis and utilization of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was studied in rats after a pulse of [35S]cysteine. A 35% decrease in hepatic GSH content 5h after administration of 4 g of ethanol/kg body wt. was accompanied by a 33% increase in the rate of GSH utilization. The decrease occurred without increases in hepatic oxidized glutathione (GSSG) or in the GSH/GSSG ratio. The rate of non-enzymic condensation of GSH with acetaldehyde could account for only 6% of the rate of hepatic GSH disappearance. The increased loss of [35S]GSH induced by ethanol was not accompanied by an increased turnover; rather, a 30% inhibition of GSH synthesis balanced the increased rate of loss, leaving the turnover rate unchanged. The rate of acetaldehyde condensation with cysteine in vitro occurred at about one-third of the rate of GSH loss in ethanol-treated animals. However, ethanol induced only a minor decrease in liver cysteine content, which did not precede, but followed, the decrease in GSH. The characteristics of 2-methylthiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, the condensation product between acetaldehyde and cysteine, were studied and methodologies were developed to determine its presence in tissues. It was not found in the liver of ethanol-treated animals. Ethanol administration led to a marked increase (47%) in plasma GSH in the post-hepatic inferior vena cava, but not in its pre-hepatic segment. Data suggest that an increased loss of GSH from the liver constitutes an important mechanism for the decrease in GSH induced by ethanol. In addition, an inhibition of GSH synthesis is observed. PMID:3977847

  4. Acute exposure of rabbit jejunum to ethanol. In vitro uptake of hexoses

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of acute exposure of rabbit jejunum to ethanol on the uptake of three hexoses was examined in vitro. With ethanol present in the preincubation medium for 30 min, or directly in the incubation medium for 6 min, glucose uptake was reduced. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that ethanol in the preincubation medium was associated with a rise in the value of the apparent Michaelis constant (Km*), whereas the inhibition of glucose uptake observed with ethanol present directly in the incubation medium was associated with a reduction in the apparent passive permeability coefficient (Pd*), a reduction in the maximal transport rate (Jdm), and an increase in Km*. When increasing concentrations of ethanol were added to the preincubation or to the incubation medium, there was a reduction in the uptake of both 1 mM and 40 mM glucose, galactose, and 3-O-methyl glucose. The addition of 40 mM galactose or 1 mM phloridzin to 40 mM glucose was associated with a 50% reduction in glucose uptake, but this uptake was not further inhibited by the addition of 6% ethanol (v/v). Similarly, the uptake of 3-O-methyl glucose was inhibited by the addition of 40 mM glucose or galactose but no further reduction in uptake was achieved by adding ethanol. Finally, galactose uptake was inhibited by adding 40 mM glucose or 40 mM 3-O-MG, but the addition of 6% ethanol was associated with no further decline in the uptake of galactose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Dietary intake and childhood leukemia: The Diet and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (DALLT) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ladas, Elena J; Orjuela, Manuela; Stevenson, Kristen; Cole, Peter D; Lin, Meiko; Athale, Uma H; Clavell, Luis A; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Michon, Bruno; Schorin, Marshall A; Welch, Jennifer Greene; Asselin, Barbara L; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Kelly, Kara M

    2016-10-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at elevated risk for nutrition-related morbidity both during and after therapy. We present the demographic characteristics and nutrient intake at study entry of a prospective cohort in which evaluating dietary intake in children diagnosed with ALL was investigated. Dietary intake data were collected for participants enrolled on the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocol. Dietary intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and was compared with the dietary reference intake by ALL risk group (standard and high risk). Dietary intake data were collected from 81% of participants (n = 640). We found that 27% of participants were overweight/obese. Intake of total calories and other nutrients exceeded the dietary reference intake in up to 79% of children. This was evident in both risk groups and was pronounced among younger children. For micronutrients, dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D (females only), and zinc differed significantly between patients with standard-risk and those with high-risk ALL. This study was successful in collecting dietary intake data at the time of cancer diagnosis in a multicenter setting in a pediatric population at high-risk for nutrition-related morbidity. We identified "at-risk" dietary intakes, which vary by sex and ALL risk group; such patients may benefit from future dietary interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy and protein intakes of hospitalised patients with acute respiratory failure receiving non-invasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Anneli; White, Hayden; Sosnowski, Kellie; Tran, Khoa; Jones, Mark; Palmer, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Nutritional intake of patients in acute respiratory failure receiving non-invasive ventilation has not previously been described, and no protocols have been developed to guide practice to optimise nutritional status. We aimed to measure energy and protein intakes of patients in acute respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation receiving standard hospital nutritional care. Food and fluid intake forms were completed by nursing staff for all meals and mid meals for patients admitted with respiratory failure commencing on non-invasive ventilation. Intake was converted from quartiles of food consumed into energy and protein to enable comparison with estimated daily requirements using descriptive statistics. Multinomial stepwise regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with inadequate protein and energy intake. Over 283 total days of intake, 36 participants (67% female, aged 65 ± 9 years) achieved on average 1434 ± 627 kcal and 63 ± 29 g protein daily. Overall, 28 patients (78%, 95% CI: 61-90%) met less than 80% of estimated energy requirements and 27 patients (75%, 95% CI: 58-88%) met less than 80% of estimated protein requirements. Being fed orally, longer time on non-invasive ventilation and higher BMI were associated with poorer intakes. Better nutritional status on admission and measuring intake closer to hospital discharge was associated with improved intakes. Patients with acute respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation often had inadequate oral intake, particularly with increasing time on non-invasive ventilation, and earlier during their hospital admission. Development of protocols to optimise nutritional intake for these patients may improve outcomes and reduce regular readmission rates. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic social isolation and chronic variable stress during early development induce later elevated ethanol intake in adult C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Becker, Howard C

    2011-06-01

    Experience with stress situations during early development can have long-lasting effects on stress- and anxiety-related behaviors. Importantly, this can also favor drug self-administration. These studies examined the effects of chronic social isolation and/or variable stress experiences during early development on subsequent voluntary ethanol intake in adult male and female C57BL/6J mice. The experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of chronic isolation between weaning and adulthood (Experiment 1), chronic isolation during adulthood (Experiment 2), and chronic variable stress (CVS) alone or in combination with chronic social isolation between weaning and adulthood (Experiment 3) on subsequent voluntary ethanol intake. Mice were born in our facility and were separated into two housing conditions: isolate housed (one mouse/cage) or group housed (four mice/cage) according to sex. Separate groups were isolated for 40 days starting either at time of weaning postnatal day 21 (PD 21) (early isolation, Experiments 1 and 3) or at adulthood (PD 60: late isolation, Experiment 2). The effects of housing condition on subsequent ethanol intake were assessed starting at around PD 65 in Experiments 1 and 3 or PD 105 days in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, starting at PD 32, isolate-housed and group-housed mice were either subjected to CVS or left undisturbed. CVS groups experienced random presentations of mild stressors for 14 days, including exposure to an unfamiliar open field, restraint, physical shaking, and forced swim, among others. All mice were tested for ethanol intake for 14 days using a two-bottle choice (ethanol 15% vol/vol vs. water) for a 2-h limited access procedure. Early social isolation resulted in greater ethanol intake compared with the corresponding group-housed mice (Experiment 1). In contrast, social isolation during adulthood (late isolation) did not increase subsequent ethanol intake compared with the corresponding group-housed mice (Experiment 2

  8. Chronic social isolation and chronic variable stress during early development induce later elevated ethanol intake in adult C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L.; Becker, Howard C

    2010-01-01

    Experience with stress situations during early development can have long-lasting effects on stress and anxiety related behaviors. Importantly, this can also favor drug self-administration. These studies examined the effects of chronic social isolation and/or variable stress experiences during early development on subsequent voluntary ethanol intake in adult male and female C57BL/6J mice. The experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of chronic isolation between weaning and adulthood (Experiment 1), chronic isolation during adulthood (Experiment 2) and chronic variable stress alone or in combination with chronic social isolation between weaning and adulthood (Experiment 3) on subsequent voluntary ethanol intake. Mice were born in our facility and were separated into two housing conditions: isolate-housed (1 mouse/cage) or group-housed (4 mice/cage), according to sex. Separate groups were isolated for 40 days starting either at time of weaning postnatal day 21 (PD 21) (early isolation, Experiments 1 and 3) or at adulthood (PD 60: late isolation, Experiment 2). The effects of housing condition on subsequent ethanol intake were assessed starting at around PD 65 in Experiments 1 and 3 or PD 105 days in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, starting at PD 32, isolate-housed and group-housed mice were either subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS) or left undisturbed. CVS groups experienced random presentations of mild stressors for 14 days, including exposure to an unfamiliar open field, restraint, physical shaking, and forced swim, among others. All mice were tested for ethanol intake for 14 days using a 2-bottle choice (ethanol 15 % v/v vs. water) 2-hr limited access procedure. Early social isolation resulted in greater ethanol intake in comparison to the corresponding group-housed mice (Experiment 1). In contrast, social isolation during adulthood (late isolation) did not increase subsequent ethanol intake compared to the corresponding group-housed mice

  9. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Lowing, Jennifer L; Bosse, Kelly E; Hildebrandt, Clara C; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Conti, Alana C

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  10. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Susick, Laura L.; Lowing, Jennifer L.; Bosse, Kelly E.; Hildebrandt, Clara C.; Chrumka, Alexandria C.; Conti, Alana C.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  11. Severe lactic acidosis in a diabetic patient after ethanol abuse and floor cleaner intake.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Lagas, Jurjen S; Daling, Ratana; Hooijberg, Jan Hendrik; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Brandjes, Desiderius P M; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2014-11-01

    An intoxication with drugs, ethanol or cleaning solvents may cause a complex clinical scenario if multiple agents have been ingested simultaneously. The situation can become even more complex in patients with (multiple) co-morbidities. A 59-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus (without treatment two weeks before the intoxication) intentionally ingested a substantial amount of ethanol along with ~750 mL of laminate floor cleaner containing citric acid. The patient was admitted with severe metabolic acidosis (both ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis, with serum lactate levels of 22 mM). He was treated with sodium bicarbonate, insulin and thiamine after which he recovered within two days. Diabetic ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis aggravated due to ethanol intoxication, thiamine deficiency and citrate. The high lactate levels were explained by excessive lactate formation caused by the combination of untreated diabetes mellitus, thiamine deficiency and ethanol abuse. Metabolic acidosis in diabetes is multi-factorial, and the clinical situation may be further complicated, when ingestion of ethanol and toxic agents are involved. Here, we reported a patient in whom diabetic ketoacidosis was accompanied by severe lactic acidosis as a result of citric acid and mainly ethanol ingestion and a possible thiamine deficiency. In the presence of lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis, physicians need to consider thiamine deficiency and ingestion of ethanol or other toxins. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  12. Midkine in the mouse ventral tegmental area limits ethanol intake and Ccl2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; He, D; Lasek, A W

    2017-09-01

    Midkine (MDK) is a cytokine and neurotrophic factor that is more highly expressed in the brains of alcoholics and in mice predisposed to drink large amounts of ethanol, suggesting that MDK may regulate ethanol consumption. Here we measured ethanol consumption in male and female Mdk knockout (-/-) mice using the two-bottle choice and the drinking in the dark (DID) tests. We found that Mdk -/- mice consumed significantly more ethanol than wild-type controls in both tests. To determine if MDK acts in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to regulate ethanol consumption, we delivered lentivirus expressing a Mdk shRNA into the VTA of male C57BL/6J mice to locally knockdown Mdk and performed the DID test. Mice expressing a Mdk shRNA in the VTA consumed more ethanol than mice expressing a control non-targeting shRNA, demonstrating that the VTA is one site in the brain through which MDK acts to regulate ethanol consumption. Since MDK also controls the expression of inflammatory cytokines in other organs, we examined gene expression of interleukin-1 beta (Il1b), tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfα) and the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2) in the VTA of Mdk -/- mice and in mice expressing Mdk shRNA in the VTA. Expression of Ccl2 was elevated in the VTA of Mdk -/- mice and in mice expressing Mdk shRNA in the VTA. These results demonstrate that MDK functions in the VTA to limit ethanol consumption and levels of CCL2, a chemokine known to increase ethanol consumption. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  13. The glycine reuptake inhibitor Org24598 and acamprosate reduce ethanol intake in the rat; tolerance development to acamprosate but not to Org24598.

    PubMed

    Lidö, Helga H; Marston, Hugh; Ericson, Mia; Söderpalm, Bo

    2012-09-01

    Extracellular glycine modulates accumbal dopamine levels as well as ethanol-induced dopamine overflow. Glycine availability is also crucial for regulating alcohol consumption and the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT-1) inhibitor Org25935 robustly decreases alcohol intake in rats. To explore whether the alcohol-intake reducing effect of Org25935 is substance bound, we examined the effect of a different selective GlyT-1 inhibitor, Org24598, on ethanol consumption in rats and compared the effect with that of acamprosate, a drug currently in clinical use. We studied the effects of daily Org24598 and acamprosate injections on male Wistar rats with ~60% ethanol preference in a limited access two bottle free-choice model for 12 days, followed by alcohol deprivation for 14 days before a second test period of 10 days. Finally, rats underwent in vivo microdialysis where dopamine, glycine, taurine and β-alanine in n. accumbens were measured. Org24598 profoundly reduced ethanol intake and the effect remained throughout both treatment periods. Acamprosate promptly reduced ethanol intake, but on the third day tolerance developed to this effect and acamprosate failed to influence alcohol consumption during the second test period. Neither Org24598 nor acamprosate reduced water intake. Following the drinking study, the Org24598 group displayed higher basal accumbal dopamine levels compared with acamprosate and vehicle groups. Both Org24598 and acamprosate reduced the ethanol-induced dopamine response in n. accumbens. The study demonstrates a robust anti-alcohol intake effect of the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org24598, supporting the new concept that GlyT-1 inhibition reduces ethanol consumption. GlyT-1 inhibition may represent a new treatment principle for alcoholism that is superior to acamprosate.

  14. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  15. Acute Toxicity and Cytotoxicity Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Spondias tuberosa Arruda Bark: Hematological, Biochemical and Histopathological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Humberto M; Nascimento, Jailson N DO; Araújo, Thiago A S; Duarte, Filipe S; Albuquerque, Ulysses P; Vieira, Jeymesson R C; Santana, Edson R B DE; Yara, Ricardo; Lima, Cláudia S A; Gomes, Dayane A; Lira, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Spondias tuberosa Arruda, popularly named as umbu, is native from savanna-like vegetation and widely used for medicinal purposes, however, the toxicological profile is not available yet. This study evaluated the phytochemical profile and acute toxicity and citoxicity of Ethanolic Extract of Spondias tuberosa Arruda Bark (EEStb) in hematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters. Female Wistar rats were divided into: control (C) and animal treated single doses of 300mg/Kg (EEStb300) or 2.000mg/kg body weight (ESStb2.000) of the EEStb. After 24 hours and 14 days from gavage, the behavior, hematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters were assayed. Cytotoxicity effect was evaluated on HEp-2 cell lines. Neither EEStb300 nor EEStb2.000 produced mortality nor changes in body weight during the 14-days of observation, but EEStb2.000 reduced quietly the food and water intake as well as locomotor activity at first day. There were no changes in macroscopic, histopathological, biochemical and hematological parameters. EEStb in concentrations of 6.25- 50μg ml-1 on HEp-2 cell did not produce cytotoxic effect. These results suggest that EEStb did not cause acute toxicity and cytotoxic, suggesting a good safety rate for Spondias tuberosa Arruda.

  16. Acute and Chronic Effects of Ethanol on Learning-Related Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zorumski, Charles F.; Mennerick, Steven; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism is associated with acute and long-term cognitive dysfunction including memory impairment, resulting in substantial disability and cost to society. Thus, understanding how ethanol impairs cognition is essential for developing treatment strategies to dampen its adverse impact. Memory processing is thought to involve persistent, use-dependent changes in synaptic transmission, and ethanol alters the activity of multiple signaling molecules involved in synaptic processing, including modulation of the glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmitter systems that mediate most fast excitatory and inhibitory transmission in the brain. Effects on glutamate and GABA receptors contribute to ethanol-induced changes in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory acquisition. In this paper, we review the effects of ethanol on learning-related forms of synaptic plasticity with emphasis on changes observed in the hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for encoding contextual and episodic memories. We also include studies in other brain regions as they pertain to altered cognitive and mental function. Comparison of effects in the hippocampus to other brain regions is instructive for understanding the complexities of ethanol’s acute and long-term pharmacological consequences. PMID:24447472

  17. Apoptosis of Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellum following chronic ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Suelen A; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Fioruci-Fontanelli, Beatriz Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Novais, Paulo Cezar; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Oishi, Jorge Camargo; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Stefanini, Maira Aparecida; Martinez, Marcelo; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol alters motricity, learning, cognition, and cellular metabolism in the cerebellum. We evaluated the effect of ethanol on apoptosis in Golgi, Purkinje, and granule cells of the cerebellum in adult rats. There were two groups of 20 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (<2 g ethanol/kg body weight/day). At 120 days old, rats were anesthetized and decapitated, and their cerebella were collected and fixed. Cerebellar sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry for terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), caspase-3, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and insulin-like growth factor 1-receptor (IGF-1R); real-time PCR (RT-PCR) to determine caspase-3, XIAP, and IGF-1R gene expression; and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We identified fragmentation of DNA and an increase in caspase-3 protein and XIAP in Purkinje cells, whereas granule cells exhibited increased caspase-3 and XIAP. IGF-1R expression was unchanged. There was no significant difference in gene expression of caspase-3, XIAP, and IGF-1R. There were an increase in lipid droplets, a reduction in the cellular cytoplasm in electron-dense nuclei, and changes in the myelin sheath in the cerebellar cortex. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that ethanol induced apoptosis in the Purkinje and granule cells of the cerebellum of adult UChA rats.

  18. Lycopene Pretreatment Ameliorates Acute Ethanol Induced NAD+ Depletion in Human Astroglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Jade; Heng, Benjamin; Grant, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with reduced brain volume and cognition. While the mechanisms by which ethanol induces these deleterious effects in vivo are varied most are associated with increased inflammatory and oxidative processes. In order to further characterise the effect of acute ethanol exposure on oxidative damage and NAD+ levels in the brain, human U251 astroglioma cells were exposed to physiologically relevant doses of ethanol (11 mM, 22 mM, 65 mM, and 100 mM) for ≤ 30 minutes. Ethanol exposure resulted in a dose dependent increase in both ROS and poly(ADP-ribose) polymer production. Significant decreases in total NAD(H) and sirtuin 1 activity were also observed at concentrations ≥ 22 mM. Similar to U251 cells, exposure to ethanol (≥22 mM) decreased levels of NAD(H) in primary human astrocytes. NAD(H) depletion in primary astrocytes was prevented by pretreatment with 1 μM of lycopene for 3.5 hours. Unexpectedly, in U251 cells lycopene treatment at concentrations ≥ 5 μM resulted in significant reductions in [NAD(H)]. This study suggests that exposure of the brain to alcohol at commonly observed blood concentrations may cause transitory oxidative damage which may be at least partly ameliorated by lycopene. PMID:26075038

  19. Gastroprotective effect of Cymbopogon citratus infusion on acute ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Sagradas, Joana; Costa, Gustavo; Figueirinha, Artur; Castel-Branco, Maria Margarida; Silvério Cabrita, António Manuel; Figueiredo, Isabel Vitória; Batista, Maria Teresa

    2015-09-15

    Treatment of gastric ulcers with medicinal plants is quite common in traditional medicine worldwide. Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf. leaves infusion has been used in folk medicine of many tropical and subtropical regions to treat gastric disturbances. The aim of this study was to assess the potential gastroprotective activity of an essential oil-free infusion from C. citratus leaves in acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol in rat. The study was performed on adult male Wistar rats (234.0±22.7g) fasted for 24h but with free access to water. The extract was given orally before (prevention) or after (treatment) intragastric administration of absolute ethanol. Effects of dose (28 or 56mg/kg of body weight) and time of contact of the extract with gastric mucosa (1 or 2h) were also assessed. Animals were sacrificed, being the stomachs removed and the lesions were assessed by macroscopic observation and histopathology. C. citratus extract, given orally before or after ethanol, significantly (P<0.01) reduced gastric mucosal injury compared with control group (vehicle+ethanol). The effect does not appear to be dose-dependent. Results also suggested that the extract is more effective when the time of contact with gastric mucosa increases. The results of this assay confirm the gastroprotective activity of C. citratus extract on experimental gastric lesions induced by ethanol, contributing for the pharmacological validation of its traditional use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2007-09-15

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed {>=} 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1.

  1. Influence of chronic ethanol intake on mouse synaptosomal aspartyl aminopeptidase and aminopeptidase A: relationship with oxidative stress indicators.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA) and aspartyl aminopeptidase (ASAP) not only act as neuromodulators in the regional brain renin-angiotensin system, but also release N-terminal acidic amino acids (glutamate and aspartate). The hyperexcitability of amino acid neurotransmitters is responsible for several neurodegenerative processes affecting the central nervous system. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence of chronic ethanol intake, a well known neurotoxic compound, on APA and ASAP activity under resting and K(+)-stimulated conditions at the synapse level. APA and ASAP activity were determined against glutamate- and aspartate-β-naphthylamide respectively in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and in their incubation supernatant in a Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The neurotoxic effects were analyzed by determining free radical generation, peroxidation of membrane lipids and the oxidation of synaptosomal proteins. In addition, the bioenergetic behavior of synaptosomes was analyzed under different experimental protocols. We obtained several modifications in oxidative stress parameters and a preferential inhibitor effect of chronic ethanol intake on APA and ASAP activities. Although previous in vitro studies failed to show signs of neurodegeneration, these in vivo modifications in oxidative stress parameters do not seem to be related to changes in APA and ASAP, invalidating the idea that an excess of free acidic amino acids released by APA and ASAP induces neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Acute ethanol intoxication among children and adolescents in Hamburg, Germany].

    PubMed

    Stolle, M; Sack, P-M; Spieles, H; Thomasius, R

    2010-09-01

    By using an anonymous postcard reporting system, data of n=358 children, adolescents, and young adults who were treated in 26 emergency departments because of acute alcohol intoxication were collected. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of acute alcohol intoxications in Hamburg, compare these data with the official hospital diagnosis register, and analyze the circumstances that led to the intoxication. A total of 358 cases were reported by the postcard system. Age ranged from 11-21 years, with 64.5% being 14-17 years old. Data were collected in the municipal area of Hamburg during the calendar year of 2008. The percentage of female patients was 65.6% in the age group from 11-17 years and decreased in the age group of patients being 18 years and older. A vast majority of patients were admitted by ambulance and were reported as being a"first offender". On average, male patients showed a higher level of blood alcohol when being admitted (2.02 ‰) than female patients (1.76 ‰). The older the age group, the higher the blood alcohol level. Among drinking circumstances, the situation"drank together with friends" was most frequently reported. In comparison with the official hospital diagnosis register, prevalence was 31.6% higher. This could mean that the prevalence reported in the official hospital diagnosis register is an underestimation of the actual case numbers.

  3. Improvement of serum antioxidant status in humans after the acute intake of apple juices.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Francilene G K; Di Pietro, Patricia F; da Silva, Edson L; Borges, Graciele S C; Nunes, Eduardo C; Fett, Roseane

    2012-03-01

    It is hypothesized that apples of 2 Brazilian cultivars with different content of sugars and antioxidant compounds promote similar effects on the antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation in human serum after acute intake. Nine healthy women ingested 300 mL of Golden Delicious or Catarina apple juice (AJ) or water, and blood samples were collected before and 1 hour after intake. After intake of both AJ, a similar and significant increase in serum antioxidant capacity and ascorbic and uric acid levels and a significant decrease in serum lipid peroxidation was observed. The increase in serum antioxidant capacity after consumption of both AJ was correlated directly with the uric acid levels and inversely with serum lipid peroxidation. In summary, the acute intake of AJ of 2 cultivars promoted a similar effect on the antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation in human blood serum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute and subacute toxicity evaluation of ethanolic extract from fruits of Schinus molle in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Adriana; Minetti, Alejandra; Bras, Cristina; Zanetti, Noelia

    2007-09-25

    Ethanolic and hexanic extracts from fruits and leaves of Schinus molle showed ability to control several insect pests. Potential vertebrate toxicity associated with insecticidal plants requires investigation before institutional promotion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute and subacute toxicity of ethanolic extracts from fruits of Schinus molle in rats. The plant extract was added to the diet at 2g/kg body weight/day during 1 day to evaluate acute toxicity and at 1g/kg body weight/day during 14 days to evaluate subacute toxicity. At the end of the exposure and after 7 days, behavioral and functional parameters in a functional observational battery and motor activity in an open field were assessed. Finally, histopathological examinations were conducted on several organs. In both exposures, an increase in the arousal level was observed in experimental groups. Also, the landing foot splay parameter increased in the experimental group after acute exposure. Only the subacute exposure produced a significant increase in the motor activity in the open field. All these changes disappeared after 7 days. None of the exposures affected the different organs evaluated. Our results suggest that ethanolic extracts from fruits and leaves of Schinus molle should be relatively safe to use as insecticide.

  5. Control of food intake by MC4-R signaling in the lateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens shell and ventral tegmental area: Interactions with ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Lerma-Cabrera, Jose M.; Carvajal, Francisca; de la Torre, Lourdes; de la Fuente, Leticia; Navarro, Montserrat; Thiele, Todd E.; Cubero, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    The Melanocortin system is involved in animal models of obesity and anorexia-cachexia and MC4 receptors (MC4-R) are currently a target system for the development of drugs aimed to treat obesity and eating disorders in humans. Previous evidence suggest that feeding peptides might lack their orexigenic activity while stimulate ethanol intake. The present study comparatively evaluated food intake (4-h interval) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats drinking ethanol (6% w/v, 2 bottle choice paradigm) (EE group) and ethanol-naïve (EN) rats in response to bilateral infusion of the selective MC4-R antagonist HS014 (0, 0.02 or 0.05 μg/0.5μl/site) or the selective MC4-R agonist cyclo(NH-CH2-CH2-CO-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Glu)-NH2 (0, 0.75 or 1.5 μg/0.5μl/site), into the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the nucleus accumbens (NAc), or the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The main findings in the study are: 1) LH-infusions of the MC4-R antagonist increased and the agonist reduced feeding and total calories consumed, while ethanol intake remained unaltered. 2) NAc- and VTA-infusions of the selective agonist reduced food, ethanol and total calories intake. 3) NAc- and VTA-infusions of the MC4-R antagonist increased feeding in EN rats, but not in EE animals which showed a mild increase in ethanol intake, while total calories consumed remained unaltered. Present data show that having ethanol available reduces feeding elicited by NAc and VTA-MC4-R blockade. Additionally, while MC4-R signalling in the LH appears to modulate homeostatic aspects of feeding, it may contribute to non-homeostatic aspects of ingestive behaviours in the VTA and the NAc. PMID:22713514

  6. Sweetened ethanol drinking during social isolation: enhanced intake, resistance to genetic heterogeneity and the emergence of a distinctive drinking pattern in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Panksepp, J B; Rodriguez, E D; Ryabinin, A E

    2017-03-01

    With its ease of availability during adolescence, sweetened ethanol ('alcopops') is consumed within many contexts. We asked here whether genetically based differences in social motivation are associated with how the adolescent social environment impacts voluntary ethanol intake. Mice with previously described differences in sociability (BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, FVB/NJ and MSM/MsJ strains) were weaned into isolation or same-sex pairs (postnatal day, PD, 21), and then given continuous access to two fluids on PDs 34-45: one containing water and the other containing an ascending series of saccharin-sweetened ethanol (3-6-10%). Prior to the introduction of ethanol (PDs 30-33), increased water and food intake was detected in some of the isolation-reared groups, and controls indicated that isolated mice also consumed more 'saccharin-only' solution. Voluntary drinking of 'ethanol-only' was also higher in a subset of the isolated groups on PDs 46-49. However, sweetened ethanol intake was increased in all isolated strain × sex combinations irrespective of genotype. Surprisingly, blood ethanol concentration (BEC) was not different between these isolate and socially housed groups 4 h into the dark phase. Using lickometer-based measures of intake in FVB mice, we identified that a predominance of increased drinking during isolation transpired outside of the typical circadian consumption peak, occurring ≈8.5 h into the dark phase, with an associated difference in BEC. These findings collectively indicate that isolate housing leads to increased consumption of rewarding substances in adolescent mice independent of their genotype, and that for ethanol this may be because of when individuals drink during the circadian cycle. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  7. Acute cor pulmonale and right heat failure complicating ethanol ablative therapy: anesthetic and radiologic considerations and management.

    PubMed

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H

    2013-10-01

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  8. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  9. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Krutika T; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N; Richard, Zachary C; O'Neil, Maura F; Pritchard, Michele T

    2016-01-06

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl₄-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl₄ exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl₄ and euthanized 24-96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl₄-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl₄ exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl₄-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl₄. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  10. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Krutika T.; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M.; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N.; Richard, Zachary C.; O’Neil, Maura F.; Pritchard, Michele T.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl4-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl4 exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl4 and euthanized 24–96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl4-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl4 exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl4-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl4. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure. PMID:26751492

  11. Ceftriaxone treatment affects the levels of GLT1 and ENT1 as well as ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Sari, Youssef; Sreemantula, Sai N; Lee, Moonnoh R; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-11-01

    Studies have demonstrated that deletion of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) is associated with reduced glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) level, and consequently increased ethanol intake. In this study, we measured changes in GLT1 and ENT1 levels in prefrontal cortex (PFC), and nucleus accumbens (NAc) core and shell associated with alcohol drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats. We examined, then, whether ceftriaxone (CEF) would affect both GLT1 and ENT1 levels in these brain regions. P rats were given 24-h concurrent access to 15 and 30% ethanol, water, and food for 5 weeks. On Week 6, P rats received 100 mg/kg CEF (i.p.) or a saline vehicle for five consecutive days. Ethanol intake was measured daily for 8 days starting on the first day of injections. We found a significant reduction in daily ethanol intake in CEF-treated group, starting on Day 2 of injections. Western blot for GLT1 and binding assay for ENT1 revealed downregulation of GLT1 level, whereas ENT1 levels were increased in the NAc core and NAc shell, respectively, but not in the PFC in saline vehicle group. Importantly, CEF treatment reversed these effects in both NAc core and shell. These findings provide evidence for potential regulatory effects of CEF on both GLT1 and ENT1 expression in reducing ethanol intake.

  12. Hepatoprotective Evaluation of Ganoderma lucidum Pharmacopuncture: In vivo Studies of Ethanol-induced Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sun-Hee; Cho, Sung-woo; Yoon, Hyun-Min; Jang, Kyung-Jeon; Song, Chun-Ho; Kim, Cheol-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Alcohol abuse is a public issue and one of the major causes of liver disease worldwide. This study was aimed at investigating the protective effect of Ganoderma lucidum pharmacopuncture (GLP) against hepatotoxicity induced by acute ethanol (EtOH) intoxication in rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 4 groups of 8 animals each: normal, control, normal saline pharmacopuncture (NP) and GLP groups. The control, NP and GLP groups received ethanol orally. The NP and the GLP groups were treated daily with injections of normal saline and Ganoderma lucidum extract, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The rats in all groups, except the normal group, were intoxicated for 6 hours by oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg BW). The same volume of distilled water was administered to the rats in the normal group. Two local acupoints were used: Qimen (LR14) and Taechung (LR3). A histopathological analysis was performed, and the liver function and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were assessed. Results: GLP treatment reduced the histological changes due to acute liver injury induced by EtOH and significantly reduced the increase in the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzyme; however, it had an insignificant effect in reducing the increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzyme. It also significantly ameliorated the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the catalase (CAT) activities. Conclusion: The present study suggests that GLP treatment is effective in protecting against ethanol-induced acute hepatic injury in SD rats by modulating the activities of ethanol-metabolizing enzymes and by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:25780705

  13. κ opioid regulation of anxiety-like behavior during acute ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Glenn R; Harshberger, Erin

    2012-07-01

    Withdrawal is one of the defining characteristics of alcohol dependence, and is often characterized by impaired physiological function and enhanced negative affect. Recent evidence suggests that the dynorphin (DYN)/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system may be a key mediator in the negative affect often associated with drugs of abuse. The objective of the present experiments was to determine the role of the DYN/KOR system in the regulation of anxiety-related behavior during acute withdrawal from ethanol. Rats were fed an ethanol liquid diet and following removal, the ability of the KOR antagonist nor-BNI to attenuate the increased anxiogenic-like response characteristic of ethanol withdrawal was investigated using the elevated plus maze. A comparison study was also conducted examining anxiety-related behavior following direct activation of KORs via injections of the KOR agonist U50,488. Rats experiencing ethanol withdrawal showed a significant decrease in open arm exploration compared to controls, an effect that was blocked by nor-BNI. Similar decreases in open arm exploration were observed following injections with the KOR agonist, U50,488, an effect also reversed by pretreatment with nor-BNI. These results suggest that similar mechanisms are involved in the regulation of ethanol withdrawal- and KOR agonist-induced changes in behavior. Given the potential role of enhanced negative affect in persistent ethanol drinking, understanding the role of the DYN/KOR system in regulating anxiety associated with withdrawal may be critical in understanding the factors associated with the nature of alcohol dependence.

  14. Redox state and energy metabolism during liver regeneration: alterations produced by acute ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, J; Miranda-Garduño, L; Trejo-Izquierdo, E; Díaz-Muñoz, M; Vidrio, S; Morales-González, J A; Hernández-Muñoz, R

    1999-12-01

    Ethanol metabolism can induce modifications in liver metabolic pathways that are tightly regulated through the availability of cellular energy and through the redox state. Since partial hepatectomy (PH)-induced liver proliferation requires an oversupply of energy for enhanced syntheses of DNA and proteins, the present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of acute ethanol administration on the PH-induced changes in cellular redox and energy potentials. Ethanol (5 g/kg body weight) was administered to control rats and to two-thirds hepatectomized rats. Quantitation of the liver content of lactate, pyruvate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and adenine nucleotides led us to estimate the cytosolic and mitochondrial redox potentials and energy parameters. Specific activities in the liver of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes also were measured in these animals. Liver regeneration had no effect on cellular energy availability, but induced a more reduced cytosolic redox state accompanied by an oxidized mitochondrial redox state during the first 48 hr of treatment; the redox state normalized thereafter. Administration of ethanol did not modify energy parameters in PH rats, but this hepatotoxin readily blocked the PH-induced changes in the cellular redox state. In addition, proliferating liver promoted decreases in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and of cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1); ethanol treatment prevented the PH-induced diminution of ADH activity. In summary, our data suggest that ethanol could minimize the PH-promoted metabolic adjustments mediated by redox reactions, probably leading to an ineffective preparatory event that culminates in compensatory liver growth after PH in the rat.

  15. Hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor are differentially affected by early chronic ethanol or red wine intake.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marco; Mancinelli, Rosanna; Aloe, Luigi; Laviola, Giovanni; Sornelli, Federica; Vitali, Mario; Ceccanti, Mauro

    2009-08-10

    Ethanol intake during pregnancy and lactation induces severe changes in brain and liver throughout mechanisms involving growth factors. These are signaling molecules regulating survival, differentiation, maintenance and connectivity of brain and liver cells. Ethanol is an element of red wine which contains also compounds with antioxidant properties. Aim of the study was to investigate differences in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in brain areas and liver by ELISA of 1-month-old male mice exposed perinatally to ethanol at 11 vol.% or to red wine at same ethanol concentration. Ethanol was administered before and during pregnancy up to pups' weaning. Ethanol per se elevated HGF in liver and cortex, potentiated liver VEGF, reduced GDNF in the liver and decreased NGF content in hippocampus and cortex in the offspring. We did not find changes in HGF or NGF due to red wine exposure. However, we revealed elevation in VEGF levels in liver and reduced GDNF in the cortex of animals exposed to red wine but the VEGF liver increase was more marked in animals exposed to ethanol only compared to the red wine group. In conclusion the present findings in the mouse show differences in ethanol-induced toxicity when ethanol is administered alone or in red wine that may be related to compounds with antioxidant properties present in the red wine.

  16. Acute heavy alcohol intake increases silent myocardial ischaemia in patients with stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Rossinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Koskinen, P.; Toivonen, L.; Kupari, M.; Nieminen, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of acute alcohol ingestion on myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary heart disease and stable angina. DESIGN: Randomised crossover study using fruit juice with and without ethanol. SETTING: Division of cardiology in a university hospital. PATIENTS: 20 patients with stable exertional angina and > or = 50% luminal diameter narrowing of at least one major coronary artery. INTERVENTIONS: Each patient was studied on two separate days, once after administration of 1.25 g of ethanol per kilogram of body weight diluted to 15% in juice, and once after an equivalent volume of juice; both tests were in the evening and lasted 90 minutes. The patients were scheduled to have 8 periods of walking for 10 min according to a time table. An ambulatory electrocardiogram and the occurrence of anginal attacks were recorded and blood pressure and blood ethanol concentration were measured until the next morning. RESULTS: The blood ethanol concentration (mean (SD)) rose to 28.8 mmol/l (1.3 (0.4)/1000). Alcohol raised the systolic blood pressure from 132 (16) to 141 (14) mm Hg (P < 0.05 compared with juice). The mean heart rate increased from 57 (7) to 64 (8) beats/min (P < 0.05) for 13 hours after ethanol ingestion compared with juice. The total duration of ischaemia during the ethanol test was 3.5 (median, range 0-80) min, compared with 0 (range 0-67) min for the juice test (P < 0.05). The difference resulted mainly from more silent ischaemia after ethanol ingestion (2.3 (0-80) v 0 (0-67) min; P < 0.05). The ST segment depression time integral increased during the ethanol test (4.4 (0-170) mm x min) relative to that during the juice test (0 (0-103) mm x min; P < 0.01) and especially during the following 13 hours after alcohol (3.5 (0-123) mm x min) compared with juice (0 (0-67) mm x min; P < 0.005). There were no changes in the number, duration, or ST segment depression time integral of the episodes of symptomatic angina, indicating that ethanol

  17. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  18. Endogenously elevated n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alleviate acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiangyong; Kang, Jing X

    2015-01-01

    Effective means for the prevention of alcohol-induced liver disease, a global health problem, have yet to be developed. We evaluated whether the high endogenous levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated acids (n-3 PUFA) in fat-1 transgenic mice could protect them against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis. We induced alcoholic liver steatosis in 9-week-old male heterozygous fat-1 mice and their wild-type (WT) male littermates through three oral gavages of 60% ethanol at 4.7 g/kg body weight. Hepatic lipid accumulation was significantly increased in both alcohol treatment groups, but by much less in the fat-1 group compared with the WT group. Fat-1 mice exhibited significantly lower levels of total hepatic/plasma TG and plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Accordingly, hepatic expression of lipogenesis-related genes (e.g., SREBP-1c, FAS, and SCD-1) and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1) were reduced in the fat-1 mice. Furthermore, decreased hepatic expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and increased hepatic levels of PPAR-α and HO-1 were observed in the fat-1 mice, compared to the WT mice. These findings show that elevated tissue n-3 PUFA protect against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis in fat-1 mice, possibly through the down-regulation of hepatic lipogenesis, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress.

  19. The novel non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonist DL77 reduces voluntary alcohol intake and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Sadek, Bassem; Nurulain, Syed M; Łażewska, Dorota; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    It has become clear that histamine H3 receptors (H3R) have been implicated in modulating ethanol intake and preference in laboratory animals. The novel non-imidazole H3R antagonist DL77 with excellent selectivity profile shows high in-vivo potency as well as in-vitro antagonist affinity with ED50 of 2.1 ± 0.2 mg/kg and pKi=8.08, respectively. In the present study, and applying an unlimited access two-bottle choice procedure, the anti-alcohol effects of the H3R antagonist, DL77 (0, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg; i.p.), were investigated in adult mice. In this C57BL/6 line, effects of DL77 on voluntary alcohol intake and preference, as well as on total fluid intake were evaluated. Results have shown that DL77, dose-dependently, reduced both ethanol intake and preference. These effects were very selective as both saccharin and quinine, used to control for taste sensitivity, and intakes were not affected following DL77 pre-application. More importantly, systemic administration of DL77 (10 mg/kg) during acquisition inhibited ethanol-induced conditioned-place preference (EtOH-CPP) as measured using an unbiased protocol. The anti-alcohol activity observed for DL77 was abrogated when mice were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α)-methyl-histamine (RAMH) (10 mg/kg), or with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10mg/kg). These results suggest that DL77 has a predominant role in two in vivo effects of ethanol. Therefore, signaling via H3R is essential for ethanol-related consumption and conditioned reward and may represent a novel therapeutic pharmacological target to tackle ethanol abuse and alcoholism.

  20. Long-term inhibition of ethanol intake by the administration of an aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2)-coding lentiviral vector into the ventral tegmental area of rats.

    PubMed

    Karahanian, Eduardo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Tampier, Lutske; Quintanilla, María Elena; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Israel, Yedy

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that acetaldehyde generated from ethanol in the brain is reinforcing. The present studies tested the feasibility of achieving a long-term reduction of chronic and post-deprivation binge ethanol drinking by a single administration into the brain ventral tegmental area (VTA) of a lentiviral vector that codes for aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), which degrades acetaldehyde. The ALDH2 gene coding vector or a control lentiviral vector were microinjected into the VTA of rats bred for their alcohol preference. In the chronic alcohol administration model, naïve animals administered the control vector and subsequently offered 10% ethanol and water ingested 8-9 g ethanol/kg body weight/day. The single administration of the ALDH2-coding vector prior to allowing ethanol availability reduced ethanol drinking by 85-90% (P < 0.001) for the 45 days tested. In the post-deprivation binge-drinking model, animals that had previously consumed ethanol chronically for 81 days were administered the lentiviral vector and were thereafter deprived of ethanol for three 7-day periods, each interrupted by a single 60-minute ethanol re-access after the last day of each deprivation period. Upon ethanol re-access, control vector-treated animals consumed intoxicating 'binge' amounts of ethanol, reaching intakes of 2.7 g ethanol/kg body weight in 60 minutes. The administration of the ALDH2-coding vector reduced re-access binge drinking by 75-80% (P < 0.001). This study shows that endowing the ventral tegmental with an increased ability to degrade acetaldehyde greatly reduces chronic alcohol consumption and post-deprivation binge drinking for prolonged periods and supports the hypothesis that brain-generated acetaldehyde promotes alcohol drinking. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Transgenic Mice with Increased Astrocyte Expression of IL-6 Show Altered Effects of Acute Ethanol on Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ruben V.; Puro, Alana C.; Manos, Jessica C.; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Reyes, Kenneth C.; Liu, Kevin; Vo, Khanh; Roberts, Amanda J.; Gruol, Donna L.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has revealed that resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS), and particularly the glial cells, comprise a neuroimmune system that serves a number of functions in the normal CNS and during adverse conditions. Cells of the neuroimmune system regulate CNS functions through the production of signaling factors, referred to as neuroimmune factors. Recent studies show that ethanol can activate cells of the neuroimmune system, resulting in the elevated production of neuroimmune factors, including the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Here we analyzed the consequences of this CNS action of ethanol using transgenic mice that express elevated levels of IL-6 through increased astrocyte expression (IL-6-tg) to model the increased IL-6 expression that occurs with ethanol use. Results show that increased IL-6 expression induces neuroadaptive changes that alter the effects of ethanol. In hippocampal slices from non-transgenic (non-tg) littermate control mice, synaptically evoked dendritic field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) and somatic population spike (PS) at the Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse were reduced by acute ethanol (20 or 60 mM). In contrast, acute ethanol enhanced the fEPSP and PS in hippocampal slices from IL-6 tg mice. Long-term synaptic plasticity of the fEPSP (i.e., LTP) showed the expected dose-dependent reduction by acute ethanol in non-tg hippocampal slices, whereas LTP in the IL-6 tg hippocampal slices was resistant to this depressive effect of acute ethanol. Consistent with altered effects of acute ethanol on synaptic function in the IL-6 tg mice, EEG recordings showed a higher level of CNS activity in the IL-6 tg mice than in the non-tg mice during the period of withdrawal from an acute high dose of ethanol. These results suggest a potential role for neuroadaptive effects of ethanol-induced astrocyte production of IL-6 as a mediator or modulator of the actions of ethanol on the CNS, including

  2. Transgenic mice with increased astrocyte expression of IL-6 show altered effects of acute ethanol on synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ruben V; Puro, Alana C; Manos, Jessica C; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Reyes, Kenneth C; Liu, Kevin; Vo, Khanh; Roberts, Amanda J; Gruol, Donna L

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has revealed that resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS), and particularly the glial cells, comprise a neuroimmune system that serves a number of functions in the normal CNS and during adverse conditions. Cells of the neuroimmune system regulate CNS functions through the production of signaling factors, referred to as neuroimmune factors. Recent studies show that ethanol can activate cells of the neuroimmune system, resulting in the elevated production of neuroimmune factors, including the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Here we analyzed the consequences of this CNS action of ethanol using transgenic mice that express elevated levels of IL-6 through increased astrocyte expression (IL-6-tg) to model the increased IL-6 expression that occurs with ethanol use. Results show that increased IL-6 expression induces neuroadaptive changes that alter the effects of ethanol. In hippocampal slices from non-transgenic (non-tg) littermate control mice, synaptically evoked dendritic field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) and somatic population spike (PS) at the Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse were reduced by acute ethanol (20 or 60 mM). In contrast, acute ethanol enhanced the fEPSP and PS in hippocampal slices from IL-6 tg mice. Long-term synaptic plasticity of the fEPSP (i.e., LTP) showed the expected dose-dependent reduction by acute ethanol in non-tg hippocampal slices, whereas LTP in the IL-6 tg hippocampal slices was resistant to this depressive effect of acute ethanol. Consistent with altered effects of acute ethanol on synaptic function in the IL-6 tg mice, EEG recordings showed a higher level of CNS activity in the IL-6 tg mice than in the non-tg mice during the period of withdrawal from an acute high dose of ethanol. These results suggest a potential role for neuroadaptive effects of ethanol-induced astrocyte production of IL-6 as a mediator or modulator of the actions of ethanol on the CNS, including

  3. Acute ethanol administration rapidly increases phosphorylation of conventional protein kinase C in specific mammalian brain regions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Mary Beth; Besheer, Joyce; Kelley, Stephen P; Kumar, Sandeep; O'Buckley, Todd K; Morrow, A Leslie; Hodge, Clyde W

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of isoenzymes that regulate a variety of functions in the central nervous system including neurotransmitter release, ion channel activity, and cell differentiation. Growing evidence suggests that specific isoforms of PKC influence a variety of behavioral, biochemical, and physiological effects of ethanol in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute ethanol exposure alters phosphorylation of conventional PKC isoforms at a threonine 674 (p-cPKC) site in the hydrophobic domain of the kinase, which is required for its catalytic activity. Male rats were administered a dose range of ethanol (0, 0.5, 1, or 2 g/kg, intragastric) and brain tissue was removed 10 minutes later for evaluation of changes in p-cPKC expression using immunohistochemistry and Western blot methods. Immunohistochemical data show that the highest dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) rapidly increases p-cPKC immunoreactivity specifically in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), lateral septum, and hippocampus (CA3 and dentate gyrus). Western blot analysis further showed that ethanol (2 g/kg) increased p-cPKC expression in the P2 membrane fraction of tissue from the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus. Although p-cPKC was expressed in numerous other brain regions, including the caudate nucleus, amygdala, and cortex, no changes were observed in response to acute ethanol. Total PKCgamma immunoreactivity was surveyed throughout the brain and showed no change following acute ethanol injection. These results suggest that ethanol rapidly promotes phosphorylation of cPKC in limbic brain regions, which may underlie effects of acute ethanol on the nervous system and behavior.

  4. Gastroprotective Effects of PMK-S005 against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seo, Ji Hyung; Lee, Seonmin; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to examine the gastroprotective effects of PMK-S005, which is a synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC; a sulfur-containing amino acid), against acute ethanol-induced gastric damage in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups, including a nonethanol group, groups treated with absolute ethanol 1 hour after pretreatment with various doses of PMK-S005 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) or rebamipide (50 mg/kg), and an absolute ethanol-only group. Ethanol-induced gross ulcer and mucus levels were measured. Myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, PGE2, LTB4, cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), GCLC, and GCLM, were assessed. Results PMK-S005 significantly attenuated the ethanol-induced gastric damage; it reduced mucosal inflammatory cytokine production and increased mucus levels. The expression levels of cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 were decreased by PMK-S005. PMK-S005 did not affect PGE2 synthesis, but LTB4 production was significantly suppressed. In addition, long-term administration of PMK-S005 significantly increased the expression of HO-1, NQO-1, GCLC, and GCLM. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that PMK-S005 prevents gastric mucosal damage and that these gastroprotective activities are due to anti-inflammatory effects and enhancement of the gastric defense system, including antioxidant enzymes. PMID:26347516

  5. REPLACEMENT WITH GABAERGIC STEROID PRECURSORS RESTORES THE ACUTE ETHANOL WITHDRAWAL PROFILE IN ADX/GDX MICE

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, KR; Tanchuck, MA; Strong, MN; Finn, DA

    2010-01-01

    The neurosteroid allopregnanolone (ALLO) is a progesterone metabolite that is one of a family of neuroactive steroids (NAS) that are potent positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors. These GABAergic NAS are produced peripherally (in the adrenals and gonads) and centrally in the brain. Peripherally produced NAS modulate some effects of ethanol intoxication (e.g., anxiolytic, antidepressant, and anticonvulsant effects) in rodents. We have found that NAS also may be involved in the rebound neural hyperexcitability following a high ethanol dose. Removal of the adrenals and gonads (ADX/GDX) increased withdrawal severity following 4 g/kg ethanol, as measured by handling-induced convulsions (HICs) in male and female DBA/2J mice. NAS are produced through the metabolism of progesterone (PROG), deoxycorticosterone (DOC), or testosterone, which can be blocked with the administration of finasteride (FIN), a 5α-reductase enzyme inhibitor. The current investigation was undertaken to clarify the step(s) in the biosynthetic NAS pathway that were sufficient to restore the acute ethanol withdrawal profile in ADX/GDX mice to that seen in intact animals. Male and female DBA/2J mice underwent ADX/GDX or SHAM surgery. After recovery, separate groups of animals were administered PROG, DOC, PROG+FIN, DOC+FIN, FIN, ALLO, ganaxalone (a synthetic ALLO derivative), corticosterone, or vehicle. Animals were then administered a 4 g/kg ethanol dose and allowed to undergo withdrawal. HICs were measured for 12 hours and again at 24 hours. The results indicate that replacement with PROG and DOC restored the withdrawal profile in ADX/GDX animals to SHAM levels, and that this effect was blocked with co-administration of FIN. Administration of FIN alone increased the withdrawal profile in both SHAM and ADX/GDX males. These findings indicate that the increase in acute withdrawal severity after ADX/GDX may be due to the loss of GABAergic NAS, providing insight into the

  6. Effects of chronic low- and high-dose ethanol intake on the nitrergic relaxations of corpus cavernosum and penile nitric oxide synthase in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Yazir, Y; Gocmez, S S; Utkan, T; Komsuoglu-Celikyurt, I; Gacar, N; Sarioglu, Y

    2012-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence showed that chronic ethanol consumption is a major risk factor in the development of impotence. The present study investigated the effects of carbachol-, electrical field stimulation (EFS)-, sodium nitroprusside (SNP)- and papaverine-induced relaxant responses in the isolated corpus cavernosum tissues from rabbits submitted to an 12-week course of chronic low (5% v/v) or high ethanol intake (30% v/v). Increased carbachol- and EFS-induced relaxant responses but not SNP and papaverine, were observed in low ethanol-fed rabbits compared with controls. However, impaired carbachol- and EFS-induced relaxant responses were observed in high ethanol-fed rabbits compared with control rabbits. There were no significant differences in SNP- and papaverine-induced relaxant responses between control and high ethanol-fed rabbits. In addition, decreased neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) immunoreactivity in penile tissue were found in high ethanol-fed rabbits, but increased the immunoreactivity in low ethanol-fed group, compared with control group. These results suggest that alterations in nitric oxide (NO) production within the cavernous tissue in the high ethanol-fed rabbits are, at least in part, responsible for the erectile dysfunction.

  7. Dietary, food service, and mealtime interventions to promote food intake in acute care adult patients.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Grace; Pizzola, Lisa; Keller, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in acute care hospitals. During hospitalization, poor appetite, medical interventions, and food access issues can impair food intake leading to iatrogenic malnutrition. Nutritional support is a common intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. "Food first" approaches have also been developed and evaluated. This scoping review identified and summarized 35 studies (41 citations) that described and/or evaluated dietary, foodservice, or mealtime interventions with a food first focus. There were few randomized control trials. Individualized dietary treatment leads to improved food intake and other positive outcomes. Foodservices that promote point-of-care food selection are promising, but further research with food intake and nutritional outcomes is needed. Protected mealtimes have had insufficient implementation, leading to mixed results, while mealtime assistance, particularly provided by volunteers or dietary staff, appears to promote food intake. A few innovative strategies were identified but further research to develop and evaluate food first approaches is needed.

  8. Fluid Intake Related to Brain Edema in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction.

    PubMed

    Dharmasaroja, Pornpatr A

    2016-02-01

    Evidence of the appropriate amount of fluid intake during the first few days after acute stroke was scarce. Concerns were raised in patients with acute malignant middle cerebral infarction, who tended to have malignant brain edema later. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of fluid intake on the occurrence of malignant brain edema in patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction. Patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction who had National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of at least 15 were included. Baseline characteristics and amount of fluid intake during the first few days were compared in patients with and without malignant brain edema. One hundred ninety-three patients were studied. Mean NIHSS score was 20. Malignant brain edema occurred in 69 patients (36%). Higher amount of fluid intake (>1650 ml or >28 ml/kg/day or >93% of daily maintenance fluid) showed a significant association with malignant brain edema (OR = 13.86, 95% CI 5.11-37.60, p value <0.001). Decompressive surgery was performed in 35 patients (18%). With mean follow-up of 12 months, 49 patients (49/184, 27%) had favorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0-2) at final follow-up. Seventy-nine patients (79/184, 43%) died. In the subgroup of patients with malignant brain edema, 39 patients (39/65, 60%) died and only 11% (7/65 patients) had favorable outcome. High amount of fluid intake in the first few days of acute middle cerebral infarction was related to the occurrence of malignant brain edema.

  9. [Favism. Acute hemolysis after intake of fava beans].

    PubMed

    Holm, B; Jensenius, M

    1998-01-30

    Acute haemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase deficiency is a common disorder in American and African Blacks, in Mediterranean people and among Orientals. The erythrocytes in affected individuals have insufficient reducing power against toxic peroxydes and free radicals generated during metabolism. Normally, affected individuals are without signs of disease, but under the influence of oxydants severe intravascular haemolysis may occur. One of the most important oxydants is the fava bean which, when ingested, may cause acute favism, a condition which has a 10% mortality if not treated properly. We describe a 35 year-old man from Iraq who developed serious haemolytic anemia with a fall in haemoglobin to 6.5 g/100 ml three days after ingestion of fava beans. He was treated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. He recovered and was discharged from hospital after nine days. This is the first described case of favism in Norway.

  10. Protein adduct species in muscle and liver of rats following acute ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vinood B; Worrall, Simon; Emery, Peter W; Preedy, Victor R

    2005-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies have shown that the post-translational formation of aldehyde-protein adducts may be an important process in the aetiology of alcohol-induced muscle disease. However, other studies have shown that in a variety of tissues, alcohol induces the formation of various other adduct species, including hybrid acetaldehyde-malondialdehyde-protein adducts and adducts with free radicals themselves, e.g. hydroxyethyl radical (HER)-protein adducts. Furthermore, acetaldehyde-protein adducts may be formed in reducing or non-reducing environments resulting in distinct molecular entities, each with unique features of stability and immunogenicity. Some in vitro studies have also suggested that unreduced adducts may be converted to reduced adducts in situ. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that in muscle a variety of different adduct species are formed after acute alcohol exposure and that unreduced adducts predominate. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were raised against unreduced and reduced aldehydes and the HER-protein adducts. These were used to assay different adduct species in soleus (type I fibre-predominant) and plantaris (type II fibre-predominant) muscles and liver in four groups of rats administered acutely with either [A] saline (control); [B] cyanamide (an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor); [C] ethanol; [D] cyanamide+ethanol. Amounts of unreduced acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde adducts were increased in both muscles of alcohol-dosed rats. However there was no increase in the amounts of reduced acetaldehyde adducts, as detected by both the rabbit polyclonal antibody and the RT1.1 mouse monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, there was no detectable increase in malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde and HER-protein adducts. Similar results were obtained in the liver. Adducts formed in skeletal muscle and liver of rats exposed acutely to ethanol are mainly unreduced acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde species.

  11. Lack of effect of exercise time of day on acute energy intake in healthy men.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue K, J M; Fournier, Paul A; Guelfi, Kym J

    2010-08-01

    Although the manipulation of exercise and dietary intake to achieve successful weight loss has been extensively studied, it is unclear how the time of day that exercise is performed may affect subsequent energy intake. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of an acute bout of exercise performed in the morning compared with an equivalent bout of exercise performed in the afternoon on short-term energy intake. Nine healthy male participants completed 3 trials: morning exercise (AM), afternoon exercise (PM), or control (no exercise; CON) in a randomized counterbalanced design. Exercise consisted of 45 min of treadmill running at 75% VO(2peak). Energy intake was assessed over a 26-hr period with the participants eating ad libitum from a standard assortment of food items of known quantity and composition. There was no significant difference in overall energy intake (M ± SD; CON 23,505 ± 6,938 kJ, AM 24,957 ± 5,607 kJ, PM 24,560 ± 5,988 kJ; p = .590) or macronutrient preferences during the 26-hr period examined between trials. Likewise, no differences in energy intake or macronutrient preferences were observed at any of the specific individual meal periods examined (i.e., breakfast, lunch, dinner) between trials. These results suggest that the time of day that exercise is performed does not significantly affect short-term energy intake in healthy men.

  12. The acute effect of D-tagatose on food intake in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Buemann, B; Toubro, S; Raben, A; Blundell, J; Astrup, A

    2000-08-01

    A double-blind randomized crossover study was performed with nineteen normal-weight men to investigate the effect on subsequent ad libitum food intake of replacing 29 g sucrose with 29 g D-tagatose as sweetener to a breakfast meal. D-Tagatose is a malabsorbed stereoisomer of fructose with potential application as a bulk sweetener. Food intake was measured at lunch offered 4 h after the breakfast meal, during the afternoon with access to abundant snacks, and finally at a supper buffet 9 h after the breakfast. Energy intake at lunch and during the snacking period was similar after ingesting the two sugars, while it was 15% lower after ingesting D-tagatose than with sucrose at supper (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal factors such as the osmotic effects of unabsorbed D-tagatose causing distension of the gut might have mediated the acute appetite-suppressing effect. The present paper also refers to data from a preceding study in which we observed an increased self-reported energy intake after ingestion of D-tagatose compared with sucrose which, in fact, suggests a relative hyperphagic effect of D-tagatose. However, self-reported food intake may be biased by selective under-reporting and this subsequent study with a more controlled assessment of food intake was therefore conducted. This present study did not support any hyperphagic effect of D-tagatose, but rather suggests that D-tagatose may contribute to a reduced energy intake.

  13. Microarray characterization of gene expression changes in blood during acute ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    and hepatic function. Five of the seven clusters showed links to the p38 MAPK pathway. Conclusions The results of this study provide a first look at changing gene expression patterns in human blood during an acute rise in blood ethanol concentration and its depletion because of metabolism and excretion, and demonstrate that it is possible to detect changes in gene expression using total RNA isolated from whole blood. The analysis approach for this study serves as a workflow to investigate the biology linked to expression changes across a time course and from these changes, to identify target genes that could serve as biomarkers linked to pilot performance. PMID:23883607

  14. μ-Opioid blockade reduces ethanol effects on intake and behavior of the infant rat during short-term but not long-term social isolation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Andrey P; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Kramskaya, Tatiana A; Varlinskaya, Elena I; Spear, Norman E

    2013-02-01

    Numerous findings in adult and infant rats have shown that the endogenous opioid system is involved in control of ethanol consumption and its reinforcing effects. Opioid systems are also involved in reactivity to social isolation with several factors (age, duration, and type of isolation) affecting this modulation. The present study investigated the effects of a selective mu-opioid antagonist CTOP (0, 0.1, 0.5mg/kg), ethanol (0, 0.5 g/kg), and the interaction of the two drugs on the behavioral consequences of two types of social isolation given to preweanling rats: 1) short-term social isolation from littermates (STSI, duration 8 min) and 2) relatively long-term (5h) isolation (LTSI) from the dam and littermates. Voluntary intake of saccharin, locomotion, rearing activity, paw licking, and grooming were assessed during an 8-min. intake test. Thermal nociceptive reactivity was also measured before and after the testing session with normalized differences in pre- and post-test latencies of paw withdrawal from a hot plate (49°C) used as an index of isolation-induced analgesia (IIA). The results indicate that pharmacological blockade of mu-opioid receptors by CTOP substantially attenuated ethanol's anxiolytic effects on the developing rat's reactions to social isolation. Some of these stress-attenuating effects of CTOP were observed only in animals exposed to short-term isolation (STSI) but not in pups isolated for 5h (LTSI). Ethanol selectively increased saccharin intake during STSI in females and CTOP blocked this effect. Ethanol decreased the magnitude of analgesia associated with STSI but had no effect on pain reactivity during LTSI. CTOP by itself did not affect IIA or saccharin intake in sober animals. The findings of the present experiments indicate that the anxiolytic effects of 0.5 g/kg ethanol on pups exposed to STSI are modulated by endogenous opioid activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential induction of ethanol-metabolizing CYP2E1 and nicotine-metabolizing CYP2B1/2 in rat liver by chronic nicotine treatment and voluntary ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiang; Khokhar, Jibran; Miksys, Sharon; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2009-05-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are frequently co-used and co-abused, and use of both drugs alone can affect hepatic drug metabolism. We investigated the influences of chronic nicotine treatment and voluntary ethanol intake on the induction of rat hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes that metabolize ethanol and nicotine. Rats were trained to voluntarily drink ethanol (6% v/v, 1 h) with nicotine pretreatment for 10 days. Another group of rats were treated with the same nicotine doses alone. Hepatic CYP2E1, CYP2B1/2 and CYP2D1 proteins were assessed by immunoblotting. Nicotine pretreatment (0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mg/kg) increased voluntary ethanol intake on day 10 by 1.8, 2.0, and 1.4 fold respectively compared to saline pretreatment (P<0.01-0.3). CYP2E1 was increased 1.7, 1.8, and 1.4 fold by the three doses of nicotine alone (P<0.02-0.21); CYP2E1 levels were increased by voluntary ethanol intake alone and a further 2.4, 2.2, and 1.8 fold by 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mg/kg nicotine respectively versus saline pretreatment (P<0.002-0.06). CYP2B1/2 proteins were not induced by nicotine alone, but were increased by 2.2-2.5 fold by ethanol drinking (P<0.05). CYP2E1 (r=0.67, P<0.001) and CYP2B1/2 levels (r=0.49, P=0.007) correlated with alcohol consumption on day 10. There was no change in CYP2D1. Chronic nicotine increased voluntary ethanol intake thereby enhancing CYP2E1 and CYP2B1/2 levels. Thus CYPs are regulated not only directly by nicotine and ethanol, but also indirectly via an increase in the ethanol consumption in the presence of nicotine pretreatment. Together this may contribute to the co-abuse of these drugs and alter the metabolism of clinical drugs and endogenous substrates.

  16. Production of inflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood monocytes in chronic alcoholism: relationship with ethanol intake and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Laso, Francisco Javier; Vaquero, José Miguel; Almeida, Julia; Marcos, Miguel; Orfao, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Controversial results have been reported about the effects of alcoholism on the functionality of monocytes. In the present study we analyze the effects of chronic alcoholism on the intracellular production of inflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood (PB) monocytes. Spontaneous and in vitro-stimulated production of interleukin (IL) 1alpha (TNFalpha) by PB monocytes was analyzed at the single level by flow cytometry in chronic alcoholics without liver disease and active ethanol (EtOH) intake (AWLD group), as well as in patients with alcohol liver cirrhosis (ALC group), who were either actively drinking (ALCET group) or with alcohol withdrawal (ALCAW group). A significantly increased spontaneous production of IL1beta, IL6, IL12, and TNFalpha was observed on PB monocytes among AWLD individuals. Conversely, circulating monocytes form ALCET patients showed an abnormally low spontaneous and stimulated production of inflammatory cytokines. No significant changes were observed in ALCAW group as regards production of IL1beta, IL6, IL12, and TNFalpha. Our results show an altered pattern of production of inflammatory cytokines in PB monocytes from chronic alcoholic patients, the exact abnormalities observed depending on both the status of EtOH intake and the existence of alcoholic liver disease. Copyright 2007 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  17. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanate reduce ethanol intake and increase GLT-1 expression as well as AKT phosphorylation in mesocorticolimbic regions.

    PubMed

    Goodwani, Sunil; Rao, P S S; Bell, Richard L; Sari, Youssef

    2015-10-05

    Studies have shown that administration of the β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone (CEF) attenuates ethanol consumption and cocaine seeking behavior as well as prevents ethanol-induced downregulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression in central reward brain regions. However, it is not known if these effects are compound-specific. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of two other β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin (AMOX) and amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin, AUG), on ethanol drinking, as well as GLT-1 and phosphorylated-AKT (pAKT) levels in the nucleus accumbens (Acb) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of alcohol-preferring (P) rats. P rats were exposed to free-choice of ethanol (15% and 30%) for five weeks and were given five consecutive daily i.p. injections of saline vehicle, 100 mg/kg AMOX or 100mg/kg AUG. Both compounds significantly decreased ethanol intake and significantly increased GLT-1 expression in the Acb. AUG also increased GLT-1 expression in the mPFC. Results for changes in pAKT levels matched those for GLT-1, indicating that β-lactam antibiotic-induced reductions in ethanol intake are negatively associated with increases in GLT-1 and pAKT levels within two critical brains regions mediating drug reward and reinforcement. These findings add to a growing literature that pharmacological increases in GLT-1 expression are associated with decreases in ethanol intake and suggest that one mechanism mediating this effect may be increased phosphorylation of AKT. Thus, GLT-1 and pAKT may serve as molecular targets for the treatment of alcohol and drug abuse/dependence.

  18. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanate reduce ethanol intake and increase GLT-1 expression as well as AKT phosphorylation in mesocorticolimbic regions

    PubMed Central

    Goodwani, Sunil; Rao, P.S.S.; Bell, Richard L.; Sari, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that administration of the β-lactam antibiotic, ceftriaxone (CEF) attenuates ethanol consumption and cocaine seeking behavior as well as preventing ethanol-induced downregulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression in central reward brain regions. However, it is not known if these effects are compound-specific. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of two other β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin (AMOX) and amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin, AUG), on ethanol drinking, as well as GLT-1 and phosphorylated-AKT (pAKT) levels in the nucleus accumbens (Acb) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of alcohol-preferring (P) rats. P rats were exposed to free-choice of ethanol (15% and 30%) for five weeks and were given five consecutive daily i.p. injections of saline vehicle, 100 mg/kg AMOX or 100 mg/kg AUG. Both compounds significantly decreased ethanol intake and significantly increased GLT-1 expression in the Acb. AUG also increased GLT-1 expression in the mPFC. Results for changes in pAKT levels matched those for GLT-1, indicating that β-lactam antibiotic-induced reductions in ethanol intake are negatively associated with increases in GLT-1 and pAKT levels within two critical brains regions mediating drug reward and reinforcement. These findings add to a growing literature that pharmacological increases in GLT-1 expression are associated with decreases in ethanol intake and suggest that one mechanism mediating this effect may be increased phosphorylation of AKT. Thus, GLT-1 and pAKT may serve as molecular targets for the treatment of alcohol and drug abuse/dependence. PMID:26168897

  19. Chronic moderate ethanol intake differentially regulates vitamin D hydroxylases gene expression in kidneys and xenografted breast cancer cells in female mice.

    PubMed

    García-Quiroz, Janice; García-Becerra, Rocío; Lara-Sotelo, Galia; Avila, Euclides; López, Sofía; Santos-Martínez, Nancy; Halhali, Ali; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Barrera, David; Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; Ibarra-Sánchez, María J; Esparza-López, José; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2017-10-01

    Factors affecting vitamin D metabolism may preclude anti-carcinogenic effects of its active metabolite calcitriol. Chronic ethanol consumption is an etiological factor for breast cancer that affects vitamin D metabolism; however, the mechanisms underlying this causal association have not been fully clarified. Using a murine model, we examined the effects of chronic moderate ethanol intake on tumoral and renal CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 gene expression, the enzymes involved in calcitriol synthesis and inactivation, respectively. Ethanol (5% w/v) was administered to 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-treated or control mice during one month. Afterwards, human breast cancer cells were xenografted and treatments continued another month. Ethanol intake decreased renal Cyp27b1 while increased tumoral CYP24A1 gene expression.Treatment with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 significantly stimulated CYP27B1 in tumors of non-alcohol-drinking mice, while increased both renal and tumoral CYP24A1. Coadministration of ethanol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 reduced in 60% renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-dependent Cyp24a1 upregulation (P<0.05). We found 5 folds higher basal Cyp27b1 than Cyp24a1 gene expression in kidneys, whereas this relation was inverted in tumors, showing 5 folds more CYP24A1 than CYP27B1. Tumor expression of the calcitriol target cathelicidin increased only in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-treated non-ethanol drinking animals (P<0.05). Mean final body weight was higher in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 treated groups (P<0.001). Overall, these results suggest that moderate ethanol intake decreases renal and tumoral 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 bioconversion into calcitriol, while favors degradation of both vitamin D metabolites in breast cancer cells. The latter may partially explain why alcohol consumption is associated with vitamin D deficiency and increased breast cancer risk and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of the acute administration of low-dosage ethanol on the phasic neurochemical oscillations of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Noori, H R

    2012-09-01

    The effects of the acute ethanol consumption on the brain's neurochemistry are largely studied at the synaptic level. Here, the acute action of low dosages of ethanol, in terms of the inhibition of the glutamatergic system through antagonizing the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, on the neurochemical oscillations along the neurocircuitry of the basal ganglia is investigated by mathematical models. Substantial alterations in the dynamical behaviour of the neurochemical oscillations after single administration of low dosages of ethanol have been observed. Significant dynamical changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate systems along the subthalamic-pallidal feedback loop and the dopamine system of the striatal complex suggest new perspectives in the understanding of the ethanol-induced motor dysfunctions.

  1. A case of acute suicidality following excessive caffeine intake.

    PubMed

    Szpak, Aleksandra; Allen, Danny

    2012-11-01

    Energy and stimulant drinks which contain caffeine provide enlivening effects, reduce fatigue and improve concentration and endurance. However, consumers may also experience physical and psychological side effects as a result of excessive consumption of caffeine within these drinks. Caffeine is known to exacerbate or induce some psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, panic attacks, psychosis and mania. Here we discuss a case of acute suicidality following sleep deprivation after the excessive consumption of a popular energy drink. We are concerned that such widely available stimulant drinks should contain health warnings or advice regarding moderating consumption.

  2. Acute post-exercise energy and macronutrient intake in lean and obese youth: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Thivel, D; Rumbold, P L; King, N A; Pereira, B; Blundell, J E; Mathieu, M-E

    2016-10-01

    This review aims to determine if acute exercise affects subsequent energy and macronutrients intake in obese and non-obese children and adolescents. Databases were searched between January 2015 and December 2015 for studies reporting energy and/or macronutrients intake immediately after an acute exercise and control condition, in children and adolescents. From the initial 118 references found, 14 were included for subsequent analysis after screening representing 31 acute exercise conditions that varied in intensity, duration and modality. One study found increased energy intake after exercise, seven decreased and 23 revealed no change. The meta-analysis revealed a significant effect of acute exercise on intake in obese but not in lean youth by a mean difference of -0.430 (95% confidence interval=-0.703 to -0.157, P=0.002) displaying low heterogeneity (I(2)=0.000; Q=5.875; df=9, P=0.752). The analysis showed that intense exercise only reduces intake in obese children (no intensity effect in lean). Unchanged macronutrients intake was reported in nine studies as opposed to three which found modified lipids, protein and/or carbohydrate intake. Although acute exercise does not affect energy intake in lean, it appears to reduced food intake in obese youth when intense, without altering the macronutrients composition of the meal.

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 ameliorates acute cardiac toxicity of ethanol: role of protein phosphatase and forkhead transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heng; Li, Ji; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the role of facilitated detoxification of acetaldehyde, the main metabolic product of ethanol, through systemic overexpression of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) on acute ethanol exposure-induced myocardial damage. Binge drinking may exert cardiac toxicity and interfere with heart function, manifested as impaired ventricular contractility, although the underlying mechanism remains poorly defined. ALDH2 transgenic mice were produced using the chicken beta-actin promoter. Wild-type FVB (friend virus B) and ALDH2 mice were challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg, intraperitoneally), and cardiac function was assessed 24 h later using the Langendroff and cardiomyocyte edge-detection systems. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate protein phosphatase 2A and 2C (PP2A and PP2C), phosphorylation of Akt, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and the transcription factors Foxo3 (Thr32 and Ser413). ALDH2 reduced ethanol-induced elevation in cardiac acetaldehyde levels. Acute ethanol challenge deteriorated myocardial and cardiomyocyte contractile function evidenced by reduction in maximal velocity of pressure development and decline (+/-dP/dt), left ventricular developed pressure, cell shortening, and prolonged relengthening duration, the effects of which were alleviated by ALDH2. Ethanol treatment dampened phosphorylation of Akt and AMPK associated with up-regulated PP2A and PP2C, which was abrogated by ALDH2. ALDH2 significantly attenuated ethanol-induced decrease in Akt- and AMPK-stimulated phosphorylation of Foxo3 at Thr32 and Ser413, respectively. Consistently, ALDH2 rescued ethanol-induced myocardial apoptosis, protein damage, and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization. Our results suggest that ALDH2 is cardioprotective against acute ethanol toxicity, possibly through inhibition of protein phosphatases, leading to enhanced Akt and AMPK activation, and subsequently, inhibition of Foxo3, apoptosis, and mitochondrial

  4. Electrolyzed-reduced water inhibits acute ethanol-induced hangovers in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Qi, Xu-Feng; Song, Soon-Bong; Kim, Dong-Heui; Teng, Yung-Chien; Yoon, Yang-Suk; Kim, Kwang-Yong; Li, Jian-Hong; Jin, Dan; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2009-10-01

    Ethanol consumption disturbs the balance between the pro- and anti-oxidant systems of the organism, leading to oxidative stress. Electrolyzed-reduced water (ERW) is widely used by people in East Asia for drinking purposes because of its therapeutic properties including scavenging effect of reactive oxygen species. This study was performed to investigate the effect of ERW on acute ethanol-induced hangovers in Sprague-Dawley rats. Alcohol concentration in serum of ERW-treated rats showed significant difference at 1 h, 3 h and 5 h respectively as compared with the rats treated with distilled water. Both alcohol dehydrogenase type 1 and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase related with oxidation of alcohol were significantly increased in liver tissue while the level of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in serum was markedly decreased 24 h after pre-oral administration of ERW. Moreover, oral administration of ERW significantly activated non-ezymatic (glutathione) and enzymatic (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and catalase) antioxidants in liver tissues compared with the control group. These results suggest that drinking ERW has an effect of alcohol detoxification by antioxidant mechanism and has potentiality for relief of ethanol-induced hangover symptoms.

  5. Effects of acute ethanol on opioid peptide release in the central amygdala: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Lam, Minh P; Marinelli, Peter W; Bai, Li; Gianoulakis, Christina

    2008-12-01

    There is experimental evidence that indicates that the endogenous opioid system of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) may mediate some of the reinforcing effects of ethanol. However, the precise interactions of ethanol with the endogenous opioid system at the level of the CeA have not been investigated. The aim of the current study was to investigate the hypothesis that acute systemic ethanol administration will increase the release of endogenous opioid peptides at the level of the CeA in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Rats were implanted with a unilateral guide cannula to aim microdialysis probes at the CeA. Intraperitoneal injections of saline and various doses of ethanol (0.8, 1.6, 2.0, 2.4, and 2.8 g ethanol/kg body weight) were administered to the rats. Dialysate samples were collected at 30-min intervals at distinct time points prior to and following treatment. Radioimmunoassays specific for beta-endorphin, met-enkephalin, and dynorphin A1-8 were used to determine the effect of ethanol on the content of the opioid peptides in the dialysate. We report that the 2.8-g/kg dose of ethanol induced a long-lasting increase in beta-endorphin release from 60 min onwards following administration and, later, an ongoing increase in dynorphin A1-8 release. None of the ethanol doses tested elicited significant changes in dialysate met-enkephalin content compared to the saline treatment. Acute systemic ethanol administration induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in beta-endorphin and dynorphin A1-8 release at the level of the CeA, which may be involved in ethanol consumption.

  6. Effect of the consumption of ethanol on the microcirculation of the human optic nerve head in the acute phase

    PubMed

    Kojima; Sugiyama; Kojima; Azuma; Ito

    2000-05-01

    Purpose: The effect of the consumption of ethanol on the circulation of the optic nerve head (ONH) in the human eye in the acute phase and its mechanism were studied.Methods: Eleven volunteers drank a bottle of beer (633 mL) with or without ethanol (29.5 g). Normalized blur (NB), a quantitative index of blood flow velocity, was measured in the temporal site of the ONH. NB, blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate (PR) were measured before, immediately after, and every 15 minutes for 90 minutes after consumption. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and plasma ethanol concentration were measured before, and 30 and 90 minutes after consumption. Genotyping of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 gene was also performed.Results: NB in the ONH increased significantly from 15 to 45 minutes after consumption of ethanol and the maximum increase was 14% at 15 minutes. IOP was lowered at 90 minutes after consumption, but it was not significant. Mean BP was lowered significantly after 60 minutes. PR and ocular perfusion pressure did not change. A significant correlation was found between plasma ethanol concentration at 30 minutes and maximum NB. NB in the ALDH 2-deficient group was significantly larger from 15 to 45 minutes after consumption than in the proficient group.Conclusions: It appeared that the consumption of ethanol can increase the blood flow in the human ONH in the acute phase through decreased resistance in blood vessels induced by acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol.

  7. Evaluation of the antinociceptive activity and acute oral toxicity of standardized ethanolic extract of the rhizome of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Sutha; Esfahani, Azadeh Sabetghadam; Ismail, Sabariah; Ramanathan, Surash; Yam, Mun Fei

    2010-04-22

    Ethanolic extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza was used to evaluate the analgesic and toxicity effects in vivo. The extract was standardized using GC-MS, which showed that 1 mg of Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract contains 0.1238 mg of xanthorrhizol. The analgesic activity was studied in rats using three different models, namely the hot plate test, tail flick test and formalin-induced pain test. The acute oral toxicity was examined by the oral administration of standardized Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract in mice at doses ranging from 300-5,000 mg/kg and observation for 14 days. Standardized Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract did not show significant analgesic effect in the hot plate and tail flick tests. However, in the formalin-induced pain test, Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed the paw licking time of rats in both early and late phases at doses 200 and 400 mg/kg of the extract, respectively. In the acute oral toxicity study, Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract did not show any toxic effects in mice at 5 g/kg. These experimental results suggest that the standardized Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract showed peripheral and central antinociceptive activity associated with neurogenic pain as well as a relative absence of toxic effects which could compromise the medicinal use of this plant in folk medicine.

  8. Carnosic acid attenuates acute ethanol-induced liver injury via a SIRT1/p66Shc-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinyao; Hu, Yan; Li, Mingzhu; Xia, Kun; Yin, Jiye; Chen, Juan; Liu, Zhaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that SIRT1/p66Shc pathway activation attenuates hepatocyte apoptosis in liver ischemia/reperfusion. The current study aimed to investigate whether carnosic acid (CA), a natural antioxidant, can inhibit acute ethanol-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes and to determine the effect of SIRT1/p66Shc on this process. Our results showed that CA pretreatment significantly reduced ethanol-induced histologic damage, serum aminotransferase activity, and oxidative stress in rats. Importantly, CA pretreatment increased SIRT1 expression following ethanol exposure. Furthermore, p66Shc expression was negatively correlated with SIRT1 expression. Consistent with the results demonstrating p66Shc inhibition, CA pretreatment inhibited the release of cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria. After exposing L02 cells to ethanol, the increased SIRT1 expression induced by CA was abrogated by pharmacologic SIRT1 inhibition or the use of siRNA against SIRT1. Additionally, SIRT1 inhibition significantly abrogated the suppression of p66Shc expression and mitochondrial translocation induced by CA. Accordingly, CA-induced decreases in the release of cytochrome C and AIF and in mitochondrial apoptosis were nearly abolished by SIRT1 knockdown. These data indicated that CA-activated SIRT1 is protective against ethanol treatment. In summary, CA attenuates acute ethanol-induced liver injury via a SIRT1/p66Shc-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  9. Analyses of differentially expressed genes after exposure to acute stress, acute ethanol, or a combination of both in mice.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jessica A; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Diana; Yang, Ming; Cook, Melloni N; Jones, Byron C; Mulligan, Megan K; Hamre, Kristin M; Lu, Lu

    2017-02-01

    Alcohol abuse is a complex disorder, which is confounded by other factors, including stress. In the present study, we examined gene expression in the hippocampus of BXD recombinant inbred mice after exposure to ethanol (NOE), stress (RSS), and the combination of both (RSE). Mice were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 1.8 g/kg ethanol or saline, and subsets of both groups were exposed to acute restraint stress for 15 min or controls. Gene expression in the hippocampus was examined using microarray analysis. Genes that were significantly (p < 0.05, q < 0.1) differentially expressed were further evaluated. Bioinformatic analyses were predominantly performed using tools available at GeneNetwork.org, and included gene ontology, presence of cis-regulation or polymorphisms, phenotype correlations, and principal component analyses. Comparisons of differential gene expression between groups showed little overlap. Gene Ontology demonstrated distinct biological processes in each group with the combined exposure (RSE) being unique from either the ethanol (NOE) or stress (RSS) group, suggesting that the interaction between these variables is mediated through diverse molecular pathways. This supports the hypothesis that exposure to stress alters ethanol-induced gene expression changes and that exposure to alcohol alters stress-induced gene expression changes. Behavior was profiled in all groups following treatment, and many of the differentially expressed genes are correlated with behavioral variation within experimental groups. Interestingly, in each group several genes were correlated with the same phenotype, suggesting that these genes are the potential origins of significant genetic networks. The distinct sets of differentially expressed genes within each group provide the basis for identifying molecular networks that may aid in understanding the complex interactions between stress and ethanol, and potentially provide relevant therapeutic targets. Using Ptp4

  10. [Acute caffeine intoxication after intake of 'herbal energy capsules'].

    PubMed

    Kromhout, H E; Landstra, A M; van Luin, M; van Setten, P A

    2008-07-12

    Two males, 15 and 17 years old respectively, presented at the Emergency Department complaining of cramping abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting after ingestion of energy capsules. Physical examination revealed sinus tachycardia and slight abdominal pain. Laboratory examination showed substantial hypokalaemia and mild hyperglycaemia. Questioning revealed that they had taken 5 and 3 'herbal energy capsules' respectively and that these capsules supposedly contained 200 mg of caffeine each. Toxicological analysis showed a greatly increased serum caffeine concentration in both patients. The peak concentrations calculated were in the highly toxic range and could have led to severe acute complications such as convulsions. Pharmaceutical analysis demonstrated that these 'Supercap Xtreme'-capsules contained 700 mg caffeine or more. All symptoms presented were compatible with caffeine intoxication. The content of these capsules is not reliable and could lead to life-threatening intoxication.

  11. Developmental differences in acute ethanol withdrawal in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Spear, Linda P

    2007-09-01

    Withdrawal from an acute high ethanol dose induces behaviors reminiscent of withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure. While such "hangover"-related anxiety has previously been shown to be considerably less pronounced in adolescent compared to adult male rats, ontogenetic studies are limited and few experiments have directly compared sex- and age-related differences in sensitivity to ethanol hangover. The current experiments examined consequences of a previous ethanol challenge (4.0 g/kg i.p. injection, 20% v/v) on anxiety and exploratory behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and holeboard (HB) tests, respectively, in adolescent and adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. In Exp. 1, evidence of hangover-related anxiety and withdrawal-induced hypoactivity emerged at both ages and in both sexes. As several procedural variables were changed in Exp.1 relative to previous studies from our laboratory showing age-related differences in these hangover measures, Exp. 2 explored the possible contribution of 2 variables to ontogenetic expression of withdrawal-induced anxiogenesis: (1) isolation vs. social context during the postchallenge recovery period and (2) EPM testing alone or immediately following a 5 minute HB test. Results of Exp. 2 revealed few significant interactions of these variables with age- and ethanol exposure-related anxiety measures, although sequential testing (HB before EPM) notably suppressed activity in the EPM and altered the major underlying component of EPM behavior from anxiety to activity as revealed in factor analyses of these data. Additional analyses conducted on animals tested only in the EPM revealed attenuations in withdrawal anxiogenesis among adolescents, along with withdrawal-related decreases in activity at both ages. Taken together, these results suggest that adolescents do show an attenuated sensitivity to hangover-induced anxiogenesis in the EPM, an age difference not evident under other pretest conditions. Therefore, caution

  12. Acute ethanol-induced changes in edema and metabolite concentrations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Zheng, Wenbin; Yan, Gen; Liu, Baoguo; Kong, Lingmei; Ding, Yan; Shen, Zhiwei; Tan, Hui; Zhang, Guishan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the acute effects of EtOH on brain edema and cerebral metabolites, using diffusion weight imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at a 7.0T MR and to define changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain after acute EtOH intoxication. ADC values in each ROI decreased significantly at 1 h and 3 h after ethanol administration. ADC values in frontal lobe were decreased significantly compared with other regions at 3 h. For EtOH/Cr+PCr and cerebral metabolites (Cho, Tau, and Glu) differing over time, no significant differences for Ins, NAA, and Cr were observed in frontal lobes. Regression analysis revealed a significant association between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, TSGlu, and TSADC. The changes of ADC values in different brain regions reflect the process of the cytotoxic edema in vivo. The characterization of frontal lobes metabolites changes and the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, and TSGlu provide a better understanding for the biological mechanisms in neurotoxic effects of EtOH on the brain. In addition, the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSADC will help us to understand development of the ethanol-induced brain cytotoxic edema.

  13. Protective effect of panax notoginseng saponins on acute ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing ethanol-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ren-Bo; Tian, Ke; Cao, Yi-Wei; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wang, Meng; He, Chengwei; Hu, Yuanjia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2015-03-11

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) against acute ethanol-induced liver injury and further to elucidate its probable mechanisms. Mice were treated with PNS (100 or 300 mg/kg) once daily for seven consecutive days priors to ethanol gavage (4.7 g/kg) every 12 h for a total of three doses. Acute alcohol gavage dramatically significantly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (23.4 ± 5.0 IU/L vs 11.7 ± 4.1 IU/L) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (52.6 ± 14.9 IU/L vs 31.1 ± 12.9 IU/L), and hepatic triglyceride level (4.04 ± 0.64 mg/g vs 1.92 ± 0.34 mg/g), these elevations were significantly diminished by pretreatment with PNS at dose of 100 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg. Alcohol exposure markedly induced the lipolysis of white adipose tissue (WAT), up-regulated protein expression of the phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL, p < 0.01), and total HSL (p < 0.01), and enhanced fatty acid uptake capacity in liver as indicated by increasing hepatic CD36 expression (p < 0.01), these effects were attenuated by PNS treatment. Additionally, PNS suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, reduced TNF-α and IL-6 levels, restored glutathione (GSH) level, enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver, and abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. These data demonstrated that pretreatment with PNS protected against acute ethanol-induced liver injury, possibly through ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress. Our findings also suggested that PNS may be potential to be developed as an effective agent for acute ethanol-induced liver injury.

  14. Acute effects of ethanol on the transfer of nicotine and two dietary carcinogens in human placental perfusion.

    PubMed

    Veid, Jenni; Karttunen, Vesa; Myöhänen, Kirsi; Myllynen, Päivi; Auriola, Seppo; Halonen, Toivo; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2011-09-10

    Many mothers use, against instructions, alcohol during pregnancy. Simultaneously mothers are exposed to a wide range of other environmental chemicals. These chemicals may also harm the developing fetus, because almost all toxic compounds can go through human placenta. Toxicokinetic effects of ethanol on the transfer of other environmental compounds through human placenta have not been studied before. It is known that ethanol has lytic properties and increases the permeability and fluidity of cell membranes. We studied the effects of ethanol on the transfer of three different environmental toxins: nicotine, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine) and NDMA (N-nitrosodimethylamine) in placental perfusion. We tested in human breast cancer adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7 whether ethanol affects ABCG2/BCRP, which is also the major transporter in human placenta. We found that the transfer of ethanol is comparable to that of antipyrine, which points to passive diffusion as the transfer mechanism. Unexpectedly, ethanol had no statistically significant effect on the transfer of the other studied compounds. Neither did ethanol inhibit the function of ABCG2/BCRP. These experiments represent only the effects of acute exposure to ethanol and chronic exposure remains to be studied.

  15. Mu-opioid blockade reduces ethanol effects on intake and behavior of the infant rat during short-term but not long-term social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Andrey P.; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Kramskaya, Tatiana. A.; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous findings in adult and infant rats have shown that the endogenous opioid system is involved in control of ethanol consumption and its reinforcing effects. Opioid systems are also involved in reactivity to social isolation with several factors (age, duration, and type of isolation) affecting this modulation. The present study investigated the effects of a selective mu – opioid antagonist CTOP (0, 0.1, 0.5 mg/kg), ethanol (0, 0.5 g/kg), and the interaction of the two drugs on the behavioral consequences of two types of social isolation given to preweanling rats: 1) short–term social isolation from littermates (STSI, duration 8 minutes) and 2) relatively long-term (5 hours) isolation (LTSI) from the dam and littermates. Voluntary intake of saccharin, locomotion, rearing activity, paw licking, and grooming were assessed during an 8 – min. intake test. Thermal nociceptive reactivity was also measured before and after the testing session with normalized differences in pre- and post-test latencies of paw withdrawal from a hot plate (49 °C) used as an index of isolation-induced analgesia (IIA). The results indicate that pharmacological blockade of mu-opioid receptors by CTOP substantially attenuated ethanol’s anxiolytic effects on the developing rat’s reactions to social isolation. Some of these stress-attenuating effects of CTOP were observed only in animals exposed to short-term isolation (STSI) but not in pups isolated for 5 hours (LTSI). Ethanol selectively increased saccharin intake during STSI in females and CTOP blocked this effect. Ethanol decreased the magnitude of analgesia associated with STSI but had no effect on pain reactivity during LTSI. CTOP by itself did not affect IIA or saccharin intake in sober animals. The findings of the present experiments indicate that the anxiolytic effects of 0.5 g/kg ethanol on pups exposed to STSI are modulated by endogenous opioid activity. PMID:23182856

  16. Adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and ethanol intake and impairs fear extinction in adulthood: Possible role of disrupted noradrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Skelly, M J; Chappell, A E; Carter, E; Weiner, J L

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol use disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are highly comorbid, and exposure to chronic stress during adolescence may increase the incidence of these conditions in adulthood. Efforts to identify the common stress-related mechanisms driving these disorders have been hampered, in part, by a lack of reliable preclinical models that replicate their comorbid symptomatology. Prior work by us, and others, has shown that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behaviors and voluntary ethanol consumption in adult male Long-Evans rats. Here we examined whether social isolation also produces deficiencies in extinction of conditioned fear, a hallmark symptom of PTSD. Additionally, as disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to alcoholism, we examined the effect of anxiolytic medications that target noradrenergic signaling on ethanol intake following adolescent social isolation. Our results confirm and extend previous findings that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and enhances ethanol intake and preference in adulthood. Additionally, social isolation is associated with a significant deficit in the extinction of conditioned fear and a marked increase in the ability of noradrenergic therapeutics to decrease ethanol intake. These results suggest that adolescent social isolation not only leads to persistent increases in anxiety-like behaviors and ethanol consumption, but also disrupts fear extinction, and as such may be a useful preclinical model of stress-related psychopathology. Our data also suggest that disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to escalated ethanol drinking following social isolation, thus further highlighting the potential utility of noradrenergic therapeutics in treating the deleterious behavioral sequelae associated with early life stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Screening tests for predicting the prognosis of oral intake in elderly patients with acute pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Oba, Shoko; Tohara, Haruka; Nakane, Ayako; Tomita, Makoto; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Uematsu, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Many elderly patients with pneumonia have aspiration pneumonia. Therefore they must temporarily abstain from oral intake. However, it is difficult to predict whether or not they will be able to start oral intake. The reason is the standard method to evaluate deglutition about pneumonia patients has not been established. In this study we aimed to develop a simple and convenient method that predicts the prognosis of oral intake as nutrition among elderly patients with acute stage pneumonia. Participants were 77 inpatients fasting due to aspiration risk with acute pneumonia. (86.0 ± 7.7 years; range 68-105 years; men: n = 34, women: n = 43) during September 2011 and August 2013. Their consciousness levels were determined by Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and swallowing function and cough reflex were evaluated by repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST), modified water swallow test, simple swallowing provocation test and cough test. Oral intake status at discharge was considered as the objective variable, and these tests were considered as explanatory variables. Then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under the curve (AUC) for each was done. From the ROC curve analysis, GCS ≥14 had the largest AUC (0.79) with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.71 and 0.80. That was followed by RSST ≥1, AUC (0.77) with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.81 and 0.67. These results suggest that GCS and RSST could be useful screening tests for prognostic prediction of oral intake capability in elderly patients with acute pneumonia.

  18. Comparative studies of oral administration of marine collagen peptides from Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiang; Li, Qiong; Lin, Bing; Yu, Yongchao; Ding, Ye; Dai, Xiaoqian; Li, Yong

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an oral administration of marine collagen peptides (MCPs) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. MCPs were orally administered to rats at doses of 0 g per kg bw, 2.25 g per kg bw, 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw, prior to or after the oral administration of ethanol. Thirty minutes after ethanol treatment, the effect of MCPs on motor incoordination and hypnosis induced by ethanol were investigated using a screen test, fixed speed rotarod test (5 g per kg bw ethanol) and loss of righting reflex (7 g per kg bw ethanol). In addition, the blood ethanol concentrations at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after ethanol administration (5 g per kg bw ethanol) were measured. The results of the screen test and fixed speed rotarod test suggested that treatment with MCPs at 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw prior to ethanol could attenuate ethanol-induced loss of motor coordination. Moreover, MCP administered both pre- and post-ethanol treatment had significant potency to alleviate the acute ethanol induced hypnotic states in the loss of righting reflex test. At 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after ethanol ingestion at 5 g per kg bw, the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) of control rats significantly increased compared with that in the 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw MCP pre-treated groups. However, post-treatment with MCPs did not exert a significant inhibitory effect on the BEC of the post-treated groups until 120 minutes after ethanol administration. Therefore, the anti-inebriation effect of MCPs was verified in SD rats with the possible mechanisms related to inhibiting ethanol absorption and facilitating ethanol metabolism. Moreover, the efficiency was better when MCPs were administered prior to ethanol.

  19. Effects of acute exercise on appetite hormones and ad libitum energy intake in men and women.

    PubMed

    Hagobian, Todd Alan; Yamashiro, Megan; Hinkel-Lipsker, Jake; Streder, Katherine; Evero, Nero; Hackney, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Acute exercise suppresses relative energy intake; however, it remains unclear whether this occurs in both men and women exposed to the same relative exercise treatment. Eleven healthy men (22 ± 2 years; 16% ± 6% body fat (BF); 26 ± 4 body mass index (BMI); 42.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) peak oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O(2peak))) and 10 healthy women (21 ± 2 years; 24 ± 2 BMI; 23% ± 3% BF; 39.9 ± 5.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) [Formula: see text]O(2peak)) rested for 60 min or exercised on a cycle ergometer at 70% [Formula: see text]O(2peak) until 30% of total daily energy expenditure was expended (men, expenditure = 975 ± 195 kcal in 82 ± 13 min; women, expenditure = 713 ± 86 kcal in 84 ± 17 min) in a counterbalanced, crossover fashion. Appetite hormones and appetite ratings were assessed in response to each condition. Forty minutes after both conditions, ad libitum total and relative energy intake (energy intake minus energy cost of exercise) were assessed at a buffet meal. There was no significant sex or condition effect in appetite hormones (PYY(3-36), acylated ghrelin, insulin) and appetite ratings (hunger, satisfaction, fullness). Total energy intake in men was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in exercise and rest conditions (1648 ± 950, 1216 ± 633 kcal, respectively) compared with women (591 ± 183, 590 ± 231 kcal, respectively). Relative energy intake was significantly lower (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with rest in men (672 ± 827, 1133 ± 619 kcal, respectively) and women (-121 ± 243, 530 ± 233 kcal, respectively). These data highlight the effectiveness of acute exercise to suppress relative energy intake regardless of sex.

  20. [The assessment of factors affecting acute ethanol poisonings clinical status in 1974-1975, 1984-1985 and 2011-2013].

    PubMed

    Hydzik, Piotr; Paź, Ewelina; Szkolnicka, Beata; Pach, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was an evaluation of clinical factors affecting relationship between ethanol concentration and clinical status in case of acute ethanol poisoning in the 70s and the 80s of the 20th century and 2011-2013 y. Ethanol blood concentration was a criterion of ethanol dose, grade of coma was a decisive factor of toxic effect. 112 patients treated at the Department of Clinical Toxicology Jagiellonian University Medical College in 1974-1975 y, 232 treated in 1984-1985 y and 663 treated in 2011-2013 y because of acute ethanol poisoning were analyzed. The degree of coma was evaluated according to Matthew's scale. Ethanol plasma concentration in each case was measured. The lowest ethanol blood concentrations in the youngest (<19 y) and the oldest (>60 y) groups were noted also the highest in group of adults (30-49 y). The three-gradual relationship between ethanol plasma level and degree of toxic coma was distinguished. However, the average of ethanol blood concentration were statistically significant in every degree of coma in 2011-2013 y. A statistically significant increase in number of patients in 0 coma grade with severe withdrawal symptoms, alcohol psychosis or epilepsy were noted, also decrease of patient in IV degree of coma. The increase ethanol tolerance in the group of acute ethanol poisoned patients shows their ethanol addiction.

  1. Male sexual behaviour and ethanol consumption from an evolutionary perspective: A comment on “Sexual Deprivation Increases Ethanol Intake in Drosophila”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Shohat-Ophir et al.1 demonstrate a connection between sexual behaviour and ethanol consumption in male Drosophila flies, and how the neuropeptide F system regulates ethanol preference. Their results are rightly discussed only in a physiological context, but this has facilitated erroneous anthropomorphic interpretations by the media. Here we discuss the link between male sexual behaviour and ethanol consumption from an evolutionary perspective, providing a broader context to interpret their results. PMID:25970263

  2. Early exposure to ethanol differentially affects ethanol preference at adult age in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Molet, Jenny; Bouaziz, Elodie; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2012-08-01

    Although the acute effects of ethanol exposure on brain development have been extensively studied, the long term consequences of juvenile ethanol intake on behavior at adult age, regarding especially ethanol consumption, are still poorly known. The aim of this study was to analyze the consequences of ethanol ingestion in juvenile C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice on ethanol intake and neurobiological regulations at adulthood. Mice were given intragastric ethanol at 4 weeks of age under different protocols and their spontaneous ethanol consumption was assessed in a free choice paradigm at adulthood. Both serotonin 5-HT(1A) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors were investigated using [(35)S]GTP-γ-S binding assay for the juvenile ethanol regimens which modified adult ethanol consumption. In DBA/2J mice, juvenile ethanol ingestion dose-dependently promoted adult spontaneous ethanol consumption. This early ethanol exposure enhanced 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor-mediated [(35)S]GTP-γ-S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus and reduced CB1 receptor-mediated G protein coupling in both the striatum and the globus pallidus at adult age. In contrast, early ethanol ingestion by C57BL/6J mice transiently lowered spontaneous ethanol consumption and increased G protein coupling of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in the hippocampus but had no effect on CB1 receptors at adulthood. These results show that a brief and early exposure to ethanol can induce strain-dependent long-lasting changes in both behavior toward ethanol and key receptors of central 5-HT and CB systems in mice.

  3. Acute and chronic effects of gum chewing on food reinforcement and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, Christine; Temple, Jennifer L

    2013-04-01

    Although chewing gum has been considered a potential method for reducing energy intake, little empirical data exist to support this idea. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that chewing gum before eating reduces motivation to eat, hunger, and energy intake. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted two experiments in which participants chewed gum prior to completing a food reinforcement task or before all eating occasions for two of three weeks. In Experiment 1, we found that chewing gum had no influence on the reinforcing value of food, but chewing mint gum reduced liking of and energy intake from fruit. In addition, chewing gum reduced self-reported hunger immediately after gum chewing and after eating compared with the no gum condition. In Experiment 2, gum chewing had no significant effect on total energy intake, but participants consumed fewer meals, consumed more energy per meal, and had a lower nutrient adequacy ratio during the gum chewing weeks. These studies provide no evidence that acute or chronic gum chewing reduces hunger or energy intake. In fact, chewing mint-flavored gum may deter consumption of fruit and reduce diet quality.

  4. Effect of acute ethanol administration on the release of opioid peptides from the midbrain including the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Jarjour, Samuel; Bai, Li; Gianoulakis, Christina

    2009-06-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that ethanol alters the activity of the endogenous opioid peptide systems in a dose and brain-region dependent manner. These alterations may influence the processes of ethanol reward and reinforcement. Thus, it was the objective of this study to investigate the response of the 3 major opioid peptide systems (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) to acute ethanol administration, at the level of the midbrain including the ventral tegmental area (midbrain/VTA), a region important for drug, including ethanol reinforcement. Using the in vivo microdialysis technique coupled with specific solid-phase radioimmunoassay for beta-endorphin, met-enkephalin, and dynorphin A(1-8,) changes in the extracellular concentration of theses peptides at the level of midbrain/VTA were determined at distinct time points following the administration of 0.0 (saline), 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 g ethanol/kg B.Wt. A biphasic effect of ethanol on beta-endorphin release was found, with low to medium (1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 g) but not high (2.4 g) doses of ethanol, inducing a significant increase in the dialysate content of beta-endorphin. A late increase in the dialysate content of dynorphin A(1-8) was observed in response to the 1.2 g ethanol dose. However, none of the ethanol doses tested significantly altered the content of met-enkephalin in the dialysate. The present findings suggest that the ethanol-induced increase of beta-endorphin release at the level of midbrain/VTA may influence alcohol reinforcement.

  5. Adolescent rats are resistant to the development of ethanol-induced chronic tolerance and ethanol-induced conditioned aversion.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Godoy, Juan Carlos; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of chronic tolerance to ethanol in adult and adolescent rats has yielded mixed results. Tolerance to some effects of ethanol has been reported in adolescents, yet other studies found adults to exhibit greater tolerance than adolescents or comparable expression of the phenomena at both ages. Another unanswered question is how chronic ethanol exposure affects subsequent ethanol-mediated motivational learning at these ages. The present study examined the development of chronic tolerance to ethanol's hypothermic and motor stimulating effects, and subsequent acquisition of ethanol-mediated odor conditioning, in adolescent and adult male Wistar rats given every-other-day intragastric administrations of ethanol. Adolescent and adult rats exhibited lack of tolerance to the hypothermic effects of ethanol during an induction phase; whereas adults, but not adolescents, exhibited a trend towards a reduction in hypothermia at a challenge phase (Experiment 1). Adolescents, unlike adults, exhibited ethanol-induced motor activation after the first ethanol administration. Adults, but not adolescents, exhibited conditioned odor aversion by ethanol. Subsequent experiments conducted only in adolescents (Experiment 2, Experiment 3 and Experiment 4) manipulated the context, length and predictability of ethanol administration. These manipulations did not promote the expression of ethanol-induced tolerance. This study indicated that, when moderate ethanol doses are given every-other day for a relatively short period, adolescents are less likely than adults to develop chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced hypothermia. This resistance to tolerance development could limit long-term maintenance of ethanol intake. Adolescents, however, exhibited greater sensitivity than adults to the acute motor stimulating effects of ethanol and a blunted response to the aversive effects of ethanol. This pattern of response may put adolescents at risk for early initiation of ethanol intake.

  6. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling facilitates liver repair from acute ethanol-induced injury in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changwen; Ellis, Jillian L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) results from alcohol overconsumption and is among the leading causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors has been observed in ALD, but how it contributes to ALD pathophysiology is unclear. Here, we investigated the impact of VEGF signaling inhibition on an established zebrafish model of acute alcoholic liver injury. Kdrl activity was blocked by chemical inhibitor treatment or by genetic mutation. Exposing 4-day-old zebrafish larvae to 2% ethanol for 24 h induced hepatic steatosis, angiogenesis and fibrogenesis. The liver started self-repair once ethanol was removed. Although inhibiting Kdrl did not block the initial activation of hepatic stellate cells during ethanol treatment, it suppressed their proliferation, extracellular matrix protein deposition and fibrogenic gene expression after ethanol exposure, thus enhancing the liver repair. It also ameliorated hepatic steatosis and attenuated hepatic angiogenesis that accelerated after the ethanol treatment. qPCR showed that hepatic stellate cells are the first liver cell type to increase the expression of VEGF ligand and receptor genes in response to ethanol exposure. Both hepatic stellate cells and endothelial cells, but not hepatic parenchymal cells, expressed kdrl upon ethanol exposure and were likely the direct targets of Kdrl inhibition. Ethanol-induced steatosis and fibrogenesis still occurred in cloche mutants that have hepatic stellate cells but lack hepatic endothelial cells, and Kdrl inhibition suppressed both phenotypes in the mutants. These results suggest that VEGF signaling mediates interactions between activated hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes that lead to steatosis. Our study demonstrates the involvement of VEGF signaling in regulating sustained liver injuries after acute alcohol exposure. It also provides a proof of principle of using the zebrafish model

  7. Acute effect of walking on energy intake in overweight/obese women

    PubMed Central

    Unick, Jessica L.; Otto, Amy D.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Helsel, Diane L.; Pellegrini, Christine A.; Jakicic, John M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the acute effect of a bout of walking on hunger, energy intake, and appetite-regulating hormones [acylated ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)] in 19 overweight/obese women (BMI:32.5±4.3kg/m2). Subjects underwent two experimental testing sessions in a counterbalanced order: exercise and rest. Subjects walked at a moderate-intensity for approximately 40 minutes or rested for a similar duration. Subjective feelings of hunger were assessed and blood was drawn at 5 time points (pre-, post-, 30-minutes, 60-minutes, 120-minutes post-testing). Ad-libitum energy intake consumed 1–2 hours post-exercise/rest was assessed and similar between conditions (mean ± standard deviation; exercise: 551.5±245.1 kcals [2.31±1.0MJ] vs. rest: 548.7±286.9 kcals [2.29±1.2MJ]). However, when considering the energy cost of exercise, relative energy intake was significantly lower following exercise (197.8±256.5 kcals [0.83±1.1MJ]) compared to rest (504.3±290.1 kcals [2.11±1.2MJ]). GLP-1 was lower in the exercise vs. resting condition while acylated ghrelin and hunger were unaltered by exercise. None of these variables were associated with energy intake. In conclusion, hunger and energy intake were unaltered by a bout of walking suggesting that overweight/obese individuals do not acutely compensate for the energy cost of the exercise bout through increased caloric consumption. This allows for an energy deficit to persist post-exercise, having potentially favorable implications for weight control. PMID:20674640

  8. Effects of Amoxicillin and Augmentin on Cystine-Glutamate Exchanger and Glutamate Transporter 1 Isoforms as well as Ethanol Intake in Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hakami, Alqassem Y.; Hammad, Alaa M.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is associated with alteration of glutamate transport and glutamate neurotransmission. Glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is a major transporter that regulates the majority of extracellular glutamate concentration, which is also regulated by cystine-glutamate exchanger (xCT). Importantly, we recently reported that amoxicillin and Augmentin (amoxicillin/clavulanate) upreglulated GLT-1 expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) as well as reduced ethanol consumption in male P rats. In this study, we examined the effects of amoxicillin and Augmentin on GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b), xCT, and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) expression in NAc and PFC as well as ethanol intake in male P rats. We found that both compounds significantly reduced ethanol intake, and increased GLT-1a, GLT-1b, and xCT expression in NAc. However, only Augmentin increased GLT-1a, GLT-1b, and xCT expression in PFC. There were no effects of these compounds on GLAST expression in NAc and PFC. These findings demonstrated that Augmentin and amoxicillin have the potential to upregulate GLT-1 isoforms and xCT expression, and consequently attenuate ethanol dependence. PMID:27199635

  9. Hepatoprotective effect of carob against acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Chehimi, Latifa; Rtibi, Kaïs; Tounsi, Haifa; Boubaker, Samir; Sakly, Mohsen; El-Benna, Jamel; Amri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether subacute treatment with aqueous extract of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pods (AECPs) protects against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Animals were divided into four groups: control, carob, EtOH and EtOH + carob. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with AECP (600 mg/kg body weight (bw)) during 7 days and intoxicated for 6 h by acute oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg bw) 24 h after the last injection. We found that acute administration of EtOH leads to hepatotoxicity as monitored by the increase in the levels of hepatic marker aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase as well as hepatic tissue injury. EtOH also increased the formation of malondialdehyde in the liver, indicating an increase in lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Subacute carob pretreatment prevented all the alterations induced by EtOH and returned their levels to near normal. Importantly, we showed that acute alcohol increased hepatic and plasmatic hydrogen peroxide and free iron levels. The carob pretreatment reversed EtOH effects to near control levels. These data suggest that carob could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting the oxidative damage induced by acute EtOH administration and that its mode of action may involve an opposite effect on plasma and tissue-free iron accumulation. Indeed, carob can be offered as a food additive to protect against EtOH-induced oxidative damage.

  10. Short- or long-term high-fat diet feeding plus acute ethanol binge synergistically induce acute liver injury in mice: an important role for CXCL1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Binxia; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Zhou, Zhou; Cai, Yan; Li, Man; Wang, Wei; Feng, Dechun; Bertola, Adeline; Wang, Hua; Kunos, George; Gao, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Obesity and alcohol consumption often coexist and work synergistically to promote steatohepatitis; however, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that feeding mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for as little as 3 days markedly exacerbated acute ethanol binge-induced liver neutrophil infiltration and injury. Feeding mice with an HFD for 3 months plus a single binge of ethanol induced much more severe steatohepatitis. Moreover, 3-day or 3-month HFD-plus-ethanol binge (3d-HFD+ethanol or 3m-HFD+ethanol) treatment markedly up-regulated the hepatic expression of several chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (Cxcl1), which showed the highest fold (approximately 20-fold and 35-fold, respectively) induction. Serum CXCL1 protein levels were also markedly elevated after the HFD+ethanol treatment. Blockade of CXCL1 with a CXCL1 neutralizing antibody or genetic deletion of the Cxcl1 gene reduced the HFD+ethanol-induced hepatic neutrophil infiltration and injury, whereas overexpression of Cxcl1 exacerbated steatohepatitis in HFD-fed mice. Furthermore, expression of Cxcl1 messenger RNA was up-regulated in hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, and endothelial cells isolated from HFD+ethanol-fed mice compared to mice that were only given the HFD, with the highest fold induction observed in hepatocytes. In vitro stimulation of hepatocytes with palmitic acid up-regulated the expression of Cxcl1 messenger RNA, and this up-regulation was attenuated after treatment with an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, or nuclear factor κB. In addition, hepatic or serum levels of free fatty acids were higher in HFD+ethanol-fed mice than in the control groups. An HFD combined with acute ethanol consumption synergistically induces acute liver inflammation and injury through the elevation of hepatic or serum free fatty acids and subsequent up-regulation of hepatic CXCL1 expression and promotion of hepatic neutrophil

  11. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, G.; Fernandes-Santos, J.; Moreira-Silva, D.; Marin, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30–35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a “three-bottle choice” paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors. PMID:26628398

  12. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, G; Fernandes-Santos, J; Moreira-Silva, D; Marin, M T

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30-35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a "three-bottle choice" paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors.

  13. Effects of ampicillin, cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments on GLT-1 expressions in the mesocorticolimbic system and ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S S; Goodwani, S; Bell, R L; Wei, Y; Boddu, S H S; Sari, Y

    2015-06-04

    Chronic ethanol consumption is known to downregulate expression of the major glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), which increases extracellular glutamate concentrations in subregions of the mesocorticolimbic reward pathway. While β-lactam antibiotics were initially identified as potent upregulators of GLT-1 expression, only ceftriaxone has been extensively studied in various drug addiction models. Therefore, in this study, adult male alcohol-preferring (P) rats exposed chronically to ethanol were treated with other β-lactam antibiotics, ampicillin, cefazolin or cefoperazone (100mg/kg) once daily for five consecutive days to assess their effects on ethanol consumption. The results demonstrated that each compound significantly reduced ethanol intake compared to the saline-treated control group. Importantly, each compound significantly upregulated both GLT-1 and pAKT expressions in the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex compared to saline-treated control group. In addition, only cefoperazone significantly inhibited hepatic aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 enzyme activity. Moreover, these β-lactams exerted only a transient effect on sucrose drinking, suggesting specificity for chronically inhibiting ethanol reward in adult male P rats. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of ampicillin, cefazolin or cefoperazone have been confirmed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These findings demonstrate that multiple β-lactam antibiotics demonstrate efficacy in reducing alcohol consumption and appear to be potential therapeutic compounds for treating alcohol abuse and/or dependence. In addition, these results suggest that pAKT may be an important player in this effect, possibly through increased transcription of GLT-1.

  14. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. I. Acute effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Acute exposure to ethanol was found to enhance the ability of a benzodiazepine (BZ) inverse agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), to reduce muscimol-activated 36Cl- uptake by membranes isolated from mouse cerebral cortex. Pretreatment in vivo with a hypnotic dose of ethanol (but not a subhypnotic dose), or exposure to a corresponding concentration in vitro, was effective. This increase in sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-operated chloride channels to the actions of DMCM was due to an increase in both the potency and efficacy of DMCM. Sensitization to DMCM was reversible and was not observed 24 hr after a single injection of ethanol. Pretreatment with ethanol (10, 50 and 100 mM) in vitro produced sensitization to DMCM in a concentration-dependent manner, similar to that produced by in vivo exposure; this increase in sensitivity did not develop if the membranes were pretreated with ethanol at 0 degrees C. Similarly, in vitro exposure to pentobarbital (200 microM) or flunitrazepam (1 microM) enhanced the actions of the inverse agonist Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5a)(1,4)BZ-3- carboxylate). Acute ethanol exposure did not alter low-affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor binding or muscimol action, or the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-activated chloride flux. Ethanol exposure did not alter (3H)flumazenil (Ro15-1788) binding to central BZ receptors, its displacement by DMCM or allosteric modulation of DMCM binding by muscimol (muscimol-shift).

  15. Protective effect of Allium neapolitanum Cyr. versus Allium sativum L. on acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Nencini, Cristina; Franchi, Gian Gabriele; Cavallo, Federica; Micheli, Lucia

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of Allium neapolitanum Cyr., a spontaneous species of the Italian flora, compared with garlic (Allium sativum L.) on liver injury induced by ethanol in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were orally treated with fresh Allium homogenates (leaves or bulbs, 250 mg/kg) daily for 5 days, whereas controls received vehicle only. At the end of the experimental 5-day period, the animals received an acute ethanol dose (6 mL/kg, i.p.) 2 hours before the last Allium administration and were sacrificed 6 hours after ethanol administration. The activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione reductase (GR) and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AA), and reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione in liver tissue were determined. Administration of both Allium species for 5 days (leaves or bulbs) led to no statistical variation of nonenzymatic parameters versus the control group; otherwise Allium treatment caused an increase of GSH and AA levels compared with the ethanol group and a diminution of MDA levels, showing in addition that A. neapolitanum bulb had the best protective effect. Regarding to enzymatic parameters, GR and CAT activities were enhanced significantly compared with the ethanol group, whereas SOD activity showed a trend different from other parameters estimated. However, the treatment with both Allium species followed by acute ethanol administration reestablished the nonenzymatic parameters similar to control values and enhanced the activities of the enzymes measured. These results suggest that fresh Allium homogenates (leaves or bulbs) possess antioxidant properties and provide protection against ethanol-induced liver injury.

  16. Neuropharmacological and acute toxicological evaluation of ethanolic extract of Allamanda cathartica L. flowers and plumieride.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Tiago J; Holzmann, Iandra; Thiesen, Liliani Carolini; Fratoni, Eduarda; Muller, Ana Flavia Fischer; Lucinda-Silva, Ruth M; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Malheiros, Angela; Gonçalves, Ana Elisa; Dalmagro, Ana Paula; da Silva, Kathryn Ana Bortolini Simão; de Souza, Márcia Maria; Santin, José Roberto

    2017-10-04

    Psychiatric diseases affect more than 350 million people all over the world, and medicinal plants have been considered the basis for pharmacological research. The study investigates the anticonvulsant and antidepressant-like activities and acute toxicological effects of ethanolic extract of Allamanda cathartica flowers, and plumieride. The extract was analyzed by HPLC and plumieride was isolated. Toxicity studies were carried out on females Wistar rats (2000 mg/kg). Toxicity was evaluated by measuring biochemical parameters and conducting histopathological analysis. For pharmacological evaluation different doses of the extract (100, 150 and 300 mg/kg, p.o.) and plumieride (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/kg, i.p.) were administered before the Forced-Swimming Test (FST), pentylenetetrazole seizure test (PTZT) or Tail-Suspension Test (TST) in mice. Furthermore, hemolytic activity, cytotoxicity and micronucleus test were performed. In addition, mutagenicity and reproductive/developmental toxicity were estimated by TEST-software analysis. Data show that both treatments induce significant antidepressive-like effect in FST and TST, but not anticonvulsant effect. The effect of plumieride last up to 4 h after treatment. No signs of toxicity, mutagenicity, cytotoxicity or hemolytic activity were observed. The TEST-software demonstrated that plumieride present reproductive/developmental toxicity. Together, the data obtained show that the flowers extract and plumieride present antidepressant-like effect and did not present signals of acute toxicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Protective effects of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seed in paracetamol induced acute hepatotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, D S; Salman, M T; Singh, P; Verma, V K; Ahmad, A

    2014-04-01

    Paracetamol overdose causes serious liver necrosis. Hepatoprotective activity of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa in Paracetamol induced acute hepatotoxicity was investigated in rats. Fasted male Wistar rats were orally treated with Nigella sativa extract in graded doses for 5 days followed by Nigella sativa extract and paracetamol 3 g kg(-1) on 6 and 7th day. Circulatory liver markers and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were estimated and histopathological study of liver performed. Paracetamol caused a significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase and total Bilirubin and a significant decrease in GSH compared to control. Nigella sativa pretreatment significantly prevented the increase in liver enzymes and total bilirubin and decrease in GSH level as compared to paracetamol group. Liver histopathology showed marked reduction in sinusoidal dilatation, midzonal necrosis, portal triaditis and occasional apoptosis in Nigella sativa extract treated groups as compared to group receiving only paracetamol. Nigella sativa extract possesses hepatoprotective action against paracetamol induced acute hepatoxicity. Further research is needed to advocate its prophylactic use for drug induced hepatotoxicity.

  18. The MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline reduces ethanol-induced locomotion and its volitional intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Juan Carlos; Escrig, Miguel Angel; Pastor, Raúl; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is the co-substrate used by the enzyme catalase to form Compound I (the catalase-H2O2 system), which is the major pathway for the conversion of ethanol (EtOH) into acetaldehyde in the brain. This acetaldehyde has been involved in many of the effects of EtOH. Previous research demonstrated that treatments that change the levels of cerebral H2O2 available to catalase modulate the locomotor-stimulating effects of EtOH and its volitional intake in rodents. However, the source of H2O2 which is used by catalase to form Compound I and mediates the psychoactive actions of EtOH is unknown. One cause of the generation of H2O2 in the brain comes from the deamination of biogenic amines by the activity of MAO-A. Here we explore the consequences of the administration of the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline on EtOH-induced locomotion and voluntary EtOH drinking. For the locomotor activity tests, we injected Swiss (RjOrl) mice intraperitoneally (IP) with clorgyline (0-10mg/kg) and later (0.5-8h) with EtOH (0-3.75 g/kg; IP). Following these treatments, mice were placed in locomotor activity chambers to measure their locomotion. For the drinking experiments, mice of the C57BL/6J strain were injected IP with clorgyline prior to offering them an EtOH (20%) solution following a drinking-in-the-dark procedure. Additional experiments were performed to assess the selectivity of this compound in altering EtOH-stimulated locomotion and EtOH intake. Moreover, we indirectly tested the ability of clorgyline to reduce brain H2O2 levels. We showed that this treatment selectively reduced EtOH-induced locomotion and its self-administration. Moreover, this compound decreased central H2O2 levels available to catalase. We suggest that H2O2 derived from the deamination of biogenic amines by the activity of MAO-A could determine the formation of brain EtOH-derived acetaldehyde. This centrally-formed acetaldehyde within the neurons of the aminergic system could play a role in the

  19. Red meat intake is positively associated with non-fatal acute myocardial infarction in the Costa Rica Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongqing; Campos, Hannia; Baylin, Ana

    2017-08-01

    The adverse effect of red meat consumption on the risk for CVD is a major population health concern, especially in developing Hispanic/Latino countries in which there are clear trends towards increased consumption. This population-based case-control study examined the associations between total, processed and unprocessed red meat intakes and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (MI) in Costa Rica. The study included 2131 survivors of a first non-fatal acute MI and 2131 controls individually matched by age, sex and area of residence. Dietary intake was assessed with a FFQ. OR were estimated by using conditional logistic regression. Higher intakes of total and processed red meat were associated with increased odds of acute MI. The OR were 1·31 (95 % CI 1·04, 1·65) and 1·29 (95 % CI 1·01, 1·65) for the highest quintiles of total red meat (median: 110·8 g or 1 serving/d) and processed red meat intake (median: 36·1 g or 5 servings/week), respectively. There were increasing trends in the odds of acute MI with higher total (P trend=0·01) and processed (P trend=0·02) red meat intakes. Unprocessed red meat intake was not associated with increased odds of acute MI. Substitutions of 50 g of alternative foods (fish, milk, chicken without skin and chicken without fat) for 50 g of total, processed and unprocessed red meat were associated with lower odds of acute MI. The positive association between red meat intake and acute MI in Costa Rica highlights the importance of reducing red meat consumption in middle-income Hispanic/Latino populations.

  20. Acute Ethanol Exposure Increases the Susceptibility of the Donor Hearts to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury after Transplantation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Weymann, Alexander; Radovits, Tamás; Barnucz, Enikő; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Hegedüs, Peter; Zhou, Yan; Tao, Liang; Páli, Szabolcs; Veres, Gábor; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Background Many donor organs come from youths involved in alcohol-related accidental death. The use of cardiac allografts for transplantation from donors after acute poisoning is still under discussion while acute ethanol intoxication is associated with myocardial functional and morphological changes. The aims of this work were 1) to evaluate in rats the time-course cardiac effects of acute ethanol-exposure and 2) to explore how its abuse by donors might affect recipients in cardiac pump function after transplantation. Methods Rats received saline or ethanol (3.45 g/kg, ip). We evaluated both the mechanical and electrical aspects of cardiac function 1 h, 6 h or 24 h after injection. Plasma cardiac troponin-T and glucose-levels were measured and histological examination of the myocardium was performed. In addition, heart transplantation was performed, in which donors received ethanol 6 h or 24 h prior to explantation. Graft function was measured 1 h or 24 h after transplantation. Myocardial TBARS-concentration was measured; mRNA and protein expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Results Ethanol administration resulted in decreased load-dependent (−34±9%) and load-independent (−33±12%) contractility parameters, LV end-diastolic pressure and elevated blood glucose levels at 1 h, which were reversed to the level of controls after 6 h and 24 h. In contrast to systolic dysfunction, active relaxation and passive stiffness are slowly recovered or sustained during 24 h. Moreover, troponin-T-levels were increased at 1 h, 6 h and 24 h after ethanol injection. ST-segment elevation (+47±10%), elongated QT-interval (+38±4%), enlarged cardiomyocyte, DNA-strand breaks, increased both mRNA and protein levels of superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione peroxydase-4, cytochrome-c-oxidase and metalloproteinase-9 were observed 24 h following ethanol-exposure. After heart transplantation, decreased myocardial contractility and relaxation

  1. Acute ethanol exposure increases the susceptibility of the donor hearts to ischemia/reperfusion injury after transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiliang; Korkmaz, Sevil; Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Weymann, Alexander; Radovits, Tamás; Barnucz, Enikő; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Hegedüs, Peter; Zhou, Yan; Tao, Liang; Páli, Szabolcs; Veres, Gábor; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Many donor organs come from youths involved in alcohol-related accidental death. The use of cardiac allografts for transplantation from donors after acute poisoning is still under discussion while acute ethanol intoxication is associated with myocardial functional and morphological changes. The aims of this work were 1) to evaluate in rats the time-course cardiac effects of acute ethanol-exposure and 2) to explore how its abuse by donors might affect recipients in cardiac pump function after transplantation. Rats received saline or ethanol (3.45 g/kg, ip). We evaluated both the mechanical and electrical aspects of cardiac function 1 h, 6 h or 24 h after injection. Plasma cardiac troponin-T and glucose-levels were measured and histological examination of the myocardium was performed. In addition, heart transplantation was performed, in which donors received ethanol 6 h or 24 h prior to explantation. Graft function was measured 1 h or 24 h after transplantation. Myocardial TBARS-concentration was measured; mRNA and protein expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Ethanol administration resulted in decreased load-dependent (-34 ± 9%) and load-independent (-33 ± 12%) contractility parameters, LV end-diastolic pressure and elevated blood glucose levels at 1 h, which were reversed to the level of controls after 6 h and 24 h. In contrast to systolic dysfunction, active relaxation and passive stiffness are slowly recovered or sustained during 24 h. Moreover, troponin-T-levels were increased at 1 h, 6 h and 24 h after ethanol injection. ST-segment elevation (+47 ± 10%), elongated QT-interval (+38 ± 4%), enlarged cardiomyocyte, DNA-strand breaks, increased both mRNA and protein levels of superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione peroxydase-4, cytochrome-c-oxidase and metalloproteinase-9 were observed 24 h following ethanol-exposure. After heart transplantation, decreased myocardial contractility and relaxation, oxidative stress and

  2. Role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in regulation of GABAergic transmission and acute response to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Suryanarayanan, A; Carter, J M; Landin, J D; Morrow, A L; Werner, D F; Spigelman, I

    2016-08-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that ethanol (EtOH) exposure activates neuroimmune signaling. Alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokines after acute and chronic EtOH exposure have been heavily investigated. In contrast, little is known about the regulation of neurotransmission and/or modulation by anti-inflammatory cytokines in the brain after an acute EtOH exposure. Recent evidence suggests that interleukin-10 (IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is upregulated during withdrawal from chronic EtOH exposure. In the present study, we show that IL-10 is increased early (1 h) after a single intoxicating dose of EtOH (5 g/kg, intragastric) in Sprague Dawley rats. We also show that IL-10 rapidly regulates GABAergic transmission in dentate gyrus neurons. In brain slice recordings, IL-10 application dose-dependently decreases miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) area and frequency, and decreases the magnitude of the picrotoxin sensitive tonic current (Itonic), indicating both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. A PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (but not the negative control LY303511) ablated the inhibitory effects of IL-10 on mIPSC area and Itonic, but not on mIPSC frequency, indicating the involvement of PI3K in postsynaptic effects of IL-10 on GABAergic transmission. Lastly, we also identify a novel neurobehavioral regulation of EtOH sensitivity by IL-10, whereby IL-10 attenuates acute EtOH-induced hypnosis. These results suggest that EtOH causes an early release of IL-10 in the brain, which may contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability as well as disturbed sleep seen after binge exposure to EtOH. These results also identify IL-10 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in alcohol-use disorders and other CNS disorders where GABAergic transmission is altered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute ethanol treatment induces a bimodal response of phospholipid acylation rates in rat red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verine, A.; Valette, A.; Richard, D.; Boyer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol in rats elicited a bimodal response of acylation rates in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine of intact red blood cells. Within an initial period, ethanol inhibited acylation rates. The inhibition then reversed, leading to increased values which persisted as long as ethanol was present in plasma. Acylation rates were not correlated to ethanol concentrations in plasma. The authors suggest that red cells first desensitize to, then overcompensate for the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acylation reactions. These adaptive changes may be one of the events mediating membrane tolerance to ethanol.

  4. Fatty acid ethyl esters in hair: correlation with self-reported ethanol intake in 160 subjects and influence of estroprogestin therapy.

    PubMed

    Bertol, Elisabetta; Del Bravo, Ester; Vaiano, Fabio; Mari, Francesco; Favretto, Donata

    2014-09-01

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are minor ethanol metabolites that can accumulate in hair. The performance of hair FAEEs as a biomarker that can discriminate null or moderate drinking from risky, excessive drinking was verified by evaluating the relationship between self-reported daily alcohol intake and FAEE concentration in hair. The study subjects were 160 healthy volunteers (52% female) that included teetotallers, moderate/social drinkers (< 60 g of ethanol per day), and heavy drinkers (≥ 60 g/day).The estimated daily alcohol intake (EDAI) was assessed by a specific written questionnaire aimed at estimating the measure and the frequency of alcohol drinking and at excluding confounding factors. FAEEs (ethyl myristate, ethyl palmitate, ethyl oleate, and ethyl stearate) were extracted from the hair matrix by overnight incubation in n-hexane/dimethylsulphoxide, purified by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring and Electron ionization (EI) mode, using pentadeuterated internal standards. Hair samples exhibited FAEE concentrations (expressed as the sum of the four esters, CFAEE ) ranging from 0.01 to 10.78 ng/mg (average 1.16 and median 0.60 ng/mg). The EDAI was from 0 to 246 g of ethanol per day, average 28 g/day and median 15 g/day. A cut-off of 0.5 ng/mg in 3 cm of a proximal hair segment was adopted to discriminate social drinking from excessive ethanol consumption. False positive samples were identified in subjects using ethanol-containing hair lotions and women on estroprogestin therapy. Specificity of 87% was reached when the identified false positives were excluded from data elaboration. CFAEE in hair at a predetermined cut-off can be used to discriminate between moderate and excessive drinking only when confounding factors are meticulously removed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Endogenous Opioids as Substrates for Ethanol Intake in the Neonatal Rat: The impact of prenatal ethanol exposure on the opioid family in the early postnatal period

    PubMed Central

    Bordner, Kelly; Deak, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite considerable knowledge that prenatal ethanol exposure can lead to devastating effects on the developing fetus, alcohol consumption by pregnant women remains strikingly prevalent. Both clinical and basic research has suggested that, in addition to possible physical, behavioral, and cognitive deficits, gestational exposure to alcohol may lead to an increased risk for the development of later alcohol-related use and abuse disorders. The current work sought to characterize alterations in endogenous opioid signaling peptides and gene expression produced by ethanol exposure during the last days of gestation. Methods Experimental subjects were 4-, 8-, and 12-day old infant rats obtained from pregnant females that were given daily intubations of 0, 1, or 2 g/kg ethanol during the last few days of gestation (GD17-20). Using real-time RT-PCR, western blotting analysis, and enzyme immunoassays, we examined mRNA and protein for three opioid receptors and ligands in the nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area, and hypothalamus. Results Three main trends emerged - (1) mRNA for the majority of factors were found to upregulate across each of the three postnatal ages assessed, indicative of escalating ontogenetic expression of opioid-related genes; (2) prenatal ethanol significantly reduced many opioid peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism by which prenatal exposure can affect future responsiveness towards ethanol; and (3) the nucleus accumbens emerged as a key site for ethanol-dependent effects, suggesting a potential target for additional assessment and intervention towards understanding the ethanol's ability to program the developing brain. Conclusion We provide a global assessment of relatively long-term changes in both opioid gene expression and protein following exposure to only moderate amounts of ethanol during a relatively short window in the prenatal period. These results suggest that, while continuing to undergo ontogenetic changes, the infant

  6. Nutritional status and dietary intake of children with acute leukaemia during induction or consolidation chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tan, S Y; Poh, B K; Nadrah, M H; Jannah, N A; Rahman, J; Ismail, M N

    2013-07-01

    The assessment of nutritional status among paediatric patients is important for the planning and execution of nutritional strategies that strive to optimise the quality of life and growth among sick children. The present study aimed to evaluate the nutritional status and dietary intake among children with acute leukaemia. This cross-sectional study included 53 paediatric patients aged 3-12 years old, who were diagnosed with either acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or acute myelogenous leukaemia and were undergoing chemotherapy treatments (induction or consolidation phase). Patients were matched for sex, age (±6 months) and ethnicity with healthy children as controls. Weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, mid-upper arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper arm muscle area and fat area were determined. Dietary intake was assessed using 3-day food records. Anthropometric variables were generally higher among patients compared to controls, although the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The prevalence of overnutrition among patients according to body mass index-for-age, waist circumference-for-age, mid-upper arm circumference-for-age and triceps skinfold-for-age were 24.5%, 29.1%, 17.0% and 30.2%, respectively. Mean energy [5732 ± 1958 kJ (1370 ± 468 kcal) versus 6945 ± 1970 kJ (1660 ± 471 kcal), P < 0.01], protein (50.0 ± 19.7 g versus 62.3 ± 22.3 g, P < 0.01) and fat (43.6 ± 18.9 g versus 58.3 ± 16.7, P < 0.001) intakes of patients were significantly lower than controls. The prevalence of being overweight and obesity in children with acute leukaemia was higher despite lower energy intake compared to controls. Studies assessing physical activity, the complex interaction and the effects of treatment drugs are warranted to better manage malnutrition among paediatric patients. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association

  7. Food proteins and gut mucosal barrier. IV. Effects of acute and chronic ethanol administration on handling and uptake of bovine serum albumin by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of ethanol exposure on small intestinal handling and uptake of radiolabeled bovine serum albumin were investigated using everted gut sacs. There was less breakdown of BSA after acute ethanol administration in vitro and after acute and chronic in vivo exposure. Thus, the vascular compartment of the small intestine was confronted with more complete and potentially more antigenic material after ethanol. Changes in BSA binding and uptake after acute exposure were shown to be reversible after 4-6 hr. In all groups, there was more BSA binding when the small intestine was exposed to ethanol. This difference was most pronounced after chronic exposure. In the same group, uptake of BSA was correlated with binding and significantly increased. Combined effects of ethanol on the gut mucosal barrier may account for changes in food antigen handling and uptake.

  8. [Ethanol elimination rate (beta60, beta-slope) in different age groups after intake of a moderate or high dose of alcohol].

    PubMed

    Barinskaia, T O; Smirnov, A V; Salomatin, E M; Shaev, A I

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol elimination rate (beta60) was measured in different age groups of men and women following its single intake at a dose of 0.8 g/kg body weight (experiment 1) and 2 g/kg (experiment 2). Samples of capillary blood were collected 20, 40, 60, 90, 120, and 300 min (experiment 1) or 360 min after the termination of the intake (experiment 2). The phase of alcohol elimination was deduced from the kinetic curve. Each alcohol dose was consumed during 1-2 minutes or 1-1.5 hours (experiments 1 and 2 respectively). The value of (beta60) in experiment 1 was estimated at 0.17 +/- 0.04 per thousand/hour in young men aged between 18-26 years, 0.22 per thousand/hour in adult men of 32-48 years, and 0.21 per thousand/hour in women aged between 19-41 years. The difference between alcohol elimination rates in young and adult men on the one hand and between young men and women on the other hand was statistically significant (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively). In the second experiment, ethanol elimination rate was practically identical in men of the above age groups (0.16 +/- 0. 02 per thousand/hour) and significantly higher than in 64-66 year-old men (0.14 +/- 0.03 per thousand/hour). The values of ethanol elimination rate in men of group 2 calculated by the Weedmark formula proved underestimated by 17 +/- 5% regardless of their age. Men of both age groups included in experiment 1 showed an alcohol excretion rate overestimated by 8 +/- 5% and 31 +/- 6% respectively compared with 10 +/- 7% in women. It is suggested that a single intake of alcohol may lead to an instantaneous rise in the hepatic concentration of ethanol unrelated to the consumed amount that however affects its metabolic rate. It is concluded that the duration of ethanol intake has greater effect on the rate of its elimination from the body than the amount of consumed alcohol, especially in alcohol-tolerant subjects.

  9. Acute effects of vinegar intake on some biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exaggerated postprandial spikes in blood glucose and lipids induce proportional increases in oxidative stress, which acutely trigger impairment endothelial, inflammation and increased risk of future cardiovascular events. In this research, we have investigated acute effects of vinegar intake on some of the biochemical atherosclerosis risk factors in high cholesterol fed rabbits to see if we can find a probable protective value for it. Methods The rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal diet, high cholesterol diet (%1cholesterol), %1 cholesterol with 5 ml vinegar (low dose), %1 cholesterol with 10 ml vinegar (high dose). After fasting for 12-15 hours, blood samples were taken to determine baseline values. Three hours after feeding, blood samples were collected again to investigate acute effects of vinegar intake on the measured factors. Results Using high-dose vinegar with cholesterolemic diet caused significant reduce in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), oxidized-LDL (ox-LDL), malondialdehyde (MDA), total cholesterol (TC) and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) in comparison with hypercholesterolemic diet. Consumption low-dose vinegar with cholesterolemic diet induced a significant decrease in fibrinogen and glucose compared to hypercholesterolemic diet. Level of serum nitrite, nitrate, triacylglycerol (TAG), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein A (ApoA), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were not significantly difference in low and high doses vinegar with cholesterolemic diet compared to hypercholesterolemic diet. A significant difference was observed for LDL-C, ApoB100 and TC between low and high doses vinegar. Conclusion This study suggest that vinegar, might have some acute effects on biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis and a probable protective value can be considered for its postprandial use. PMID:20109192

  10. Role of Interleukin-1 Receptor Signaling in the Behavioral Effects of Ethanol and Benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Yuri A.; Benavidez, Jillian M.; Black, Mendy; Mayfield, Jody; Harris, R. Adron

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies identified the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1R1) as part of a pathway associated with a genetic predisposition to high alcohol consumption, and lack of the endogenous IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) strongly reduced ethanol intake in mice. Here, we compared ethanol-mediated behaviors in mice lacking Il1rn or Il1r1. Deletion of Il1rn (the gene encoding IL-1ra) increases sensitivity to the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and flurazepam and reduces severity of acute ethanol withdrawal. Conversely, deletion of Il1r1 (the gene encoding the IL-1 receptor type I, IL-1R1) reduces sensitivity to the sedative effects of ethanol and flurazepam and increases the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal. The sedative effects of ketamine and pentobarbital were not altered in the knockout (KO) strains. Ethanol intake and preference were not changed in mice lacking Il1r1 in three different tests of ethanol consumption. Recovery from ethanol-induced motor incoordination was only altered in female mice lacking Il1r1. Mice lacking Il1rn (but not Il1r1) showed increased ethanol clearance and decreased ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion. The increased ethanol- and flurazepam-induced sedation in Il1rn KO mice was decreased by administration of IL-1ra (Kineret), and pre-treatment with Kineret also restored the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal. Ethanol-induced sedation and withdrawal severity were changed in opposite directions in the null mutants, indicating that these responses are likely regulated by IL-1R1 signaling, whereas ethanol intake and preference do not appear to be solely regulated by this pathway. PMID:25839897

  11. Fatty acid ethyl ester synthase inhibition ameliorates ethanol-induced Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Booth, David M; Cane, Matthew C; Chvanov, Michael; Javed, Muhammad A; Elliott, Victoria L; Armstrong, Jane A; Dingsdale, Hayley; Cash, Nicole; Li, Yan; Greenhalf, William; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Jaffar, Mohammed; Petersen, Ole H; Tepikin, Alexei V; Sutton, Robert; Criddle, David N

    2014-08-01

    Non-oxidative metabolism of ethanol (NOME) produces fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) via carboxylester lipase (CEL) and other enzyme action implicated in mitochondrial injury and acute pancreatitis (AP). This study investigated the relative importance of oxidative and non-oxidative pathways in mitochondrial dysfunction, pancreatic damage and development of alcoholic AP, and whether deleterious effects of NOME are preventable. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](C)), NAD(P)H, mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways were examined in isolated pancreatic acinar cells in response to ethanol and/or palmitoleic acid (POA) in the presence or absence of 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) to inhibit oxidative metabolism. A novel in vivo model of alcoholic AP induced by intraperitoneal administration of ethanol and POA was developed to assess the effects of manipulating alcohol metabolism. Inhibition of OME with 4-MP converted predominantly transient [Ca(2+)](C) rises induced by low ethanol/POA combination to sustained elevations, with concurrent mitochondrial depolarisation, fall of NAD(P)H and cellular necrosis in vitro. All effects were prevented by 3-benzyl-6-chloro-2-pyrone (3-BCP), a CEL inhibitor. 3-BCP also significantly inhibited rises of pancreatic FAEE in vivo and ameliorated acute pancreatic damage and inflammation induced by administration of ethanol and POA to mice. A combination of low ethanol and fatty acid that did not exert deleterious effects per se became toxic when oxidative metabolism was inhibited. The in vitro and in vivo damage was markedly inhibited by blockade of CEL, indicating the potential for development of specific therapy for treatment of alcoholic AP via inhibition of FAEE generation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Enhances the Excitability and Synaptic Plasticity of Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Neurons and Induces a Tolerance to the Acute Inhibitory Actions of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Lopez, Marcelo F; Mulholland, Patrick J; Woodward, John J

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is associated with changes in brain reward and control systems, including the prefrontal cortex. In prefrontal areas, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been suggested to have an important role in the development of alcohol-abuse disorders and studies from this laboratory demonstrate that OFC-mediated behaviors are impaired in alcohol-dependent animals. However, it is not known whether chronic alcohol (ethanol) exposure alters the fundamental properties of OFC neurons. In this study, mice were exposed to repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure to induce dependence and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine the effects of CIE treatment on lateral OFC (lOFC) neuron excitability, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. Repeated cycles of CIE exposure and withdrawal enhanced current-evoked action potential (AP) spiking and this was accompanied by a reduction in the after-hyperpolarization and a decrease in the functional activity of SK channels. CIE mice also showed an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio, and this was associated with an increase in GluA1/GluA2 AMPA receptor expression and a decrease in GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. Following CIE treatment, lOFC neurons displayed a persistent long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission following a spike-timing-dependent protocol. Lastly, CIE treatment diminished the inhibitory effect of acute ethanol on AP spiking of lOFC neurons and reduced expression of the GlyT1 transporter. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol leads to enhanced intrinsic excitability and glutamatergic synaptic signaling of lOFC neurons. These alterations may contribute to the impairment of OFC-dependent behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals. PMID:26286839

  13. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Enhances the Excitability and Synaptic Plasticity of Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Neurons and Induces a Tolerance to the Acute Inhibitory Actions of Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Lopez, Marcelo F; Mulholland, Patrick J; Woodward, John J

    2016-03-01

    Alcoholism is associated with changes in brain reward and control systems, including the prefrontal cortex. In prefrontal areas, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been suggested to have an important role in the development of alcohol-abuse disorders and studies from this laboratory demonstrate that OFC-mediated behaviors are impaired in alcohol-dependent animals. However, it is not known whether chronic alcohol (ethanol) exposure alters the fundamental properties of OFC neurons. In this study, mice were exposed to repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure to induce dependence and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine the effects of CIE treatment on lateral OFC (lOFC) neuron excitability, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. Repeated cycles of CIE exposure and withdrawal enhanced current-evoked action potential (AP) spiking and this was accompanied by a reduction in the after-hyperpolarization and a decrease in the functional activity of SK channels. CIE mice also showed an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio, and this was associated with an increase in GluA1/GluA2 AMPA receptor expression and a decrease in GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. Following CIE treatment, lOFC neurons displayed a persistent long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission following a spike-timing-dependent protocol. Lastly, CIE treatment diminished the inhibitory effect of acute ethanol on AP spiking of lOFC neurons and reduced expression of the GlyT1 transporter. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol leads to enhanced intrinsic excitability and glutamatergic synaptic signaling of lOFC neurons. These alterations may contribute to the impairment of OFC-dependent behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals.

  14. Acute effect of alcohol intake on sine-wave Cartesian and polar contrast sensitivity functions.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti-Galdino, M K; Silva, J A da; Mendes, L C; Santos, N A da; Simas, M L B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess contrast sensitivity for angular frequency stimuli as well as for sine-wave gratings in adults under the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol. We measured the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for gratings of 0.25, 1.25, 2.5, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle (cpd) as well as for angular frequency stimuli of 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 cycles/360°. Twenty adults free of ocular diseases, with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and no history of alcoholism were enrolled in two experimental groups: 1) no alcohol intake (control group) and 2) alcohol ingestion (experimental group). The average concentration of alcohol in the experimental group was set to about 0.08%. We used a paradigm involving a forced-choice method. Maximum sensitivity to contrast for sine-wave gratings in the two groups occurred at 4 cpd sine-wave gratings and at 24 and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Significant changes in contrast sensitivity were observed after alcohol intake compared with the control condition at spatial frequency of 4 cpd and 1, 24, and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Alcohol intake seems to affect the processing of sine-wave gratings at maximum sensitivity and at the low and high frequency ends for angular frequency stimuli, both under photopic luminance conditions.

  15. Homocysteine levels after acute levodopa intake in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Kuhn, Wilfried

    2009-07-15

    Levodopa (L-dopa) administered with a dopadecarboxylase inhibitor (DDI) increases homocysteine plasma levels. This may support the onset of atherosclerosis-related disorders and neuropsychiatric complications in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This homocysteine elevation is considered as long-term effect of chronic L-dopa/DDI treatment. Little is known about the acute effects of L-dopa/DDI intake on homocysteine generation. The objective of this trial was to investigate the relations between L-dopa and homocysteine after acute L-dopa/DDI administration in PD patients with different L-dopa metabolism. Thirty PD patients were divided into groups with superior (I) and less (II) L-dopa absorption after standardized intake of 125 mg L-dopa/benserazide with determination of L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD) and homocysteine in plasma at baseline, 30, 60, and 90 minutes. There was a homocysteine increase in Group I (F = 5; P = 0.005) and a moderate decrease in Group II (F = 4.27; P = 0.01). A rise of 3-OMD (F = 10.51; P < 0.0001) appeared in Group I, but not in Group II (F = 0.91; P = 0.44), accordingly L-dopa accumulation was better in Group I than in Group II. Thus, in conclusion, L-dopa metabolism is an important component for homocysteine elevation after one time L-dopa/DDI administration in PD patients.

  16. Acute injection of ASP in the third ventricle inhibits food intake and locomotor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Christian; Roy, Marie-Claude; Gauvreau, Danny; Poulin, Anne-Marie; Tom, Fun-Qun; Timofeeva, Elena; Richard, Denis; Cianflone, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    Acylation-stimulating protein (ASP; also known as C3adesArg) stimulates triglyceride synthesis and glucose transport via interaction with its receptor C5L2, which is expressed peripherally (adipose tissue, muscle) and centrally. Previous studies have shown that ASP-deficient mice (C3KO) and C5L2-deficient mice (C5L2KO) are hyperphagic (59 to 229% increase, P < 0.0001), which is counterbalanced by increased energy expenditure measured as oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) and a lower RQ. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ASP's effect on food intake, energy expenditure, and neuropeptide expression. Male rats were surgically implanted with intracerebroventricular (icv) cannulas directed toward the third ventricle. After a 5-h fast, rats were injected, and food intake was assessed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 16, 24, and 48 h, with a 5- to 7-day washout period between each injection. Acute icv injections of ASP (0.3-1,065 pmol) had a time-dependent effect on decreasing food intake by 20 to 57% (P < 0.05). Decreases were detected by 30 min (maximum 57%, P < 0.01) and at the highest dose effects extended to 48 h (19%, P < 0.05, 24- to 48-h period). Daily body weight gain was decreased by 131% over the first 24 h and 29% over the second 24 h (P < 0.05). A conditioned taste aversion test indicated that there was no malaise. Furthermore, acute ASP injection affected energy substrate usage, demonstrated by decreased Vo(2) and RQ (P < 0.05; implicating greater fatty acid usage), with a 49% decrease in total activity over 24 h (P < 0.05). ASP administration also increased anorexic neuropeptide POMC expression (44%) in the arcuate nucleus, with no change in NPY. Altogether ASP may have central in addition to peripheral effects.

  17. Anti-obesity activity, acute toxicity, and chemical constituents of aqueous and ethanol Viola mandshurica extracts.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Kim, Dong-Seon; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2017-06-06

    Viola mandshurica has traditionally been used as an expectorant, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory drug. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of two different V. mandshurica extracts have anti-obesity effects. We evaluated the effects of ethanol extract (VME) and aqueous extract (VMA) from V. mandshurica on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice as well as the acute oral toxicities and chemical compositions of both extracts. Oral administration of VME or VMA (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) decreased body weight gain, liver and adipose tissue mass, adipocyte size, and serum lipid levels. Both extracts increased adiponectin serum concentrations and mRNA expression in epididymal adipose tissue. VME and VMA also reversed the HFD-induced mRNA expression of lipogenic genes such as CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α, C/EBPβ, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, and leptin in adipose tissue, whereas they increased mRNA expression of uncoupling protein 2 and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). VME and VMA increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-coA carboxylase with a concomitant decrease in fat accumulation in the liver. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that both VME and VMA contained esculetin (0.566% for VME, 0.231% for VMA) and schaftoside (0.147% for VME, 0.126% for VMA). In a 2-week acute toxicity study, administration of a single oral dose of VME or VMA (5000 mg/kg) caused no signs of toxicity or mortality. These results suggest that both VM extracts exert anti-obesity effects in HFD-induced obese mice by suppressing lipogenesis and activating AMPK in the liver and adipose tissue. Our findings suggest that VM extracts could be a safe and effective treatment for obesity.

  18. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence: effects on social behavior and ethanol sensitivity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Truxell, Eric; Spear, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed long-lasting consequences of repeated ethanol exposure during two different periods of adolescence on 1) baseline levels of social investigation, play fighting, and social preference and 2) sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol challenge. Adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were tested 25 days after repeated exposure to ethanol (3.5 g/kg intragastrically [i.g.], every other day for a total of 11 exposures) in a modified social interaction test. Early-mid adolescent intermittent exposure (e-AIE) occurred between postnatal days (P) 25–45, whereas late adolescent intermittent exposure (l-AIE) was conducted between P45–65. Significant decreases in social investigation and social preference were evident in adult male rats, but not their female counterparts following e-AIE, whereas neither males nor females demonstrated these alterations following l-AIE. In contrast, both e-AIE and l-AIE produced alterations in sensitivity to acute ethanol challenge in males tested 25 days after adolescent exposure. Ethanol-induced facilitation of social investigation and play fighting, reminiscent of that normally seen during adolescence, was evident in adult males after e-AIE, whereas control males showed an age-typical inhibition of social behavior. Males after l-AIE were found to be insensitive to the socially suppressing effects of acute ethanol challenge, suggesting the development of chronic tolerance in these animals. In contrast, females showed little evidence for alterations in sensitivity to acute ethanol challenge following either early or late AIE. The results of the present study demonstrate a particular vulnerability of young adolescent males to long-lasting detrimental effects of repeated ethanol. Retention of adolescent-typical sensitivity to the socially facilitating effects of ethanol could potentially make ethanol especially appealing to these males, therefore promoting relatively high levels of ethanol intake later in

  19. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence: effects on social behavior and ethanol sensitivity in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Truxell, Eric; Spear, Linda P

    2014-08-01

    This study assessed long-lasting consequences of repeated ethanol exposure during two different periods of adolescence on 1) baseline levels of social investigation, play fighting, and social preference and 2) sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol challenge. Adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were tested 25 days after repeated exposure to ethanol (3.5 g/kg intragastrically [i.g.], every other day for a total of 11 exposures) in a modified social interaction test. Early-mid adolescent intermittent exposure (e-AIE) occurred between postnatal days (P) 25 and 45, whereas late adolescent intermittent exposure (l-AIE) was conducted between P45 and P65. Significant decreases in social investigation and social preference were evident in adult male rats, but not their female counterparts following e-AIE, whereas neither males nor females demonstrated these alterations following l-AIE. In contrast, both e-AIE and l-AIE produced alterations in sensitivity to acute ethanol challenge in males tested 25 days after adolescent exposure. Ethanol-induced facilitation of social investigation and play fighting, reminiscent of that normally seen during adolescence, was evident in adult males after e-AIE, whereas control males showed an age-typical inhibition of social behavior. Males after l-AIE were found to be insensitive to the socially suppressing effects of acute ethanol challenge, suggesting the development of chronic tolerance in these animals. In contrast, females showed little evidence for alterations in sensitivity to acute ethanol challenge following either early or late AIE. The results of the present study demonstrate a particular vulnerability of young adolescent males to long-lasting detrimental effects of repeated ethanol. Retention of adolescent-typical sensitivity to the socially facilitating effects of ethanol could potentially make ethanol especially appealing to these males, therefore promoting relatively high levels of ethanol intake later

  20. Energy intake and appetite-related hormones following acute aerobic and resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Balaguera-Cortes, Liliana; Wallman, Karen E; Fairchild, Timothy J; Guelfi, Kym J

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has shown that resistance and aerobic exercise have differing effects on perceived hunger and circulating levels of appetite-related hormones. However, the effect of resistance and aerobic exercise on actual energy intake has never been compared. This study investigated the effect of an acute bout of resistance exercise, compared with aerobic exercise, on subsequent energy intake and appetite-regulating hormones. Ten active men completed 3 trials in a counterbalanced design: 45 min of resistance exercise (RES; free and machine weights), aerobic exercise (AER; running), or a resting control trial (CON). Following exercise or CON, participants had access to a buffet-style array of breakfast foods and drinks to consume ad libitum. Plasma concentrations of a range of appetite-regulating hormones were measured throughout each trial. Despite significantly higher energy expenditure with AER compared with RES (p < 0.05), there was no difference in total energy intake from the postexercise meal between trials (p = 0.779). Pancreatic polypeptide was significantly higher prior to the meal after both RES and AER compared with CON. In contrast, active ghrelin was lower following RES compared with both CON and AER (p ≤ 0.05), while insulin was higher following RES compared with CON (p = 0.013). In summary, the differential response of appetite-regulating hormones to AER and RES does not appear to influence energy intake in the postexercise meal. However, given the greater energy expenditure associated with AER compared with RES, AER modes of exercise may be preferable for achieving short-term negative energy balance.

  1. Oral processing effort, appetite and acute energy intake in lean and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Richard D; Considine, Robert V

    2013-08-15

    Chewing reportedly contributes to satiation and satiety signals. Attempts to document and quantify this have led to small and inconsistent effects. The present trial manipulated oral processing effort though required chewing of gums of different hardness and measured appetitive sensations, energy intake, gastric emptying, GI transit time, and concentrations of glucose, insulin, GLP-1, ghrelin and pancreatic polypeptide. Sixty adults classified by sex and BMI (15 each of lean females, obese females, lean males and obese males) were tested in a randomized, controlled, cross-over trial with three arms. They chewed nothing, soft gum or hard gum for 15 min while sipping grape juice (10% of individual energy needs) containing acetaminophen and lactulose on one day each separated by 7 days. Electromyographic recordings and self-reports were obtained during and after chewing to quantify oral processing effort. Blood was sampled through an indwelling catheter and appetite ratings were obtained at baseline and at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min after chewing initiation. Breath samples were collected at 10 min intervals for the first 2h and at 30 min intervals for the next 2h. No effects of chewing were observed for appetitive sensations or gut peptide concentrations. Energy intake tended to decline in lean and increase in obese participants so that daily energy intake differed significantly between the two groups when chewing either gum, while no difference was observed on the non-chewing day. Serum glucose and insulin were significantly lower at selected time points 90-240 min after chewing compared to baseline and the non-chewing day. These data indicate chewing effort does not affect appetitive sensations or gut peptide secretion, but may exert a small differential effect on acute energy intake in lean and obese individuals and lead to greater post-prandial declines of serum glucose and insulin. The efficacy of gum chewing as a substitute for eating for weight

  2. Oral processing effort, appetite and acute energy intake in lean and obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Richard D.; Considine, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Chewing reportedly contributes to satiation and satiety signals. Attempts to document and quantify this have led to small and inconsistent effects. The present trial manipulated oral processing effort though required chewing of gums of different hardness and measured appetitive sensations, energy intake, gastric emptying, GI transit time, and concentrations of glucose, insulin, GLP-1, ghrelin and pancreatic polypeptide. Sixty adults classified by sex and BMI (15 each of lean females, obese females, lean males and obese males) were tested in a randomized, controlled, cross-over trial with three arms. They chewed nothing, soft gum or hard gum for 15 minutes while sipping grape juice (10% of individual energy needs) containing acetaminophen and lactulose on one day each separated by 7 days. Electromyographic recordings and self-reports were obtained during and after chewing to quantify oral processing effort. Blood was sampled through an indwelling catheter and appetite ratings were obtained at baseline and at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 minutes after chewing initiation. Breath samples were collected at 10 minute intervals for the first 2 hours and at 30 minute intervals for the next two hours. No effects of chewing were observed for appetitive sensations or gut peptide concentrations. Energy intake tended to decline in lean and increase in obese participants so that daily energy intake differed significantly between the two groups when chewing either gum, while no difference was observed on the non-chewing day. Serum glucose and insulin were significantly lower at selected time points 90-240 minutes after chewing compared to baseline and the non-chewing day. These data indicate chewing effort does not affect appetitive sensations or gut peptide secretion, but may exert a small differential effect on acute energy intake in lean and obese individuals and lead to greater post-prandial declines of serum glucose and insulin. The efficacy of gum chewing as a

  3. Acute ethanol exposure induces behavioural differences in two zebrafish (Danio rerio) strains: a time course analysis.

    PubMed

    Pannia, Emanuela; Tran, Steven; Rampersad, Mindy; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-02-01

    The zebrafish has been proposed as a model organism to study genetic effects influencing behaviour and also as a tool with which the mechanisms of the action of alcohol (ethanol or EtOH) in the vertebrate brain may be investigated. In the current study we exposed zebrafish from two genetically distinct strains (WIK and TU) to a computer animated image of a natural predator of this species, the Indian leaf fish. We measured the subjects' behavioural responses in the presence of different acute doses of alcohol (0.00, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00% vol/vol) using an observation based event-recording method. We found fish of both strains to exhibit an atypical predator inspection response during the presentation of the animated predator image coupled with a classical fear response, increased jumping frequency. We found numerous alcohol induced behavioural changes and more importantly also revealed alcohol induced strain dependent changes as well, including different dose-response trajectories for WIK vs. TU in predator inspection response, general swimming activity, location of swimming (top vs. bottom half of the tank) and freezing. The results suggest that zebrafish of the TU strain may be more tolerant at least to lower doses of alcohol as compared to WIK. The characterization of strain differences in zebrafish will aid the identification of possible molecular mechanisms involved in alcohol's actions in the vertebrate brain.

  4. The effect of dietary intake changes on nutritional status in acute leukaemia patients after first induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Malihi, Z; Kandiah, M; Chan, Y M; Esfandbod, M; Vakili, M; Hosseinzadeh, M; Zarif Yeganeh, M

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate how changes in dietary intake among acute lymphoblastic and acute myeloid leukaemia (ALL and AML) patients affect nutritional status after the first induction chemotherapy. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h recall and a 136-item food frequency questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed by Patients Subjective Global Assessment questionnaire before starting induction therapy and again after 1 month. All newly diagnosed acute leukaemia patients aged 15 years old and older who attended three referral hospitals for initiation of their induction chemotherapy were included in the sample selection provided that they gave informed consent. A total of 30 AML and 33 ALL patients participated in the study. Dietary intake and nutritional status worsened after the chemotherapy treatment. Dietary intake in terms of macronutrients, micronutrients, food variety and diet diversity score changed significantly after the induction chemotherapy. No significant relationship was found between the changes in dietary indices and nutritional status. Chemotherapy-related side effects as an additional factor to cancer itself could affect dietary intake of leukaemia patients. The effectiveness of an early assessment of nutritional status and dietary intake should be further investigated in order to deter further deterioration. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Reduced subjective response to acute ethanol administration among young men with a broad bipolar phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yip, Sarah W; Doherty, Joanne; Wakeley, Judi; Saunders, Kate; Tzagarakis, Charidimos; de Wit, Harriet; Goodwin, Guy M; Rogers, Robert D

    2012-07-01

    Elevated lifetime prevalence rates of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are a feature of bipolar disorder (BD). Individuals at-risk for AUDs exhibit blunted subjective responses to alcohol (low levels of response), which may represent a biomarker for AUDs. Thus, individuals at-risk for BD may exhibit low responses to alcohol. Participants were 20 unmedicated adult males who reported high rates of hypomanic experiences (bipolar phenotype participants; BPPs), aged 18 to 21 years, and 20 healthy controls matched on age, gender, IQ, BMI, and weekly alcohol intake. Subjective and pharmacokinetic responses to acute alcohol (0.8 g/kg) vs placebo administration were collected in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design. BPP participants reported significantly lower subjective intoxication effects ('feel high': F=14.2, p=0.001; 'feel effects': F=8.1, p=0.008) across time, but did not differ in their pharmacokinetic, stimulant, or sedative responses. Paradoxically, however, the BPP participants reported significantly higher expectations of the positive effects of alcohol than controls. Our results suggest that unmedicated young males with previous hypomanic experiences exhibit diminished subjective responses to alcohol. These blunted alcohol responses are not attributable to differences in weekly alcohol intake, pharmacokinetic effects (eg, absorption rates), or familial risk of AUDs. These observations suggest that the dampened intoxication may contribute to the increased rates of alcohol misuse in young people at-risk for BD, and suggest possible shared etiological factors in the development of AUDs and BD.

  6. Acute ethanol treatment prevents endocannabinoid-mediated long-lasting disinhibition of striatal output.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Rhona B C; Adermark, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that the neuronal circuit adaptations elicited by drugs of abuse share common features with traditional learning models, and that drugs of abuse cause long-term changes in behavior by altering synaptic function and plasticity. Especially, the endocannabinoid (eCB) system appears to be involved in the neuronal circuitry regulating ethanol (EtOH) preference in rodent. The aim of this study was to evaluate if acute EtOH exposure could modulate eCB-mediated plasticity in the dorsolateral striatum. Our data show that EtOH (20-50 mM) prevents eCB-mediated long-lasting disinhibition (DLL) of striatal output induced by a single stimulation train delivered at 5 Hz for 60 s, and reduces long-term depression (LTD) induced by low-frequency stimulation at inhibitory synapses. Acute EtOH-treatment also prevents DLL induced by the L-type calcium channel activator 2,5-dimethyl-4-[2-(phenylmethyl)benzoyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylic acid methylester (FPL64176; 500 nM), or by the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB(1)R) agonist WIN55,212-2 (300 nM), indicating that EtOH affects eCB-signaling at a stage that is downstream from eCB production and release. Importantly, high-frequency stimulation, or a higher concentration of WIN55,212-2 (1 muM), induces EtOH-insensitive depression of striatal output, suggesting that EtOH affects CB(1)R-mediated signaling in a synapse-specific manner. Maintaining the balance between excitation and inhibition is vital for neuronal networks, and EtOH-mediated modulation of eCB-signaling might thus affect the stability and the fine-tuning of neuronal circuits in the striatum. Our data suggest that changes in eCB-signaling could be involved in the physiological response to acute alcohol intoxication. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EFFECT OF THE SELECTIVE NMDA NR2B ANTAGONIST, IFENPRODIL, ON ACUTE TOLERANCE TO ETHANOL-INDUCED MOTOR IMPAIRMENT IN ADOLESCENT AND ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, R. Liane; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent rats have been observed to be less sensitive than adults to a number of acute ethanol effects, including ethanol-induced motor impairment. These adolescent insensitivities may be related in part to the more rapid emergence of within session (acute) tolerance in adolescents than adults. Adolescent-related alterations in neural systems that serve as ethanol target sites, including changes in NMDA receptor subunit expression, may influence the responsiveness of adolescents to acute ethanol effects. The present study explored the role of NMDA NR2B receptors in the development of acute tolerance to ethanol-induced motor impairment in male adolescent (postnatal day [P]28–30), and adult (P68-70) Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Motor impairing effects of ethanol on the stationary inclined plane and blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) were examined following challenge at each age with a functionally equivalent ethanol dose (adolescents: 2.25 g/kg; adults: 1.5 g/kg). Data were collected at two post-injection intervals (10 or 60 min) to compare rate of recovery from ethanol intoxication with BEC declines using the Radlow approach (Radlow, 1994) and changes in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time for assessing acute tolerance. Results Both vehicle-treated adolescent and adult animals showed similar acute tolerance development to the motor-impairing effects of ethanol at these functionally equivalent doses on the stationary inclined plane, as indexed by an increasing time-dependent dissociation between BECs and ethanol-induced motor impairment, with motor impairment declining faster than BECs, as well as by significant declines in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time. Acute tolerance development was reliably blocked by administration of the NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, (5.0 mg/kg), in adult rats, whereas adolescents were affected by a higher dose (10.0 mg/kg). Conclusions These data support the suggestion that alterations in NMDA receptor systems

  8. The cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, β-caryophyllene, reduced voluntary alcohol intake and attenuated ethanol-induced place preference and sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Al Mansouri, Shamma; Ojha, Shreesh; Al Maamari, Elyazia; Al Ameri, Mouza; Nurulain, Syed M; Bahi, Amine

    2014-09-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that brain CB2 cannabinoid receptors play a major role in alcohol reward. In fact, the implication of cannabinoid neurotransmission in the reinforcing effects of ethanol (EtOH) is becoming increasingly evident. The CB2 receptor agonist, β-caryophyllene (BCP) was used to investigate the role of the CB2 receptors in mediating alcohol intake and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (EtOH-CPP) and sensitivity in mice. The effect of BCP on alcohol intake was evaluated using the standard two-bottle choice drinking method. The mice were presented with increasing EtOH concentrations and its consumption was measured daily. Consumption of saccharin and quinine solutions was measured following the EtOH preference tests. Finally, the effect of BCP on alcohol reward and sensitivity was tested using an unbiased EtOH-CPP and loss of righting-reflex (LORR) procedures, respectively. BCP dose-dependently decreased alcohol consumption and preference. Additionally, BCP-injected mice did not show any difference from vehicle mice in total fluid intake in a 24-hour paradigm nor in their intake of graded concentrations of saccharin or quinine, suggesting that the CB2 receptor activation did not alter taste function. More importantly, BCP inhibited EtOH-CPP acquisition and exacerbated LORR duration. Interestingly, these effects were abrogated when mice were pre-injected with a selective CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630. Overall, the CB2 receptor system appears to be involved in alcohol dependence and sensitivity and may represent a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of alcoholism.

  9. Influences of acute ethanol exposure on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae under different illumination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Lin, Jia; Peng, Xiaolan; Chen, Haojun; Zhang, Yinglan; Liu, Xiuyun; Li, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Larval zebrafish present unique opportunities to study the behavioral responses of a model organism to environmental challenges during early developmental stages. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the locomotor activities of AB strain zebrafish larvae at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) in response to light changes under the influence of ethanol, and to explore potential neurological mechanisms that are involved in ethanol intoxication. AB strain zebrafish larvae at both 5 and 7 dpf were treated with ethanol at 0% (control), 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (v/v%). The locomotor activities of the larvae during alternating light-dark challenges, as well as the locomotor responses immediately following the light transitions, were investigated. The levels of various neurotransmitters were also measured in selected ethanol-treated groups. The larvae at 5 and 7 dpf demonstrated similar patterns of locomotor responses to ethanol treatment. Ethanol treatment at 1% increased the swimming distances of the zebrafish larvae in the dark periods, but had no effect on the swimming distances in the light periods. In contrast, ethanol treatment at 2% increased the swimming distances in the light periods, but did not potentiate the swimming activity in the dark periods, compared to controls. Differences in the levels of neurotransmitters that are involved in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin pathways were also observed in groups with different ethanol treatments. These results indicated the behavioral studies concerning the ethanol effects on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae could be carried out as early as 5 dpf. The 1% and 2% ethanol-treated zebrafish larvae modeled ethanol effects at different intoxication states, and the differences in neurotransmitter levels suggested the involvement of various neurotransmitter pathways in different ethanol intoxication states.

  10. Chronic ethanol intake modifies pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes under resting and K+ -stimulated conditions: role of calcium.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García-López, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2008-07-04

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase (Pcp) is an omega peptidase that removes pyroglutamyl N-terminal residues of peptides such as thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), which is one of the neuropeptides that has been localized into many areas of the brain and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator of several parameters related to ethanol (EtOH) consumption. In this study, we analysed the effects of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity on mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and their corresponding supernatant under basal and K+ -stimulated conditions, in presence and absence of calcium (Ca2+) to know the regulation of Pcp on TRH. In basal conditions, chronic EtOH intake significantly decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+. However, supernatant Pcp activity is also decreased in presence and absence of calcium. Under K+-stimulated conditions, chronic EtOH intake decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+, whereas supernatant Pcp activity was significantly decreased only in presence of Ca2+. The general inhibitory effect of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity suggests an inhibition of TRH metabolism and an enhancement of TRH neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions, which could be related to putative processes of tolerance to EtOH in which TRH has been involved. Our data may also indicate that active peptides and their degrading peptidases are released together to the synaptic cleft to regulate the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions of these peptides, through a Ca2+ -dependent mechanism.

  11. Frontline Science: ATF3 is responsible for the inhibition of TNF-α release and the impaired migration of acute ethanol-exposed monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaojie; Meng, Xiaoming; Huang, Cheng; Shen, Chenlin; Li, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Binge drinking represses host innate immunity and leads to a high risk of infection. Acute EtOH-pretreated macrophages exhibit a decreased production of proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS. ATF3 is induced and counter-regulates the LPS/TLR4 inflammatory cascade. Here, we investigated the potential role of ATF3 in LPS tolerance in acute ethanol-pretreated macrophages. We found that there was an inverse correlation between ATF3 and LPS-induced TNF-α production in acute ethanol-pretreated murine monocytes and macrophages. The knockdown of ATF3 attenuated the inhibitory effects of acute ethanol treatment on LPS-induced TNF-α production. Furthermore, ChIP assays and co-IP demonstrated that ATF3, together with HDAC1, negatively modulated the transcription of TNF-α. In binge-drinking mice challenged with LPS, an up-regulation of ATF3 and HDAC1 and a concomitant decrease in TNF-α were observed. Given that HDAC1 was concomitantly induced in acute ethanol-exposed monocytes and macrophages, we used the HDACi TSA or silenced HDAC1 to explore the role of HDAC1 in acute ethanol-treated macrophages. Our results revealed that TSA treatment and HDAC1 knockdown prevented acute ethanol-induced ATF3 expression and the inhibition of TNF-α transcription. These data indicated a dual role for HDAC1 in acute ethanol-induced LPS tolerance. Furthermore, we showed that the induction of ATF3 led to the impaired migration of BM monocytes and macrophages. Overall, we present a novel role for ATF3 in the inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α and in the impairment of monocyte and macrophage migration. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  12. Severe Hypernatremia Caused by Acute Exogenous Salt Intake Combined with Primary Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo Jin; Park, Su Min; Park, Jong Man; Rhee, Harin; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Seong, Eun Young; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a case of severe hypernatremia with a serum sodium concentration of 188.1mmol/L caused by exogenous salt intake. A 26-year-old man diagnosed with Crohn's disease 5 years previously visited our clinic due to generalized edema and personality changes, with aggressive behavior. He had compulsively consumed salts, ingesting approximately 154 g of salt over the last 4 days. Despite careful fluid management that included not only hypotonic fluid therapy for 8 hours but also hypertonic saline administration, his serum sodium level decreased sharply at 40.6 mmol/L; however, it returned to normal within 72-hour of treatment without any neurological deficits. Primary hypothyroidism was also diagnosed. He was discharged after 9 days from admission, with a stable serum sodium level. We have described the possibility of successful treatment in a patient with hypernatremia caused by acute salt intoxication without sustained hypotonic fluid therapy. PMID:28275385

  13. Desipramine potentiation of the acute depressant effects of ethanol: Modulation by α2-adrenoreceptors and stress

    PubMed Central

    Boyce-Rustay, Janel M.; Palachick, Benjamin; Hefner, Kathryn; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Millstein, Rachel A.; Harvey-White, Judith; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol exerts effects on the brain noradrenergic system, and these are thought to contribute to the sedative/hypnotic (depressant) effects of ethanol. Recent studies suggest that the norepinephrine transporter (NET) plays an important role in modulating ethanol's depressant effects. The aim of the present study was to further characterize this role. Transporter blockers with varying affinity for NET versus the serotonin transporter (desipramine > fluoxetine > citalopram) were tested for their ability to alter ethanol's depressant effects, and for comparison, hypothermic effects. Effects of desipramine on another depressant, pentobarbital, were examined. Desipramine potentiation of ethanol's depressant effects was assessed following depletion of brain norepinephrine via N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4) treatment, or depletion of brain 5-HT via para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA) treatment. The effects of co-administration of either the selective α2-adrenoreceptor agonist (dexmedetomidine) or the selective α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist (atipamezole) on desipramine's effect on ethanol's depressant effects were examined. Given the close link between stress, ethanol and norepinephrine, desipramine potentiation of ethanol's depressant effects was tested following repeated forced swim stress. Results showed that desipramine, but not SERT-selective doses of citalopram or fluoxetine, strongly potentiated the depressant (not hypothermic) effects of ethanol. These effects were mimicked by dexmedetomidine and blocked by atipamezole, but not by depletion of either norepinephrine or 5-HT. Desipramine potentiation of ethanol's depressant effects was abolished following repeated stress. Present findings further support a major role for NET and the α2-adrenoreceptor in modulating the depressant effects of ethanol, with possible implications for understanding the role of noradrenergic dysfunction in stress

  14. Desipramine potentiation of the acute depressant effects of ethanol: modulation by alpha2-adrenoreceptors and stress.

    PubMed

    Boyce-Rustay, Janel M; Palachick, Benjamin; Hefner, Kathryn; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Millstein, Rachel A; Harvey-White, Judith; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Ethanol exerts effects on the brain noradrenergic system, and these are thought to contribute to the sedative/hypnotic (depressant) effects of ethanol. Recent studies suggest that the norepinephrine transporter (NET) plays an important role in modulating ethanol's depressant effects. The aim of the present study was to further characterize this role. Transporter blockers with varying affinity for NET versus the serotonin transporter (desipramine>fluoxetine>citalopram) were tested for their ability to alter ethanol's depressant effects, and for comparison, hypothermic effects. Effects of desipramine on another depressant, pentobarbital, were examined. Desipramine potentiation of ethanol's depressant effects was assessed following depletion of brain norepinephrine via N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4) treatment, or depletion of brain 5-HT via para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA) treatment. The effects of co-administration of either the selective alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist (dexmedetomidine) or the selective alpha2-adrenoreceptor antagonist (atipamezole) on desipramine's effect on ethanol's depressant effects were examined. Given the close link between stress, ethanol and norepinephrine, desipramine potentiation of ethanol's depressant effects was tested following repeated forced swim stress. Results showed that desipramine, but not SERT-selective doses of citalopram or fluoxetine, strongly potentiated the depressant (not hypothermic) effects of ethanol. These effects were mimicked by dexmedetomidine and blocked by atipamezole, but not by depletion of either norepinephrine or 5-HT. Desipramine potentiation of ethanol's depressant effects was abolished following repeated stress. Present findings further support a major role for NET and the alpha2-adrenoreceptor in modulating the depressant effects of ethanol, with possible implications for understanding the role of noradrenergic dysfunction in stress

  15. Glutathione Depletion and Recovery After Acute Ethanol Administration in the Aging Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Barbara L.; Richie, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in the detoxification of ethanol (EtOH) and acute EtOH administration leads to GSH depletion in the liver and other tissues. Aging is also associated with a progressive decline in GSH levels and impairment in GSH biosynthesis in many tissues. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the effects of aging on EtOH-induced depletion and recovery of GSH in different tissues of the C57Bl/6NNIA mouse. EtOH (2-5 g/kg) or saline was administered i.p. to mice of ages 6 mo (young), 12 mo (mature), and 24 mo (old); and GSH and cyst(e)ine concentrations were measured 0-24 hours thereafter. EtOH administration (5g/kg) depleted hepatic GSH levels >50% by 6 hr in all animals. By 24 hr, levels remained low in both young and old mice, but recovered to baseline levels in mature mice. At 6 hr, the decrease in hepatic GSH was dose-dependent up to 3 g/kg EtOH, but not at higher doses. The extent of depletion at the 3 g/kg dose was dependent upon age, with old mice demonstrating significantly lower GSH levels than mature mice (P<0.001). Altogether these results indicate that aging was associated with a greater degree of EtOH and fasting-induced GSH depletion and subsequent impaired recovery in liver. An impaired ability to recover was also observed in young animals. Further studies are required to determine if an inability to recover from GSH depletion by EtOH is associated with enhanced toxicity. PMID:17343832

  16. Acute ethanol alters multiple histone modifications at model gene promoters in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Finegersh, Andrey; Homanics, Gregg E

    2014-07-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure alters gene expression in the cerebral cortex (CCx); however, mechanisms of EtOH-induced gene regulation are not well understood. We hypothesized that EtOH regulates gene expression by differentially altering histone modifications at gene promoters that are up- and down-regulated by EtOH. Such epigenetic mechanisms may ultimately contribute to EtOH-induced neuro-adaptations that underlie tolerance, dependence, and EtOH-use disorders. Eight-week-old, male C57BL/6J mice were treated with 3 g/kg EtOH (intraperitoneally) or saline and sacrificed 6 hours after injection; the CCx and hippocampus (HC) were immediately removed and flash frozen. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to study the association of model gene promoters with histone modifications. Western blot was used to detect global changes in the histone modifications studied. We also used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array to identify changes in expression of chromatin-modifying enzymes. In CCx, acute EtOH decreased expression of Gad1, Hdac2, and Hdac11, which was associated with decreased histone acetylation at the Gad1 and Hdac2 promoters; we also identified increased expression of Mt1, Mt2, Egr1, which was associated with increased H3K4me3 levels at the Mt2 promoter and decreased H3K27me3 levels at the Mt1 promoter. We identified an increase in global levels of H3K4me3 in CCx as well as a global increase in H3K9ac and H3K14ac in HC. The PCR array identified decreased expression of Csrp2 bp, Hdac2, and Hdac11 as well as increased expression of Kat2b in CCx. Acute EtOH induces chromatin remodeling at model up- and down-regulated genes in CCx. Different patterns of histone modifications at these gene promoters indicate that EtOH may be acting through multiple histone-modifying enzymes to alter gene expression; in particular, differential expression of Kat2b, Hdac2, Hdac11, and Csrp2 bp in CCx may mediate EtOH-induced chromatin remodeling. Additional studies are necessary to

  17. Changes in sleep, food intake, and activity levels during acute painful episodes in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Miaskowski, Christine; Savedra, Marilyn; Beyer, Judith E; Treadwell, Marsha; Styles, Lori

    2006-02-01

    As part of a larger study that examined pain experience, pain management, and pain outcomes among children with sickle cell disease, functional status (sleep, food intake, and activity levels) was examined during hospitalization for acute painful episodes. Children were asked to rate the amount of pain they experienced as well as the amount of time they slept, the amount of food they ate, and the amount of activity they had everyday. Children reported high levels of pain, which showed only a small decrease throughout hospitalization, and had disrupted sleep and wake patterns, decreased food intake, and decreased activity levels. Nurses need to routinely monitor functional status during acute painful episodes so that strategies to promote adequate sleep, food intake, and activity may be incorporated to minimize long-term negative outcomes in children with sickle cell disease.

  18. Developmental differences in EEG and sleep responses to acute ethanol administration and its withdrawal (hangover) in adolescent and adult Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N

    2013-12-01

    Age-related differences in sensitivity to the acute effects of alcohol may play an important role in the increased risk for the development of alcoholism seen in teens that begin drinking at an early age. The present study evaluated the acute and protracted (hangover) effects of ethanol in adolescent (P33-P40) and adult (P100-P107) Wistar rats, using the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). Six minutes of EEG was recorded during waking, 15 min after administration of 0, 1.5, or 3.0 g/kg ethanol, and for 3 h at 20 h post ethanol, during the rats' next sleep cycle. Significantly higher overall frontal and parietal cortical power was seen in a wide range of EEG frequencies in adolescent rats as compared to adult rats in their waking EEG. Acute administration of ethanol did not produce differences between adolescents and adults on behavioral measures of acute intoxication. However, it did produce a significantly less intense acute EEG response to ethanol in the theta frequencies in parietal cortex in the adolescents as compared to the adults. At 20 h following acute ethanol administration, during the rats' next sleep cycle, a decrease in slow-wave frequencies (1-4 Hz) was seen and the adolescent rats were found to display more reduction in the slow-wave frequencies than the adults did. The present study found that adolescent rats, as compared to adults, demonstrate low sensitivity to acute ethanol administration in the theta frequencies and more susceptibility to disruption of slow-wave sleep during hangover. These studies may lend support to the idea that these traits may contribute to increased risk for alcohol use disorders seen in adults who begin drinking in their early teenage years.

  19. Protein-enriched 'regular products' and their effect on protein intake in acute hospitalized older adults; a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stelten, S; Dekker, I M; Ronday, E M; Thijs, A; Boelsma, E; Peppelenbos, H W; de van der Schueren, M A E

    2015-06-01

    Especially in older adults, maintaining muscle mass is essential to perform activities of daily living. This requires a sufficient protein intake. However, protein intake in hospitalized older adults is often insufficient. Thus far different nutrition intervention strategies have failed to show success in reaching sufficient protein intake in hospitalized older adults. The effect of recently developed protein-enriched bread and drinking yoghurt on protein intake is still unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the effect of protein-enriched bread and drinking yoghurt on the protein intake of acute hospitalized older adults (≥55 years). This study was performed as a single blind randomized controlled trial in 47 hospitalized elderly acutely admitted to a university hospital. During three consecutive days participants received either ad libitum protein-enriched bread and drinking yoghurt or normal, non-enriched products as part of their daily meals. The protein-enriched bread contained 6.9 g of protein per serving and the normal bread 3.8 g of protein. For drinking yoghurt this was 20.0 g and 7.5 g of protein per serving respectively. The products were almost isocaloric. Food intake of participants was measured and nutritional values were calculated according to the Dutch Food Composition Table. An independent sample t-test was used to compare protein intake between the intervention and control group. Analyses illustrate a protein intake in the intervention group of 75.0 ± 33.2 g per day versus 58.4 ± 14.5 g in the control group (p = 0.039). Intervention patients had a mean protein intake of 1.1 g/kg/day, with 36% of the patients reaching the minimum requirement of 1.2 g/kg/day; in control patients this was 0.9 g/kg/day (p = 0.041) and 8% (p = 0.030). Bread and drinking yoghurt contributed almost equally to the increased intake of protein in the intervention group. The use of protein-enriched bread and drinking yoghurt, consumed as part of

  20. Plasma and Urinary Phenolic Profiles after Acute and Repetitive Intake of Wild Blueberry.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Rodrigo P; Istas, Geoffrey; Heiss, Christian; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana

    2016-08-25

    Recent studies have shown that blueberries may have cardiovascular and cognitive health benefits. In this work, we investigated the profile of plasma and urine (poly)phenol metabolites after acute and daily consumption of wild blueberries for 30 days in 18 healthy men. The inter-individual variability in plasma and urinary polyphenol levels was also investigated. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 2 h post-consumption on day 1 and day 30. Twenty-four-hour urine was also collected on both days. A total of 61 phenolic metabolites were quantified in plasma at baseline, of which 43 increased after acute or chronic consumption of blueberries over one month. Benzoic and catechol derivatives represented more than 80% of the changes in phenolic profile after 2 h consumption on day 1, whereas hippuric and benzoic derivatives were the major compounds that increased at 0 and 2 h on day 30, respectively. The total (poly)phenol urinary excretion remained unchanged after 30 days of wild blueberry intake. The inter-individual variability ranged between 40%-48% in plasma and 47%-54% in urine. Taken together, our results illustrate that blueberry (poly)phenols are absorbed and extensively metabolized by phase II enzymes and by the gut microbiota, leading to a whole array of metabolites that may be responsible for the beneficial effects observed after blueberry consumption.

  1. Cannabidiol reduces ethanol consumption, motivation and relapse in mice.

    PubMed

    Viudez-Martínez, Adrián; García-Gutiérrez, María S; Navarrón, Carmen María; Morales-Calero, María Isabel; Navarrete, Francisco; Torres-Suárez, Ana Isabel; Manzanares, Jorge

    2017-02-13

    This study evaluated the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on ethanol reinforcement, motivation and relapse in C57BL/6 J mice. The effects of CBD (60 mg/kg, i.p.) on blood ethanol concentration, hypothermia and handling-induced convulsions associated to acute ethanol administration were evaluated. The two-bottle choice paradigm was performed to assess the effects of CBD (30, 60 and 120 mg/kg/day, i.p.) on ethanol intake and preference. In addition, an oral ethanol self-administration experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of CBD [a single s.c. administration of a microparticle formulation providing CBD continuous controlled release (30 mg/kg/day)] on the reinforcement and motivation for ethanol. The effects of CBD (60 and 120 mg/kg/day, i.p.) on ethanol-induced relapse were also evaluated. Gene expression analyses of tyrosine hydroxylase in ventral tegmental area and μ-opioid (Oprm1), cannabinoid (CB1 r and CB2 r) and GPR55 receptors in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) were carried out by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cannabidiol reduced the ethanol-induced hypothermia and handling-induced convulsion but failed to modify blood ethanol concentration. CBD reduced ethanol consumption and preference in the two-bottle choice, significantly decreased ethanol intake and the number of effective responses in the oral ethanol self-administration, and reduced ethanol-induced relapse. Furthermore, the administration of CBD significantly reduced relative gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area, Oprm1, CB1 r and GPR55 in the NAcc and significantly increased CB2 r in the NAcc. Taken together, these results reveal that the administration of CBD reduced the reinforcing properties, motivation and relapse for ethanol. These findings strongly suggest that CBD may result useful for the treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  2. Acute Ethanol Increases IGF-I-Induced Phosphorylation of ERKs by Enhancing Recruitment of p52-Shc to the Grb2/Shc Complex.

    PubMed

    Dean, Matthew; Lassak, Adam; Wilk, Anna; Zapata, Adriana; Marrero, Luis; Molina, Patricia; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Ethanol plays a detrimental role in the development of the brain. Multiple studies have shown that ethanol inhibits insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) function. Because the IGF-IR contributes to brain development by supporting neural growth, survival, and differentiation, we sought to determine the molecular mechanism(s) involved in ethanol's effects on this membrane-associated tyrosine kinase. Using multiple neuronal cell types, we performed Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and GST-pulldowns following acute (1-24 h) or chronic (3 weeks) treatment with ethanol. Surprisingly, exposure of multiple neuronal cell types to acute (up to 24 h) ethanol (50 mM) enhanced IGF-I-induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs), without affecting IGF-IR tyrosine phosphorylation itself, or Akt phosphorylation. This acute increase in ERKs phosphorylation was followed by the expected inhibition of the IGF-IR signaling following 3-week ethanol exposure. We then expressed a GFP-tagged IGF-IR construct in PC12 cells and used them to perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Using these fluorescently labeled cells, we determined that 50 mM ethanol decreased the half-time of the IGF-IR-associated FRAP, which implied that cell membrane-associated signaling events could be affected. Indeed, co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pulldown studies demonstrated that the acute ethanol exposure increased the recruitment of p52-Shc to the Grb2-Shc complex, which is known to engage the Ras-Raf-ERKs pathway following IGF-1 stimulation. These experiments indicate that even a short and low-dose exposure to ethanol may dysregulate function of the receptor, which plays a critical role in brain development. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1275-1286, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?—An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0–35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis. PMID:22577377

  4. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?-An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0-35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis.

  5. Determination of fatty acid ethyl esters in dried blood spots by LC-MS/MS as markers for ethanol intake: application in a drinking study.

    PubMed

    Luginbühl, Marc; Schröck, Alexandra; König, Stefan; Schürch, Stefan; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The forensic utility of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in dried blood spots (DBS) as short-term confirmatory markers for ethanol intake was examined. An LC-MS/MS method for the determination of FAEEs in DBS was developed and validated to investigate FAEE formation and elimination in a drinking study, whereby eight subjects ingested 0.66-0.84 g/kg alcohol to reach blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0.8 g/kg. Blood was taken every 1.5-2 h, BAC was determined, and dried blood spots were prepared, with 50 μL of blood, for the determination of FAEEs. Lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) were between 15 and 37 ng/mL for the four major FAEEs. Validation data are presented in detail. In the drinking study, ethyl palmitate and ethyl oleate proved to be the two most suitable markers for FAEE determination. Maximum FAEE concentrations were reached in samples taken 2 or 4 h after the start of drinking. The following mean peak concentrations (c̅(max)) were reached: ethyl myristate 14 ± 4 ng/mL, ethyl palmitate 144 ± 35 ng/mL, ethyl oleate 125 ± 55 ng/mL, ethyl stearate 71 ± 21 ng/mL, total FAEEs 344 ± 91 ng/mL. Detectability of FAEEs was found to be on the same time scale as BAC. In liquid blood samples containing ethanol, FAEE concentrations increase post-sampling. This study shows that the use of DBS fixation prevents additional FAEE formation in blood samples containing ethanol. Positive FAEE results obtained by DBS analysis can be used as evidence for the presence of ethanol in the original blood sample.

  6. Isolation stress and chronic mild stress induced immobility in the defensive burying behavior and a transient increased ethanol intake in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-León, Priscila; Martínez-Mota, Lucía; Quevedo-Corona, Lucía; Miranda-Páez, Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Stress can be experienced with or without adverse effects, of which anxiety and depression are two of the most important due to the frequent comorbidity with alcohol abuse in humans. Historically, stress has been considered a cause of drug use, particularly alcohol abuse due to its anxiolytic effects. In the present work we exposed male Wistar rats to two different stress conditions: single housing (social isolation, SI), and chronic mild stress (CMS). We compared both stressed groups to group-housed rats and rats without CMS (GH) to allow the determination of a clear behavioral response profile related to their respective endocrine stress response and alcohol intake pattern. We found that SI and CMS, to a greater extent, induced short-lasting increased sucrose consumption, a transient increase in serum corticosterone level, high latency/immobility, and low burying behavior in the defensive burying behavior (DBB) test, and a transient increase in alcohol intake. Thus, the main conclusion was that stress caused by both SI and CMS induced immobility in the DBB test and, subsequently, induced a transient increased voluntary ethanol intake in Wistar rats with a free-choice home-cage drinking paradigm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing the α4 subunit are critical for the nicotine-induced reduction of acute voluntary ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Linzy M; Gardner, Paul; Tapper, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of the smoking cessation drug varenicline, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist, in its ability to decrease voluntary ethanol intake in mice. Previous to our study, other labs had shown that this drug can decrease ethanol consumption and seeking in rat models of ethanol intake. Although varenicline was designed to be a high affinity partial agonist of nAChRs containing the α4 and β2 subunits (designated as α4β2*), at higher concentrations it can also act upon α3β2*, α6*, α3β4* and α7 nAChRs. Therefore, to further elucidate the nAChR subtype responsible for varenicline-induced reduction of ethanol consumption, we utilized a pharmacological approach in combination with two complimentary nAChR genetic mouse models, a knock-out line that does not express the α4 subunit (α4 KO) and another line that expresses α4* nAChRs hypersensitive to agonist (the Leu9'Ala line). We found that activation of α4* nAChRs was necessary and sufficient for varenicline-induced reduction of alcohol consumption. Consistent with this result, here we show that a more efficacious nAChR agonist, nicotine, also decreased voluntary ethanol intake, and that α4* nAChRs are critical for this reduction.

  8. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist varenicline increases the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of acute ethanol administration in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamens, Helen M.; Andersen, Jimena; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The costs associated with alcohol abuse are staggering, therefore much effort has been put into developing new pharmacological strategies to decrease alcohol abuse. Recently, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist varenicline has been shown to decrease ethanol consumption in both humans and animal models. Methods We examined the effects of varenicline on the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol. First, varenicline was administered prior to placement in a locomotor activity chamber to determine if varenicline influenced baseline locomotor activity. To determine the effect of nicotinic modulation on ethanol-induced motor incoordination, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to an acute ethanol injection and then mice were tested on the balance beam, dowel test or fixed-speed rotarod. To examine ethanol's sedative-hypnotic effects, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to 4 g/kg ethanol and the duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR) was measured. Results Varenicline markedly reduced baseline locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice. Varenicline increased ethanol-induced ataxia when measured on the balance beam and dowel test, but had no effect when measured on the fixed-speed rotarod. Pretreatment with varenicline increased the duration of LORR. Conclusions These data provide evidence that nAChRs may be involved in the ataxic and sedative effects of ethanol. It is possible that one mechanism which could contribute to the ability of varenicline to decrease ethanol consumption may be through increasing negative behavioral effects of alcohol. PMID:20946306

  9. Ethanol preexposure increases ethanol self-administration in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice.

    PubMed

    Camarini, Rosana; Hodge, Clyde W

    2004-12-01

    Genetic variables are thought to interact with environmental factors, such as alcohol exposure history, to produce individual differences in alcohol abuse and alcoholism. The objective of this study was to test the potential interaction between genetic predisposition to consume alcohol and alcohol pretreatment on subsequent self-administration. To accomplish this goal, four groups of mice from the ethanol-avoiding DBA/2J (D2) and ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) inbred strains were exposed to saline, acute ethanol (2 g/kg), or chronic intermittent ethanol (1 or 2 g/kg) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections. Locomotor activity was monitored after each injection. After preexposure, animals were given a two-bottle choice test with various concentrations of ethanol/sucrose vs. sucrose or ethanol vs. water for 4 days at each concentration. Then, all animals were challenged with a 2.0 g/kg ethanol i.p. injection and locomotor activity was assessed. Acute and chronic ethanol pretreatment increased locomotor activity in response to a challenge dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) in D2 mice but had no effect on B6 mice. Prior exposure to ethanol altered the amount of ethanol consumed in a mouse strain-dependent manner. D2 mice showed a positive relationship between ethanol intake and dose or duration of ethanol preexposure. B6 mice preexposed to ethanol consumed more ethanol than naive animals, independent of dose or duration of exposure. During the last phase of self-administration testing, D2 mice exposed to chronic ethanol (2 g/kg) consumed as much ethanol as B6 from the same pretreatment condition. After a history of ethanol self-administration, saline control mice from the D2 strain showed equal locomotor activation as compared to D2 mice that were pretreated with ethanol injections. B6 mice showed no change in locomotor activity after ethanol self-administration or injection. These results demonstrate that genetic predisposition to avoid alcohol (D2 mice) can be modified by a

  10. Sex differences in sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol and social drinking during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Truxell, Eric M; Spear, Linda P

    2015-04-01

    In human adolescents, sociable males frequently drink to enhance positive emotional states, whereas anxious females often drink to avoid negative affective states. This study used a rat model of adolescence to provide information regarding possible sex differences in contributors to social drinking. The effects of ethanol (0, 0.5, and 0.75g/kg) on play fighting and social preference were assessed on P30, P32, and P34 using a within-subject design. Then animals were tested in a social drinking paradigm (P37-P40), with this testing revealing high drinkers and low drinkers. Sex differences in sensitivity to ethanol emerged among high and low drinkers. High socially drinking males, but not females, when tested prior to drinking sessions, showed significant increases in play fighting at both doses. In low drinking males, play fighting was increased by 0.5g/kg ethanol, whereas the higher dose of 0.75g/kg produced significant decreases in play fighting. High drinking females initially showed low levels of social preference than high drinking males and low drinking females and were extremely sensitive to ethanol-induced enhancement of this social measure. Low social drinkers, both males and females, were more sensitive to the suppressing effects of ethanol on social preference following 0.75g/kg ethanol. These findings indicate that during adolescence enhanced sensitivity to the facilitating effects of ethanol on play fighting is associated with heavy drinking among males, whereas low social preference together with high sensitivity to ethanol-induced enhancement of social preference is related to high social drinking in females.

  11. Sex differences in sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol and social drinking during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Truxell, Eric M.; Spear, Linda P.

    2015-01-01

    In human adolescents, sociable males frequently drink to enhance positive emotional states, whereas anxious females often drink to avoid negative affective states. This study used a rat model of adolescence to provide information regarding possible sex differences in contributors to social drinking. The effects of ethanol (0, 0.5, and 0.75 g/kg) on play fighting and social preference were assessed on P30, P32, and P34 using a within-subject design. Then animals were tested in a social drinking paradigm (P37-P40), with this testing revealing high drinkers and low drinkers. Sex differences in sensitivity to ethanol emerged among high and low drinkers. High socially drinking males, but not females, when tested prior to drinking sessions, showed significant increases in play fighting at both doses. In low drinking males, play fighting was increased by 0.5 g/kg ethanol, whereas the higher dose of 0.75 g/kg produced significant decreases in play fighting. High drinking females initially showed low levels of social preference than high drinking males and low drinking females and were extremely sensitive to ethanol-induced enhancement of this social measure. Low social drinkers, both males and females, were more sensitive to the suppressing effects of ethanol on social preference following 0.75 g/kg ethanol. These findings indicate that during adolescence enhanced sensitivity to the facilitating effects of ethanol on play fighting is associated with heavy drinking among males, whereas low social preference together with high sensitivity to ethanol-induced enhancement of social preference is related to high social drinking in females. PMID:25557799

  12. Probing the modulation of acute ethanol intoxication by pharmacological manipulation of the NMDAR glycine coagonist site

    PubMed Central

    Debrouse, Lauren; Hurd, Benita; Kiselycznyk, Carly; Plitt, Aaron; Todaro, Alyssa; Mishina, Masayoshi; Grant, Seth; Camp, Marguerite; Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Holmes, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Stimulating the glycineB binding site on the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) has been proposed as a novel mechanism for modulating behavioral effects of ethanol (EtOH) that are mediated via the NMDAR, including acute intoxication. Here, we pharmacologically interrogated this hypothesis in mice. METHODS Effects of systemic injection of the glycineB agonist, D-serine, the GlyT-1 glycine transporter inhibitor, ALX-5407, and the glycineB antagonist, L-701,324, were tested for effects on EtOH-induced ataxia, hypothermia, loss of righting reflex duration (LORR) in C57BL/6J (B6) and 129S1/SvImJ (S1) inbred mice. Effects of the glycineB partial agonist, D-cycloserine, the GlyT-1 inhibitor, NFPS, and the glycineB antagonist, DCKA, on EtOH-induced LORR duration were also tested. Interaction effects on EtOH-induced LORR duration were examined via combined treatment with D-serine and ALX-5407, D-serine and MK-801, D-serine and L-701,324, as well as L-701,324 and ALX-5407, in B6 mice, as D-serine in GluN2A and PSD-95 KO mice. The effect of dietary depletion of Magnesium (Mg), an element which interacts the glycineB site, was also tested. RESULTS Neither D-serine, D-cycloserine, ALX-5407, nor NFPS significantly affected EtOH intoxication on any of the measures or strains studied. L-701,324, but not DCKA, dose-dependently potentiated the ataxia-inducing effects of EtOH and increased EtOH-induced (but not pentobarbital-induced) LORR duration. D-serine did not have interactive effects on EtOH-induced LORR duration when combined with ALX-5407. The EtOH-potentiating effects of L-701,324, but not MK-801, on LORR duration were prevented by D-serine, but not ALX-5407. Mg depletion potentiated LORR duration in B6 mice and was lethal in a large proportion of S1 mice. CONCLUSIONS GlycineB site activation failed to produce the hypothesized reduction in EtOH intoxication across a range of measures and genetic strains, but blockade of the glycineB site potentiated Et

  13. Enhancement by glutathione depletion of ethanol-induced acute hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Younes, M; Pentz, R

    1987-08-01

    Ethanol at initial concentrations between 0.75 and 6 g/l produced a dose-dependent release of the enzymes glutamic-pyruvic-transaminase and sorbitol dehydrogenase (GPT, SDH) from the isolated perfused rat liver. At the concentration of 6 g/l, it also decreased the oxygen consumption and elevated the calcium content of the isolated livers. These toxic effects of ethanol were significantly enhanced in livers, the glutathione content of which had been depleted by pretreatment with phorone. Ethanol-induced toxicity in glutathione-depleted isolated livers could be prevented both by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase with 4-methylpyrazole and of xanthine oxidase with allopurinol. In rats, in vivo, 1.6 g/kg ethanol injected intravenously produced a small increase in serum GPT and SDH concentrations 4 h after its administration. This increase in enzyme activities was several-fold higher and longer lasting in rats pretreated with phorone. Glutathione depletion per se did not induce hepatotoxicity in vitro or in vivo. Since glutathione is involved in several lines of defense against oxidative damage, our results of an enhanced susceptibility of glutathione-depleted livers to ethanol toxicity favour the hypothesis that ethanol exerts its hepatotoxic action via an activation of molecular oxygen.

  14. Acute ethanol poisoning in a 4-year-old as a result of ethanol-based hand-sanitizer ingestion.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jeffrey S; Spiller, Henry A

    2010-07-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers have become widely available because of widespread usage in schools, hospitals, and workplaces and by consumers. We report what we believe is the first unintentional ingestion in a small child producing significant intoxication. A 4-year-old 14-kg girl was brought to the emergency department with altered mental status after a history of ingesting an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Physical examination revealed an obtunded child with periods of hypoventilation and a hematoma in the central portion of her forehead from a fall at home that occurred after the ingestion. Abnormal vital signs included a heart rate of 139 beats/min and temperature of 96.3 degrees F, decreasing to 93.6 degrees F. Abnormal laboratory values consisted of potassium of 2.6 mEq/L and a serum alcohol of 243 mg/dL. A computed tomography scan of her brain without contrast showed no acute intracranial abnormality. A urine drug screen for common drugs of abuse was reported as negative. The child was intubated, placed on mechanical ventilation, and admitted for medical care. She recovered over the next day without sequelae. As with other potentially toxic products, we would recommend caution and direct supervision of use when this product is available to young children.

  15. The effects of acute exposure to ethanol on neurotensin and guanine nucleotide-stimulation of phospholipase C activity in intact NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Both ethanol and neurotensin produce sedation and hypothermia. When administered in combination the behavioral effects of these two substances are potentiated. In order to better understand the biochemical nature of this interaction, the direct effects of ethanol on neurotensin receptors and an associated signal transduction process were determined in NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells. Ethanol in physiologically relevant concentrations significantly reduced neurotensin stimulated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production while having no effect on the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)neurotensin. In addition, ethanol up to 200 mM had no effect on GTPYS mediated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production. The results indicate that acute exposure ethanol partially disrupts the normal coupling of activated neurotensin receptors to the guanine nucleotide binding protein associated with phospholipase C.

  16. Adolescent and Adult Rats Differ in the Amnesic Effects of Acute Ethanol in Two Hippocampus-Dependent Tasks: Trace and Contextual Fear Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Pamela S.; Barnet, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-produced deficits in trace conditioning and context conditioning have been useful tools for examining the role of the hippocampus in learning. It has also been suggested that learning in these tasks is especially vulnerable to neurotoxic effects of alcohol during key developmental periods such as adolescence. In five experiments we systematically examined the presence and source of age-dependent vulnerability to the memory-disrupting effects of acute ethanol in trace conditioning and contextual fear conditioning. In Experiment 1a pre-training ethanol disrupted trace conditioning more strongly in adolescent (postnatal day, PD30-35) than adult rats (PD65-75). In Experiment 1b when pre-training ethanol was accompanied by pre-test ethanol no deficit in trace conditioning was observed in adolescents, suggesting that state-dependent retrieval failure mediated ethanol's disruption of trace conditioning at this age. Experiments 2a and 2b examined the effect of ethanol pretreatment on context conditioning. Here, adult but not adolescent rats were impaired in conditioned freezing to context cues. Experiment 2c explored state-dependency of this effect. Pre-training ethanol continued to disrupt context conditioning in adults even when ethanol was also administered prior to test. Collectively these findings reveal clear age-dependent and task-dependent vulnerabilities in ethanol's disruptive effects on hippocampus-dependent memory. Adolescents were more disrupted by ethanol in trace conditioning than adults, and adults were more disrupted by ethanol in context conditioning than adolescents. We suggest that adolescents may be more susceptible to changes in internal state (state-dependent retrieval failure) than adults and that ethanol disrupted performance in trace and context conditioning through different mechanisms. Relevance of these findings to theories of hippocampus function is discussed. PMID:26192910

  17. Adolescent and adult rats differ in the amnesic effects of acute ethanol in two hippocampus-dependent tasks: Trace and contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S; Barnet, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Experience-produced deficits in trace conditioning and context conditioning have been useful tools for examining the role of the hippocampus in learning. It has also been suggested that learning in these tasks is especially vulnerable to neurotoxic effects of alcohol during key developmental periods such as adolescence. In five experiments we systematically examined the presence and source of age-dependent vulnerability to the memory-disrupting effects of acute ethanol in trace conditioning and contextual fear conditioning. In Experiment 1a pre-training ethanol disrupted trace conditioning more strongly in adolescent (postnatal day, PD30-35) than adult rats (PD65-75). In Experiment 1b when pre-training ethanol was accompanied by pre-test ethanol no deficit in trace conditioning was observed in adolescents, suggesting that state-dependent retrieval failure mediated ethanol's disruption of trace conditioning at this age. Experiment 2a and b examined the effect of ethanol pretreatment on context conditioning. Here, adult but not adolescent rats were impaired in conditioned freezing to context cues. Experiment 2c explored state-dependency of this effect. Pre-training ethanol continued to disrupt context conditioning in adults even when ethanol was also administered prior to test. Collectively these findings reveal clear age-dependent and task-dependent vulnerabilities in ethanol's disruptive effects on hippocampus-dependent memory. Adolescents were more disrupted by ethanol in trace conditioning than adults, and adults were more disrupted by ethanol in context conditioning than adolescents. We suggest that adolescents may be more susceptible to changes in internal state (state-dependent retrieval failure) than adults and that ethanol disrupted performance in trace and context conditioning through different mechanisms. Relevance of these findings to theories of hippocampus function is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute ethanol exposure suppresses the repair of O6-methylguanine DNA lesions in castrated adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D M; Tentler, J J; Carney, J P; Wilson, T M; Kelley, M R

    1994-10-01

    Alcohol has clearly been associated with an increase of cancers in numerous tissue, including the respiratory tract, colon, rectum, liver, but especially the esophagus, larynx, pharynx, and mouth. Alcohol alone has not been shown to be a mutagen until it is converted to acetaldehyde and, therefore, alcohol presumably acts as a cocarcinogen. Previous data has shown that alcohol concentrations of 2% or greater inhibits DNA repair, and in light of the widespread consumption of alcoholic beverages with alcohol contents ranging from 4 to 5% (beer and wine coolers) to 50% (whiskey), interest in determining the mechanism(s) responsible for alcohol-induced carcinogenesis has heightened. Although previous studies, in intact rats, have investigated the effects of chronic alcohol exposure on some aspects of DNA repair, we have begun to address the effects of acute or "binge" alcohol exposure on mammalian DNA repair. Toward this end, we report the inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) by a single intraperitoneal injection of 30% ethanol in adult male castrated rats. This inhibition lasted for at least 24 hr. We also observed a dose-response effect of ethanol on MGMT activity, again only in the castrated rats. The finding of ethanol's effect on MGMT activity in castrated and not intact rats implies a hormonal component of MGMT DNA repair response, which has only been alluded to in past research.

  19. Melatonin Restores White Blood Cell Count, Diminishes Glycated Haemoglobin Level and Prevents Liver, Kidney and Muscle Oxidative Stress in Mice Exposed to Acute Ethanol Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kurhaluk, Natalia; Sliuta, Alina; Kyriienko, Svitlana; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of melatonin impact on changes in haematological profile, biomarkers of oxidative stress (dienes conjugates, malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidatively modified protein levels, total antioxidant capacity and antioxidant enzyme activity) in liver, muscle, kidney and erythrocytes, and glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c) in mice during acute ethanol stress. Assays were carried out in quadruplicate: control, melatonin (10 mg/kg, 10 days), acute ethanol stress (0.75 g/kg/day, 10 days) and acute ethanol stress plus melatonin groups. Acute ethanol stress caused a significant increase in the total number of white blood cells (WBC), especially neutrophils in the blood, and HBA1c levels vs. control mice. The correlation between lipid peroxidation and the glycated haemoglobin level was shown (r = 0.93, P = 0.007). Ethanol reduced the antioxidant capacity by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the level of oxidatively modified protein content, diene conjugates and MDA. Melatonin administration in animals during acute ethanol stress reduced antioxidant stress biomarkers, WBC, HBA1c levels and ROS production. Melatonin had protective effects on liver, kidney and muscle tissues by preventing the intensive lipid peroxidation processes in initial (diene conjugation production) and late stages (MDA level), and significantly reduced the level of aldehyde and ketone protein derivatives. Furthermore, melatonin restored elevated WBC count and HBA1c level and diminished ROS production. Ethanol reduces antioxidant capacity and leads to exaggerated reactive oxygen species production and consequent increases in oxidatively modified proteins. Melatonin exerts protective effects by preventing the intensive lipid peroxidation processes. Melatonin significantly reduces the level of aldehyde and ketone protein derivatives, restores glycated haemoglobin level and white blood cell count.

  20. Chronic ethanol ingestion impairs alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function and predisposes to endotoxin-mediated acute edematous lung injury in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Holguin, F; Moss, I; Brown, L A; Guidot, D M

    1998-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases the incidence and mortality of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in septic patients. To examine a potential mechanism, we hypothesized that ethanol ingestion predisposes to sepsis-mediated acute lung injury by decreasing alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function. Lungs isolated from rats fed ethanol (20% in water for >/= 3 wk), compared with lungs from control-fed rats, had greater (P < 0. 05) edematous injury (reflected by nonhydrostatic weight gain) after endotoxin (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and subsequent perfusion ex vivo with n-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP, 10(-7) M). Ethanol ingestion decreased (P < 0.05) glutathione levels in the plasma, lung tissue, and lung lavage fluid, and increased (P < 0.05) oxidized glutathione levels in the lung lavage fluid. Furthermore, ethanol ingestion decreased type II cell glutathione content by 95% (P < 0.05), decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell surfactant synthesis and secretion, and decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell viability, in vitro. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursors S-adenosyl-L-methionine and N-acetylcysteine in the final week of ethanol ingestion significantly reduced lung edema during perfusion ex vivo. We conclude that ethanol ingestion in rats alters alveolar type II cell glutathione levels and function, thereby predisposing the lung to acute edematous injury after endotoxemia. We speculate that chronic alcohol abuse in humans predisposes to ARDS through similar mechanisms. PMID:9466970

  1. Third trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure is characterized by an acute cellular stress response and an ontogenetic disruption of genes critical for synaptic establishment and function in mice.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Morgan L; Laufer, Benjamin I; Stringer, Randa L; Singh, Shiva M

    2014-01-01

    The developing brain is remarkably sensitive to alcohol exposure, resulting in the wide range of cognitive and neurobehavioral characteristics categorized under the term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The brain is particularly susceptible to alcohol during synaptogenesis, a process that occurs heavily during the third trimester and is characterized by the establishment and pruning of neural circuitry; however, the molecular response of the brain to ethanol during synaptogenesis has not been documented. To model a binge-like exposure during the third-trimester neurodevelopmental equivalent, neonate mice were given a high (5 g/kg over 2 h) dose of ethanol at postnatal day 7. Acute transcript changes within the brain were assessed using expression arrays and analyzed for associations with gene ontology functional categories, canonical pathways, and gene network interactions. The short-term effect of ethanol was characterized by an acute stress response and a downregulation of energetically costly cellular processes. Further, alterations to a number of genes with roles in synaptic transmission and hormonal signaling, particularly those associated with the neuroendocrine development and function, were evident. Ethanol exposure during synaptogenesis was also associated with altered histone deacetylase and microRNA transcript levels, suggesting that abnormal epigenetic patterning may maintain some of the persistent molecular consequences of developmental ethanol exposure. The results shed insight into the sensitivity of the brain to ethanol during the third-trimester equivalent and outline how ethanol-induced alterations to genes associated with neural connectivity may contribute to FASD phenotypes. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Further studies on the hepatoprotective effect of Antrodia camphorata in submerged culture on ethanol-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen-Ming; Tao, Wen-Yi; Xu, Hong-Yu; Ao, Zong-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2011-04-01

    To further understand the hepatoprotective activity of Antrodia camphorata in living systems and the possible mechanisms of this protection, the effects of fractions from A. camphorata in submerged culture on the liver and its antioxidative system in acute ethanol intoxicated rats were investigated. The results showed that the ethanolic extract (Fr-I) of A. camphorata was the most effective in the prevention of ethanol-induced acute liver injury and free radical generation in rats. The ethanolic extract administrated prior to ethanol significantly prevented the increase in serum levels of hepatic enzyme markers such as aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. It also normalised the increase of hepatic malondialdehyde concentration and the decrease of glutathione levels in the liver. Moreover, Fr-I improved the ethanol-induced decrease of hepatic glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities. On the basis of these results, the ethanolic extract of A. camphorata may exert its hepatoprotective activity by up-regulating GSH-dependent enzymes and inhibiting free radical formation in the liver.

  3. Evaluation of acute toxicity, genotoxicity and inhibitory effect on acute inflammation of an ethanol extract of Morus alba L. (Moraceae) in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Alisson Macário de; Nascimento, Matheus Ferreira do; Ferreira, Magda Rhayanny Assunção; Moura, Danielle Feijó de; Souza, Talita Giselly Dos Santos; Silva, Gabriela Cavalcante da; Ramos, Eduardo Henrique da Silva; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Medeiros, Paloma Lys de; Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves da; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Chagas, Cristiano Aparecido; Souza, Ivone Antônia de; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2016-12-24

    Morus alba L. (white mulberry) is used in traditional medicine worldwide, including Brazil. The leaves of this plant are used to treat inflammatory disorders. Universal interest in this plant necessitates studies on the toxicological safety and scientific substantiation of the medicinal properties of M. alba. In previous work, we investigated the acute toxicity of orally administered M. alba ethanol extract in mice. This work was designed to investigate the ethanol extract obtained from M. alba leaves for acute toxicity when intraperitoneally administered, in vivo genotoxicity, and potential to reduce acute inflammation. In order to further investigate the constituents of the extract, we also obtained the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint of the extract. Phytochemical analysis by thin layer chromatography (TLC) was performed and the results were used to obtain the HPLC fingerprint. Acute toxicity of 300 and 2000mg/kg b.w. i.p. doses administered to mice for 14 days was evaluated. Genotoxicity was evaluated by counting the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the blood of mice that either received or did not receive the extract at 75, 150 and 300mg/kg b.w. per os. The anti-inflammatory effect of the same doses administered per os was investigated using the carrageenan air pouch model. The TLC analysis of the extract revealed the presence of a remarkable amount of flavonoids and cinnamic acids. The HPLC fingerprint showed the presence of one major peak corresponding to chlorogenic acid and two smaller peaks corresponding to flavonoids. In the toxicity assays, there were no deaths or deviations in behavior of treated mice as compared to the control at any dose. However, biochemical, hematological, and histological analyses showed that intraperitoneal injection caused several forms of damage to the mice, which were not observed in case of oral administration, studied in our previous work. Oral administration of the extract did

  4. Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 7315/7316 intake modulates the acute and chronic innate inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Vilahur, Gemma; López-Bernal, Sergi; Camino, Sandra; Mendieta, Guiomar; Padró, Teresa; Badimon, Lina

    2015-10-01

    Probiotics may confer health benefits for the host. Although Lactobacillus has demonstrated to stimulate the immune response, only a few strains have demonstrated immunomodulatory properties. The newly identified Lactobacillus plantarum strains CECT7315 and CECT7316 (LP3457) seem to boost the immune system in individuals that immune decline. We aimed to investigate whether LP3457 protects against inflammation and the mechanism behind. LP3457 potential anti-inflammatory effects were assessed in an acute model LPS-induced inflammation in healthy rats and in a chronic model of low-grade inflammation in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Wistar rats received LP3457 or placebo control for 20 days. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally at day 14, and animals were sacrificed 6 days after. Blood was collected at baseline (day 0) and consecutively at day 7, 14, 17, and 20 for haematological evaluation and assessment of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory systemic markers. Myeloperoxidase activity was investigated in the ileum. ZDF rats received LP3457 or placebo control during 8 weeks, and changes in inflammasome-related transcripts were assessed in the ileum. LPS induced a comparable and significant leucocytosis 3 days post-injection (day 17) in both LP3457-treated and LP3457-untreated rats. However, the probiotic supplementation attenuated IL-1β, IL-6, and CRP release and increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels 6 days post-LPS induction (p < 0.05 vs. placebo). LP3457-supplemented animals also displayed lower intestinal myeloperoxidase activity (p < 0.05 vs. placebo). Chronic administration of LP3457 to ZDF rats resulted in a significant downregulation of the inflammasome signalling pathway (p < 0.05 vs. placebo). Intake of LP3457 attenuates both acute endotoxemia-induced and chronic metabolically induced inflammatory reactions and the inflammasome signalling pathway. The stabilization and regulation of the gut microbiota is an important target

  5. Long-term ethanol effects on acute stress responses: modulation by dynorphin.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Ildikó; Markert, Astrid; Mauer, Daniela; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Zimmer, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    The brain stress-response system is critically involved in the addiction process, stimulating drug consumption and the relapse to drug taking in abstinent addicts. At the same time, its functioning is affected by chronic drug exposure. Here, we have investigated the role of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin as a modulator of effects of long-term ethanol consumption on the brain stress-response system. Using the two-bottle choice paradigm, we demonstrate an enhanced ethanol preference in male dynorphin knockout mice. Exposure to mild foot shock increased ethanol consumption in wild-type control littermates, but not in dynorphin-deficient animals. Blood adrenocorticotropic hormone levels determined 5 minutes after the shock were not affected by the genotype. We also determined the neuronal reactivity after foot shock exposure using c-Fos immunoreactivity in limbic structures. This was strongly influenced by both genotype and chronic ethanol consumption. Long-term alcohol exposure elevated the foot shock-induced c-Fos expression in the basolateral amygdala in wild-type animals, but had the opposite effect in dynorphin-deficient mice. An altered c-Fos reactivity was also found in the periventricular nucleus, the thalamus and the hippocampus of dynorphin knockouts. Together these data suggest that dynorphin plays an important role in the modulation of the brain stress-response systems after chronic ethanol exposure. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Acute ethanol administration affects zebrafish preference for a biologically inspired robot.

    PubMed

    Spinello, Chiara; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-08-01

    Preclinical animal models constitute a cornerstone against which the reward processes involved in drug addiction are often studied and dissected. While rodents have traditionally represented the species of choice, a growing body of literature indicates that zebrafish are emerging as a valuable model organism. Specifically, several studies demonstrate that the effects of ethanol at the level of emotional- and cognitive-related domains can be reliably investigated using zebrafish. The rapidly evolving nature of these efforts allows substantial room for the development of novel experimental paradigms suited to this freshwater species. The field of ethorobotics may prove particularly beneficial, due to its ability to convey fully controllable and easily reproducible experimental tools. In this study, we addressed the possibility of using a biologically inspired robot to investigate the emotionally related properties of ethanol in a preference task in zebrafish. To this aim, we evaluated wild-type zebrafish preference toward a robotic stimulus and addressed whether ethanol administration (0.25% and 1.00% ethanol/water concentration) may alter such preferences. In accordance with our previous studies, we observed that zebrafish exhibit a natural attraction toward the robot. Additionally, in agreement with our predictions, we showed that ethanol administration abolishes such preferences. This work is the first to demonstrate that robotic stimuli can be used in zebrafish to investigate the reward-related properties of alcohol.

  7. Effects of Acute Prenatal Exposure to Ethanol on microRNA Expression are Ameliorated by Social Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Cherry; Mooney, Sandra M.; Middleton, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are associated with abnormal social behavior. These behavioral changes may resemble those seen in autism. Rats acutely exposed to ethanol on gestational day 12 show decreased social motivation at postnatal day 42. We previously showed that housing these ethanol-exposed rats with non-exposed controls normalized this deficit. The amygdala is critical for social behavior and regulates it, in part, through connections with the basal ganglia, particularly the ventral striatum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, hairpin-derived RNAs that repress mRNA expression. Many brain disorders, including FASD, show dysregulation of miRNAs. In this study, we tested if miRNA and mRNA networks are altered in the amygdala and ventral striatum as a consequence of prenatal ethanol exposure and show any evidence of reversal as a result of social enrichment. RNA samples from two different brain regions in 72 male and female adolescent rats were analyzed by RNA-Seq and microarray analysis. Several miRNAs showed significant changes due to prenatal ethanol exposure and/or social enrichment in one or both brain regions. The top predicted gene targets of these miRNAs were mapped and subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. Several miRNA changes caused by ethanol were reversed by social enrichment, including mir-204, mir-299a, miR-384-5p, miR-222-3p, miR-301b-3p, and mir-6239. Moreover, enriched gene networks incorporating the targets of these miRNAs also showed reversal. We also extended our previously published mRNA expression analysis by directly examining all annotated brain-related canonical pathways. The additional pathways that were most strongly affected at the mRNA level included p53, CREB, glutamate, and GABA signaling. Together, our data suggest a number of novel epigenetic mechanisms for social enrichment to reverse the effects of ethanol exposure through widespread influences on gene expression. PMID:25309888

  8. Formation of a fibrin based gelatinous coat over repairing rat gastric epithelium after acute ethanol damage: interaction with adherent mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, L A; Allen, A; Bennett, M K

    1987-01-01

    A gelatinous coat, heterogeneous in appearance, was formed over damaged rat gastric mucosa recovering from acute ethanol injury. This coat, in places 1.6 mm thick (median thickness 680 microns), was 10 times thicker than the translucent layer of adherent mucus (median thickness 70 microns) covering the undamaged mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and periodic acid Schiff staining showed this gelatinous coat to be predominantly a fibrin gel with an exterior layer rich in mucus and necrotic cells. The plasma clotting time was significantly decreased in vitro by pig gastric mucus gel and soluble mucus glycoprotein (90% and 13% respectively) suggesting that in vivo the mucus layer remaining after epithelial damage could act as a template for fibrinogen-fibrin conversion. These results show that a fibrin based gelatinous coat, quite distinct from the adherent mucus layer and with considerable protective potential could be formed over the repairing rat gastric mucosa after acute ethanol damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3653751

  9. Tectoridin, an isoflavone glycoside from the flower of Pueraria lobata, prevents acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yu; Yang, Yuqing; Yang, Jin; Chai, Hongyan; Li, Ying; Yang, Jing; Jia, Ziming; Wang, Zhengrong

    2010-09-30

    In traditional Chinese medicine, the flower of Pueraria lobata (Puerariae Flos) has been used in therapy to counteract the problems associated with alcohol drinking and liver injury. In this study, we investigated the hepatoprotective effects and its mechanisms of tectoridin, an isoflavone glycoside from the flower of P. lobata (Willd.) Ohwi. Ethanol (5g/kg) was given orally every 12h for a total of three doses. 1h after the last dose of ethanol, tectoridin (25, 50 and 100mg/kg) was given intragastrically five times in three consecutive days. The mice were sacrificed at 4h after tectoridin treatment. Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c and their target genes were evaluated by biochemical analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Mitochondria were isolated for the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) assay. Acute ethanol exposure resulted in the significant increase of the alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and triglyceride (TG) levels and hepatic mitochondria dysfunction shown as the increase of MPT and the decrease of DeltaPsi(m). However, tectoridin treatment dramatically attenuated these effects. In addition, tectoridin remarkably alleviated the over-production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance. Furthermore, tectoridin inhibited the decrease of PPARalpha expression and its target genes, including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) and cytochrome P450 4A (CYP 4A) at mRNA and enzyme activity levels. These data showed that tectoridin protected against ethanol-induced liver steatosis mainly through modulating the disturbance of PPARalpha pathway and ameliorating mitochondrial function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A, a novel gastroprotective compound from Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, against ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Amir, Junaidah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hadi, A Hamid A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Teh, Xinsheng; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Rahmani, Mawardi; Mohan, Syam

    2013-07-15

    Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A (PA), a xanthone derived from the Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, belongs to the Moraceae family which is native to the tropical forest of Malaysia. In this study, the efficacy of PA as a gastroprotective compound was examined against ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. The rats were pretreated with PA and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol. The ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological analysis, glutathione (GSH) levels, malondialdehyde level (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NP-SH) contents were evaluated in vivo. The activities of PA as anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and free radical scavenger were also investigated in vitro. The results showed that the oral administration of PA protects gastric mucosa from ethanol-induced gastric lesions. PA pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) restored the depleted GSH, NP-SH and NO levels in the gastric homogenate. Moreover, PA significantly (p<0.05) reduced the elevated MDA level due to ethanol administration. The gastroprotective effect of PA was associated with an over expression of HSP70 and suppression of Bax proteins in the ulcerated tissue. In addition, PA exhibited a potent FRAP value and significant COX-2 inhibition. It also showed a significant minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against H. pylori bacterium. The efficacy of PA was accomplished safely without the presence of any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the gastroprotective effect of PA might contribute to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as well as the anti-apoptotic mechanism and antibacterial action against Helicobacter pylori. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence that Melanocortin Receptor Agonist Melanotan-II Synergistically Augments the Ability of Naltrexone to Blunt Binge-Like Ethanol Intake in Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Montserrat; Carvajal, Francisca; Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel; Cubero, Inmaculada; Picker, Mitchell J.; Thiele, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (NAL), reduces alcohol (ethanol) consumption in animals and humans and is an approved medication for treating alcohol abuse disorders. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived melanocortin (MC) and opioid peptides are produced in the same neurons in the brain, and recent pre-clinical evidence shows that MC receptor (MCR) agonists reduce excessive ethanol drinking in animal models. Interestingly, there is a growing body of literature revealing interactions between the MC and opioid systems in the modulation of pain, drug tolerance, and food intake. Method In the present report, a mouse model of binge ethanol drinking was employed to determine if the MCR agonist, melanotan-II (MTII), would improve the effectiveness of NAL in reducing excessive binge-like ethanol drinking when these drugs were co-administered prior to ethanol access. Results Both NAL and MTII blunt binge-like ethanol drinking and associated blood ethanol levels, and when administered together, a low dose of MTII (0.26 mg/kg) produces a 7.6-fold increase in the effectiveness of NAL in reducing binge-like ethanol drinking. Using isobolographic analysis, it is demonstrated that MTII increases the effectiveness of NAL in a synergistic manner. Conclusions The current observations suggest that activators of MC signaling may represent a new approach to treating alcohol abuse disorders, and a way to potentially improve existing NAL-based therapies. PMID:26108334

  12. Mood influences on acute smoking responses are independent of nicotine intake and dose expectancy.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Ciccocioppo, Melinda; Conklin, Cynthia A; Milanak, Melissa E; Grottenthaler, Amy; Sayette, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Acute responses to smoking are influenced by nicotine and by nonpharmacological factors such as nicotine dose expectancy and sensory effects of smoke inhalation. Because negative mood increases smoking reinforcement, the authors examined whether these effects may be altered by mood context. Smokers (n=200) participated in 2 sessions, negative or positive mood induction, and were randomized to 1 of 5 groups. Four groups comprised the 2x2 balanced placebo design, varying actual (0.6 mg vs. 0.05 mg yield) and expected nicotine dose (expected nicotine vs. denicotinized [denic]) of cigarettes. A fifth group was a no-smoking control. Smoking, versus not smoking, attenuated negative affect, as well as withdrawal and craving. Negative mood increased smoking reinforcement. However, neither actual nor expected nicotine dose had much influence on these responses; even those smokers receiving and expecting a denic cigarette reported attenuated negative affect. A follow-up comparison suggested that the sensory effects of smoke inhalation, but not the simple motor effects of smoking behavior, were responsible. Thus, sensory effects of smoke inhalation had a greater influence on relieving negative affect than actual or expected nicotine intake.

  13. Emotional reactivity to incentive downshift as a correlated response to selection of high and low alcohol preferring mice and an influencing factor on ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Matson, Liana M; Grahame, Nicholas J

    2015-11-01

    Losing a job or significant other are examples of incentive loss that result in negative emotional reactions. The occurrence of negative life events is associated with increased drinking (Keyes, Hatzenbuehler, & Hasin, 2011). Further, certain genotypes are more likely to drink alcohol in response to stressful negative life events (Blomeyer et al., 2008; Covault et al., 2007). Shared genetic factors may contribute to alcohol drinking and emotional reactivity, but this relationship is not currently well understood. We used an incentive downshift paradigm to address whether emotional reactivity is elevated in mice predisposed to drink alcohol. We also investigated if ethanol drinking is influenced in High Alcohol Preferring mice that had been exposed to an incentive downshift. Incentive downshift procedures have been widely utilized to model emotional reactivity, and involve shifting a high reward group to a low reward and comparing the shifted group to a consistently rewarded control group. Here, we show that replicate lines of selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring mice exhibited larger successive negative contrast effects than their corresponding replicate Low Alcohol Preferring lines, providing strong evidence for a genetic association between alcohol drinking and susceptibility to the emotional effects of negative contrast. These mice can be used to study the shared neurological and genetic underpinnings of emotional reactivity and alcohol preference. Unexpectedly, an incentive downshift suppressed ethanol drinking immediately following an incentive downshift. This could be due to a specific effect of negative contrast on ethanol consumption or a suppressive effect on consummatory behavior in general. These data suggest that either alcohol intake does not provide the anticipated negative reinforcement, or that a single test was insufficient for animals to learn to drink following incentive downshift. However, the emotional intensity following incentive

  14. Emotional Reactivity to Incentive Downshift as a Correlated Response to Selection of High and Low Alcohol Preferring Mice and an Influencing Factor on Ethanol Intake

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Liana M.; Grahame, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Losing a job or significant other are examples of incentive loss that result in negative emotional reactions. The occurrence of negative life events is associated with increased drinking (Keyes et al., 2011). Further, certain genotypes are more likely drink alcohol in response to stressful negative life events (Blomeyer et al., 2008; Covault et al., 2007). Shared genetic factors may contribute to alcohol drinking and emotional reactivity, but this relationship is not currently well understood. We used an incentive downshift paradigm to address whether emotional reactivity is elevated in mice predisposed to drink alcohol. We also investigated if ethanol drinking is influenced in High Alcohol Preferring mice that had been exposed to an incentive downshift. Incentive downshift procedures have been widely utilized to model emotional reactivity, and involve shifting a high reward group to a low reward and comparing the shifted group to a consistently rewarded control group. Here, we show that replicate lines of selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring mice exhibited larger successive negative contrast effects than their corresponding replicate Low Alcohol Preferring lines, providing strong evidence for a genetic association between alcohol drinking and susceptibility to the emotional effects of negative contrast. These mice can be used to study the shared neurological and genetic underpinnings of emotional reactivity and alcohol preference. Unexpectedly, an incentive downshift suppressed ethanol drinking immediately following an incentive downshift. This could be due to a specific effect of negative contrast on ethanol consumption, or a suppressive effect on consummatory behavior in general. These data suggest that alcohol intake either doesn’t provide the anticipated negative reinforcement, or that a single test was insufficient for animals to learn to drink following incentive downshift. However, that high drinking and emotional intensity following incentive

  15. Long-term behavioral impairment following acute embryonic ethanol exposure in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M; Oliveri, A N; Zhang, C; Frazier, J M; Mackinnon, S; Cole, G J; Levin, E D

    2015-01-01

    Developmental exposure to ethanol has long been known to cause persisting neurobehavioral impairment. However, the neural and behavioral mechanisms underlying these deficits and the importance of exposure timing are not well-characterized. Given the importance of timing and sequence in neurodevelopment it would be expected that alcohol intoxication at different developmental periods would result in distinct neurobehavioral consequences. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to ethanol (0%, 1%, 3%) at either 8-10 or 24-27 h post-fertilization (hpf) then reared to adolescence and evaluated on several behavioral endpoints. Habituation to a repeated environmental stimulus and overall sensorimotor function were assessed using a tap startle test; measurements of anxiety and exploration behavior were made following introduction to a novel tank; and spatial discrimination learning was assessed using aversive control in a three-chambered apparatus. Overt signs of dysmorphogenesis were also scored (i.e. craniofacial malformations, including eye diameter and midbrain-hindbrain boundary morphology). Ethanol treated fish were more active both at baseline and following a tap stimulus compared to the control fish and were hyperactive when placed in a novel tank. These effects were more prominent following exposure at 24-27 hpf than with the earlier exposure window, for both dose groups. Increases in physical malformation were only present in the 3% ethanol group; all malformed fish were excluded from behavioral testing. These results suggest specific domains of behavior are affected following ethanol exposure, with some but not all of the tests revealing significant impairment. The behavioral phenotypes following distinct exposure windows described here can be used to help link cellular and molecular mechanisms of developmental ethanol exposure to functional neurobehavioral effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental Enrichment Blunts Ethanol Consumption after Restraint Stress in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marianno, Priscila; Abrahao, Karina Possa

    2017-01-01

    Elevated alcohol intake after abstinence is a key feature of the addiction process. Some studies have shown that environmental enrichment (EE) affects ethanol intake and other reinforcing effects. However, different EE protocols may vary in their ability to influence alcohol consumption and stress-induced intake. The present study evaluated whether short (3 h) or continuous (24 h) EE protocols affect ethanol consumption after periods of withdrawal. Mice were challenged with stressful stimuli (24 h isolation and restraint stress) to evaluate the effects of stress on drinking. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a two-bottle choice drinking-in-the-dark paradigm for 15 days (20% ethanol and water, 2 h/day, acquisition phase). Control mice were housed under standard conditions (SC). In the first experiment, one group of mice was housed under EE conditions 24 h/day (EE24h). In the second experiment, the exposure to EE was reduced to 3 h/day (EE3h). After the acquisition phase, the animals were deprived of ethanol for 6 days, followed by 2 h ethanol access once a week. Animals were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM) during ethanol withdrawal. During the last 2 weeks, the mice were exposed to 24 h ethanol access. A 1-h restraint stress test was performed immediately before the last ethanol exposure. EE24h but not EE3h increased anxiety-like behavior during withdrawal compared to controls. Neither EE24h nor EE3h affected ethanol consumption during the 2 h weekly exposure periods. However, EE24h and EE3h mice that were exposed to acute restraint stress consumed less ethanol than controls during a 24 h ethanol access. These results showed that EE reduces alcohol intake after an acute restraint stress. PMID:28107511

  17. Acute ethanol exposure during late mouse neurodevelopment results in long-term deficits in memory retrieval, but not in social responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Houlé, Katherine; Abdi, Myshake; Clabough, Erin B D

    2017-04-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can result in neurological changes in affected individuals and may result in the emergence of a broad spectrum of neurobehavioral abnormalities termed fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The effects of ethanol exposure during development are both time and dose dependent. Although many animal models of FASD use more chronic ethanol exposure, acute developmental alcohol exposure may also cause long-lasting neuronal changes. Our research employed behavioral measures to assess the effects of a single early postnatal ethanol intoxication event in mice. Mice were dosed at postnatal day 6 (a 2.5 g/kg dose of ethanol or a saline control administered twice, 2 hr apart) as a model of third trimester binge drinking in humans. This exposure was followed by behavioral assessment in male mice at 1 month (1M) and at 4 months of age (4M), using the Barnes maze (for learning/memory retrieval), exploratory behavior, and a social responsiveness task. Ethanol-exposed mice appeared to be less motivated to complete the Barnes maze at 1M, but were able to successfully learn the maze. However, deficits in long-term spatial memory retrieval were observed in ethanol-exposed mice when the Barnes maze recall was measured at 4M. No significant differences were found in open field behavior or social responsiveness at 1M or 4M of age. Acute ethanol exposure at P6 in mice leads to mild but long-lasting deficits in long-term spatial memory. Results suggest that even brief acute exposure to high ethanol levels during the third trimester equivalent of human pregnancy may have a permanent negative impact on the neurological functioning of the offspring.

  18. [Pecularities of correction of alcohol affctions of liver in patients with acute ethanol poisoning in the setting of consequence of toxic effect of ethanol].

    PubMed

    Shilov, V V; batotsyrenov, B V; Vasil'ev, S A; Shikalova, I A; Kuznetsov, O A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to test the usage of infusion of hepatoprotector "remaxol" in intensive therapy of acute ethanol poisoning accompanied with severe alcohol affections of the lever. In the result of the examination and treatment of 130 patients it was established that severe alcohol poisonings registered on alcohol abused patients with toxic hepatopathy, are always accompanied with serious metabolic violations. In the process of a comparative valuation of the using of heptral (ademethionin) and remaxol in the intensive therapy of alcohol poisonings it has been revealed that the using of remaxol led to improvement of the clinic of that poisonings, what had been registered as a decrease of frequency and duration of an alcohol delirium from 33,9% to 10,8%, a decrease of frequency of secondary lung complication from 18,5 to 3,1%, a decrease of a duration of treatment in intensive care unit from 7,3 +/- 0,6 to 5,6 +/- 0,3 and a hospital treatment duration from 11,8 +/- 0,5 to 9,0 +/- 0,3 days. Biochemical investigation has shown that using as heptral, as remaxol led to improvement of lever damages due to alcohol. However remaxol compared with heptral was better in the treatment of metabolic violations.

  19. Catechol-o-methyltransferase gene polymorphism modifies the effect of coffee intake on incidence of acute coronary events.

    PubMed

    Happonen, Pertti; Voutilainen, Sari; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Salonen, Jukka T

    2006-12-27

    The role of coffee intake as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) has been debated for decades. We examined whether the relationship between coffee intake and incidence of CHD events is dependent on the metabolism of circulating catecholamines, as determined by functional polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. In a cohort of 773 men who were 42 to 60 years old and free of symptomatic CHD at baseline in 1984-89, 78 participants experienced an acute coronary event during an average follow-up of 13 years. In logistic regression adjusting for age, smoking, family history of CHD, vitamin C deficiency, blood pressure, plasma cholesterol concentration, and diabetes, the odds ratio (90% confidence interval) comparing heavy coffee drinkers with the low activity COMT genotype with those with the high activity or heterozygotic genotypes was 3.2 (1.2-8.4). Urinary adrenaline excretion increased with increasing coffee intake, being over two-fold in heavy drinkers compared with nondrinkers (p = 0.008 for trend). Heavy coffee consumption increases the incidence of acute coronary events in men with low but not high COMT activity. Further studies are required to determine to which extent circulating catecholamines mediate the relationship between coffee intake and CHD.

  20. Intra-nucleus accumbens shell injections of R(+)- and S(-)-baclofen bidirectionally alter binge-like ethanol, but not saccharin, intake in C57Bl/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, Chelsea R.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The GABAB agonist baclofen has been widely researched clinically and preclinically as a treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). However, the efficacy of baclofen remains uncertain. The clinically used racemic compound can be separated into separate enantiomers. These enantiomers have produced different profiles in behavioral assays, with the S- compound often being ineffective compared to the R- compound, or the S- compound antagonizing the effects of the R- compound. We have previously demonstrated that the R(+)-baclofen enantiomer decreases binge-like ethanol intake in the Drinking-in-the-Dark (DID) paradigm, whereas the S(-)-baclofen enantiomer increases ethanol intake. One area implicated in drug abuse is the nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh).The current study sought to define the role of the NACsh in the enantioselective effects of baclofen on binge-like ethanol consumption by directly microinjecting each enantiomer into the structure. Following bilateral cannulation of the NACsh, C57Bl/6J mice were given 5 days of access to ethanol or saccharin for 2 hours, 3 hours into the dark cycle. On Day 5 mice were given an injection of aCSF, 0.02 R(+)-, 0.04R(+)-, 0.08 S(-)-, or 0.16 S(-)-baclofen (μg/side dissolved in 200nl of aCSF). It was found that the R(+)-baclofen dose-dependently decreased ethanol consumption, whereas the high S(-)-baclofen dose increased ethanol consumption, compared to the aCSF group. Saccharin consumption was not affected. These results further confirm that GABAB receptors and the NACsh shell are integral in mediating ethanol intake. They also demonstrate that baclofen displays bidirectional, enantioselective effects which are important when considering therapeutic uses of the drug. PMID:25026094

  1. Intra-nucleus accumbens shell injections of R(+)- and S(-)-baclofen bidirectionally alter binge-like ethanol, but not saccharin, intake in C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kasten, Chelsea R; Boehm, Stephen L

    2014-10-01

    The GABAB agonist baclofen has been widely researched clinically and preclinically as a treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). However, the efficacy of baclofen remains uncertain. The clinically used racemic compound can be separated into separate enantiomers. These enantiomers have produced different profiles in behavioral assays, with the S- compound often being ineffective compared to the R- compound, or the S- compound antagonizing the effects of the R- compound. We have previously demonstrated that the R(+)-baclofen enantiomer decreases binge-like ethanol intake in the Drinking-in-the-Dark (DID) paradigm, whereas the S(-)-baclofen enantiomer increases ethanol intake. One area implicated in drug abuse is the nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh).The current study sought to define the role of the NACsh in the enantioselective effects of baclofen on binge-like ethanol consumption by directly microinjecting each enantiomer into the structure. Following bilateral cannulation of the NACsh, C57Bl/6J mice were given 5 days of access to ethanol or saccharin for 2h, 3h into the dark cycle. On Day 5 mice were given an injection of aCSF, 0.02 R(+)-, 0.04R(+)-, 0.08 S(-)-, or 0.16 S(-)-baclofen (μg/side dissolved in 200nl of aCSF). It was found that the R(+)-baclofen dose-dependently decreased ethanol consumption, whereas the high S(-)-baclofen dose increased ethanol consumption, compared to the aCSF group. Saccharin consumption was not affected. These results further confirm that GABAB receptors and the NACsh shell are integral in mediating ethanol intake. They also demonstrate that baclofen displays bidirectional, enantioselective effects which are important when considering therapeutic uses of the drug.

  2. Acute prenatal exposure to ethanol on gestational day 12 elicits opposing deficits in social behaviors and anxiety-like behaviors in Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Marvin R.; Mooney, Sandra M.; Varlinskaya, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous research has shown that in Long Evans rats acute prenatal exposure to a high dose of ethanol on gestational day (G) 12 produces social deficits in male offspring and elicits substantial decreases in social preference relative to controls, in late adolescents and adults regardless of sex. In order to generalize the observed detrimental effects of ethanol exposure on G12, pregnant female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to ethanol or saline and their offspring were assessed in a modified social interaction (SI) test as early adolescents, late adolescents, or young adults. Anxiety-like behavior was also assessed in adults using the elevated plus maze (EPM) or the light/dark box (LDB) test. Age- and sex-dependent social alterations were evident in ethanol-exposed animals. Ethanol-exposed males showed deficits in social investigation at all ages and age-dependent alterations in social preference. Play fighting was not affected in males. In contrast, ethanol-exposed early adolescent females showed no changes in social interactions, whereas older females demonstrated social deficits and social indifference. In adulthood, anxiety-like behavior was decreased in males and females prenatally exposed to ethanol in the EPM, but not the LDB. These findings suggest that social alterations associated with acute exposure to ethanol on G12 are not strain-specific, although they are more pronounced in Long Evans males and Sprague Dawley females. Furthermore, given that anxiety-like behaviors were attenuated in a test-specific manner, this study indicates that early ethanol exposure can have differential effects on different forms of anxiety. PMID:27154534

  3. Acute oral administration of the novel, competitive and selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34517 reduces the severity of ethanol withdrawal and related hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal axis activation

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Anna R.; Saunders, Meredith A.; Brewton, Honoree’ W.; Winchester, Sydney R.; Elgumati, Ibrahim S.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of ethanol dependence is associated with alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and activation of type II glucocorticoid receptors (GR). These effects may contribute to withdrawal-associated anxiety, craving and relapse to drinking. The present studies examined acute and oral administration of the novel, selective and competitive GR antagonist ORG 34517 on the severity of ethanol withdrawal. Methods Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered ethanol (4g/kg/i.g.) twice daily for 5 days followed by 2 days of withdrawal for 1, 2 or 3 consecutive cycles. Blood ethanol levels (BELs) were determined at 0930 on Day 4 of each week, while blood corticosterone levels (BCLs) were obtained at 1100 hrs on the first day of each ethanol withdrawal. During early withdrawal, subjects received oral administration of ORG 345617 (60 mg/kg/i.g.) or a placebo and withdrawal was monitored. Results Peak BELs of 225.52 mg/dl were observed during the third week. Withdrawal from three cycles of the regimen produced marked behavioral abnormalities (e.g. aggression, rigidity, and hypoactivity) and significant increases in BCLs of ethanol-dependent subjects. Acute, oral administration of ORG 34517 during early withdrawal significantly reduced both the severity of ethanol withdrawal, as reflected in reduced rigidity, aggression, and hypoactivity, and elevations in BCL without producing any sedative-like effects. Conclusions The present findings demonstrate that repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal is associated with significant behavioral abnormalities and dysregulation of HPA axis activation. Further these data suggest that selective GR antagonists should be further considered as putative pharmacotherapies for treatment of ethanol dependence. PMID:26143299

  4. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission.

  5. Betulinic acid and betulin ameliorate acute ethanol-induced fatty liver via TLR4 and STAT3 in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ying; Jiang, Shuang; Lian, Li-Hua; Bai, Ting; Cui, Peng-He; Sun, Xiao-Ting; Jin, Xue-Jun; Wu, Yan-Ling; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2013-10-01

    Ethanol consumption leads to many kinds of liver injury and suppresses innate immunity, but the molecular mechanisms have not been fully delineated. The present study was conducted to determine whether betulinic acid (BA) or betulin (BT) would ameliorate acute ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice, and to characterize whether Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were involved in ethanol-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). EtOH (5mg/kg) and BA or BT (20 or 50mg/kg) were applied in vivo, while EtOH (50mM) and BA or BT (12.5 or 25μM) were applied in vitro. Administration of BA or BT significantly prevented the increases of serum ALT and AST caused by ethanol, as well as serum TG. Supplement of BA or BT prevented ethanol-induced acidophilic necrosis, increased hepatocyte nuclei and stromal inflammation infiltration as indicated by liver histopathological studies. Administration of BA or BT significantly decreased CYP2E1 activities and expression of SREBP-1caused by ethanol, however, lower dosage of BA or BT showed slight effects on CYP2E1 activity or expression of SREBP-1c. BA or BT administration significantly decreased the expression of TLR4, and increased the phosphorylation of STAT3. In vitro, BA or BT treatment reduced the expressions of α-SMA and collagen-I in ethanol-stimulated HSCs via regulation of TLR4 and STAT3, coincided with in vivo. All of these findings demonstrated that BA or BT might ameliorate acute ethanol-induced fatty liver via TLR4 and STAT3 in vivo and in vitro, promising agents for ethanol-induced fatty liver therapies.

  6. Gastroprotective effects of CoQ10 on ethanol-induced acute gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, K; Barut, F; Hanci, V; Can, M; Comert, M; Ucan, H B; Cakmak, G K; Irkorucu, O; Tascilar, O; Emre, A U

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is frequently associated with gastric mucosal lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Coenzyme-Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on the ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in a rat model. Sixty-four female wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 8 groups (n = 8). Studies were performed in ethanol induced gastric ulcer model in Wistar albino rats. Famotidine at a dose of 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg and CoQ10 at a single dose of 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg for 7 days were administered as pretreatment. All the rats in study groups received 2 ml/kg ethanol 95 % intragastrically, 30 minutes after pretreatment. Four hour after ethanol administration, all rats were sacrificed and their stomachs were removed under ketamin anaesthesia. Gastric protection was evaluated by measuring the ulcer index, MDA concentrations, and histopathological studies. Rats pretreated either with famotidine or CoQ10 had significantly diminished gastric mucosal damage which was assessed with gross and microscopic analysis (p < 0.00625). MDA levels were significantly lower in famotidine 20 mg/kg and CoQ10 pretreatment for 7 days group (p < 0.00625).

  7. Interactions of ethanol on the acute toxicity of cocaine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Trouve, R. ); Latour, C ); Nahas, G.G. Columbia Univ., New York, NY )

    1992-02-26

    Administration of 65 mg/kg in the awake rate, restrained and instrumented, is associated with cardiovascular toxicity, convulsions and lethality within 9 feet 44 inches {plus minus} 4 feet 56 inches. Such an outcome is prevented if selected Ca{sup 2+} antagonists are administered intraarterially 5 minutes following cocaine. Four additional groups of Sprague Dawley rats were studied. The first was administered I.P. ethanol 1.5-2.0 gr. Such doses were well tolerated only producing hypertension of 50 minutes duration and all animals survived without apparent ill effects. Second and third groups were first administered the same doses of ethanol and 15 minutes later 65 mg/kg of cocaine. Survival time was 5 feet 49 inches with 1.5 mg/kg ethanol and 5 feet 57 inches {plus minus} 1 foot 26 inches with 2 mg/kg, significantly less than after cocaine administration alone. In a fourth group, animals were treated intraarterially with nicardipine or flunarizine, 2 minutes after cocaine. Survival time was not different from saline control. Ethanol enhances significantly cocaine lethal toxicity in the rate and prevents the protective effects of antidotes to this alkaloid.

  8. Ethanol intake under social circumstances or alone in sprague-dawley rats: impact of age, sex, social activity, and social anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Truxell, Eric M; Spear, Linda P

    2015-01-01

    In human adolescents, heavy drinking is often predicted by high sociability in males and high social anxiety in females. This study assessed the impact of baseline levels of social activity and social anxiety-like behavior in group-housed adolescent and adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats on ethanol (EtOH) intake when drinking alone or in a social group. Social activity and anxiety-like behavior initially were assessed in a modified social interaction test, followed by 6 drinking sessions that occurred every other day in animals given ad libitum food and water. Sessions consisted of 30-minute access to 10% EtOH in a "supersac" (3% sucrose + 0.1% saccharin) solution given alone as well as in groups of 5 same-sex littermates, with order of the alternating session types counterbalanced across animals. Adolescent males and adults of both sexes overall consumed more EtOH under social than alone circumstances, whereas adolescent females ingested more EtOH when alone. Highly socially active adolescent males demonstrated elevated levels of EtOH intake relative to their low and medium socially active counterparts when drinking in groups, but not when tested alone. Adolescent females with high levels of social anxiety-like behavior demonstrated the highest EtOH intake under social, but not alone circumstances. Among adults, baseline levels of social anxiety-like behavior did not contribute to individual differences in EtOH intake in either sex. The results clearly demonstrate that in adolescent rats, but not their adult counterparts, responsiveness to a social peer predicts EtOH intake in a social setting-circumstances under which drinking typically occurs in human adolescents. High levels of social activity in males and high levels of social anxiety-like behavior in females were associated with elevated social drinking, suggesting that males ingest EtOH for its socially enhancing properties, whereas females ingest EtOH for its socially anxiolytic effects. Copyright

  9. CHOLINE AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN BALANCE CAUSED BY ACUTE NEONATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, Cynthia F.; Wellmann, Kristen A.; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1% of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits, but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of 8 treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1-5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid® on P5, C or S post-treatment from P6-20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol. PMID:26085462

  10. Effects of acute L-carnitine intake on metabolic and blood lactate levels of elite badminton players.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu, Hüseyin; Senel, Omer; Güzel, Nevin A

    2008-04-01

    Purpose of this study is to research the effects of acute L-Carnitine intake on badminton players' metabolic and blood lactate values. A total of 16 Turkish national badminton players (8 male, 8 female) were voluntarily participated into study. M