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Sample records for acute ethanol sensitivity

  1. Acute Oral Ethanol Exposure Triggers Asthma In Cockroach Allergen–Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Jiyoun; Beal, Dominic R.; Vaickus, Louis J.; Craciun, Florin L.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma may be triggered by multiple mediators, including allergen-IgE cross-linking and non-IgE mechanisms. Several clinical studies have shown acute ethanol consumption exacerbates asthma, yet no animal model exists to study this process. We developed a model of ethanol-triggered asthma in allergen-sensitized mice to evaluate the mechanisms of ethanol inducing asthma-like responses. Outbred mice were exposed to cockroach allergens on Days 0 and 14; and on Day 21, mice received ethanol by oral gavage. Tracer studies confirmed alcohol aspiration did not occur. Within 30 minutes, alcohol induced degranulation of over 74% of mast cells, and multiple parameters of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation were triggered. Ethanol-gavaged mice had a fivefold increased production of eotaxin-2 (534 pg/mL) and a sevenfold increase in bronchoalveolar eosinophils (70,080 cells). Ethanol induced a 10-fold increase in IL-13, from 84 pg/mL in sensitized mice to 845 pg/mL in ethanol-gavaged sensitized mice. In cockroach allergen–sensitized mice, ethanol triggered asthma-like changes in respiratory physiology and a significant fivefold increase in airway mucin production. Importantly, none of these asthmatic exacerbations were observed in normal mice gavaged with ethanol. Cromolyn sodium effectively stabilized mast cells, yet increased mucin production and bronchoalveolar eosinophil recruitment. Together, these data show a single oral alcohol exposure will trigger asthma-like pulmonary inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice, providing a novel asthma model. PMID:22796441

  2. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Lowing, Jennifer L; Bosse, Kelly E; Hildebrandt, Clara C; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Conti, Alana C

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  3. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Susick, Laura L.; Lowing, Jennifer L.; Bosse, Kelly E.; Hildebrandt, Clara C.; Chrumka, Alexandria C.; Conti, Alana C.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  4. Mechanics of the carotid artery wall and baroreflex sensitivity after acute ethanol administration in young healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Fazio, M; Bardelli, M; Macaluso, L; Fiammengo, F; Mattei, P L; Bossi, M; Fabris, B; Fischetti, F; Pascazio, L; Candido, R; Carretta, R

    2001-09-01

    The effects of ethanol administered orally (300 mg/kg in 250 ml of water) or intravenously (7.5 mg.min(-1).kg(-1) in 250 ml of saline over 40 min) on common carotid haemodynamics, wall mechanics and baroreflex sensitivity were compared with the effects of the intravenous infusion of 250 ml of saline. Ethanol or saline was administered to 10 healthy volunteers after 30 min of supine rest, and measurements were obtained 40 min (median; range 34-46 min) after administration. After ethanol administration, the plasma alcohol level rose from 0 to 0.3+/-0.07 g/l. Mean arterial blood pressure had risen slightly at 20 min, but was normalized by 40 min, the time at which the haemodynamic study was performed. Heart rate decreased after infusion of either saline or alcohol, but was unchanged after oral ethanol administration. Both oral and intravenous ethanol administration were associated with significant decreases in baroreflex sensitivity, carotid shear stress and blood velocity, compared with resting values, while the mean carotid artery diameter was increased, and blood viscosity and mean blood flow were unchanged. No changes were observed in these parameters after saline administration. Ethanol, administered either intravenously or orally, increased the stiffness of the carotid artery and decreased the pulsatility (systo-diastolic changes) of its diameter. A direct, statistically significant correlation was found between the decrease in shear stress and the decrease in baroreflex heart rate control sensitivity after both modes of alcohol administration, while no such correlation was found between the increase in the Peterson elastic modulus and the decrease in carotid diameter pulsatility on the one hand or the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity on the other. In conclusion, reduced shear stress associated with vasodilatation of the carotid artery wall may contribute to the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity observed after acute ethanol administration.

  5. A major QTL for acute ethanol sensitivity in the alcohol tolerant and non-tolerant selected rat lines.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, R A; Erwin, V G; Bludeau, P; Deng, X; Fay, T; Floyd, K L; Deitrich, R A

    2009-08-01

    The Alcohol Tolerant and Alcohol Non-Tolerant rats (AT, ANT) were selectively bred for ethanol-induced ataxia as measured on the inclined plane. Here we report on a quantitative trait locus (QTL) study in an F(2) intercross population derived from inbred AT and ANT (IAT, IANT) and a follow-up study of congenics that were bred to examine one of the mapped QTLs. Over 1200 F(2) offspring were tested for inclined plane sensitivity, acute tolerance on the inclined plane, duration of the loss of righting reflex (LORR) and blood ethanol at regain of the righting reflex (BECRR). F(2) rats that were in the upper and lower 20% for inclined plane sensitivity were genotyped with 78 SSLP markers. Significant QTLs for inclined plane sensitivity were mapped on chromosomes 8 and 20; suggestive QTLs were mapped on chromosomes 1, 2 and 3. Highly significant QTLs for LORR duration (LOD = 12.4) and BECRR (LOD = 5.7) were mapped to the same locus on chromosome 1. Breeding and testing of reciprocal congenic lines confirmed the chromosome 1 LORR/BECRR QTL. A series of recombinant congenic sub-lines were bred to fine-map this QTL. Current results have narrowed the QTL to an interval of between 5 and 20 Mb. We expect to be able to narrow the interval to less than 5 Mb with additional genotyping and continued breeding of recombinant sub-congenic lines.

  6. Gender differences in ethanol-induced behavioral sensitivity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Dlugos, Cynthia A; Brown, Shereene J; Rabin, Richard A

    2011-02-01

    Gender-related differential sensitivity to ethanol has long been recognized. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the zebrafish, an animal model used currently to study genetics and development related to a variety of human diseases, is also sensitive to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of ethanol. Sensitivity to ethanol in the zebrafish can be easily gauged with a simple nonintrusive behavioral test that measures ethanol-related alterations in schooling by determining the distance between each fish and its nearest neighbor. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of gender on the strain-specific ethanol sensitivity that we had observed previously. One hundred and sixty zebrafish of the wild-type (WT) and the long fin striped (LFS) strains were equally divided by gender for use in this study. For acute ethanol treatment, the fish were separated by gender and strain and exposed to 0.0, 0.125, 0.25 0.50, or 1.0% (vol/vol) ethanol. In the chronic study, eight fish of each strain and gender were exposed to 0.5% (vol/vol) ethanol for a period of 10 weeks and the swimming behavior tested before treatment and after each week of treatment. Results showed that female WT zebrafish displayed enhanced sensitivity to the effects of chronic ethanol exposure of increased nearest neighbor distances, whereas male and female LFS fish were not significantly affected by chronic ethanol exposure. Results of the acute ethanol study showed a dose-dependent effect in both strains and a gender effect that needs to be further investigated before enhanced female sensitivity to acute ethanol can be verified. PMID:20880661

  7. The contribution of electrophysiology to knowledge of the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Little, H J

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the effects of ethanol on the components of neuronal transmission and the relationship of such effects to the behavioural actions of ethanol. The concentrations of ethanol with acute actions on voltage-sensitive ion channels are first described, then the actions of ethanol on ligand-gated ion channels, including those controlled by cholinergic receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors, the various excitatory amino acid receptors, and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. Acute effects of ethanol are then described on brain areas thought to be involved in arousal and attention, the reinforcing effects of ethanol, the production of euphoria, the actions of ethanol on motor control, and the amnesic effects of ethanol; the acute effects of ethanol demonstrated by EEG studies are also discussed. Chronic effects of alcohol on neuronal transmission are described in the context of the various components of the ethanol withdrawal syndrome, withdrawal hyperexcitability, dysphoria and anhedonia, withdrawal anxiety, craving, and relapse drinking. Electrophysiological studies on the genetic influences on the effects of ethanol are discussed, particularly the acute actions of ethanol and electrophysiological differences reported in individuals predisposed to alcoholism. The conclusion notes the concentration of studies on the classical transmitters, with relative neglect of the effects of ethanol on peptides and on neuronal interactions between brain areas and integrated patterns of neuronal activity. PMID:10665833

  8. Neurosteroid Influences on Sensitivity to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Christa M.; Rossi, David J.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    This review will highlight a variety of mechanisms by which neurosteroids affect sensitivity to ethanol, including physiological states associated with activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axes, and the effects of chronic exposure to ethanol, in addition to behavioral implications. To date, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor mechanisms are a major focus of the modulation of ethanol effects by neuroactive steroids. While NMDA receptor mechanisms are gaining prominence in the literature, these complex data would be best discussed separately. Accordingly, GABAA receptor mechanisms are emphasized in this review with brief mention of some NMDA receptor mechanisms to point out contrasting neuroactive steroid pharmacology. Overall, the data suggest that neurosteroids are virtually ubiquitous modulators of inhibitory neurotransmission. Neurosteroids appear to affect sensitivity to ethanol in specific brain regions and, consequently, specific behavioral tests, possibly related to the efficacy and potency of ethanol to potentiate the release of GABA and increase neurosteroid concentrations. Although direct interaction of ethanol and neuroactive steroids at common receptor binding sites has been suggested in some studies, this proposition is still controversial. It is currently difficult to assign a specific mechanism by which neuroactive steroids could modulate the effects of ethanol in particular behavioral tasks. PMID:22654852

  9. Decreased sensitivity to the hypnotic effects of ethanol early in ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Silveri, M M; Spear, L P

    1998-05-01

    Sensitivity to the hypnotic effects of ethanol was examined in Sprague-Dawley male and female rats at 16, 26, 36, 46, 56, or 96 days postnatally. Following administration of 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, or 5.0 g/kg of a 17% v/v ethanol solution, sleep times were recorded and blood alcohol levels (BALs) and brain alcohol levels (BrALs) were measured upon awakening. In addition to examining ethanol sleep time during ontogeny, data were used to estimate acute tolerance (indexed by the slope of the linear regressions of waking BALs and BrALs as a function of dose) and initial brain sensitivity to ethanol (indexed by calculating the y-intercept from the linear regression of BrALs as a function of sleep time). The results showed a marked increase in sensitivity to ethanol hypnosis during ontogeny, with young animals exhibiting shorter ethanol-induced sleep times and high waking BALs and BrALs. This ontogenetic increase in ethanol sensitivity was associated with a developmental decline in acute tolerance, with acute tolerance being most pronounced at postnatal day (P) 16 and evident only up to P36. Initial sensitivity conversely increased with age, with P16 pups showing lower initial brain sensitivity to ethanol than at all other ages. Gender differences emerged in adulthood, with males sleeping significantly longer than females at P56 and P96. These findings suggest that the marked insensitivity of young animals to the hypnotic effects of ethanol is related to both pronounced acute tolerance, as well as reduced initial brain sensitivity to ethanol early in life. PMID:9622449

  10. Acute ethanol preexposure promotes liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in mice by activating ALDH2.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiang; Beier, Juliane I; Baldauf, Keegan J; Jokinen, Jenny D; Zhong, Hai; Arteel, Gavin E

    2014-01-01

    It is known that chronic ethanol significantly impairs liver regeneration. However, the effect of acute ethanol exposure on liver regeneration remains largely unknown. To address this question, C57Bl6/J mice were exposed to acute ethanol (6 g/kg intragastrically) for 3 days, and partial hepatectomy (PHx) was performed 24 h after the last dose. Surprisingly, acute ethanol preexposure promoted liver regeneration. This effect of ethanol did not correlate with changes in expression of cell cycle regulatory genes (e.g., cyclin D1, p21, and p27) but did correlate with protection against the effect of PHx on indices of impaired lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Ethanol preexposure protected against inhibition of the oxidant-sensitive mitochondrial enzyme, aconitase. The activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) was significantly increased by ethanol preexposure. The effect of ethanol was blocked by inhibiting (Daidzin) and was mimicked by activating (Alda-1) ALDH2. Lipid peroxides are also substrates for ALDH2; indeed, alcohol preexposure blunted the increase in lipid peroxidation (4OH-nonenal adducts) caused by PHx. Taken together, these data suggest that acute preoperative ethanol exposure "preconditions" the liver to respond more rapidly to regenerate after PHx by activating mitochondrial ALDH2, which prevents oxidative stress in this compartment.

  11. Up-regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter I mediates ethanol sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, J-H; Ma, Y-H; Yang, N; Mei, Z-T; Zhang, M-H; Fei, J; Guo, L-H

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol is among the most widely abused drugs in the world. Chronic ethanol consumption leads to ethanol tolerance and addiction, and impairs learning and memory. Na+/Cl- dependent GABA transporters play an important role in controlling the concentration of GABA in the synaptic cleft, and thus they control the intensity and duration of synaptic transmission of GABA. It has been suggested that GABAergic system is involved in ethanol consumption, tolerance and addiction, because chronic ethanol consumption alters the expression of GABAA receptors and drugs on GABA receptors affect ethanol actions. The results of the present study reveal that that activity of GABA transporters in mouse brain after 15-min acute ethanol injection or after chronic ethanol consumption is increased. Moreover, mice pre-injected with a competitive or a noncompetitive antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) showed high sensitivity to the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol. In contrast, transgenic mice overexpressing GAT1 displayed low sensitivity to ethanol, as shown by the righting reflex test. Mice overexpressing GAT1 survived a lethal dose of ethanol (9 g/kg, i.p.) longer, maintained locomotor activity longer after a sub-lethal dose (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) and exhibited a higher median lethal dose than wild-type littermates. These results suggest that GAT1 plays an important role in sensitivity to ethanol, and might be a therapeutic target for alcoholism prevention and treatment. Acute and chronic ethanol administration resulted in the increase of GABA transporter function. Use of GAT1 selective inhibitors and GAT1 overexpressing mice thus demonstrate that GAT1 should be an important protein mediating sensitivity to ethanol in mice.

  12. Genetically determined differences in ethanol sensitivity influenced by body temperature during intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Alkana, R.L.; Finn, D.A.; Bejanian, M.; Crabbe, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The present study investigated the importance of body temperature during intoxication in mediating differences between five inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J; BALB/cJ; DBA/2J; A/HeJ; 129/J) in their acute sensitivity to the hypnotic effects of ethanol. Mice exposed to 22/degrees/C after ethanol injection became hypothermic and exhibited statistically significant differences between strains in rectal temperatures at the return of the righting reflex (RORR), duration of loss of the righting reflex (LORR), and blood and brain ethanol concentrations at RORR. Exposure to 34/degrees/C after injection offset ethanol-hypothermia and markedly reduced strain-related differences in rectal temperatures and blood and brain ethanol concentrations at RORR. Brain ethanol concentrations at RORR were significantly lower in C57, BALB, DBA and A/He mice exposed to 34/degrees/C compared to mice exposed to 22/degrees/C during intoxication suggesting that offsetting hypothermia increased ethanol sensitivity in these strains. Taken with previous in vitro studies, these results suggest that genetically determined differences in acute sensitivity to the behavioral effects of ethanol reflect differences in body temperature during intoxication as well as differences in sensitivity to the initial actions of ethanol at the cellular level.

  13. Ethanol intake and motor sensitization: the role of brain catalase activity in mice with different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Pastor, R; Aragon, C M G

    2004-09-15

    The C57BL/6J strain of inbred mice shows a characteristic pattern of ethanol-induced behaviors: very weak acute locomotor stimulation, a lack of locomotor-sensitizing effect of ethanol, and a high level of ethanol intake. This strain has relatively low levels of activity of the ethanol metabolizing enzyme catalase, and it has been proposed that brain catalase plays a role in the modulation of some behavioral effects of ethanol. In the first study of the present paper, we investigated the effects of pharmacological manipulations of brain catalase activity on C57BL/6J mice in acute ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol intake. Results indicated that the reduction in motor activity produced by ethanol was reversed by pretreatment with catalase potentiators and it was enhanced by catalase inhibitors. In addition, ethanol intake was highly correlated with brain catalase activity in mice treated with a catalase potentiator. In the second study, F1 hybrid mice (SWXB6) from the outbred Swiss-Webster mice and the inbred C57BL/6J mice were used. Basal brain catalase activity levels of F1 mice were intermediate between to those of the two progenitor genotypes. That profile of catalase activity was parallel to the acute-ethanol-induced locomotion and to repeated-ethanol-induced motor sensitization effects observed across the three types of mice. These data suggest that brain catalase activity modifications in the C57BL/6J strain change the pattern of several ethanol-related behaviors in this inbred mouse.

  14. Experimental traumatic brain injury alters ethanol consumption and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lowing, Jennifer L; Susick, Laura L; Caruso, James P; Provenzano, Anthony M; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Conti, Alana C

    2014-10-15

    Altered alcohol consumption patterns after traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to significant impairments in TBI recovery. Few preclinical models have been used to examine alcohol use across distinct phases of the post-injury period, leaving mechanistic questions unanswered. To address this, the aim of this study was to describe the histological and behavioral outcomes of a noncontusive closed-head TBI in the mouse, after which sensitivity to and consumption of alcohol were quantified, in addition to dopaminergic signaling markers. We hypothesized that TBI would alter alcohol consumption patterns and related signal transduction pathways that were congruent to clinical observations. After midline impact to the skull, latency to right after injury, motor deficits, traumatic axonal injury, and reactive astrogliosis were evaluated in C57BL/6J mice. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation was observed in white matter tracts at 6, 24, and 72 h post-TBI. Increased intensity of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity was observed by 24 h, primarily under the impact site and in the nucleus accumbens, a striatal subregion, as early as 72 h, persisting to 7 days, after TBI. At 14 days post-TBI, when mice were tested for ethanol sensitivity after acute high-dose ethanol (4 g/kg, intraperitoneally), brain-injured mice exhibited increased sedation time compared with uninjured mice, which was accompanied by deficits in striatal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32) phosphorylation. At 17 days post-TBI, ethanol intake was assessed using the Drinking-in-the-Dark paradigm. Intake across 7 days of consumption was significantly reduced in TBI mice compared with sham controls, paralleling the reduction in alcohol consumption observed clinically in the initial post-injury period. These data demonstrate that TBI increases sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation and affects downstream signaling mediators of striatal

  15. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  16. Acute effects of ethanol on left ventricular diastolic function.

    PubMed Central

    Kupari, M; Koskinen, P; Hynynen, M; Salmenperä, M; Ventilä, M

    1990-01-01

    Transmitral flow velocities were measured by Doppler echocardiography in nine healthy men who ingested 1 g/kg of ethanol within one hour. The measurements were made before the first drink and every hour thereafter for three hours. The peak mean (SE) blood ethanol concentration was 21.4 (1.0) mmol/l. Each man was also studied after drinking fruit juice. Ethanol increased the heart rate but did not change the peak transmitral velocities, the normalised peak filling rate, the deceleration of early flow, or the duration of relaxation as measured from the second heart sound to the peak early diastolic velocity. The ratio of the peak atrial to the peak early diastolic velocity rose from 0.41 (0.03) to 0.44 (0.03) after ethanol but remained unchanged after juice. The difference between juice and ethanol was independent of changes in heart rate. The fluid balance was more negative in the ethanol experiment (-727 (114) ml v -107 (70) ml), suggesting a reduction in preload, and the ethanol-induced net loss of fluid correlated with the concomitant change in the velocity ratio. A moderate dose of ethanol causes a small acute increase of the ratio of the peak atrial to the peak early diastolic velocity of mitral flow in healthy subjects. Although this change indicates altered diastolic function of the left ventricle, most of it may result from the diuretic effect of ethanol. Any major impairment of ventricular relaxation seems unlikely. PMID:2393610

  17. Ethanol Increases Mechanical Pain Sensitivity in Rats via Activation of GABAA Receptors in Medial Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Geng, Kai-Wen; He, Ting; Wang, Rui-Rui; Li, Chun-Li; Luo, Wen-Jun; Wu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Yan; Li, Zhen; Lu, Yun-Fei; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol is widely known for its ability to cause dramatic changes in emotion, social cognition, and behavior following systemic administration in humans. Human neuroimaging studies suggest that alcohol dependence and chronic pain may share common mechanisms through amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) interactions. However, whether acute administration of ethanol in the mPFC can modulate pain perception is unknown. Here we showed that bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the prelimbic and infralimbic areas of the mPFC lowered the bilateral mechanical pain threshold for 48 h without influencing thermal pain sensitivity in adult rats. However, bilateral microinjections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid into the mPFC or bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the dorsolateral PFC (also termed as motor cortex area 1 in Paxinos and Watson's atlas of The Rat Brain. Elsevier Academic Press, Amsterdam, 2005) failed to do so, suggesting regional selectivity of the effects of ethanol. Moreover, bilateral microinjections of ethanol did not change the expression of either pro-apoptotic (caspase-3 and Bax) or anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, suggesting that the dose was safe and validating the method used in the current study. To determine whether γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors are involved in mediating the ethanol effects, muscimol, a selective GABAA receptor agonist, or bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, was administered alone or co-administered with ethanol through the same route into the bilateral mPFC. The results showed that muscimol mimicked the effects of ethanol while bicuculline completely reversed the effects of ethanol and muscimol. In conclusion, ethanol increases mechanical pain sensitivity through activation of GABAA receptors in the mPFC of rats. PMID:27628528

  18. Ethanol-Regulated Genes That Contribute to Ethanol Sensitivity and Rapid Tolerance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eric C.; Allouche, Lorien; Chapot, Paul A.; Vranizan, Karen; Moore, Monica S.; Heberlein, Ulrike; Wolf, Fred W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Increased ethanol intake, a major predictor for the development of alcohol use disorders, is facilitated by the development of tolerance to both the aversive and pleasurable effects of the drug. The molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol tolerance development are complex and are not yet well understood. Methods To identify genetic mechanisms that contribute to ethanol tolerance, we examined the time course of gene expression changes elicited by a single sedating dose of ethanol in Drosophila, and completed a behavioral survey of strains harboring mutations in ethanol-regulated genes. Results Enrichment for genes in metabolism, nucleic acid binding, olfaction, regulation of signal transduction, and stress suggests that these biological processes are coordinately affected by ethanol exposure. We also detected a coordinate up-regulation of genes in the Toll and Imd innate immunity signal transduction pathways. A multi-study comparison revealed a small set of genes showing similar regulation, including increased expression of 3 genes for serine biosynthesis. A survey of Drosophila strains harboring mutations in ethanol-regulated genes for ethanol sensitivity and tolerance phenotypes revealed roles for serine biosynthesis, olfaction, transcriptional regulation, immunity, and metabolism. Flies harboring deletions of the genes encoding the olfactory co-receptor Or83b or the sirtuin Sir2 showed marked changes in the development of ethanol tolerance. Conclusions Our findings implicate novel roles for these genes in regulating ethanol behavioral responses. PMID:19951294

  19. Acute ethanol effects on focal cerebral ischemia in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y J; Yang, G Y; Ben-Joseph, O; Ross, B D; Chenevert, T L; Domino, E F

    1998-05-01

    The effects of acute ethanol intoxication were investigated in a rat model of unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion. Groups of 5 to 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 hr of left middle cerebral artery occlusion. All groups were deprived of food overnight and were pretreated intraperitoneally with 5% dextrose solution (10 ml/kg), 20% ethyl alcohol in 5% dextrose solution (2 g/kg), or 30% ethyl alcohol in a 5% dextrose solution (3 g/kg) 1 hr before middle cerebral artery occlusion. Regional cerebral blood flow during ipsilateral occlusion was approximately 9.1 to 10% of baseline in all groups. The mean % brain water content in control, 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups, and 3 g/kg ethanol-treated groups were: in the ischemic core--81.6, 81.2, and 82.4; intermediate zone--80.5, 80.6, and 81.7; and outer zone--79.7, 79.7, and 80.8, respectively. Brain Na+ and K+ content in the three groups was related to water content, but much greater with ethanol pretreatment. The water content of the intermediate zones in the 3 g/kg ethanol-treated animals was significantly greater than in the control (p < 0.01 and 0.001) and the 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups. One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant dose-effect relationship in which the lower dose of ethanol tended to reduce ischemic core water content, and the larger dose increased ischemic core water, compared with the control. None of the overnight fasted groups had any significant hyperglycemia. The group given 3 g/kg i.p. ethanol 1 hr before had exacerbated edema formation with a mean whole blood level of ethanol of approximately 230 mg/dl. The neurotoxic effects of high concentrations of ethanol were unrelated to any change in plasma glucose concentrations.

  20. Anxiety in mice following acute aspartame and ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    LaBuda, C J; Hale, R L

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to look at the effect of aspartame on the anxiolytic actions of ethanol. Previous research has shown that ethanol reliably produces an anxiolytic effect on rodent's plus-maze performance. There have been anecdotal reports that aspartame increases anxiety. CD-1 male mice were given i.p. aspartame doses of vehicle, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg, followed 30 min later by i.p. ethanol doses of 1.6 g/kg or vehicle. Animals were then placed in an open field, then tested in the plus-maze. Results determined that the aspartame condition had no significant effect on anxiety-related behavior, nor did it alter the anxiolytic actions of ethanol. Thus, acute high dose exposure to aspartame does not appear to affect anxiety-related behaviors.

  1. Acute Ethanol Withdrawal Impairs Contextual Learning and Enhances Cued Learning

    PubMed Central

    Tipps, Megan E.; Raybuck, Jonathan D.; Buck, Kari J.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol affects many of the brain regions and neural processes that support learning and memory, and these effects are thought to underlie, at least in part, the development of addiction. Although much work has been done regarding the effects of alcohol intoxication on learning and memory, little is known about the effects of acute withdrawal from a single alcohol exposure. Methods We assess the effects of acute ethanol withdrawal (6 h post-injection with 4 g/kg ethanol) on two forms of fear conditioning (delay and trace fear conditioning) in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. The influence of a number of experimental parameters (pre- and post-training withdrawal exposure; foreground/background processing; training strength; non-associative effects) is also investigated. Results Acute ethanol withdrawal during training had a bidirectional effect on fear conditioned responses, decreasing contextual responses and increasing cued responses. These effects were apparent for both trace and delay conditioning in DBA/2J mice and for trace conditioning in C57BL/6J mice; however, C57BL/6J mice were selectively resistant to the effects of acute withdrawal on delay cued responses. Conclusions Our results show that acute withdrawal from a single, initial ethanol exposure is sufficient to alter long-term learning in mice. In addition, the differences between the strains and conditioning paradigms used suggest that specific learning processes can be differentially affected by acute withdrawal in a manner that is distinct from the reported effects of both alcohol intoxication and withdrawal following chronic alcohol exposure. Thus, our results suggest a unique effect of acute alcohol withdrawal on learning and memory processes. PMID:25684050

  2. Evaluation of acute effects of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Zahoor Ahmad; Chowta, Mukta N.; Bolumbu, Ganaraja; Rakesh, K. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the acute effect of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats and to determine the specificity of the effect of melatonin on ethanol intake as compared to an intake of plain tap water or sugar water. Materials and Methods: A total of three experiments (2 weeks duration each) using different drinking solutions (ethanol, plain tap water, sugar water) was conducted in individually housed male wistar rats of 5 weeks age. Each animal had access to bottles containing drinking solutions for 2 h a day. In each experiment, on day 1, day 2, day 4, day 5, day 8, day 9, day 11, day 12 rats received drinking solutions. Each individual rat received single doses of saline, melatonin (50 mg and 100 mg/kg), and naltrexone on day 2, 5, 9, and 12, 1-h before receiving drinking solution. The order of drug administration is permuted such a way that each animal received the drugs in a different order in different experiments. Results: Melatonin has significantly decreased ethanol consumption by the rats and effect is dose-dependent. Naltrexone also has caused a significant reduction in the ethanol consumption. The maximum reduction in ethanol consumption was seen with melatonin 100 mg/kg dose compared to melatonin 50 mg/kg and naltrexone. There was no statistically significant effect of melatonin on plain water and sugar solution intake. Conclusions: Melatonin decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol naïve rats. The effect of melatonin is similar to naltrexone affecting selectively ethanol consumption, but not plain water and sugar water consumption. PMID:26288469

  3. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  4. Acute Ethanol Causes Hepatic Mitochondrial Depolarization in Mice: Role of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Rehman, Hasibur; Liu, Qinlong; Theruvath, Tom P.; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis. Methods Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT), and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), calcein, NAD(P)H, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1–6 g/kg). Results Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(P)H autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼70% and ∼20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis. Conclusions Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to

  5. The discriminative stimulus properties of ethanol and acute ethanol withdrawal states in rats.

    PubMed

    Gauvin, D V; Harland, R D; Criado, J R; Michaelis, R C; Holloway, F A

    1989-10-01

    Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained in a standard two-choice Drug 1-Drug 2 discrimination task utilizing 3.0 mg/kg chlordiazepoxide (CDP, an anxiolytic drug) and 20 mg/kg pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, an anxiogenic drug) as discriminative stimuli under a VR 5-15 schedule of food reinforcement. Saline tests conducted at specific time points after acute high doses of ethanol (3.0 and 4.0 g/kg) indicated a delayed rebound effect, evidenced by a shift to PTZ-appropriate responding. Insofar as such a shift in lever selection indexes a delayed anxiety-like state, this acute 'withdrawal' reaction can be said to induce an affective state similar to that seen with chronic ethanol withdrawal states. Ethanol generalization tests: (1) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent biphasic generalization to CDP, (2) failed to block the PTZ stimulus and (3) failed to block the time- and dose-dependent elicitation of an ethanol-rebound effect. These data suggest that ethanol's anxiolytic effects are tenuous. PMID:2791886

  6. Congenital brain serotonin deficiency leads to reduced ethanol sensitivity and increased ethanol consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Benjamin D; Salahi, A Ayten; Caron, Marc G

    2014-02-01

    Serotonergic dysfunction has been hypothesized to play an important role in the pathophysiology of alcoholism. However, whether congenital serotonin (5-HT) deficiency leads to increased alcohol consumption or affects ethanol-related behaviors has not been established. Here, we use a transgenic mouse line that expresses a hypofunctional variant of the 5-HT synthesis enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase 2, to examine the impact of 5-HT deficiency on responses to alcohol. We demonstrate that these 5-HT-deficient transgenic animals (Tph2KI mice) recover their righting reflex more rapidly than wild-type controls following a high dose of ethanol and exhibit blunted locomotor retardation in response to repeated ethanol administration. In addition, compared to WT controls, 5-HT-deficient animals consume significantly more ethanol and exhibit increased preference for ethanol in two-bottle choice tests. Our data also suggest that 5-HT plays a critical role in mediating the effects of ethanol on Akt/GSK3β signaling in the nucleus accumbens. Overall, our results corroborate previous theories regarding the importance of brain 5-HT levels in mediating responsiveness to alcohol and demonstrate, for the first time, that congenital 5-HT deficiency leads to increased ethanol consumption and decreased sensitivity to the sedative-like effects of ethanol, perhaps in part through modulating Akt/GSK3β signaling.

  7. Acute Ethanol Does Not Always Affect Delay Discounting in Rats Selected to Prefer or Avoid Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Clare J.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether animals predisposed to prefer alcohol possess an altered acute response to alcohol on a delay discounting task relative to animals predisposed to avoid alcohol. Methods: We used rats selected to prefer or avoid alcohol to assess whether genotype moderates changes in delay discounting induced by acute ethanol exposure. Selectively bred rat lines of Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP; n = 8) and non-preferring (sNP; n = 8) rats, and alko alcohol (AA, n = 8) and alko non-alcohol (ANA, n = 8) rats were trained in an adjusting amount task to assess delay discounting. Results: There were no significant effects of line on baseline discounting; however, both lines of alcohol-preferring rats exhibit slowed reaction times. Acute ethanol (0, 0.25, 0.5 g/kg) treatment also had no effect on delay discounting in any of the selectively bred rat lines. Conclusion: Our data indicate that in these lines of animals, alcohol preference or avoidance has no impact on delay discounting following acute ethanol exposure. It is possible that other genetic models or lines may be differentially affected by alcohol and exhibit qualitatively and quantitatively different responses in delay discounting tasks. PMID:22645038

  8. MeCP2 regulates ethanol sensitivity and intake.

    PubMed

    Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; Chen, Jihuan; Lefebvre, Celine; Kawamura, Tomoya; Kreifeldt, Max; Basson, Oan; Roberts, Amanda J; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the expression of chromatin-regulating genes in the prefrontal cortex and in the shell subdivision of the nucleus accumbens during protracted withdrawal in mice with increased ethanol drinking after chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure and in mice with a history of non-dependent drinking. We observed that the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) was one of the few chromatin-regulating genes to be differentially regulated by a history of dependence. As MeCP2 has the potential of acting as a broad gene regulator, we investigated sensitivity to ethanol and ethanol drinking in MeCP2(308/) (Y) mice, which harbor a truncated MeCP2 allele but have a milder phenotype than MeCP2 null mice. We observed that MeCP2(308/) (Y) mice were more sensitive to ethanol's stimulatory and sedative effects than wild-type (WT) mice, drank less ethanol in a limited access 2 bottle choice paradigm and did not show increased drinking after induction of dependence with exposure to CIE vapors. Alcohol metabolism did not differ in MeCP2(308/) (Y) and WT mice. Additionally, MeCP2(308/) (Y) mice did not differ from WT mice in ethanol preference in a 24-hour paradigm nor in their intake of graded solutions of saccharin or quinine, suggesting that the MeCP2(308/) (Y) mutation did not alter taste function. Lastly, using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis algorithm, we found a significant overlap in the genes regulated by alcohol and by MeCP2. Together, these results suggest that MeCP2 contributes to the regulation of ethanol sensitivity and drinking.

  9. Acute and chronic tianeptine treatments attenuate ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kayir, Hakan; Celik, Turgay; Yüksel, Nevzat

    2006-05-01

    Effects of acute and chronic tianeptine treatments on ethanol withdrawal syndrome were investigated in rats. Ethanol (7.2% v/v) was given to adult male Wistar rats by a liquid diet for 30 days. Acute or chronic (twice daily) tianeptine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and saline were administered to rats intraperitoneally. Acute and last chronic tianeptine injections and saline were done 30 min before ethanol withdrawal testing. After 2nd, 4th and 6th hours of ethanol withdrawal, rats were observed for 5 min, and withdrawal signs which included locomotor hyperactivity, agitation, tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behavior and audiogenic seizures were recorded or rated. Locomotor activity in naive (no ethanol-dependent rats) was also tested after acute tianeptine treatments. Acute but not chronic tianeptine treatment attenuated locomotor hyperactivity and agitation in ethanol-dependent rats. Both acute and chronic tianeptine treatment produced some significant inhibitory effects on tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behaviors and audiogenic seizures during the ethanol withdrawal. Our results suggest that acute or chronic tianeptine treatment attenuates ethanol withdrawal syndrome in ethanol-dependent rats and this drug may be useful for treatment of ethanol-type dependence.

  10. Acute and chronic effect of ethanol on hepatic albumin synthesis in rat liver in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtake, H.; Kato, S.; Murawaki, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Wakushima, T.; Hirayama, C.

    1986-08-01

    To study the effects of ethanol and its metabolite on albumin metabolism, we examined the hepatic albumin synthesis and secretion in male Wistar rats in vitro, following acute and chronic ethanol administration. After acute ethanol administration, proalbumin synthesis in rat liver in vitro, declined to 47% of the control level at 4 hrs, the lowest level, and increased thereafter to slightly higher than the control level at 16 hrs. On the other hand, chronic ethanol administration for 4 weeks, increased proalbumin synthesis to 1.5 times that of the control level. In the acute ethanol group, a significant negative correlation was observed between proalbumin radioactivity and the concentration of hepatic ethanol and acetaldehyde. The variation between proalbumin radioactivity and hepatic ethanol concentration was wider than the variation between proalbumin and hepatic acetaldehyde. In the chronic ethanol group, ethanol was not detected in the liver. No significant differences from the proalbumin/albumin ratio were seen at any time point after acute or chronic ethanol administration. These findings suggest that the effects of ethanol on hepatic albumin synthesis differ with the method of ethanol administration, and acetaldehyde and/or ethanol is involved in the reduction in albumin synthesis, however, proalbumin-albumin conversion is not disturbed.

  11. The effects of acute ethanol administration on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety-like syndrome in rats: A biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya; Hapidin, Hermizi; Get Bee, Yvonne-Tee; Ismail, Zalina

    2016-02-01

    Withdrawal from long-term ethanol consumption results in overexcitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the amygdala, which induces an anxiety-like syndrome. Most alcoholics that suffer from such symptoms frequently depend on habitual drinking as self-medication to alleviate their symptoms. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) and protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon have been reported to mediate acute and chronic effects of ethanol. This study explores the changes in mGlu5 and PKC epsilon in the amygdala following acute administration of ethanol during ethanol withdrawal (EW) induced anxiety. Male Wistar rats were fed a modified liquid diet containing low-fat cow milk, sucrose, and maltodextrin, with a gradual introduction of 2.4%, 4.8% and 7.2% ethanol for 20 days. Six hours into EW, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline and ethanol (2.5 g/kg, 20% v/v), and exposed to open-field and elevated plus maze tests. Then, amygdala tissue was dissected from the rat brain for Western blot and gene expression studies. EW-induced anxiety was accompanied by a significant increase in mGlu5, total PKC epsilon, and phosphorylated PKC epsilon protein levels, and also of mRNA of mGlu5 (GRM5) in the amygdala. Acute administration of ethanol significantly attenuated EW-induced anxiety as well as an EW-induced increase in GRM5. The acute challenge of ethanol to EW rats had little effect on the phosphorylated and total protein levels of PKC epsilon in the amygdala. Our results demonstrate that amygdala PKC epsilon may not be directly involved in the development of anxiety following EW.

  12. Interactions between methaqualone and ethanol in rats and mice during acute and chronic states.

    PubMed

    Ho, C C; Ho, A K

    1978-01-01

    1. The effects of acute and chronic treatment of methaqualone on ethanol preference, the rate of disappearance of ethanol and on toxicity were studied in mice and rats. 2. Acute treatment with methaqualone showed a dose-dependent suppression in the voluntary intake of ethanol in C57Bl/6J mice in rats. No significant change in ethanol intake was observed during chronic methaqualone treatment and withdrawal. 3. Methaqualone pretreatment significantly (P less than 0.005) delayed the disappearance of ethanol in the blood and brain over a period of 50 and 200 min after a loading dose of 2.0 g/kg, i.p., of ethanol. 4. Methaqualone pretreatment at doses of 140 and 200 mg/kg significantly increased ethanol toxicity by 11% and 28%, respectively. Co-administration of ethanol using 6.0, 7.0 and 8.0 g/kg also reduced the LD50 of methaqualone by 19%, 24% and 40%, respectively. 5. Chronic administration with ethanol decreased the toxicity due to methaqualone. Potentiation of ethanol toxicity by methaqualone may be of clinical importance in view of the narrow range of safety margin of ethanol.

  13. Depression of contraction and the calcium transient in single cardiomyocytes with acute ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanski, D.J.; Delaville, F.J.; Thomas, A.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism by which acute ethanol (ET) exposure causes reversible myocardial dysfunction is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ET exposure on contraction and cytosolic free Ca[sup 2+] ([Ca[sup 2+

  14. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  15. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  16. Genetic Dissociation of Ethanol Sensitivity and Memory Formation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    LaFerriere, Holly; Guarnieri, Douglas J.; Sitaraman, Divya; Diegelmann, Soeren; Heberlein, Ulrike; Zars, Troy

    2008-01-01

    The ad hoc genetic correlation between ethanol sensitivity and learning mechanisms in Drosophila could overemphasize a common process supporting both behaviors. To challenge directly the hypothesis that these mechanisms are singular, we examined the learning phenotypes of 10 new strains. Five of these have increased ethanol sensitivity, and the other 5 do not. We tested place and olfactory memory in each of these lines and found two new learning mutations. In one case, altering the tribbles gene, flies have a significantly reduced place memory, elevated olfactory memory, and normal ethanol response. In the second case, mutation of a gene we name ethanol sensitive with low memory (elm), place memory was not altered, olfactory memory was sharply reduced, and sensitivity to ethanol was increased. In sum, however, we found no overall correlation between ethanol sensitivity and place memory in the 10 lines tested. Furthermore, there was a weak but nonsignificant correlation between ethanol sensitivity and olfactory learning. Thus, mutations that alter learning and sensitivity to ethanol can occur independently of each other and this implies that the set of genes important for both ethanol sensitivity and learning is likely a subset of the genes important for either process. PMID:18430923

  17. Effects of acute administration of ethanol on cerebral glucose utilization in adult alcohol-preferring and alcohol-nonpreferring rats.

    PubMed

    Strother, Wendy N; McBride, William J; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai

    2005-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rates, as determined by the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique, were examined after acute ethanol administration within selected brain regions of alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats. Adult male P and NP rats were injected with saline, 0.25 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg ethanol, intraperitoneally (ip), 10 min before an intravenous bolus of [(14)C]2-DG (125 microCi/kg). Timed arterial blood samples were collected over 45 min and assayed for plasma glucose, ethanol, and [(14)C]2-DG levels. Image densities were determined using quantitative autoradiography and LCGU values calculated. Data were collected from several key limbic, basal ganglionic, cortical, and subcortical structures. Low-dose ethanol (0.25 g/kg) significantly decreased LCGU rates in several brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, and the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus of P rats. Low-dose ethanol had no significant effects on LCGU rates in the NP rats. Moderate-dose ethanol (1.0 g/kg) also significantly lowered LCGU rates in many brain regions of P rats, including key limbic structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, ventral tegmental area, basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, lateral septum, and ventral pallidum. Moderate-dose ethanol also significantly lowered LCGU rates in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the habenula of NP rats. All other regions were unaffected in the NP rats. These findings support the suggestion that certain central nervous system regions of P rats may be more sensitive than those of NP rats to the effects of low to intermediate doses of ethanol.

  18. Conditioned place aversion to the "hangover" phase of acute ethanol administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Morse, A C; Schulteis, G; Holloway, F A; Koob, G F

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine ethanol's delayed effects (termed hangover) using conditioned place testing. Four groups of rats received a single pairing of a distinctive environment (tactile and visual) 10 h after injection with ethanol (0, 2, 3, 4 g/kg, i.p. ) or saline in a counterbalanced design. Rats receiving 3 and 4 g/kg ethanol showed a conditioned place aversion to ethanol hangover. Conditioning 10 h after 0 or 2 g/kg ethanol did not produce a significant place preference or aversion. The results suggest that the hangover following an acute injection of high doses of ethanol (3-4 g/kg) produces a significant and dose-related conditioned place aversion in the rat.

  19. Effect of acute and chronic ethanol pre-treatment on the disposition of phencyclidine (PCP) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B; Misra, A L

    1982-05-01

    Disposition of [H] Phencyclidine in brain, plasma and adipose tissue of rats acutely and chronically-treated with ethanol was studied using a method possessing high sensitivity and specificity for PCP. In rats acutely-treated with ethanol (5 g/kg PO dose) and PCP (10 mg/kg IP dose), dispositional factors did not play a role in the intensifies pharmacological and behavioral effects of PCP. However in rats chronically-treated with 2.5 g/kg PO dose of ethanol twice a day for 19 days, the disposition of PCP (5 mg/kg IP dose) was significantly altered and the values of PCP in brain, plasma and adipose tissue were significantly higher than those in the control group. Although inhibition of PCP metabolism and a comparatively slower rate of its elimination appear to account for the potentiation of drug effects in animals chronically-treated with ethanol, interaction of drugs at the level of the central nervous system cannot be ruled out. PMID:7089042

  20. ACUTE ETHANOL DISRUPTS PHOTIC AND SEROTONERGIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK PHASE-RESETTING IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired circadian rhythms and sleep. Ethanol administration disrupts circadian clock phase-resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on the circadian timing system. In this study, we extend previous work in C57BL/6J mice to: 1) characterize the SCN pharmacokinetics of acute systemic ethanol administration; 2) explore the effects of acute ethanol on photic and non-photic phase-resetting; and 2) determine if the SCN is a direct target for photic effects. Methods First, microdialysis was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of acute i.p. injections of 3 doses of ethanol (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) in the mouse suprachiasmatic (SCN) circadian clock. Second, the effects of acute i.p. ethanol administration on photic phase-delays and serotonergic ([+]8-OH-DPAT-induced) phase-advances of the circadian activity rhythm were assessed. Third, the effects of reverse-microdialysis ethanol perfusion of the SCN on photic phase-resetting were characterized. Results Peak ethanol levels from the 3 doses of ethanol in the SCN occurred within 20–40 min post-injection with half-lives for clearance ranging from 0.6–1.8 hr. Systemic ethanol treatment dose-dependently attenuated photic and serotonergic phase-resetting. This treatment also did not affect basal SCN neuronal activity as assessed by Fos expression. Intra-SCN perfusion with ethanol markedly reduced photic phase-delays. Conclusions These results confirm that acute ethanol attenuates photic phase-delay shifts and serotonergic phase-advance shifts in the mouse. This dual effect could disrupt photic and non-photic entrainment mechanisms governing circadian clock timing. It is also significant that the SCN clock is a direct target for disruptive effects of ethanol on photic shifting. Such actions by ethanol could underlie the disruptive effects of alcohol abuse on behavioral, physiological, and endocrine rhythms associated with alcoholism. PMID:21463340

  1. Effects of ethanol on voltage-sensitive Na-channels in cultured skeletal muscle: Up-regulation as a result of chronic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, C.; Sampson, S.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The effects of acute and chronic treatment with ethanol were studied on the number and activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na-channels in cultured rat skeletal muscle. The number of channels was determined by measurements of specific binding of (3H) saxitoxin (STX) in whole cell preparations. Measurements were also made of the frequency and rate of rise of spontaneously occurring action potentials, which are the physiologic expression of Na-channel density. Acute ethanol (37.5-150 mM), while causing depolarization of membrane potential and blockade of electrical activity, was without effect on specific STX binding. Neither methanol, acetaldehyde nor ethylene glycol had significant effects on these properties when given acutely in the same concentrations as ethanol. Chronic ethanol caused dose-related increases in STX binding and action potential properties with maximal levels being attained after 3 days of treatment at a concentration of 150 mM. On removal of ethanol from the culture medium all properties returned to control levels after 48 hr. Both increased external K+ and tetrodotoxin, which up-regulate Na-channels by reducing cytosolic Ca++, potentiated the ethanol-induced increase in Na-channel density. The increase in STX binding was not associated with changes in affinity of the binding sites for the ligand but was completely prevented by treatment with cycloheximide and actinomycin D. The results demonstrate that ethanol interacts with the cell membrane to induce synthesis of STX-binding sites.

  2. Localized brain differences in Arc expression between mice showing low vs. high propensity to ethanol sensitization.

    PubMed

    Nona, Christina N; Lam, Marcus; Nobrega, José N

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral sensitization to ethanol (EtOH) manifests as a progressive and enduring increase in locomotor activity with repeated drug exposure. However, not all mice sensitize to EtOH and the neuronal mechanisms mediating vulnerability and resistance to EtOH sensitization remain unclear. We examined regional brain expression of the immediate early gene activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) in order to identify brain areas in which neuroplastic changes may contribute to the development and expression of EtOH sensitization. Male DBA/2J mice received 5 biweekly injections of EtOH (2.2g/kg, i.p.) or saline (SAL). They were categorized as high- (HS) or low-sensitized (LS) on the basis of final locomotor activity scores. In both LS and HS mice sacrificed after the last sensitization injection, Arc expression was decreased throughout the brain in comparison to SAL animals. A similar pattern was seen in mice sacrificed after an EtOH challenge two weeks after the last sensitization injection. However in this cohort, Arc expression was significantly increased in the central amygdala (CeA) in LS mice and in SAL mice receiving EtOH for the first time. No significant increases in Arc expression were seen in brains of sensitized (HS) animals. These results indicate an acute EtOH challenge results in different patterns of Arc expression in brains of LS, HS, and SAL mice. The dramatic increases in Arc expression in the CeA in LS and SAL mice showing little or no behavioral activation suggests that neural activity in this region may serve to inhibit the stimulant effects of EtOH. The observation that HS mice do not show increases in Arc expression with an EtOH challenge suggests the possibility that increased tolerance to the Arc-inducing effects of EtOH may be a factor in behavioral sensitization.

  3. Effects of acute ethanol exposure on hepatic metallothionein, zinc and glutathione in male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Harrell, B. )

    1991-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the simultaneous responses of hepatic metallothionein (MT), zinc (Zn) and glutathione (GSH) in male and female rats to an acute ethanol dose. In male rats, hepatic MT has been shown to be induced by an acute ethanol dose. The Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the Lieber-DeCarli control diet for a five day period and then divided into 6 groups: baseline females and males, ethanol-treated females and males, pair-fed females and males. At t=0, baseline rats were killed, ethanol-treated rats were given ethanol by intragastric tube, and pair-fed rats were given ethanol by intragastric tube, and pair-fed rats were given an isocaloric sucrose solution by intragastric tube. At t=24 h, the ethanol-treated and pair-fed rats were killed. Livers were assayed for MT. Zn and GSH. Concentrations of blood ethanol (BEC) were significantly greater for male than female rats. A two way ANOVA with the independent variables being time and sex was performed to analyze differences for hepatic MT, Zn and GSH. For rats dosed with ethanol and killed 24 h later compared with rats at baseline, hepatic MT was significantly greater and hepatic Zn and GSH were not significantly different. Hepatic MT, Zn and GSH were not significantly different by sex. A significant correlation existed between hepatic Zn/g and MT/g. In conclusion, 24 h after an acute dose of ethanol, female as well as male rats responded with the induction of hepatic MT; and enough cysteine was available for the induction of hepatic MT and the maintenance of hepatic GSH levels. The measurement of Zn bound to hepatic MT rather than total hepatic Zn would be desirable to discern if changes in Zn distribution occur.

  4. Chronic ethanol-induced changes in cardiac and neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bangalore, R.; Hawthorn, M.; Triggle, D.J. )

    1992-02-26

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on cardiac and neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium channels. These channels have been shown to be regulated under diseased conditions such as congestive heart failure. Rats were chronically fed with a liquid diet containing ethanol or equicaloric amount of dextrin for the three weeks. This diet induced tolerance to ethanol as assessed by the longer time the ethanol fed rats could stay on a rotorod compared to control rats when challenged with an i.p. injection of ethanol, ATP-sensitive potassium channels were characterized using ({sup 3}H)glibenclamide binding to membrane preparations from heart, olfactory bulb, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. Chronic ethanol consumption caused a significant increase in the K{sub D} value in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and a significant decrease in the K{sub D} value in the cortex. The K{sub D} value did not change in other brain areas and heart with chronic ethanol consumption. In contrast, chronic ethanol caused a significant decrease in the B{sub max} value in the heart, and a slight but significant increase in the B{sub max} value in the spinal cord. Chronic ethanol did not affect the B{sub max} value in other brain areas. ATP-sensitive potassium channels are differently regulated by ethanol in cardiac and neuronal preparations.

  5. Acute extracellular ethanol load does not produce hyponatremia by internal osmoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.E.; Tzamaloukas, A.H.; Long, D.A.

    1986-03-05

    Hyponatremia is frequently present in subjects intoxicated with ethanol. To study whether an acute increase in extracellular osmolality by addition of ethanol creates any clinically appreciable osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, they infused over 20 sec 11 mmol/kg of ethanol intravenously into 5 anesthetized dogs (2 with intact renal function, 3 anuric) and measured plasma sodium and ethanol concentrations and osmolality at frequent intervals for 100 min after the end of the infusion. For a range of ethanol concentration between 4 and 120 mmol/l, changes in osmolality were equal to ethanol concentration in plasma water (y = -0.49 + 1.06 x mosm/kg per mmol/l, r = 0.981, p < 0.01). Plasma sodium concentration remained unchanged from baseline throughout the experiments, even at 1 min post-infusion, when osmolality was 78 +/- 25 mosm/kg above the baseline. An acute increase in extracellular osmolality created by rapid intravenous infusion of a large dose of ethanol does not create any osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, that can be detected by dilution of extracellular sodium. The mechanism of hyponatremia in ethanol intoxication is not internal osmoregulation, but abnormalities in external balance of body water and/or solute.

  6. Maternal metallothionein and zinc after acute ethanol exposure during gestation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.E. )

    1992-02-26

    Acute exposure of the rat fetus to ethanol at critical periods can cause growth retardation and brain damage; the mechanism(s) is not known. Ethanol may cause redistribution of maternal zinc which results in fetal zinc deficiency and subsequent interruption of growth and development. The purpose was to determine if acute ethanol administration to the pregnant rat alters Zn and the Zn binding protein metallothionein (MT) in selected tissues. On gestational day (gd) 14, eighteen pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups. By intragastric tube, ethanol treated dams were given ethanol and pairfed controls were given a 0.85% NaCl solution. On gd 15, intragastric feedings were repeated. Throughout, the Lieber-DeCarli control diet was fed (adlibitum to untreated controls and ethanol treated dams and in appropriate quantities to pair fed controls). Blood ethanol concentrations at 90 minutes after the ethanol dose were 154 {plus minus} 46 and 265 {plus minus} 110 mg% on gd 14 and 15, respectively.

  7. An inexpensive, scalable behavioral assay for measuring ethanol sedation sensitivity and rapid tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Simran; Kollah, Arnavaz P; Lewellyn, Lara; Chan, Robin F; Grotewiel, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a serious health challenge. Despite a large hereditary component to AUD, few genes have been unambiguously implicated in their etiology. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a powerful model for exploring molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying alcohol-related behaviors and therefore holds great promise for identifying and understanding the function of genes that influence AUD. The use of the Drosophila model for these types of studies depends on the availability of assays that reliably measure behavioral responses to ethanol. This report describes an assay suitable for assessing ethanol sensitivity and rapid tolerance in flies. Ethanol sensitivity measured in this assay is influenced by the volume and concentration of ethanol used, a variety of previously reported genetic manipulations, and also the length of time the flies are housed without food immediately prior to testing. In contrast, ethanol sensitivity measured in this assay is not affected by the vigor of fly handling, sex of the flies, and supplementation of growth medium with antibiotics or live yeast. Three different methods for quantitating ethanol sensitivity are described, all leading to essentially indistinguishable ethanol sensitivity results. The scalable nature of this assay, combined with its overall simplicity to set-up and relatively low expense, make it suitable for small and large scale genetic analysis of ethanol sensitivity and rapid tolerance in Drosophila. PMID:25939022

  8. An Inexpensive, Scalable Behavioral Assay for Measuring Ethanol Sedation Sensitivity and Rapid Tolerance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Simran; Kollah, Arnavaz; Chan, Robin; Lewellyn, Lara; Grotewiel, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a serious health challenge. Despite a large hereditary component to AUDs, few genes have been unambiguously implicated in their etiology. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a powerful model for exploring molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying alcohol-related behaviors and therefore holds great promise for identifying and understanding the function of genes that influence AUD. The use of the Drosophila model for these types of studies depends on the availability of assays that reliably measure behavioral responses to ethanol. This report describes an assay suitable for assessing ethanol sensitivity and rapid tolerance in flies. Ethanol sensitivity measured in this assay is influenced by the volume and concentration of ethanol used, a variety of previously reported genetic manipulations, and also the length of time the flies are housed without food immediately prior to testing. In contrast, ethanol sensitivity measured in this assay is not affected by the vigor of fly handling, sex of the flies, and supplementation of growth medium with antibiotics or live yeast. Three different methods for quantitating ethanol sensitivity are described, all leading to essentially indistinguishable ethanol sensitivity results. The scalable nature of this assay, combined with its overall simplicity to set-up and relatively low expense, make it suitable for small and large scale genetic analysis of ethanol sensitivity and rapid tolerance in Drosophila. PMID:25939022

  9. Genetic differences in the ethanol sensitivity of GABA sub A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wafford, K.A.; Burnett, D.M.; Dunwiddie, T.V.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-07-20

    Animal lines selected for differences in drug sensitivity can be used to help determine the molecular basis of drug action. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice differ markedly in their genetic sensitivity to ethanol. To investigate the molecular basis for this difference, mRNA from brains of LS and SS mice was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the ethanol sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA{sub A})- and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) - activated ion channels was tested. Ethanol facilitated GABA responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from LS mice but antagonized responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from SS animals. Ethanol inhibited NMDA responses equally in the two lines. Thus, genes coding for the GABA{sub A} receptor or associated proteins may be critical determinants of individual differences in ethanol sensitivity.

  10. Adapting to alcohol: Dwarf hamster (Phodopus campbelli) ethanol consumption, sensitivity, and hoard fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lupfer, Gwen; Murphy, Eric S; Merculieff, Zoe; Radcliffe, Kori; Duddleston, Khrystyne N

    2015-06-01

    Ethanol consumption and sensitivity in many species are influenced by the frequency with which ethanol is encountered in their niches. In Experiment 1, dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) with ad libitum access to food and water consumed high amounts of unsweetened alcohol solutions. Their consumption of 15%, but not 30%, ethanol was reduced when they were fed a high-fat diet; a high carbohydrate diet did not affect ethanol consumption. In Experiment 2, intraperitoneal injections of ethanol caused significant dose-related motor impairment. Much larger doses administered orally, however, had no effect. In Experiment 3, ryegrass seeds, a common food source for wild dwarf hamsters, supported ethanol fermentation. Results of these experiments suggest that dwarf hamsters may have adapted to consume foods in which ethanol production naturally occurs.

  11. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening.

  12. Role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in regulation of GABAergic transmission and acute response to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Suryanarayanan, A; Carter, J M; Landin, J D; Morrow, A L; Werner, D F; Spigelman, I

    2016-08-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that ethanol (EtOH) exposure activates neuroimmune signaling. Alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokines after acute and chronic EtOH exposure have been heavily investigated. In contrast, little is known about the regulation of neurotransmission and/or modulation by anti-inflammatory cytokines in the brain after an acute EtOH exposure. Recent evidence suggests that interleukin-10 (IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is upregulated during withdrawal from chronic EtOH exposure. In the present study, we show that IL-10 is increased early (1 h) after a single intoxicating dose of EtOH (5 g/kg, intragastric) in Sprague Dawley rats. We also show that IL-10 rapidly regulates GABAergic transmission in dentate gyrus neurons. In brain slice recordings, IL-10 application dose-dependently decreases miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) area and frequency, and decreases the magnitude of the picrotoxin sensitive tonic current (Itonic), indicating both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. A PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (but not the negative control LY303511) ablated the inhibitory effects of IL-10 on mIPSC area and Itonic, but not on mIPSC frequency, indicating the involvement of PI3K in postsynaptic effects of IL-10 on GABAergic transmission. Lastly, we also identify a novel neurobehavioral regulation of EtOH sensitivity by IL-10, whereby IL-10 attenuates acute EtOH-induced hypnosis. These results suggest that EtOH causes an early release of IL-10 in the brain, which may contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability as well as disturbed sleep seen after binge exposure to EtOH. These results also identify IL-10 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in alcohol-use disorders and other CNS disorders where GABAergic transmission is altered. PMID:27016017

  13. Role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in regulation of GABAergic transmission and acute response to ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Suryanarayanan, A.; Carter, J.M.; Landin, J.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Werner, D.F.; Spigelman, I.

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that ethanol (EtOH) exposure activates neuroimmune signaling. Alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokines after acute and chronic EtOH exposure have been heavily investigated. In contrast, little is known about the regulation of neurotransmission and/or modulation by anti-inflammatory cytokines in the brain after an acute EtOH exposure. Recent evidence suggests that interleukin-10 (IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is upregulated during withdrawal from chronic EtOH exposure. In the present study, we show that IL-10 is increased early (1 h) after a single intoxicating dose of EtOH (5 g/kg, intragastric) in Sprague Dawley rats. We also show that IL-10 rapidly regulates GABAergic transmission in dentate gyrus neurons. In brain slice recordings, IL-10 application dose-dependently decreases miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) area and frequency, and decreases the magnitude of the picrotoxin sensitive tonic current (Itonic), indicating both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. A PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (but not the negative control LY303511) ablated the inhibitory effects of IL-10 on mIPSC area and Itonic, but not on mIPSC frequency, indicating the involvement of PI3K in postsynaptic effects of IL-10 on GABAergic transmission. Lastly, we also identify a novel neurobehavioral regulation of EtOH sensitivity by IL-10, whereby IL-10 attenuates acute EtOH-induced hypnosis. These results suggest that EtOH causes an early release of IL-10 in the brain, which may contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability as well as disturbed sleep seen after binge exposure to EtOH. These results also identify IL-10 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in alcohol-use disorders and other CNS disorders where GABAergic transmission is altered. PMID:27016017

  14. Evaluation of acute skin irritation and phototoxicity by aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei

    PubMed Central

    LEE, SANG-HAN

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to assess whether aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei induce acute skin irritation and phototoxicity, acute skin irritancy and phototoxicity tests were performed. The skin of rabbits or guinea pigs was treated with these fractions (100 mg/dose) and whether the animals sustained significant skin damage was determined. The data demonstrated that the aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei did not induce acute toxicity in the skin of the animals, as assessed by anatomical and pathological observations. The results from the present study suggest that these aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei have promising potential uses as cosmetic ingredients that do not induce significant levels of skin irritation or phototoxicity. PMID:23251240

  15. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.A.; Rudeen, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effect upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity.

  16. Physiological and behavioral effects of acute ethanol hangover in juvenile, adolescent, and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Brasser, Susan M; Spear, Norman E

    2002-04-01

    This study examined differential responding of juvenile, adolescent, and adult rats after intoxication from an acute alcohol challenge. Experiment I generated blood ethanol curves for subjects 25, 35, or 110 days postnatal, after doses of 2.0 or 4.0 g/kg, assessing elimination rates and time of drug clearance. Experiment 2 compared ethanol's initial hypothermic and delayed hyperthermic effect across age by 48-hr temperature measurement with telemetry. At clearance or 24 hr after alcohol exposure, Experiment 3 tested subjects for changes in acoustic startle reactivity and ultrasonic vocalization (USV). Younger rats showed an absent or reduced tendency for residual hyperthermia, and adults showed alterations in USV observed as aftereffects of intoxication, despite greater initial blood alcohol levels and ethanol hypothermia in the former. The lesser ethanol hangover effects in weanlings and adolescents may be due in part to faster ethanol elimination at these ages compared with adults.

  17. Studies on psychomotoric effects and pharmacokinetic interactions of the new calcium sensitizing drug levosimendan and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Antila, S; Järvinen, A; Akkila, J; Honkanen, T; Karlsson, M; Lehtonen, L

    1997-07-01

    Levosimendan (CAS 141505-33-1) is a calcium sensitizing drug intended for the treatment of congestive heart failure. In animal experiments levosimendan has potentiated the sedative effects of ethanol. Due to poor water solubility of the compound, ethanol is used as a diluent in the intravenous formulation. In this study the possible interactions between levosimendan and ethanol in human have been studied. Twelve healthy male volunteers were included in this double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. The study consisted of three treatment periods: levosimendan 1 mg intravenously, levosimendan combined with ethanol orally and ethanol 0.8 g/kg alone. Blood samples for determination of levosimendan and ethanol concentrations were collected for 8 h after the dosing. To observe possible pharmacodynamic interactions psychomotoric tests were made before drug administration and 1h, 2h, 3h and 6h thereafter. These tests included Digit symbol substitution test, Maddox wing, Critical Flicker fusion and VAS-test for subjective assessment of performance status. Plasma levosimendan concentrations were not changed by the concomitant ethanol administration. Ethanol did not alter the pharmacokinetics of levosimendan except the volume of distribution of central compartment which was decreased. Levosimendan did neither affect elimination of ethanol. Levosimendan did not potentiate the psychomotoric effects of ethanol neither did it have any psychomotoric effects itself. In conclusion, levosimendan is not likely to have any psychomotoric adverse effects or any clinically significant interactions with ethanol.

  18. Protective effect of panax notoginseng saponins on acute ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing ethanol-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ren-Bo; Tian, Ke; Cao, Yi-Wei; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wang, Meng; He, Chengwei; Hu, Yuanjia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2015-03-11

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) against acute ethanol-induced liver injury and further to elucidate its probable mechanisms. Mice were treated with PNS (100 or 300 mg/kg) once daily for seven consecutive days priors to ethanol gavage (4.7 g/kg) every 12 h for a total of three doses. Acute alcohol gavage dramatically significantly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (23.4 ± 5.0 IU/L vs 11.7 ± 4.1 IU/L) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (52.6 ± 14.9 IU/L vs 31.1 ± 12.9 IU/L), and hepatic triglyceride level (4.04 ± 0.64 mg/g vs 1.92 ± 0.34 mg/g), these elevations were significantly diminished by pretreatment with PNS at dose of 100 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg. Alcohol exposure markedly induced the lipolysis of white adipose tissue (WAT), up-regulated protein expression of the phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL, p < 0.01), and total HSL (p < 0.01), and enhanced fatty acid uptake capacity in liver as indicated by increasing hepatic CD36 expression (p < 0.01), these effects were attenuated by PNS treatment. Additionally, PNS suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, reduced TNF-α and IL-6 levels, restored glutathione (GSH) level, enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver, and abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. These data demonstrated that pretreatment with PNS protected against acute ethanol-induced liver injury, possibly through ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress. Our findings also suggested that PNS may be potential to be developed as an effective agent for acute ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:25665731

  19. The discriminative stimulus properties of acute ethanol withdrawal (hangover) in rats.

    PubMed

    Gauvin, D V; Youngblood, B D; Holloway, F A

    1992-04-01

    Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) from saline (SAL) under a drug discrimination procedure. Test sessions were conducted with 10 randomly selected subjects. Tests with various doses of PTZ resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the percentage of total session responses emitted on the PTZ-appropriate lever without a significant change in response rates across a wide range of test PTZ doses. Rats did not generalize the PTZ stimulus to ethanol (ETOH) up to ETOH test doses that completely suppressed responding. High acute ETOH doses (2, 3, and 4 g/kg) administered at various time points prior to discrimination test sessions engendered responding on the PTZ-appropriate level in a quantitative fashion, that was dose- and time-dependent. This acute ETOH delayed effect from these high doses replicates our previously published study using a Drug 1-Drug 2 discrimination task with Chlordiazepoxide and PTZ. More importantly, we suggest that the present behavioral assay may be a sensitive animal analogue of human "hangover" phenomena.

  20. Acute and Cytotoxicity Studies of Aqueous and Ethanolic Leaf Extracts of Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Asomugha, R N; Ezejiofor, A N; Okafor, P N; Ijeh, I I

    2015-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata, a commonly used traditional remedy for different ailments, believed to be quite safe in terms of toxicity was evaluated for acute toxicity and cytotoxic potentials. Acute toxicity was done on albino Wistar rats using the Lorke method while brine shrimps were used to test for cytotoxicity. The results showed that the estimated LD50 for the aqueous and ethanolic extracts was 2154 and > 5000 mg kg(-1) body weight, respectively. Cytotoxicity to brine shrimps showed LC50 values of 324 and 392 ppm for aqueous and ethanolic extracts, respectively. These results indicate the relative non toxic nature of Chromolaena odorata extracts.

  1. Acute behavioural comparisons of toluene and ethanol in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, D; Fine, L; Langolf, G; Schork, T; Sampaio, C

    1991-01-01

    A comparison of toluene and ethanol (EtOH) induced changes in central nervous system (CNS) function and symptoms were evaluated in two studies, and when possible the effects of toluene were expressed in EtOH equivalent units. The toluene concentrations were 0, 75, and 150 ppm, bracketing the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value (ACGIH TLV) of 100 ppm. The socially relevant EtOH doses were 0.00, 0.33, and 0.66 g EtOH/kg body weight, equivalent to two and four 3.5% 12 ounce beers. Forty two paid college students were used in each study. In the first study, subjects were exposed to toluene and an odour masking agent menthol (0.078 ppm) for seven hours over three days. In the second study EtOH or a placebo was administered at 1530 across three days also in the presence of menthol. Verbal and visual short term memory (Sternberg, digit span, Benton, pattern memory), perception (pattern recognition), psychomotor skill (simple reaction time, continuous performance, symbol-digit, hand-eye coordination, finger tapping, and critical tracking), manual dexterity (one hole), mood (profile on mood scales (POMS), fatigue (fatigue checklist), and verbal ability were evaluated at 0800, 1200, and 1600. Voluntary symptoms and observations of sleep were collected daily. A 3 x 3 latin square design evaluated solvent effects simultaneously controlling for learning and dose sequence. An analysis of variance and test for trend were performed on am-pm differences reflecting an eight hour workday and on pm scores for each solvent, in which subjects were their own control Intersubject variation in absorbance was monitored in breath. A 5 to 10% decrement was considered meaningful if consistent with a linear trend at p less than 0.05. At 150 ppm toluene, losses in performance were 6.0% for digit span, 12.1% for pattern recognition (latency), 5% for pattern memory (number correct), 6.5% for one hole, and 3% for critical tracking. The number of headaches

  2. ACUTE ETHANOL MODULATES GLUTAMATERGIC AND SEROTONERGIC PHASE SHIFTS OF THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN LOCK IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Rebecca A.; Mangrum, Charles A.; Glass, J. David

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with sleep problems, which are often linked to circadian rhythm disturbances. However, there is no information on the direct effects of ethanol on the mammalian circadian clock. Acute ethanol inhibits glutamate signaling, which is the primary mechanism through which light resets the mammalian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Glutamate and light also inhibit circadian clock resetting induced by non-photic signals, including serotonin. Thus, we investigated the effects of acute ethanol on both glutamatergic and serotoninergic resetting of the SCN clock in vitro. We show that ethanol dose-dependently inhibits glutamate-induced phase shifts and enhances serotonergic phase shifts. The inhibition of glutamate-induced phase shifts is not affected by excess glutamate, glycine or D-serine, but is prevented by excess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is known to augment glutamate signaling in the SCN and to be necessary for glutamate/light-induced phase shifts. Thus, ethanol may inhibit glutamate-induced clock resetting at least in part by blocking BDNF enhancement of glutamate signaling. Ethanol enhancement of serotonergic phase shifts is mimicked by treatments that suppress glutamate signaling in the SCN, including antagonists of glutamate receptors, BDNF signaling and nitric oxide synthase. The combined effect of ethanol with these treatments is not additive, suggesting they act through a common pathway. Our data indicate further that the interaction between serotonin and glutamate in the SCN may occur downstream from nitric oxide synthase activation. Thus, acute ethanol disrupts normal circadian clock phase regulation, which could contribute to the physiological and psychological problems associated with alcohol abuse. PMID:18313227

  3. Effects of nicotine on ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization: A model of neuroadaptation.

    PubMed

    Gubner, Noah R; Phillips, Tamara J

    2015-07-15

    Co-morbid use of nicotine-containing tobacco products and alcohol (ethanol) is prevalent in young adults initiating use and in alcohol dependent adults, suggesting that these drugs in combination may increase risk to develop dependence on one or both drugs. Neuroadaptations caused by repeated drug exposure are related to the development of drug dependence and vulnerability to relapse. Locomotor sensitization has been used as a behavioral measure used to detect changes in neural drug sensitivity that are thought to contribute to drug dependence and relapse. Locomotor sensitization was measured in the current studies to examine potential differences in the effects of nicotine and ethanol given alone and in combination. Baseline activity levels of DBA/2J mice were assessed on 2 days, then mice were treated for 10 days with saline, nicotine (1 or 2mg/kg of nicotine tartrate), ethanol (1 or 2g/kg), or nicotine plus ethanol and locomotor activity was assessed every third day. On the following day, all mice were challenged with ethanol to measure the expression of sensitization. Mice treated with both nicotine and ethanol exhibited greater stimulation than predicted from the combined independent effects of these drugs, consistent with our previously published results. The combined effects of nicotine and ethanol on locomotor sensitization were dependent on the dose of ethanol and whether testing was performed after the drugs were given together, or after challenge with ethanol alone. These results suggest that nicotine and ethanol in combination can have neuroadaptive effects that differ from the independent effects of these drugs.

  4. Locomotor sensitization to ethanol impairs NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens and increases ethanol self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Abrahao, K.P.; Ariwodola, O.J.; Butler, T.R.; Rau, A.R.; Skelly, M.J.; Carter, E.; Alexander, N.P.; McCool, B.A.; Souza-Formigoni, M.L.O.; Weiner, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Although alcoholism is a worldwide problem resulting in millions of deaths, only a small percentage of alcohol users become addicted. Notably, the specific neural substrates responsible for individual differences in vulnerability to alcohol addiction are not known. In these studies, we used rodent models to study behavioral and synaptic correlates related to individual differences in the development of ethanol locomotor sensitization, a form of drug-dependent behavioral plasticity associated with addiction vulnerability. Male Swiss mice were treated daily with saline or 1.8 g/kg ethanol for 21 days. Locomotor activity tests were performed once a week for 15 min immediately after saline or ethanol injections. After at least eleven days of withdrawal, cohorts of saline and ethanol-treated mice were used to characterize the relationships between locomotor sensitization, ethanol drinking, and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the nucleus accumbens. Ethanol-treated mice that expressed locomotor behavioral sensitization to ethanol drank significantly more ethanol than saline-treated subjects and ethanol-treated animals resilient to this form of behavioral plasticity. Moreover, ethanolsensitized mice also had reduced accumbal NMDA receptor function and expression, as well as deficits in NMDA receptor-dependent long term depression in the nucleus accumbens core after a protracted withdrawal. These findings suggest that disruption of accumbal core NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity may represent a synaptic correlate associated with ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and increased propensity to consume ethanol. PMID:23486954

  5. Acute Ethanol Inhibition of γ Oscillations Is Mediated by Akt and GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Wang, JianGang; Zhao, JingXi; Liu, ZhiHua; Guo, FangLi; Wang, Yali; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, RuiLing; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Chengbiao

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal network oscillations at gamma band frequency (γ, 30-80 Hz) are closely associated with higher brain functions such as learning and memory. Acute ethanol exposure at intoxicating concentrations (≥50 mM) impairs cognitive function. This study aimed to determine the effects and the mechanisms of acute ethanol exposure on γ oscillations in an in vitro model. Ethanol (25-100 mM) suppressed kainate-induced γ oscillations in CA3 area of the rat hippocampal slices, in a concentration-dependent, reversible manner. The ethanol-induced suppression was reduced by the D1R antagonist SCH23390 or the PKA inhibitor H89, was prevented by the Akt inhibitor triciribine or the GSk3β inhibitor SB415286, was enhanced by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5, but was not affected by the MAPK inhibitor U0126 or PI3K inhibitor wortmanin. Our results indicate that the intracellular kinases Akt and GSk3β play a critical role in the ethanol-induced suppression of γ oscillations and reveal new cellular pathways involved in the ethanol-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27582689

  6. Acute Ethanol Inhibition of γ Oscillations Is Mediated by Akt and GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Wang, JianGang; Zhao, JingXi; Liu, ZhiHua; Guo, FangLi; Wang, Yali; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, RuiLing; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Chengbiao

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal network oscillations at gamma band frequency (γ, 30–80 Hz) are closely associated with higher brain functions such as learning and memory. Acute ethanol exposure at intoxicating concentrations (≥50 mM) impairs cognitive function. This study aimed to determine the effects and the mechanisms of acute ethanol exposure on γ oscillations in an in vitro model. Ethanol (25–100 mM) suppressed kainate-induced γ oscillations in CA3 area of the rat hippocampal slices, in a concentration-dependent, reversible manner. The ethanol-induced suppression was reduced by the D1R antagonist SCH23390 or the PKA inhibitor H89, was prevented by the Akt inhibitor triciribine or the GSk3β inhibitor SB415286, was enhanced by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5, but was not affected by the MAPK inhibitor U0126 or PI3K inhibitor wortmanin. Our results indicate that the intracellular kinases Akt and GSk3β play a critical role in the ethanol-induced suppression of γ oscillations and reveal new cellular pathways involved in the ethanol-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27582689

  7. Catalase-independent early-gene expression in rat brain following acute ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Canales, Juan J

    2004-07-30

    Early-gene expression evoked by acute ethanol treatment was studied in rat brain by quantitative immunocytochemistry, with reference to ethanol metabolism by the enzyme catalase. Colocalization with mu-opioid receptor (MOR) sites was also examined. Ethanol challenges [1, 2.5, and 4 g/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)] evoked dose-dependent increases in c-Fos expression in several brain regions, but overlap with MOR-rich sites was only partial. Strong inhibition of brain catalase activity (ca. 60%) with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT, 1 g/kg i.p.) did not alter ethanol-induced c-Fos nor Krox-24 expression in any of the brain regions analyzed. This evidence demonstrates that catalase-mediated metabolism is not a requisite for c-Fos nor Krox-24 induction in rat brain following acute ethanol treatment, and suggests that ethanol is by itself capable of eliciting strong neuronal and circuit-level adaptations in the nervous system.

  8. Purification of ethanol for highly sensitive self-assembly experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Kathrin; Kind, Martin; Pfeiffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ethanol is the preferred solvent for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolates on gold. By applying a thin film sensor system, we could demonstrate that even the best commercial qualities of ethanol contain surface-active contaminants, which can compete with the desired thiolates for surface sites. Here we present that gold nanoparticles deposited onto zeolite X can be used to remove these contaminants by chemisorption. This nanoparticle-impregnated zeolite does not only show high capacities for surface-active contaminants, such as thiols, but can be fully regenerated via a simple pyrolysis protocol. PMID:25161861

  9. The influence of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on acute and chronic ethanol administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Blagaic, Vladimir; Romic, Zeljko; Sikiric, Predrag

    2004-09-24

    The stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W.1419), which was promising in inflammatory bowel disease (PL-10, PLD-116, PL-14736, Pliva) trials, protects against both acute and chronic alcohol-induced lesions in stomach and liver, but also, given peripherally, affects various centrally mediated disturbances. Now, in male NMRI mice BPC 157 (10 pg intraperitoneally, 10 ng and 10 microg, intraperitoneally or intragastrically) (i) strongly opposed acute alcohol (4 g/kg intraperitoneally) intoxication (i.e., quickly produced and sustained anesthesia, hypothermia, increased ethanol blood values, 25% fatality, 90-min assessment period) given before or after ethanol, and (ii) when given after abrupt cessation of ethanol (at 0 or 3 or 7 h withdrawal time), attenuated withdrawal (assessed through 24 hours) after 20%-alcohol drinking (7.6 g/kg) through 13 days, with provocation on the 14th day. PMID:15381050

  10. Male adolescent rats display blunted cytokine responses in the CNS after acute ethanol or lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Gano, Anny; Paniccia, Jacqueline E; Deak, Terrence

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol induces widespread changes in cytokine expression, with recent data from our laboratory having demonstrated that, during acute ethanol intoxication, adult rats exhibit consistent increases in interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression in several brain regions, while showing reductions in IL-1 and TNFα expression. Given evidence indicating that adolescence may be an ontogenetic period in which some neuroimmune processes and cells may not yet have fully matured, the purpose of the current experiments was to examine potential age differences in the central cytokine response of adolescent (P31-33days of age) and adult (69-71days of age) rats to either an acute immune (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or non-immune challenge (ethanol). In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either sterile saline, LPS (250μg/kg), or ethanol (4-g/kg), and then trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 3h later for measurement of blood ethanol concentrations (BECs), plasma endotoxin, and central mRNA expression of several immune-related gene targets. In Experiment 2, the response to intragastrically (i.g.) administered ethanol was examined and compared to animals given tap water (i.g.). Results showed that LPS stimulated robust increases in expression of IL-1, IL-6, TNFα, and IκBα in the hippocampus, PVN, and amygdala, and that these increases were generally less pronounced in adolescents relative to adults. Following an i.p. ethanol challenge, IL-6 and IκBα expression was significantly increased in both ages in the PVN and amygdala, and adults exhibited even greater increases in IκBα than adolescents. I.g. administration of ethanol also increased IL-6 and IκBα expression in all three brain regions, with hippocampal IL-6 elevated even more so in adults compared to adolescents. Furthermore, assessment of plasma endotoxin concentrations revealed (i) whereas robust increases in plasma endotoxin were observed in adults injected with LPS

  11. Acute tolerance to rate-decreasing effects of single doses of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Martinez, Gerardo; Friesenhahn, Gregory; Javors, Martin; Lamb, R J

    2008-06-01

    Acute tolerance occurs when behavioral impairment is greater at a given blood ethanol concentration (BAC) on the ascending versus descending limb of the BAC-time curve following administration of a single dose of ethanol, however studies utilizing learned behaviors have not been widely reported. We assessed acute tolerance to single doses of ethanol in five Lewis rats responding under a fixed-ratio (FR8) schedule of food presentation. Response rates for food during 1-min components (ending 2, 4, 11, 18, 33, and 57 min after ethanol administration) were determined, and BAC was measured immediately after each component using a rat breathalyzer. Ethanol (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg, i.p.) produced dose-related decreases in responding for food that tended to recover over time for all but the highest dose tested. Similarly, dose-related increases in BAC were also observed. Using either an analysis that expressed impairment per unit BAC on the ascending limb versus the descending limb (by assessing the area under the curve (AUC) for behavior and BAC on each limb), the slope of the function that relates the behavioral effect to BAC (each expressed as percent maximum effect), or a variant of the Mellanby method (hysteresis), acute tolerance was observed following a dose of 0.4 g/kg ethanol. Though behavior appeared to recover on the descending limb following higher doses (especially 0.6 and 0.8 g/kg), acute tolerance to these doses was not present. PMID:18328511

  12. The sap of Acer okamotoanum decreases serum alcohol levels after acute ethanol ingestion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Ha-Young; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, we examined whether Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) sap decreased the serum alcohol and acetaldehyde levels after acute ethanol treatment in a rat model. Male rats were orally administered 25, 50 or 100% A. okamotoanum sap 30 min prior to oral challenge with 3 ml of ethanol (15 ml/kg of a 20% ethanol solution in water), and the blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde were analyzed up to 7 h after the treatment. Pre-treatment with the sap significantly decreased the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations after 5 h when compared with ethanol treatment alone (a negative control). The expression levels of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) mRNA were increased significantly in animals pre-treated with A. okamotoanum sap when compared with negative and positive controls. The data suggest that sap pre-treatment enhanced the alcohol metabolism rate in the rat liver. To investigate the involvement of mitochondrial regulation in the ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we carried out an immunohistochemical analysis of Bax and Bcl-2. Pre-treatment with sap significantly decreased Bax expression and increased Bcl-2 expression 7 h after ethanol administration when compared with the negative control. The data suggest that A. okamotoanum sap pre-treatment may reduce the alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the rat liver.

  13. Assessment of Expression of Genes Coding GABAA Receptors during Chronic and Acute Intoxication of Laboratory Rats with Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Osechkina, N S; Ivanov, M B; Nazarov, G V; Batotsyrenova, E G; Lapina, N V; Babkin, A V; Berdinskikh, I S; Melekhova, A S; Voitsekhovich, K O; Lisitskii, D S; Kashina, T V

    2016-02-01

    Expression of genes encoding the individual subunits of ionotropic GABAA receptor was assessed after acute and chronic intoxication of rats with ethanol. The chronic 1-month-long exposure to ethanol signifi cantly decreased (by 38%) expression of Gabrb1 gene in the hippocampus. Acute exposure to ethanol elevated expression of genes Gabrb1 (by 1.7 times), Gabra1 (by 3.8 times), and Gabra4 (by 6.5 times), although it diminished expression of Gabra2 gene by 1.4 times. In preliminarily alcoholized rats, acute intoxication with ethanol enhanced expression of genes Gabrb1 and Gabra5 by 1.7 and 8.7 times, respectively. There was neither acute nor chronic effect of ethanol on expression of gene Gabra3. PMID:26902358

  14. Distribution of methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine in acute and subacute ethanol-methamphetamine combination abuse model rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Man; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Na; Ananda, Sunnassee; Liu, Liang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the distribution of methamphetamine (MA) and its metabolite amphetamine (AP) in rat models of acute and subacute MA-ethanol combination abuse. Rats were fed with 20% ethanol for 4 weeks (chronic active-drinking group), and MA was injected intraperitoneally into chronically drinking and normal rats over 5 and 14 days, respectively. Then the rats from the acute and subacute combination abuse groups were euthanized, and ethanol, MA, and AP concentrations in samples were quantified. Except for the similar ethanol concentrations among acute and subacute groups, the MA and AP levels between groups were quite different. The concentrations of MA and AP in rats' liver, lung, kidney, and brain were much higher than other tissues, regardless of combination with ethanol. Also, MA and AP levels in subacute rats groups were higher than those in acute groups, and the levels of MA and the formation of AP in rats subjected to the combination abuse with ethanol were higher than in MA-only intoxicated rats. We conclude that ethanol has no bearing on the MA and AP distribution in body fluids and tissues, yet it can increase MA levels and markedly accelerate the formation of AP in combination-abuse rats. Comparing the acute and subacute combination-abuse rats' samples, it can be deduced that various accumulated amounts of MA and AP were unaffected by ethanol, even after multi-dose injection, regardless of acute or subacute use.

  15. Acute effects of ethanol in the control of protein synthesis in isolated rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Girbes, T.; Susin, A.; Ayuso, M.S.; Parrilla, R.

    1983-10-01

    The acute effect of ethanol on hepatic protein synthesis is a rather controversial issue. In view of the conflicting reports on this subject, the effect of ethanol on protein labeling from L-(/sup 3/H)valine in isolated liver cells was studied under a variety of experimental conditions. When tracer doses of the isotope were utilized, ethanol consistently decreased the rate of protein labeling, regardless of the metabolic conditions of the cells. This inhibition was not prevented by doses of 4-methylpyrazole large enough to abolish all the characteristic metabolic effects of ethanol, and it was not related to perturbations on the rates of L-valine transport and/or proteolysis. When ethanol was tested in the presence of saturating doses of L-(/sup 3/H)valine no effect on protein labeling was observed. These observations suggest that the ethanol effect in decreasing protein labeling from tracer doses of the radioactive precursor does not reflect variations in the rate of protein synthesis but reflects changes in the specific activity of the precursor. These changes probably are secondary to variations in the dimensions of the amino acid pool utilized for protein synthesis. Even though it showed a lack of effect when tested alone, in the presence of saturating doses of the radioactive precursor ethanol inhibited the stimulatory effects on protein synthesis mediated by glucose and several gluconeogenic substrates. This effect of ethanol was not prevented by inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase, indicating that a shift of the NAD system to a more reduced state is not the mediator of its action. It is suggested that ethanol probably acted by changing the steady-state levels of some common effector(s) generated from the metabolism of all these fuels or else by preventing the inactivation of a translational repressor.

  16. Acute and chronic effects of ethanol on learning-related synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2014-02-01

    Alcoholism is associated with acute and long-term cognitive dysfunction including memory impairment, resulting in substantial disability and cost to society. Thus, understanding how ethanol impairs cognition is essential for developing treatment strategies to dampen its adverse impact. Memory processing is thought to involve persistent, use-dependent changes in synaptic transmission, and ethanol alters the activity of multiple signaling molecules involved in synaptic processing, including modulation of the glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmitter systems that mediate most fast excitatory and inhibitory transmission in the brain. Effects on glutamate and GABA receptors contribute to ethanol-induced changes in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory acquisition. In this paper, we review the effects of ethanol on learning-related forms of synaptic plasticity with emphasis on changes observed in the hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for encoding contextual and episodic memories. We also include studies in other brain regions as they pertain to altered cognitive and mental function. Comparison of effects in the hippocampus to other brain regions is instructive for understanding the complexities of ethanol's acute and long-term pharmacological consequences.

  17. Dependence on dose of the acute effects of ethanol on liver metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Guynn, R W; Pieklik, J R

    1975-01-01

    The dose dependence of the acute effects of ethanol upon liver intermediary metabolism in vivo has been demonstrated in rats. Ethanol was given i.p. in doses of 0.69, 1.7, and 3.0 g/kg in equal volumes (20 ml/kg). The liver was freeze-clamped 120 min after injection, and multiple metabolites were measured in the perchloric acid extract of the tissue. Each group showed a significantly different pattern of metabolites, redox states, and phosphorylation potentials although the rate of ethanol disappearance, at least between the two highest dose groups, was not significantly different. The mitochondrial free [NAD+]/[NADH] ratios and the cytoplasmic free [NADP+]/[NADPH] ratio were paradoxically most reduced with the lowest dose of ethanol and became progressively more oxidized with increasing dose. Once established, the differences in these ratios between the groups tended to persist with time, relatively independent of the concentration of ethanol. In a somewhat different pattern, the phosphorylation potential ([ATP]/[ADP][P1]) remained at the control level in the low-dose group but was significantly elevated in the two higher-dose groups. The results, therefore, show distinct and complicated dose-dependent patterns of intermediary metabolism that cannot be explained completely by any one hypothesis but that imply significant dose-dependent effects of ethanol upon intermediary metabolism not directly related to NADH production. PMID:422

  18. Acute neuropsychological effects of MDMA and ethanol (co-)administration in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wezenberg, E.; Valkenberg, M. M. G. J.; de Jong, C. A. J.; Buitelaar, J. K.; van Gerven, J. M. A.; Verkes, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale In Western societies, a considerable percentage of young people expose themselves to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”). Commonly, ecstasy is used in combination with other substances, in particular alcohol (ethanol). MDMA induces both arousing as well as hallucinogenic effects, whereas ethanol is a general central nervous system depressant. Objective The aim of the present study is to assess the acute effects of single and co-administration of MDMA and ethanol on executive, memory, psychomotor, visuomotor, visuospatial and attention function, as well as on subjective experience. Materials and methods We performed a four-way, double-blind, randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (nine male, seven female) between the ages of 18–29. MDMA was given orally (100 mg) and blood alcohol concentration was maintained at 0.6‰ by an ethanol infusion regime. Results Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol was well tolerated and did not show greater impairment of performance compared to the single-drug conditions. Impaired memory function was consistently observed after all drug conditions, whereas impairment of psychomotor function and attention was less consistent across drug conditions. Conclusions Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol did not exacerbate the effects of either drug alone. Although the impairment of performance by all drug conditions was relatively moderate, all induced significant impairment of cognitive function. PMID:18305926

  19. Increased loss and decreased synthesis of hepatic glutathione after acute ethanol administration. Turnover studies.

    PubMed Central

    Speisky, H; MacDonald, A; Giles, G; Orrego, H; Israel, Y

    1985-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on rates of synthesis and utilization of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was studied in rats after a pulse of [35S]cysteine. A 35% decrease in hepatic GSH content 5h after administration of 4 g of ethanol/kg body wt. was accompanied by a 33% increase in the rate of GSH utilization. The decrease occurred without increases in hepatic oxidized glutathione (GSSG) or in the GSH/GSSG ratio. The rate of non-enzymic condensation of GSH with acetaldehyde could account for only 6% of the rate of hepatic GSH disappearance. The increased loss of [35S]GSH induced by ethanol was not accompanied by an increased turnover; rather, a 30% inhibition of GSH synthesis balanced the increased rate of loss, leaving the turnover rate unchanged. The rate of acetaldehyde condensation with cysteine in vitro occurred at about one-third of the rate of GSH loss in ethanol-treated animals. However, ethanol induced only a minor decrease in liver cysteine content, which did not precede, but followed, the decrease in GSH. The characteristics of 2-methylthiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, the condensation product between acetaldehyde and cysteine, were studied and methodologies were developed to determine its presence in tissues. It was not found in the liver of ethanol-treated animals. Ethanol administration led to a marked increase (47%) in plasma GSH in the post-hepatic inferior vena cava, but not in its pre-hepatic segment. Data suggest that an increased loss of GSH from the liver constitutes an important mechanism for the decrease in GSH induced by ethanol. In addition, an inhibition of GSH synthesis is observed. PMID:3977847

  20. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially regulate CB1 receptor function at glutamatergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacey L; Alexander, Nancy J; Bluett, Rebecca J; Patel, Sachin; McCool, Brian A

    2016-09-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system has been suggested to play a key role in ethanol preference and intake, the acute effects of ethanol, and in the development of withdrawal symptoms following ethanol dependence. Ethanol-dependent alterations in glutamatergic signaling within the lateral/basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) are critical for the development and expression of withdrawal-induced anxiety. Notably, the eCB system significantly regulates both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic activity within the BLA. Chronic ethanol exposure significantly alters eCB system expression within regions critical to the expression of emotionality and anxiety-related behavior, including the BLA. Here, we investigated specific interactions between the BLA eCB system and its functional regulation of synaptic activity during acute and chronic ethanol exposure. In tissue from ethanol naïve-rats, a prolonged acute ethanol exposure caused a dose dependent inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic activity via a presynaptic mechanism that was occluded by CB1 antagonist/inverse agonists SR141716a and AM251. Importantly, this acute ethanol inhibition was attenuated following 10 day chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE). CIE exposure also significantly down-regulated CB1-mediated presynaptic inhibition at glutamatergic afferent terminals but spared CB1-inhibition of GABAergic synapses arising from local inhibitory-interneurons. CIE also significantly elevated BLA N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA or anandamide) levels and decreased CB1 receptor protein levels. Collectively, these data suggest a dynamic regulation of the BLA eCB system by acute and chronic ethanol.

  1. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening. PMID:26314628

  2. Acute psychomotor effects of MDMA and ethanol (co-) administration over time in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dumont, G J H; Schoemaker, R C; Touw, D J; Sweep, F C G J; Buitelaar, J K; van Gerven, J M A; Verkes, R J

    2010-02-01

    In Western societies, a considerable percentage of young people use 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or 'ecstasy'). The use of alcohol (ethanol) in combination with ecstasy is common. The aim of the present study was to assess the acute psychomotor and subjective effects of (co-) administration of MDMA and ethanol over time and in relation to the pharmacokinetics. We performed a four-way, double blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (nine men, seven women) between the ages of 18 and 29. MDMA (100 mg) was given orally while blood alcohol concentration was maintained at pseudo-steady state levels of approximately 0.6 per thousand for 3 h by a 10% intravenous ethanol clamp. MDMA significantly increased psychomotor speed but did not affect psychomotor accuracy and induced subjective arousal. Ethanol impaired both psychomotor speed and accuracy and induced sedation. Coadministration of ethanol and MDMA improved psychomotor speed but impaired psychomotor accuracy compared with placebo and reversed ethanol-induced sedation. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics showed maximal effects at 90-150 min after MDMA administration after which drug effects declined in spite of persisting MDMA plasma concentration, with the exception of ethanol-induced sedation, which manifested itself fully only after the infusion was stopped. In conclusion, results show that subjects were more aroused when intoxicated with both substances combined compared with placebo, but psychomotor accuracy was significantly impaired. These findings may have implications for general neuropsychological functioning as this may provide a sense of adequate performance that does not agree with a significant reduction in psychomotor accuracy.

  3. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2007-09-15

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed {>=} 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1.

  4. The frequency of daily ethanol consumption influences the effect of ethanol on insulin sensitivity in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Han, Bo; Wang, Ruxia; Li, Qiu; Bian, Dezhi; Ma, Chunyan; Song, Guangyao; Gao, Ling; Zhao, J

    2012-03-01

    The different effects of ethanol on insulin sensitivity may be due to complex reasons. Here, we focus on the various daily ethanol consumption frequencies in rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet and explore the possible mechanism mediated by adiponectin and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A total of thirty-six male Wistar rats were fed a HF diet and were randomly divided into three groups: those that received tap water (C); those that received ethanol via a gastric tube twice per d (E1); those that received free access to ethanol for drinking (E2). The total daily ethanol dosage in groups E1 and E2 were the same (5 g/kg per d). At the end of 18 weeks, insulin sensitivity was evaluated. Adiponectin AMPK and GLUT4 levels were determined. We found that the different administration frequencies led to markedly different plasma ethanol concentrations and there were intimate relationships between plasma ethanol concentration and insulin sensitivity. Insulin resistance was markedly improved in group E1, whereas only a slight improvement was observed in group E2. Accordingly, adiponectin, phosphorylated AMPK and GLUT4 levels were significantly increased in group E1. Based on these findings, we propose that ethanol concentration might be the major influencing factor mediating the effect of ethanol on insulin sensitivity. At a total daily dosage of 5 g/kg per d, twice daily administration of ethanol was more beneficial than continuous drinking. The protective effect of ethanol might be mediated by increased adiponectin levels, which subsequently improve the activation of AMPKα and GLUT4 expression in adipose tissue.

  5. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5 mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered to rats 2 h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Gastric mucosal injuries were evaluated by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the acute toxicity study, no adverse effects of OSWE were observed at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day. Administration of OSWE reduced the damage by conditioning the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, which included hemorrhage, hyperemia, and loss of epithelial cells. The level of MDA was reduced in OSWE-treated groups compared with the ethanol-induced group. Moreover, the level of GSH and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the OSWE-treated groups. Our findings suggest that OSWE has a protective effect on the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury via the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23118790

  6. Moderate ingestion of ethanol induces development of tolerance to the acute positive chronotropic effect of ethanol in the rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo-Carpentier, A.; Carpentier, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of moderate ingestion of ethanol (E) on the acute cardiac effects of E, carbachol (CBL), and isoproterenol (ISOP) was studied in rat litter-mates pair-fed a liquid diet for 24 weeks. The rats on E (E-R) received 14% of total caloric intake as E. The normal rats (N-%) received the same diet except for isocaloric substitution of carbohydrates for E. Sinoatrial (SA) preparations were superfused with Tyrode (36/sup 0/C) and intracellular microelectrodes were used to monitor (1) SA automatically, and (2) atrial action potentials (AAP). E 40-80 mg% increased SA rate in N-R, but in E-R this action was evident only with E 240 mg%. E ingestion did not modify the effects of CBL or ISOP on SA rate. E 240 mg% shortened the AAP in N-R and E-R. E ingestion did not modify the effects of CBL or ISOP on AAP. In summary: (a) Small doses of E enhance SA automaticity in vitro. (b) Moderate ingestion of E induces development of tolerance to the positive chronotropic effect of E without changing (1) the acute effects of CBL or ISOP on SA rate and AAP, or (2) the shortening effect of ETOH on AP.

  7. Ethanol Metabolism and Osmolarity Modify Behavioral Responses to Ethanol in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Joseph T.; Davis, Scott J.; Song, Sam S.; Burnette, Christopher R.; Grotewiel, Mike; Shelton, Keith L.; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.; Davies, Andrew G.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is metabolized by a two-step process in which alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) oxidizes ethanol to acetaldehyde, which is further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Although variation in ethanol metabolism in humans strongly influences the propensity to chronically abuse alcohol, few data exist on the behavioral effects of altered ethanol metabolism. Here, we used the nematode C. elegans to directly examine how changes in ethanol metabolism alter behavioral responses to alcohol during an acute exposure. Additionally, we investigated ethanol solution osmolarity as a potential explanation for contrasting published data on C. elegans ethanol sensitivity. Methods We developed a gas chromatography assay and validated a spectrophotometric method to measure internal ethanol in ethanol-exposed worms. Further, we tested the effects of mutations in ADH and ALDH genes on ethanol tissue accumulation and behavioral sensitivity to the drug. Finally, we tested the effects of ethanol solution osmolarity on behavioral responses and tissue ethanol accumulation. Results Only a small amount of exogenously applied ethanol accumulated in the tissues of C. elegans and consequently their tissue concentrations were similar to those that intoxicate humans. Independent inactivation of an ADH-encoding gene (sodh-1) or an ALDH-encoding gene (alh-6 or alh-13) increased the ethanol concentration in worms and caused hypersensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol on locomotion. We also found that the sensitivity to the depressive effects of ethanol on locomotion is strongly influenced by the osmolarity of the exogenous ethanol solution. Conclusions Our results indicate that ethanol metabolism via ADH and ALDH has a statistically discernable but surprisingly minor influence on ethanol sedation and internal ethanol accumulation in worms. In contrast, the osmolarity of the medium in which ethanol is delivered to the animals has a more substantial effect on

  8. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  9. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Krutika T.; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M.; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N.; Richard, Zachary C.; O’Neil, Maura F.; Pritchard, Michele T.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl4-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl4 exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl4 and euthanized 24–96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl4-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl4 exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl4-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl4. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure. PMID:26751492

  10. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Krutika T; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N; Richard, Zachary C; O'Neil, Maura F; Pritchard, Michele T

    2016-01-06

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl₄-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl₄ exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl₄ and euthanized 24-96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl₄-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl₄ exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl₄-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl₄. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  11. Effect of ethanol at clinically relevant concentrations on atrial inward rectifier potassium current sensitive to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bébarová, Markéta; Matejovič, Peter; Pásek, Michal; Hořáková, Zuzana; Hošek, Jan; Šimurdová, Milena; Šimurda, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol intoxication tends to induce arrhythmias, most often the atrial fibrillation. To elucidate arrhythmogenic mechanisms related to alcohol consumption, the effect of ethanol on main components of the ionic membrane current is investigated step by step. Considering limited knowledge, we aimed to examine the effect of clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol (0.8-80 mM) on acetylcholine-sensitive inward rectifier potassium current I K(Ach). Experiments were performed by the whole-cell patch clamp technique at 23 ± 1 °C on isolated rat and guinea-pig atrial myocytes, and on expressed human Kir3.1/3.4 channels. Ethanol induced changes of I K(Ach) in the whole range of concentrations applied; the effect was not voltage dependent. The constitutively active component of I K(Ach) was significantly increased by ethanol with the maximum effect (an increase by ∼100 %) between 8 and 20 mM. The changes were comparable in rat and guinea-pig atrial myocytes and also in expressed human Kir3.1/3.4 channels (i.e., structural correlate of I K(Ach)). In the case of the acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach), a dual ethanol effect was apparent with a striking heterogeneity of changes in individual cells. The effect correlated with the current magnitude in control: the current was increased by eth-anol in the cells showing small current in control and vice versa. The average effect peaked at 20 mM ethanol (an increase of the current by ∼20 %). Observed changes of action potential duration agreed well with the voltage clamp data. Ethanol significantly affected both components of I K(Ach) even in concentrations corresponding to light alcohol consumption.

  12. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  13. The effects of acute ethanol exposure and ageing on rat brain glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sommavilla, Michela; Sánchez-Villarejo, M Victoria; Almansa, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Barcia, Jorge M; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2012-09-01

    Binge alcohol consumption in adolescents is increasing, and it has been proposed that immature brain deals poorly with oxidative stress. The aim of our work was to study the effect of an acute dose of ethanol on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum of juvenile and adult rats. We have observed no change in levels of glutathione produced by acute alcohol in the three brain areas studied of juvenile and adult rats. Only in the frontal cortex the ratio of GSH/GSSG was increased in the ethanol-treated adult rats. GSH levels in the hippocampus and striatum were significantly higher in adult animals compared to young ones. Higher glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in adult rats was observed in frontal cortex and in striatum. Our data show an increased GSH concentration and GPx activity in different cerebral regions of the adult rat, compared to the young ones, suggesting that age-related variations of total antioxidant defences in brain may predispose young brain structures to ethanol-induced, oxidative stress-mediated tissue damage.

  14. Endogenously elevated n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alleviate acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiangyong; Kang, Jing X

    2015-01-01

    Effective means for the prevention of alcohol-induced liver disease, a global health problem, have yet to be developed. We evaluated whether the high endogenous levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated acids (n-3 PUFA) in fat-1 transgenic mice could protect them against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis. We induced alcoholic liver steatosis in 9-week-old male heterozygous fat-1 mice and their wild-type (WT) male littermates through three oral gavages of 60% ethanol at 4.7 g/kg body weight. Hepatic lipid accumulation was significantly increased in both alcohol treatment groups, but by much less in the fat-1 group compared with the WT group. Fat-1 mice exhibited significantly lower levels of total hepatic/plasma TG and plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Accordingly, hepatic expression of lipogenesis-related genes (e.g., SREBP-1c, FAS, and SCD-1) and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1) were reduced in the fat-1 mice. Furthermore, decreased hepatic expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and increased hepatic levels of PPAR-α and HO-1 were observed in the fat-1 mice, compared to the WT mice. These findings show that elevated tissue n-3 PUFA protect against acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis in fat-1 mice, possibly through the down-regulation of hepatic lipogenesis, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress.

  15. The role of GABAA receptors in the acute and chronic effects of ethanol: a decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Porcu, Patrizia; Werner, David F.; Matthews, Douglas B.; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L.; Helfand, Rebecca S.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has brought many advances in our understanding of GABAA receptor-mediated ethanol action in the central nervous system. We now know that specific GABAA receptor subtypes are sensitive to ethanol at doses attained during social drinking while other subtypes respond to ethanol at doses attained by severe intoxication. Furthermore, ethanol increases GABAergic neurotransmission through indirect effects, including the elevation of endogenous GABAergic neuroactive steroids, presynaptic release of GABA, and dephosphorylation of GABAA receptors promoting increases in GABA sensitivity. Ethanol’s effects on intracellular signaling also influence GABAergic transmission in multiple ways that vary across brain regions and cell types. The effects of chronic ethanol administration are influenced by adaptations in GABAA receptor function, expression, trafficking, and subcellular localization that contribute to ethanol tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal hyperexcitability. Adolescents exhibit altered sensitivity to ethanol actions, the tendency for higher drinking and longer lasting GABAergic adaptations to chronic ethanol administration. The elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie adaptations to ethanol exposure are leading to a better understanding of the regulation of inhibitory transmission and new targets for therapies to support recovery from ethanol withdrawal and alcoholism. PMID:19455309

  16. Glycine and GABA(A) ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors as novel tools for alcohol and brain research.

    PubMed

    Naito, Anna; Muchhala, Karan H; Asatryan, Liana; Trudell, James R; Homanics, Gregg E; Perkins, Daya I; Davies, Daryl L; Alkana, Ronald L

    2014-12-01

    A critical obstacle to developing effective medications to prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders is the lack of specific knowledge regarding the plethora of molecular targets and mechanisms underlying alcohol (ethanol) action in the brain. To identify the role of individual receptor subunits in ethanol-induced behaviors, we developed a novel class of ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors (USERs) that allow activation of a single receptor subunit population sensitized to extremely low ethanol concentrations. USERs were created by mutating as few as four residues in the extracellular loop 2 region of glycine receptors (GlyRs) or γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which are implicated in causing many behavioral effects linked to ethanol abuse. USERs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and tested using two-electrode voltage clamp, demonstrated an increase in ethanol sensitivity of 100-fold over wild-type receptors by significantly decreasing the threshold and increasing the magnitude of ethanol response, without altering general receptor properties including sensitivity to the neurosteroid, allopregnanolone. These profound changes in ethanol sensitivity were observed across multiple subunits of GlyRs and GABA(A)Rs. Collectively, our studies set the stage for using USER technology in genetically engineered animals as a unique tool to increase understanding of the neurobiological basis of the behavioral effects of ethanol.

  17. The effects of acute ethanol exposure on inhibitors of hepatic regenerative activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M N; Gong, Y; Minuk, G Y

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism(s) whereby acute ethanol exposure inhibits hepatic regenerative activity in the rat. Adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were randomized to receive either ethanol (1 g/kg i.p. q 4 h) or an equal volume of saline (controls) for 24 h beginning 1 h prior to a 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx). At 0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h post-PHx, rats were sacrificed (N = 4-6/group), and the expression of the following genes associated with inhibition of hepatocyte proliferation were documented; p53, p21, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and gamma aminobutyric acid transport protein (GABA-TP). Inhibition of hepatic regenerative activity was confirmed by 3H-thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA at 24 h post-PHx. The results of the study revealed that in ethanol-treated rats, DNA synthesis was inhibited by 37% when compared to saline-treated controls (p < 0.01). Regarding suppressor gene expression, both p21 and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression in ethanol-treated rats were similar to those obtained in saline-treated controls. Although p53 mRNA expression differed in the two groups, in the ethanol-treated group, p53 mRNA expression was decreased rather than increased (relative to controls) at 24 h post-PHx, a finding not in keeping with inhibition of DNA synthesis. GABA-TP mRNA was strongly expressed prior to PHx in both ethanol- and saline-treated rats. Following PHx, GABA-TP mRNA expression decreased in both groups but remained low in the saline-treated group while returning to pre-PHx values in ethanol-treated rats. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the inhibitory effects of ethanol on hepatic regeneration are not associated with significant or the appropriate changes in mRNA expression of the p53, p21 or TGF-beta1 suppressor genes. On the other hand, transcriptional changes in GABA-TP gene expression post-PHx are in keeping with an inhibitory effect of GABA on hepatic regeneration.

  18. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E.; Mecawi, André S.; Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase‐mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ► Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ► RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation.

  19. Adenosinergic modulation of the imidazoline I₁-receptor-dependent hypotensive effect of ethanol in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Osama F; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; Ghazal, Abdel-Rheem M; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2012-08-01

    We reported that inhibition of central sympathetic pools of imidazoline I(1) receptors abolishes the hypotensive effect of ethanol in rats with glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF). This study investigated whether adenosine receptors modulate the ethanol-I(1)-receptor interaction. The effect of selective blockade of adenosine A(1), A(2A), or A(2B) receptors on hemodynamic responses to ethanol in the absence and presence of the I(1)-receptor agonist moxonidine was determined in ARF rats. Ethanol (1g/kg i.v.) decreased and increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), respectively. Pretreatment with moxonidine abolished the hypotensive but not the tachycardic effect of ethanol. The hypotensive effect of ethanol remained unaltered after selective blockade of A(1), A(2A), or A(2B) receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) and 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) and alloxazine, respectively. Neither was ethanol hypotension affected after inhibition of adenosine uptake by dipyridamole (DPY). Alternatively, the ability of moxonidine to abolish ethanol hypotension was still evident in presence of alloxazine whereas it disappeared or weakened in rats pretreated with CSC and DPCPX, respectively. These findings implicate adenosine A(2A) receptors in the moxonidine-evoked inhibition of the hypotensive action of ethanol. A modulatory role for adenosine A(1) site in the ethanol-I(1)-receptor interaction is also possible through as yet unidentified mechanism. PMID:22613216

  20. The effect of acute ethanol consumption on the human retinal circulation: a study in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Dhasmana, D; Herbert, L; Patel, V; Chen, H C; Jones, M; Kohner, E M

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acute ethanol consumption on retinal haemodynamics and retinal vascular autoregulation to oxygen in the human retinal circulation were studied in 10 diabetic (mean age +/- SD: 38.2 +/- 11.1) and 16 non-diabetic (mean age +/- SD: 32.4 +/- 8.8) subjects. Subjects drank 0.5 g of ethanol, as vodka, per kg of body weight, diluted in sugar-free orange juice. Retinal blood flow was determined using laser Doppler velocimetry and computerised image analysis. The effect of ethanol on oxygen reactivity, as a measure of autoregulation, was also determined after 60% oxygen inhalation. All subjects demonstrated a significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure (control group 3.3%, p = 0.04, diabetic subjects 5.7%, p = 0.05), after ethanol intake. Ethanol caused no significant change in retinal blood flow. Oxygen reactivity was found to be 38.3% (22.4-47.7, median and interquartile range) in the non-diabetic subjects at baseline, and 30.7% (10.8-42.1) after ethanol ingestion. In diabetic subjects, the oxygen reactivity was 33.2% (19.8-46.8) at baseline and 24.5% (21.1-32.1) after ethanol. In this study ethanol did not significantly affect retinal blood flow or impair autoregulation. These results suggest that the retinal circulation may be able to autoregulate despite the presence of ethanol, in contrast to other vascular beds where ethanol changes flow. PMID:7819729

  1. Acute Ethanol Administration Rapidly Increases Phosphorylation of Conventional Protein Kinase C in Specific Mammalian Brain Regions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Mary Beth; Besheer, Joyce; Kelley, Stephen P.; Kumar, Sandeep; O’Buckley, Todd K.; Morrow, A. Leslie; Hodge, Clyde W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of isoenzymes that regulate a variety of functions in the central nervous system including neurotransmitter release, ion channel activity, and cell differentiation. Growing evidence suggests that specific isoforms of PKC influence a variety of behavioral, biochemical, and physiological effects of ethanol in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute ethanol exposure alters phosphorylation of conventional PKC isoforms at a threonine 674 (p-cPKC) site in the hydrophobic domain of the kinase, which is required for its catalytic activity. Methods Male rats were administered a dose range of ethanol (0, 0.5, 1, or 2 g/kg, intragastric) and brain tissue was removed 10 minutes later for evaluation of changes in p-cPKC expression using immunohistochemistry and Western blot methods. Results Immunohistochemical data show that the highest dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) rapidly increases p-cPKC immunoreactivity specifically in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), lateral septum, and hippocampus (CA3 and dentate gyrus). Western blot analysis further showed that ethanol (2 g/kg) increased p-cPKC expression in the P2 membrane fraction of tissue from the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus. Although p-cPKC was expressed in numerous other brain regions, including the caudate nucleus, amygdala, and cortex, no changes were observed in response to acute ethanol. Total PKCγ immunoreactivity was surveyed throughout the brain and showed no change following acute ethanol injection. Conclusions These results suggest that ethanol rapidly promotes phosphorylation of cPKC in limbic brain regions, which may underlie effects of acute ethanol on the nervous system and behavior. PMID:17511744

  2. Activation of adenosine A1 receptors reduces anxiety-like behavior during acute ethanol withdrawal (hangover) in mice.

    PubMed

    Prediger, Rui D S; da Silva, George E; Batista, Luciano C; Bittencourt, Alvorita L; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2006-10-01

    Elevated signs of anxiety are observed in both humans and rodents during withdrawal from chronic as well as acute ethanol exposure, and it represents an important motivational factor for ethanol relapse. Several reports have suggested the involvement of brain adenosine receptors in different actions produced by ethanol such as motor incoordination and hypnotic effects. In addition, we have recently demonstrated that adenosine A1 receptors modulate the anxiolytic-like effect induced by ethanol in mice. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor agonists in reducing the anxiety-like behavior during acute ethanol withdrawal (hangover) in mice. Animals received a single intraperitoneal administration of saline or ethanol (4 g/kg) and were tested in the elevated plus maze after an interval of 0.5-24 h. The results indicated that hangover-induced anxiety was most pronounced between 12 and 18 h after ethanol administration, as indicated by a significant reduction in the exploration of the open arms of the maze. At this time interval, ethanol was completely cleared. The acute administration of 'nonanxiolytic' doses of adenosine and the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), but not the adenosine A2A receptor agonist N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA), at the onset of peak withdrawal (18 h), reduced this anxiogenic-like response. In addition, the effect of CCPA on the anxiety-like behavior of ethanol hangover was reversed by pretreatment with the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). These results reinforce the notion of the involvement of adenosine receptors in the anxiety-like responses and indicate the potential of adenosine A1 receptor agonists to reduce the anxiogenic effects during ethanol withdrawal.

  3. In vitro anti oxidant activity and acute oral toxicity of Terminalia paniculata bark ethanolic extract on Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Mopuri, Ramgopal; Meriga, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Objective To ensure the safety and evaluate the anti oxidant activity of Terminalia paniculata (T. paniculata) ethanolic extract in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods The solvent extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol) of T. paniculata were subjected to phytochemical analysis and their DPPH radical scavenging activity was assayed. The oral acute toxicity was evaluated using ethanolic extract of T. paniculata. Results Ethyl acetate and ethanolic extracts showed more phytochemicals, whereas highest DPPH scavenging activity was found in ethanolic extract. In an acute toxicity study, T. paniculata ethanolic extract was orally administered (1 000 mg/kg body weight) to rats and observed for 72 h for any toxic symptoms and the dose was continued up to 14 d. On the 15th day rats were sacrificed and blood samples were collected from control and test animals and analyzed for some biochemical parameters. We did not observe any behavioral changes in test groups in comparison with their controls. Also, there were no significant alterations in biochemical, hematological (hemoglobin content and blood cells count) and liver function parameters such as serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, albumin and bilirubin levels between T. paniculata ethanolic extract treated and normal control groups. Conclusions Together our results demonstrated that T. paniculata ethanolic possessed potent antioxidant activity and it was safer and non toxic to rats even at higher doses and therefore could be well considered for further investigation for its medicinal and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25182554

  4. Gastroprotective Effects of PMK-S005 against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seo, Ji Hyung; Lee, Seonmin; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to examine the gastroprotective effects of PMK-S005, which is a synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC; a sulfur-containing amino acid), against acute ethanol-induced gastric damage in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups, including a nonethanol group, groups treated with absolute ethanol 1 hour after pretreatment with various doses of PMK-S005 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) or rebamipide (50 mg/kg), and an absolute ethanol-only group. Ethanol-induced gross ulcer and mucus levels were measured. Myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, PGE2, LTB4, cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), GCLC, and GCLM, were assessed. Results PMK-S005 significantly attenuated the ethanol-induced gastric damage; it reduced mucosal inflammatory cytokine production and increased mucus levels. The expression levels of cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 were decreased by PMK-S005. PMK-S005 did not affect PGE2 synthesis, but LTB4 production was significantly suppressed. In addition, long-term administration of PMK-S005 significantly increased the expression of HO-1, NQO-1, GCLC, and GCLM. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that PMK-S005 prevents gastric mucosal damage and that these gastroprotective activities are due to anti-inflammatory effects and enhancement of the gastric defense system, including antioxidant enzymes. PMID:26347516

  5. Neonatal sensitization to ethanol-induced breathing disruptions as a function of late prenatal exposure to the drug in the rat: modulatory effects of ethanol's chemosensory cues.

    PubMed

    Cullere, Marcela; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Haymal, Beatriz; Paradelo, Martin; Langer, Marcos Daniel; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have systematically demonstrated abrupt changes in fetal respiratory patterns when the unborn organism is exposed to the effects of maternal ethanol intoxication. In subprimates, chronic exposure to this drug during gestation and infancy results in marked alterations of the plasticity of the respiratory network. These alterations are manifested in terms of an early incapability to overcome deleterious effects of hypoxic events as well as in terms of sensitization to ethanol's depressant effects upon breathing patterns. It has also been demonstrated that near term rat fetuses process ethanol's chemosensory cues when the drug contaminates the amniotic fluid and that associative learning processes occur due to the temporal contiguity existing between these cues and different ethanol-related physiological effects. In the present study during the course of late gestation (gestational days 17-20), pregnant rats were intragastrically administered with either 0.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Seven-day-old pups derived of these dams were evaluated in terms of respiration rates (breaths/min) and apneas when subjected to different experimental conditions. These conditions were defined by postnatal exposure to the drug (intragastric administrations of either 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol), postadministration time of evaluation (5-10 or 30-35 min) and olfactory context at test (no explicit ambient odor or ethanol ambient odor). The results, obtained via whole body plethysmography, indicated that brief prenatal experience with the drug sensitized the organisms to ethanol's depressant effects particularly when employing the higher ethanol doses. In turn, presence of ethanol odor at test potentiated the above mentioned respiratory alterations. Prenatal treatment with ethanol was not found to alter pharmacokinetic profiles resulting from postnatal exposure to the drug or to affect different morphometric parameters related with lung development. These

  6. Acute effects of ethanol on sex hormones in non-alcoholic men and women.

    PubMed

    Ellingboe, J

    1987-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption has long been known to interfere with reproductive function and sexual behavior, but specific effects of acute alcohol ingestion on sex hormones have been studied only recently. An attempt is made in this review to summarize and explain conflicting results from studies of the acute effects of alcohol on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, with healthy non-alcoholic men and women as subjects. In men, moderate to high doses of ethanol have been reported to suppress plasma testosterone. Although some clinical studies have not supported this observation, considerable evidence documents direct alcohol inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis in the testis. After alcohol ingestion, plasma LH remains unchanged or increases, probably because of reduced androgen negative feedback. In analogous studies with women during the late follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, alcohol does not decrease plasma estradiol or alter LH levels. Furthermore, it has been reported that plasma levels of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone increase during alcohol treatment in the midluteal phase, while gonadotropins tend to decrease. Alcohol has no effect on LH secretion in post-menopausal women. Because reports on the acute effects of alcohol in men have not been consistent, it remains to be determined if acute alcohol effects in men and women are really different. In men, provocative tests of gonadotropin response to LHRH stimulation were normal during periods of intoxication and hangover, indicating that ethanol has no significant direct effect on LH secretion at the pituitary level. It seems more likely that alcohol changes plasma levels of sex steroids by altering hepatic, gonadal, and possibly adrenal metabolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. A highly sensitive ethanol sensor based on mesoporous ZnO–SnO2 nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zhaojie; Liu, Yongben; Wang, Ce; Li, Lijuan

    2009-01-01

    A facile and versatile method for the large-scale synthesis of sensitive mesoporous ZnO–SnO2 (m-Z–S) nanofibers through a combination of surfactant-directed assembly and an electrospinning approach is reported. The morphology and the structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm analysis. The results showed that the diameters of fibers ranged from 100 to 150 nm with mixed structures of wurtzite (ZnO) and rutile (SnO2), and a mesoporous structure was observed in the m-Z–S nanofibers. The sensor performance of the prepared m-Z–S nanofibers was measured for ethanol. It is found that the mesoporous fiber film obtained exhibited excellent ethanol sensing properties, such as high sensitivity, quick response and recovery, good reproducibility, and linearity in the range 3–500 ppm. PMID:19417420

  8. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  9. The effects of acute ethanol on growth in rat liver: steady state c-myc transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lumpkin, C K; Taylor, J M; Tarpley, M D; Hayden, J B; Badger, T M; McClung, J K

    1992-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effects of acute ethanol on compensatory liver growth (regeneration), the steady state c-myc mRNA levels were studied following two-thirds partial hepatectomy. After surgery, control rat livers exhibited two peaks of c-myc transcripts, at 0.5-2 h and at 8-10 h. Sham surgery did not induce c-myc mRNA expression. Ethanol (3 g/kg), administered by gavage at 1 hour prehepatectomy, had no effect on the initial peak of c-myc mRNA; however, the second peak was eliminated. Control gavage of isocaloric glucose prior to partial hepatectomy had no effects on either of the subsequent c-myc mRNA peaks. Blood alcohol levels were found to be elevated throughout the prereplicative phase. These results suggest that ethanol may disrupt proto-oncogene expression near the restriction point at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle in hepatocytes.

  10. Robust and sensitive analysis of methanol and ethanol from cellulose degradation in mineral oils.

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Jocelyn; Duchesne, Steve; Rodriguez-Celis, Esperanza; Tétreault, Pierre; Collin, Pascal

    2012-09-21

    Methanol and ethanol have been identified as oil-soluble by-products generated by the aging of oil-impregnated cellulosic insulation materials of power transformers. Their presence provides useful information for diagnostics and end-of-life transformer estimation. Despite their value as cellulose degradation indicators, their sensitive and accurate determination is challenged by the complex oil matrix. To overcome this constraint, we present a simple, fast and direct procedure for their simultaneous determination in mineral insulating oil samples. The procedure uses a static headspace sampler coupled with a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometer. The selected method parameters permitted adequate separation of these two compounds from the complex oil matrix and quantification at ng g(-1) concentrations. An original internal standard procedure was developed, in which ethanol-d6 was added to all studied samples and blanks, with adequate resolution between the internal standard and its isotopomer ethanol. The method was validated in terms of accuracy and reproducibility for both analytes. The method detection limit, 4 ng g(-1) for methanol and ethanol, is well below the value (μg g(-1)) achieved by a standardized method for methanol determination in crude oil. During method validation studies, a relative error of approximately 6% was obtained for both methanol and ethanol with excellent reproducibility, average %RSD, below 2%. An experiment control chart, constructed to evaluate long-term reproducibility, indicate an overall good reproducibility (%RSD<3%) for 1000 ng g(-1) control solutions. The applicability of the method to the direct analysis of trace methanol and ethanol in oil from field transformer samples was successfully demonstrated. This analytical method is of high relevance to the electrical utilities as it allows indirectly assessment of the level of deterioration of the critical cellulose, an inaccessible part of a power transformer.

  11. Evaluation of the antinociceptive activity and acute oral toxicity of standardized ethanolic extract of the rhizome of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Sutha; Esfahani, Azadeh Sabetghadam; Ismail, Sabariah; Ramanathan, Surash; Yam, Mun Fei

    2010-04-22

    Ethanolic extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza was used to evaluate the analgesic and toxicity effects in vivo. The extract was standardized using GC-MS, which showed that 1 mg of Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract contains 0.1238 mg of xanthorrhizol. The analgesic activity was studied in rats using three different models, namely the hot plate test, tail flick test and formalin-induced pain test. The acute oral toxicity was examined by the oral administration of standardized Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract in mice at doses ranging from 300-5,000 mg/kg and observation for 14 days. Standardized Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract did not show significant analgesic effect in the hot plate and tail flick tests. However, in the formalin-induced pain test, Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed the paw licking time of rats in both early and late phases at doses 200 and 400 mg/kg of the extract, respectively. In the acute oral toxicity study, Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract did not show any toxic effects in mice at 5 g/kg. These experimental results suggest that the standardized Curcuma xanthorrhiza ethanolic extract showed peripheral and central antinociceptive activity associated with neurogenic pain as well as a relative absence of toxic effects which could compromise the medicinal use of this plant in folk medicine.

  12. Refeeding after acute food restriction: differential reduction in preference for ethanol and ethanol-paired flavors in selectively bred rats.

    PubMed

    Dess, Nancy K; Chapman, Clinton D; Cousins, Laura A; Monroe, Derek C; Nguyen, Phuong

    2013-01-17

    Rats' voluntary ethanol intake varies with dispositional factors and energy status. The joint influences of these were of interest here. We previously reported that rats selectively bred for high voluntary saccharin intake (HiS) consume more ethanol and express more robust conditioning of preference for flavors paired with voluntarily consumed ethanol than do low-saccharin consuming counterparts (LoS). Three new experiments examined the effect of refeeding after an episode of food restriction on ethanol intake and on preference for ethanol-paired flavors in HiS and LoS rats. A 48-h episode of food restriction with wheel running reduced intake of and preference for 4% ethanol (Exp. 1a) and preference for an ethanol-paired flavor (Exp. 1b) during refeeding. Food restriction alone was sufficient to reduce the flavor preference (Exp. 2). Adding fat to the refeeding diet or extending the food restriction period exacerbated the effect (Exp. 3), yielding a frank aversion to ethanol-paired flavors in LoS rats. These studies indicate that rebound from negative energy balance shifts responses to ethanol-associated cues from preference toward aversion. Analyses of bodyweight changes and caloric intake during refeeding support this conclusion and further suggest that lower metabolic efficiency may be a marker for enhanced preference mutability.

  13. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Ethanol administration increased GPD1 mRNA expression. • Ethanol administration increased glucose incorporation into TG glycerol moieties. • No increase in hepatic TG levels was observed in ethanol-injected GPD1 null mice. • We propose that GPD1 is required for ethanol-induced TG accumulation in the liver. - Abstract: Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2 h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6 h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2 h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6 h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of {sup 14}C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  14. Comparative studies of oral administration of marine collagen peptides from Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiang; Li, Qiong; Lin, Bing; Yu, Yongchao; Ding, Ye; Dai, Xiaoqian; Li, Yong

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an oral administration of marine collagen peptides (MCPs) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. MCPs were orally administered to rats at doses of 0 g per kg bw, 2.25 g per kg bw, 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw, prior to or after the oral administration of ethanol. Thirty minutes after ethanol treatment, the effect of MCPs on motor incoordination and hypnosis induced by ethanol were investigated using a screen test, fixed speed rotarod test (5 g per kg bw ethanol) and loss of righting reflex (7 g per kg bw ethanol). In addition, the blood ethanol concentrations at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after ethanol administration (5 g per kg bw ethanol) were measured. The results of the screen test and fixed speed rotarod test suggested that treatment with MCPs at 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw prior to ethanol could attenuate ethanol-induced loss of motor coordination. Moreover, MCP administered both pre- and post-ethanol treatment had significant potency to alleviate the acute ethanol induced hypnotic states in the loss of righting reflex test. At 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after ethanol ingestion at 5 g per kg bw, the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) of control rats significantly increased compared with that in the 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw MCP pre-treated groups. However, post-treatment with MCPs did not exert a significant inhibitory effect on the BEC of the post-treated groups until 120 minutes after ethanol administration. Therefore, the anti-inebriation effect of MCPs was verified in SD rats with the possible mechanisms related to inhibiting ethanol absorption and facilitating ethanol metabolism. Moreover, the efficiency was better when MCPs were administered prior to ethanol.

  15. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator "tPA" in ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned-place preference.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is one of the most abused drugs in the western societies. It is well established that mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons mediate the rewarding properties of ethanol. In our previous studies we have shown that the serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in the rewarding properties of morphine and amphetamine. In the current study, we investigated the role of tPA in ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference (CPP). Ethanol treatment dose-dependently induced tPA enzymatic activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In addition, ethanol-induced increase in tPA activity was completely inhibited by pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and raclopride respectively. Furthermore, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation, behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference were enhanced following tPA over-expression in the NAc using a lentiviral vector. In contrast, tPA knock down in the NAc with specific shRNA blocked the rewarding properties of ethanol. The defect of locomotor stimulation in shRNA-injected mice was reversed by microinjections of exogenous recombinant tPA into the nucleus accumbens. Collectively, these results indicate, for the first time, that activation of tPA is effective in enhancing the rewarding effects of ethanol. Targeting the tissue plasminogen activator system would provide new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of alcoholism.

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of carob against acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Chehimi, Latifa; Rtibi, Kaïs; Tounsi, Haifa; Boubaker, Samir; Sakly, Mohsen; El-Benna, Jamel; Amri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether subacute treatment with aqueous extract of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pods (AECPs) protects against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Animals were divided into four groups: control, carob, EtOH and EtOH + carob. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with AECP (600 mg/kg body weight (bw)) during 7 days and intoxicated for 6 h by acute oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg bw) 24 h after the last injection. We found that acute administration of EtOH leads to hepatotoxicity as monitored by the increase in the levels of hepatic marker aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase as well as hepatic tissue injury. EtOH also increased the formation of malondialdehyde in the liver, indicating an increase in lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Subacute carob pretreatment prevented all the alterations induced by EtOH and returned their levels to near normal. Importantly, we showed that acute alcohol increased hepatic and plasmatic hydrogen peroxide and free iron levels. The carob pretreatment reversed EtOH effects to near control levels. These data suggest that carob could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting the oxidative damage induced by acute EtOH administration and that its mode of action may involve an opposite effect on plasma and tissue-free iron accumulation. Indeed, carob can be offered as a food additive to protect against EtOH-induced oxidative damage.

  17. Charge and geometry of residues in the loop 2 β hairpin differentially affect agonist and ethanol sensitivity in glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Daya I; Trudell, James R; Asatryan, Liana; Davies, Daryl L; Alkana, Ronald L

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of loop 2 of α1 glycine receptors (GlyRs) in the propagation of ligand-binding energy to the channel gate. Mutations that changed polarity at position 52 in the β hairpin of loop 2 significantly affected sensitivity to ethanol. The present study extends the investigation to charged residues. We found that substituting alanine with the negative glutamate at position 52 (A52E) significantly left-shifted the glycine concentration response curve and increased sensitivity to ethanol, whereas the negative aspartate substitution (A52D) significantly right-shifted the glycine EC₅₀ but did not affect ethanol sensitivity. It is noteworthy that the uncharged glutamine at position 52 (A52Q) caused only a small right shift of the glycine EC₅₀ while increasing ethanol sensitivity as much as A52E. In contrast, the shorter uncharged asparagine (A52N) caused the greatest right shift of glycine EC₅₀ and reduced ethanol sensitivity to half of wild type. Collectively, these findings suggest that charge interactions determined by the specific geometry of the amino acid at position 52 (e.g., the 1-Å chain length difference between aspartate and glutamate) play differential roles in receptor sensitivity to agonist and ethanol. We interpret these results in terms of a new homology model of GlyR based on a prokaryotic ion channel and propose that these mutations form salt bridges to residues across the β hairpin (A52E-R59 and A52N-D57). We hypothesize that these electrostatic interactions distort loop 2, thereby changing agonist activation and ethanol modulation. This knowledge will help to define the key physical-chemical parameters that cause the actions of ethanol in GlyRs.

  18. Differential sensitivity of ethanol-elicited ERK phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens of Sardinian alcohol-preferring and -non preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Michela; Zaru, Alessandro; Sabariego, Marta; Giugliano, Valentina; Carboni, Ezio; Colombo, Giancarlo; Acquas, Elio

    2014-08-01

    Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) and -non preferring (sNP) rats have been selectively bred for opposite ethanol preference and consumption; sP rats represent a validated experimental tool to model several aspects of excessive ethanol drinking in humans. Phosphorylated Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase (pERK) in dopamine-rich terminal areas plays a critical role in several psychopharmacological effects of addictive drugs, including ethanol. This study was aimed at investigating whether ethanol-elicited ERK activation may differ in key brain areas of ethanol-naïve sP and sNP rats. To this end, the effects of ethanol (0, 0.5, 1, and 2 g/kg, administered intra-gastrically [i.g.]) on ERK phosphorylation were assessed by pERK immunohistochemistry in the shell (AcbSh) and core (AcbC) of the nucleus accumbens (Acb) as well as in the prelimbic (PrL) and infralimbic (IL) prefrontal cortex (PFCx), in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BSTL) and in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Ethanol (1 g/kg) significantly increased pERK immunoreactivity in AcbSh and AcbC of sP but not sNP rats. Conversely, ethanol failed to affect pERK expression in PrL and IL PFCx as well as in BSTL and CeA of both sP and sNP rats. These results suggest that selective breeding of these rat lines results in differential effects of acute ethanol on ERK phosphorylation in brain regions critical for the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol.

  19. Ethanol induced changes in lipid peroxidation and nonprotein sulfhydryl content. Different sensitivities in rat liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Kera, Y; Komura, S; Ohbora, Y; Kiriyama, T; Inoue, K

    1985-02-01

    Acute ethanol ingestion (5 g/Kg) led to an acceleration of lipid peroxidation and reduction in non-proteinic free sulfhydryl (NPFSH) levels in the rat liver and kidney. In the liver, progressive changes of these phenomena were inversely related, and maximal effects were observed 6 hr after ethanol ingestion. Unlike the liver, in the kidney, there was a rapid fall in NPFSH content followed by constantly reduced levels during ethanol intoxication, whereas acceleration of lipid peroxidation was detected only after 6-8 hr of ethanol. In addition, a lower dose (2 g/Kg) which caused no significant change in the liver, was effective in reducing renal NPFSH, but not in enhancing lipid peroxidation. These results suggest that acceleration of lipid peroxidation may not be required for the NPFSH decrease, at least in case of kidney.

  20. Protective effects of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seed in paracetamol induced acute hepatotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, D S; Salman, M T; Singh, P; Verma, V K; Ahmad, A

    2014-04-01

    Paracetamol overdose causes serious liver necrosis. Hepatoprotective activity of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa in Paracetamol induced acute hepatotoxicity was investigated in rats. Fasted male Wistar rats were orally treated with Nigella sativa extract in graded doses for 5 days followed by Nigella sativa extract and paracetamol 3 g kg(-1) on 6 and 7th day. Circulatory liver markers and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were estimated and histopathological study of liver performed. Paracetamol caused a significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase and total Bilirubin and a significant decrease in GSH compared to control. Nigella sativa pretreatment significantly prevented the increase in liver enzymes and total bilirubin and decrease in GSH level as compared to paracetamol group. Liver histopathology showed marked reduction in sinusoidal dilatation, midzonal necrosis, portal triaditis and occasional apoptosis in Nigella sativa extract treated groups as compared to group receiving only paracetamol. Nigella sativa extract possesses hepatoprotective action against paracetamol induced acute hepatoxicity. Further research is needed to advocate its prophylactic use for drug induced hepatotoxicity.

  1. Combined effects of acute, very-low-dose ethanol and delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in healthy human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; de Wit, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Previous studies examining the combined effects of ethanol and cannabis, or its primary psychoactive ingredient, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), have provided mixed results. Data from an in vitro study suggests that combined, sub-threshold doses of these drugs may interact to produce synergistic effects. Very low doses of the two drugs in combination have not been tested in humans. Materials and Methods This study assessed whether combinations of acute, very-low doses of ethanol and THC produce synergistic effects on subjective, cognitive, and physiological measures. Healthy volunteers (n=11) received capsules containing placebo or THC (2.5mg), and beverages containing placebo or ethanol (0.1 and 0.2g/kg) alone, and in combination, across separate sessions, in a within-subjects, randomized, double-blind design. During each session, participants completed measures of working memory, psychomotor ability, and simple reaction time, and provided subjective mood and drug effect ratings. Cardiovascular measures were obtained at regular intervals. Results As intended, when administered alone, these very-low doses of ethanol and THC had only moderate effects on isolated measures. The combined effects of these drugs were not synergistic, and in some cases appeared to be less-than-additive. Conclusions Our data provide no evidence for synergistic effects of acute combinations of very-low-dose ethanol and THC on subjective or physiologic response, or on cognitive performance. PMID:21110996

  2. Model studies for evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of complex hydrocarbon solvents I. Validation of methods with ethanol.

    PubMed

    McKee, R H; Lammers, J H C M; Hoogendijk, E M G; Emmen, H H; Muijser, H; Barsotti, D A; Owen, D E; Kulig, B M

    2006-12-01

    As a preliminary step to evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of hydrocarbon solvents and to establish a working model for extrapolating animal test data to humans, joint neurobehavioral/toxicokinetic studies were conducted which involved administering ethanol to rats and volunteers. The specific objectives of the present studies were to evaluate the acute central nervous system (CNS) effects of ethanol in rats and humans and to assess relationships between internal levels of exposure and behavioral effects. A more general objective was to validate a battery of neurobehavioral tests that could be used to carry out comparative studies in both species. Accordingly, a range of tests including standardized observational measures, spontaneous motor activity assessments and learned visual discrimination performance was utilized in rat studies to evaluate acute CNS effects. Groups of rats were given ethanol at levels of approximately 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0g/kg, with blood level measurements to verify internal doses. In a volunteer study, 12 healthy male subjects were given 0.65g/kg ethanol, a level approximating the limit for motor vehicle operation in The Netherlands, and neurobehavioral effects were measured prior to and 1 and 3h after ethanol administration, with a computerized neurobehavioral test battery. Blood and air measurements were made to quantify internal doses. Results of the behavioral tests in rats provided evidence of ethanol-induced changes in neuromuscular, sensori-motor, and activity domains. There were also significant changes in visual discrimination, particularly in the areas of general measures of responding and psychomotor speed. In humans there were small but statistically significant effects on learning and memory, psychomotor skills and attention. However, the effects were subtle and not all parameters within given domains were affected. These studies demonstrated a qualitative similarity in response between rats and humans.

  3. Acute effects of ethanol on pattern reversal and flash-evoked potentials in rats and the relationship to body temperature.

    PubMed

    Boyes, W K; Hetzler, B E; Dyer, R S

    1993-01-01

    The effects of acute ethanol treatment on flash and pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (FEPs and PREPs, respectively) were examined in three experiments using Long-Evans rats. The relationships of evoked potential parameters with blood ethanol concentration and body temperature were examined. In Experiment 1, rats were treated i.p. with vehicle or 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 g ethanol/kg body weight, and tested 30 min later. The 2.0 g/kg group had prolonged latencies of PREP peaks, no changes in PREP peak-to-peak amplitudes, and lower body temperatures than saline-treated controls. The peak latency shifts were significantly correlated with both blood ethanol concentration and body temperature, and were of a magnitude to be expected from similar changes in body temperature alone. Experiment 2 measured both PREPs and paired-flash FEPs in rats 30 min after injection of either 0, 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. PREP changes were found following treatment with the high dose which were similar to those of Experiment 1. Some FEP peak latencies were prolonged and peak-to-peak amplitudes were reduced by both doses of ethanol, despite the fact that body temperatures were reduced at only the high dose. At 2.0 g/kg ethanol, the FEP changes in latency, but not amplitude, were in accordance with what would be expected from body temperature changes alone. The third study attempted to investigate the role of reduced body temperature in producing the visual evoked potential changes by testing at room temperatures of 22 or 30 degrees C. Contrary to expectations, the rats receiving 2 g/kg ethanol were approx. 1 degree C cooler than controls at both room temperatures. Evoked potential latencies were greater in ethanol-treated rats than controls at both room temperatures. There were no significant effects of ethanol on FEP amplitudes. Overall, the effects of low doses of ethanol were independent of temperature changes, but the effects of higher doses of ethanol (2.0 g/kg) could not be

  4. Ultra-sensitive method for determination of ethanol in whole blood by headspace capillary gas chromatography with cryogenic oven trapping.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Suzuki, K; Seno, H; Ishii, A; Kumazawa, T; Suzuki, O

    1999-04-30

    We have established an ultra-sensitive method for determination of ethanol in whole blood by headspace capillary gas chromatography (GC) with cryogenic oven trapping. After heating a blood sample containing ethanol and isobutyl alcohol (internal standard, IS) in a 7.0-ml vial at 55 degrees C for 15 min, 5 ml of the headspace vapor was drawn into a glass syringe and injected into a GC port. All vapor was introduced into an Rtx-BAC2 wide-bore capillary column in the splitless mode at -60 degrees C oven temperature to trap entire analytes, and then the oven temperature was programmed up to 240 degrees C for GC measurements with flame ionization detection. The present method gave sharp peaks of ethanol and IS, and low background noise for whole blood samples. The mean partition into the gaseous phase for ethanol and IS was 3.06+/-0.733 and 8.33+/-2.19%, respectively. The calibration curves showed linearity in the range 0.02-5.0 microg/ml whole blood. The detection limit was estimated to be 0.01 microg/ml. The coefficients of intra-day and inter-day variation for spiked ethanol were 8.72 and 9.47%, respectively. Because of the extremely high sensitivity, we could measure low levels of endogenous ethanol in whole blood of subjects without drinking. The concentration of endogenous ethanol measured for 10 subjects under uncontrolled conditions varied from 0 to 0.377 microg/ml (mean, 0.180 microg/ml). Data on the diurnal changes of endogenous ethanol in whole blood of five subjects under strict food control are also presented; they are in accordance with the idea that endogenous blood ethanol is of enteric bacterial origin.

  5. Deletion of the Wolfram syndrome-related gene Wfs1 results in increased sensitivity to ethanol in female mice.

    PubMed

    Raud, Sirli; Reimets, Riin; Loomets, Maarja; Sütt, Silva; Altpere, Alina; Visnapuu, Tanel; Innos, Jürgen; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Volke, Vallo; Vasar, Eero

    2015-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome, induced by mutation in WFS1 gene, increases risk of developing mood disorders in humans. In mice, Wfs1 deficiency cause higher anxiety-like behaviour and increased response to anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam, a GABAA receptor agonist. As GABAergic system is also target for ethanol, we analysed its anxiolytic-like and sedative properties in Wfs1-deficient mice using elevated plus-maze test and tests measuring locomotor activity and coordination, respectively. Additionally loss of righting reflex test was conducted to study sedative/hypnotic properties of ethanol, ketamine and pentobarbital. To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ethanol in mice enzymatic colour test was used. Finally, gene expression of alpha subunits of GABAA receptors following ethanol treatment was studied by real-time-PCR. Compared to wild-types, Wfs1-deficient mice were more sensitive to ethanol-induced anxiolytic-like effect, but less responsive to impairment of motor coordination. Ethanol and pentobarbital, but not ketamine, caused longer duration of hypnosis in Wfs1-deficient mice. The expression of Gabra2 subunit at 30 minutes after ethanol injection was significantly increased in the frontal cortex of Wfs1-deficient mice as compared to respective vehicle-treated mice. For the temporal lobe, similar change in Gabra2 mRNA occurred at 60 minutes after ethanol treatment in Wfs1-deficient mice. No changes were detected in Gabra1 and Gabra3 mRNA following ethanol treatment. Taken together, increased anxiolytic-like effect of ethanol in Wfs1-deficient mice is probably related to altered Gabra2 gene expression. Increased anti-anxiety effect of GABAA receptor agonists in the present work and earlier studies (Luuk et al., 2009) further suggests importance of Wfs1 gene in the regulation of emotional behaviour. PMID:25725334

  6. Deletion of the Wolfram syndrome-related gene Wfs1 results in increased sensitivity to ethanol in female mice.

    PubMed

    Raud, Sirli; Reimets, Riin; Loomets, Maarja; Sütt, Silva; Altpere, Alina; Visnapuu, Tanel; Innos, Jürgen; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Volke, Vallo; Vasar, Eero

    2015-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome, induced by mutation in WFS1 gene, increases risk of developing mood disorders in humans. In mice, Wfs1 deficiency cause higher anxiety-like behaviour and increased response to anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam, a GABAA receptor agonist. As GABAergic system is also target for ethanol, we analysed its anxiolytic-like and sedative properties in Wfs1-deficient mice using elevated plus-maze test and tests measuring locomotor activity and coordination, respectively. Additionally loss of righting reflex test was conducted to study sedative/hypnotic properties of ethanol, ketamine and pentobarbital. To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ethanol in mice enzymatic colour test was used. Finally, gene expression of alpha subunits of GABAA receptors following ethanol treatment was studied by real-time-PCR. Compared to wild-types, Wfs1-deficient mice were more sensitive to ethanol-induced anxiolytic-like effect, but less responsive to impairment of motor coordination. Ethanol and pentobarbital, but not ketamine, caused longer duration of hypnosis in Wfs1-deficient mice. The expression of Gabra2 subunit at 30 minutes after ethanol injection was significantly increased in the frontal cortex of Wfs1-deficient mice as compared to respective vehicle-treated mice. For the temporal lobe, similar change in Gabra2 mRNA occurred at 60 minutes after ethanol treatment in Wfs1-deficient mice. No changes were detected in Gabra1 and Gabra3 mRNA following ethanol treatment. Taken together, increased anxiolytic-like effect of ethanol in Wfs1-deficient mice is probably related to altered Gabra2 gene expression. Increased anti-anxiety effect of GABAA receptor agonists in the present work and earlier studies (Luuk et al., 2009) further suggests importance of Wfs1 gene in the regulation of emotional behaviour.

  7. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: a role for angiotensin type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E; Mecawi, André S; Batalhão, Marcelo E; Carnio, Evelin C; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H; Touyz, Rhian M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT₁ receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase-mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT₁-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage.

  8. N-acetylcysteine treatment blocks the development of ethanol-induced behavioural sensitization and related ΔFosB alterations.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Alves, Gabrielle Cunha; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-11-01

    Ethanol addiction is a serious public health problem that still needs more effective pharmacological treatment. A key factor in the development and maintenance of this disease is the advent of neuroadaptations in the mesocorticolimbic brain pathway upon chronic ethanol abuse. In general, these neuroadaptations are maladaptive and affect numerous neurotransmitter systems and intracellular molecules. One of these molecules is ΔFosB, a transcription factor that is altered after chronic drug use. Behavioural sensitization is a useful model for the study of the neuroadaptations related to addiction. Recent works have shown a role for the imbalance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the symptoms found in addicted people. In this sense, the treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a l-cysteine prodrug that acts by restoring extrasynaptic concentrations of glutamate through the activation of cystine-glutamate antiporter, has shown promising results in the treatment of addiction. Thus, an animal model of behavioural sensitization was used to evaluate the effects of N-acetylcysteine treatment in the behavioural and molecular alterations induced by chronic ethanol administration. Swiss mice were subject to 13 days of daily ethanol administration to induce behavioural sensitization. Two hours before each ethanol administration and locomotor activity evaluation, the animals received intraperitoneally N-acetylcysteine injections. Immediately after the last test session, their brains were removed for ΔFosB and cystine-glutamate antiporter quantification. It was found that N-acetylcysteine treatment blocked ethanol-induced behavioural sensitization, the increase of ΔFosB content in the prefrontal cortex, and its reduction in the nucleus accumbens. The results suggest a possible use of N-acetylcysteine in ethanol-related disorders. PMID:27401790

  9. Effects of ethanol on RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated calcium sensitization in mouse lung parenchymal tissue.

    PubMed

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Ergurhan Kiroglu, Olcay; Astarci, Erhan; Balli, Ebru; Ogulener, Nuran

    2015-10-01

    Calcium sensitization by the RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway contributes to the contraction in smooth muscle. Contractile stimuli can sensitize myosin to Ca(2+) by activating RhoA/Rho-kinase that inhibits myosin light chain phosphatase activity. The present study was aimed at investigating the possible involvement of RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway in contractile responses to agonist (phenylephrine) and depolarizing (KCl) of mouse lung parenchymal tissues. Also, we investigated the effect of ethanol on RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Phenylephrine (10(-8)-10(-4) M) and KCl (10-80 mM) induced sustained contractions in parenchymal strips. Ethanol significantly attenuated the contractions to phenylephrine and KCl. The Rho-kinase inhibitors fasudil (5×10(-5) M) and Y-27632 (5×10(-5) M) inhibited contractions to in both control and ethanol-treated parenchymal strips. In addition, the relaxations induced by fasudil (10(-4) M) and Y-27632 (5×10(-4) M) on parenchymal strips contracted by phenylephrine but not KCl was decreased in ethanol-treatment group. Also, RhoA, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expressions were detected in mouse lung parenchymal tissue. In ethanol-treated group, expression of RhoA and ROCK1 but not ROCK2 decreased compared to control. Furthermore, ethanol causes apoptotic changes in alveolar type I epithelial cells of parenchymal tissue. These results suggest that RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway plays an important role in phenylephrine- and KCl-induced Ca(2)(+) sensitization in mouse lung parenchymal tissue. Also, ethanol may be decrease phenylephrine- and KCl-induced contraction due to lowering the RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated Ca(2+)-sensitizing by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway in parenchymal tissue. These results may be lead to important insights into the mechanisms of lung diseases due to alcohol consumption.

  10. Acute ethanol exposure induces behavioural differences in two zebrafish (Danio rerio) strains: a time course analysis.

    PubMed

    Pannia, Emanuela; Tran, Steven; Rampersad, Mindy; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-02-01

    The zebrafish has been proposed as a model organism to study genetic effects influencing behaviour and also as a tool with which the mechanisms of the action of alcohol (ethanol or EtOH) in the vertebrate brain may be investigated. In the current study we exposed zebrafish from two genetically distinct strains (WIK and TU) to a computer animated image of a natural predator of this species, the Indian leaf fish. We measured the subjects' behavioural responses in the presence of different acute doses of alcohol (0.00, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00% vol/vol) using an observation based event-recording method. We found fish of both strains to exhibit an atypical predator inspection response during the presentation of the animated predator image coupled with a classical fear response, increased jumping frequency. We found numerous alcohol induced behavioural changes and more importantly also revealed alcohol induced strain dependent changes as well, including different dose-response trajectories for WIK vs. TU in predator inspection response, general swimming activity, location of swimming (top vs. bottom half of the tank) and freezing. The results suggest that zebrafish of the TU strain may be more tolerant at least to lower doses of alcohol as compared to WIK. The characterization of strain differences in zebrafish will aid the identification of possible molecular mechanisms involved in alcohol's actions in the vertebrate brain. PMID:24239692

  11. Expression of autophagy and UPR genes in the developing brain during ethanol-sensitive and resistant periods.

    PubMed

    Alimov, Alexander; Wang, Haiping; Liu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A; Xu, Mei; Ou, Xiaoming; Luo, Jia

    2013-12-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) results from ethanol exposure to the developing fetus and is the leading cause of mental retardation. FASD is associated with a broad range of neurobehavioral deficits which may be mediated by ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in the developing brain. An immature brain is more susceptible to ethanol neurotoxicity. We hypothesize that the enhanced sensitivity of the immature brain to ethanol is due to a limited capacity to alleviate cellular stress. Using a third trimester equivalent mouse model of ethanol exposure, we demonstrated that subcutaneous injection of ethanol induced a wide-spread neuroapoptosis in postnatal day 4 (PD4) C57BL/6 mice, but had little effect on the brain of PD12 mice. We analyzed the expression profile of genes regulating apoptosis, and the pathways of ER stress response (also known as unfolded protein response, UPR) and autophagy during these ethanol-sensitive and resistant periods (PD4 versus PD12) using PCR microarray. The expression of pro-apoptotic genes, such as caspase-3, was much higher on PD4 than PD12; in contrast, the expression of genes that regulate UPR and autophagy, such as atf6, atg4, atg9, atg10, beclin1, bnip3, cebpb, ctsb, ctsd, ctss, grp78, ire1α, lamp, lc3 perk, pik3c3, and sqstm1 was significantly higher on PD12 than PD4. These results suggest that the vulnerability of the immature brain to ethanol could result from high expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and a deficiency in the stress responsive system, such as UPR and autophagy.

  12. Expression of Autophagy and UPR genes in the Developing Brain during Ethanol-Sensitive and Resistant Periods

    PubMed Central

    Alimov, Alexander; Wang, Haiping; Liu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Xu, Mei; Ou, Xiaoming; Luo, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) results from ethanol exposure to the developing fetus and is the leading cause of mental retardation. FASD is associated with a broad range of neurobehavioral deficits which may be mediated by ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in the developing brain. An immature brain is more susceptible to ethanol neurotoxicity. We hypothesize that the enhanced sensitivity of the immature brain to ethanol is due to a limited capacity to alleviate cellular stress. Using a third trimester equivalent mouse model of ethanol exposure, we demonstrated that subcutaneous injection of ethanol induced a wide-spread neuroapoptosis in postnatal day 4 (PD4) C57BL/6 mice, but had little effect on the brain of PD12 mice. We analyzed the expression profile of genes regulating apoptosis, and the pathways of ER stress response (also known as unfolded protein response, UPR) and autophagy during these ethanol-sensitive and resistant periods (PD4 versus PD12) using PCR microarray. The expression of pro-apoptotic genes, such as caspase-3, was much higher on PD4 than PD12; in contrast, the expression of genes that regulate UPR and autophagy, such as atf6, atg4, atg9, atg10, beclin1, bnip3, cebpb, ctsb, ctsd, ctss, grp78, ire1α, lamp, lc3 perk, pik3c3, and sqstm1 was significantly higher on PD12 than PD4. These results suggest that the vulnerability of the immature brain to ethanol could result from high expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and a deficiency in the stress responsive system, such as UPR and autophagy. PMID:23979425

  13. Wide bandgap mesoporous hematite nanowire bundles as a sensitive and rapid response ethanol sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danping; Zhang, Beibei; Xu, Jingcai; Han, Yanbing; Jin, Hongxiao; Jin, Dingfeng; Peng, Xiaoling; Ge, Hongliang; Wang, Xinqing

    2016-05-01

    In this study, α-Fe2O3 nanowires were synthesized using mesoporous SBA-15 silica as the hard templates with the nanocasting method, and then mesoporous α-Fe2O3 nanowire bundles (NWBs) were separated from the well-dispersed α-Fe2O3 nanowires (NWs) by the centrifugation technique. Both samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm and UV-vis spectra. All results indicated that the α-Fe2O3 NWBs with mesoporous structure presented a higher BET surface area (95 m2 g-1) and wider bandgap (2.08 eV) than those of α-Fe2O3 NWs (32 m2 g-1 and 1.91 eV). The bandgap of α-Fe2O3 NWBs was in accordance with the bulk α-Fe2O3, while the BET surface area was much higher. The results from the gas-sensing measurement revealed that the α-Fe2O3 NWBs based gas sensor exhibited a high sensitivity of 21.7, fast response-recovery of 7.5 s and 1 s, and good selectivity to ethanol at 340 °C. The sensitivity (21.7) for ethanol of α-Fe2O3 NWBs was much better than that of the α-Fe2O3 NWs (12.2), which should be attributed to the higher BET surface area and wider bandgap of α-Fe2O3 NWBs.

  14. Retrobulbar blood flow and visual field alterations after acute ethanol ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Anke; Remky, Andreas; Bienert, Marion; der Velden, Klaudia Huber-van; Kirschkamp, Thomas; Rennings, Corinna; Roessler, Gernot; Plange, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to test the effect of ethyl alcohol on the koniocellular and magnocellular pathway of visual function and to investigate the relationship between such visual field changes and retrobulbar blood flow in healthy subjects. Methods In 12 healthy subjects (mean age 32 ± 4 years), color Doppler imaging, short-wavelength automated perimetry, and frequency doubling perimetry was performed before and 60 minutes after oral intake of 80 mL of 40 vol% ethanol. Mean and pattern standard deviations for short-wavelength automated and frequency doubling perimetry were assessed. End diastolic velocity (EDV) and peak systolic velocity (PSV) were measured in the central retinal and ophthalmic arteries using color Doppler imaging. Systemic blood pressure, heart rate, intraocular pressure, and blood alcohol concentration were determined. Results Mean PSV and EDV in the central retinal artery showed a significant increase after alcohol intake (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02, respectively). Similarly, we found a significant acceleration of blood flow velocity in the ophthalmic artery (P = 0.02 for PSV; P = 0.04 for EDV). Mean intraocular pressure decreased by 1.0 mmHg after alcohol ingestion (P = 0.01). Retinal sensitivity in short-wavelength automated perimetry did not alter, whereas in frequency doubling perimetry, the mean deviation decreased significantly. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not change significantly. Mean blood alcohol concentration was 0.38 ± 0.16 g/L. Conclusion Although ethanol is known to cause peripheral vasodilation, our subjects had no significant drop in systemic blood pressure. However, a significant increase of blood flow velocity was seen in the retrobulbar vessels. Regarding visual function, moderate alcohol consumption led to reduced performance in the magnocellular visual system tested by frequency doubling perimetry, but had no effect on short-wavelength automated perimetry. PMID:23990703

  15. Acute effects of ethanol and acetate on glucose kinetics in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Koivisto, V.A.; Ylikahri, R.; Taskinen, M.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors compared the effects of two ethanol doses on glucose kinetics and assessed the role of acetate as a mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance. Ten normal males were studied on four occasions, during which either a low or moderate ethanol, acetate, or saline dose was administered. Both ethanol doses similarly inhibited basal glucose production. The decrease in R{sub a} was matched by a comparable decrease in glucose utilization (R{sub d}), resulting in maintenance of normoglycemia. During hyperinsulinemia glucose disposal was lower in the moderate than the low-dose ethanol or saline studies. During acetate infusion, the blood acetate level was comparable with those in the ethanol studies. Acetate had no effect on glucose kinetics. In conclusion, (1) in overnight fasted subjects, ethanol does not cause hypoglycemia because its inhibitory effect on R{sub a} is counterbalanced by equal inhibition of R{sub d}; (2) basal R{sub a} and R{sub d} are maximally inhibited already by small ethanol doses, whereas inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal requires a moderate ethanol dose; and (3) acetate is not the mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance.

  16. Influences of acute ethanol exposure on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae under different illumination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Lin, Jia; Peng, Xiaolan; Chen, Haojun; Zhang, Yinglan; Liu, Xiuyun; Li, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Larval zebrafish present unique opportunities to study the behavioral responses of a model organism to environmental challenges during early developmental stages. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the locomotor activities of AB strain zebrafish larvae at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) in response to light changes under the influence of ethanol, and to explore potential neurological mechanisms that are involved in ethanol intoxication. AB strain zebrafish larvae at both 5 and 7 dpf were treated with ethanol at 0% (control), 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (v/v%). The locomotor activities of the larvae during alternating light-dark challenges, as well as the locomotor responses immediately following the light transitions, were investigated. The levels of various neurotransmitters were also measured in selected ethanol-treated groups. The larvae at 5 and 7 dpf demonstrated similar patterns of locomotor responses to ethanol treatment. Ethanol treatment at 1% increased the swimming distances of the zebrafish larvae in the dark periods, but had no effect on the swimming distances in the light periods. In contrast, ethanol treatment at 2% increased the swimming distances in the light periods, but did not potentiate the swimming activity in the dark periods, compared to controls. Differences in the levels of neurotransmitters that are involved in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin pathways were also observed in groups with different ethanol treatments. These results indicated the behavioral studies concerning the ethanol effects on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae could be carried out as early as 5 dpf. The 1% and 2% ethanol-treated zebrafish larvae modeled ethanol effects at different intoxication states, and the differences in neurotransmitter levels suggested the involvement of various neurotransmitter pathways in different ethanol intoxication states. PMID:26384924

  17. Influences of acute ethanol exposure on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae under different illumination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Lin, Jia; Peng, Xiaolan; Chen, Haojun; Zhang, Yinglan; Liu, Xiuyun; Li, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Larval zebrafish present unique opportunities to study the behavioral responses of a model organism to environmental challenges during early developmental stages. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the locomotor activities of AB strain zebrafish larvae at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) in response to light changes under the influence of ethanol, and to explore potential neurological mechanisms that are involved in ethanol intoxication. AB strain zebrafish larvae at both 5 and 7 dpf were treated with ethanol at 0% (control), 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (v/v%). The locomotor activities of the larvae during alternating light-dark challenges, as well as the locomotor responses immediately following the light transitions, were investigated. The levels of various neurotransmitters were also measured in selected ethanol-treated groups. The larvae at 5 and 7 dpf demonstrated similar patterns of locomotor responses to ethanol treatment. Ethanol treatment at 1% increased the swimming distances of the zebrafish larvae in the dark periods, but had no effect on the swimming distances in the light periods. In contrast, ethanol treatment at 2% increased the swimming distances in the light periods, but did not potentiate the swimming activity in the dark periods, compared to controls. Differences in the levels of neurotransmitters that are involved in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin pathways were also observed in groups with different ethanol treatments. These results indicated the behavioral studies concerning the ethanol effects on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae could be carried out as early as 5 dpf. The 1% and 2% ethanol-treated zebrafish larvae modeled ethanol effects at different intoxication states, and the differences in neurotransmitter levels suggested the involvement of various neurotransmitter pathways in different ethanol intoxication states.

  18. Differential sensitivity of cerebellar purkinje neurons to ethanol in selectively outbred lines of mice: maintenance in vitro independent of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Basile, A; Hoffer, B; Dunwiddie, T

    1983-03-28

    The effects of ethanol on spontaneous firing of cerebellar Purkinje neurons were examined in outbred lines of mice (short-sleep, SS; and long-sleep, LS) which exhibit differential behavioral sensitivity to ethanol. In order to determine whether the differences in Purkinje cell ethanol sensitivity which are observed in situ reflect differences in intrinsic properties of Purkinje neurons, we developed an isolated in vitro preparation of mouse cerebellum. Even when synaptic transmission was largely inhibited by elevating Mg2+ and decreasing Ca2+ concentrations, Purkinje cells demonstrated stable long-term firing rates quite similar to those observed in vivo. Purkinje cells responded to superfusion of ethanol with both increases and decreases in firing rate. Inhibition of rate was more commonly observed, and was the only response which was demonstrably dose-dependent. The differential sensitivity to ethanol which we have previously reported in vivo was maintained even under under these conditions, with the LS mice being approximately 5 times more sensitive to the depressant effects of ethanol. In addition, it was shown that ethanol, at the concentrations used in these experiments, decreased the amplitude and increased the duration of single action potentials. Thus, taken together, these results suggest that the differential sensitivity of outbred lines to the soporific effects of ethanol are paralleled by differences in the sensitivity of Purkinje neurons in vitro to superfusion with ethanol. Because these differences can be observed even when synaptic transmission is largely suppressed, it would appear that these differences are intrinsic to the purkinje neurons themselves.

  19. Glutathione Depletion and Recovery After Acute Ethanol Administration in the Aging Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Barbara L.; Richie, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in the detoxification of ethanol (EtOH) and acute EtOH administration leads to GSH depletion in the liver and other tissues. Aging is also associated with a progressive decline in GSH levels and impairment in GSH biosynthesis in many tissues. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the effects of aging on EtOH-induced depletion and recovery of GSH in different tissues of the C57Bl/6NNIA mouse. EtOH (2-5 g/kg) or saline was administered i.p. to mice of ages 6 mo (young), 12 mo (mature), and 24 mo (old); and GSH and cyst(e)ine concentrations were measured 0-24 hours thereafter. EtOH administration (5g/kg) depleted hepatic GSH levels >50% by 6 hr in all animals. By 24 hr, levels remained low in both young and old mice, but recovered to baseline levels in mature mice. At 6 hr, the decrease in hepatic GSH was dose-dependent up to 3 g/kg EtOH, but not at higher doses. The extent of depletion at the 3 g/kg dose was dependent upon age, with old mice demonstrating significantly lower GSH levels than mature mice (P<0.001). Altogether these results indicate that aging was associated with a greater degree of EtOH and fasting-induced GSH depletion and subsequent impaired recovery in liver. An impaired ability to recover was also observed in young animals. Further studies are required to determine if an inability to recover from GSH depletion by EtOH is associated with enhanced toxicity. PMID:17343832

  20. Circadian modulation of acute alcohol sensitivity but not acute tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Kim; Lyons, Lisa C

    2011-05-01

    An increased understanding of the factors affecting behavioral and neurological responses to alcohol and alcohol physiology is necessary given the tremendous toll alcohol abuse and alcoholism exert on individuals and society. At the behavioral and molecular levels, the response to alcohol appears remarkably conserved from Drosophila to humans, suggesting that investigations across model species can provide insight into the identification of common modulatory factors. We investigated the interaction between the circadian clock and alcohol sensitivity, alcohol tolerance, and alcohol absorbance in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a loss-of-righting reflex (LoRR) assay, we found that flies exhibit a circadian rhythm in the LoRR, with the greatest sensitivity to alcohol occurring from mid to late night, corresponding to the flies' inactive phase. As predicted, a circadian rhythm in the LoRR was absent in circadian mutant flies and under conditions in which the circadian clock was nonfunctional. Circadian modulation of the response to alcohol was not due to circadian regulation of alcohol absorbance. Similar to other animals, Drosophila develop acute and chronic tolerance to alcohol upon repeat exposures. We found that the circadian clock did not modulate the development of acute alcohol tolerance measured as the difference in sensitivity to alcohol between naïve and pre-exposed flies. Thus, the circadian clock modulates some, but not all, of the behavioral responses to alcohol exposure, suggesting that specific mechanisms underlie the observed circadian modulation of LoRR rather than global cellular circadian regulation. This study provides valuable new insights in our understanding of the circadian modulation of alcohol-induced behaviors that ultimately could facilitate preventative measures in combating alcohol abuse and alcoholism.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Jand Venes R; Bezerra, Víctor H; Gomes, Antoniella S; Barbosa, André Luiz R; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Soares, Pedro Marcos G; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Souza, Marcellus H L P

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in mice and the influence of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferent neurons, and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 receptors on such an effect. Saline and L-cysteine alone or with propargylglycine, sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), or Lawesson's reagent were administrated for testing purposes. For other experiments, mice were pretreated with glibenclamide, neurotoxic doses of capsaicin, or capsazepine. Afterward, mice received L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent. After 30 min, 50% ethanol was administrated by gavage. After 1 h, mice were sacrificed, and gastric damage was evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic analyses. L-cysteine, NaHS, and Lawesson's reagent treatment prevented ethanol-induced macroscopic and microscopic gastric damage in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of propargylglycine, an inhibitor of endogenous H(2)S synthesis, reversed gastric protection induced by L-cysteine. Glibenclamide reversed L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent gastroprotective effects against ethanol-induced macroscopic damage in a dose-dependent manner. Chemical ablation of sensory afferent neurons by capsaicin reversed gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine or H(2)S donors (NaHS or Lawesson's reagent) in ethanol-induced macroscopic gastric damage. Likewise, in the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, the gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent were also abolished. Our results suggest that H(2)S prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage. Although there are many mechanisms through which this effect can occur, our data support the hypothesis that the activation of K(ATP) channels and afferent neurons/TRPV1 receptors is of primary importance. PMID:19491326

  2. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?-An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0-35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis. PMID:22577377

  3. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?-An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0-35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis.

  4. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?—An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0–35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis. PMID:22577377

  5. SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES OF ETHANOL: IMPACT OF AGE, STRESS AND PRIOR HISTORY OF ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    The adolescent period is associated with high significance of interactions with peers, high frequency of stressful situations, and high rates of alcohol use. At least two desired effects of alcohol that may contribute to heavy and problematic drinking during adolescence are its abilities to both facilitate interactions with peers and to alleviate anxiety, perhaps especially anxiety seen in social contexts. Ethanol-induced social facilitation can be seen using a simple model of adolescence in the rat, with normal adolescents, but not their more mature counterparts, demonstrating this ethanol-related social facilitation. Prior repeated stress induces expression of ethanol-induced social facilitation in adults and further enhances socially facilitating effects of ethanol among adolescent rats. In contrast, under normal circumstances, adolescent rats are less sensitive than adults to the social inhibition induced by higher ethanol doses and are insensitive to the socially anxiolytic effects of ethanol. Sensitivity to the socially anxiolytic effects of ethanol can be modified by prior stress or ethanol exposure at both ages. Shortly following repeated restraint or ethanol exposure, adolescents exhibit social anxiety-like behavior, indexed by reduced social preference, and enhanced sensitivity to the socially anxiolytic effects of ethanol, indexed through ethanol-associated reinstatement of social preference in these adolescents. Repeated restraint, but not repeated ethanol, induces similar effects in adults as well, eliciting social anxiety-like behavior and increasing their sensitivity to the socially anxiolytic effects of acute ethanol; the stressor also decreases sensitivity of adults to ethanol-induced social inhibition. The persisting consequences of early adolescent ethanol exposure differ from its immediate consequences, with males exposed early in adolescence, but not females or those exposed later in adolescence, showing social anxiety-like behavior when tested

  6. Social consequences of ethanol: Impact of age, stress, and prior history of ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Spear, Linda P

    2015-09-01

    The adolescent period is associated with high significance of interactions with peers, high frequency of stressful situations, and high rates of alcohol use. At least two desired effects of alcohol that may contribute to heavy and problematic drinking during adolescence are its abilities to both facilitate interactions with peers and to alleviate anxiety, perhaps especially anxiety seen in social contexts. Ethanol-induced social facilitation can be seen using a simple model of adolescence in the rat, with normal adolescents, but not their more mature counterparts, demonstrating this ethanol-related social facilitation. Prior repeated stress induces expression of ethanol-induced social facilitation in adults and further enhances socially facilitating effects of ethanol among adolescent rats. In contrast, under normal circumstances, adolescent rats are less sensitive than adults to the social inhibition induced by higher ethanol doses and are insensitive to the socially anxiolytic effects of ethanol. Sensitivity to the socially anxiolytic effects of ethanol can be modified by prior stress or ethanol exposure at both ages. Shortly following repeated restraint or ethanol exposure, adolescents exhibit social anxiety-like behavior, indexed by reduced social preference, and enhanced sensitivity to the socially anxiolytic effects of ethanol, indexed through ethanol-associated reinstatement of social preference in these adolescents. Repeated restraint, but not repeated ethanol, induces similar effects in adults as well, eliciting social anxiety-like behavior and increasing their sensitivity to the socially anxiolytic effects of acute ethanol; the stressor also decreases sensitivity of adults to ethanol-induced social inhibition. The persisting consequences of early adolescent ethanol exposure differ from its immediate consequences, with males exposed early in adolescence, but not females or those exposed later in adolescence, showing social anxiety-like behavior when tested

  7. Gastroprotective effect of 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate against acute gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2016-05-01

    Gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol is a serious medical problem. Recent evidences suggest that reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators play a key role in the destruction of gastric mucosa. The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effect of MESNA (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice. The animals were orally pretreated with vehicle or MESNA and then treated with acidified ethanol to induce gastric mucosal damage. One hour after ethanol ingestion mice were euthanized and stomach samples were collected for biochemical analysis. Macroscopic and histopathological evaluation of gastric mucosa showed that pretreatment with MESNA attenuated gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Administration of MESNA significantly increased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the gastric tissues. In addition, MESNA markedly reduced ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation, myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels. These findings suggest that the thiol-containing compound MESNA is able to decrease alcohol-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in the gastric tissue. It seems that MESNA may have a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. PMID:26967742

  8. Baroreflex sensitivity in acute hypoxia and carbohydrate loading.

    PubMed

    Klemenc, Matjaž; Golja, Petra

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia decreases baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and can be a sufficient cause for syncope in healthy individuals. Carbohydrate loading enhances efferent sympathetic activity, which affects cardiac contractility, heart rate and vascular resistance, the main determinants of blood pressure. Thus, in both normoxia and hypoxia, carbohydrate loading may be more than simply metabolically beneficial, as it may affect blood pressure regulation. We hypothesised that carbohydrate loading will, in both normoxia and hypoxia, alter the regulation of blood pressure, as reflected in a change in baroreflex sensitivity. Fourteen subjects participated in two experiments, composed of a 15-min normoxic period, after which the subjects ingested water or an equal amount of water with carbohydrates. A 30-min rest period was then followed by a 10-min second normoxic and a 30-min hypoxic period. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously during the experiment to determine BRS. Despite an increased sympathetic activation, reflected in increased heart rate (P < 0.001) BRS was lower (P < 0.01) after carbohydrate loading, as compared to the water experiment, in both normoxic [23.7 (12.4) versus 28.8 (13.8) ms/mmHg] and hypoxic [16.8 (11.0) versus 24.3 (12.3) ms/mmHg] phases of the present study. As BRS was decreased in acute hypoxic exposure, the results confirm that hypoxia interferes with blood pressure regulation. However, although oral carbohydrate loading induced sympathoexcitation, it did not improve blood pressure regulation in hypoxia, as evident from the BRS data. Baroreflex effects of other forms of carbohydrate loading, not causing postprandial blood shifts to digestive system, should therefore be investigated. PMID:21360202

  9. Baroreflex sensitivity in acute hypoxia and carbohydrate loading.

    PubMed

    Klemenc, Matjaž; Golja, Petra

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia decreases baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and can be a sufficient cause for syncope in healthy individuals. Carbohydrate loading enhances efferent sympathetic activity, which affects cardiac contractility, heart rate and vascular resistance, the main determinants of blood pressure. Thus, in both normoxia and hypoxia, carbohydrate loading may be more than simply metabolically beneficial, as it may affect blood pressure regulation. We hypothesised that carbohydrate loading will, in both normoxia and hypoxia, alter the regulation of blood pressure, as reflected in a change in baroreflex sensitivity. Fourteen subjects participated in two experiments, composed of a 15-min normoxic period, after which the subjects ingested water or an equal amount of water with carbohydrates. A 30-min rest period was then followed by a 10-min second normoxic and a 30-min hypoxic period. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously during the experiment to determine BRS. Despite an increased sympathetic activation, reflected in increased heart rate (P < 0.001) BRS was lower (P < 0.01) after carbohydrate loading, as compared to the water experiment, in both normoxic [23.7 (12.4) versus 28.8 (13.8) ms/mmHg] and hypoxic [16.8 (11.0) versus 24.3 (12.3) ms/mmHg] phases of the present study. As BRS was decreased in acute hypoxic exposure, the results confirm that hypoxia interferes with blood pressure regulation. However, although oral carbohydrate loading induced sympathoexcitation, it did not improve blood pressure regulation in hypoxia, as evident from the BRS data. Baroreflex effects of other forms of carbohydrate loading, not causing postprandial blood shifts to digestive system, should therefore be investigated.

  10. [On the importance of a comprehensive study for diagnostics of death from acute ethanol poisoning and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Porodenko, V A; Korkhmazov, V T

    2011-01-01

    Over 30 000 cases of acute poisoning with ethyl alcohol and its surrogates are recorded annually in this country. Differential diagnostics between fatal poisoning and death from coronary heart disease encounters serious difficulties. The authors report a comprehensive forensic chemical, morphometric, and pathomorphological study of the activity of ethanol-oxidizing enzyme systems in the internal organs. The results of histochemical examination provide a basis for the extension of diagnostic potential of the available methods and the enhancement of the objective value of expert reports. PMID:21866846

  11. Sex differences in acute ethanol withdrawal severity after adrenalectomy and gonadectomy in Withdrawal Seizure-Prone and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant mice.

    PubMed

    Strong, Moriah N; Kaufman, Katherine R; Crabbe, John C; Finn, Deborah A

    2009-08-01

    Recent findings suggest that the ability of ethanol (EtOH) to increase the levels of neurosteroids with potent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic properties can influence measures of EtOH sensitivity. Earlier studies determined that removal of the adrenals and gonads diminished the steroidogenic effect of EtOH and significantly increased acute EtOH withdrawal severity in two inbred mouse strains that differed in withdrawal severity, suggesting the contribution of anticonvulsant GABAergic steroids to acute withdrawal in intact animals. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate the consequence of steroid removal on acute EtOH withdrawal through excision of the adrenals and gonads, in another genetic animal model of EtOH withdrawal differences, the Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR) selected lines. Male and female WSP and WSR mice underwent surgical removal of the adrenals and gonads or no organ removal (SHAM). One to 2 weeks later, baseline handling-induced convulsions (HICs) were assessed, mice were given a 4 g/kg dose of EtOH, and HICs were measured hourly for 12 h and then at 24 h. The combination surgery significantly increased EtOH withdrawal in WSP and WSR female mice, as measured by area under the curve (AUC) and peak HIC scores. The AUC was significantly positively correlated with plasma corticosterone levels and significantly negatively correlated with progesterone levels. In contrast, surgical status did not alter withdrawal severity in male WSP and WSR mice. Overall, the increase in acute EtOH withdrawal severity in female WSP and WSR mice after adrenalectomy and gonadectomy corroborate our recent evidence that withdrawal from a high dose of EtOH can be modulated by anticonvulsant steroids produced in the periphery.

  12. Sensitization of Listeria monocytogenes to Low pH, Organic Acids, and Osmotic Stress by Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Clive; Park, Simon F.

    2001-01-01

    The killing of Listeria monocytogenes following exposure to low pH, organic acids, and osmotic stress was enhanced by the addition of 5% (vol/vol) ethanol. At pH 3, for example, the presence of this agent stimulated killing by more than 3 log units in 40 min of exposure. The rate of cell death at pH 3.0 was dependent on the concentration of ethanol. Thus, while the presence 10% (vol/vol) ethanol at pH 3.0 stimulated killing by more than 3 log units in just 5 min, addition of 1.25% (vol/vol) ethanol resulted in less than 1 log unit of killing in 10 min. The ability of 5% (vol/vol) ethanol to stimulate killing at low pH and at elevated osmolarity was also dependent on the amplitude of the imposed stress, and an increase in the pH from 3.0 to 4.0 or a decrease in the sodium chloride concentration from 25 to 2.5% led to a marked reduction in the effectiveness of 5% (vol/vol) ethanol as an augmentative agent. Combinations of organic acids, low pH, and ethanol proved to be particularly effective bactericidal treatments; the most potent combination was pH 3.0, 50 mM formate, and 5 % (vol/vol) ethanol, which resulted in 5 log units of killing in just 4 min. Ethanol-enhanced killing correlated with damage to the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:11282610

  13. The effects of acute exposure to ethanol on neurotensin and guanine nucleotide-stimulation of phospholipase C activity in intact NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Both ethanol and neurotensin produce sedation and hypothermia. When administered in combination the behavioral effects of these two substances are potentiated. In order to better understand the biochemical nature of this interaction, the direct effects of ethanol on neurotensin receptors and an associated signal transduction process were determined in NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells. Ethanol in physiologically relevant concentrations significantly reduced neurotensin stimulated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production while having no effect on the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)neurotensin. In addition, ethanol up to 200 mM had no effect on GTPYS mediated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production. The results indicate that acute exposure ethanol partially disrupts the normal coupling of activated neurotensin receptors to the guanine nucleotide binding protein associated with phospholipase C.

  14. Adolescent and adult rats differ in the amnesic effects of acute ethanol in two hippocampus-dependent tasks: Trace and contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S; Barnet, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Experience-produced deficits in trace conditioning and context conditioning have been useful tools for examining the role of the hippocampus in learning. It has also been suggested that learning in these tasks is especially vulnerable to neurotoxic effects of alcohol during key developmental periods such as adolescence. In five experiments we systematically examined the presence and source of age-dependent vulnerability to the memory-disrupting effects of acute ethanol in trace conditioning and contextual fear conditioning. In Experiment 1a pre-training ethanol disrupted trace conditioning more strongly in adolescent (postnatal day, PD30-35) than adult rats (PD65-75). In Experiment 1b when pre-training ethanol was accompanied by pre-test ethanol no deficit in trace conditioning was observed in adolescents, suggesting that state-dependent retrieval failure mediated ethanol's disruption of trace conditioning at this age. Experiment 2a and b examined the effect of ethanol pretreatment on context conditioning. Here, adult but not adolescent rats were impaired in conditioned freezing to context cues. Experiment 2c explored state-dependency of this effect. Pre-training ethanol continued to disrupt context conditioning in adults even when ethanol was also administered prior to test. Collectively these findings reveal clear age-dependent and task-dependent vulnerabilities in ethanol's disruptive effects on hippocampus-dependent memory. Adolescents were more disrupted by ethanol in trace conditioning than adults, and adults were more disrupted by ethanol in context conditioning than adolescents. We suggest that adolescents may be more susceptible to changes in internal state (state-dependent retrieval failure) than adults and that ethanol disrupted performance in trace and context conditioning through different mechanisms. Relevance of these findings to theories of hippocampus function is discussed.

  15. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  16. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: screening for sensitization potential.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Copeland, Lisa B; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D W

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naïve individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approximately 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods. PMID:20045013

  17. Gynura procumbens Reverses Acute and Chronic Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis through MAPK/SREBP-1c-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jun; Mu, Yun-Mei; Li, Ting-Ting; Yang, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Mei-Tuo; Li, Yu-Sang; Zhang, Wei Kevin; Tang, He-Bin; Shang, Hong-Cai

    2015-09-30

    The present study aimed to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect and mechanism of action of Gynura procumbens on acute and chronic ethanol-induced liver injuries. Ethanol extract from G. procumbens stems (EEGS) attenuated acute ethanol-induced serum alanine aminotransferase levels and hepatic lipid accumulation. Therefore, EEGS was successively extracted by petroleum, ethyl acetate, and n-butyl alcohol. The results showed that the n-butyl alcohol extract was the active fraction of EEGS, and hence it was further fractionated on a polyamide glass column. The 60% ethanol-eluted fraction that contained 13.6% chlorogenic acid was the most active fraction, and its effect was further evaluated using a chronic model. Both the n-butyl alcohol extract and the 60% ethanol-eluted fraction inhibited chronic ethanol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation by modulating lipid metabolism-related regulators through MAPK/SREBP-1c-dependent and -independent signaling pathways and ameliorated liver steatosis. Our findings suggest that EEGS and one of its active ingredients, chlorogenic acid, may be developed as potential effective agents for ethanol-induced liver injury.

  18. Perillyl alcohol protects against ethanol induced acute liver injury in Wistar rats by inhibiting oxidative stress, NFκ-B activation and proinflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Nafees, Sana; Sultana, Sarwat

    2011-01-11

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are two major etiological factors that are suggested to play key roles in the development of ethanol induced liver injury. Release of proinflammatory cytokine like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and activation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκ-B) may strongly intensify inflammation and cell damage. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) also exerts significant effect in this whole cell signaling machinery. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of perillyl alcohol (POH) on ethanol-induced acute liver injury in Wistar rats and its probable mechanism. We have successfully demonstrated that pre-treatment with POH, besides exerting antioxidant activity might be able to modulate TNF-α release and NFκ-B activation. Rats were divided into five groups and treated with ethanol or POH via an intragastric tube for one week. Control group was treated with vehicle, and ethanol treated group was given ethanol (5 g/kg body wt). Animal of treatment groups were pretreated with POH (50 & 100 mg/kg body wt) and have been given ethanol. Serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase and hepatic malondialdehyde were increased significantly by ethanol treatment. Ethanol administration decreased hepatic reduced glutathione content and various antioxidant enzymes activity. TNF-α production and NFκ-B activation was also found to be increased after ethanol administration. POH pre-treatment significantly ameliorates ethanol induced acute liver injury possibly by inhibition of lipid peroxidation, replenishment of endogenous enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense system, downregulation of TNF-α as well as NFκ-B.

  19. Effects of Acute Prenatal Exposure to Ethanol on microRNA Expression are Ameliorated by Social Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Cherry; Mooney, Sandra M; Middleton, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are associated with abnormal social behavior. These behavioral changes may resemble those seen in autism. Rats acutely exposed to ethanol on gestational day 12 show decreased social motivation at postnatal day 42. We previously showed that housing these ethanol-exposed rats with non-exposed controls normalized this deficit. The amygdala is critical for social behavior and regulates it, in part, through connections with the basal ganglia, particularly the ventral striatum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, hairpin-derived RNAs that repress mRNA expression. Many brain disorders, including FASD, show dysregulation of miRNAs. In this study, we tested if miRNA and mRNA networks are altered in the amygdala and ventral striatum as a consequence of prenatal ethanol exposure and show any evidence of reversal as a result of social enrichment. RNA samples from two different brain regions in 72 male and female adolescent rats were analyzed by RNA-Seq and microarray analysis. Several miRNAs showed significant changes due to prenatal ethanol exposure and/or social enrichment in one or both brain regions. The top predicted gene targets of these miRNAs were mapped and subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. Several miRNA changes caused by ethanol were reversed by social enrichment, including mir-204, mir-299a, miR-384-5p, miR-222-3p, miR-301b-3p, and mir-6239. Moreover, enriched gene networks incorporating the targets of these miRNAs also showed reversal. We also extended our previously published mRNA expression analysis by directly examining all annotated brain-related canonical pathways. The additional pathways that were most strongly affected at the mRNA level included p53, CREB, glutamate, and GABA signaling. Together, our data suggest a number of novel epigenetic mechanisms for social enrichment to reverse the effects of ethanol exposure through widespread influences on gene expression.

  20. Effects of Acute Prenatal Exposure to Ethanol on microRNA Expression are Ameliorated by Social Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Cherry; Mooney, Sandra M.; Middleton, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are associated with abnormal social behavior. These behavioral changes may resemble those seen in autism. Rats acutely exposed to ethanol on gestational day 12 show decreased social motivation at postnatal day 42. We previously showed that housing these ethanol-exposed rats with non-exposed controls normalized this deficit. The amygdala is critical for social behavior and regulates it, in part, through connections with the basal ganglia, particularly the ventral striatum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, hairpin-derived RNAs that repress mRNA expression. Many brain disorders, including FASD, show dysregulation of miRNAs. In this study, we tested if miRNA and mRNA networks are altered in the amygdala and ventral striatum as a consequence of prenatal ethanol exposure and show any evidence of reversal as a result of social enrichment. RNA samples from two different brain regions in 72 male and female adolescent rats were analyzed by RNA-Seq and microarray analysis. Several miRNAs showed significant changes due to prenatal ethanol exposure and/or social enrichment in one or both brain regions. The top predicted gene targets of these miRNAs were mapped and subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. Several miRNA changes caused by ethanol were reversed by social enrichment, including mir-204, mir-299a, miR-384-5p, miR-222-3p, miR-301b-3p, and mir-6239. Moreover, enriched gene networks incorporating the targets of these miRNAs also showed reversal. We also extended our previously published mRNA expression analysis by directly examining all annotated brain-related canonical pathways. The additional pathways that were most strongly affected at the mRNA level included p53, CREB, glutamate, and GABA signaling. Together, our data suggest a number of novel epigenetic mechanisms for social enrichment to reverse the effects of ethanol exposure through widespread influences on gene expression. PMID:25309888

  1. Effects of Acute Prenatal Exposure to Ethanol on microRNA Expression are Ameliorated by Social Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Cherry; Mooney, Sandra M; Middleton, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are associated with abnormal social behavior. These behavioral changes may resemble those seen in autism. Rats acutely exposed to ethanol on gestational day 12 show decreased social motivation at postnatal day 42. We previously showed that housing these ethanol-exposed rats with non-exposed controls normalized this deficit. The amygdala is critical for social behavior and regulates it, in part, through connections with the basal ganglia, particularly the ventral striatum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, hairpin-derived RNAs that repress mRNA expression. Many brain disorders, including FASD, show dysregulation of miRNAs. In this study, we tested if miRNA and mRNA networks are altered in the amygdala and ventral striatum as a consequence of prenatal ethanol exposure and show any evidence of reversal as a result of social enrichment. RNA samples from two different brain regions in 72 male and female adolescent rats were analyzed by RNA-Seq and microarray analysis. Several miRNAs showed significant changes due to prenatal ethanol exposure and/or social enrichment in one or both brain regions. The top predicted gene targets of these miRNAs were mapped and subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. Several miRNA changes caused by ethanol were reversed by social enrichment, including mir-204, mir-299a, miR-384-5p, miR-222-3p, miR-301b-3p, and mir-6239. Moreover, enriched gene networks incorporating the targets of these miRNAs also showed reversal. We also extended our previously published mRNA expression analysis by directly examining all annotated brain-related canonical pathways. The additional pathways that were most strongly affected at the mRNA level included p53, CREB, glutamate, and GABA signaling. Together, our data suggest a number of novel epigenetic mechanisms for social enrichment to reverse the effects of ethanol exposure through widespread influences on gene expression. PMID:25309888

  2. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A, a novel gastroprotective compound from Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, against ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Amir, Junaidah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hadi, A Hamid A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Teh, Xinsheng; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Rahmani, Mawardi; Mohan, Syam

    2013-07-15

    Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A (PA), a xanthone derived from the Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, belongs to the Moraceae family which is native to the tropical forest of Malaysia. In this study, the efficacy of PA as a gastroprotective compound was examined against ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. The rats were pretreated with PA and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol. The ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological analysis, glutathione (GSH) levels, malondialdehyde level (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NP-SH) contents were evaluated in vivo. The activities of PA as anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and free radical scavenger were also investigated in vitro. The results showed that the oral administration of PA protects gastric mucosa from ethanol-induced gastric lesions. PA pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) restored the depleted GSH, NP-SH and NO levels in the gastric homogenate. Moreover, PA significantly (p<0.05) reduced the elevated MDA level due to ethanol administration. The gastroprotective effect of PA was associated with an over expression of HSP70 and suppression of Bax proteins in the ulcerated tissue. In addition, PA exhibited a potent FRAP value and significant COX-2 inhibition. It also showed a significant minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against H. pylori bacterium. The efficacy of PA was accomplished safely without the presence of any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the gastroprotective effect of PA might contribute to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as well as the anti-apoptotic mechanism and antibacterial action against Helicobacter pylori.

  3. Long-term Behavioral Impairment Following Acute Embryonic Ethanol Exposure in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, JM; Oliveri, AN; Zhang, C; Frazier, JM; Mackinnon, S; Cole, GJ; Levin, ED

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Developmental exposure to ethanol has long been known to cause persisting neurobehavioral impairment. However, the neural and behavioral mechanisms underlying these deficits and the importance of exposure timing are not well-characterized. Given the importance of timing and sequence in neurodevelopment it would be expected that alcohol intoxication at different developmental periods would result in distinct neurobehavioral consequences. METHODS Zebrafish embryos were exposed to ethanol (0%, 1%, 3%) at either 8-10 or 24-27 hours post-fertilization (hpf) then reared to adolescence and evaluated on several behavioral endpoints. Habituation to a repeated environmental stimulus and overall sensorimotor function were assessed using a tap startle test; measurements of anxiety and exploration behavior were made following introduction to a novel tank; and spatial discrimination learning was assessed using aversive control in a three-chambered apparatus. Overt signs of dysmorphogenesis were also scored (i.e. craniofacial malformations, including eye diameter and midbrain-hindbrain boundary morphology). RESULTS Ethanol treated fish were more active both at baseline and following a tap stimulus compared to the control fish and were hyperactive when placed in a novel tank. These effects were more prominent following exposure at 24-27 hpf than with the earlier exposure window, for both dose groups. Increases in physical malformation were only present in the 3% ethanol group; all malformed fish were excluded from behavioral testing. DISCUSSION These results suggest specific domains of behavior are affected following ethanol exposure, with some but not all of the tests revealing significant impairment. The behavioral phenotypes following distinct exposure windows described here can be used to help link cellular and molecular mechanisms of developmental ethanol exposure to functional neurobehavioral effects. PMID:25599606

  4. Naltrexone Prevents in Males and Attenuates in Females the Expression of Behavioral Sensitization to Ethanol Regardless of Maternal Separation

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Suzi E.; Quadros, Isabel M. H.; Suchecki, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Maternal separation alters the activity of the opioid system, which modulates ethanol-induced stimulation and behavioral sensitization. This study examined the effects of an opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), on the expression of behavioral sensitization to ethanol in adult male and female mice submitted to maternal separation from postnatal days (PNDs) 2 to 14. Whole litters of Swiss mice were either not separated [animal facility rearing (AFR)] or separated from their mothers for 3 h [long maternal separation (LMS)]. Starting on PND 90, male and female AFR and LMS mice received daily i.p. injections of saline (SAL) or ethanol (EtOH, 2.2 g/kg) for 21 days. Locomotor activity was assessed in cages containing photoelectric beams, once a week, to examine the development of behavioral sensitization. Five days after the end of the chronic treatment, animals were submitted to four locomotor activity tests spaced by 48 h, to assess the expression of behavioral sensitization. In all tests, animals received two i.p. injections with a 30-min interval and were then assessed for locomotor response to different treatment challenges, which were: SAL/SAL, SAL/EtOH (2.2 g/kg), NTX 2.0 mg/kg (NTX2)/EtOH, and NTX 4.0 mg/kg (NTX4)/EtOH. Regardless of maternal separation, EtOH-treated male and female mice displayed increased locomotor responses to EtOH during the 21-day treatment, indicating the development of behavioral sensitization. In the SAL/EtOH challenge, EtOH-treated LMS and AFR male and female mice exhibited higher locomotor activity than their SAL-treated counterparts, indicating the expression of sensitization. The coadministration of either dose of NTX blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization in both AFR and LMS male mice with a history of EtOH sensitization. In females, a significant attenuation of EtOH sensitization was promoted by both NTX doses, while still maintaining an augmented stimulant response to EtOH. Importantly, maternal separation

  5. Ethanol-nicotine interactions in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    SciTech Connect

    de Fiebre, C.M.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The possibility that common genetic factors regulate initial sensitivities to ethanol and nicotine as well as the development of cross-tolerance between these agents was explored using the long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice. The LS mice proved to be more sensitive to an acute challenge with nicotine than were the SS mice. Segregation analysis (F1, F2, backcross) indicated that ethanol sensitivity and nicotine sensitivity segregate together. Acute pretreatment with nicotine did not significantly affect sensitivity to ethanol, but ethanol pretreatment altered nicotine responsiveness. The LS mice develop more tolerance to nicotine and ethanol than do the SS and they also develop more cross-tolerance. These genetically determined differences in initial sensitivities, and tolerance and cross-tolerance development are not readily explained by differences in brain nicotinic receptor numbers.

  6. [Pecularities of correction of alcohol affctions of liver in patients with acute ethanol poisoning in the setting of consequence of toxic effect of ethanol].

    PubMed

    Shilov, V V; batotsyrenov, B V; Vasil'ev, S A; Shikalova, I A; Kuznetsov, O A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to test the usage of infusion of hepatoprotector "remaxol" in intensive therapy of acute ethanol poisoning accompanied with severe alcohol affections of the lever. In the result of the examination and treatment of 130 patients it was established that severe alcohol poisonings registered on alcohol abused patients with toxic hepatopathy, are always accompanied with serious metabolic violations. In the process of a comparative valuation of the using of heptral (ademethionin) and remaxol in the intensive therapy of alcohol poisonings it has been revealed that the using of remaxol led to improvement of the clinic of that poisonings, what had been registered as a decrease of frequency and duration of an alcohol delirium from 33,9% to 10,8%, a decrease of frequency of secondary lung complication from 18,5 to 3,1%, a decrease of a duration of treatment in intensive care unit from 7,3 +/- 0,6 to 5,6 +/- 0,3 and a hospital treatment duration from 11,8 +/- 0,5 to 9,0 +/- 0,3 days. Biochemical investigation has shown that using as heptral, as remaxol led to improvement of lever damages due to alcohol. However remaxol compared with heptral was better in the treatment of metabolic violations.

  7. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:27376896

  8. Acute prenatal exposure to ethanol on gestational day 12 elicits opposing deficits in social behaviors and anxiety-like behaviors in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Marvin R; Mooney, Sandra M; Varlinskaya, Elena I

    2016-09-01

    Our previous research has shown that in Long Evans rats acute prenatal exposure to a high dose of ethanol on gestational day (G) 12 produces social deficits in male offspring and elicits substantial decreases in social preference relative to controls, in late adolescents and adults regardless of sex. In order to generalize the observed detrimental effects of ethanol exposure on G12, pregnant female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to ethanol or saline and their offspring were assessed in a modified social interaction (SI) test as early adolescents, late adolescents, or young adults. Anxiety-like behavior was also assessed in adults using the elevated plus maze (EPM) or the light/dark box (LDB) test. Age- and sex-dependent social alterations were evident in ethanol-exposed animals. Ethanol-exposed males showed deficits in social investigation at all ages and age-dependent alterations in social preference. Play fighting was not affected in males. In contrast, ethanol-exposed early adolescent females showed no changes in social interactions, whereas older females demonstrated social deficits and social indifference. In adulthood, anxiety-like behavior was decreased in males and females prenatally exposed to ethanol in the EPM, but not the LDB. These findings suggest that social alterations associated with acute exposure to ethanol on G12 are not strain-specific, although they are more pronounced in Long Evans males and Sprague Dawley females. Furthermore, given that anxiety-like behaviors were attenuated in a test-specific manner, this study indicates that early ethanol exposure can have differential effects on different forms of anxiety. PMID:27154534

  9. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission.

  10. Interactions of ethanol on the acute toxicity of cocaine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Trouve, R. ); Latour, C ); Nahas, G.G. Columbia Univ., New York, NY )

    1992-02-26

    Administration of 65 mg/kg in the awake rate, restrained and instrumented, is associated with cardiovascular toxicity, convulsions and lethality within 9 feet 44 inches {plus minus} 4 feet 56 inches. Such an outcome is prevented if selected Ca{sup 2+} antagonists are administered intraarterially 5 minutes following cocaine. Four additional groups of Sprague Dawley rats were studied. The first was administered I.P. ethanol 1.5-2.0 gr. Such doses were well tolerated only producing hypertension of 50 minutes duration and all animals survived without apparent ill effects. Second and third groups were first administered the same doses of ethanol and 15 minutes later 65 mg/kg of cocaine. Survival time was 5 feet 49 inches with 1.5 mg/kg ethanol and 5 feet 57 inches {plus minus} 1 foot 26 inches with 2 mg/kg, significantly less than after cocaine administration alone. In a fourth group, animals were treated intraarterially with nicardipine or flunarizine, 2 minutes after cocaine. Survival time was not different from saline control. Ethanol enhances significantly cocaine lethal toxicity in the rate and prevents the protective effects of antidotes to this alkaloid.

  11. Choline Ameliorates Deficits in Balance Caused by Acute Neonatal Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bearer, Cynthia F; Wellmann, Kristen A; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M

    2015-08-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1 % of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient, but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline-deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of eight treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1 to P5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid(®) on P5, C and or S post-treatment from P6 to P20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol.

  12. CHOLINE AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN BALANCE CAUSED BY ACUTE NEONATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, Cynthia F.; Wellmann, Kristen A.; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1% of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits, but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of 8 treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1-5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid® on P5, C or S post-treatment from P6-20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol. PMID:26085462

  13. Effects of ethanol on cAMP production in murine embryonic palate mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, W.M.; Greene, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol affected the ability of murine embryonic palate mesenchymal (MEPM) cells to produce cAMP in response to hormone treatment. Acute exposure to ethanol resulted in an increase in hormone-stimulated cAMP levels, while chronic ethanol treatment led to decreased sensitivity to hormone. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels were decreased by both acute and chronic ethanol treatment, while the cells' response to cholera toxin was unchanged by ethanol treatment. The lack of sensitivity of the cholera toxin response to ethanol suggests that,in contrast to what has been observed in other systems, ethanol does not affect the production or activity of G{alpha}s in MEPM cells. These results suggest a possible explanation for the molecular basis for the craniofacial abnormalities observed in the fetal alcohol syndrome.

  14. Gastroprotective effect of the ethanolic extract of Parkia platycephala Benth. leaves against acute gastric lesion models in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hélio B; Silva, Francilene V; Passos, Flávia Franceli B; Bezerra, Roosevelt D S; Chaves, Mariana H; Oliveira, Francisco A; Oliveira, Rita C Meneses

    2010-01-01

    Parkia platycephala Benth. (Leguminosae--Mimosoideae), popularly known as "visgueira", fava bean tree or "fava-de-bolota", is widely found in the Northern and Northeastern regions of Brazil. Its pods are used as cattle food supplement in the drought period. Compounds with a gastroprotective activity were obtained from the genus Parkia. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the gastroprotective effect of the ethanolic extract of Parkia platycephala Benth. leaves (Pp-EtOH), as well as evaluating its possible mechanisms of action in experimental ulcer induction models. Lesions were induced by absolute ethanol, ethanol-HCl, ischemia-reperfusion and indomethacin in rodents. Pp-EtOH showed a protective effect in the lesion models (66, 48 and 52%, respectively), but it was not able to protect gastric mucosa against indomethacin-induced lesions. Results show a possible participation of the NO-synthase pathway in the gastroprotection and an antioxidant activity, by the increase of the catalase activity. The participation of prostaglandins and potassium channels sensitive to ATP in the gastroprotective effect of Pp-EtOH seems less likely to occur. More comprehensive studies, therefore, should be carried out to elucidate the antiulcerative effects of this promising natural product against this gastrointestinal disorder.

  15. Gastroprotective effect of the ethanolic extract of Parkia platycephala Benth. leaves against acute gastric lesion models in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hélio B; Silva, Francilene V; Passos, Flávia Franceli B; Bezerra, Roosevelt D S; Chaves, Mariana H; Oliveira, Francisco A; Oliveira, Rita C Meneses

    2010-01-01

    Parkia platycephala Benth. (Leguminosae--Mimosoideae), popularly known as "visgueira", fava bean tree or "fava-de-bolota", is widely found in the Northern and Northeastern regions of Brazil. Its pods are used as cattle food supplement in the drought period. Compounds with a gastroprotective activity were obtained from the genus Parkia. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the gastroprotective effect of the ethanolic extract of Parkia platycephala Benth. leaves (Pp-EtOH), as well as evaluating its possible mechanisms of action in experimental ulcer induction models. Lesions were induced by absolute ethanol, ethanol-HCl, ischemia-reperfusion and indomethacin in rodents. Pp-EtOH showed a protective effect in the lesion models (66, 48 and 52%, respectively), but it was not able to protect gastric mucosa against indomethacin-induced lesions. Results show a possible participation of the NO-synthase pathway in the gastroprotection and an antioxidant activity, by the increase of the catalase activity. The participation of prostaglandins and potassium channels sensitive to ATP in the gastroprotective effect of Pp-EtOH seems less likely to occur. More comprehensive studies, therefore, should be carried out to elucidate the antiulcerative effects of this promising natural product against this gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:21526272

  16. Basis of the Gabamimetic Profile of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Breese, G. R.; Criswell, H. E.; Carta, M.; Dodson, P. D.; Hanchar, H. J.; Khisti, R. T.; Mameli, M.; Ming, Z.; Morrow, A. L.; Olsen, R. W.; Otis, T. S.; Parsons, L. H.; Penland, S. N.; Roberto, M.; Siggins, G. R.; Valenzuela, C. F.; Wallner, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium held at the 2005 Research Society on Alcoholism meeting. The initial presentation by Dr. Wallner provided evidence that selected GABAA receptors containing the δ subunit display sensitivity to low intoxicating ethanol concentrations and this sensitivity is further increased by a mutation in the cerebellar α6 subunit, found in alcohol-hypersensitive rats. Dr. Mameli reported that ethanol affects γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) function by affecting neural circuits that influence GABA release. Dr. Parsons presented data from electrophysiological and microdialysis investigations that ethanol is capable of releasing GABA from presynaptic terminals. Dr. Morrow demonstrated that systemic ethanol increases neuroactive steroids in brain, the absence of which alters various functional responses to ethanol. Dr. Criswell presented evidence that the ability of ethanol to increase GABA was apparent in some, but not all, brain regions indicative of regional specificity. Further, Dr. Criswell demonstrated that neurosteroids alone and when synthesized locally by ethanol act postsynaptically to enhance the effect of GABA released by ethanol in a region specific manner. Collectively, this series of reports support the GABAmimetic profile of acutely administered ethanol being dependent on several specific mechanisms distinct from a direct effect on the major synaptic isoforms of GABAA receptors. PMID:16573592

  17. Adolescent rats are resistant to the development of ethanol-induced chronic tolerance and ethanol-induced conditioned aversion.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Godoy, Juan Carlos; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of chronic tolerance to ethanol in adult and adolescent rats has yielded mixed results. Tolerance to some effects of ethanol has been reported in adolescents, yet other studies found adults to exhibit greater tolerance than adolescents or comparable expression of the phenomena at both ages. Another unanswered question is how chronic ethanol exposure affects subsequent ethanol-mediated motivational learning at these ages. The present study examined the development of chronic tolerance to ethanol's hypothermic and motor stimulating effects, and subsequent acquisition of ethanol-mediated odor conditioning, in adolescent and adult male Wistar rats given every-other-day intragastric administrations of ethanol. Adolescent and adult rats exhibited lack of tolerance to the hypothermic effects of ethanol during an induction phase; whereas adults, but not adolescents, exhibited a trend towards a reduction in hypothermia at a challenge phase (Experiment 1). Adolescents, unlike adults, exhibited ethanol-induced motor activation after the first ethanol administration. Adults, but not adolescents, exhibited conditioned odor aversion by ethanol. Subsequent experiments conducted only in adolescents (Experiment 2, Experiment 3 and Experiment 4) manipulated the context, length and predictability of ethanol administration. These manipulations did not promote the expression of ethanol-induced tolerance. This study indicated that, when moderate ethanol doses are given every-other day for a relatively short period, adolescents are less likely than adults to develop chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced hypothermia. This resistance to tolerance development could limit long-term maintenance of ethanol intake. Adolescents, however, exhibited greater sensitivity than adults to the acute motor stimulating effects of ethanol and a blunted response to the aversive effects of ethanol. This pattern of response may put adolescents at risk for early initiation of ethanol intake.

  18. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of ethyl palmitate calibration and resolution with ethyl oleate as biomarker ethanol sub acute in urine application study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaniti, Ni Made; Manurung, Manuntun

    2016-03-01

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry is used to separate two and more compounds and identify fragment ion specific of biomarker ethanol such as palmitic acid ethyl ester (PAEE), as one of the fatty acid ethyl esters as early detection through conyugated reaction. This study aims to calibrate ethyl palmitate and develop analysis with oleate acid. This methode can be used analysis ethanol and its chemistry biomarker in ethanol sub-acute consumption as analytical forensic toxicology. The result show that ethanol level in urine rats Wistar were 9.21 and decreased 6.59 ppm after 48 hours consumption. Calibration curve of ethyl palmitate was y = 0.2035 x + 1.0465 and R2 = 0.9886. Resolution between ethyl palmitate and oleate were >1.5 as good separation with fragment ion specific was 88 and the retention time was 18 minutes.

  19. [Anatomo-histological and histochemical study of acute lesions of the gastroduodenal mucosa, produced by ethanol, before and after truncal vagotomy plus pyloroplasty in rats].

    PubMed

    Bartolomucci, A C; da Silva, A L; Barbosa, A J; Nogueira, A M

    1990-01-01

    The anatomo-pathologic alterations determined by ethanol in the gastroduodenal mucosa of rats are studied, as well as its action about truncal vagotomy plus pyloroplasty (VT + P). We use albino rats submitted to the administration of ethanol, 33% --via orogastric catheter- and to truncal vagotomy plus pyloroplasty, as well the association of the 2 variants. The utilization of ethanol, according to the up to date methodology, can be confirmed by a simple experimental production method of acute ulcer in rats. The VT + P determined acute ulcers in the 24 hour observation group, besides acute inflammatory lesions and with the decrease of mucins, diffusively, in the gastroduodenal mucosa. The performance of VT + P, 2 hours after the administration of ethanol, period in which the lesions are entirely settled, determined and aggravation of the gastric lesions through the increase of the media ulcerous gastric area and its histological aspects. On the other hand, the performance of VT + P, followed by the administration of ethanol 2 hours after, also determined an aggravation of gastric lesions, according to the same former parameters. When it was the time to perform the VT + P, 10 days before the administration of ethanol, or the inverse, a small reduction at the ulcerous gastric area had accrued but it did not amount to much. There was not a characterization of preventive effects or curative of this surgical procedure considering the gastric lesions produced by ethanol, but there was characterization of aggravating effect. All the possible hypothesis to the aggravation of these lesions are also discussed with the utilization of VT + P, as well its clinical use on the human being.

  20. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Copper (II) Complex against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; A. Hadi, A. Hamid; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Majid, Nazia; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential element in various metabolisms. The investigation was carried out to evaluate acute gastroprotective effects of the Copper (II) complex against ethanol-induced superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Rats were divided into 7 groups. Groups 1 and 2 were orally administered with Tween 20 (10% v/v). Group 3 was orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole (10% Tween 20). Groups 4–7 received 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg of the complex (10% Tween 20), respectively. Tween 20 (10% v/v) was given orally to group 1 and absolute ethanol was given orally to groups 2–7, respectively. Rats were sacrificed after 1 h. Group 2 exhibited severe superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Gastric wall mucus was significantly preserved by the pre-treatment complex. The results showed a significant increase in glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) activities and a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Histology showed marked reduction of hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in groups 4–7. Immunohistochemical staining showed up-regulation of Hsp70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. PAS staining of groups 4–7 showed intense stain uptake of gastric mucosa. The acute toxicity revealed the non-toxic nature of the compound. Conclusions/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the Copper (II) complex may possibly be due to preservation of gastric wall mucus; increase in PGE2 synthesis; GSH, SOD, and NO up-regulation of Hsp70 protein; decrease in MDA level; and down-regulation of Bax protein. PMID:23251568

  1. Laryngeal choking on food and acute ethanol intoxication in adults--An autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Slobodan; Zivković, Vladimir; Dragan, Babic; Juković, Fehim

    2011-01-01

    The retrospective autopsy study included 98 adults who died because of laryngeal choking on a bolus of food: 67 men and 31 women (χ(2)=6.843, p<0.01), average age 58.61±15.87 years (range 26-92 years). Most of the subjects had poor dentition (χ(2) =34.327, p<0.01). Twenty individuals died in medical institutions, and 78 were nonhospitalized individuals. More than a third of the nonhospitalized individuals were under the influence of ethanol at the moment of death: average blood concentration 8.3g/dL (SD=11.0), ranged from 5.0 to 36.0. Nonhospitalized persons were at the moment of event more often under influence of ethanol than the subjects in control group (χ(2)= 38.874, p<0.01), and at the same time significantly more intoxicated (z=-7.126, p<0.01). Our study pointed out that poor dentition and impairment of the swallowing reflex, as a consequence of ethanol intoxication in individuals without mental disorders, were the most important risk factors for bolus death.

  2. A Standardized Composition from Extracts of Myristica Fragrans, Astragalus Membranaceus, and Poria Cocos Protects Liver from Acute Ethanol Insult.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Despite the promising advances in therapeutic discovery, there still is a major challenge in the development of a safe, effective, and economical intervention for managing alcohol-related liver disorders. In this study, we describe the potential use of "MAP," a standardized composition comprising three extracts from Myristica fragrans, Astragalus membranaceus, and Poria cocos, in ameliorating alcohol-induced acute liver toxicity. Ethanol-induced acute hepatotoxicity as an animal model of binge drinking was utilized. Mice received oral doses of MAP at 300 mg/kg for four consecutive days. Mice were orally gavaged with 50% ethanol in 12 mL/kg dosing volume following the third dose of MAP every 12 h thereafter for a total of three doses. Hepatic functional tests from serum collected at T12, and hepatic glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutases (SODs), and triglyceride from liver homogenates were evaluated. Histopathology analysis and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) scoring were also determined. Excessive increases of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly inhibited at 46.3% and 43.6%, respectively, when mice were treated with MAP. MAP replenished the depleted SOD by more than 60%, while causing significant stimulation of GSH productions. MAP showed statistically significant reduction in ballooning degeneration, vascular steatosis, cytoplasmic or nuclear condensation, and shrinkage, as well as inflammations when compared to vehicle-treated alcohol-induced liver toxicity model. Mice treated with MAP showed statistically significant reduction in ASH scoring when compared to vehicle control. Therefore, the composition MAP could be potentially utilized as an effective hepatic-detoxifying agent for the protection of liver damage caused by alcohol consumptions.

  3. A Standardized Composition from Extracts of Myristica Fragrans, Astragalus Membranaceus, and Poria Cocos Protects Liver from Acute Ethanol Insult.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Despite the promising advances in therapeutic discovery, there still is a major challenge in the development of a safe, effective, and economical intervention for managing alcohol-related liver disorders. In this study, we describe the potential use of "MAP," a standardized composition comprising three extracts from Myristica fragrans, Astragalus membranaceus, and Poria cocos, in ameliorating alcohol-induced acute liver toxicity. Ethanol-induced acute hepatotoxicity as an animal model of binge drinking was utilized. Mice received oral doses of MAP at 300 mg/kg for four consecutive days. Mice were orally gavaged with 50% ethanol in 12 mL/kg dosing volume following the third dose of MAP every 12 h thereafter for a total of three doses. Hepatic functional tests from serum collected at T12, and hepatic glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutases (SODs), and triglyceride from liver homogenates were evaluated. Histopathology analysis and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) scoring were also determined. Excessive increases of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly inhibited at 46.3% and 43.6%, respectively, when mice were treated with MAP. MAP replenished the depleted SOD by more than 60%, while causing significant stimulation of GSH productions. MAP showed statistically significant reduction in ballooning degeneration, vascular steatosis, cytoplasmic or nuclear condensation, and shrinkage, as well as inflammations when compared to vehicle-treated alcohol-induced liver toxicity model. Mice treated with MAP showed statistically significant reduction in ASH scoring when compared to vehicle control. Therefore, the composition MAP could be potentially utilized as an effective hepatic-detoxifying agent for the protection of liver damage caused by alcohol consumptions. PMID:27355692

  4. Individual Differences in Ethanol Locomotor Sensitization Are Associated with Dopamine D1 Receptor Intra-Cellular Signaling of DARPP-32 in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Abrahao, Karina Possa; Oliveira Goeldner, Francine; Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    In mice there are clear individual differences in the development of behavioral sensitization to ethanol, a progressive potentiation of its psychomotor stimulant effect. Variability in the behavioral responses to ethanol has been associated with alcohol preference. Here we investigated if the functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors observed in ethanol sensitized mice leads to an increased activation of DARPP-32, a central regulatory protein in medium spiny neurons, in the nucleus accumbens - a brain region known to play a role in drug reinforcement. Swiss Webster mice received ethanol (2.2 g/kg/day) or saline i.p. administrations for 21 days and were weekly evaluated regarding their locomotor activity. From those treated with ethanol, the 33% with the highest levels of locomotor activity were classified as “sensitized” and the 33% with the lowest levels as "non-sensitized”. The latter presented similar locomotor levels to those of saline-treated mice. Different subgroups of mice received intra-accumbens administrations of saline and, 48 h later, SKF-38393, D1 receptor agonist 0.1 or 1 µg/side. Indeed, sensitized mice presented functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the accumbens. Two weeks following the ethanol treatment, other subgroups received systemic saline or SKF 10 mg/kg, 20 min before the euthanasia. The nucleus accumbens were dissected for the Western Blot analyses of total DARPP-32 and phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression. D1 receptor activation induced higher phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression in sensitized mice than in non-sensitized or saline. The functionally hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the nucleus accumbens is associated with an increased phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression after D1 receptor activation. These data suggest that an enduring increase in the sensitivity of the dopamine D1 receptor intracellular pathway sensitivity represents a neurobiological correlate associated with the development of locomotor

  5. Highly Sensitive Ethanol Sensor Based on Au-Decorated SnO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized Through Precipitation and Microwave Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Fang-Xian; Lian, Xiao-Xue; Zou, Yun-Ling; Wang, Qiong; Zhou, Qing-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Gold (Au)-decorated SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized through a precipitation and microwave irradiation process. The as-prepared products were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the as-prepared products consisted of nanometer-scale tetragonal crystalline SnO2 and face-centered cubic gold metal NPs. The gas sensing measurements showed that the sensor based on Au-decorated SnO2 NPs exhibited an extremely high response (239.5) toward 500-ppm ethanol at a relatively low working temperature (220°C). In addition, the response and recovery times of this sensor to ethanol were 1 s and 31 s, respectively. The excellent gas sensing performance of the synthesized NPs in terms of high response, fast response-recovery, superior selectivity, and good stability was attributed to the small nanometer size of the particles, Schottky barrier, and Au NP catalysis. Finally, we demonstrated that our Au-decorated SnO2 NPs could be a potential candidate for use in highly sensitive and selective gas sensors for ethanol.

  6. Distinct behavioral phenotypes in ethanol-induced place preference are associated with different extinction and reinstatement but not behavioral sensitization responses.

    PubMed

    Pildervasser, João V N; Abrahao, Karina P; Souza-Formigoni, Maria L O

    2014-01-01

    Conditioned place preference (CPP) is a model to study the role of drug conditioning properties. In outbred strains, individual variability may affect some behavioral measures. However, there are few studies focusing on understanding how different phenotypes of ethanol conditioned behavior may influence its extinction, reinstatement, and behavioral adaptation measures. We used male Swiss Webster mice to study different phenotypes related to ethanol conditioning strength, reinstatement and behavioral sensitization. Mice went through a CPP procedure with ethanol (2.2 g/kg, i.p.). After that, one group of mice was submitted to repeated extinction sessions, while another group remained in their home cages without any drug treatment. Mice went through environmental and ethanol priming (1.0 g/kg, i.p.) reinstatement tests. Ethanol priming test reinstated the conditioned behavior only in the animals kept in the home-cage during the abstinence period. Besides, the ethanol conditioned behavior strength was positively correlated with the time required to be extinguished. In the second set of experiments, some mice went through a CPP protocol followed by behavioral sensitization (five i.p. administrations of ethanol 2.2 g/kg or saline per week, for 3 weeks) and another group of mice went through sensitization followed by CPP. No positive correlation was observed between ethanol CPP strength and the intensity of behavioral sensitization. Considering that different phenotypes observed in CPP strength predicted the variability in other CPP measures, we developed a statistics-based method to classify mice according to CPP strength to be used in the evaluation of ethanol conditioning properties. PMID:25152719

  7. Distinct behavioral phenotypes in ethanol-induced place preference are associated with different extinction and reinstatement but not behavioral sensitization responses

    PubMed Central

    Pildervasser, João V. N.; Abrahao, Karina P.; Souza-Formigoni, Maria L. O.

    2014-01-01

    Conditioned place preference (CPP) is a model to study the role of drug conditioning properties. In outbred strains, individual variability may affect some behavioral measures. However, there are few studies focusing on understanding how different phenotypes of ethanol conditioned behavior may influence its extinction, reinstatement, and behavioral adaptation measures. We used male Swiss Webster mice to study different phenotypes related to ethanol conditioning strength, reinstatement and behavioral sensitization. Mice went through a CPP procedure with ethanol (2.2 g/kg, i.p.). After that, one group of mice was submitted to repeated extinction sessions, while another group remained in their home cages without any drug treatment. Mice went through environmental and ethanol priming (1.0 g/kg, i.p.) reinstatement tests. Ethanol priming test reinstated the conditioned behavior only in the animals kept in the home-cage during the abstinence period. Besides, the ethanol conditioned behavior strength was positively correlated with the time required to be extinguished. In the second set of experiments, some mice went through a CPP protocol followed by behavioral sensitization (five i.p. administrations of ethanol 2.2 g/kg or saline per week, for 3 weeks) and another group of mice went through sensitization followed by CPP. No positive correlation was observed between ethanol CPP strength and the intensity of behavioral sensitization. Considering that different phenotypes observed in CPP strength predicted the variability in other CPP measures, we developed a statistics-based method to classify mice according to CPP strength to be used in the evaluation of ethanol conditioning properties. PMID:25152719

  8. Naloxone and ethanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Askenasi, R; Fontaine, J

    1982-01-01

    Naloxone has been said to be an antidote of acute ethanol intoxication in man. Experimental and clinical studies are however not convincing and contradictory. We have used naloxone to antagonize the effect of ethanol in mice. Results are compared to those obtained with morphine intoxication. Even at high doses (5 mg/kg) naloxone is not a good antagonist of ethanol intoxication in mice.

  9. Nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate the dose-related myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by acute ethanol in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2013-01-01

    Acute ethanol lowers blood pressure (BP) and cardiac output in proestrus and after chronic estrogen (E2) replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. However, whether rapid nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate these hemodynamic effects of ethanol remains unanswered. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of ethanol (0.5 or 1.5 g/kg iv) on left ventricular (LV) function and oxidative markers in OVX rats pretreated 30 min earlier with 1 μg/kg E2 (OVXE2) or vehicle (OVX) and in proestrus sham-operated (SO) rats. In SO rats, ethanol caused significant and dose-related reductions in BP, rate of rise in LV pressure (LV dP/dtmax), and LV developed pressure (LVDP). These effects of ethanol disappeared in OVX rats and were restored in OVXE2 rats, suggesting rapid estrogen receptor signaling mediates the detrimental effects of ethanol on LV function. Ex vivo studies revealed that the estrogen-dependent myocardial dysfunction caused by ethanol was coupled with higher LV 1) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), 2) expression of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, 3) phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and 4) catalase activity. ERK1/2 inhibition by PD-98059 (1 mg/kg iv) abrogated the myocardial dysfunction, hypotension, and the elevation in myocardial ROS generation caused by ethanol. We conclude that rapid estrogen receptor signaling is implicated in cellular events that lead to the generation of aldehyde protein adducts and Akt/ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which ultimately mediate the estrogen-dependent LV oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:24368668

  10. Regional tongue sensitivity for sweetness and pungency of ethanol-aspartame mixtures.

    PubMed

    Calviño, A M

    1998-02-01

    Binary mixtures of aspartame prepared at three levels of concentration and dissolved in four ethanolic dilutions were perceptually evaluated. Sweet-pungent combinations were presented in solution or in disks of filter paper (paper) soaked in the solutions. Variations in sweetness and pungency were examined at two oral loci including the tip and the back plus the front of the tongue in the liquid condition or the tip and the back of the tongue in the paper condition. A similar behavior was observed in liquid and paper conditions; as the concentration of aspartame and ethanol increased so did the intensity for sweet and pungent qualities. Whereas sweetness was not influenced by ethanol addition (2-8% V/V), a suppressive effect of aspartame (1-4 mM) on pungency was noted for liquid but not for the paper condition. Sweetness was enhanced when the back plus the front of the tongue was stimulated by solutions. Finally, there was a complex pattern of regional effects on the perceived pungency of alcoholic-sweet solutions that was not replicated in the paper condition.

  11. Antitumor activity of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves towards human acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhamanbaeva, G T; Murzakhmetova, M K; Tuleukhanov, S T; Danilenko, M P

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effects of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves on the growth and differentiation of human acute myeloid leukemia cells (KG-1a, HL60, and U937). The extract of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves inhibited cell growth depending on the cell strain and extract dose. In a high concentration (100 μg/ml), the extract also exhibited a cytotoxic effect on HL60 cells. Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves extract did not affect cell differentiation and did not modify the differentiating effect of calcitriol, active vitamin D metabolite. Inhibition of cell proliferation was paralleled by paradoxical accumulation of phase S cells (synthetic phase) with a reciprocal decrease in the count of G1 cells (presynthetic phase). The extract in a concentration of 100 μg/ml induced the appearance of cells with a subdiploid DNA content (sub-G1 phase cells), which indicated induction of apoptosis. The antiproliferative effect of Hippophae rhamnoides L. extract on acute myeloid leukemia cells was at least partially determined by activation of the S phase checkpoint, which probably led to deceleration of the cell cycle and apoptosis induction. PMID:25432283

  12. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-Song; Li, Huan-Zhou; Niu, Cong-Cong; Pan, Su-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200 mg/kg/d bw) for 30 d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-α and increased adiponectin, PPAR-α, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16 g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  13. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-song; Li, Huan-zhou; Niu, Cong-cong; Pan, Su-hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200 mg/kg/d bw) for 30 d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-α and increased adiponectin, PPAR-α, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16 g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  14. Repeated ethanol administration modifies the temporal structure of sucrose intake patterns in mice: effects associated with behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Raúl; Kamens, Helen M; McKinnon, Carrie S; Ford, Matthew M; Phillips, Tamara J

    2010-07-01

    Neuroadaptations supporting behavioral sensitization to abused drugs are suggested to underlie pathological, excessive motivation toward drugs and drug-associated stimuli. Drug-induced sensitization has also been linked to increased appetitive responses for non-drug, natural reinforcers. The present research investigated whether ethanol (EtOH)-induced neural changes, inferred from psychomotor sensitization, can modify consumption and intake dynamics for the natural reinforcer, sucrose. The effects of EtOH-induced sensitization in mice on the temporal structure of sucrose intake patterns were measured using a lickometer system. After sensitization, sucrose intake dynamics were measured for 1 hour daily for 7 days and indicated more rapid initial approach and consumption of sucrose in EtOH-sensitized groups; animals showed a shorter latency to the first intake bout and an increased number of sucrose bottle licks during the initial 15 minutes of the 1-hour sessions. This effect was associated with increased frequency and size of bouts. For the total 1-hour session, sucrose intake and bout dynamics were not different between groups, indicating a change in patterns of sucrose intake but not total consumption. When sensitization was prevented by the gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor agonist, baclofen, the increased rate of approach and consumption of sucrose were also prevented. Thus, EtOH-induced sensitization, and not the mere exposure to EtOH, was associated with changes in sucrose intake patterns. These data are consistent with current literature suggesting an enhancing effect of drug-induced sensitization on motivational processes involved in reinforcement.

  15. [Characteristics of the pharmacological treatment of toxic liver damage in patients with an alcohol abused syndrome and an acute severe ethanol poison].

    PubMed

    Shilov, V V; Shikalova, I A; Vasil'ev, S A; Loladze, A T; Batotsyrenov, B V

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 130 patients with an alcohol abused syndrome and a severe ethanol poison have revealed that ethanol action are accompanied by significant metabolic disturbances. The comparative evaluation of the inclusion of heptral and remaxol in the treatment has shown that remaxol improves the clinical course of mentioned disorders decreasing the frequency and duration of alcohol delirium. Patients treated with this drug spent less time in acute care and their treatment duration was shorter. Remaxol reduces more effectively the severity of metabolic disorders.

  16. Spin-trapping studies of hepatic free radicals formed following the acute administration of ethanol to rats: In vivo detection of 1-hydroxyethyl radicals with PBN

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, L.A.; Kotake, Y.; McCay, P.B.; Janzen, E.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The generation of free radicals in rat liver following the acute oral administration of ethanol was studied with the spin-trapping method, using a deuterated derivative of phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN-d14) as the spin-trapping agent. After administration of ethanol and PBN-d14 to rats, organic extracts of the liver were prepared and subjected to ESR spectroscopy. In the case of ethanol-treated rats, the ESR spectra indicated that mixtures of radicals had been trapped, while spectra from control rats were essentially negative. The predominant spin adduct detected after ethanol treatment is proposed to be from a carbon-centered, primary alkyl radical, based on gamma-hydrogen hyperfine splitting patterns observed with PBN-d14. Oxygen-centered radicals also contributed to the ESR spectra. Liver extracts also contained low concentrations of the 1-hydroxyethyl radical spin adduct, which was indicated by weak spectral lines corresponding to those of the 1-13C-ethanol adduct. These data confirm previous suggestions that ethanol is metabolized to a free radical metabolite in rat liver. In addition, some information on types of lipid radicals generated during alcohol intoxication has been obtained.

  17. Amphetamine sensitization and cross-sensitization with acute restraint stress: impact of prenatal alcohol exposure in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Uban, Kristina A.; Comeau, Wendy L.; Bodnar, Tamara; Yu, Wayne K.; Weinberg, Joanne; Galea, Liisa A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) are at increased risk for substance use disorders (SUD). In typically developing individuals, susceptibility to SUD is associated with alterations in dopamine and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) systems, and their interactions. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) alters dopamine and HPA systems, yet effects of PAE on dopamine-HPA interactions are unknown. Amphetamine-stress cross-sensitization paradigms were utilized to investigate sensitivity of dopamine and stress (HPA) systems, and their interactions following PAE. Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley offspring from PAE, pair-fed, and ad libitum-fed control groups were assigned to amphetamine-(1–2mg/kg) or saline-treated conditions, with injections every other day for 15 days. 14 days later, all animals received an amphetamine challenge (1mg/kg) and 5 days later, hormones were measured under basal or acute stress conditions. Amphetamine sensitization (augmented locomotion, days 1–29) and cross-sensitization with acute restraint stress (increased stress hormones, day 34) were assessed. Results PAE rats exhibited a lower threshold for amphetamine sensitization compared to controls, suggesting enhanced sensitivity of dopaminergic systems to stimulant-induced changes. Cross-sensitization between amphetamine (dopamine) and stress (HPA hormone) systems was evident in PAE, but not in control rats. PAE males exhibited increased dopamine receptor expression (mPFC) compared to controls. Conclusions PAE alters induction and expression of sensitization/cross-sensitization, as reflected in locomotor, neural, and endocrine changes, in a manner consistent with increased sensitivity of dopamine and stress systems. These results provide insight into possible mechanisms that could underlie increased prevalence of SUD, as well as the impact of widely prescribed stimulant medications among adolescents with FASD. PMID:25420606

  18. Phytochemical and acute toxicity of ethanolic extract of Enantia chlorantha (oliv) stem bark in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Abatan, Mathew O.

    2013-01-01

    It is presumed that drugs sourced from herbs have lesser side effects than allopathic drugs. Enantia chlorantha is widely used in herbal medicine for the treatment of several ailments such as jaundice, malaria, fever, infective hepatitis, etc. However its toxicity profiles are not well documented. The effects of ethanolic extract of E. chlorantha stem bark on body weight changes, biochemical and haematological parameters as well as histology of vital organs (heart, kidneys and liver) were assessed. Also, the phytochemical constituent of the plant was analysed. Albino rats of both sexes were randomly divided into five groups (A–E) of five rats each and the ethanolic extract of E. chlorantha stem bark extract was administered by oral gavage in a single dose. Group A rats were administered 500 mg/kg of the extract, group B; 1000 mg/kg, group C; 2000 mg/kg, group D; 3000 mg/kg and group E rats received distilled water (10 ml/kg) and served as control. The extract caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in the levels of packed cell volume, haemoglobin concentration and red blood cell counts in a dose dependent manner. Further, significant alterations were not observed in the serum biochemical parameters analysed (AST, ALP, ALT, blood urea nitrogen, total protein, albumin, globulin and bilirubin). In addition, the extract at 1000, 2000 and 3000 mg/kg caused congestion in the heart and kidney of experimental rats. These results suggest that oral administration of E. chlorantha may produce severe toxic effects at relatively high doses, thus caution should be exercised in its use. PMID:24678252

  19. Toxicogenomic identification of biomarkers of acute respiratory exposure sensitizing agents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allergy induction requires multiple exposures to an agent. Therefore the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for effective screening of potential sensitizers will require the identification of biomarkers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential ...

  20. *Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens fol...

  1. Land usage attributed to corn ethanol production in the United States: sensitivity to technological advances in corn grain yield, ethanol conversion, and co-product utilization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the system for producing yellow corn grain is well established in the US, its role among other biofeedstock alternatives to petroleum-based energy sources has to be balanced with its predominant purpose for food and feed as well as economics, land use, and environmental stewardship. We model land usage attributed to corn ethanol production in the US to evaluate the effects of anticipated technological change in corn grain production, ethanol processing, and livestock feeding through a multi-disciplinary approach. Seven scenarios are evaluated: four considering the impact of technological advances on corn grain production, two focused on improved efficiencies in ethanol processing, and one reflecting greater use of ethanol co-products (that is, distillers dried grains with solubles) in diets for dairy cattle, pigs, and poultry. For each scenario, land area attributed to corn ethanol production is estimated for three time horizons: 2011 (current), the time period at which the 15 billion gallon cap for corn ethanol as per the Renewable Fuel Standard is achieved, and 2026 (15 years out). Results Although 40.5% of corn grain was channeled to ethanol processing in 2011, only 25% of US corn acreage was attributable to ethanol when accounting for feed co-product utilization. By 2026, land area attributed to corn ethanol production is reduced to 11% to 19% depending on the corn grain yield level associated with the four corn production scenarios, considering oil replacement associated with the soybean meal substituted in livestock diets with distillers dried grains with solubles. Efficiencies in ethanol processing, although producing more ethanol per bushel of processed corn, result in less co-products and therefore less offset of corn acreage. Shifting the use of distillers dried grains with solubles in feed to dairy cattle, pigs, and poultry substantially reduces land area attributed to corn ethanol production. However, because distillers dried grains

  2. Acute Stress Decreases but Chronic Stress Increases Myocardial Sensitivity to Ischemic Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Eric D.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the largest cause of mortality worldwide, and stress is a significant contributor to the development of CVD. The relationship between acute and chronic stress and CVD is well evidenced. Acute stress can lead to arrhythmias and ischemic injury. However, recent evidence in rodent models suggests that acute stress can decrease sensitivity to myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). Conversely, chronic stress is arrhythmogenic and increases sensitivity to myocardial IRI. Few studies have examined the impact of validated animal models of stress-related psychological disorders on the ischemic heart. This review examines the work that has been completed using rat models to study the effects of stress on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Utilization of animal models of stress-related psychological disorders is critical in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders in patients experiencing stress-related psychiatric conditions. PMID:27199778

  3. Acute and chronic sensitivity, avoidance behavior and sensitive life stages of bullfrog tadpoles exposed to the biopesticide abamectin.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana M; Daam, Michiel A; dos Santos, Liliana R A; Sanches, Ana L M; Araújo, Cristiano V M; Espíndola, Evaldo L G

    2016-04-01

    As compared to other aquatic organism groups, relatively few studies have been conducted so far evaluating the toxicity of pesticides to amphibians. This may at least partly be due to the fact that regulations for registering pesticides usually do not require testing amphibians. The sensitivity of amphibians is generally considered to be covered by that based on toxicity tests with other aquatic organisms (e.g. fish) although the impact of a pesticide on amphibians may be very different. In the present study, acute and chronic laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of abamectin (as Vertimec(®) 18EC) to bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) tadpoles. Acute tests were conducted at two tadpole stages (Gosner stage 21G and 25G) and avoidance tests were also conducted with stage Gosner stage 21G tadpoles. Calculated acute toxicity values were greater than those reported for standard fish test species, hence supporting the use of fish toxicity data as surrogates for amphibians in acute risk assessments. Given the limited number and extent of available amphibian toxicity studies, however, research needs to increase our understanding of pesticide toxicity to amphibians are discussed. PMID:26758616

  4. Adolescents and Alcohol: Acute Sensitivities, Enhanced Intake, and Later Consequences*

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Linda Patia

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is an evolutionarily conserved developmental period characterized by notable maturational changes in brain along with various age-related behavioral characteristics, including the propensity to initiate alcohol and other drug use and consume more alcohol per occasion than adults. After a brief review of adolescent neurobehavioral function from an evolutionary perspective, the paper will turn to assessment of adolescent alcohol sensitivity and consequences, with a focus on work from our laboratory. After summarizing evidence showing that adolescents differ considerably from adults in their sensitivity to various effects of alcohol, potential contributors to these age-typical sensitivities will be discussed, and the degree to which these findings are generalizable to other drugs and to human adolescents will be considered. Recent studies are then reviewed to illustrate that repeated alcohol exposure during adolescence induces behavioral, cognitive, and neural alterations that are highly specific, replicable, persistent and dependent on the timing of the exposure. Research in this area is in its early stages, however, and more work will be necessary to characterize the extent of these neurobehavioral alterations and further determine the degree to which observed effects are specific to alcohol exposure during adolescence. PMID:24291291

  5. Comparative acute and chronic sensitivity of fish and amphibians: a critical review of data.

    PubMed

    Weltje, Lennart; Simpson, Peter; Gross, Melanie; Crane, Mark; Wheeler, James R

    2013-04-01

    The relative sensitivity of amphibians to chemicals in the environment, including plant protection product active substances, is the subject of ongoing scientific debate. The objective of this study was to compare systematically the relative sensitivity of amphibians and fish to chemicals. Acute and chronic toxicity data were obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) ECOTOX database and were supplemented with data from the scientific and regulatory literature. The overall outcome is that fish and amphibian toxicity data are highly correlated and that fish are more sensitive (both acute and chronic) than amphibians. In terms of acute sensitivity, amphibians were between 10- and 100-fold more sensitive than fish for only four of 55 chemicals and more than 100-fold more sensitive for only two chemicals. However, a detailed inspection of these cases showed a similar acute sensitivity of fish and amphibians. Chronic toxicity data for fish were available for 52 chemicals. Amphibians were between 10- and 100-fold more sensitive than fish for only two substances (carbaryl and dexamethasone) and greater than 100-fold more sensitive for only a single chemical (sodium perchlorate). The comparison for carbaryl was subsequently determined to be unreliable and that for sodium perchlorate is a potential artifact of the exposure medium. Only a substance such as dexamethasone, which interferes with a specific aspect of amphibian metamorphosis, might not be detected using fish tests. However, several other compounds known to influence amphibian metamorphosis were included in the analysis, and these did not affect amphibians disproportionately. These analyses suggest that additional amphibian testing is not necessary during chemical risk assessment.

  6. The impact of acute ethanol on reproductive hormone synthesis, processing, and secretion in female rats at proestrous.

    PubMed

    LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; Emanuele, M A; Emanuele, N

    1997-12-01

    It is the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of acute ethanol (EtOH) on the female rat hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The molecular and cellular mechanistic details of such effects have been studied intensively in the male rat. However, there has been relatively little in-depth study of EtOH's effects on the adult, postpubertal female rat. Adult female rats with confirmed 4- or 5-day estrous cycles were given a single injection of EtOH or saline between noon and 1:00 PM on proestrous and were killed at 4:00 PM. EtOH caused a sharp 97% reduction in luteinizing hormone (LH) serum levels (p < 0.001), compared with controls with no concomitant change in LH mRNA. EtOH also significantly reduced hypothalamic LH releasing hormone (LHRH) by 49% (p < 0.01), with no change in content of the precursor pro-LHRH compared with saline-injected controls. The ratio of LHRH to pro-LHRH was also significantly reduced by EtOH (p < 0.05), compared with control. There was no EtOH-induced change in LHRH mRNA. Compared with saline, EtOH reduced both serum estradiol by 37% (p < 0.02) and progesterone by 47% (p < 0.001). These results show that EtOH has profound disruptive effects on the female HPG axis. Our data suggests that EtOH decreases the releasable LHRH pool either by decreasing conversion of pro-LHRH to LHRH and/or by increasing local LHRH degradation. This acutely restricts the release of LH and subsequent estradiol and progesterone secretion.

  7. Role of interleukin-1 receptor signaling in the behavioral effects of ethanol and benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Blednov, Yuri A; Benavidez, Jillian M; Black, Mendy; Mayfield, Jody; Harris, R Adron

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression studies identified the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1R1) as part of a pathway associated with a genetic predisposition to high alcohol consumption, and lack of the endogenous IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) strongly reduced ethanol intake in mice. Here, we compared ethanol-mediated behaviors in mice lacking Il1rn or Il1r1. Deletion of Il1rn (the gene encoding IL-1ra) increases sensitivity to the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and flurazepam and reduces severity of acute ethanol withdrawal. Conversely, deletion of Il1r1 (the gene encoding the IL-1 receptor type I, IL-1R1) reduces sensitivity to the sedative effects of ethanol and flurazepam and increases the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal. The sedative effects of ketamine and pentobarbital were not altered in the knockout (KO) strains. Ethanol intake and preference were not changed in mice lacking Il1r1 in three different tests of ethanol consumption. Recovery from ethanol-induced motor incoordination was only altered in female mice lacking Il1r1. Mice lacking Il1rn (but not Il1r1) showed increased ethanol clearance and decreased ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion. The increased ethanol- and flurazepam-induced sedation in Il1rn KO mice was decreased by administration of IL-1ra (Kineret), and pre-treatment with Kineret also restored the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal. Ethanol-induced sedation and withdrawal severity were changed in opposite directions in the null mutants, indicating that these responses are likely regulated by IL-1R1 signaling, whereas ethanol intake and preference do not appear to be solely regulated by this pathway.

  8. Consumer Choice of E85 Denatured Ethanol Fuel Blend: Price Sensitivity and Cost of Limited Fuel Availability

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David

    2014-12-01

    The promotion of greater use of E85, a fuel blend of 85% denatured ethanol, by flex-fuel vehicle owners is an important means of complying with the Renewable Fuel Standard 2. A good understanding of factors affecting E85 demand is necessary for effective policies that promote E85 and for developing models that forecast E85 sales in the United States. In this paper, the sensitivity of aggregate E85 demand to E85 and gasoline prices is estimated, as is the relative availability of E85 versus gasoline. The econometric analysis uses recent data from Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa. The more recent data allowmore » a better estimate of nonfleet demand and indicate that the market price elasticity of E85 choice is substantially higher than previously estimated.« less

  9. Consumer Choice of E85 Denatured Ethanol Fuel Blend: Price Sensitivity and Cost of Limited Fuel Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David

    2014-12-01

    The promotion of greater use of E85, a fuel blend of 85% denatured ethanol, by flex-fuel vehicle owners is an important means of complying with the Renewable Fuel Standard 2. A good understanding of factors affecting E85 demand is necessary for effective policies that promote E85 and for developing models that forecast E85 sales in the United States. In this paper, the sensitivity of aggregate E85 demand to E85 and gasoline prices is estimated, as is the relative availability of E85 versus gasoline. The econometric analysis uses recent data from Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa. The more recent data allow a better estimate of nonfleet demand and indicate that the market price elasticity of E85 choice is substantially higher than previously estimated.

  10. Effects of S-Adenosylmethionine and Its Combinations With Taurine and/or Betaine on Glutathione Homeostasis in Ethanol-induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seo Yeon; Ko, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure to ethanol abuse and severe oxidative stress are risk factors for hepatocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and its combinations with taurine and/or betaine on the level of glutathione (GSH), a powerful antioxidant in the liver, in acute hepatotoxicity induced by ethanol. Methods To examine the effects of SAMe and its combinations with taurine and/or betaine on ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity, AML12 cells and C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with SAMe, taurine, and/or betaine, followed by ethanol challenge. Cell viability was detected with an MTT assay. GSH concentration and mRNA levels of GSH synthetic enzymes were measured using GSH reductase and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were measured with commercially available kits. Results Pretreatment of SAMe, with or without taurine and/or betaine, attenuated decreases in GSH levels and mRNA expression of the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), the rate-limiting enzyme for GSH synthesis, in ethanol-treated cells and mice. mRNA levels of the modifier subunit of GCL and glutathione synthetase were increased in mice treated with SAMe combinations. SAMe, taurine, and/or betaine pretreatment restored serum ALT and AST levels to control levels in the ethanol-treated group. Conclusions Combinations of SAMe with taurine and/or betaine have a hepatoprotective effect against ethanol-induced liver injury by maintaining GSH homeostasis. PMID:27722142

  11. A SUBSET OF VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA DOPAMINE NEURONS RESPONDS TO ACUTE ETHANOL

    PubMed Central

    MREJERU, A.; MARTIÍ-PRATS, L.; AVEGNO, E. M.; HARRISON, N. L.; SULZER, D.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which alcohol drinking promotes addiction in humans and self-administration in rodents remain obscure, but it is well known that alcohol can enhance dopamine (DA) neurotransmission from neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and increase DA levels within the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex. We recorded from identified DA neuronal cell bodies within ventral midbrain slices prepared from a transgenic mouse line (TH-GFP) using long-term stable extracellular recordings in a variety of locations and carefully mapped the responses to applied ethanol (EtOH). We identified a subset of DA neurons in the medial VTA located within the rostral linear and interfascicular nuclei that fired spontaneously and exhibited a concentration-dependent increase of firing frequency in response to EtOH, with some neurons responsive to as little as 20 mM EtOH. Many of these medial VTA DA neurons were also insensitive to the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. In contrast, DA neurons in the lateral VTA (located within the parabrachial pigmented and paranigral nuclei) were either unresponsive or responded only to 100 mM EtOH. Typically, these lateral VTA DA cells had very slow firing rates, and all exhibited inhibition by quinpirole via D2 “autoreceptors”. VTA non-DA cells did not show any significant response to low levels of EtOH. These findings are consistent with evidence for heterogeneity among midbrain DA neurons and provide an anatomical and pharmacological distinction between DA neuron sub-populations that will facilitate future mechanistic studies on the actions of EtOH in the VTA. PMID:25660505

  12. Alterations in ethanol-induced accumbal transmission after acute and long-term zinc depletion.

    PubMed

    Morud, Julia; Adermark, Louise; Ericson, Mia; Söderpalm, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is subject to extensive research, but the role of changes in metabolism caused by alcohol consumption has been poorly investigated. Zinc (Zn(2+) ) deficiency is a common metabolic aberration among alcoholics and Zn(2+) influences the function of ligand-gated ion channels, known pharmacological targets of ethanol (EtOH). Here, we investigate whether manipulation of extracellular levels of Zn(2+) modulates EtOH-induced increases of dopamine (DA) output, as measured by in vivo microdialysis in the rat, and whether voluntary EtOH consumption is altered by Zn(2+) deficiency. Our findings show that the Zn(2+) -chelating agent tricine slowly raises DA levels when perfused in the nucleus accumbens (nAc), whereas the more potent Zn(2+) chelator TPEN reduces DA levels. We also show that pre-treatment with either tricine or TPEN blocks the EtOH-induced DA elevation. Chronic Zn(2+) deficiency induced by a Zn(2+) -free diet did not affect EtOH consumption, but excitatory transmission, assessed by striatal field-potential recordings in the nAc shell, was significantly modulated both by Zn(2+) -free diet and by EtOH consumption, as compared with the EtOH naïve controls. The present study indicates that Zn(2+) influences EtOH's interaction with the brain reward system, possibly by interfering with glycine receptor and GABAA receptor function. This also implies that Zn(2+) deficiency among alcoholics may be important to correct in order to normalize important aspects of brain function.

  13. Laser irradiation-induced Au-ZnO nanospheres with enhanced sensitivity and stability for ethanol sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shouliang; Liu, Jun; Cai, Yunyu; Liang, Changhao

    2016-08-10

    Incorporating noble metal nanoparticles on the surface or the inner side of semiconductors to form a hybrid nanostructure is an effective route for improving the gas sensing performance of the semiconductors. In this study, we present novel Au-decorated ZnO nanospheres (Au-ZnO NSs) obtained by the laser irradiation of liquids. Structural characterization indicated that the Au-ZnO NSs consisted of single crystalline ZnO NSs with a few Au nanoparticles decorated on their surfaces and abundant encapsulated Au nanoparticles with relatively small sizes. Laser irradiation-induced heating-melting-evaporating processes are responsible for the formation of unique Au-ZnO NSs. The gas sensing properties of the Au-ZnO NSs, as gas sensing materials, were investigated and compared with those of pure ZnO NSs. The former showed a lower working temperature, higher sensitivity, better selectivity, and good reproducibility. The response values of the Au-ZnO NS and pure ZnO NS sensors to ethanol of 100 ppm were 252 and 75 at a working temperature of 320 °C and 360 °C, respectively. Significant enhancements in gas sensing performance should be attributed to the electronic sensitization induced by the depleted layers between the encapsulated Au nanoparticles and ZnO and chemical sensitization originating from the catalytic effects of Au nanoparticles decorated on the surfaces that dissociated molecular oxygen. PMID:27465699

  14. Effect of acute ethanol on beta-endorphin secretion from rat fetal hypothalamic neurons in primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, D.K.; Minami, S. )

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the effect of ethanol on the hypothalamic {beta}-endorphin-containing neurons, rat fetal hypothalamic neurons were maintained in primary culture, and the secretion of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-EP) was determined after ethanol challenges. Constant exposure to ethanol at doses of 6-50 mM produced a dose-dependent increase in basal secretion of {beta}-EP from these cultured cells. These doses of ethanol did not produce any significant effect on cell viability, DNA or protein content. The stimulated secretion of {beta}-EP following constant ethanol exposure is short-lasting. However, intermittent ethanol exposures maintained the ethanol stimulatory action on {beta}-EP secretion for a longer time. The magnitude of the {beta}-EP response to 50 mM ethanol is similar to that of the {beta}-EP response to 56 mM of potassium. Ethanol-stimulated {beta}-EP secretion required extracellular calcium and was blocked by a calcium channel blocker; a sodium channel blocker did not affect ethanol-stimulated secretion. These results suggest that the neuron culture system is a useful model for studying the cellular mechanisms involved in the ethanol-regulated hypothalamic opioid secretion.

  15. S6 Kinase Reflects and Regulates Ethanol-Induced Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Summer F.; Peru y Colón de Portugal, Raniero L.; Gonzalez, Dante A.; Rodan, Aylin R.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) affect people at great individual and societal cost. Individuals at risk for AUDs are sensitive to alcohol's rewarding effects and/or resistant to its aversive and sedating effects. The molecular basis for these traits is poorly understood. Here, we show that p70 S6 kinase (S6k), acting downstream of the insulin receptor (InR) and the small GTPase Arf6, is a key mediator of ethanol-induced sedation in Drosophila. S6k signaling in the adult nervous system determines flies' sensitivity to sedation. Furthermore, S6k activity, measured via levels of phosphorylation (P-S6k), is a molecular marker for sedation and overall neuronal activity: P-S6k levels are decreased when neurons are silenced, as well as after acute ethanol sedation. Conversely, P-S6k levels rebound upon recovery from sedation and are increased when neuronal activity is enhanced. Reducing neural activity increases sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation, whereas neuronal activation decreases ethanol sensitivity. These data suggest that ethanol has acute silencing effects on adult neuronal activity, which suppresses InR/Arf6/S6k signaling and results in behavioral sedation. In addition, we show that activity of InR/Arf6/S6k signaling determines flies' behavioral sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation, highlighting this pathway in acute responses to ethanol. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Genetic factors play a major role in the development of addiction. Identifying these genes and understanding their molecular mechanisms is a necessary first step in the development of targeted therapeutic intervention. Here, we show that signaling from the insulin receptor in Drosophila neurons determines flies' sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation. We show that this signaling cascade includes the small GTPase Arf6 and S6 kinase (S6k). In addition, activity of S6k is regulated by acute ethanol exposure and by neuronal activity. S6k activity is therefore both an acute target of ethanol exposure and

  16. ACUTE SENSITIVITY OF JUVENILE SHORTNOSE STURGEON TO LOW DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Campbell, Jed G. and Larry R. Goodman. 2004. Acute Sensitivity of Juvenile Shortnose Sturgeon to Low Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations. EPA/600/J-04/175. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 133(3):772-776. (ERL,GB 1155).

    There is considerable concern that factors such as eutrophication, ...

  17. Impaired Ethanol-Induced Sensitization and Decreased Cannabinoid Receptor-1 in a Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Matchynski-Franks, Jessica J.; Susick, Laura L.; Schneider, Brandy L.; Perrine, Shane A.; Conti, Alana C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Impaired striatal neuroplasticity may underlie increased alcoholism documented in those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) is sensitive to the effects of ethanol (EtOH) and traumatic stress, and is a critical regulator of striatal plasticity. To investigate CB1 involvement in the PTSD-alcohol interaction, this study measured the effects of traumatic stress using a model of PTSD, mouse single-prolonged stress (mSPS), on EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization and striatal CB1 levels. Methods Mice were exposed to mSPS, which includes: 2-h restraint, 10-min group forced swim, 15-min exposure to rat bedding odor, and diethyl ether exposure until unconsciousness or control conditions. Seven days following mSPS exposure, the locomotor sensitizing effects of EtOH were assessed. CB1, post-synaptic density-95 (PSD95), and dopamine-2 receptor (D2) protein levels were then quantified in the dorsal striatum using standard immunoblotting techniques. Results Mice exposed to mSPS-EtOH demonstrated impaired EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization compared to Control-EtOH mice, which was accompanied by reduced striatal CB1 levels. EtOH increased striatal PSD95 in control and mSPS-exposed mice. Additionally, mSPS-Saline exposure increased striatal PSD95 and decreased D2 protein expression, with mSPS-EtOH exposure alleviating these changes. Conclusions These data indicate that the mSPS model of PTSD blunts the behavioral sensitizing effects of EtOH, a response that suggests impaired striatal neuroplasticity. Additionally, this study demonstrates that mice exposed to mSPS and repeated EtOH exposure decreases CB1 in the striatum, providing a mechanism of interest for understanding the effects of EtOH following severe, multimodal stress exposure. PMID:27186643

  18. Ethanol Sensitivity of Cu{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}O(x = 0.00, 0.03, and 0.05) Nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect

    Mariammal, R. N.; Ramachandran, K.

    2011-07-15

    Cu{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}O(x = 0.00, 0.03, and 0.05) nanoflakes were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) result confirms the monoclinic structure of CuO with no secondary phases due to Sn doping. The scanning electron microscopic images indicate the formation of nanoflakes. The fundamental Raman modes were observed at 273, 318, 610, and 1084 cm{sup -1} for undoped CuO sample and theses modes were slightly shifted towards lower frequency side for Sn-doped samples, which indicates the inclusion of Sn in CuO. In addition, XRD and Raman studies infer the decrease of crystallinity in doped samples, which is reflected in the sensitivity towards ethanol. The ethanol sensitivity (resistivity measurement) increases with ethanol gas concentration and decreases with Sn-doping in CuO nanoflakes.

  19. Ethanol Sensitivity of Cu1-xSnxO (x = 0.00, 0.03, and 0.05) Nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariammal, R. N.; Ramachandran, K.

    2011-07-01

    Cu1-xSnxO (x = 0.00, 0.03, and 0.05) nanoflakes were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) result confirms the monoclinic structure of CuO with no secondary phases due to Sn doping. The scanning electron microscopic images indicate the formation of nanoflakes. The fundamental Raman modes were observed at 273, 318, 610, and 1084 cm-1 for undoped CuO sample and theses modes were slightly shifted towards lower frequency side for Sn-doped samples, which indicates the inclusion of Sn in CuO. In addition, XRD and Raman studies infer the decrease of crystallinity in doped samples, which is reflected in the sensitivity towards ethanol. The ethanol sensitivity (resistivity measurement) increases with ethanol gas concentration and decreases with Sn-doping in CuO nanoflakes.

  20. Acute Ethanol Effects on Brain Activation in Low- and High-Level Responders to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Trim, Ryan S.; Simmons, Alan N.; Tolentino, Neil J.; Hall, Shana A.; Matthews, Scott C.; Robinson, Shannon K.; Smith, Tom L.; Padula, Claudia B.; Paulus, Martin P.; Tapert, Susan F.; Schuckit, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Background A low level of response (LR) to alcohol is an important endophenotype associated with an increased risk for alcoholism. However, little is known about how neural functioning may differ between individuals with low and high LRs to alcohol. This study examined whether LR group effects on neural activity varied as a function of acute alcohol consumption. Methods 30 matched high- and low-LR pairs (N=60 healthy young adults) were recruited from the University of California, San Diego and administered a structured diagnostic interview and laboratory alcohol challenge followed by two fMRI sessions under placebo and alcohol conditions, in randomized order. Task performance and BOLD response contrast to high relative to low working memory load in an event-related visual working memory (VWM) task was examined across 120 fMRI sessions. Results Both LR groups performed similarly on the VWM task across conditions. A significant LR group by condition interaction effect was observed in inferior frontal and cingulate regions, such that alcohol attenuated the LR group differences found under placebo (p<.05). The LR group by condition effect remained even after controlling for cerebral blood flow, age, and typical drinking quantity. Conclusions Alcohol had differential effects on brain activation for low and high LR individuals within frontal and cingulate regions. These findings represent an additional step in the search for physiological correlates of a low LR, and identify brain regions that may be associated with the low LR response. PMID:20477775

  1. Acute ethanol ingestion produces dose-dependent effects on motor behavior in the honey bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Maze, Ian S; Wright, Geraldine A; Mustard, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    Ethanol consumption produces characteristic behavioral states in animals that include sedation, disorientation, and disruption of motor function. Using individual honey bees, we assessed the effects of ethanol ingestion on motor function via continuous observations of their behavior. Consumption of 1 M sucrose solutions containing a range of ethanol doses led to hemolymph ethanol levels of approximately 40-100 mM. Using ethanol doses in this range, we observed time and dose-dependent effects of ethanol on the percent of time our subjects spent walking, stopped, or upside down, and on the duration and frequency of bouts of behavior. The effects on grooming and flying behavior were more complex. Behavioral recovery from ethanol treatment was both time and ethanol dose dependent, occurring between 12 and 24 h post-ingestion for low doses and at 24-48 h for higher doses. Furthermore, the amount of ethanol measured in honey bee hemolymph appeared to correlate with recovery. We predict that the honey bee will prove to be an excellent model system for studying the influence of ethanol on the neural mechanisms underlying behavior.

  2. Acute airway effects of airborne formaldehyde in sensitized and non-sensitized mice housed in a dry or humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Søren Thor Wolkoff, Peder Hammer, Maria Kofoed-Sørensen, Vivi Clausen, Per Axel Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the role of air humidity and allergic sensitization on the acute airway response to inhaled formaldehyde (FA) vapor. Mice were sensitized to the immunogen ovalbumin (OVA) by three intraperitoneal injections followed by two aerosol challenges, giving rise to allergic airway inflammation. Control mice were sham sensitized by saline injections and challenged by saline aerosols. Once sensitized, the mice were housed at high (85–89%) or low (< 10%) relative humidity, respectively for 48 h prior to a 60-min exposure to either 0.4, 1.8 or about 5 ppm FA. Before, during and after exposure, breathing parameters were monitored. These included the specific markers of nose and lung irritations as well as the expiratory flow rate, the latter being a marker of airflow limitation. The sensory irritation response in the upper airways was not affected by allergic inflammation or changes in humidity. At high relative humidity, the OVA-sensitized mice had a decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to the saline control mice after exposure to approximately 5 ppm FA. This is in accordance with the observations that asthmatics are more sensitive than non-asthmatics to higher concentrations of airway irritants including FA. In the dry environment, the opposite trend was seen; here, the saline control mice had a significantly decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to OVA-sensitized mice when exposed to 1.8 and 4 ppm FA. We speculate that increased mucus production in the OVA-sensitized mice has increased the “scrubber effect” in the nose, consequently protecting the conducting and lower airways. - Highlights: ► Role of air humidity and allergy on sensitivity to an airway irritant was studied. ► In the humid environment, allergy amplified the effects of formaldehyde. ► In the dry environment, allergy reduced the effect of formaldehyde. ► Neither allergy nor humidity changed the formaldehyde-induced nasal irritation.

  3. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  4. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  5. Minimal cross-sensitivity to humidity during ethanol detection by SnO2-TiO2 solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Tricoli, Antonio; Righettoni, Marco; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-08-01

    A nanocomposite material is presented that optimally combines the excellent gas sensitivity of SnO2 and the selectivity of TiO2. Nanostructured, rutile titanium-tin oxide solid solutions up to 81.5% Ti, as determined by x-ray diffraction, are made by scalable spray combustion (flame spray pyrolysis) of organometallic precursor solutions, directly deposited and in situ annealed onto sensing electrodes in one step. Above that content, segregation of anatase TiO2 takes place. It was discovered that at low titanium contents (less than 5 Ti%), these materials exhibit higher sensitivity to ethanol vapor than pure SnO2 and, in particular, limited cross-sensitivity to relative humidity, a long standing challenge for metal oxide gas sensors. These solid solutions are aggregated nanoparticles with an enhanced presence of Ti on their surface as indicated by Raman and IR-spectroscopy. The presence of such low Ti-content in the SnO2 lattice drastically reduces the band gap of these solid solutions, as determined by UV-vis absorption, almost to that of pure TiO2. Furthermore, titania reduces the number of rooted and terminal OH species (that are correlated to the cross-sensitivity of tin oxide to water) on the particle surface as determined by IR-spectroscopy. The present material represents a new class of sensors where detection of gases and organic vapors can be accomplished without pre-treatment of the gas mixture, avoiding other semiconducting components that require more heating power and that add bulkiness to a sensing device. This is attractive in developing miniaturized sensors especially for microelectronics and medical diagnostics. PMID:19597246

  6. Comprehensive mechanism and structure-sensitivity of ethanol oxidation on platinum: new transition-state searching method for resolving the complex reaction network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Fang; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2008-08-20

    Ethanol oxidation on Pt is a typical multistep and multiselectivity heterogeneous catalytic process. A comprehensive understanding of this fundamental reaction would greatly benefit design of catalysts for use in direct ethanol fuel cells and the degradation of biomass-derived oxygenates. In this work, the reaction network of ethanol oxidation on different Pt surfaces, including close-packed Pt{111}, stepped Pt{211}, and open Pt{100}, is explored thoroughly with an efficient reaction path searching method, which integrates our new transition-state searching technique with periodic density functional theory calculations. Our new technique enables the location of the transition state and saddle points for most surface reactions simply and efficiently by optimization of local minima. We show that the selectivity of ethanol oxidation on Pt depends markedly on the surface structure, which can be attributed to the structure-sensitivity of two key reaction steps: (i) the initial dehydrogenation of ethanol and (ii) the oxidation of acetyl (CH3CO). On open surface sites, ethanol prefers C-C bond cleavage via strongly adsorbed intermediates (CH2CO or CHCO), which leads to complete oxidation to CO2. However, only partial oxidizations to CH3CHO and CH3COOH occur on Pt{111}. Our mechanism points out that the open surface Pt{100} is the best facet to fully oxidize ethanol at low coverages, which sheds light on the origin of the remarkable catalytic performance of Pt tetrahexahedra nanocrystals found recently. The physical origin of the structure-selectivity is rationalized in terms of both thermodynamics and kinetics. Two fundamental quantities that dictate the selectivity of ethanol oxidation are identified: (i) the ability of surface metal atoms to bond with unsaturated C-containing fragments and (ii) the relative stability of hydroxyl at surface atop sites with respect to other sites. PMID:18642913

  7. Selective changes in GABAergic transmission in substantia nigra and superior colliculus caused by ethanol and ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Peris, J; Coleman-Hardee, M; Burry, J; Pecins-Thompson, M

    1992-04-01

    One of ethanol's actions after acute exposure is anticonvulsant activity whereas withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure increases convulsant activity. An increase in neuronal transmission in the GABAergic pathways from striatum to the substantia nigra (SN) and a decrease in GABAergic transmission from SN to superior colliculus (SC) both appear to play a major role in inhibiting seizure propagation. If this is the case, then the changes in seizure sensitivity caused by ethanol may be expected to affect GABAergic transmission in opposite ways in SN and SC. We measured the effects of in vitro ethanol on pre- and postsynaptic indices of GABA transmission using SN and SC tissue from both ethanol-naive rats and rats given ethanol in their drinking water for 24 days and then withdrawn for 24 hr, a treatment that decreases seizure latency. While ethanol inhibited 3H-GABA release from slices of SC at low concentrations (20-100 nM), much higher concentrations were required to inhibit release from SN (100-500 mM). In fact, release from SN was increased by low concentrations of ethanol. Ethanol in vitro (20-1000 mM) also inhibited specific binding of 35S-TBPS to the GABAA receptor but this effect was similar in both potency and efficacy in SC and SN. Next, the in vitro effects of ethanol were measured in rats that had consumed an average of 9.8 g ethanol/kg body weight/day and were then withdrawn for 24 hr. Ethanol inhibition of 3H-GABA release from SC was significantly less in ethanol-treated rats compared to controls whereas the inhibitory effect of ethanol was increased in SN from ethanol-treated rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Reduced fear-recognition sensitivity following acute buprenorphine administration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Jonathan C; Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Phillips, Nicole; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Thomas, Kevin; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In rodents, the endogenous opioid system has been implicated in emotion regulation, and in the reduction of fear in particular. In humans, while there is evidence that the opioid antagonist naloxone acutely enhances the acquisition of conditioned fear, there are no corresponding data on the effect of opioid agonists in moderating responses to fear. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mu-opioid agonist buprenorphine would decrease fear sensitivity with an emotion-recognition paradigm. Healthy human subjects participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, in which they performed a dynamic emotion recognition task 120min after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. In the recognition task, basic emotional expressions were morphed between their full expression and neutral in 2% steps, and presented as dynamic video-clips with final frames of different emotional intensity for each trial, which allows for a fine-grained measurement of emotion sensitivity. Additionally, visual analog scales were used to investigate acute effects of buprenorphine on mood. Compared to placebo, buprenorphine resulted in a significant reduction in the sensitivity for recognizing fearful facial expressions exclusively. Our data demonstrate, for the first time in humans, that acute up-regulation of the opioid system reduces fear recognition sensitivity. Moreover, the absence of an effect of buprenorphine on mood provides evidence of a direct influence of opioids upon the core fear system in the human brain. PMID:22651957

  9. Happyhour, a Ste20 family kinase, implicates EGFR signaling in ethanol-induced behaviors.

    PubMed

    Corl, Ammon B; Berger, Karen H; Ophir-Shohat, Galit; Gesch, Julie; Simms, Jeffrey A; Bartlett, Selena E; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2009-05-29

    The consequences of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are devastating to individuals and society, yet few treatments are currently available. To identify genes regulating the behavioral effects of ethanol, we conducted a genetic screen in Drosophila and identified a mutant, happyhour (hppy), due to its increased resistance to the sedative effects of ethanol. Hppy protein shows strong homology to mammalian Ste20 family kinases of the GCK-1 subfamily. Genetic and biochemical experiments revealed that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-signaling pathway regulates ethanol sensitivity in Drosophila and that Hppy functions as an inhibitor of the pathway. Acute pharmacological inhibition of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in adult animals altered acute ethanol sensitivity in both flies and mice and reduced ethanol consumption in a preclinical rat model of alcoholism. Inhibitors of the EGFR or components of its signaling pathway are thus potential pharmacotherapies for AUDs.

  10. Sensitivity of the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Farrar, W H; Calkins, G

    1978-06-01

    An elevated amylase-creatinine clearance ratio has been established as being highly specific for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the sensitivity of this test was compared to that of the serum amylase and the one-hour urinary amylase test in 29 patients with acute pancreatitis. Abnormal elevations of the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio were found less frequently than abnormal elevations of the serum and one-hour urinary amylases. Moreover, abnormal elevations of the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio showed less deviation from normal and values returned to normal sooner than those of the serum and one-hour urinary amylases. When compared to the serum amylase and the one-hour urinary amylase tests, the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio is a relatively insensitive test in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  11. Effect of acute and chronic ethanol on the agonist responses of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.; Wooles, W.R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors studied the effects of ETOH on the response of isolated rat thoracic aorta rings to phenylephrine (PE) and angiotensin II (AII). They also examined the effect of chronic ETOH on vascular reactivity to PE and ETOH in vitro for up to 18 weeks during the development of ETOH-induced hypertension. The dose-responses (DR) of both PE and AII were shifted to the right by ETOH in a dose dependent manner. All was more sensitive to this shift which was significantly different from the controls at 50 mM ETOH compared to 150 mM ETOH for PE. The combination of 1 nM saralasin and 150 mM ETOH depressed the AII DR more than saralasin alone but was comparable to that of ETOH. The combination of 150 mM ETOH and 0.3 nM prazosin depressed the PE DR less than prazosin alone but more than ETOH alone. The effect of .01 nM verapamil on the PE DR was similar to that of saralasin on the AII DR. The results of the chronic study showed that the PE DR of the aortic rings from ETOH rats was comparable to that of control rats until the 18th week when it was shifted to the right. The PE DR was shifted rightward by 150 mM ETOH to the same extent in both control and ETOH rats which suggests that ETOH has ..cap alpha..-receptor blocking properties. Vascular reactivity to PE and to ETOH remained the same throughout the ETOH drinking period indicating a lack of development of hypersensitivity to PE or tolerance to ETOH which may contribute to the hypertensive effect of ETOH.

  12. GABAA receptor regulation of voluntary ethanol drinking requires PKCepsilon.

    PubMed

    Besheer, Joyce; Lepoutre, Veronique; Mole, Beth; Hodge, Clyde W

    2006-11-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) regulates a variety of neural functions, including ion channel activity, neurotransmitter release, receptor desensitization and differentiation. We have shown previously that mice lacking the epsilon-isoform of PKC (PKCepsilon) self-administer 75% less ethanol and exhibit supersensitivity to acute ethanol and allosteric positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors when compared with wild-type controls. The purpose of the present study was to examine involvement of PKCepsilon in GABA(A) receptor regulation of voluntary ethanol drinking. To address this question, PKCepsilon null-mutant and wild-type control mice were allowed to drink ethanol (10% v/v) vs. water on a two-bottle continuous access protocol. The effects of diazepam (nonselective GABA(A) BZ positive modulator), zolpidem (GABA(A) alpha1 agonist), L-655,708 (BZ-sensitive GABA(A) alpha5 inverse agonist), and flumazenil (BZ antagonist) were then tested on ethanol drinking. Ethanol intake (grams/kg/day) by wild-type mice decreased significantly after diazepam or zolpidem but increased after L-655,708 administration. Flumazenil antagonized diazepam-induced reductions in ethanol drinking in wild-type mice. However, ethanol intake by PKCepsilon null mice was not altered by any of the GABAergic compounds even though effects were seen on water drinking in these mice. Increased acute sensitivity to ethanol and diazepam, which was previously reported, was confirmed in PKCepsilon null mice. Thus, results of the present study show that PKCepsilon null mice do not respond to doses of GABA(A) BZ receptor ligands that regulate ethanol drinking by wild-type control mice. This suggests that PKCepsilon may be required for GABA(A) receptor regulation of chronic ethanol drinking.

  13. Acute ethanol intoxication shows no effect on Ca sup 2+ -uptake of Ca sup 2+ -dependent ATPase activity in myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, K.P.; Horton, J.W.; Kaufman, T.M.; White, D.J. )

    1989-02-09

    We have previously shown that acute ethanolism impairs left ventricular (LV) function. We hypothesized that cardiac dysfunction may be related to altered Ca{sup 2+} pump function by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In this study, LV function (in isolated perfused hearts) was compared to Ca{sup 2+} transport in SR vesicles isolated from nonperfused hearts in control (C) and acutely intoxicated (ETOH, 2.5 ml/kg IV) guinea pigs. Compared to control hearts, ETOH hearts had significantly lower LV systolic pressure maximal rate of LV pressure rise and fall. Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity was not significantly different in either group of animals. Although maximum Ca{sup 2+} uptake tended to be slightly lower in ETOH compared to control hearts coupling ratios (mol Ca{sup 2+} transported/mol ATP hydrolyzed) were not significantly different. We conclude that changes in SR Ca{sup 2+} pump function are not responsible for the depressed LV function seen in acute ethanolism.

  14. Deletion of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) in mice alters behavioral effects of ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Y.A.; Harris, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is activated by ethanol and this may be important for some of the central and peripheral actions of ethanol. To determine if this receptor has a role in ethanol-mediated behaviors, we studied null mutant mice in which the Trpv1 gene was deleted. Mice lacking this gene showed significantly higher preference for ethanol and consumed more ethanol in a two-bottle choice test as compared with wild type littermates. Null mutant mice showed shorter duration of loss of righting reflex induced by low doses of ethanol (3.2 and 3.4 g/kg) and faster recovery from motor incoordination induced by ethanol (2 g/kg). However, there were no differences between null mutant and wild type mice in severity of ethanol-induced acute withdrawal (4 g/kg) or conditioned taste aversion to ethanol (2.5 g/kg). Two behavioral phenotypes (decreased sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation and faster recovery from ethanol-induced motor incoordination) seen in null mutant mice were reproduced in wild type mice by injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (10 mg/kg). These two ethanol behaviors were changed in the opposite direction after injection of capsaicin, a selective TRPV1 agonist, in wild type mice. The studies provide the first evidence that TRPV1 is important for specific behavioral actions of ethanol. PMID:19705551

  15. Hydroethanolic extract of Baccharis trimera promotes gastroprotection and healing of acute and chronic gastric ulcers induced by ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Ferreira, Daniele Maria; Galuppo, Larissa Favaretto; Borato, Debora Gasparin; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Acco, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol is a psychoactive substance highly consumed around the world whose health problems include gastric lesions. Baccharis trimera is used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, few studies have evaluated its biological and toxic effects. To validate the popular use of B. trimera and elucidate its possible antiulcerogenic and cytotoxic mechanisms, a hydroethanolic extract of B. trimera (HEBT) was evaluated in models of gastric lesions. Rats and mice were used to evaluate the protective and antiulcerogenic effects of HEBT on gastric lesions induced by ethanol, acetic acid, and chronic ethanol consumption. The effects of HEBT were also evaluated in a pylorus ligature model and on gastrointestinal motility. The LD50 of HEBT in mice was additionally estimated. HEBT was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and a high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was performed. Oral HEBT administration significantly reduced the lesion area and the oxidative stress induced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption. However, HEBT did not protect against gastric wall mucus depletion and did not alter gastric secretory volume, pH, or total acidity in the pylorus ligature model. Histologically, HEBT accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats, reflected by contractions of the ulcer base. Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids were detected in HEBT, which likely contributed to the therapeutic efficacy of HEBT, preventing or reversing ethanol- and acetic acid-induced ulcers, respectively. HEBT antiulcerogenic activity may be partially attributable to the inhibition of free radical generation and subsequent prevention of lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that HEBT has both gastroprotective and curative activity in animal models, with no toxicity. PMID:27314669

  16. Lanthanum and zinc sensitivity of GABAA-activated currents in adult medial septum/diagonal band neurons from ethanol dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Frye, G D; Fincher, A S; Grover, C A; Jayaprabhu, S

    1996-05-13

    The impact of chronic ethanol treatment, sufficient to induce tolerance and physical dependence, on GABAA receptor function was studied in acutely isolated neurons from the medial septum/nucleus diagonal band (MS/nDB) of adult rats using whole cell, patch-clamp recordings. In ethanol-naive Controls, GABA (0.3-300 microM) induced concentration-dependent increases in Cl- current with a threshold of 0.3-1 microM, a mean maximal current of 7645 +/- 2148 pA at 100-300 microM, an EC50 of 11.3 +/- 1.3 microM and a slope of 1.53 +/- 0.07. GABA-activated currents in neurons from animals receiving two weeks of ethanol liquid diet treatment did not differ significantly on any of these measures. The rate of GABAA receptor desensitization (t1/2 = 6.49 +/- 1.19 s) estimated as the time required for loss of 50% of peak current during sustained application of 10 microM GABA, as well as the residual steady state current remaining following complete desensitization for controls was unchanged by chronic ethanol. The impact of chronic ethanol treatment on the GABAA receptor modulation by lanthanum and zinc which act as positive and negative allosteric modulators, respectively, was also evaluated. Test pulses of 3 microM GABA in control neurons showed maximal potentiation by 141 +/- 30% at approximately 1000 microM lanthanum with an EC50 of 107 +/- 34 microM and a slope of approximately 1. Lanthanum potentiation remained the same following chronic ethanol treatment. Initial estimates based on fitted concentration response curves suggested that maximal inhibition of 3 microM GABA responses by zinc at the level of 70.2 +/- 8.5% in control cells was significantly increased by chronic ethanol treatment to 95.3 +/- 2.5%, although the IC50 of 60.2 +/- 25 microM was not changed. However, this difference was not supported by direct tests of maximal 3-10 mM zinc concentrations. These results suggest that chronic ethanol treatment, sufficient to induce tolerance and physical dependence, probably

  17. Serotoninergic neuronal systems and ethanol sensitivity in long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.A.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-01

    LS and SS mice selectively bred for differences in CNS sensitivity to ethanol (EtOH) exhibit markedly different sleep times (LS = 120 min; SS = 13 min) and differ considerably in hypothermic response following EtOH< 4 g/kg i.p. Basal levels of serotonin (5HT), 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and 5HT turnover (defined as 5-hydroxy-tryptophan accumulation after inhibition of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase) in 6 brain regions (hypthalamus (HYP), dorsal raphe (DR), pontine-medullary raphe (PMR), striatum (STR), hippocampus (HIP) and cortex (CTX)) differ minimally between the two lines. 5 HT turnover in STR, HIP, CTX and PMR of either LS or SS mice or in HYP or DR of SS mice was not altered at either 20 or 120 min after EtOH, 4 g/kg. However, in LS mice, 5HT turnover was decreased 23% in HYP at 20 min and 30-34% in HYP and DR at 120 min. LS mice become 1.2 and 2.2/sup 0/ more hypothermic than SS mice at 20 and 120 min after EtOH, 4 g/kg. When approximately equi-effective hypothermic doses of EtOH were administered to LS (3.5 g/kg) and SS (5.0 g/kg) mice, differences in 5HT turnover were still apparent. Pentobarbital administration (65 mg/kg) both decreased brain 5HT turnover 30-60% and produced comparable degrees of hypothermia in LS and SS mice. These data suggest that the apparent increase in sensitivity to inhibition by EtOH of 5HT neurons of HYP and DR of LS mice may contribute to the greater degree of hypothermia induced in this line.

  18. Synergism of organic zinc salts and sulfhydryl compounds (thiols) in the protection of mice against acute ethanol toxicity, and protective effects of various metal salts.

    PubMed

    Floersheim, G L

    1987-06-01

    Organic zinc salts such as zinc aspartate, zinc orotate, zinc histidine and zinc acetate protected mice against the lethality of an acute intraperitoneal challenge with ethanol. A similar activity was also provided by salts of cobalt, zirconium, lithium and magnesium. Organic zinc salts acted synergistically with sulfhydryl compounds in protecting the mice and potentiation between the two categories of agents was seen. The results are in analogy to radioprotective effects by zinc and thiols and imply that organic zinc salts may, alone or in conjunction with thiols, reduce in a wider context tissue injury caused by free radical-mediated mechanisms. PMID:3630856

  19. Comparison of ethanol toxicity to Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia tested at two different temperatures: static acute toxicity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, I.T.; Cowgill, U.M.; Murphy, P.G.

    1987-08-01

    Ethanol is a commonly used solvent in toxicity testing, yet there are few studies in the literature devoted to its toxicity to zooplankton. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of Daphnia magna Straus 1820 and Ceriodaphnia dubia J. Richard 1894 to ethanol. Two temperatures were selected because most toxicity data involving D. magna has been carried out at 20/sup 0/C while all discussions concerning C. dubia appear to relate to temperatures oscillating around 25/sup 0/C. Thus, the response of these two organisms to ethanol was examined at 20/sup 0/C and at 24/sup 0/C.r

  20. Genetic differences in ethanol-induced hyperglycemia and conditioned taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Risinger, F.O.; Cunningham, C.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Genetic differences in the hyperglycemic response to acute ethanol exposure and ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion were examined using inbred mice. Adult male C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice were injected with ethanol and blood glucose levels determined over 4 h. C57 mice demonstrated greater dose-dependent elevations in blood glucose compared to DBA mice. In a conditioned taste aversion procedure, water deprived mice received ethanol injections immediately after access to a NaCl flavored solution. DBA mice developed aversion to the ethanol-paired flavor at a lower dose than C57 mice. These results provide further support for a possible inverse genetic relationship between sensitivity to ethanol-induced hyperglycemia and sensitivity to conditioned taste aversion.

  1. Assessing contaminant sensitivity of endangered and threatened aquatic species: Part I. Acute toxicity of five chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, F.J.; Mayer, F.L.; Sappington, L.C.; Buckler, D.R.; Bridges, C.M.; Greer, I.E.; Hardesty, D.K.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kunz, J.L.; Whites, D.W.; Augspurger, T.; Mount, D.R.; Hattala, K.; Neuderfer, G.N.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of contaminant impacts to federally identified endangered, threatened and candidate, and state-identified endangered species (collectively referred to as "listed" species) requires understanding of a species' sensitivities to particular chemicals. The most direct approach would be to determine the sensitivity of a listed species to a particular contaminant or perturbation. An indirect approach for aquatic species would be application of toxicity data obtained from standard test procedures and species commonly used in laboratory toxicity tests. Common test species (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus; and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss) and 17 listed or closely related species were tested in acute 96-hour water exposures with five chemicals (carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin) representing a broad range of toxic modes of action. No single species was the most sensitive to all chemicals. For the three standard test species evaluated, the rainbow trout was more sensitive than either the fathead minnow or sheepshead minnow and was equal to or more sensitive than listed and related species 81% of the time. To estimate an LC50 for a listed species, a factor of 0.63 can be applied to the geometric mean LC50 of rainbow trout toxicity data, and more conservative factors can be determined using variance estimates (0.46 based on 1 SD of the mean and 0.33 based on 2 SD of the mean). Additionally, a low- or no-acute effect concentration can be estimated by multiplying the respective LC50 by a factor of approximately 0.56, which supports the United States Environmental Protection Agency approach of multiplying the final acute value by 0.5 (division by 2). When captive or locally abundant populations of listed fish are available, consideration should be given to direct testing. When direct toxicity testing cannot be performed, approaches for developing protective measures using common test

  2. Evaluation of acute sensory--motor effects and test sensitivity using termiticide workers exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Dick, R B; Steenland, K; Krieg, E F; Hines, C J

    2001-01-01

    Sensory and motor testing was performed on a group of termiticide workers primarily using chlorpyrifos-containing products to evaluate both the acute effects from current exposure and sensitivity of the measures to detect effects. The study group comprised 106 applicators and 52 nonexposed participants. Current exposure was measured by urinary concentrations of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) collected the morning of testing. The mean TCP value for the 106 applicators was 200 microg/g creatinine. Participants received 4--5 h of testing and were evaluated using a sensory--motor test battery recommended by a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-sponsored advisory panel to be appropriate for testing effects from pesticide exposures. Measurements testing olfactory dysfunction, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, color vision, vibrotactile sensitivity, tremor, manual dexterity, eye--hand coordination, and postural stability were analyzed. Study results indicated limited acute effects from exposure to chlorpyrifos using urinary TCP as a measure of current exposure. The effects occurred primarily on measures of postural sway in the eyes closed and soft-surface conditions, which suggests a possible subclinical effect involving the proprioceptive and vestibular systems. Several other tests of motor and sensory functions did not show any evidence of acute exposure effects, although statistically significant effects of urinary TCP on the Lanthony color vision test scores and one contrast sensitivity test score were found. The visual measures, however, were not significant when a step-down Bonferroni correction was applied. Information also is presented on the sensitivity of the measures to detect effects in an occupationally exposed population using standard error of the parameter estimates. PMID:11485841

  3. Effects of Nitric oxide synthase blockade on the acute response of the reproductive axis to ethanol in pubertal male rats.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, M A; LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; Emanuele, N V

    1999-05-01

    The effects of ethanol (EtOH) and nitric oxide (NO) are well known in the adult male rat reproductive axis. In the present study, we investigate the effects of EtOH, NO, and their interaction on key genes and reproductive hormone levels in mid- (45-day) and late pubertal (55-day) male rats. Using three different NO synthase blockers--N'omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), N'omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), and 7-nitroindazole--we show that it is possible to block, in part, some of the disruptive effects of EtOH. L-NAME totally prevented the EtOH-induced fall in serum testosterone in both 45- and 55-day-old rats (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). On the other hand, the D-NAME, an inactive isomer of L-NAME, did not protect testosterone from suppression caused by EtOH. Similarly, L-NA and 7-nitroindazole prevented the suppression of testosterone caused by EtOH in 55-day-old animals (p < 0.001 L-NA and p < 0.05 for 7-nitroindazole), but not in the 45-day-old rats. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) was significantly reduced by EtOH in all the studies in both age groups. L-NAME (but not D-NAME) and L-NA prevented this inhibition in 55-day-old animals (p < 0.001 for L-NAME and p < 0.01 for L-NA). However, only L-NA was able to prevent the effects of EtOH on LH in the 45-day-old rats. 7-Nitroindazole was unable to prevent the decrease in LH in either age group. Despite changes in the other reproductive hormones, there were no consistent changes in hypothalamic concentrations of either LH releasing hormone (LHRH) or its precursor, pro-LHRH. No treatment caused any change in steady-state levels of beta-LH mRNA. There were no consistent changes in pro-LHRH mRNA; but, interestingly, in 45-day-old rats, L-NA given with or without EtOH lead to a significant fall in LHRH gene expression. Our findings indicate that the acute suppressive effects of EtOH on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of the pubertal male rat can be at least partially prevented by NO synthase

  4. Protectiveness of species sensitivity distribution hazard concentrations for acute toxicity used in endangered species risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Vivian, Deborah N; Delos, Charles; Barron, Mace G

    2008-12-01

    A primary objective of threatened and endangered species conservation is to ensure that chemical contaminants and other stressors do not adversely affect listed species. Assessments of the ecological risks of chemical exposures to listed species often rely on the use of surrogate species, safety factors, and species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) of chemical toxicity; however, the protectiveness of these approaches can be uncertain. We comprehensively evaluated the protectiveness of SSD first and fifth percentile hazard concentrations (HC1, HC5) relative to the application of safety factors using 68 SSDs generated from 1,482 acute (lethal concentration of 50%, or LC50) toxicity records for 291 species, including 24 endangered species (20 fish, four mussels). The SSD HC5s and HCls were lower than 97 and 99.5% of all endangered species mean acute LC50s, respectively. The HC5s were significantly less than the concentrations derived from applying safety factors of 5 and 10 to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) toxicity data, and the HCls were generally lower than the concentrations derived from a safety factor of 100 applied to rainbow trout toxicity values. Comparison of relative sensitivity (SSD percentiles) of broad taxonomic groups showed that crustaceans were generally the most sensitive taxa and taxa sensitivity was related to chemical mechanism of action. Comparison of relative sensitivity of narrow fish taxonomic groups showed that standard test fish species were generally less sensitive than salmonids and listed fish. We recommend the use of SSDs as a distribution-based risk assessment approach that is generally protective of listed species.

  5. An acute bout of endurance exercise but not sprint interval exercise enhances insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brestoff, Jonathan R; Clippinger, Benjamin; Spinella, Thomas; von Duvillard, Serge P; Nindl, Bradley C; Nindl, Bradley; Arciero, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    An acute bout of endurance exercise (EE) enhances insulin sensitivity, but the effects of sprint interval exercise (SIE) have not yet been described. We sought to compare insulin sensitivity at baseline and after an acute bout of EE and SIE in healthy men (n = 8) and women (n = 5) (age, 20.7 +/- 0.3 years; peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak), 42.6 +/- 1.7 mL.kg(-1).min(-1); <1.5 days.week(-1) structured exercise; body fat, 21.1 +/- 1.9%). Subjects underwent 3 oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT(s)) the day after each of the following 3 conditions: no exercise, baseline (OGTT(B)); SIE at approximately 125% VO(2 peak) (OGTT(SIE)); and EE at approximately 75% VO(2 peak )(OGTT(EE)). SIE and EE sessions were randomized for each subject. Subjects consumed identical meals the day preceding each OGTT. Two insulin sensitivity indices - composite whole-body insulin sensitivity index (ISI-COMP) and ISI-hepatic insulin sensitivity (HOMA) - were calculated, using previously validated formulas (ISI-COMP = 10 000/ radical(glucose(fasting)) x insulin(fasting) x glucose(mean OGTT) x insulin(mean OGTT)); ISI-HOMA = 22.5/(insulin(fasting) x glucose(fasting)), and the plasma concentrations of cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were measured. There were no differences by sex for any condition (men vs. women, p > 0.05). Pearson's correlation coefficients between ISI-COMP and ISI-HOMA for each condition were highly correlated (p < 0.01), and followed similar patterns of response. ISI-COMP(EE) was 71.4% higher than ISI-COMP(B) (8.4 +/- 1.4 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.0; p < 0.01) and 40.0% higher than ISI-COMPSIE (8.4 +/- 1.4 vs. 6.0 +/- 1.5; p < 0.05), but there was no difference between ISI-COMP(B) and ISI-COMP(SIE) (p = 0.182). VO(2 peak) was highly correlated with both ISI-COMP and ISI-HOMA during baseline and SIE test conditions (p < 0.02). These findings demonstrate that an acute bout of EE, but not SIE, increases insulin sensitivity relative to a no-exercise control condition

  6. Gastroprotective effects of thymol on acute and chronic ulcers in rats: The role of prostaglandins, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, and gastric mucus secretion.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Roseli S; Diniz, Polyana B F; Pinheiro, Malone S; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo L C; Thomazzi, Sara M

    2016-01-25

    Thymol, a monoterpene phenol derivative of cymene, is found in abundance in the essential oils of Thymus, Origanum, and Lippia species. The present study investigated the gastroprotective actions of thymol (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) in the acute (ethanol- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced ulcers) and chronic (acetic acid-induced ulcers) ulcer models in rats. Some of the mechanisms underlying to the gastroprotective effect of thymol were investigated in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. Gastric secretion parameters (volume, pH, and total acidity) were also evaluated by the pylorus ligature model, and the mucus in the gastric content was determined. The anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of thymol was performed using the agar-well diffusion method. Thymol (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) produced dose dependent reduction (P < 0.01) on the total lesion area in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. The gastroprotective response caused by thymol (30 mg/kg) was significantly attenuated (P < 0.001) by intraperitoneal treatment of rats with indomethacin (a non-selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, 10 mg/kg) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker, 10 mg/kg), but not by DL-Propargylglycine (PAG, a cystathionine-γ-lyase inhibitor, 25 mg/kg) and Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, a non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 70 mg/kg). Thymol (30 and 100 mg/kg) also reduced the ulcer index (P < 0.05) and the total lesion area (P < 0.001) in the indomethacin- and acetic-acid-induced ulcer models, respectively. In the model pylorus ligature, the treatment with thymol failed to significantly change the gastric secretion parameters. However, after treatment with thymol (30 and 100 mg/kg), there was a significant increase (P < 0.01) in mucus production. Thymol no showed anti-H. pylori activity in vitro. Collectively, the present results provide convincing evidence that thymol displays gastroprotective actions on the acute and chronic

  7. Gastroprotective effects of thymol on acute and chronic ulcers in rats: The role of prostaglandins, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, and gastric mucus secretion.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Roseli S; Diniz, Polyana B F; Pinheiro, Malone S; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo L C; Thomazzi, Sara M

    2016-01-25

    Thymol, a monoterpene phenol derivative of cymene, is found in abundance in the essential oils of Thymus, Origanum, and Lippia species. The present study investigated the gastroprotective actions of thymol (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) in the acute (ethanol- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced ulcers) and chronic (acetic acid-induced ulcers) ulcer models in rats. Some of the mechanisms underlying to the gastroprotective effect of thymol were investigated in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. Gastric secretion parameters (volume, pH, and total acidity) were also evaluated by the pylorus ligature model, and the mucus in the gastric content was determined. The anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of thymol was performed using the agar-well diffusion method. Thymol (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) produced dose dependent reduction (P < 0.01) on the total lesion area in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. The gastroprotective response caused by thymol (30 mg/kg) was significantly attenuated (P < 0.001) by intraperitoneal treatment of rats with indomethacin (a non-selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, 10 mg/kg) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker, 10 mg/kg), but not by DL-Propargylglycine (PAG, a cystathionine-γ-lyase inhibitor, 25 mg/kg) and Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, a non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 70 mg/kg). Thymol (30 and 100 mg/kg) also reduced the ulcer index (P < 0.05) and the total lesion area (P < 0.001) in the indomethacin- and acetic-acid-induced ulcer models, respectively. In the model pylorus ligature, the treatment with thymol failed to significantly change the gastric secretion parameters. However, after treatment with thymol (30 and 100 mg/kg), there was a significant increase (P < 0.01) in mucus production. Thymol no showed anti-H. pylori activity in vitro. Collectively, the present results provide convincing evidence that thymol displays gastroprotective actions on the acute and chronic

  8. Acute toxicity and gastroprotective role of M. pruriens in ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A Hamid A; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions.

  9. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  10. Loss of Ethanol Conditioned Taste Aversion and Motor Stimulation in Knockin Mice with Ethanol-Insensitive α2-Containing GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Borghese, C. M.; McCracken, M. L.; Benavidez, J. M.; Geil, C. R.; Osterndorff-Kahanek, E.; Werner, D. F.; Iyer, S.; Swihart, A.; Harrison, N. L.; Homanics, G. E.; Harris, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    GABA type A receptors (GABAA-Rs) are potential targets of ethanol. However, there are multiple subtypes of this receptor, and, thus far, individual subunits have not been definitively linked with specific ethanol behavioral actions. Interestingly, though, a chromosomal cluster of four GABAA-R subunit genes, including α2 (Gabra2), was associated with human alcoholism (Am J Hum Genet 74:705–714, 2004; Pharmacol Biochem Behav 90:95–104, 2008; J Psychiatr Res 42:184–191, 2008). The goal of our study was to determine the role of receptors containing this subunit in alcohol action. We designed an α2 subunit with serine 270 to histidine and leucine 277 to alanine mutations that was insensitive to potentiation by ethanol yet retained normal GABA sensitivity in a recombinant expression system. Knockin mice containing this mutant subunit were tested in a range of ethanol behavioral tests. These mutant mice did not develop the typical conditioned taste aversion in response to ethanol and showed complete loss of the motor stimulant effects of ethanol. Conversely, they also demonstrated changes in ethanol intake and preference in multiple tests. The knockin mice showed increased ethanol-induced hypnosis but no difference in anxiolytic effects or recovery from acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the effects of ethanol at GABAergic synapses containing the α2 subunit are important for specific behavioral effects of ethanol that may be relevant to the genetic linkage of this subunit with human alcoholism. PMID:20876231

  11. Acute effect of alcohol intake on sine-wave Cartesian and polar contrast sensitivity functions.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti-Galdino, M K; Silva, J A da; Mendes, L C; Santos, N A da; Simas, M L B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess contrast sensitivity for angular frequency stimuli as well as for sine-wave gratings in adults under the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol. We measured the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for gratings of 0.25, 1.25, 2.5, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle (cpd) as well as for angular frequency stimuli of 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 cycles/360°. Twenty adults free of ocular diseases, with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and no history of alcoholism were enrolled in two experimental groups: 1) no alcohol intake (control group) and 2) alcohol ingestion (experimental group). The average concentration of alcohol in the experimental group was set to about 0.08%. We used a paradigm involving a forced-choice method. Maximum sensitivity to contrast for sine-wave gratings in the two groups occurred at 4 cpd sine-wave gratings and at 24 and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Significant changes in contrast sensitivity were observed after alcohol intake compared with the control condition at spatial frequency of 4 cpd and 1, 24, and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Alcohol intake seems to affect the processing of sine-wave gratings at maximum sensitivity and at the low and high frequency ends for angular frequency stimuli, both under photopic luminance conditions.

  12. Acute effect of alcohol intake on sine-wave Cartesian and polar contrast sensitivity functions

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti-Galdino, M.K.; da Silva, J.A.; Mendes, L.C.; dos Santos, N.A.; Simas, M.L.B.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess contrast sensitivity for angular frequency stimuli as well as for sine-wave gratings in adults under the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol. We measured the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for gratings of 0.25, 1.25, 2.5, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle (cpd) as well as for angular frequency stimuli of 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 cycles/360°. Twenty adults free of ocular diseases, with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and no history of alcoholism were enrolled in two experimental groups: 1) no alcohol intake (control group) and 2) alcohol ingestion (experimental group). The average concentration of alcohol in the experimental group was set to about 0.08%. We used a paradigm involving a forced-choice method. Maximum sensitivity to contrast for sine-wave gratings in the two groups occurred at 4 cpd sine-wave gratings and at 24 and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Significant changes in contrast sensitivity were observed after alcohol intake compared with the control condition at spatial frequency of 4 cpd and 1, 24, and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Alcohol intake seems to affect the processing of sine-wave gratings at maximum sensitivity and at the low and high frequency ends for angular frequency stimuli, both under photopic luminance conditions. PMID:24676473

  13. Unexpected gender difference in sensitivity to the acute toxicity of dioxin in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Miettinen, Hanna; Sankari, Satu; Hegde, Nagabhooshan; Lindén, Jere

    2012-07-15

    The acute toxicity of the ubiquitous environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) varies widely among species and strains. Previous studies in rats have established that females are approximately 2-fold more sensitive to TCDD lethality than males. However, there is a surprising gap in the literature regarding possible gender-related sensitivity differences in mice. In the present study, by using three substrains of TCDD-sensitive C57BL/6 mice and transgenic mice on this background, we demonstrated that: 1) in contrast to the situation in rats, female mice are the more resistant gender; 2) the magnitude of the divergence between male and female mice depends on the substrain, but can amount to over 10-fold; 3) AH receptor protein expression levels or mutations in the primary structure of this receptor are not involved in the resistance of female mice of a C57BL/6 substrain, despite their acute LD{sub 50} for TCDD being over 5000 μg/kg; 4) transgenic mice that globally express the rat wildtype AH receptor follow the mouse type of gender difference; 5) in gonadectomized mice, ovarian estrogens appear to enhance TCDD resistance, whereas testicular androgens seem to augment TCDD susceptibility; and 6) the gender difference correlates best with the severity of liver damage, which is also reflected in hepatic histopathology and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially IL-6. Hence, the two closely related rodent species most often employed in toxicological risk characterization studies, rat and mouse, represent opposite examples of the influence of gender on dioxin sensitivity, further complicating the risk assessment of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. -- Highlights: ► In contrast to rats, male mice are more sensitive to TCDD toxicity than female mice. ► The resistance of female C57BL/6Kuo mice matches or exceeds that of male DBA/2 mice. ► The resistance of female C57BL/6Kuo mice is not based on AHR structure or abundance.

  14. Antimicrobial activity, acute toxicity and cytoprotective effect of Crassocephalum vitellinum (Benth.) S. Moore extract in a rat ethanol-HCl gastric ulcer model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A decoction of Crassocephallum vitellinum (Benth.) S. Moore (Asteraceae) is used in Kagera Region to treat peptic ulcers. This study seeks to evaluate an aqueous ethanol extract of aerial parts of the plant for safety and efficacy. Methods An 80% ethanolic extract of C. vitellinum at doses of 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body wt was evaluated for ability to protect Sprague Dawley rats from acidified ethanol gastric ulceration in comparison with 40 mg/kg body wt pantoprazole. The extract and its dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and aqueous fractions were also evaluated for acute toxicity in mice, brine shrimp toxicity, and antibacterial activity against four Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Salmonella typhi (NCTC 8385), Vibrio cholera (clinical isolate), and Streptococcus faecalis (clinical isolate). The groups of phytochemicals present in the extract were also determined. Results The ethanolic extract of C. vitellinum dose-dependently protected rat gastric mucosa against ethanol/HCl insult to a maximum of 88.3% at 800 mg/kg body wt, affording the same level of protection as by 40 mg/kg body wt pantoprazole. The extract also exhibited weak antibacterial activity against S. typhi and E. coli, while its ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and aqueous fractions showed weak activity against K. pneumonia, S.typhi, E. coli and V. cholera. The extract was non-toxic to mice up to 5000 mg/kg body wt, and the total extract (LC50 = 37.49 μg/ml) and the aqueous (LC50 = 87.92 μg/ml), ethyl acetate (LC50 = 119.45 μg/ml) and dichloromethane fractions (88.79 μg/ml) showed low toxicity against brine shrimps. Phytochemical screening showed that the extract contains tannins, saponins, flavonoids, and terpenoids. Conclusion The results support the claims by traditional healers that a decoction of C.vitellinum has antiulcer activity. The mechanism of cytoprotection is yet to be determined but the phenolic compounds present in the

  15. Stronger cortisol response to acute psychosocial stress is correlated with larger decrease in temporal sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhuxi; Jiang, Caihong; Zhang, Kan; Wu, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    As a fundamental dimension of cognition and behavior, time perception has been found to be sensitive to stress. However, how one’s time perception changes with responses to stress is still unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between stress-induced cortisol response and time perception. A group of 40 healthy young male adults performed a temporal bisection task before and after the Trier Social Stress Test for a stress condition. A control group of 27 male participants completed the same time perception task without stress induction. In the temporal bisection task, participants were first presented with short (400 ms) and long (1,600 ms) visual signals serving as anchor durations and then required to judge whether the intermediate probe durations were more similar to the short or the long anchor. The bisection point and Weber ratio were calculated and indicated the subjective duration and the temporal sensitivity, respectively. Data showed that participants in the stress group had significantly increased salivary cortisol levels, heart rates, and negative affects compared with those in the control group. The results did not show significant group differences for the subjective duration or the temporal sensitivity. However, the results showed a significant positive correlation between stress-induced cortisol responses and decreases in temporal sensitivity indexed by increases in the Weber ratio. This correlation was not observed for the control group. Changes in subjective duration indexed by temporal bisection points were not correlated with cortisol reactivity in both the groups. In conclusion, the present study found that although no significant change was observed in time perception after an acute stressor on the group-level comparison (i.e., stress vs. nonstress group), individuals with stronger cortisol responses to stress showed a larger decrease in temporal sensitivity. This finding may provide insight into the understanding of

  16. The difference between temperate and tropical saltwater species' acute sensitivity to chemicals is relatively small.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Kwok, Kevin W H; Lui, Gilbert C S; Zhou, Guang-Jie; Lee, Jae-Seong; Lam, Michael H W; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2014-06-01

    Due to a lack of saltwater toxicity data in tropical regions, toxicity data generated from temperate or cold water species endemic to North America and Europe are often adopted to derive water quality guidelines (WQG) for protecting tropical saltwater species. If chemical toxicity to most saltwater organisms increases with water temperature, the use of temperate species data and associated WQG may result in under-protection to tropical species. Given the differences in species composition and environmental attributes between tropical and temperate saltwater ecosystems, there are conceivable uncertainties in such 'temperate-to-tropic' extrapolations. This study aims to compare temperate and tropical saltwater species' acute sensitivity to 11 chemicals through a comprehensive meta-analysis, by comparing species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) between the two groups. A 10 percentile hazardous concentration (HC10) is derived from each SSD, and then a temperate-to-tropic HC10 ratio is computed for each chemical. Our results demonstrate that temperate and tropical saltwater species display significantly different sensitivity towards all test chemicals except cadmium, although such differences are small with the HC10 ratios ranging from 0.094 (un-ionised ammonia) to 2.190 (pentachlorophenol) only. Temperate species are more sensitive to un-ionised ammonia, chromium, lead, nickel and tributyltin, whereas tropical species are more sensitive to copper, mercury, zinc, phenol and pentachlorophenol. Through comparison of a limited number of taxon-specific SSDs, we observe that there is a general decline in chemical sensitivity from algae to crustaceans, molluscs and then fishes. Following a statistical analysis of the results, we recommend an extrapolation factor of two for deriving tropical WQG from temperate information.

  17. Autophagy and ethanol neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Excessive ethanol exposure is detrimental to the brain. The developing brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol such that prenatal ethanol exposure causes fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Neuronal loss in the brain is the most devastating consequence and is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Since alcohol consumption during pregnancy has not declined, it is imperative to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and develop effective therapeutic strategies. One cellular mechanism that acts as a protective response for the central nervous system (CNS) is autophagy. Autophagy regulates lysosomal turnover of organelles and proteins within cells, and is involved in cell differentiation, survival, metabolism, and immunity. We have recently shown that ethanol activates autophagy in the developing brain. The autophagic preconditioning alleviates ethanol-induced neuron apoptosis, whereas inhibition of autophagy potentiates ethanol-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exacerbates ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. The expression of genes encoding proteins required for autophagy in the CNS is developmentally regulated; their levels are much lower during an ethanol-sensitive period than during an ethanol-resistant period. Ethanol may stimulate autophagy through multiple mechanisms; these include induction of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress, modulation of MTOR and AMPK signaling, alterations in BCL2 family proteins, and disruption of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. This review discusses the most recent evidence regarding the involvement of autophagy in ethanol-mediated neurotoxicity as well as the potential therapeutic approach of targeting autophagic pathways. PMID:25484085

  18. Cross-Sensitization Between Cocaine and Acute Restraint Stress is Associated with Sensitized Dopamine but not Glutamate Release in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Keller, C; Martinez, SA; Esparza, A; Bollati, F; Kalivas, PW; Cancela, LM

    2015-01-01

    Repeated administration of psychostimulant drugs or stress can elicit a sensitized response to the stimulating and reinforcing properties of the drug. Here we explore the mechanisms in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) whereby an acute restraint stress augments the acute locomotor response to cocaine. This was accomplished by a combination of behavioral pharmacology, microdialysis measures of extracellular dopamine and glutamate, and Western blotting for GluR1 subunit of the AMPA glutamate receptor (AMPAR). A single exposure to restraint stress 3 weeks before testing revealed that enduring locomotor sensitization to cocaine was paralleled by an increase in extracellular dopamine in the core, but not the shell subcompartment of the NAc. Wistar rats pre-exposed to acute stress showed increased basal levels of glutamate in the core but the increase in glutamate by acute cocaine was blunted. The alterations in extracellular glutamate seem to be relevant, since blocking AMPAR by CNQX microinjection into the core prevented both the behavioral cross-sensitization and the augmented increase in cocaine-induced extracellular dopamine. Further implicating glutamate, the locomotor response to AMPAR stimulation in the core was potentiated, but not in the shell of pre-stressed animals, and this was accompanied by an increase in NAc GluR1 surface expression. This study provides evidence that the long-term expression of restraint stress-induced behavioral cross-sensitization to cocaine recapitulates some mechanisms thought to underpin the sensitization induced by daily cocaine administration, and shows that long-term neurobiological changes induced in the NAc by acute stress are consequential in the expression of cross-sensitization to cocaine. PMID:23360446

  19. Role of cannabinoid CB2 receptor in the reinforcing actions of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Álvaro, Antonio; Ternianov, Alexander; Aracil-Fernández, Auxiliadora; Navarrete, Francisco; García-Gutiérrez, Maria Salud; Manzanares, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the role of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2 r) on the vulnerability to ethanol consumption. The time-related and dose-response effects of ethanol on rectal temperature, handling-induced convulsions (HIC) and blood ethanol concentrations were evaluated in CB2 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. The reinforcing properties of ethanol were evaluated in conditioned place preference (CPP), preference and voluntary ethanol consumption and oral ethanol self-administration. Water-maintained behavior schedule was performed to evaluate the degree of motivation induced by a natural stimulus. Preference for non-alcohol tastants assay was performed to evaluate the differences in taste sensitivity. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and μ-opioid receptor gene expressions were also measured in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), respectively. CB2 KO mice presented increased HIC score, ethanol-CPP, voluntary ethanol consumption and preference, acquisition of ethanol self-administration, and increased motivation to drink ethanol compared with WT mice. No differences were found between genotypes in the water-maintained behavior schedule or preference for non-alcohol tastants. Naïve CB2 KO mice presented increased μ-opioid receptor gene expression in NAcc. Acute ethanol administration (1-2 g/kg) increased TH and μ-opioid receptor gene expressions in CB2 KO mice, whereas the lower dose of ethanol decreased TH gene expression in WT mice. These results suggest that deletion of the CB2 r gene increased preference for and vulnerability to ethanol consumption, at least in part, by increased ethanol-induced sensitivity of the TH and μ-opioid receptor gene expressions in mesolimbic neurons. Future studies will determine the role of CB2 r as a target for the treatment of problems related with alcohol consumption.

  20. Liver, plasma and erythrocyte levels of thiamine and its phosphate esters in rats with acute ethanol intoxication: a comparison of thiamine and benfotiamine administration.

    PubMed

    Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Vannucchi, Helio; Jordao, Alceu Afonso

    2013-03-12

    Thiamine and benfotiamine are vitamin B1 and pro-vitamin B1 substances, respectively. Vitamin B1 plays an essential role in energy metabolism, and its deficiency leads to neurologic and cardiovascular pathologies, as seen in alcoholics. This study presents new data about the effects of thiamine hydrochloride or benfotiamine treatment given to rats with acute alcohol intoxication, on the distribution of thiamine and its phosphate esters in liver, plasma and erythrocytes. The treatments were effective in increasing thiamine levels in plasma, erythrocytes and liver cells. The benfotiamine-treated group had its total plasma thiamine increased by 100%. In erythrocytes, thiamine levels were 4- and 25-fold higher in the groups treated with thiamine and benfotiamine, respectively, compared with the untreated groups. Liver thiamine was increased by 60% in the treated groups compared with the untreated groups. Thus, we verified the high bioavailability especially of benfotiamine within 6h of ethanol administration.

  1. Synergistic effect of Se-methylselenocysteine and vitamin E in ameliorating the acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhao; Zhang, Yunlong; Li, Hongyan; Deng, Zeyuan; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conduced to investigate the synergistic effects of combined treatments with Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) and vitamin E (Vit E) in reversing oxidative stress induced by ethanol in serum and different tissues of rats. Sixty female rats were randomly divided into six groups for 30 days' consecutive pretreatments as followed: control (I), physiological saline (II), 2.8μgkg(-1) Se as SeMSC (III), 2.8μgkg(-1) Se as sodium selenite (Na2SeO3, IV), 5mgkg(-1) α-tocopherol as α-tocopherol acetate (Vit E, V), 5mgkg(-1) α-tocopherol as α-tocopherol acetate and 2.8μgkg(-1) Se as SeMSC (VI). All animals in groups II-VI were treated by ethanol treatment to cause oxidative stress. After 6h of ethanol treatment, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), the contents of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and carbonyl protein (CP) in the serum, liver, heart and kidney were measured. The result showed that the individual SeSMC, Na2SeO3 and vitamin E could effectively increase the SOD, T-AOC, GSH-Px and GSH contents as well as significantly decrease the MDA and CP concentrations in the tissues of ethanol-induced rats. At the same dose on different forms of Se, SeMSC showed greater antioxidant activity than Na2SeO3. Moreover, group VI (SeMSC and α-tocopherol acetate) showed much better antioxidant activity than individual group III (SeMSC) and V (α-tocopherol acetate) due to the synergistic effect.

  2. Acute ethanol inhibits calcium influxes into esophageal smooth but not striated muscle: a possible mechanism for ethanol-induced inhibition of esophageal contractility.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzian, A; Zorub, O; Sayeed, M; Urban, G; Sweeney, C; Winship, D; Fields, J

    1994-09-01

    In both humans and cats, EtOH administered in vivo and acutely decreases contractility of smooth muscle of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and lower esophagus (LE), but not striated muscle of upper esophagus. To see if these effects are associated with perturbation of Ca++ homeostasis, esophageal muscle slices were incubated in vitro with EtOH and then 45Ca++. At steady-state Ca++ uptake, some slices were exposed to 1 microM carbachol (CCH). Although 100 mM EtOH had no effect on Ca++ uptake into resting or stimulated striated muscle of upper esophagus, it significantly inhibited Ca++ uptake into smooth muscle of LES and LE. For unstimulated LE and resting LES, 100 mM EtOH significantly inhibited both initial uptake and steady-state levels, whereas lower doses had no significant effect. EtOH at 100 mM also affected changes in Ca++ content induced by CCH stimulation. CCH increased total exchangeable tissue Ca++ content in LE, whereas it decreased Ca++ content in LES. EtOH at 100 mM blunted these CCH-induced effects in both LES and LE. In contrast to resting muscle, inhibition of CCH-stimulated LE muscle was not limited to 100 mM EtOH, because substantial and significant inhibition was also seen at EtOH doses of 25 and 50 mM, doses which are relevant even in social drinking. Thus, EtOH inhibition of Ca++ influx into esophageal muscle is selective for smooth muscle, can occur at pharmacologically relevant EtOH doses and could be the underlying mechanism for EtOH's inhibition of contractility of esophageal smooth muscle. PMID:7932153

  3. A report of acute ethanol poisoning in a child: mouthwash versus cologne, perfume and after-shave.

    PubMed

    Hornfeldt, C S

    1992-01-01

    The ingestion of ethanol-containing products, such as cologne, perfume and after-shave, in children under six years of age is common, but serious poisoning is rarely reported. Thus, it has been recently suggested that children ingesting up to 3.5 ounces of these products may be safely observed at home as long as they remain asymptomatic. While it may be assumed that products with a significantly lower alcohol content represent a much smaller poisoning hazard, mouthwashes are a relatively frequent cause of serious poisoning in children. In the following case report, 75 milliliters of mouthwash caused hypoglycemia, coma and manifestations of tonic seizure activity. Because of the palatable nature of mouthwash, wine and liquor, it appears that children are more apt to drink large quantities, consuming dangerous amounts of ethanol. The apparent safety of cologne, perfume, and after-shave may be due to a lack of palatability as well as the irritant nature of high concentrations of ethanol. This case suggests that consumer items such as mouthwash should be packaged in child-resistant containers.

  4. Sensitivity of hepatobiliary imaging and real-time ultrasonography in the detection of acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fink-Bennett, D.; Freitas, J.E.; Ripley, S.D.; Bree, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    To determine the sensitivity of hepatobiliary imaging (HBI) and strict- and liberal-criteria real-time ultrasonography (RTUS), the authors retrospectively analyzed 100 cases of pathologically proved acute cholecystitis (AC). A positive HBI was one in which there was nonvisualization of the gallbladder up to four hours after the administration of technetium 99m-disofenin. In the absence of hypoalbuminemia, cirrhosis, or ascites, pathognomonic RTUS findings (strict criteria) for AC were wall edema and/or pericholecystic fluid. Findings indicative of AC (liberal criteria) included the demonstration of stones, a thick gallbladder wall, nonshadowing echoes, or the ultrasonographic Murphy's sign. Of the 100 cases of AC, 91 were calculous, and nine were acalculous. Four of 100 patients had associated choledocholithiasis. The sensitivities in detecting calculous AC were as follows: HBI, 97%; liberal-criteria RTUS, 86%; and strict-criteria RTUS, 24%. The sensitivities in detecting acalculous AC were as follows: HBI, 100%; liberal-criteria RTUS, 89%; and strict-criteria RTUS, 44%.

  5. A study of antimicrobial activity, acute toxicity and cytoprotective effect of a polyherbal extract in a rat ethanol-HCl gastric ulcer model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The decoction of the aerial parts of Rhynchosia recinosa (A.Rich.) Bak. [Fabaceae] is used in combination with the stem barks of Ozoroa insignis Del. (Anacardiaceae), Maytenus senegalensis (Lam.) Excell. [Celastraceae] Entada abyssinica Steud. ex A.Rich [Fabaceae] and Lannea schimperi (Hochst.)Engl. [Anacardiaceae] as a traditional remedy for managing peptic ulcers. However, the safety and efficacy of this polyherbal preparation has not been evaluated. This study reports on the phytochemical profile and some biological activities of the individual plant extracts and a combination of extracts of the five plants. Methods A mixture of 80% ethanol extracts of R. recinosa, O. insignis, M. senegalensis, E. abyssinica and L. schimperi at doses of 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body wt were evaluated for ability to protect Sprague Dawley rats from gastric ulceration by an ethanol-HCl mixture. Cytoprotective effect was assessed by comparison with a negative control group given 1% tween 80 in normal saline and a positive control group given 40 mg/kg body wt pantoprazole. The individual extracts and their combinations were also tested for antibacterial activity against four Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Salmonella typhi (NCTC 8385), Vibrio cholerae (clinical isolate), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (clinical isolate) using the microdilution method. In addition the extracts were evaluated for brine shrimp toxicity and acute toxicity in mice. Phytochemical tests were done using standard methods to determine the presence of tannins, saponins, steroids, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids in the individual plant extracts and in the mixed extract of the five plants. Results The combined ethanolic extracts of the 5 plants caused a dose-dependent protection against ethanol/HCl induced ulceration of rat gastric mucosa, reaching 81.7% mean protection as compared to 87.5% protection by 40 mg/kg body wt pantoprazole. Both the individual

  6. Sensitive electrochemical detection of NADH and ethanol at low potential based on pyrocatechol violet electrodeposited on single walled carbon nanotubes-modified pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Shan, Dan; Yuan, Pei-Xin; Zhang, Xue-Ji

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the electrodeposition of pyrocatechol violet (PCV) was initially investigated by the electrochemical surface plasmon resonance (ESPR) technique. Subsequently, PCV was used as redox-mediator and was electrodeposited on the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE) modified with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Owing to the remarkable synergistic effect of SWCNTs and PCV, PGE/SWCNTs/PCV exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation at low potential (0.2V vs. SCE) with fast amperometric response (<10s), broad linear range (1.3-280 μM), good sensitivity (146.2 μA mM(-1)cm(-2)) and low detection limit (1.3 μM) at signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Thus, this PGE/SWCNTs/PCV could be further used to fabricate a sensitive and economic ethanol biosensor using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) via a glutaraldehyde/BSA cross-linking procedure.

  7. Cumulative Adversity Sensitizes Neural Response to Acute Stress: Association with Health Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dongju; Tsou, Kristen A; Ansell, Emily B; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative adversity (CA) increases stress sensitivity and risk of adverse health outcomes. However, neural mechanisms underlying these associations in humans remain unclear. To understand neural responses underlying the link between CA and adverse health symptoms, the current study assessed brain activity during stress and neutral-relaxing states in 75 demographically matched, healthy individuals with high, mid, and low CA (25 in each group), and their health symptoms using the Cornell Medical Index. CA was significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (P=0.01) in all participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results indicated significant associations between CA scores and increased stress-induced activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, striatum, right amygdala, hippocampus, and temporal regions in all 75 participants (p<0.05, whole-brain corrected). In addition to these regions, the high vs low CA group comparison revealed decreased stress-induced activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the high CA group (p<0.01, whole-brain corrected). Specifically, hypoactive medial OFC and hyperactive right hippocampus responses to stress were each significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (p<0.01). Furthermore, an inverse correlation was found between activity in the medial OFC and right hippocampus (p=0.01). These results indicate that high CA sensitizes limbic–striatal responses to acute stress and also identifies an important role for stress-related medial OFC and hippocampus responses in the effects of CA on increasing vulnerability to adverse health consequences. PMID:24051900

  8. Paradoxical glucose-sensitizing yet proinflammatory effects of acute ASP administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Fisette, Alexandre; Poursharifi, Pegah; Oikonomopoulou, Katerina; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Lapointe, Marc; Cianflone, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipokine derived from the immune complement system, which stimulates fat storage and is typically increased in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, the acute effects of ASP on energy metabolism and inflammatory processes in vivo were evaluated. We hypothesized that ASP would specifically exert proinflammatory effects. C57Bl/6 wild-type mice were put on a high-fat-high-sucrose diet for 12 weeks. Mice were then subjected to both glucose and insulin tolerance tests, each manipulation being preceded by recombinant ASP or vehicle (control) bolus injection. ASP supplementation increased whole-body glucose excursion, and this was accomplished with reduced concomitant insulin levels. However, ASP did not directly alter insulin sensitivity. ASP supplementation induced a proinflammatory phenotype, with higher levels of cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α in plasma and in adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle mRNA. Additionally, ASP increased M1 macrophage content of these tissues. ASP exerted a direct concentration-dependent role in the migration and M1 activation of cultured macrophages. Altogether, the in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that ASP plays a role in both energy metabolism and inflammation, with paradoxical whole-body glucose-sensitizing yet proinflammatory effects.

  9. Anxiety Sensitivity as a Predictor of Acute Subjective Effects of Smoking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anxiety sensitivity (i.e., AS; the degree to which one believes that anxiety and its related sensations are harmful) is a stable trait that is associated with habitual smoking. Yet, the mechanisms linking AS and smoking are unclear. A promising hypothesis is that high-AS individuals are more sensitive to the acute subjective reinforcing effects of smoking and are, therefore, more prone to tobacco dependence. This study examined trait AS as a predictor of several subjective effects of cigarette smoking. Methods: Adult non-treatment-seeking smokers (N = 87; 10+ cigarettes/day) completed a measure of AS during a baseline session. Prior to a subsequent experimental session, participants were asked to smoke normally before their appointment. At the outset of that visit, each participant smoked a single cigarette of their preferred brand in the laboratory. Self-report measures of affect and cigarette craving were completed before and after smoking, and post-cigarette subjective effect ratings were provided. Results: AS predicted greater increases in positive affect from pre- to post-cigarette (β = .30, p = .006) as well as greater smoking satisfaction and psychological reward (β = .23 to .48, ps < .03). Each of these effects remained statistically significant after adjusting for anxiety symptom severity. AS did not predict the degree of negative affect and craving suppression or post-cigarette aversive effects. Conclusions: These findings suggest that positive reinforcement mechanisms may be particularly salient etiological processes that maintain smoking in high-AS individuals. PMID:23144083

  10. Acute effects of ethanol or d-amphetamine on the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish in a microtiter plate format.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. We are assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that are known to act on the central ...

  11. Chronic Ethanol Intake Alters Circadian Phase Shifting and Free-Running Period in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seggio, Joseph A.; Fixaris, Michael C.; Reed, Jeffrey D.; Logan, Ryan W.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic and acute ethanol treatments alter fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker—including free-running period and responsiveness to photic and nonphotic phase-shifting stimuli—in rats and hamsters. In the present work, the authors extend these observations to the C57BL/6J mouse, an inbred strain characterized by very high levels of voluntary ethanol intake and by reliable and stable free-running circadian activity rhythms. Mice were housed individually in running-wheel cages under conditions of either voluntary or forced ethanol intake, whereas controls were maintained on plain water. Forced ethanol intake significantly attenuated photic phase delays (but not phase advances) and shortened free-running period in constant darkness, but voluntary ethanol intake failed to affect either of these parameters. Thus, high levels of chronic ethanol intake, beyond those normally achieved under voluntary drinking conditions, are required to alter fundamental circadian pacemaker properties in C57BL/6J mice. These observations may be related to the relative ethanol insensitivity displayed by this strain in several other phenotypic domains, including ethanol-induced sedation, ataxia, and withdrawal. Additional experiments will investigate chronobiological sensitivity to ethanol in a range of inbred strains showing diverse ethanol-related phenotypes. PMID:19625732

  12. Chronic ethanol intake alters circadian phase shifting and free-running period in mice.

    PubMed

    Seggio, Joseph A; Fixaris, Michael C; Reed, Jeffrey D; Logan, Ryan W; Rosenwasser, Alan M

    2009-08-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic and acute ethanol treatments alter fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker--including free-running period and responsiveness to photic and nonphotic phase-shifting stimuli--in rats and hamsters. In the present work, the authors extend these observations to the C57BL/6J mouse, an inbred strain characterized by very high levels of voluntary ethanol intake and by reliable and stable free-running circadian activity rhythms. Mice were housed individually in running-wheel cages under conditions of either voluntary or forced ethanol intake, whereas controls were maintained on plain water. Forced ethanol intake significantly attenuated photic phase delays (but not phase advances) and shortened free-running period in constant darkness, but voluntary ethanol intake failed to affect either of these parameters. Thus, high levels of chronic ethanol intake, beyond those normally achieved under voluntary drinking conditions, are required to alter fundamental circadian pacemaker properties in C57BL/6J mice. These observations may be related to the relative ethanol insensitivity displayed by this strain in several other phenotypic domains, including ethanol-induced sedation, ataxia, and withdrawal. Additional experiments will investigate chronobiological sensitivity to ethanol in a range of inbred strains showing diverse ethanol-related phenotypes. PMID:19625732

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of four solvent fractions of ethanol extract of Mentha spicata L. investigated on acute and chronic inflammation induced rats.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, P; Priya, N Gayatri; Subathra, M; Ramesh, A

    2008-07-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of four solvent fractions of ethanol extract of Mentha spicata were evaluated in acute and chronic inflammation induced in Wistar albino rats. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and some antioxidants produced during chronic inflammation were quantitated. Hexane (320mg/kg of body weight in 25% DMSO), chloroform (320mg/kg body weight in 25% DMSO), ethyl acetate (160mg/kg body weight in 25% DMSO), aqueous (320mg/kg of body weight in ddH(2)O) fractions, two negative control groups (25% DMSO and ddH(2)O) and two anti-inflammatory drugs (Diclofenac: 25mg/kg of body weight; Indomethacin: 10mg/kg of body weight both in ddH(2)O) were administered by oral intubations to the eight groups of rats consisting six animals, each. In acute study, 1% carrageenan was injected subcutaneously in the sub-plantar region of the right hind paw after 1h of administration of test doses. The increased paw edema was measured at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24h intervals. In the chronic study, the oral administration was carried out for seven consecutive days. On eighth day, four sterile cotton pellets (50mg each) were implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal region of the rats. On the sixteenth day, the rats were sacrificed and the cotton pellets with granulomatous tissue were dissected out and weighed (fresh and dry). Both in chronic and acute inflammation, ethyl acetate (EAF) and aqueous fraction (AF) were effective. EAF is comparable with the positive standards in chronic inflammation. The results indicate that EAF's anti-inflammatory activity is largely due to its ability to modulate in vivo antioxidants.

  14. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Wavelet analysis can sensitively describe dynamics of ethanol evoked local field potentials of the slug (Limax marginatus) brain.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Atsuko; Ito, Iori; Rosso, Osvaldo A; Figliola, Alejandra

    2003-10-30

    Odorants evoke characteristic, but complex, local field potentials (LFPs) in the molluscan brain. Wavelet tools in combination with Fourier analysis can detect and characterize hitherto unknown discrete, slow potentials underlying the conspicuous oscillations. Ethanol was one of the odorants that we have extensively studied (J. Neurosci. Methods, 119 (2002) 89). To detect new features and to elucidate their functions, we tested the wavelet tools on the ethanol-evoked LFP responses of the slug (Limax) procerebrum. Recordings were made in vitro from the neuropile and the cell layer. The present study led to the following findings: (i) Mutual exclusion. Energy concentrated mainly in two ranges, (a) 0.1-0.4 Hz and (b) 1.56-12.5 Hz, and the sum of energy remained constant throughout experiments regardless of the condition. A redistribution of relative energy within this sum seemed to occur in the course of main, possible interactions between the two components excluding each other ('mutual exclusion'). (ii) Transient signal ordering and disordering. Ethanol stimulation alternatingly evoked periods of strongly time evolving oscillation dominated by the energy of 1.56-12.5 Hz (increase of entropy=disordered or complexly ordered state) and those of near-silence were predominated by the energy of 0.1-0.4 Hz (decrease of entropy=ordered state). (iii) About 0.1 Hz slow wave oscillation. It was robust. The dominant energy oscillation and the resulting large entropy fluctuation were negatively correlated to each other, and revealed strong frequency-tuning or synchronization at this frequency. Our findings suggest that discrete slow waves play functionally important roles in the invertebrate brain, as widely known in vertebrate EEG. Wavelet tools allow an easy interpretation of several minutes of frequency variations in a single display and give precise information on stimulus-evoked complex change of the neural system describing the new state 'more ordered' or 'non-ordered or

  16. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake

    PubMed Central

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction. PMID:27378852

  17. Social Isolation Blunted the Response of Mesocortical Dopaminergic Neurons to Chronic Ethanol Voluntary Intake.

    PubMed

    Lallai, Valeria; Manca, Letizia; Dazzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress can increase the response of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to acute administration of drugs of abuse included ethanol. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathway in the development of ethanol abuse under stress conditions. To this aim we trained both socially isolated (SI) and group housed (GH) rats to self administer ethanol which was made available only 2 ha day (from 11:00 to 13:00 h). Rats have been trained for 3 weeks starting at postnatal day 35. After training, rats were surgically implanted with microdialysis probes under deep anesthesia, and 24 hlater extracellular dopamine concentrations were monitored in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for the 2 hpreceding ethanol administration (anticipatory phase), during ethanol exposure (consummatory phase) and for 2 hafter ethanol removal. Results show that, in GH animals, dopamine extracellular concentration in the mPFC increased as early as 80 min before ethanol presentation (+50% over basal values) and remained elevated for 80 min during ethanol exposure. In SI rats, on the contrary, dopamine extracellular concentration did not show any significant change at any time point. Ethanol consumption was significantly higher in SI than in GH rats. Moreover, mesocortical dopaminergic neurons in SI animals also showed a decreased sensitivity to an acute administration of ethanol with respect to GH rats. Our results show that prolonged exposure to stress, as in social isolation, is able to induce significant changes in the response of mesocortical dopaminergic neurons to ethanol exposure and suggest that these changes might play an important role in the compulsivity observed in ethanol addiction. PMID:27378852

  18. Influence of water hardness and sulfate on the acute toxicity of chloride to sensitive freshwater invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Soucek, David J; Linton, Tyler K; Tarr, Christopher D; Dickinson, Amy; Wickramanayake, Nilesh; Delos, Charles G; Cruz, Luis A

    2011-04-01

    Total dissolved solids (TDS) represent the sum of all common ions (e.g., Na, K, Ca, Mg, chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate) in freshwater. Currently, no federal water quality criteria exist for the protection of aquatic life for TDS, but because the constituents that constitute TDS are variable, the development of aquatic life criteria for specific ions is more practical than development of aquatic life criteria for TDS. Chloride is one such ion for which aquatic life criteria exist; however, the current aquatic life criteria dataset for chloride is more than 20 years old. Therefore, additional toxicity tests were conducted in the current study to confirm the acute toxicity of chloride to several potentially sensitive invertebrates: water flea (Ceriodaphnia dubia), fingernail clams (Sphaerium simile and Musculium transversum), snail (Gyraulus parvus), and worm (Tubifex tubifex), and determine the extent to which hardness and sulfate modify chloride toxicity. The results indicated a significant ameliorating effect of water hardness (calcium and magnesium) on chloride toxicity for all species tested except the snail; for example, the 48-h chloride median lethal concentration (LC50) for C. dubia at 50 mg/L hardness (977 mg Cl(-) /L) was half that at 800 mg/L hardness (1,836 mg Cl(-) /L). Conversely, sulfate over the range of 25 to 600 mg/L exerted a negligible effect on chloride toxicity to C. dubia. Rank order of LC50 values for chloride at a given water hardness was in the order (lowest to highest): S. simile < C. dubia < M. transversum < G. parvus < T. tubifex. Results of the current study support the contention that the specific conductivity or TDS concentration of a water body alone is not a sufficient predictor of acute toxicity and that knowledge of the specific ion composition is critical.

  19. The prognostic value of high sensitivity troponin T 7 weeks after an acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Michelle P C; Dow, Ellie; Lang, Chim; Struthers, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Objective The role of high sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) in the convalescence phase after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is unknown. The authors aim to assess the prognostic utility of a single hs-TnT level at 7-week post-ACS. Second, the authors evaluated whether any serial changes in hs-TnT between the index admission and 7 weeks post-ACS had any link with the prognosis. Third, the authors assessed whether the prognostic utility of hs-TnT is independent of various echocardiographic abnormalities. Methods The authors measured hs-TnT levels in 326 consecutive patients at 7 weeks after an ACS event. The composite end point of death from any cause or acute myocardial infarction was evaluated over a median duration of 30 months. Results A high 7-week hs-TnT (>14 ng/l) predicted adverse clinical outcomes independent of conventional risk factors, left ventricular dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiography (adjusted RR: 2.69 (95% CI 1.45 to 5.00)). Patients with persistent hs-TnT elevation at 7 weeks were also at an increased risk of cardiovascular events compared with those with an initial high hs-TnT which then normalised (unadjusted RR 3.39 (95% CI 2.02 to 5.68)). Conclusion The authors have demonstrated the prognostic utility of a single 7-week hs-TnT measurement in routine ACS patients and that it could be used to assist medium term risk stratification in this patient cohort. In addition, the authors also showed that hs-TnT predicted long-term adverse prognosis independent of various echo parameters. Future studies should evaluate whether tailoring specific treatment interventions to higher risk individuals as identified by an elevated hs-TnT during the convalescence phase of ACS would improve clinical outcomes. PMID:22689713

  20. Gut microbiota affects sensitivity to acute DSS-induced colitis independently of host genotype.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Brigitta M; Becker, Anne; Ayiseh, Rene B; Hildebrand, Falk; Raes, Jeroen; Huys, Geert; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Caspase-deficient mice and wild-type (WT) mice show significant differences in their gut microbiota composition. These differences coincide with the observation that caspase-3-deficient mice carrying a natural caspase-11 mutation (Casp3/11(-/-)) are less sensitive to acute dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis than WT mice. For these reasons, we investigated the role of the microbiota in the development of colitis by cohousing WT and Casp3/11(-/-) mice. Microbial community fingerprinting by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the similarities in gut microbial composition of WT and Casp3/11(-/-) mice increased after cohousing. In the acute dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model, Casp3/11(-/-) mice that were cohoused with WT mice showed increased weight loss and disease activity scores and increased neutrophil infiltration and inflammatory cytokine levels in their colon tissue compared with Casp3/11(-/-) mice that were not cohoused with WT mice. Also, we demonstrate that only the microbiota of the Casp3/11(-/-) mice cohoused with WT mice showed an important increase in Prevotella species. In conclusion, our cohousing experiments revealed that the colitogenic activity of the WT microbiota is transferable to Casp3/11(-/-) mice and that Prevotella species are likely to be involved. By contrast, the relative protection of Casp3/11(-/-) mice against dextran sodium sulfate damage is not transferred to WT mice after cohousing. These results underscore the need for in-depth studies of the bilateral interaction of host genes and microbiota to gain insight into the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Our findings also have important implications for the experimental design of disease studies in genetically modified mice and conclusions drawn from them. PMID:24105395

  1. Acute mild footshock alters ethanol drinking and plasma corticosterone levels in C57BL/6J male mice, but not DBA/2J or A/J male mice

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Douglas B.; Morrow, A. Leslie; Todd, O’Buckley; Flanigan, Timothy J.; Berry, Raymond B.; Cook, Melloni N.; Mittleman, Guy; Goldowitz, Dan; Tokunaga, Sayaka; Silvers, Janelle M.

    2008-01-01

    Stress is an often-reported cause for alcohol consumption in humans. Acute intermittent footshock is a frequently used paradigm to produce stress in laboratory animals including mice. The effect produced by intermittent footshock stress on ethanol self-administration has been inconsistent: both increases and decreases in ethanol consumption have been reported. The current set of studies further investigates, in three commonly studied mouse strains, the effect of footshock stress on ethanol self-administration. Furthermore, the effect of footshock on plasma corticosterone levels was determined to investigate potential biochemical correlates. Adult male C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and A/J mice were allowed to self-administer 10% (wt/vol) ethanol for 12 days in a standard 23-h two-bottle paradigm before receiving either 15 min of mild inescapable footshock or no footshock. Shock intensity was equal to the mean intensity at which each strain vocalized as previously determined. Following footshock, animals had the opportunity to self-administer ethanol for an additional 23 h. Separate animals were subjected to either footshock or no shock prior to collection of plasma for corticosterone. Mild footshock stress altered ethanol self-administration and increased plasma corticosterone levels in C57BL/6J mice. Footshock stress did not alter ethanol self-administration or plasma corticosterone levels in DBA/2J or A/J mice. These data demonstrate that mild footshock stress is a suboptimal method of modeling the stress-induced increases in ethanol consumption often reported by humans. PMID:18599253

  2. Intracranial self-stimulation in rats: sensitization to an opioid antagonist following acute or chronic treatment with mu opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Easterling, K W; Holtzman, S G

    1997-04-01

    Acute mu opioid agonist pretreatment (4 hr) dose-dependently sensitizes rats responding for food reinforcement to the rate-decreasing effects of naltrexone (NTX). In the present study, adult rats were trained to respond in an intracranial self-stimulation autotitration procedure in which responding resulted in electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle that decreased in frequency until reset to the initial value. In an acute sensitization experiment, pretreatment (4 hr) doses of 3.0 and 10 mg/kg morphine reduced the ED25 value for the intracranial self-stimulation rate-decreasing effect of NTX from 28.2 mg/kg to 0.29 and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively. All mu-selective opioid agonists tested, fentanyl > levorphanol > methadone > morphine > meperidine (listed in order of decreasing potency), produced similar large increases in sensitivity to NTX. Acute sensitization was not induced by the kappa-selective opioid agonist spiradoline, the dextrorotary enantiomer of levorphanol, dextrorphan, or the nonopioid drugs d-amphetamine and pentobarbital. Pretreatment with morphine for 10 days by continuous subcutaneous infusion (15 mg/kg/day) reduced the ED25 value of NTX from 28.2 to 0.002 +/- 1.48 mg/kg. The correlation of decreases in ED25 values for the rate-decreasing effect of NTX after both acute and chronic morphine administration is consistent with the theory that acute agonist-induced sensitization reflects receptor-mediated changes occurring early in the development of physical dependence.

  3. Differential action for ethanol on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate and sympathetic efferent discharge in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Z.; Abdel-Rahman, A.R.A.; Wooles, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol (0.33, 0.66, or 1 g/kg) on baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and sympathetic efferent discharge (SED) were investigated in rats. The two higher doses of ethanol caused a progressive and significant increase in baseline SED and a slight increase in HR. The findings suggest that the sensitivity of the reflex control of SED was preserved whereas that of HR was impaired after acute ethanol administration. Since these findings were obtained in the same animals, the data suggest that acute ethanol has a differential action on reflex control of SED and HR. Further, the significant increase in SED after moderate and high doses of ethanol suggests an increased central sympathetic tone as recordings were made from preganglionic nerve fibers (splanchnic nerve). The absence of an increase in baseline MAP, in spite of a significant increase in baseline SED following acute ethanol injection, could be explained, at least in part, by an ethanol-evoked reduction in pressor responsiveness to phenylephrine, an ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist.

  4. The cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, β-caryophyllene, reduced voluntary alcohol intake and attenuated ethanol-induced place preference and sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Al Mansouri, Shamma; Ojha, Shreesh; Al Maamari, Elyazia; Al Ameri, Mouza; Nurulain, Syed M; Bahi, Amine

    2014-09-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that brain CB2 cannabinoid receptors play a major role in alcohol reward. In fact, the implication of cannabinoid neurotransmission in the reinforcing effects of ethanol (EtOH) is becoming increasingly evident. The CB2 receptor agonist, β-caryophyllene (BCP) was used to investigate the role of the CB2 receptors in mediating alcohol intake and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (EtOH-CPP) and sensitivity in mice. The effect of BCP on alcohol intake was evaluated using the standard two-bottle choice drinking method. The mice were presented with increasing EtOH concentrations and its consumption was measured daily. Consumption of saccharin and quinine solutions was measured following the EtOH preference tests. Finally, the effect of BCP on alcohol reward and sensitivity was tested using an unbiased EtOH-CPP and loss of righting-reflex (LORR) procedures, respectively. BCP dose-dependently decreased alcohol consumption and preference. Additionally, BCP-injected mice did not show any difference from vehicle mice in total fluid intake in a 24-hour paradigm nor in their intake of graded concentrations of saccharin or quinine, suggesting that the CB2 receptor activation did not alter taste function. More importantly, BCP inhibited EtOH-CPP acquisition and exacerbated LORR duration. Interestingly, these effects were abrogated when mice were pre-injected with a selective CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630. Overall, the CB2 receptor system appears to be involved in alcohol dependence and sensitivity and may represent a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of alcoholism.

  5. Acute Sodium Arsenite-Induced Hematological and Biochemical Changes in Wistar Rats: Protective Effects of Ethanol Extract of Ageratum conyzoides

    PubMed Central

    Ola-Davies, Olufunke Eunice; Akinrinde, Akinleye Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ageratum conyzoides L. (Asteraceae) is an annual herbaceous plant used in folklore medicine for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. Objective: To investigate the protective effect of the ethanol leaf extract of A. conyzoides (EEAC) against hematological, serum biochemical and histological alterations induced by Sodium arsenite administration to Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups of five rats each. Group I received propylene glycol and Group II rats were given the (EEAC, 100 mg/kg b.w.) orally for 7 days. Group III were given a single oral dose of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 2.5 mg/kg b.w.). Animals in Group IV were pretreated with 100 mg/kg EEAC for 7 days followed by a single oral dose of sodium arsenite. Results: Arsenic exposure resulted in significant reductions (P < 0.05) in values of packed cell volume (PCV), hemoglobin concentration (Hb) and red blood cell (RBC) count, and elevation in total white blood cell (WBC) count with insignificant reductions in serum total protein, albumin, and globulin levels. Alterations in aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma glutamyl transferase activities, as well as in serum levels of urea, creatinine, glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, were not statistically significant. EEAC significantly restored (P < 0.05) the PCV, Hb, RBC, and WBC as well as serum albumin, globulin, and total protein to normal values. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that EEAC possess strong potentials to protect against toxicities induced by sodium arsenite. SUMMARY Ageratum conyzoides produced significant reversal of the reduction in the erythrocytic indices (packed cell volume, red blood cell, and Hb) caused by sodium arseniteSodium arsenite-induced slight elevations in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), correlating with the

  6. CDK4/6 inhibitor PD 0332991 sensitizes acute myeloid leukemia to cytarabine-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenyi; Boyson, Cynthia A.; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Huang, Xiangao; Hannah, Jeffrey; Dorn, David C.; Moore, Malcolm AS; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Zhou, Pengbo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4 and CDK6 are frequently overexpressed or hyperactivated in human cancers. Targeting CDK4/CDK6 in combination with cytotoxic killing therefore represents a rational approach to cancer therapy. By selective inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 with PD 0332991, which leads to early G1 arrest and synchronous S phase entry upon release of the G1 block, we have developed a novel strategy to prime acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells for cytotoxic killing by cytarabine (Ara-C). This sensitization is achieved in part through enrichment of S-phase cells, which maximizes the AML populations for Ara-C incorporation into replicating DNA to elicit DNA damage. Moreover, PD 0332991 trigged apoptosis of AML cells through inhibition of the homeobox (HOX)A9 oncogene expression, reducing the transcription of its target PIM1. Reduced PIM1 synthesis attenuates PIM1-mediated phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic BAD and activates BAD-dependent apoptosis. In vivo, timely inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 by PD 0332991 and release profoundly suppresses tumor growth in response to reduced doses of Ara-C in a xenograft AML model. Collectively, these data suggest selective and reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 as an effective means to enhance Ara-C killing of AML cells at reduced doses, which has implications for the treatment of elderly AML patients who are unable to tolerate high dose Ara-C therapy. PMID:25744718

  7. Anger regulation style, anger arousal and acute pain sensitivity: evidence for an endogenous opioid "triggering" model.

    PubMed

    Burns, John W; Bruehl, Stephen; Chont, Melissa

    2014-08-01

    Findings suggest that greater tendency to express anger is associated with greater sensitivity to acute pain via endogenous opioid system dysfunction, but past studies have not addressed the role of anger arousal. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with Drug Condition (placebo or opioid blockade with naltrexone) crossed with Task Order (anger-induction/pain-induction or pain-induction/anger-induction), and with continuous Anger-out Subscale scores. Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interactions were tested for pain intensity during a 4-min ischemic pain task performed by 146 healthy people. A significant Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interaction was dissected to reveal different patterns of pain intensity changes during the pain task for high anger-out participants who underwent pain-induction prior to anger-induction compared to those high in anger-out in the opposite order. Namely, when angered prior to pain, high anger-out participants appeared to exhibit low pain intensity under placebo that was not shown by high anger-out participants who received naltrexone. Results hint that people with a pronounced tendency to express anger may suffer from inadequate opioid function under simple pain-induction, but may experience analgesic benefit to some extent from the opioid triggering properties of strong anger arousal.

  8. Sensitization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for LCL161-induced cell death by targeting redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haß, Christina; Belz, Katharina; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Fulda, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed redox homeostasis with both elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense mechanisms has been reported in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of pathways responsible for ROS detoxification renders ALL cells more susceptible for cell death. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibitors of key pathways for the elimination of ROS, i.e. Erastin, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and Auranofin, sensitize ALL cells for cell death upon treatment with the Smac mimetic LCL161 that antagonizes Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Erastin, BSO or Auranofin significantly increase LCL161-induced cell death and also act in concert with LCL161 to profoundly suppress long-term clonogenic survival in several ALL cell lines. Erastin or BSO cooperates with LCL161 to stimulate ROS production and lipid peroxidation prior to cell death. ROS production and lipid peroxidation are required for this cotreatment-induced cell death, since ROS scavengers or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation provides significant protection against cell death. These results emphasize that inhibition of antioxidant defense mechanisms can serve as a potent approach to prime ALL cells for LCL161-induced cell death.

  9. Angiotensin and thromboxane in the enhanced renal adrenergic nerve sensitivity of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Robinette, J B; Conger, J D

    1990-01-01

    The roles of intrarenal angiotensin (A) and thromboxane (TX) in the vascular hypersensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) and paradoxical vasoconstriction to renal perfusion pressure (RPP) reduction in the autoregulatory range in 1 wk norepinephrine (NE)-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats were investigated. Renal blood flow (RBF) responses were determined before and during intrarenal infusion of an AII and TXA2 antagonist. Saralasin or SQ29548 alone partially corrected the slopes of RBF to RNS and RPP reduction in NE-ARF rats (P less than 0.02). Saralasin + SQ29548 normalized the RBF response to RNS. While combined saralasin + SQ29548 eliminated the vasoconstriction to RPP reduction, similar to the effect of renal denervation, appropriate vasodilatation was not restored. Renal vein norepinephrine efflux during RNS was disproportionately increased in NE-ARF (P less than 0.001) and was suppressed by saralasin + SQ29548 infusion (P less than 0.005). It is concluded that the enhanced sensitivity to RNS and paradoxical vasoconstriction to RPP reduction in 1 wk NE-ARF kidneys are the result of intrarenal TX and AII acceleration of neurotransmitter release to adrenergic nerve activity. PMID:2243129

  10. Minimal residual disease diagnostics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: need for sensitive, fast, and standardized technologies

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Brüggemann, Monika; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) has become routine clinical practice in frontline treatment of virtually all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in many adult ALL patients. MRD diagnostics has proven to be the strongest prognostic factor, allowing for risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from significant treatment reduction to mild or strong intensification. Also in relapsed ALL patients and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, MRD diagnostics is guiding treatment decisions. This is also why the efficacy of innovative drugs, such as antibodies and small molecules, are currently being evaluated with MRD diagnostics within clinical trials. In fact, MRD measurements might well be used as a surrogate end point, thereby significantly shortening the follow-up. The MRD techniques need to be sensitive (≤10−4), broadly applicable, accurate, reliable, fast, and affordable. Thus far, flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes (allele-specific oligonucleotide [ASO]-PCR) are claimed to meet these criteria, but classical flow cytometry does not reach a solid 10−4, whereas classical ASO-PCR is time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, 2 high-throughput technologies are being explored, ie, high-throughput sequencing and next-generation (multidimensional) flow cytometry, both evaluating millions of sequences or cells, respectively. Each of them has specific advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25999452

  11. Down regulation of Kv3.4 channels by chronic hypoxia increases acute oxygen sensitivity in rabbit carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Kääb, Stefan; Miguel-Velado, Eduardo; López-López, José Ramón; Pérez-García, M Teresa

    2005-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors participate in the ventilatory responses to acute and chronic hypoxia (CH). Arterial hypoxaemia increases breathing within seconds, and CB chemoreceptors are the principal contributors to this reflex hyperventilatory response. Acute hypoxia induces depolarization of CB chemoreceptors by inhibiting certain K+ channels, but the role of these channels in CH, as in high-altitude acclimatization, is less known. Here we explored the effects of prolonged (24–48 h) hypoxic exposure of rabbit CB chemoreceptor cells in primary cultures on the voltage-dependent K+ currents and on their response to acute hypoxia. We found that CH induces a decrease in the amplitude of outward K+ currents due to a reduction in a fast-inactivating BDS- and highly TEA-sensitive component of the current. In spite of this effect, acute hypoxic inhibition of K+ currents is increased in CH cultures, as well as hypoxia-induced depolarization. These data suggest that downregulation of this component (that does not contribute to the oxygen-sensitive K+ current (IKO2)) participates in the hypoxic sensitization. Pharmacological, immunocytochemical and quantitative PCR (qPCR) experiments demonstrate that CH-induced decrease in outward K+ currents is due to a downregulation of the expression of Kv3.4 channels. Taken together, our results suggest that CH sensitization in rabbit CB could be achieved by an increase in the relative contribution of IKO2 to the outward K+ current as a consequence of the decreased expression of the oxygen-insensitive component of the current. We conclude that acute and chronic hypoxia can exert their effects acting on different molecular targets. PMID:15890707

  12. Antioxidant Properties and Gastroprotective Effects of 2-(Ethylthio)Benzohydrazones on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ariffin, Azhar; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Abdullah, Zanariah

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 2-(ethylthio)benzohydrazone derivatives (1–6) were prepared and characterised by IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The newly prepared compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Among them, most powerful antioxidant, compound 1 has been selected in order to illustrate anti-ulcer effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were respectively treated with 10% Tween 20 as ulcer control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole as reference group, 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg compound 1 as experimental animals. Macroscopically, ulcer control group showed extensive hemorrhagic lesions of gastric mucosa compared with omeprazole or compound 1. Rats pre-treated with compound 1 showed increased in gastric pH and gastric mucus. Histologically, ulcer control group showed severe damage to gastric mucosa with edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer. In immunohistochemical analysis, rats which were pre-treated with compound 1 showed up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effect of compound 1 may be due to its antioxidant activity, and/or due to up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax protein in stained tissue section. PMID:27272221

  13. The human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 mediates in vitro cytarabine sensitivity in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hubeek, I; Stam, R W; Peters, G J; Broekhuizen, R; Meijerink, J P P; Wering, E R van; Gibson, B E S; Creutzig, U; Zwaan, C M; Cloos, J; Kuik, D J; Pieters, R; Kaspers, G J L

    2005-01-01

    Cytarabine (ara-C) is the most effective agent for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Aberrant expression of enzymes involved in the transport/metabolism of ara-C could explain drug resistance. We determined mRNA expression of these factors using quantitative-real-time-PCR in leukemic blasts from children diagnosed with de novo AML. Expression of the inactivating enzyme pyrimidine nucleotidase-I (PN-I) was 1.8-fold lower in FAB-M5 as compared to FAB-M1/2 (P=0.007). In vitro sensitivity to deoxynucleoside analogues was determined using the MTT-assay. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) mRNA expression and ara-C sensitivity were significantly correlated (rp=−0.46; P=0.001), with three-fold lower hENT1 mRNA levels in resistant patients (P=0.003). hENT1 mRNA expression also seemed to correlate inversely with the LC50 values of cladribine (rp=−0.30; P=0.04), decitabine (rp=−0.29; P=0.04) and gemcitabine (rp=−0.33; P=0.02). Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and cytidine deaminase (CDA) mRNA expression seemed to correlate with in vitro sensitivity to gemcitabine (rp=−0.31; P=0.03) and decitabine (rp=0.33; P=0.03), respectively. The dCK/PN-I ratio correlated inversely with LC50 values for gemcitabine (rp=−0.45, P=0.001) and the dCK/CDA ratio seemed to correlate with LC50 values for decitabine (rp=−0.29; 0.04). In conclusion, decreased expression of hENT1, which transports ara-C across the cell membrane, appears to be a major factor in ara-C resistance in childhood AML. PMID:16333246

  14. Increased Ethanol Consumption and Preference in Mice Lacking Neurotensin Receptor Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moonnoh R.; Hinton, David J.; Unal, Sencan S.; Richelson, Elliott; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurotensin receptors (NTS) regulate a variety of the biological functions of neurotensin (NT) in the central nervous system. Although NT and NT receptor type 1 (NTS1) are implicated in some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, the functional roles of NT receptor type 2 (NTS2) in ethanol intoxication and consumption remain unknown. Here we investigated behavioral effects mediated by NTS2 in response to ethanol, which are implicated in ethanol consumption and preference, using NTS2 null mice. Method First, we examined ethanol-induced locomotion, ataxia, hypnosis, and hypothermia in NTS2 null mice. Next, we measured ethanol consumption and preference in NTS2 null mice by giving them free choice between ethanol- and tap water-containing bottles. Then using a brain-permeable neurotensin analog, NT69L, we examined the role of NTS2 in locomotor activity and ataxia. Finally, we examined the effect of NT69L on ethanol consumption and preference in NTS2 null mice. Results We found that NTS2 null mice appear less sensitive to the acute hypnotic effects of ethanol and consumed more ethanol compared to wild-type littermates in a two-bottle choice experiment, even though ethanol-induced locomotion, ataxia, and hypothermia were similar between genotypes. Interestingly, the administration of NT69L for 4 consecutive days significantly reduced alcohol consumption and preference in wild-type littermates as well as in NTS2 null mice. Conclusions Our findings suggest that NTS2 regulates ethanol-induced hypnosis and ethanol consumption. PMID:21039631

  15. Chronic functional ethanol tolerance in mice influenced by body temperature during acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Alkana, R.L.; Bejanian, M.; Syapin, P.J.; Finn, D.A.

    1987-07-27

    Previous studies have found that body temperature during intoxication influences brain sensitivity to ethanol with the sensitivity being less at cool than at warm body temperatures. If this effect of temperature reflects alterations in the acute membrane perturbing action of ethanol, as suggested by in vitro studies, then body temperature reduction during tolerance acquisition should reduce the effectiveness of a given ethanol concentration and, in turn, should reduce the development of chronic functional ethanol tolerance. To test this hypothesis, adult drug-naive C57BL/6J mice were injected i.p. once daily for five days with 3.6 g/kg ethanol and were exposed to 34C or 25C for five hours following injection. On day 6, both ethanol acquisition groups and naive mice were injected i.p. with 4.0 g/kg ethanol and exposed to 25C. During acquisition, the group exposed to 34C had significantly higher body temperatures than the mice exposed to 25C, and there were no statistically significant differences in blood ethanol concentrations between treatment conditions. The extent of tolerance on day 6 was significantly greater in the 34C acquisition group than in the 25C acquisition group. 31 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  16. Conservation of the ethanol-induced locomotor stimulant response among arthropods.

    PubMed

    Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation has been variously described as reflective of the disinhibitory, euphoric, or reinforcing effects of ethanol and is commonly used as an index of acute ethanol sensitivity in rodents. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster also shows a locomotor stimulant response to ethanol that is believed to occur via conserved, ethanol-sensitive neurobiological mechanisms, but it is currently unknown whether this response is conserved among arthropod species or is idiosyncratic to D. melanogaster. The current experiments surveyed locomotor responses to ethanol in a phylogenetically diverse panel of insects and other arthropod species. A clear ethanol-induced locomotor stimulant response was seen in 9 of 13 Drosophilidae species tested, in 8 of 10 other species of insects, and in an arachnid (wolf spider) and a myriapod (millipede) species. Given the diverse phylogenies of the species that showed the response, these experiments support the hypothesis that locomotor stimulation is a conserved behavioral response to ethanol among arthropod species. Further comparative studies are needed to determine whether the specific neurobiological mechanisms known to underlie the stimulant response in D. melanogaster are conserved among arthropod and vertebrate species.

  17. [The protective effect of pantothenic acid derivatives and changes in the system of acetyl CoA metabolism in acute ethanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Moiseenok, A G; Dorofeev, B F; Omel'ianchik, S N

    1988-01-01

    Calcium pantothenate (CaP), calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CaPP), pantethine, panthenol, sulfopantetheine and CoA decrease acute toxicity of acetaldehyde in mice. All studied compounds diminish duration of the narcotic action of ethanol--ET (3.5 g/kg intraperitoneally) in mice and rats. In the latter this effect is realized at the expense of "long sleeping" and "middle sleeping" animals. CaP (150 mg/kg subcutaneously) and CaPP (100 mg/kg subcutaneously) prevent hypothermia and a decrease of oxygen consumption in rats induced by ET administration. Combined administration of ET, CaP and CaPP leads to a characteristic increase of acid-soluble CoA fractions in the rat liver and a relative decrease of acetyl CoA synthetase and N-acetyltransferase reactions. The antitoxic effect of preparations of pantothenic acid is not mediated by CoA-dependent reactions of detoxication, but most probably is due to intensification of ET oxidation and perhaps to its elimination from the organism. PMID:2905277

  18. Ethanol extract of Synurus deltoides (Aiton) Nakai suppresses in vitro LPS-induced cytokine production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo acute inflammatory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunyao

    2014-01-01

    Synurus deltoides (Aiton) Nakai, belonging to the Compositae family, is an edible plant widely distributed in Northeast Asia. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulative effects of the ethanol extract of S. deltoides (SDE). The SDE extract strongly down-regulated the mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, thereby inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and TNF-α in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, SDE also suppressed the nuclear translocation of the activation protein (AP)-1 and the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and simultaneously decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK), p38, and Akt. In agreement with the in vitro observations, the orally administered SDE ameliorated the acute inflammatory symptoms in the arachidonic acid-induced ear edema and the EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Therefore, S. deltoides have a potential anti-inflammatory capacity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the potential therapeutic use in the inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:24611100

  19. Effect of ASF (a Compound of Traditional Chinese Medicine) on Behavioral Sensitization Induced by Ethanol and Conditioned Place Preference in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Da-chao; Li, Yi-bei; Hu, Xiao-Yu; Lin, Wu; Jia, Ling-yan; Zhong, Sen

    2014-01-01

    ASF composed by semen and epimedium herbal is a traditional plant compound that is widely used in the treatment of insomnia. Studies have shown that saponins and flavonoids contained in semen can significantly decrease the content of excitatory neurotransmitter Glu in mice. And the total flavone of YinYangHuo can increase the release of GABA in the anterior periventricular system of rat and increase the affinity of GABA for the receptors GABAA. It can be inferred that their synergism may have effect on the neurotransmitter that causes behavioral sensitization and conditioned place preference in experimental animals and affects their drinking behaviors, which is the starting point of this research. The present study found that ASF can inhibit development and expression of behavioral sensitization induced by ethanol and the development of CPP in mice. We demonstrate the inhibition of ASF on behavioral sensitization partly due to its effect on the mesolimbic neurotransmitter system, including decreasing level of DA and Glu and increasing the content of GABA. It suggested that the ASF may have pharmacological effects in the treatment of alcohol addiction. PMID:25530778

  20. Critical features of acute stress-induced cross-sensitization identified through the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis output.

    PubMed

    Belda, Xavier; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced sensitization represents a process whereby prior exposure to severe stressors leaves animals or humans in a hyper-responsive state to further stressors. Indeed, this phenomenon is assumed to be the basis of certain stress-associated pathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder and psychosis. One biological system particularly prone to sensitization is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the prototypic stress system. It is well established that under certain conditions, prior exposure of animals to acute and chronic (triggering) stressors enhances HPA responses to novel (heterotypic) stressors on subsequent days (e.g. raised plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels). However, such changes remain somewhat controversial and thus, the present study aimed to identify the critical characteristics of the triggering and challenging stressors that affect acute stress-induced HPA cross-sensitization in adult rats. We found that HPA cross-sensitization is markedly influenced by the intensity of the triggering stressor, whereas the length of exposure mainly affects its persistence. Importantly, HPA sensitization is more evident with mild than strong challenging stressors, and it may remain unnoticed if exposure to the challenging stressor is prolonged beyond 15 min. We speculate that heterotypic HPA sensitization might have developed to optimize biologically adaptive responses to further brief stressors. PMID:27511270

  1. Critical features of acute stress-induced cross-sensitization identified through the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis output

    PubMed Central

    Belda, Xavier; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced sensitization represents a process whereby prior exposure to severe stressors leaves animals or humans in a hyper-responsive state to further stressors. Indeed, this phenomenon is assumed to be the basis of certain stress-associated pathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder and psychosis. One biological system particularly prone to sensitization is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the prototypic stress system. It is well established that under certain conditions, prior exposure of animals to acute and chronic (triggering) stressors enhances HPA responses to novel (heterotypic) stressors on subsequent days (e.g. raised plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels). However, such changes remain somewhat controversial and thus, the present study aimed to identify the critical characteristics of the triggering and challenging stressors that affect acute stress-induced HPA cross-sensitization in adult rats. We found that HPA cross-sensitization is markedly influenced by the intensity of the triggering stressor, whereas the length of exposure mainly affects its persistence. Importantly, HPA sensitization is more evident with mild than strong challenging stressors, and it may remain unnoticed if exposure to the challenging stressor is prolonged beyond 15 min. We speculate that heterotypic HPA sensitization might have developed to optimize biologically adaptive responses to further brief stressors. PMID:27511270

  2. Ethanol tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ingram, L O

    1990-01-01

    The adverse effects of ethanol on bacterial growth, viability, and metabolism are caused primarily by ethanol-induced leakage of the plasma membrane. This increase in membrane leakage is consistent with known biophysical properties of membranes and ethanolic solutions. The primary actions of ethanol result from colligative effects of the high molar concentrations rather than from specific interactions with receptors. The ethanol tolerance of growth in different microorganisms appears to result in large part from adaptive and evolutionary changes in cell membrane composition. Different cellular activities vary in their tolerance to ethanol. Therefore, it is essential that the aspect of cellular function under study be specifically defined and that comparisons of ethanol tolerance among systems share this common definition. Growth is typically one of the most sensitive cellular activities to inhibition by ethanol, followed by survival, or loss of reproductive ability. Glycolysis is the most resistant of these three activities. Since glycolysis is an exergonic process, a cell need not be able to grow or remain viable for glycolysis to occur.

  3. Effect of acute treatment with cadmium on ethanol anesthesia, body termperature, and synaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Magour, S.; Kristof, V.; Baumann, M.; Assmann, G.

    1981-12-01

    The effect of a single intraperitoneal dose of 0.56, 1.12, and 1.68 mg cadmium/kg on the duration of ethanol-induced sleep was investigated in male rats. Cadmium potentiated ethanol sleeping time in a dose dependent manner up to 300% over controls. No significant difference in the elimination rate of ethanol from blood and brain and observed between control and cadmium-pretreated rats. Cadmium slightly inhibited the hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase in vivo and also potentiated ethanol hypothermia but these changes did not play a significant role in the observed prolongation of ethanol sleeping time. However, cadmium and ethanol additively inhibited brain synaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase in a noncompetitive manner. The results so far indicate that cadmium may increase brain responsiveness toward ethanol partly through inhibition of snaptosomal Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase.

  4. GH11 xylanase from Emericella nidulans with low sensitivity to inhibition by ethanol and lignocellulose-derived phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Caio de Oliveira Gorgulho; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Ricart, Carlos André Ornelas; Midorikawa, Gláucia Emy Okida; Miller, Robert Neil Gerard; Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira

    2015-07-01

    An endo-β-1,4-xylanase (X22) was purified from crude extract of Emericella nidulans when cultivated on submerged fermentation using sugarcane bagasse as the carbon source. The purified protein was identified by mass spectrometry and was most active at pH and temperature intervals of 5.0-6.5 and 50-60°C, respectively. The enzyme showed half-lives of 40, 10 and 7 min at 28, 50 and 55°C, respectively, and pH 5.0. Apparent Km and Vmax values on soluble oat spelt xylan were 3.39 mg/mL and 230.8 IU/mg, respectively, while Kcat and Kcat/Km were 84.6 s(-1) and 25.0 s(-1) mg(-1) mL. Incubation with phenolic compounds showed that tannic acid and cinnamic acid had an inhibitory effect on X22 but no time-dependent deactivation. On the other hand, ferulic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillin and p-coumaric acid did not show any inhibitory effect on X22 activity, although they changed X22 apparent kinetic parameters. Ethanol remarkably increased enzyme thermostability and apparent Vmax and Kcat values, even though the affinity and catalytic efficiency for xylan were lowered.

  5. Ethanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  6. An assay for measuring the effects of ethanol on the locomotion speed of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Andrew G.; Blackwell, GinaMari G.; Raabe, Richard C.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are a significant public health concern, for which there are few effective treatment strategies. One difficulty that has delayed the development of more effective treatments is the relative lack of understanding of the molecular underpinnings of the effects of ethanol on behavior. The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), provides a useful model in which to generate and test hypotheses about the molecular effects of ethanol. Here, we describe an assay that has been developed and used to examine the roles of particular genes and environmental factors in behavioral responses to ethanol, in which locomotion is the behavioral output. Ethanol dose-dependently causes an acute depression of crawling on an agar surface. The effects are dynamic; animals exposed to a high concentration demonstrate an initial strong depression of crawling, referred to here as initial sensitivity, and then partially recover locomotion speed despite the continued presence of the drug. This ethanol-induced behavioral plasticity is referred to here as the development of acute functional tolerance. This assay has been used to demonstrate that these two phenotypes are distinct and genetically separable. The straightforward locomotion assay described here is suitable for examining the effects of both genetic and environmental manipulations on these acute behavioral responses to ethanol in C. elegans. PMID:25938273

  7. The effect of acute ethanol (EtOH) exposure on protein kinase C (PKC) activity in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; LaPaglia, N; Lawrence, A; Williams, D; Emanuele, N; Emanuele, M

    1997-01-01

    Alterations in the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway may interrupt anterior pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) synthesis and/or secretion, which may impair normal reproductive function. Work by our laboratory and others has shown that EtOH has profound deleterious effects on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The present study focuses on PKC translocation from the cytosol to the membrane of anterior pituitary after acute EtOH exposure. Serum levels of LH were measured at three time points (15, 30, and 90 min) after an IP injection of either saline or 3 g/kg EtOH in adult castrated male rats. LH levels dropped significantly (p < 0.03) in EtOH-injected compared to saline-injected control animals. In the same animals, EtOH significantly suppressed PKC localization at its active site at the pituitary cell membrane (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that the mechanism of EtOH's suppression of LH is mediated, at least in part, through a decrease in PKC translocation to the anterior pituitary cell membrane.

  8. GM1 ganglioside reduces the motor incoordination and loss of righting reflex caused by acute ethanol in C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, C.; Rezazadeh, S.M.; Forster, M.J.; Lal, H. )

    1992-02-26

    Ethanol produces its intoxicating effects by modifying neuronal membranes. Gangliosides stabilize neuronal membranes and promote their recovery from a variety of insults. In this experiment, the efficacy of GM1(i.p.) to reverse ethanol intoxication was evaluated in male mice trained to run on a constantly accelerating rotorod. When mice were tested 15-min following saline or ethanol GM1 pre-treatment reduced rotorod performance by 15% but was ineffective in modifying the ethanol-impaired performance. However, when mice were tested at 15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 min intervals following ethanol, GM1 pre-treatments dose-dependently reduced the efficacy and duration of ethanol in producing motor incoordination. Further, GM1 given prior to ethanol significantly prolonged the time to onset of the loss of righting reflex from 1.4 to 1.9 min, and reduced the duration of the righting-reflex loss from 94 to 77 min. This GM1 effect was seen at 24 h, but not at 48 or 72 h after its administration. The blood ethanol concentration at awakening was significantly higher in 24h GM1-treated animals than in controls suggesting that the GM1 effect was not due to an alteration in ethanol clearance. These findings support the hypothesis that GM1 promotes recovery from ethanol intoxication via a neuroprotective mechanism.

  9. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  10. Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews the current process technologies for fuel ethanol production. In the US, almost all commercial fuel ethanol is produced from corn whereas cane sugar is used almost exclusively in Brazil. In Europe, two major types of feedstock considered for fuel ethanol production are be...

  11. Child Anxiety Symptoms Related to Longitudinal Cortisol Trajectories and Acute Stress Responses: Evidence of Developmental Stress Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Gilliam, Kathryn S.; Wright, Dorianne B.; Fisher, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that individuals at risk for internalizing disorders show differential activation levels and/or dynamics of stress-sensitive physiological systems, possibly reflecting a process of stress sensitization. However, there is little longitudinal research to clarify how the development of these systems over time relates to activation during acute stress, and how aspects of such activation map onto internalizing symptoms. We investigated children’s (n=107) diurnal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity via salivary cortisol (morning and evening levels) across 29 assessments spanning 6+ years, and related longitudinal patterns to acute stress responses at the end of this period (age 9–10). Associations with child psychiatric symptoms at age 10 were also examined to determine internalizing risk profiles. Increasing morning cortisol levels across assessments predicted less of a cortisol decline following interpersonal stress at age 9, and higher cortisol levels during performance stress at age 10. These same profiles of high and/or sustained cortisol elevation during psychosocial stress were associated with child anxiety symptoms. Results suggest developmental sensitization to stress—reflected in rising morning cortisol and eventual hyperactivation during acute stress exposure—may distinguish children at risk for internalizing disorders. PMID:25688433

  12. Structure of alpha6 beta3 delta GABA(A) receptors and their lack of ethanol sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Baur, Roland; Kaur, Kuldeep H; Sigel, Erwin

    2009-12-01

    Delta (delta) subunit containing GABA(A) receptors are expressed extra-synaptically and mediate tonic inhibition. In cerebellar granule cells, they often form a receptor together with alpha(6) subunits. We were interested to determine the architecture of these receptors. We predefined the subunit arrangement of 24 different GABA(A) receptor pentamers by subunit concatenation. These receptors (composed of alpha(6), beta(3) and delta subunits) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their electrophysiological properties analyzed. Currents elicited in response to GABA were determined in presence and absence of 3alpha, 21-dihydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one and to 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol. alpha(6)-beta(3)-alpha(6)/delta receptors showed a substantial response to GABA alone. Three receptors, beta(3)-alpha(6)-delta/alpha(6)-beta(3), alpha(6)-beta(3)-alpha(6)/beta(3)-delta and beta(3)-delta-beta(3)/alpha(6)-beta(3), were only uncovered in the combined presence of the neurosteroid 3alpha, 21-dihydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one with GABA. All four receptors were activated by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol. None of the functional receptors was modulated by physiological concentrations (up to 30 mM) of ethanol. GABA concentration response curves indicated that the delta subunit can contribute to the formation of an agonist site. We conclude from the investigated receptors that the delta subunit can assume multiple positions in a receptor pentamer composed of alpha(6), beta(3) and delta subunits.

  13. Medicinal Mushroom Cracked-Cap Polypore, Phellinus rimosus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Attenuates Acute Ethanol-Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil A; Janardhanan, Kainoor K

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and alcoholism remain one of the major health issues worldwide, especially in developing countries. The protective effect of Phellinus rimosus against acute alcohol-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver, kidney, and brain as well as its effect against antioxidant enzyme activity such as superoxide (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in the liver was evaluated in mice. Ethyl acetate extract of Ph. Rimosus (50 mg/kg body wt, p.o.) 1 h before each administration of alcohol (3 mL/kg, p.o.; total 2 doses at 24-h intervals) protected against lipid peroxidation in all organs and attenuated the decline of SOD and CAT activity in the liver. The fold increase in lipid peroxidation, including conjugated diene and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels, was highest in the liver. There were 2.6- and 1.5- fold increases in TBARS levels in the liver of the alcohol alone- and alcohol+Ph. Rimosus-treated groups, compared with that of the normal group. Activity of SOD and CAT in the liver of alcohol- and alcohol+Ph. Rimosus- treated animals was 9.05±1.38, 18.76±1.71, and 11.26±1.02, 31.58±3.35 IU/mg protein, respectively. Extract at 1 mg/mL inhibited 50.6% activity of aniline hydroxylase (CYP2E1) in liver homogenate. From these results, we concluded that the extract significantly protected against the lipid peroxidation. Protection in the liver may be due to the inhibitory effect on CYP2E1 as well as the direct radical scavenging effect of Ph. Rimosus, which warrants further research.

  14. In vitro efficacy of ethanolic extract of Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. using cell sensitivity and flow cytometry assays.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Kourosh; Shahidi-Hakak, Fatemeh; Asgari, Qasem; Hatam, Gholam Reza; Fakoorziba, Mohammad Reza; Miri, Ramin; Moemenbellah-Fard, Mohammad Djaefar

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most neglected human diseases with an estimated global burden ranking second in mortality and fourth in morbidity among the tropical infections. Chemotherapy involving the use of drugs like glucantime is the mainstay treatment in endemic areas of Iran. Drug resistance is increasingly prevalent, so search for alternative therapy is gathering pace. Medicinal herbs, like wormwood Artemisia, have chemical compounds effective against a number of pathogens. In this study, the efficacy of ethanol extract from Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. was investigated in vitro. The outcome of different effective doses (1-40 mg/ml) of ethanol extracts from this medicinal herb, A. absinthium, on a standard Iranian parasite strain of L. major was examined. The L. major promastigote cell sensitivity and mortality or viability effects due to the addition of herbal extract were measured using the MTT assay and the flow cytometry technique, respectively. There was complete agreement between the two assays. The lethal concentration (LC50) was measured as 101 mg/ml. Some contrasting relationships between the medicinal herb concentrations and the viability of parasites were observed; so that there was an increased multiplication of the parasite at low concentrations of the drug, but an anti-parasitic apoptotic effect was seen at high concentrations of A. absinthium. It was concluded that there might be one or more chemical constituents within the herbal extract of wormwood which at high concentration controlled cell division and affected the relevant activity within the only one giant mitochondrion in this flagellate parasite. At low doses, however, it showed the opposite effect of leading to mitotic cell divisions. PMID:27605775

  15. In vitro efficacy of ethanolic extract of Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. using cell sensitivity and flow cytometry assays.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Kourosh; Shahidi-Hakak, Fatemeh; Asgari, Qasem; Hatam, Gholam Reza; Fakoorziba, Mohammad Reza; Miri, Ramin; Moemenbellah-Fard, Mohammad Djaefar

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most neglected human diseases with an estimated global burden ranking second in mortality and fourth in morbidity among the tropical infections. Chemotherapy involving the use of drugs like glucantime is the mainstay treatment in endemic areas of Iran. Drug resistance is increasingly prevalent, so search for alternative therapy is gathering pace. Medicinal herbs, like wormwood Artemisia, have chemical compounds effective against a number of pathogens. In this study, the efficacy of ethanol extract from Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. was investigated in vitro. The outcome of different effective doses (1-40 mg/ml) of ethanol extracts from this medicinal herb, A. absinthium, on a standard Iranian parasite strain of L. major was examined. The L. major promastigote cell sensitivity and mortality or viability effects due to the addition of herbal extract were measured using the MTT assay and the flow cytometry technique, respectively. There was complete agreement between the two assays. The lethal concentration (LC50) was measured as 101 mg/ml. Some contrasting relationships between the medicinal herb concentrations and the viability of parasites were observed; so that there was an increased multiplication of the parasite at low concentrations of the drug, but an anti-parasitic apoptotic effect was seen at high concentrations of A. absinthium. It was concluded that there might be one or more chemical constituents within the herbal extract of wormwood which at high concentration controlled cell division and affected the relevant activity within the only one giant mitochondrion in this flagellate parasite. At low doses, however, it showed the opposite effect of leading to mitotic cell divisions.

  16. Juvenile ethanol exposure increases rewarding properties of cocaine and morphine in adult DBA/2J mice.

    PubMed

    Molet, Jenny; Hervé, Denis; Thiébot, Marie-Hélène; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2013-12-01

    Convergent data showed that ethanol exposure during adolescence can alter durably ethanol-related behaviour at adulthood. However, the consequences of juvenile ethanol exposure on the reinforcing effects of other drugs of abuse remain unclear. In the present work, we evaluated in adult male DBA/2J mice the effects of early ethanol exposure on the sensitivity to the incentive effects of cocaine and morphine, and on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in response to cocaine. Juvenile male mice received intragastric administration of ethanol (2×2.5g/kg/day) or water for 5 days starting on postnatal day 28. When reaching adult age (10 week-old), animals were subjected to an unbiased procedure to assess conditioned place preference (CPP) to cocaine or morphine. In addition, activation of ERK in response to an acute injection of cocaine was investigated using immunoblotting in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens. Mice that have been subjected to early ethanol exposure developed CPP to doses of cocaine (5mg/kg) or morphine (10mg/kg) below the threshold doses to induce CPP in water pre-exposed mice. In addition, early ethanol administration significantly increased striatal ERK phosphorylation normally induced by acute cocaine (10 and 20mg/kg) in adult mice. These results show that, in DBA/2J mice, early exposure to ethanol enhanced the perception of the incentive effects of cocaine and morphine. Ethanol pre-exposure also induced a positive modulation of striatal ERK signalling, in line with the inference that juvenile ethanol intake may contribute to the development of addictive behaviour at adult age. PMID:23619165

  17. Assessing Contaminant Sensitivity of Endangered and Threatened Aquatic Species: Part I. Acute Toxicity of Five Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on the results of acute toxicity tests conducted with common surrogate species, and several species of threatened and endangered species for which there were excess artificially propagated stock to allow direct testing.

  18. Low brain histamine content affects ethanol-induced motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Lintunen, Minnamaija; Raatesalmi, Kristiina; Sallmen, Tina; Anichtchik, Oleg; Karlstedt, Kaj; Kaslin, Jan; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R; Panula, Pertti

    2002-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on motor performance in humans is well established but how neural mechanisms are affected by ethanol action remains largely unknown. To investigate whether the brain histaminergic system is important in it, we used a genetic model consisting of rat lines selectively outbred for differential ethanol sensitivity. Ethanol-sensitive rats had lower levels of brain histamine and lower densities of histamine-immunoreactive fibers than ethanol-insensitive rats, although both rat lines showed no changes in histamine synthesizing neurons. Lowering the high brain histamine content of the ethanol-insensitive rats with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine before ethanol administration increased their ethanol sensitivity in a behavioral motor function test. Higher H3 receptor ligand binding and histamine-induced G-protein activation was detected in several brain regions of ethanol-naive ethanol-sensitive rats. Brain histamine levels and possibly signaling via H3 receptors may thus correlate with genetic differences in ethanol-induced motor impairment.

  19. Differential sensitivity of the nicotinic receptor of long (LS) and short (SS) sleep mice to ethanol (E) and forane (F)

    SciTech Connect

    McArdle, J.J.; Choi, J.J. )

    1989-02-09

    Studies of inbred mice indicate that heredity determines the behavioral response to CNS depressants. For example, LS mice lose their righting reflex at blood levels of E having no effect on this reflex of SS mice. In order to determine if such differential sensitivity extends to the effects of depressants known to alter the mean open time (tau) of the ion channel activated by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AR), we used an extracellular electrode to record miniature end-plate currents (23 C) from the triangularis sterni muscle of adult male LS and SS mice. The average decay time constant (tau) of 70 currents was calculated before, during and after drug exposure. Tau was the same for LS and SS mice (1.41 {plus minus} 0.03 mS and 1.47 {plus minus} 0.02 mS, respectively) prior to treatment and was reversible prolonged by E and shortened by F as expected. However, tau of SS mice was more responsive. For example, 25 mM of E increased tau by 12.9% and 3.8% in SS and LS mice, respectively. Likewise, the decrease of tau in response to 3 mM F was 18.5% and 9.2%. The net result was that the curve relating tau for LS mice to drug concentration was to the right of the for SS mice. These data suggest that the sensitivity of the peripheral AR to CNS depressants can be genetically controlled.

  20. Chronic intermittent toluene inhalation initiated during adolescence in rats does not alter voluntary consumption of ethanol in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Dick, Alec L W; Lawrence, Andrew J; Duncan, Jhodie R

    2014-09-01

    Voluntary inhalation of organic solvents, such as toluene, is particularly prevalent in adolescent populations and is considered to be a contributing factor to substance use and dependence later in life. While inhalants are often the initial "drug" experienced during this period, alcohol is another substance readily abused by adolescent populations. Although both substances are thought to have similar actions within the brain, our understanding of the implications of adolescent inhalant abuse upon subsequent exposure to alcohol remains to be investigated. Thus, this study aimed to assess locomotor responses to acute ethanol and voluntary ethanol consumption following a period of toluene inhalation throughout adolescence/early adulthood. Adolescent male Wistar rats (postnatal day [PN] 27) inhaled air or toluene (3000 ppm) for 1 h/day, 3 days/week for 4 (PN 27-52) or 8 weeks (PN 27-80) to mimic the patterns observed in human inhalant abusers. Following the exposure period, cross-sensitization to acute ethanol challenge (0.5 g/kg, intra-peritoneally [i.p.]), and voluntary consumption of 20% ethanol in a chronic intermittent 2-bottle choice paradigm, were assessed. Hepatic ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolism and liver histopathology were also investigated. Chronic intermittent toluene (CIT) exposure throughout adolescence for up to 8 weeks did not alter the behavioral response to acute ethanol or voluntary consumption of ethanol in adulthood, although an age-dependent effect on ethanol consumption was observed (p<0.05). Both liver function and pathology did not differ between treatment groups. Thus, in the paradigm employed, CIT exposure throughout adolescence and early adulthood did not predispose rats to subsequent locomotor sensitivity or voluntary consumption of ethanol in adulthood.

  1. Design of a highly sensitive ethanol sensor using a nano-coaxial p-Co3O4/n-TiO2 heterojunction synthesized at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y. Q.; Cui, Z. D.; Zhu, S. L.; Li, Z. Y.; Yang, X. J.; Chen, Y. J.; Ma, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication and gas-sensing tests of nano-coaxial p-Co3O4/n-TiO2 heterojunction. Specifically, uniform TiO2 nanotubular arrays have been assembled by anodization and used as templates for generation of the Co3O4 one-dimensional nanorods. The structure morphology and composition of as-prepared products have been characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, and XPS. A possible growth mechanism governing the formation of such nano-coaxial heterojunctions is proposed. The TiO2 nanotube sensor shows a normal n-type response to reducing ethanol gas, whereas TiO2-Co3O4 exhibits p-type response with excellent sensing performances. This conversion of sensing behavior can be explained by the formation of p-n heterojunction structures. A possible sensing mechanism is also illustrated, which can provide theoretical guidance for the further development of advanced gas-sensitive materials with p-n heterojunction.In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication and gas-sensing tests of nano-coaxial p-Co3O4/n-TiO2 heterojunction. Specifically, uniform TiO2 nanotubular arrays have been assembled by anodization and used as templates for generation of the Co3O4 one-dimensional nanorods. The structure morphology and composition of as-prepared products have been characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, and XPS. A possible growth mechanism governing the formation of such nano-coaxial heterojunctions is proposed. The TiO2 nanotube sensor shows a normal n-type response to reducing ethanol gas, whereas TiO2-Co3O4 exhibits p-type response with excellent sensing performances. This conversion of sensing behavior can be explained by the formation of p-n heterojunction structures. A possible sensing mechanism is also illustrated, which can provide theoretical guidance for the further development of advanced gas-sensitive materials with p-n heterojunction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03616b

  2. Transgenic over expression of nicotinic receptor alpha 5, alpha 3, and beta 4 subunit genes reduces ethanol intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Xavier; Ruiz-Medina, Jessica; Valverde, Olga; Molas, Susanna; Robles, Noemí; Sabrià, Josefa; Crabbe, John C; Dierssen, Mara

    2012-05-01

    Abuse of alcohol and smoking are extensively co-morbid. Some studies suggest partial commonality of action of alcohol and nicotine mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We tested mice with transgenic over expression of the alpha 5, alpha 3, beta 4 receptor subunit genes, which lie in a cluster on human chromosome 15, that were previously shown to have increased nicotine self-administration, for several responses to ethanol. Transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to several acute behavioral responses to ethanol. However, transgenic mice drank less ethanol than wild-type in a two-bottle (ethanol vs. water) preference test. These results suggest a complex role for this receptor subunit gene cluster in the modulation of ethanol's as well as nicotine's effects.

  3. Ethanol induction of steroidogenesis in rat adrenal and brain is dependent upon pituitary ACTH release and de novo adrenal StAR synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kevin N.; Kumar, Sandeep; O'Buckley, Todd K.; Porcu, Patrizia; Morrow, A. Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of ethanol actions that produce its behavioral sequelae involve the synthesis of potent GABAergic neuroactive steroids, specifically the GABAergic metabolites of progesterone, (3α,5α)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP), and deoxycorticosterone, (3α,5α)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one. We investigated the mechanisms that underlie the effect of ethanol on adrenal steroidogenesis. We found that ethanol effects on plasma pregnenolone, progesterone, 3α,5α-THP and cortical 3α,5α-THP are highly correlated, exhibit a threshold of 1.5 g/kg, but show no dose dependence. Ethanol increases plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), adrenal steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and adrenal StAR phosphorylation, but does not alter levels of other adrenal cholesterol transporters. The inhibition of ACTH release, de novo adrenal StAR synthesis or cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage activity prevents ethanol-induced increases in GABAergic steroids in plasma and brain. ACTH release and de novo StAR synthesis are independently regulated following ethanol administration and both are necessary, but not sufficient, for ethanol-induced elevation of plasma and brain neuroactive steroids. As GABAergic steroids contribute to ethanol actions and ethanol sensitivity, the mechanisms of this effect of ethanol may be important factors that contribute to the behavioral actions of ethanol and risk for alcohol abuse disorders. PMID:20021565

  4. ASSESSING CONTAMINANT SENSITIVITY OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED AQUATIC SPECIES WITH ACUTE TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of contaminant impacts to endangered and threatened (listed) species requires understanding of a species' sensitivity to particular chemicals. The most direct approach would be to determine the sensitivity of a listed species to a particular contaminant or perturbation...

  5. Consequences of adolescent ethanol exposure in male Sprague-Dawley rats on fear conditioning and extinction in adulthood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadwater, Margaret A.

    Some evidence suggests that adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to alcohol-induced cognitive deficits and that these deficits may persist into adulthood. Five experiments were conducted to assess long-term consequences of ethanol exposure on tone and context Pavlovian fear conditioning in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Experiment 1 examined age-related differences in sensitivity to ethanol-induced disruptions of fear conditioning to a pre-conditioning ethanol challenge. Experiments 2 examined fear conditioning 22 days after early-mid adolescent (P28-48) or adult (P70-90) exposure to 4 g/kg i.g. ethanol or water given every other day (total of 11 exposures). In Experiment 3, mid-late adolescents (P35-55) were exposed in the same manner to assess whether timing of ethanol exposure within the adolescent period would differentially affect later fear conditioning. Experiment 4 assessed the influence of prior adolescent or adult ethanol exposure on the disrupting effects of a pre-conditioning ethanol challenge. In Experiment 5, neurogenesis (doublecortin---DCX) and cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase---ChAT) markers were measured to assess potential long-term ethanol-induced changes in neural mechanisms important for learning and memory. Results indicated that the long-lasting behavioral effects of ethanol exposure varied depending on exposure age, with early-mid adolescent exposed animals showing attenuated context fear retention (a relatively hippocampal-dependent task), whereas mid-late adolescent and adult exposed animals showed slower context extinction (thought to be reliant on the mPFC). Early-mid adolescent ethanol-exposed animals also had significantly less DCX and ChAT expression than their water-exposed counterparts, possibly contributing to deficits in context fear. Tone fear was not influenced by prior ethanol exposure at any age. In terms of age differences in ethanol sensitivity, adolescents were less sensitive than adults to ethanol

  6. The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal on motor performance and dopaminergic receptor sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, N; Fernandez, W; Lees, A J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal were studied in nine patients with levodopa related on-off oscillations. One patient withdrew from the study due to off period confusion and hallucinations. A marked deterioration in motor disability occurred in all patients following overnight withdrawal of levodopa and a further mild delayed deterioration was present over a mean withdrawal period of 44 hours. Patients with more severe disease were able to tolerate levodopa withdrawal for a shorter period of time than those with milder disease severity. The minimum therapeutic dose of subcutaneous apomorphine needed to produce a similar improvement in patients' mobility, before and after several days of drug withdrawal, did not differ, thus providing no clinical evidence for alterations in striatal dopamine receptor sensitivity after acute levodopa withdrawal. PMID:8331352

  7. MicroRNA-101 regulates T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression and chemotherapeutic sensitivity by targeting Notch1

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Lu; Zhang, Wanggang; Lei, Bo; He, Aili; Ye, Lianhong; Li, Xingzhou; Dong, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-101 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression and chemoresistance. Furthermore, a novel target gene of miR-101 was identified. Here, we confirmed that miR-101 was significantly downregulated in the blood samples of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) compared with the healthy controls, as determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTqPCR) analysis. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that miR-101 significantly repressed the proliferation and invasion, and induced potent apoptosis in Jurkat cells, as determined by CCK-8, flow cytometer and cell invasion assays. Luciferase assay confirmed that Notch1 was a target gene of miR-101, and western blotting showed that miR-101 suppressed the expression of Notch1 at the protein level. Moreover, functional restoration assays revealed that Notch1 mediates the effects of miR-101 on Jurkat cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. miR-101 enhanced the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to the chemotherapeutic agent adriamycin. Taken together, our results show for the first time that miR-101 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and it could enhance chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Furthermore, Notch1 was identified to be a novel target of miR-101. This study indicates that miR-101 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia intervention. PMID:27666896

  8. Mutation of a zinc-binding residue in the glycine receptor α1 subunit changes ethanol sensitivity in vitro and alcohol consumption in vivo.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Lindsay M; Blednov, Yuri A; Trudell, James R; Benavidez, Jillian M; Betz, Heinrich; Harris, R Adron

    2013-02-01

    Ethanol is a widely used drug, yet an understanding of its sites and mechanisms of action remains incomplete. Among the protein targets of ethanol are glycine receptors (GlyRs), which are potentiated by millimolar concentrations of ethanol. In addition, zinc ions also modulate GlyR function, and recent evidence suggests that physiologic concentrations of zinc enhance ethanol potentiation of GlyRs. Here, we first built a homology model of a zinc-bound GlyR using the D80 position as a coordination site for a zinc ion. Next, we investigated in vitro the effects of zinc on ethanol action at recombinant wild-type (WT) and mutant α1 GlyRs containing the D80A substitution, which eliminates zinc potentiation. At D80A GlyRs, the effects of 50 and 200 mM ethanol were reduced as compared with WT receptors. Also, in contrast to what was seen with WT GlyRs, neither adding nor chelating zinc changed the magnitude of ethanol enhancement of mutant D80A receptors. Next, we evaluated the in vivo effects of the D80A substitution by using heterozygous Glra1(D80A) knock-in (KI) mice. The KI mice showed decreased ethanol consumption and preference, and they displayed increased startle responses compared with their WT littermates. Other behavioral tests, including ethanol-induced motor incoordination and strychnine-induced convulsions, revealed no differences between the KI and WT mice. Together, our findings indicate that zinc is critical in determining the effects of ethanol at GlyRs and suggest that zinc binding at the D80 position may be important for mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol action at GlyRs.

  9. Prenatal ethanol exposure leads to greater ethanol-induced appetitive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo M; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol significantly heightens later alcohol consumption, but the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon are poorly understood. Little is known about the basis of 'this effect of prenatal ethanol on the sensitivity to ethanol's reinforcing effects. One possibility is that prenatal ethanol exposure makes subjects more sensitive to the appetitive effects of ethanol or less sensitive to ethanol's aversive consequences. The present study assessed ethanol-induced second-order conditioned place preference (CPP) and aversion and ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in infant rats prenatally exposed to ethanol (2.0 g/kg) or vehicle (water) or left untreated. The involvement of the κ opioid receptor system in ethanol-induced CTA was also explored. When place conditioning occurred during the ascending limb of the blood-ethanol curve (Experiment 1), the pups exposed to ethanol in utero exhibited greater CPP than untreated controls, with a shift to the right of the dose-response curve. Conditioning during a later phase of intoxication (30-45 min post-administration; Experiment 2) resulted in place aversion in control pups exposed to vehicle during late gestation but not in pups that were exposed to ethanol in utero. Ethanol induced a reliable and similar CTA (Experiment 3) in the pups treated with vehicle or ethanol during gestation, and CTA was insensitive to κ antagonism. These results suggest that brief exposure to a moderate ethanol dose during late gestation promotes ethanol-mediated reinforcement and alters the expression of conditioned aversion by ethanol. This shift in the motivational reactivity to ethanol may be an underlying basis of the effect of prenatal ethanol on later ethanol acceptance.

  10. AZD1775 sensitizes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to cytarabine by promoting apoptosis over DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Ford, James B; Baturin, Dmitry; Burleson, Tamara M; Van Linden, Annemie A; Kim, Yong-Mi; Porter, Christopher C

    2015-09-29

    While some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have excellent prognoses, the prognosis for adults and children with T cell ALL is more guarded. Treatment for T-ALL is heavily dependent upon antimetabolite chemotherapeutics, including cytarabine. Targeted inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 has emerged as a strategy to sensitize cancer cells to cytarabine and other chemotherapeutics. We sought to determine if this strategy would be effective for T-ALL with clinically relevant anti-leukemia agents. We found that AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL cells to several traditional anti-leukemia agents, acting synergistically with cytarabine by enhancing DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX), AZD1775 led to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at tyrosine 142, a signaling event associated with promotion of apoptosis over DNA repair. In a xenograft model of T-ALL, the addition of AZD1775 to cytarabine slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival. Inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL to several anti-leukemia agents, particularly cytarabine and that mechanistically, AZD1775 promotes apoptosis over DNA repair in cells treated with cytarabine. These data support the development of clinical trials including AZD1775 in combination with conventional chemotherapy for acute leukemia. PMID:26334102

  11. The mysid Siriella armata as a model organism in marine ecotoxicology: comparative acute toxicity sensitivity with Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Sara; Beiras, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Siriella armata (Crustacea, Mysidacea) is a component of the coastal zooplankton that lives in swarms in the shallow waters of the European neritic zone, from the North Sea to the Mediterranean. Juveniles of this species were examined as standard test organisms for use in marine acute toxicity tests. The effects of reference toxicants, three trace metals (Copper, Cadmium and Zinc), and one surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied on S. armata neonates (\\24 h) reared in the laboratory. Acute toxicity tests were carried out with filtered sea water on individual chambers (microplate wells for metals or glass vials for SDS) incubated in an isothermal room at 20 degrees C, with 16 h light: 8 h dark photoperiod for 96 h. Each neonate was fed daily with 10-15 nauplii of Artemia salina. Acute (96 h) LC50 values, in increasing order, were 46.9 lg/L for Cu, 99.3 lg/L for Cd, 466.7 lg/L for Zn and 8.5 mg/L for SDS. The LC(10), NOEC and LOEC values were also calculated. Results were compared with Daphnia magna, a freshwater cladoceran widely used as a standard ecotoxicological test organism. Acute (48 h) LC(50) values were 56.2 lg/L for Cu, 571.5 lg/L for Cd, 1.3 mg/L for Zn and 27.3 mg/L for SDS. For all the reference toxicants studied, the marine mysid Siriella armata showed higher sensitivity than the freshwater model organism Daphnia magna, validating the use of Siriella mysids as model organisms in marine acute toxicity tests.

  12. The anesthetic action of ethanol analyzed by genetics in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Mingi; Choi, Myung Kyu; Lee, Junho

    2008-02-29

    Acute exposure to ethanol causes paralysis at high concentrations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We set out to elucidate the mechanism of the anesthetic action of ethanol by genetic approaches. We identified nine mutations that conferred reduced sensitivity to ethanol after chemical, irradiation, or transposon insertion mutagenesis. Of these nine, we further characterized five mutations that defined four genes, jud-1-jud-4. Analysis of the phenotypes of the animals heterozygous for two unlinked genes revealed that jud-1 and jud-3 act synergistically in a gene dose-dependent manner. We cloned jud-4 and found that it encodes a protein with limited homology to human Homer proteins. jud-4 was expressed in the hypodermis and vulva muscles, suggesting that this gene acts in tissues directly exposed to the external environment. Characterization of the other mutations identified in this study will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular mechanism for the anesthetic action of ethanol.

  13. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Loizou, George D; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  14. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George D.; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  15. Fuel ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report discusses the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 which requires GAO to examine fuel ethanol imports from Central America and the Caribbean and their impact on the U.S. fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol is the alcohol in beverages, such as beer, wine, and whiskey. It can also be used as a fuel by blending with gasoline. It can be made from renewable resources, such as corn, wheat, grapes, and sugarcane, through a process of fermentation. This report finds that, given current sugar and gasoline prices, it is not economically feasible for Caribbean ethanol producers to meet the current local feedstock requirement.

  16. Acute toxicity tests using rotifers. 4. Effects of cyst age, temperature, and salinity on the sensitivity of Brachionus calyciflorus

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, T.W.; Moffat, B.D.; Janssen, C.; Persoone, G. )

    1991-06-01

    Several aspects of the response to toxicants using a standardized toxicity test with the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus are described. Test animals are obtained by hatching cysts which produce animals of similar age and physiological condition. The acute toxicity of 28 compounds is described with 24-hr LC50's. The LC50's span five orders of magnitude, from silver at 0.008 mg.liter-1 to benzene at more than 1000 mg.liter-1. Control mortality in 84 tests averaged 2% with a standard deviation of 3%, indicating very consistent test sensitivity. Only once in 84 trials did a test fail because of excessive control mortality, yielding a failure rate of 1.2%. Cyst age from 0 to 18 months had no effect on the sensitivity of neonates to reference toxicants. Both high and low temperatures increased rotifer sensitivity to reference toxicants. Copper sensitivity was greater at 10, 25, and 30 degrees C compared with results at 20 degrees C. Likewise, sodium pentachlorophenol toxicity was greater at 10 and 30 degrees C compared with results at 20 degrees C. Survivorship curves at 25 degrees C of neonates under control conditions indicated that mortality begins at about 30 hr. This places a practical limit on toxicant exposure for the assay of 24 hr. B. calyciflorus cysts hatch at salinities up to 5 ppt and acute toxicity tests using pentachlorophenol at this salinity yielded LC50's about one-half those of standard freshwater. B. calyciflorus is preferred over Brachionus plicatilis for toxicity tests in salinities up to 5 ppt because it is consistently more sensitive.

  17. Detection of acute nervous system injury with advanced diffusion-weighted MRI: a simulation and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Nathan P; Kurpad, Shekar N; Schmit, Brian D; Budde, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful tool to investigate the microscopic structure of the central nervous system (CNS). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a common model of the DWI signal, has a demonstrated sensitivity to detect microscopic changes as a result of injury or disease. However, DTI and other similar models have inherent limitations that reduce their specificity for certain pathological features, particularly in tissues with complex fiber arrangements. Methods such as double pulsed field gradient (dPFG) and q-vector magic angle spinning (qMAS) have been proposed to specifically probe the underlying microscopic anisotropy without interference from the macroscopic tissue organization. This is particularly important for the study of acute injury, where abrupt changes in the microscopic morphology of axons and dendrites manifest as focal enlargements known as beading. The purpose of this work was to assess the relative sensitivity of DWI measures to beading in the context of macroscopic fiber organization and edema. Computational simulations of DWI experiments in normal and beaded axons demonstrated that, although DWI models can be highly specific for the simulated pathologies of beading and volume fraction changes in coherent fiber pathways, their sensitivity to a single idealized pathology is considerably reduced in crossing and dispersed fibers. However, dPFG and qMAS have a high sensitivity for beading, even in complex fiber tracts. Moreover, in tissues with coherent arrangements, such as the spinal cord or nerve fibers in which tract orientation is known a priori, a specific dPFG sequence variant decreases the effects of edema and improves specificity for beading. Collectively, the simulation results demonstrate that advanced DWI methods, particularly those which sample diffusion along multiple directions within a single acquisition, have improved sensitivity to acute axonal injury over conventional DTI metrics and hold promise for more

  18. Stress, Ethanol, and Neuroactive Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Biggio, Giovanni; Concas, Alessandra; Follesa, Paolo; Sanna, Enrico; Serra, Mariangela

    2010-01-01

    Neurosteroids play a crucial role in stress, alcohol dependence and withdrawal, and other physiological and pharmacological actions by potentiating or inhibiting neurotransmitter action. This review article focuses on data showing that the interaction among stress, ethanol, and neuroactive steroids may result in plastic molecular and functional changes of GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission. The molecular mechanisms by which stress-ethanol-neuroactive steroids interactions can produce plastic changes in GABAA receptors have been studied using different experimental models in vivo and in vitro in order to provide useful evidence and new insights into the mechanisms through which acute and chronic ethanol and stress exposure modulate the activity of GABAergic synapses. We show detailed data on a) the effect of acute and chronic stress on peripheral and brain neurosteroid levels and GABAA receptor gene expression and function; b) ethanol-stimulated brain steroidogenesis; c) plasticity of GABAA receptor after acute and chronic ethanol exposure. The implications of these new mechanistic insights to our understanding of the effects of ethanol during stress are also discussed. The understanding of these neurochemical and molecular mechanisms may shed new light on the physiopathology of diseases, such as anxiety, in which GABAergic transmission play a pivotal role. These data may also lead to the need for new anxiolytic, hypnotic and anticonvulsant selective drugs devoid of side effects. PMID:17555824

  19. Chronic ethanol exposure decreases CB1 receptor function at GABAergic synapses in the rat central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Varodayan, Florence P; Soni, Neeraj; Bajo, Michal; Luu, George; Madamba, Samuel G; Schweitzer, Paul; Parsons, Loren H; Roberto, Marisa

    2016-07-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) influence the acute response to ethanol and the development of tolerance, dependence and relapse. Chronic alcohol exposure alters eCB levels and Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1 ) expression and function in brain regions associated with addiction. CB1 inhibits GABA release, and GABAergic dysregulation in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is critical in the transition to alcohol dependence. We investigated possible disruptions in CB1 signaling of rat CeA GABAergic transmission following intermittent ethanol exposure. In the CeA of alcohol-naive rats, CB1 agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (s/mIPSCs). This effect was prevented by CB1 antagonism, but not Type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2 ) antagonism. After 2-3 weeks of intermittent ethanol exposure, these WIN inhibitory effects were attenuated, suggesting ethanol-induced impairments in CB1 function. The CB1 antagonist AM251 revealed a tonic eCB/CB1 control of GABAergic transmission in the alcohol-naive CeA that was occluded by calcium chelation in the postsynaptic cell. Chronic ethanol exposure abolished this tonic CB1 influence on mIPSC, but not sIPSC, frequency. Finally, acute ethanol increased CeA GABA release in both naive and ethanol-exposed rats. Although CB1 activation prevented this effect, the AM251- and ethanol-induced GABA release were additive, ruling out a direct participation of CB1 signaling in the ethanol effect. Collectively, these observations demonstrate an important CB1 influence on CeA GABAergic transmission and indicate that the CeA is particularly sensitive to alcohol-induced disruptions of CB1 signaling.

  20. Acute Stress Dysregulates the LPP ERP Response to Emotional Pictures and Impairs Sustained Attention: Time-Sensitive Effects.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Rima A; Fernandez, Mercedes; Banks, Jonathan B; Acosta, Juliana; Tartar, Jaime L

    2015-05-20

    Stress can increase emotional vigilance at the cost of a decrease in attention towards non-emotional stimuli. However, the time-dependent effects of acute stress on emotion processing are uncertain. We tested the effects of acute stress on subsequent emotion processing up to 40 min following an acute stressor. Our measure of emotion processing was the late positive potential (LPP) component of the visual event-related potential (ERP), and our measure of non-emotional attention was the sustained attention to response task (SART). We also measured cortisol levels before and after the socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT) induction. We found that the effects of stress on the LPP ERP emotion measure were time sensitive. Specifically, the LPP ERP was only altered in the late time-point (30-40 min post-stress) when cortisol was at its highest level. Here, the LPP no longer discriminated between the emotional and non-emotional picture categories, most likely because neutral pictures were perceived as emotional. Moreover, compared to the non-stress condition, the stress-condition showed impaired performance on the SART. Our results support the idea that a limit in attention resources after an emotional stressor is associated with the brain incorrectly processing non-emotional stimuli as emotional and interferes with sustained attention.

  1. Acute Stress Dysregulates the LPP ERP Response to Emotional Pictures and Impairs Sustained Attention: Time-Sensitive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Rima A.; Fernandez, Mercedes; Banks, Jonathan B.; Acosta, Juliana; Tartar, Jaime L.

    2015-01-01

    Stress can increase emotional vigilance at the cost of a decrease in attention towards non-emotional stimuli. However, the time-dependent effects of acute stress on emotion processing are uncertain. We tested the effects of acute stress on subsequent emotion processing up to 40 min following an acute stressor. Our measure of emotion processing was the late positive potential (LPP) component of the visual event-related potential (ERP), and our measure of non-emotional attention was the sustained attention to response task (SART). We also measured cortisol levels before and after the socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT) induction. We found that the effects of stress on the LPP ERP emotion measure were time sensitive. Specifically, the LPP ERP was only altered in the late time-point (30–40 min post-stress) when cortisol was at its highest level. Here, the LPP no longer discriminated between the emotional and non-emotional picture categories, most likely because neutral pictures were perceived as emotional. Moreover, compared to the non-stress condition, the stress-condition showed impaired performance on the SART. Our results support the idea that a limit in attention resources after an emotional stressor is associated with the brain incorrectly processing non-emotional stimuli as emotional and interferes with sustained attention. PMID:26010485

  2. Acute Stress Dysregulates the LPP ERP Response to Emotional Pictures and Impairs Sustained Attention: Time-Sensitive Effects.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Rima A; Fernandez, Mercedes; Banks, Jonathan B; Acosta, Juliana; Tartar, Jaime L

    2015-01-01

    Stress can increase emotional vigilance at the cost of a decrease in attention towards non-emotional stimuli. However, the time-dependent effects of acute stress on emotion processing are uncertain. We tested the effects of acute stress on subsequent emotion processing up to 40 min following an acute stressor. Our measure of emotion processing was the late positive potential (LPP) component of the visual event-related potential (ERP), and our measure of non-emotional attention was the sustained attention to response task (SART). We also measured cortisol levels before and after the socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT) induction. We found that the effects of stress on the LPP ERP emotion measure were time sensitive. Specifically, the LPP ERP was only altered in the late time-point (30-40 min post-stress) when cortisol was at its highest level. Here, the LPP no longer discriminated between the emotional and non-emotional picture categories, most likely because neutral pictures were perceived as emotional. Moreover, compared to the non-stress condition, the stress-condition showed impaired performance on the SART. Our results support the idea that a limit in attention resources after an emotional stressor is associated with the brain incorrectly processing non-emotional stimuli as emotional and interferes with sustained attention. PMID:26010485

  3. Acute subjective response to alcohol as a function of reward and punishment sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Morris, David H; Treloar, Hayley; Tsai, Chia-Lin; McCarty, Kayleigh N; McCarthy, Denis M

    2016-09-01

    Individual differences in subjective response to alcohol play a crucial role in the development of heavy drinking and related problems. In light of this, a growing focus of research has been identifying factors that contribute to differences in response. The aim of the present study was to determine whether individual differences in the subjective experience of rewarding and aversive effects of alcohol are a specific manifestation of general differences in reward and punishment sensitivity. Eighty-nine participants (M age=22.4, SD=1.9; 47.2% women) consumed a moderate dose of alcohol, i.e., peak breath alcohol concentration (BrAC)≈0.080g%, and rated their level of stimulation and sedation at seven timepoints over the BrAC curve. Sensitivity to reward and punishment were assessed by a self-report questionnaire prior to consumption. Multilevel growth models showed that post-consumption changes in stimulation ratings varied as a function of participants' level of reward and punishment sensitivity. Drinkers more sensitive to reward reported feeling more stimulated shortly after drinking and exhibited an attenuated rate of decline in stimulation over the blood alcohol curve, relative to drinkers with less strong reward sensitivity. Reward sensitivity was not related to subjective ratings of sedation, and punishment sensitivity was not related to either stimulation or sedation ratings. Findings suggest that reward sensitivity may increase risk for alcohol misuse among young adult social drinkers by increasing their subjective feelings of stimulation while drinking. PMID:27104798

  4. Consequences of amygdala kindling and repeated withdrawal from ethanol on amphetamine-induced behaviours.

    PubMed

    Ripley, Tamzin L; Dunworth, Sarah J; Stephens, David N

    2002-09-01

    It has been shown previously that chronic ethanol treatment in mice leads to accelerated behavioural sensitization to psychomotor stimulants [Manley & Little (1997) J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther., 281, 1330-1339], whilst repeated experience of ethanol withdrawal sensitizes pathways underlying seizure activity (Becker & Hale (1993) Alcohol Clin. Exp. Res., 17, 94-98]. The aim of the current experiment was to investigate the consequences of repeated withdrawal from ethanol on amphetamine-induced behaviours in the rat and compare this with animals with electrical kindling of the amygdala, a procedure that has been shown to enhance alcohol withdrawal seizures [Pinel et al. (1975) Can. J. Neurol. Sci., 2, 467-475]. For the kindling experiments, electrodes were surgically implanted in the left basolateral amygdala and were stimulated daily at the afterdischarge threshold until a criterion of three consecutive stage 5 seizures was reached. Fully kindled rats showed a marginally significant reduction in sensitivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of acute amphetamine compared with sham and partially kindled rats which had experienced subthreshold stimulation of the amygdala. Sham and partially kindled rats sensitized readily to the locomotor activating effects of amphetamine (0.125 mg/kg) following repeated treatments, but the fully kindled rats did not. Fully kindled rats also failed to show place preference conditioning to amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg). Rats, withdrawn three times from chronic ethanol (liquid-diet), kindled more quickly to PTZ (30 mg/kg, i.p.) than rats with the same overall exposure to ethanol (24 days) followed by a single withdrawal or control animals. However, there was no difference in the locomotor stimulating effects of acute amphetamine (0.25-1 mg/kg, i.p.), the rate of sensitization to amphetamine (0.125 mg/kg, i.p.) or amphetamine induced conditioned place preference (1 mg/kg, i.p.). These observations suggest that, in rats, repeated withdrawal from a

  5. HOXA/PBX3 knockdown impairs growth and sensitizes cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Glenda J.; Liberante, Fabio G.; Kettyle, Laura M; O’Hagan, Kathleen A.; Finnegan, Damian P. J.; Bullinger, Lars; Geerts, Dirk; McMullin, Mary Frances; Lappin, Terry R. J.; Mills, Ken I.; Thompson, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The cytogenetically normal subtype of acute myeloid leukemia is associated with an intermediate risk which complicates therapeutic options. Lower overall HOX/TALE expression appears to correlate with more favorable prognosis/better response to treatment in some leukemias and solid cancer. The functional significance of the associated gene expression and response to chemotherapy is not known. Three independent microarray datasets obtained from large cohorts of patients along with quantitative polymerase chain reaction validation were used to identify a four-gene HOXA/TALE signature capable of prognostic stratification. Biochemical analysis was used to identify interactions between the four encoded proteins and targeted knockdown used to examine the functional importance of sustained expression of the signature in leukemia maintenance and response to chemotherapy. An 11 HOXA/TALE code identified in an intermediate-risk group of patients (n=315) compared to a group with a favorable risk (n=105) was reduced to a four-gene signature of HOXA6, HOXA9, PBX3 and MEIS1 by iterative analysis of independent platforms. This signature maintained the favorable/intermediate risk partition and where applicable, correlated with overall survival in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. We further showed that cell growth and function are dependent on maintained levels of these core genes and that direct targeting of HOXA/PBX3 sensitizes cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cells to standard chemotherapy. Together the data support a key role for HOXA/TALE in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia and demonstrate that targeting of clinically significant HOXA/PBX3 elements may provide therapeutic benefit to patients with this subtype of leukemia. PMID:23539541

  6. PRENATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE LEADS TO GREATER ETHANOL-INDUCED APPETITIVE REINFORCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo M.; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol significantly heightens later alcohol consumption, but the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon are poorly understood. Little is known about the basis of this effect of prenatal ethanol on the sensitivity to ethanol’s reinforcing effects. One possibility is that prenatal ethanol exposure makes subjects more sensitive to the appetitive effects of ethanol or less sensitive to ethanol’s aversive consequences. The present study assessed ethanol-induced second-order conditioned place preference (CPP) and aversion and ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in infant rats prenatally exposed to ethanol (2.0 g/kg) or vehicle (water) or left untreated. The involvement of the κ opioid receptor system in ethanol-induced CTA was also explored. When place conditioning occurred during the ascending limb of the blood-ethanol curve (Experiment 1), the pups exposed to ethanol in utero exhibited greater CPP than untreated controls, with a shift to the right of the dose-response curve. Conditioning during a later phase of intoxication (30–45 min post-administration; Experiment 2) resulted in place aversion in control pups exposed to vehicle during late gestation but not in pups that were exposed to ethanol in utero. Ethanol induced a reliable and similar CTA (Experiment 3) in the pups treated with vehicle or ethanol during gestation, and CTA was insensitive to κ antagonism. These results suggest that brief exposure to a moderate ethanol dose during late gestation promotes ethanol-mediated reinforcement and alters the expression of conditioned aversion by ethanol. This shift in the motivational reactivity to ethanol may be an underlying basis of the effect of prenatal ethanol on later ethanol acceptance. PMID:22698870

  7. Ethanol and membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Sun, G Y; Sun, A Y

    1985-01-01

    Although ethanol is known to exert its primary mode of action on the central nervous system, the exact molecular interaction underlying the behavioral and physiological manifestations of alcohol intoxication has not been elucidated. Chronic ethanol administration results in changes in organ functions. These changes are reflective of the adaptive mechanisms in response to the acute effects of ethanol. Biophysical studies have shown that ethanol in vitro disorders the membrane and perturbs the fine structural arrangement of the membrane lipids. In the chronic state, these membranes develop resistance to the disordering effects. Tolerance development is also accompanied by biochemical changes. Although ethanol-induced changes in membrane lipids have been implicated in both biophysical and biochemical studies, measurements of membrane lipids, such as cholesterol content, fatty acid unsaturation, phospholipid distribution, and ganglioside profiles, have not produced conclusive evidence that any of these parameters are directly involved in the action of ethanol. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence indicating that although ethanol in vitro produces a membrane-fluidizing effect, the chronic response to this effect is not to change the membrane bulk lipid composition. Instead, changes in membrane lipids may pertain to small metabolically active pools located in certain subcellular fractions. Most likely, these lipids are involved in important membrane functions. For example, the increase in PS in brain plasma membranes may provide an explanation for the adaptive increase in synaptic membrane ion transport activity, especially (Na,K)-ATPase. There is also evidence that the lipid pool involved in the deacylation-reacylation mechanism (i.e., PI and PC with 20:4 groups) is altered after ethanol administration. An increase in metabolic turnover of these phospholipid pools may have important implications for the membrane functional changes. Obviously, there are other

  8. The mu opioid receptor A118G gene polymorphism moderates effects of trait anger-out on acute pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y; Burns, John W

    2008-10-15

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested that the effects of anger-out on postoperative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotypexphenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-outxA118G interactions were observed (p's<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p's<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-outxA118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotypexphenotype interactions involving trait anger-out.

  9. Effects of acute NH3 air pollution on N-sensitive and N-tolerant lichen species.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Maslaňáková, Ivana; Grassi, Alice; Bačkor, Martin; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Lichens are sensitive to the presence of ammonia (NH3) in the environment. However, in order to use them as reliable indicators in biomonitoring studies, it is necessary to establish unequivocally the occurrence of certain symptoms following the exposure to NH3 in the environment. In this paper, we simulated an episode of acute air pollution due to the release of NH3. The biological effects of acute air pollution by atmospheric NH3 have been investigated using N-sensitive (Flavoparmelia caperata) and N-tolerant (Xanthoria parietina) species. Lichen samples were exposed to ecologically relevant NH3 concentrations for 8 weeks, simulating three areas of impact: a control area (2 μg/m(3)), an area of intermediate impact (2-35 μg/m(3)) and an area of high impact (10-315 μg/m(3)), with a peak of pollution reached between the fourth and fifth week. Ammonia affected both the photobiont and the mycobiont in F. caperata, while in X. parietina only the photosynthetic performance of the photobiont was altered after exposure to the highest concentration. In the photobiont of F. caperata we recorded chlorophyll degradation as indicated by OD435/415 ratio, decrease of the photosynthetic performance (as reflected by the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry FV/FM and the performance index PIABS); in the mycobiont, ergosterol reduction, membrane lipid peroxidation (as reflected by the increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), alteration (decrease) of the secondary metabolite usnic acid. No effects were detected on caperatic acid and dehydrogenase activity. In X. parietina, the only signal determined by NH3 was the alteration of FV/FM and the performance index PIABS. The results suggest that physiological parameters in N-sensitive lichens well reflect the effects of NH3 exposure and can be applied as early indicators in monitoring studies. PMID:26342688

  10. Effects of acute NH3 air pollution on N-sensitive and N-tolerant lichen species.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Maslaňáková, Ivana; Grassi, Alice; Bačkor, Martin; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Lichens are sensitive to the presence of ammonia (NH3) in the environment. However, in order to use them as reliable indicators in biomonitoring studies, it is necessary to establish unequivocally the occurrence of certain symptoms following the exposure to NH3 in the environment. In this paper, we simulated an episode of acute air pollution due to the release of NH3. The biological effects of acute air pollution by atmospheric NH3 have been investigated using N-sensitive (Flavoparmelia caperata) and N-tolerant (Xanthoria parietina) species. Lichen samples were exposed to ecologically relevant NH3 concentrations for 8 weeks, simulating three areas of impact: a control area (2 μg/m(3)), an area of intermediate impact (2-35 μg/m(3)) and an area of high impact (10-315 μg/m(3)), with a peak of pollution reached between the fourth and fifth week. Ammonia affected both the photobiont and the mycobiont in F. caperata, while in X. parietina only the photosynthetic performance of the photobiont was altered after exposure to the highest concentration. In the photobiont of F. caperata we recorded chlorophyll degradation as indicated by OD435/415 ratio, decrease of the photosynthetic performance (as reflected by the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry FV/FM and the performance index PIABS); in the mycobiont, ergosterol reduction, membrane lipid peroxidation (as reflected by the increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), alteration (decrease) of the secondary metabolite usnic acid. No effects were detected on caperatic acid and dehydrogenase activity. In X. parietina, the only signal determined by NH3 was the alteration of FV/FM and the performance index PIABS. The results suggest that physiological parameters in N-sensitive lichens well reflect the effects of NH3 exposure and can be applied as early indicators in monitoring studies.

  11. The Mu Opioid Receptor A118G Gene Polymorphism Moderates Effects of Trait Anger-Out on Acute Pain Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.; Burns, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested the effects of anger-out on post-operative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotype X phenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-out X A118G interactions were observed (p’s<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p’s<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-out X A118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotype X phenotype interactions involving trait anger-out. PMID:18579306

  12. Acute colonic ischaemia in rats results in long-term structural changes without alterations of colonic sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ravnefjord, Anna; Pettersson, Madeleine; Rehnström, Erika; Martinez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Colonic ischaemia and mast cells have been involved in the pathophysiology of the functional gastrointestinal disorder irritable bowel syndrome, although the cause–effect relationships remain unknown. We assessed long-term histopathological and functional changes associated to an acute ischaemic episode (1 h) of the colon, followed by 8-week recovery, in rats. Functional colonic alterations [sensitivity during colorectal distension (CRD), compliance and propulsive motility] were assessed regularly during the recovery. Colonic histopathology (presence of inflammation, morphometric alterations and variations in neuronal density in the enteric nervous system) 8-week postischaemia was assessed. Following ischaemia, none of the functional parameters tested (motility, sensitivity and compliance) were affected. At necropsy, the colon presented an overall normal appearance with an increase in weight of the ischaemic area (mg/cm: 99 ± 6; P < 0.05 vs. control: 81 ± 4 or sham ischaemia: 81 ± 3). Histopathological evaluations revealed the presence of a local infiltrate of mast cells in the area of ischaemia (nb of mast cells: 142 ± 50; P < 0.05 vs. control, 31 ± 14 or sham ischaemia: 40 ± 16), without other significant alterations. Animals subjected to colonic ischaemia and treated 8 weeks later with the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80, showed no changes in CRD-related pain responses. These studies show that acute colonic ischaemia is associated with the presence of a long-term local infiltration of mast cells, located within the serosa and muscle layers, despite the absence of functional changes, including colonic sensitivity. Considering the important pathophysiological functions of mast cells, the observed mast cell infiltration may be involved in ischaemia-induced functional changes yet to be characterized. PMID:19134057

  13. Autophagy Constitutes a Protective Mechanism against Ethanol Toxicity in Mouse Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pla, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces brain damage and neurodegeneration by triggering inflammatory processes in glial cells through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Recent evidence indicates the role of protein degradation pathways in neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver disease, but how these processes affect the brain remains elusive. We have demonstrated that chronic ethanol consumption impairs proteolytic pathways in mouse brain, and the immune response mediated by TLR4 receptors participates in these dysfunctions. We evaluate the in vitro effects of an acute ethanol dose on the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) on WT and TLR4-/- mouse astrocytes and neurons in primary culture, and how these changes affect cell survival. Our results show that ethanol induces overexpression of several autophagy markers (ATG12, LC3-II, CTSB), and increases the number of lysosomes in WT astrocytes, effects accompanied by a basification of lysosomal pH and by lowered phosphorylation levels of autophagy inhibitor mTOR, along with activation of complexes beclin-1 and ULK1. Notably, we found only minor changes between control and ethanol-treated TLR4-/- mouse astroglial cells. Ethanol also triggers the expression of the inflammatory mediators iNOS and COX-2, but induces astroglial death only slightly. Blocking autophagy by using specific inhibitors increases both inflammation and cell death. Conversely, in neurons, ethanol down-regulates the autophagy pathway and triggers cell death, which is partially recovered by using autophagy enhancers. These results support the protective role of the ALP against ethanol-induced astroglial cell damage in a TLR4-dependent manner, and provide new insight into the mechanisms that underlie ethanol-induced brain damage and are neuronal sensitive to the ethanol effects. PMID:27070930

  14. Autophagy Constitutes a Protective Mechanism against Ethanol Toxicity in Mouse Astrocytes and Neurons.

    PubMed

    Pla, Antoni; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces brain damage and neurodegeneration by triggering inflammatory processes in glial cells through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Recent evidence indicates the role of protein degradation pathways in neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver disease, but how these processes affect the brain remains elusive. We have demonstrated that chronic ethanol consumption impairs proteolytic pathways in mouse brain, and the immune response mediated by TLR4 receptors participates in these dysfunctions. We evaluate the in vitro effects of an acute ethanol dose on the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) on WT and TLR4-/- mouse astrocytes and neurons in primary culture, and how these changes affect cell survival. Our results show that ethanol induces overexpression of several autophagy markers (ATG12, LC3-II, CTSB), and increases the number of lysosomes in WT astrocytes, effects accompanied by a basification of lysosomal pH and by lowered phosphorylation levels of autophagy inhibitor mTOR, along with activation of complexes beclin-1 and ULK1. Notably, we found only minor changes between control and ethanol-treated TLR4-/- mouse astroglial cells. Ethanol also triggers the expression of the inflammatory mediators iNOS and COX-2, but induces astroglial death only slightly. Blocking autophagy by using specific inhibitors increases both inflammation and cell death. Conversely, in neurons, ethanol down-regulates the autophagy pathway and triggers cell death, which is partially recovered by using autophagy enhancers. These results support the protective role of the ALP against ethanol-induced astroglial cell damage in a TLR4-dependent manner, and provide new insight into the mechanisms that underlie ethanol-induced brain damage and are neuronal sensitive to the ethanol effects. PMID:27070930

  15. Autophagy Constitutes a Protective Mechanism against Ethanol Toxicity in Mouse Astrocytes and Neurons.

    PubMed

    Pla, Antoni; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces brain damage and neurodegeneration by triggering inflammatory processes in glial cells through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Recent evidence indicates the role of protein degradation pathways in neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver disease, but how these processes affect the brain remains elusive. We have demonstrated that chronic ethanol consumption impairs proteolytic pathways in mouse brain, and the immune response mediated by TLR4 receptors participates in these dysfunctions. We evaluate the in vitro effects of an acute ethanol dose on the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) on WT and TLR4-/- mouse astrocytes and neurons in primary culture, and how these changes affect cell survival. Our results show that ethanol induces overexpression of several autophagy markers (ATG12, LC3-II, CTSB), and increases the number of lysosomes in WT astrocytes, effects accompanied by a basification of lysosomal pH and by lowered phosphorylation levels of autophagy inhibitor mTOR, along with activation of complexes beclin-1 and ULK1. Notably, we found only minor changes between control and ethanol-treated TLR4-/- mouse astroglial cells. Ethanol also triggers the expression of the inflammatory mediators iNOS and COX-2, but induces astroglial death only slightly. Blocking autophagy by using specific inhibitors increases both inflammation and cell death. Conversely, in neurons, ethanol down-regulates the autophagy pathway and triggers cell death, which is partially recovered by using autophagy enhancers. These results support the protective role of the ALP against ethanol-induced astroglial cell damage in a TLR4-dependent manner, and provide new insight into the mechanisms that underlie ethanol-induced brain damage and are neuronal sensitive to the ethanol effects.

  16. Comparative acute inhalation toxicity of a saline suspension and an ethanol solution of t-2 mycotoxin in mice. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Creasia, D.A.; Thurman, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    We compared retention, distribution, toxicity, and histopathological change in mice after exposure to aerosols of T-2 suspended in saline or dissolved in ethanol. We found that the LC50 for mice exposed for 10 min to an aerosol of a saline suspension of T-2 was 0.035 plus or minus 0.02 T-2 per liter of air, which was lower than the LC50 (0.380 plus or minus 0.08 mg T-2 per liter air) for an aerosol of T-2 dissolved in ethanol. However, within about 15 min postexposure, most of the T-2 deposited in the respiratory tract was translocated from the respiratory tract regardless of whether the T-2 aerosol was from a saline suspension or ethanol solution. Also, although T-2 is an inflammatory agent to dermis and gastrointestinal epithelium, T-2 from either aerosol did not produce any histological evidence of inflammation in the respiratory tract.

  17. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Folias, Alexandra E.; Wang, Chao; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) supports embryonic development, central nervous system function, and the immune response. atRA initiates neurogenesis and dendritic growth in the hippocampus and is required for spatial memory; superphysiological atRA inhibits neurogenesis, causes teratology and/or embryo toxicity, and alters cognitive function and behavior. Because abnormal atRA shares pathological conditions with alcoholism, inhibition of retinol (vitamin A) activation into atRA has been credited widely as a mechanism of ethanol toxicity. Here, we analyze the effects of ethanol on retinoid concentrations in vivo during normal vitamin A nutriture, using sensitive and analytically robust assays. Ethanol either increased or had no effect on atRA, regardless of changes in retinol and retinyl esters. Acute ethanol (3.5 g/kg) increased atRA in adult hippocampus (1.6-fold), liver (2.4-fold), and testis (1.5-fold). Feeding dams a liquid diet with 6.5% ethanol from embryonic day 13 (e13) to e19 increased atRA in fetal hippocampus (up to 20-fold) and cortex (up to 50-fold), depending on blood alcohol content. One-month feeding of the 6.5% ethanol diet increased atRA in adult hippocampus (20-fold), cortex (2-fold), testis (2-fold), and serum (10-fold). Tissue-specific increases in retinoid dehydrogenase mRNAs and activities, extrahepatic retinol concentrations, and atRA catabolism combined to produce site-specific effects. Because a sustained increase in atRA has deleterious effects on the central nervous system and embryo development, these data suggest that superphysiological atRA contributes to ethanol pathological conditions, including cognitive dysfunction and fetal alcohol syndrome.—Kane, M. A., Folias, A. E., Wang, C., Napoli, J. L. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity. PMID:19890016

  18. Toxicogenomic identification of biomarkers of acute respiratory expsoure to sensitizing agents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allergy induction requires multiple exposures to an agent. Therefore the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for effective screening of potential sensitizers will require the identification of biomarkers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential ...

  19. Acute ozone exposure increases plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha in ozone-sensitive human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Giri, S.N.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1989-07-01

    Twenty O/sub 3/-sensitive and /sup 2/O O/sub 3/-nonsensitive subjects participated in a study to investigate the effects of disparate O/sub 3/ sensitivity on plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha responses consequent to exposure to ambient O3 concentrations. Subjects were selected from a pool of 75 normal healthy college-aged males who had been previously exposed to 0.35 ppm O3 for 1 h at an exercising VE of 60 L/min. The selection criterion used was the observed decrement in FEV1 after the O/sub 3/ exposure: O/sub 3/-sensitive, FEV1 decrement greater than 24%; O/sub 3/-nonsensitive, FEV1 decrement less than 11%. Each subject was exposed to filtered air and to 0.20 and 0.35 ppm O/sub 3/ for 80 min while exercising at a VE of 50 L/min. These experimental protocols were divided into two 40-min sessions separated by a period of 4 to 10 min. PGF2 alpha, FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were evaluated before, during, and after each protocol. SGaw and Vtg were measured before and after each protocol. Plasma PGF2 alpha was significantly increased in the O/sub 3/-sensitive group during and after the 0.35-ppm O/sub 3/ exposure.

  20. Acute effects of 17 β-estradiol and genistein on insulin sensitivity and spatial memory in aged ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana; González-Pardo, Héctor; Garrido, Pablo; Conejo, Nélida M; Llaneza, Plácido; Díaz, Fernando; Del Rey, Carmen González; González, Celestino

    2010-12-01

    Aging is characterized by decline in metabolic function and insulin resistance, and both seem to be in the basis of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive dysfunction. Estrogens prevent age-related changes, and phytoestrogens influence learning and memory. Our hypothesis was that estradiol and genistein, using rapid-action mechanisms, are able to modify insulin sensitivity, process of learning, and spatial memory. Young and aged ovariectomized rats received acute treatment with estradiol or genistein. Aged animals were more insulin-resistant than young. In each age, estradiol and genistein-treated animals were less insulin-resistant than the others, except in the case of young animals treated with high doses of genistein. In aged rats, no differences between groups were found in spatial memory test, showing a poor performance in the water maze task. However, young females treated with estradiol or high doses of genistein performed well in spatial memory task like the control group. Only rats treated with high doses of genistein showed an optimal spatial memory similar to the control group. Conversely, acute treatment with high doses of phytoestrogens improved spatial memory consolidation only in young rats, supporting the critical period hypothesis for the beneficial effects of estrogens on memory. Therefore, genistein treatment seems to be suitable treatment in aged rats in order to prevent insulin resistance but not memory decline associated with aging. Acute genistein treatment is not effective to restore insulin resistance associated to the early loss of ovarian function, although it can be useful to improve memory deficits in this condition. PMID:20467821

  1. Primary acute myeloid leukemia cells with overexpression of EVI-1 are sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Han J M P; Smit, Marjon A; Rutten, Arjo; Denkers, Fedor; Poddighe, Pino J; Merle, Pauline A; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Smit, Linda

    2016-01-28

    Enhanced expression of ecotropic viral integration site 1 (EVI-1) occurs in ∼10% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and is associated with a very poor disease outcome. Patients with EVI-1-positive AML have poor initial responses to chemotherapy and high relapse rates, indicating an urgent need for alternative treatment strategies improving clinical outcome for these patients. Because treatment of acute promyelocytic patients with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has improved the survival of these patients substantially, we investigated whether ATRA might also be effective for the subgroup of AML patients with EVI-1 overexpression. Here, we show that a substantial part of the EVI-1-positive AML cases respond to ATRA by induction of differentiation and decreased clonogenic capacity of myeloid blasts. Most importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo treatment of primary EVI-1-positive AML with ATRA leads to a significant reduction in leukemic engraftment. Altogether, our results show that a considerable part of the EVI-1-positive primary AML cases are sensitive to ATRA, suggesting that combining ATRA with the currently used conventional chemotherapy might be a promising treatment strategy decreasing relapse rates and enhancing complete remissions in this poor prognostic subgroup of AML patients.

  2. Phase sensitive detection of light reflected from a Fabry{endash}P{acute e}rot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bava, E.; Massari, F.

    1996-05-01

    We present an analysis of the Fabry{endash}P{acute e}rot response to a phase-modulated light in the reflection mode, by considering the general problem of the lock-in detection at the {ital p}th harmonics of the rf modulating frequency. Suitable frequency modulation conditions for servo-locking purposes are obtained and the values of modulation index which maximize the sensitivity for the first, third, and fifth harmonics are found. Moreover, we investigate the effects of the residual amplitude modulation introduced by the electro-optic frequency modulator, the presence of laser amplitude and frequency noise, and the dependence of the achievable closed-loop frequency fluctuation spectrum on the modulation index and detection noise. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Impaired niacin sensitivity in acute first-episode but not in multi-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smesny, S; Rosburg, T; Riemann, S; Baur, K; Rudolph, N; Berger, G; Sauer, H

    2005-06-01

    Niacin (vitamin B3) flushing--a marker of altered prostaglandin signaling--is indirectly linked to the phospholipid-prostaglandin metabolism. Diminished skin flushing was repeatedly found in schizophrenia, but has not been systematically investigated at different stages of disorder as yet. We compared niacin sensitivity of 32 first-episode and 32 multi-episode patients (mainly on stable medication) with age and gender matched healthy controls. Methylnicotinate was applied in three concentrations onto the inner forearm skin. Flush response was assessed in 3 min intervals over 15 min using optical reflection spectroscopy. Whereas first-episode patients showed significantly diminished flush response as compared to controls, comparable differences were not found between multi-episode patients and controls. Comparison of niacin sensitivity at different stages of schizophrenia support the notion of altered prostaglandin signaling primarily at the onset of disorder. Longitudinal studies have to rule out possible long-term effects of neuroleptic medication.

  4. Sensitivity of a green alga to atrazine is not enhanced by previous acute exposure.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard; Prosser, Ryan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to atrazine in small lotic systems can be episodic, with short-term pulses (peaks) followed by lower, decreasing concentrations. Algae and macrophytes recover rapidly from pulsed exposure to atrazine, but reported observations of population response to subsequent exposures are minimal and inconclusive. Consequently, the sensitivity of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata to atrazine following a pulsed exposure was assessed. Exposure concentrations reflected amplifications of those observed in streams from highly vulnerable watersheds in regions of intense use. Initial pulsed atrazine exposure at 0, 150 or 300 μg/L for 24-h was followed by 72-h exposure to 0, 5, 10, 25, or 50 μg/L. Measured responses were cell density, growth rate, chlorophyll-a, and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II. Algal recovery was rapid and prior pulsed exposure to atrazine did not significantly affect subsequent sensitivity (EC10s, EC25s) for any endpoint, indicating no changes in tolerance at the population level for this species.

  5. Influence of gender on ethanol-induced ventricular myocyte contractile depression in transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinhong; Esberg, Lucy B; Ye, Gang; Borgerding, Anthony J; Ren, Bonnie H; Aberle, Nicholas S; Epstein, Paul N; Ren, Jun

    2003-03-01

    Acute ethanol exposure depresses ventricular contractility and contributes to alcoholic cardiomyopathy in both men and women chronically consuming ethanol. However, a gender-related difference in the severity of myopathy exists with female being more sensitive to ethanol-induced tissue damage. Acetaldehyde (ACA), the major oxidized product of ethanol, has been implicated to play a role in the pathogenesis and gender-related difference of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, possibly due to its direct cardiac effect and interaction with estrogen. This study was designed to compare the effects of cardiac overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which converts ethanol into ACA, on the cardiac contractile response to ethanol in ventricular myocytes isolated from age-matched adult male and female transgenic (ADH) and wild-type (FVB) mice. Mechanical properties were measured with an IonOptix SoftEdge system. ACA production was assessed by gas chromatography. The ADH myocytes from both genders exhibited similar mechanical properties but a higher efficacy to produce ACA compared to FVB myocytes. Exposure to ethanol (80-640 mg/dl) for 60 min elicited concentration-dependent decrease of cell shortening in both FVB and ADH groups. The ethanol-induced depression on cell shortening was significantly augmented in female but not male ADH group. ADH transgene did not exacerbate the ethanol-induced inhibition of maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening in either gender. In addition, neither ethanol nor ADH transgene affect the duration of shortening and relengthening in male or female mice. These data suggest that females may be more sensitive to ACA-induced cardiac contractile depression than male, which may attribute to the gender-related difference of alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

  6. Transient Exposure to Ethanol during Zebrafish Embryogenesis Results in Defects in Neuronal Differentiation: An Alternative Model System to Study FASD

    PubMed Central

    Joya, Xavier; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Vall, Oriol; Pujades, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Background The exposure of the human embryo to ethanol results in a spectrum of disorders involving multiple organ systems, including the impairment of the development of the central nervous system (CNS). In spite of the importance for human health, the molecular basis of prenatal ethanol exposure remains poorly understood, mainly to the difficulty of sample collection. Zebrafish is now emerging as a powerful organism for the modeling and the study of human diseases. In this work, we have assessed the sensitivity of specific subsets of neurons to ethanol exposure during embryogenesis and we have visualized the sensitive embryonic developmental periods for specific neuronal groups by the use of different transgenic zebrafish lines. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to evaluate the teratogenic effects of acute ethanol exposure, we exposed zebrafish embryos to ethanol in a given time window and analyzed the effects in neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and brain patterning. Zebrafish larvae exposed to ethanol displayed small eyes and/or a reduction of the body length, phenotypical features similar to the observed in children with prenatal exposure to ethanol. When neuronal populations were analyzed, we observed a clear reduction in the number of differentiated neurons in the spinal cord upon ethanol exposure. There was a decrease in the population of sensory neurons mainly due to a decrease in cell proliferation and subsequent apoptosis during neuronal differentiation, with no effect in motoneuron specification. Conclusion Our investigation highlights that transient exposure to ethanol during early embryonic development affects neuronal differentiation although does not result in defects in early neurogenesis. These results establish the use of zebrafish embryos as an alternative research model to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) of ethanol-induced developmental toxicity at very early stages of embryonic development. PMID:25383948

  7. Transgenic Over Expression of Nicotinic Receptor Alpha 5, Alpha 3, and Beta 4 Subunit Genes Reduces Ethanol Intake in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Xavier; Ruiz, Jessica; Valverde, Olga; Molas, Susanna; Robles, Noemí; Sabrià, Josefa; Crabbe, John C.; Dierssen, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and smoking are extensively co-morbid. Some studies suggest partial commonality of action of alcohol and nicotine mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We tested mice with transgenic over expression of the alpha 5, alpha 3, beta 4 receptor subunit genes, which lie in a cluster on human chromosome 15, that were previously shown to have increased nicotine self-administration, for several responses to ethanol. Transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to several acute behavioral responses to ethanol. However, transgenic mice drank less ethanol than wild-type in a two-bottle (ethanol vs. water) preference test. These results suggest a complex role for this receptor subunit gene cluster in the modulation of ethanol’s as well as nicotine’s effects. PMID:22459873

  8. Low dose acute alcohol effects on GABAA receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Hanchar, H. Jacob; Olsen, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors and have long been implicated in mediating at least part of the acute actions of ethanol. For example, ethanol and GABAergic drugs including barbiturates and benzodiazepines share many pharmacological properties. Besides the prototypical synaptic GABAAR subtypes, nonsynaptic GABAARs have recently emerged as important regulators of neuronal excitability. While high doses (≥100 mM) of ethanol have been reported to enhance activity of most GABAAR subtypes, most abundant synaptic GABAARs are essentially insensitive to ethanol concentrations that occur during social ethanol consumption (<30 mM). However, extrasynaptic δ and β3 subunit-containing GABAARs, associated in the brain with α4or α6 subunits, are sensitive to low millimolar ethanol concentrations, as produced by drinking half a glass of wine. Additionally, we found that a mutation in the cerebellar α6 subunit (α6R100Q), initially reported in rats selectively bred for increased alcohol sensitivity, is sufficient to produce increased alcohol-induced motor impairment and further increases of alcohol sensitivity in recombinant α6β3δ receptors. Furthermore, the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 blocks the low dose alcohol enhancement on α4/6/β3δ receptors, without reducing GABA-induced currents. In binding assays α4β3δ GABAARs bind [3H] Ro15-4513 with high affinity, and this binding is inhibited, in an apparently competitive fashion, by low ethanol concentrations, as well as analogs of Ro15-4513 that are active to antagonize ethanol or Ro15-4513’s block of ethanol. We conclude that most low to moderate dose alcohol effects are mediated by alcohol actions on alcohol/Ro15-4513 binding sites on GABAAR subtypes. PMID:16814864

  9. κ-opioid receptors are implicated in the increased potency of intra-accumbens nalmefene in ethanol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Nealey, Kathryn A; Smith, Alexander W; Davis, Seth M; Smith, Daniel G; Walker, Brendan M

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that ethanol-dependent animals display increased sensitivity to the general opioid receptor antagonist nalmefene compared to naltrexone. It was hypothesized that the dissociable effects of the two antagonists were attributable to a κ-opioid receptor mechanism. Nucleus accumbens dynorphin is upregulated following chronic ethanol exposure and such neuroadaptations could contribute to nalmefene's increased potency in ethanol-dependent animals. To test this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer ethanol using an operant conditioning procedure. Animals were then implanted with bilateral intra-accumbens shell guide cannulae and assigned to either a chronic intermittent ethanol vapor-exposure condition (to induce dependence) or an air-exposed control group. Following a one-month exposure period, nalmefene, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; selective for κ-opioid receptors) or a combination of the selective opioid receptor antagonists CTOP and naltrindole (selective for the μ- and δ-opioid receptors, respectively) were site-specifically infused into the nucleus accumbens shell prior to ethanol self-administration sessions during acute withdrawal. Nalmefene and CTOP/naltrindole dose-dependently reduced ethanol self-administration in nondependent and dependent animals, whereas nor-BNI selectively attenuated ethanol self-administration in ethanol-dependent animals without affecting the self-administration of nondependent animals. Further analysis indentified that intra-accumbens shell nalmefene was more potent in ethanol-dependent animals and that the increased potency was attributable to a κ-opioid receptor mechanism. These data support the concept that dysregulation of DYN/κ-opioid receptor systems contributes to the excessive self-administration observed in dependent animals and suggest that pharmacotherapeutics for ethanol dependence that target κ-opioid receptors, in addition to μ- and δ-opioid receptors, are preferable

  10. [Sensitivity and specificity of blood amylase, amylase and creatinine clearance ratio and urinary amylase/urinary creatinine ratio in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ligny, G; Meunier, J C; Hayard, P; Ligny, C; Van Cauter, J

    1987-12-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of amylasemia, the ratios of amylase/creatinine clearance and amylasuria/creatininuria were determined in four groups of patients: a control group (n = 43), patients with acute pancreatitis detected on computed tomography (n = 30, 25 cases of alcoholic pancreatitis), patients with an acute surgical abdomen without pancreatitis (n = 25), and patients with renal failure (n = 20). Sensitivity was defined for the acute pancreatitis group and specificity for the other groups. When amylasemia was greater than 20 UI/dl and the amylasuria/creatininuria ratio greater than 100, sensitivity was 98 per cent. The specificity of these two results in patients with an acute surgical abdomen was 98 per cent. When the ratio amylase/creatinine clearance ratio was greater than 4 sensitivity was 73 per cent and specificity in patients with acute surgical abdomen was 75 per cent. These two values were lower than those of the two preceding tests (p less than 0.01). Sensitivity of the association of an amylasemia greater than 13 UI/dl (m + 2SD) with a clearance ratio greater than 4 was 73 per cent. The amylase/creatinine clearance ratio did not seem to be reliable since its change was delayed with respect to the increase of amylasemia and amylasuria. This ratio has a poor specificity as it increased when the clearance of creatinine decreased in the group with an acute surgical abdomen associated with functional or organic renal failure. In these two groups, the correlation between the amylase/creatinine clearance ratio and creatininemia was significant. This suggested that the clearance of creatinine fell more rapidly than the clearance of amylase as renal failure increased.

  11. Sensitivity and symptomology of marigold cultivars exposed to acute sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, T.K.; Woltz, S.S.

    1982-08-01

    Thirty-nine cultivars of marigold (Tagetes spp.) were exposed to sulfur dioxide to determine their relative sensitivity. Flowering plants were fumigated at 1 ppM SO/sub 2/ for 4 hours or at 2 ppM SO/sub 2/ for 2 hours. The average foliar injury for all leaves on individual plants ranged from 42.3% for 'Crackerjack Mix' at 2 ppM SO/sub 2/ to 0.0% for 'Cupid Yellow' at 1 ppM SO/sub 2/. Foliar necrosis appeared as a gray to white marginal and/or interveinal scorch 1 day after exposure. There was a tendency for interveinal necrosis to be near the midvein. The extra-floral nectaries which line the leaf margins of marigold were scorched in 15 of the 39 cultivars. This injury may be of diagnostic value. Sepals were very sensitive to SO/sub 2/. Sepal injury appeared as a pinpoint scorch and as tip burn, and was apparent in some cultivars when no foliar injury occurred. 12 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  12. PKCζ and PKMζ are overexpressed in TCF3-rearranged paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and are associated with increased thiopurine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hartsink-Segers, S A; Beaudoin, J J; Luijendijk, M W J; Exalto, C; Pieters, R; Den Boer, M L

    2015-02-01

    Both tumour suppressor and oncogenic functions have been ascribed to the atypical zeta isoform of protein kinase C (PKCζ), whereas its constitutively active form PKMζ is almost exclusively expressed in the brain where it has a role in long-term memory. Using primers unique for either isoform, we found that both PKCζ and PKMζ were expressed in a subset of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cases carrying a TCF3 (E2A) chromosomal rearrangement. Combined PKCζ and PKMζ (PKC/Mζ) protein as well as phosphorylation levels were elevated in ALL cases, especially TCF3-rearranged precursor B-ALL cases, compared with normal bone marrow (P<0.01). Furthermore, high PKC/Mζ expression in primary ALL cells was associated with increased sensitivity to 6-thioguanine and 6-mercaptopurine (P<0.01), thiopurines used in ALL treatment. PKCζ is believed to stabilize mismatch-repair protein MSH2, facilitating thiopurine responsiveness in T-ALL. However, PKC/Mζ knockdown in a TCF3-rearranged cell line model decreased MSH2 expression but did not induce thiopurine resistance, indicative that the link between high PKC/Mζ levels and thiopurine sensitivity in paediatric precursor B-ALL is not directly causal. Collectively, our data indicate that thiopurine treatment may be effective, especially in paediatric TCF3-rearranged ALL and other patients with a high expression of PKC/Mζ.

  13. Suppression of NRF2-ARE activity sensitizes chemotherapeutic agent-induced cytotoxicity in human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Wang, Huihui; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Dong, Jian; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Peng, Shuangqing; Li, Jin; Carmichael, Paul L; Nelson, Bud; Clewell, Rebecca; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription, plays a pivotal role in chemical detoxification in normal and tumor cells. Consistent with previous findings that NRF2-ARE contributes to chemotherapeutic resistance of cancer cells, we found that stable knockdown of NRF2 by lentiviral shRNA in human acute monocytic leukemia (AML) THP-1 cells enhanced the cytotoxicity of several chemotherapeutic agents, including arsenic trioxide (As2O3), etoposide and doxorubicin. Using an ARE-luciferase reporter expressed in several human and mouse cells, we identified a set of compounds, including isonicotinic acid amides, isoniazid and ethionamide, that inhibited NRF2-ARE activity. Treatment of THP-1 cells with ethionamide, for instance, significantly reduced mRNA expression of multiple ARE-driven genes under either basal or As2O3-challenged conditions. As determined by cell viability and cell cycle, suppression of NRF2-ARE by ethionamide also significantly enhanced susceptibility of THP-1 and U937 cells to As2O3-induced cytotoxicity. In THP-1 cells, the sensitizing effect of ethionamide on As2O3-induced cytotoxicity was highly dependent on NRF2. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that ethionamide suppresses NRF2-ARE signaling and disrupts the transcriptional network of the antioxidant response in AML cells, leading to sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. A simultaneous multiple species acute toxicity test comparing relative sensitivities of six aquatic organisms to HgCl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.E.; Heagler, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    In the last few years there has been concern in the scientific community about observed declines in some amphibian species. These population declines could be reflecting a global phenomenon due to a general class sensitivity or may be part of a natural cycle. The suggestion of an overall greater sensitivity of amphibians is not supported. Studies show that amphibians, as a class, are neither more or less susceptible than fish to environmental conditions. Mercury has been found to be one of the most toxic of the heavy metals introduced into amphibian breeding waters. Six aquatic species were simultaneously exposed in a comparative acute toxicity test with mercury chloride: three amphibians, Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog), R. clamitans (green frog), and R. sphenocephala (southern leopard frog, formally classified as R. utricularia); two fish, Gambusia affinis (mosquitofish) and Notemigonus crysoleucas (golden shiner); one aquatic aligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus (aquatic earthworm). The five test concentrations used were 1.4, 3.9, 12.0, 110.0, and 487.0 {micro}g Hg/L respectively. Ten organisms per species were randomly placed into the six test tanks (control and five concentrations), each species in a separate chamber. The resultant LC50-96hr values produced the following rank order: R. sphenocephala, 6.59 {micro}g Hg/L; R. clamitans, 14.7 {micro}g Hg/L; N. crysoleucas, 16.75 {micro}g Hg/L; L. variegatus, 43.72,ug Hg/L; G. affinis, 52.62 {micro}g Hg/L; R. catesbeiana, 63.36 {micro}g Hg/L. No general organism class sensitivity trend, for amphibians, was developed from this data, contrary to the implicit suggestions of some researchers.

  15. Acute pharmacological blockade of corticosterone secretion reverses food restriction-induced sensitization of the locomotor response to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, M; Le Moal, M; Piazza, P V

    1996-06-17

    Several data indicate that a blockade of stress-induced corticosterone secretion prevents the development of the stress-induced sensitization of the behavioral effects of drugs of abuse. In this report we investigated if an acute blockade of corticosterone secretion could reverse stress-induced sensitization once it is already established. Food restriction (90% of initial body weight) was used as stressor. Corticosterone secretion was blocked by the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (100 mg/kg). After 8 days of food restriction, animals received an injection of metyrapone and 3 h later they were tested either for the locomotor response to cocaine or for the corticosterone secretion in response to stress (restraint, 30 min). Neither metyrapone nor food restriction had any effect on the locomotor response to a saline injection. In contrast, food-restricted animals, compared to ad libitum-fed controls, showed a higher locomotor response to cocaine and higher corticosterone levels. Treatment with metyrapone totally abolished these effects. Food-restricted animals, receiving a single injection of metyrapone, did not differ from ad libitum-fed controls for both locomotor response to cocaine and corticosterone secretion. Metyrapone treatment also similarly reduced the response to cocaine and corticosterone secretion in ad libitum-fed controls. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that the enhancement in drug effects produced by stress depends on an increase in corticosterone levels. Since stress-induced sensitization is considered one of the conditions predisposing to drug abuse, the present results might have implications for the treatment of addiction. PMID:8828576

  16. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus

  17. Protective effects of alginate-chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in "Danxi's experiential therapy" for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus, these

  18. Ethanol-mediated operant learning in the infant rat leads to increased ethanol intake during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Luciano Federico; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the infant rat has high affinity for ethanol ingestion and marked sensitivity to the drug’s reinforcing effects (Spear & Molina, 2005). A novel operant technique was developed to analyze reinforcing effects of ethanol delivery during the third postnatal week. The impact of this ethanol-reinforcement experience upon subsequent ethanol consumption during adolescence (postnatal weeks 5–6 was also examined. In Experiment 1, pups (postnatal days 14–17 were given an explicit contingency between nose-poking behavior and intraoral delivery of either water or 3.75% v/v ethanol (paired groups). Yoked controls (pups receiving either reinforcer independently of their behavior) were also included. Paired subjects reinforced with ethanol exhibited rapid and robust operant conditioning leading to blood ethanol concentrations in the 25–48 mg% range. In Experiment 2, a higher ethanol concentration (7.5% v/v) provided significant reinforcement. During adolescence, animals originally reinforced with 3.75% v/v ethanol exhibited greater ingestion of ethanol than control animals without prior ethanol reinforcement. These results indicate that, without extensive initiation to ethanol, infant rats rapidly learn to gain access to ethanol and that this experience has a significant impact upon later ethanol intake patterns. PMID:18571224

  19. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Manganese (II) Complex against HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcerations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Dhiyaaldeen, Summaya M.; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M.Jamil; El-Ferjani, Rashd M.; Adam, Hoyam; Alkotaini, Bassam; Batran, Rami Al; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a crucial element for health. In this study, the gastroprotective efficacy of Mn (II) complex (MDLA) against acidified ethanol (HCl/Ethanol)-induced gastric ulceration in rats was evaluated. The animals were distributed into 5 groups. Groups 1 and 2 received carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), group 3 was pretreated with omeprazole, and groups 4 and 5 were given 10 and 20 mg/kg of MDLA, respectively. After one hour, CMC and HCl/Ethanol were given to groups 2–5 whilst the animals in group 1 were ingested with CMC. After sacrifice, gastric lesions were evaluated by wall mucus, gross appearance, histology, antioxidant enzymes and immunohistochemistry. Group 2 displayed severe gastric damage with a significant reduction in wall mucus. Conversely, gastric lesions were reduced in groups 3–5 by 85.72%, 56.51% and 65.93%, respectively. The rats in groups 3–5 showed up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) with down-regulation of Bcl-2-associated protein x (Bax). Pretreatment with omeprazole or MDLA led to an increase in the uptake of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) stain in the glandular part of the gastric tissue, raised levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and a reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. These results suggested the gastroprotective action of Mn (II) complex. PMID:27229938

  20. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Manganese (II) Complex against HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcerations in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Dhiyaaldeen, Summaya M; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M Jamil; El-Ferjani, Rashd M; Adam, Hoyam; Alkotaini, Bassam; Batran, Rami Al; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a crucial element for health. In this study, the gastroprotective efficacy of Mn (II) complex (MDLA) against acidified ethanol (HCl/Ethanol)-induced gastric ulceration in rats was evaluated. The animals were distributed into 5 groups. Groups 1 and 2 received carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), group 3 was pretreated with omeprazole, and groups 4 and 5 were given 10 and 20 mg/kg of MDLA, respectively. After one hour, CMC and HCl/Ethanol were given to groups 2-5 whilst the animals in group 1 were ingested with CMC. After sacrifice, gastric lesions were evaluated by wall mucus, gross appearance, histology, antioxidant enzymes and immunohistochemistry. Group 2 displayed severe gastric damage with a significant reduction in wall mucus. Conversely, gastric lesions were reduced in groups 3-5 by 85.72%, 56.51% and 65.93%, respectively. The rats in groups 3-5 showed up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) with down-regulation of Bcl-2-associated protein x (Bax). Pretreatment with omeprazole or MDLA led to an increase in the uptake of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) stain in the glandular part of the gastric tissue, raised levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and a reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. These results suggested the gastroprotective action of Mn (II) complex.

  1. Allopurinol ameliorates thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure by regulating cellular redox-sensitive transcription factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Ulvi; Yalniz, Mehmet; Aygün, Cem; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Bahçecioğlu, Ibrahim Halil

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress plays important role in the development of acute liver failure. In this study, we investigated effects of allopurinol (AP) upon thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury and the potential mechanisms leading to amelioration in inflammation with AP treatment. Acute liver failure was induced by intraperitoneal administration of TAA (300 mg/kg/day for 2 days). Thirty-five rats were divided into five groups as control (group 1), TAA (group 2), TAA + 25AP (group 3), TAA + 50 AP (group 4), and TAA + 100AP (group 5). The number of animals in each group was seven. At the end of the study, histopathological, biochemical, and western blot analysis were done. TAA treatment significantly increased serum levels of aminotransferases, liver malondialdehyde (MDA), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-қB ), activator protein-1 (AP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, and the necro-inflammation scores. Nevertheless, nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expressions in the liver were decreased by TAA. AP treatment significantly lowered the serum levels of aminotransferases (P < 0.01) and liver MDA, NF-κB, AP-1, TNF-α, COX-2, and IL-6 expressions (P < 0.05). Moreover, AP restored the liver Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions and improved the necro-inflammation scores significantly. AP improves oxidative stress-induced liver damage by regulating cellular redox-sensitive transcriptor factors and expression of pro-inflammatory and antioxidant defense mechanisms. AP probably exerts these beneficiary features by its free radical scavenging ability in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. Increased ANG II sensitivity following recovery from acute kidney injury: role of oxidant stress in skeletal muscle resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Shane A.; Pechman, Kimberly R.; Leonard, Ellen C.; Friedrich, Jessica L.; Bian, Jing-Tan; Beal, Alisa G.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) results in prolonged impairment of peripheral (i.e., nonrenal) vascular function since skeletal muscle resistance arteries derived from rats 5 wk post-I/R injury, show enhanced responses to ANG II stimulation but not other constrictors. Because vascular superoxide increases ANG II sensitivity, we hypothesized that peripheral responsiveness following recovery from AKI was attributable to vascular oxidant stress. Gracilis arteries (GA) isolated from post-I/R rats (∼5 wk recovery) showed significantly greater superoxide levels relative to sham-operated controls, as detected by dihydroeithidium, which was further augmented by acute ANG II stimulation in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide measured by dichlorofluorescein was not affected by ANG II. GA derived from postischemic animals manifested significantly greater constrictor responses in vitro to ANG II than GA from sham-operated controls. The addition of the superoxide scavenging reagent Tempol (10−5 M) normalized the response to values similar to sham-operated controls. Apocynin (10−6 M) and endothelial denudation nearly abrogated all ANG II-stimulated constrictor activity in GA from post-AKI rats, suggesting an important role for an endothelial-derived source of peripheral oxidative stress. Apocynin treatment in vivo abrogated GA oxidant stress and attenuated ANG II-induced pressor responses post-AKI. Interestingly, gene expression studies in GA vessels indicated a paradoxical reduction in NADPH oxidase subunit and AT1-receptor genes and no effect on several antioxidant genes. Taken together, this study demonstrates that AKI alters peripheral vascular responses by increasing oxidant stress, likely in the endothelium, via an undefined mechanism. PMID:20335375

  3. Repeated Binge-Like Ethanol Drinking Alters Ethanol Drinking Patterns and Depresses Striatal GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Mark V; Carlson, Verginia C Cuzon; Sherazee, Nyssa; Sprow, Gretchen M; Bock, Roland; Thiele, Todd E; Lovinger, David M; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2014-01-01

    Repeated cycles of binge alcohol drinking and abstinence are key components in the development of dependence. However, the precise behavioral mechanisms underlying binge-like drinking and its consequences on striatal synaptic physiology remain unclear. In the present study, ethanol and water drinking patterns were recorded with high temporal resolution over 6 weeks of binge-like ethanol drinking using the ‘drinking in the dark' (DID) protocol. The bottle exchange occurring at the beginning of each session prompted a transient increase in the drinking rate that might facilitate the acquisition of ethanol binge-like drinking. Ethanol drinking mice also displayed a ‘front-loading' behavior, in which the highest rate of drinking was recorded during the first 15 min. This rate increased over weeks and paralleled the mild escalation of blood ethanol concentrations. GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission in the dorsal striatum were examined following DID. Spontaneous glutamatergic transmission and the density of dendritic spines were unchanged after ethanol drinking. However, the frequency of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents was depressed in medium spiny neurons of ethanol drinking mice. A history of ethanol drinking also increased ethanol preference and altered the acute ethanol effects on GABAergic transmission differentially in dorsolateral and dorsomedial striatum. Together, the study shows that the bottle exchange during DID promotes fast, voluntary ethanol drinking and that this intermittent pattern of ethanol drinking causes a depression of GABAergic transmission in the dorsal striatum. PMID:23995582

  4. Developing high-sensitivity ethanol liquid sensors based on ZnO/porous Si nanostructure surfaces using an electrochemical impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husairi, Mohd; Rouhi, Jalal; Alvin, Kevin; Atikah, Zainurul; Rusop, Muhammad; Abdullah, Saifollah

    2014-07-01

    ZnO nanostructures were synthesized on porous Si (PSi) substrates using the thermal catalytic-free immersion method. Crack-like ZnO nanostructures were formed on the bare, sponge-like PSi structures. An approach to fabricate chemical sensors based on the ZnO/PSi nanostructure arrays that uses an electrochemical impedance technique is reported. Sensor performance was evaluated for ethanol solutions by the morphology and defect structures of the ZnO nanostructure layer. Results indicate that the ZnO/PSi nanostructure chemical sensor exhibits rapid and high response to ethanol compared with a PSi nanostructure sensor because of its small particle size and an oxide layer acting as a capacitive layer on the PSi nanostructure surface.

  5. Prospective validation of a 1-hour algorithm to rule-out and rule-in acute myocardial infarction using a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay

    PubMed Central

    Reichlin, Tobias; Twerenbold, Raphael; Wildi, Karin; Gimenez, Maria Rubini; Bergsma, Nathalie; Haaf, Philip; Druey, Sophie; Puelacher, Christian; Moehring, Berit; Freese, Michael; Stelzig, Claudia; Krivoshei, Lian; Hillinger, Petra; Jäger, Cedric; Herrmann, Thomas; Kreutzinger, Philip; Radosavac, Milos; Weidmann, Zoraida Moreno; Pershyna, Kateryna; Honegger, Ursina; Wagener, Max; Vuillomenet, Thierry; Campodarve, Isabel; Bingisser, Roland; Miró, Òscar; Rentsch, Katharina; Bassetti, Stefano; Osswald, Stefan; Mueller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to prospectively validate a novel 1-hour algorithm using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement for early rule-out and rule-in of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: In a multicentre study, we enrolled 1320 patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected acute MI. The high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, incorporating baseline values as well as absolute changes within the first hour, was validated against the final diagnosis. The final diagnosis was then adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists using all available information, including coronary angiography, echocardiography, follow-up data and serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels. Results: Acute MI was the final diagnosis in 17.3% of patients. With application of the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, 786 (59.5%) patients were classified as “rule-out,” 216 (16.4%) were classified as “rule-in” and 318 (24.1%) were classified to the “observational zone.” The sensitivity and the negative predictive value for acute MI in the rule-out zone were 99.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 97.6%–99.9%) and 99.9% (95% CI 99.3%–100%), respectively. The specificity and the positive predictive value for acute MI in the rule-in zone were 95.7% (95% CI 94.3%–96.8%) and 78.2% (95% CI 72.1%–83.6%), respectively. The 1-hour algorithm provided higher negative and positive predictive values than the standard interpretation of highsensitivity cardiac troponin T using a single cut-off level (both p < 0.05). Cumulative 30-day mortality was 0.0%, 1.6% and 1.9% in patients classified in the rule-out, observational and rule-in groups, respectively (p = 0.001). Interpretation: This rapid strategy incorporating high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T baseline values and absolute changes within the first hour substantially accelerated the management of suspected acute MI by allowing safe rule-out as well as accurate

  6. Development of acute toxicity quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and their use in linear alkylbenzene sulfonate species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Scott E; Brill, Jessica L; Rawlings, Jane M; Price, Brad B

    2016-07-01

    Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) is high tonnage and widely dispersed anionic surfactant used by the consumer products sector. A range of homologous structures are used in laundry applications that differ primarily on the length of the hydrophobic alkyl chain. This research summarizes the development of a set of acute toxicity QSARs (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships) for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and daphnids (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) using accepted test guideline approaches. A series of studies on pure chain length LAS from C10 to C14 were used to develop the QSARs and the robustness of the QSARs was tested by evaluation of two technical mixtures of differing compositions. All QSARs were high quality (R(2) were 0.965-0.997, p < 0.0001). Toxicity normalization employing QSARs is used to interpret a broader array of tests on LAS chain length materials to a diverse group of test organisms with the objective of developing Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs) for various chain lengths of interest. Mixtures include environmental distributions measured from exposure monitoring surveys of wastewater effluents, various commercial mixtures, or specific chain lengths. SSD 5th percentile hazardous concentrations (HC5s) ranged from 0.129 to 0.254 mg/L for wastewater effluents containing an average of 11.26-12 alkyl carbons. The SSDs are considered highly robust given the breadth of species (n = 19), use of most sensitive endpoints from true chronic studies and the quality of the underlying statistical properties of the SSD itself. The data continue to indicate a low hazard to the environment relative to expected environmental concentrations.

  7. Development of acute toxicity quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and their use in linear alkylbenzene sulfonate species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Scott E; Brill, Jessica L; Rawlings, Jane M; Price, Brad B

    2016-07-01

    Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) is high tonnage and widely dispersed anionic surfactant used by the consumer products sector. A range of homologous structures are used in laundry applications that differ primarily on the length of the hydrophobic alkyl chain. This research summarizes the development of a set of acute toxicity QSARs (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships) for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and daphnids (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) using accepted test guideline approaches. A series of studies on pure chain length LAS from C10 to C14 were used to develop the QSARs and the robustness of the QSARs was tested by evaluation of two technical mixtures of differing compositions. All QSARs were high quality (R(2) were 0.965-0.997, p < 0.0001). Toxicity normalization employing QSARs is used to interpret a broader array of tests on LAS chain length materials to a diverse group of test organisms with the objective of developing Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs) for various chain lengths of interest. Mixtures include environmental distributions measured from exposure monitoring surveys of wastewater effluents, various commercial mixtures, or specific chain lengths. SSD 5th percentile hazardous concentrations (HC5s) ranged from 0.129 to 0.254 mg/L for wastewater effluents containing an average of 11.26-12 alkyl carbons. The SSDs are considered highly robust given the breadth of species (n = 19), use of most sensitive endpoints from true chronic studies and the quality of the underlying statistical properties of the SSD itself. The data continue to indicate a low hazard to the environment relative to expected environmental concentrations. PMID:27105149

  8. Anti-Ulcerogenic Effect of Methanolic Extracts from Enicosanthellum pulchrum (King) Heusden against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Lesion in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Noraziah; Salama, Suzy Munir; Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Omar, Hanita; Fadaienasab, Mehran; Karimian, Hamed; Taha, Hairin; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    A natural source of medicine, Enicosanthellum pulchrum is a tropical plant which belongs to the family Annonaceae. In this study, methanol extract from the leaves and stems of this species was evaluated for its gastroprotective potential against mucosal lesions induced by ethanol in rats. Seven groups of rats were assigned, groups 1 and 2 were given Tween 20 (10% v/v) orally. Group 3 was administered omeprazole 20 mg/kg (10% Tween 20) whilst the remaining groups received the leaf and stem extracts at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg, respectively. After an additional hour, the rats in groups 2–7 received ethanol (95% v/v; 8 mL/kg) orally while group 1 received Tween 20 (10% v/v) instead. Rats were sacrificed after 1 h and their stomachs subjected to further studies. Macroscopically and histologically, group 2 rats showed extremely severe disruption of the gastric mucosa compared to rats pre-treated with the E. pulchrum extracts based on the ulcer index, where remarkable protection was noticed. Meanwhile, a significant percentage of inhibition was shown with the stem extract at 62% (150 mg/kg) and 65% (300 mg/kg), whilst the percentage with the leaf extract at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg was 63% and 75%, respectively. An increase in mucus content, nitric oxide, glutathione, prostaglandin E2, superoxide dismutase, protein and catalase, and a decrease in malondialdehyde level compared to group 2 were also obtained. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining of groups 4–7 exhibited down-regulation of Bax and up-regulation of Hsp70 proteins. The methanol extract from the leaves and the stems showed notable gastroprotective potential against ethanol. PMID:25379712

  9. Anti-ulcerogenic effect of methanolic extracts from Enicosanthellum pulchrum (King) Heusden against ethanol-induced acute gastric lesion in animal models.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Noraziah; Salama, Suzy Munir; Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Omar, Hanita; Fadaienasab, Mehran; Karimian, Hamed; Taha, Hairin; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    A natural source of medicine, Enicosanthellum pulchrum is a tropical plant which belongs to the family Annonaceae. In this study, methanol extract from the leaves and stems of this species was evaluated for its gastroprotective potential against mucosal lesions induced by ethanol in rats. Seven groups of rats were assigned, groups 1 and 2 were given Tween 20 (10% v/v) orally. Group 3 was administered omeprazole 20 mg/kg (10% Tween 20) whilst the remaining groups received the leaf and stem extracts at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg, respectively. After an additional hour, the rats in groups 2-7 received ethanol (95% v/v; 8 mL/kg) orally while group 1 received Tween 20 (10% v/v) instead. Rats were sacrificed after 1 h and their stomachs subjected to further studies. Macroscopically and histologically, group 2 rats showed extremely severe disruption of the gastric mucosa compared to rats pre-treated with the E. pulchrum extracts based on the ulcer index, where remarkable protection was noticed. Meanwhile, a significant percentage of inhibition was shown with the stem extract at 62% (150 mg/kg) and 65% (300 mg/kg), whilst the percentage with the leaf extract at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg was 63% and 75%, respectively. An increase in mucus content, nitric oxide, glutathione, prostaglandin E2, superoxide dismutase, protein and catalase, and a decrease in malondialdehyde level compared to group 2 were also obtained. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining of groups 4-7 exhibited down-regulation of Bax and up-regulation of Hsp70 proteins. The methanol extract from the leaves and the stems showed notable gastroprotective potential against ethanol.

  10. Intrinsic and chemo-sensitizing activity of SMAC-mimetics on high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, M; Trentin, L; Queudeville, M; Seyfried, F; Demir, S; Tausch, E; Stilgenbauer, S; Eckhoff, S M; Meyer, L H; Debatin, K-M

    2016-01-01

    SMAC-mimetics represent a targeted therapy approach to overcome apoptosis resistance in many tumors. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the SMAC-mimetic BV6 in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In ALL cell lines, intrinsic apoptosis sensitivity was associated with rapid cIAP degradation, NF-κB activation, TNF-α secretion and induction of an autocrine TNF-α-dependent cell death loop. This pattern of responsiveness was also observed upon ex vivo analysis of 40 primograft BCP-ALL samples. Treatment with BV6 induced cell death in the majority of ALL primografts including leukemias with high-risk and poor-prognosis features. Inhibition of cell death by the TNF receptor fusion protein etanercept demonstrated that BV6 activity is dependent on TNF-α. In a preclinical NOD/SCID/huALL model of high-risk ALL, marked anti-leukemia effectivity and significantly prolonged survival were observed upon BV6 treatment. Interestingly, also in vivo, intrinsic SMAC-mimetic activity was mediated by TNF-α. Importantly, BV6 increased the effectivity of conventional induction therapy including vincristine, dexamethasone and asparaginase leading to prolonged remission induction. These data suggest SMAC-mimetics as an important addendum to efficient therapy of pediatric BCP-ALL. PMID:26775704

  11. Anger regulation style, anger arousal and acute pain sensitivity: evidence for an endogenous opioid “triggering” model

    PubMed Central

    Burns, John W.; Bruehl, Stephen; Chont, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Findings suggest that greater tendency to express anger is associated with greater sensitivity to acute pain via endogenous opioid system dysfunction, but past studies have not addressed the role of anger arousal. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with Drug Condition (placebo or opioid blockade with naltrexone) crossed with Task Order (anger-induction/pain-induction or pain-induction/anger-induction), and with continuous Anger-out Subscale scores. Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interactions were tested for pain intensity during a 4-min ischemic pain task performed by 146 healthy people. A significant Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interaction was dissected to reveal different patterns of pain intensity changes during the pain task for high anger-out participants who underwent pain-induction prior to anger-induction compared to those high in anger-out in the opposite order. Namely, when angered prior to pain, high anger-out participants appeared to exhibit low pain intensity under placebo that was not shown by high anger-out participants who received naltrexone. Results hint that people with a pronounced tendency to express anger may suffer from inadequate opioid function under simple pain-induction, but may experience analgesic benefit to some extent from the opioid triggering properties of strong anger arousal. PMID:23624641

  12. Repeated thermal stressor causes chronic elevation of baseline corticosterone and suppresses the physiological endocrine sensitivity to acute stressor in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2014-04-01

    Extreme environmental temperature could impact the physiology and ecology of animals. The stress endocrine axis provides necessary physiological stress response to acute (day-day) stressors. Presently, there are no empirical evidences showing that exposure to extreme thermal stressor could cause chronic stress in amphibians. This could also modulate the physiological endocrine sensitivity to acute stressors and have serious implications for stress coping in amphibians, particularly those living in fragmented and disease prone environments. We addressed this important question using the cane toad (Rhinella marina) model from its introduced range in Queensland, Australia. We quantified their physiological endocrine sensitivity to a standard acute (capture and handling) stressor after exposing the cane toads to thermal shock at 35°C for 30min daily for 34 days. Corticosterone (CORT) responses to the capture and handling protocol were measured on three sampling intervals (days 14, 24, and 34) to determine whether the physiological endocrine sensitivity was maintained or modulated over-time. Two control groups (C1 for baseline CORT measurement only and C2 acute handled only) and two temperature treatment groups (T1 received daily thermal shock up to day 14 only and a recovery phase of 20 days and T2 received thermal shock daily for 34 days). Results showed that baseline CORT levels remained high on day 14 (combined effect of capture, captivity and thermal stress) for both T1 and T2. Furthermore, baseline CORT levels decreased for T1 once the thermal shock was removed after day 14 and returned to baseline by day 29. On the contrary, baseline CORT levels kept on increasing for T2 over the 34 days of daily thermal shocks. Furthermore, the magnitudes of the acute CORT responses or physiological endocrine sensitivity were consistently high for both C1 and T1. However, acute CORT responses for T2 toads were dramatically reduced between days 24 and 34. These novel findings

  13. Repeated thermal stressor causes chronic elevation of baseline corticosterone and suppresses the physiological endocrine sensitivity to acute stressor in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2014-04-01

    Extreme environmental temperature could impact the physiology and ecology of animals. The stress endocrine axis provides necessary physiological stress response to acute (day-day) stressors. Presently, there are no empirical evidences showing that exposure to extreme thermal stressor could cause chronic stress in amphibians. This could also modulate the physiological endocrine sensitivity to acute stressors and have serious implications for stress coping in amphibians, particularly those living in fragmented and disease prone environments. We addressed this important question using the cane toad (Rhinella marina) model from its introduced range in Queensland, Australia. We quantified their physiological endocrine sensitivity to a standard acute (capture and handling) stressor after exposing the cane toads to thermal shock at 35°C for 30min daily for 34 days. Corticosterone (CORT) responses to the capture and handling protocol were measured on three sampling intervals (days 14, 24, and 34) to determine whether the physiological endocrine sensitivity was maintained or modulated over-time. Two control groups (C1 for baseline CORT measurement only and C2 acute handled only) and two temperature treatment groups (T1 received daily thermal shock up to day 14 only and a recovery phase of 20 days and T2 received thermal shock daily for 34 days). Results showed that baseline CORT levels remained high on day 14 (combined effect of capture, captivity and thermal stress) for both T1 and T2. Furthermore, baseline CORT levels decreased for T1 once the thermal shock was removed after day 14 and returned to baseline by day 29. On the contrary, baseline CORT levels kept on increasing for T2 over the 34 days of daily thermal shocks. Furthermore, the magnitudes of the acute CORT responses or physiological endocrine sensitivity were consistently high for both C1 and T1. However, acute CORT responses for T2 toads were dramatically reduced between days 24 and 34. These novel findings

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Parameters on Acute Cardiac Autonomic Responses: Chronotropic, Inotropic and Dromotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, David; Le Rolle, Virginie; Romero-Ugalde, Hector M.; Gallet, Clément; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Henry, Christine; Bel, Alain; Mabo, Philippe; Carrault, Guy; Hernández, Alfredo I.

    2016-01-01

    Although the therapeutic effects of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) have been recognized in pre-clinical and pilot clinical studies, the effect of different stimulation configurations on the cardiovascular response is still an open question, especially in the case of VNS delivered synchronously with cardiac activity. In this paper, we propose a formal mathematical methodology to analyze the acute cardiac response to different VNS configurations, jointly considering the chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic cardiac effects. A latin hypercube sampling method was chosen to design a uniform experimental plan, composed of 75 different VNS configurations, with different values for the main parameters (current amplitude, number of delivered pulses, pulse width, interpulse period and the delay between the detected cardiac event and VNS onset). These VNS configurations were applied to 6 healthy, anesthetized sheep, while acquiring the associated cardiovascular response. Unobserved VNS configurations were estimated using a Gaussian process regression (GPR) model. In order to quantitatively analyze the effect of each parameter and their combinations on the cardiac response, the Sobol sensitivity method was applied to the obtained GPR model and inter-individual sensitivity markers were estimated using a bootstrap approach. Results highlight the dominant effect of pulse current, pulse width and number of pulses, which explain respectively 49.4%, 19.7% and 6.0% of the mean global cardiovascular variability provoked by VNS. More interestingly, results also quantify the effect of the interactions between VNS parameters. In particular, the interactions between current and pulse width provoke higher cardiac effects than the changes on the number of pulses alone (between 6 and 25% of the variability). Although the sensitivity of individual VNS parameters seems similar for chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic responses, the interacting effects of VNS parameters provoke

  15. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin I at presentation in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anoop S V; Anand, Atul; Sandoval, Yader; Lee, Kuan Ken; Smith, Stephen W; Adamson, Philip D; Chapman, Andrew R; Langdon, Timothy; Sandeman, Dennis; Vaswani, Amar; Strachan, Fiona E; Ferry, Amy; Stirzaker, Alexandra G; Reid, Alan; Gray, Alasdair J; Collinson, Paul O; McAllister, David A; Apple, Fred S; Newby, David E; Mills, Nicholas L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Suspected acute coronary syndrome is the commonest reason for emergency admission to hospital and is a large burden on health-care resources. Strategies to identify low-risk patients suitable for immediate discharge would have major benefits. Methods We did a prospective cohort study of 6304 consecutively enrolled patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome presenting to four secondary and tertiary care hospitals in Scotland. We measured plasma troponin concentrations at presentation using a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay. In derivation and validation cohorts, we evaluated the negative predictive value of a range of troponin concentrations for the primary outcome of index myocardial infarction, or subsequent myocardial infarction or cardiac death at 30 days. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT01852123). Findings 782 (16%) of 4870 patients in the derivation cohort had index myocardial infarction, with a further 32 (1%) re-presenting with myocardial infarction and 75 (2%) cardiac deaths at 30 days. In patients without myocardial infarction at presentation, troponin concentrations were less than 5 ng/L in 2311 (61%) of 3799 patients, with a negative predictive value of 99·6% (95% CI 99·3–99·8) for the primary outcome. The negative predictive value was consistent across groups stratified by age, sex, risk factors, and previous cardiovascular disease. In two independent validation cohorts, troponin concentrations were less than 5 ng/L in 594 (56%) of 1061 patients, with an overall negative predictive value of 99·4% (98·8–99·9). At 1 year, these patients had a lower risk of myocardial infarction and cardiac death than did those with a troponin concentration of 5 ng/L or more (0·6% vs 3·3%; adjusted hazard ratio 0·41, 95% CI 0·21–0·80; p<0·0001). Interpretation Low plasma troponin concentrations identify two-thirds of patients at very low risk of cardiac events who could be discharged from

  16. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73(+/+)) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73(-/-)) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73(+/+) mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73(+/+) mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg(2+) conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73(-/-) mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  17. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73+/+) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73−/−) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73+/+ mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73+/+ mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg2+ conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73−/− mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  18. Prepubertal mouse testis growth and maturation and androgen production are acutely sensitive to di-n-butyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Moody, Sarah; Goh, Hoey; Bielanowicz, Amanda; Rippon, Paul; Loveland, Kate L; Itman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Phthalates are plasticizers with widespread industrial, domestic, and medical applications. Epidemiological data indicating increased incidence of testicular dysgenesis in boys exposed to phthalates in utero are reinforced by studies demonstrating that phthalates impair fetal rodent testis development. Because humans are exposed to phthalates continuously from gestation through adulthood, it is imperative to understand what threat phthalates pose at other life stages. To determine the impact during prepuberty, we assessed the consequences of oral administration of 1 to 500 mg di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)/kg/d in corn oil to wild-type (C57BL/6J) male mice from 4 to 14 days of age. Dose-dependent effects on testis growth correlated with reduced Sertoli cell proliferation. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses identified delayed spermatogenesis and impaired Sertoli cell maturation after exposure to 10 to 500 mg DBP/kg/d. Interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was indicated in mice fed 500 mg DBP/kg/d, which had elevated circulating inhibin but no change in serum FSH. Increased immunohistochemical staining for inhibin-α was apparent at doses of 10 to 500 mg DBP/kg/d. Serum testosterone and testicular androgen activity were lower in the 500 mg DBP/kg/d group; however, reduced anogenital distance in all DBP-treated mice suggested impaired androgen action at earlier time points. Long-term effects were evident, with smaller anogenital distance and indications of disrupted spermatogenesis in adult mice exposed prepubertally to doses from 1 mg DBP/kg/d. These data demonstrate the acute sensitivity of the prepubertal mouse testis to DBP at doses 50- to 500-fold lower than those used in rat and identify the upregulation of inhibin as a potential mechanism of DBP action.

  19. High sensitivity recording of afferent nerve activity using ultra-compliant microchannel electrodes: an acute in vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Chew, Daniel J.; Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Fawcett, James W.; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2012-04-01

    Neuroprostheses interfaced with transected peripheral nerves are technological routes to control robotic limbs as well as convey sensory feedback to patients suffering from traumatic neural injuries or degenerative diseases. To maximize the wealth of data obtained in recordings, interfacing devices are required to have intrafascicular resolution and provide high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) recordings. In this paper, we focus on a possible building block of a three-dimensional regenerative implant: a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel electrode capable of highly sensitive recordings in vivo. The PDMS 'micro-cuff' consists of a 3.5 mm long (100 µm × 70 µm cross section) microfluidic channel equipped with five evaporated Ti/Au/Ti electrodes of sub-100 nm thickness. Individual electrodes have average impedance of 640 ± 30 kΩ with a phase angle of -58 ± 1 degrees at 1 kHz and survive demanding mechanical handling such as twisting and bending. In proof-of-principle acute implantation experiments in rats, surgically teased afferent nerve strands from the L5 dorsal root were threaded through the microchannel. Tactile stimulation of the skin was reliably monitored with the three inner electrodes in the device, simultaneously recording signal amplitudes of up to 50 µV under saline immersion. The overall SNR was approximately 4. A small but consistent time lag between the signals arriving at the three electrodes was observed and yields a fibre conduction velocity of 30 m s-1. The fidelity of the recordings was verified by placing the same nerve strand in oil and recording activity with hook electrodes. Our results show that PDMS microchannel electrodes open a promising technological path to 3D regenerative interfaces.

  20. Sex-dependent consequences of pre-pubertal gonadectomy: Social behavior, stress and ethanol responsivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Esther U; Spear, Linda P

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption can be enhanced or moderated by sensitivity to its aversive and appetitive properties, including positive social outcomes. These differences emerge post-pubertally, suggesting a potential role of gonadal hormones. To determine the role of gonadal hormones in sensitivity to the social impairing and social context-related attenuations in the aversive effects of ethanol, prepubertal male and female rats were gonadectomized (GX) or sham (SH) operated on postnatal day (P) 25, or left non-manipulated (NM). In adulthood (P70), rats were restrained for 90 min prior to challenge with 0.0 or 1.0 g/kg ethanol and social interaction (SI) testing. At P77, groups of 4 same-sex littermates from the same surgical condition were given access to a supersaccharin (SS) solution (3% sucrose, 0.125% saccharin), followed by an intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (0.0, 0.50, 1.0, 1.5 g/kg). Intakes of SS were examined 24h later for expression of conditioned taste aversions. Acute stress prior to SI testing increased frequency of play fighting in both sexes, whereas there were no GX effects on this measure, social investigation nor contact. GX, however, decreased baseline social preference (a social anxiety-like effect) in males, while inducing anxiolytic-like increases in baseline social preference in females. The social drinking test revealed that females developed ethanol conditioned taste aversions at a lower dose relative to males, regardless of surgical condition. These findings suggest a potential role for gonadal hormones in moderating social-anxiety like behaviors but not sensitivity to the social impairing effects of ethanol or ethanol's aversive consequences in a social context.

  1. Detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.

    1997-04-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation has been developed and validated against a variety of experimental data sets. Laminar flame speed data obtained from a constant volume bomb, ignition delay data behind reflected shock waves, and ethanol oxidation product profiles from a turbulent flow reactor were used in this study. Very good agreement was found in modeling the data sets obtained from the three different experimental systems. The computational modeling results show that high temperature ethanol oxidation exhibits strong sensitivity to the fall-off kinetics of ethanol decomposition, branching ratio selection for c2h5oh+oh=products, and reactions involving the hydroperoxyl (HO2) radical.

  2. Sensitivity of 3D Gradient Recalled Echo Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Technique Compared to Computed Tomography Angiography for Detection of Middle Cerebral Artery Thrombus in Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Vijay, Kanupriya; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul

    2014-10-23

    We aimed at comparing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR) susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) with computed tomography angiography (CTA) in the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA) thrombus in acute stroke. Seventy-nine patients with acute MCA stroke was selected using our search engine software; only the ones showing restricted diffusion in the MCA territory on diffusion-weighted images were included. We finally selected 35 patients who had done both MRI (including SWI) and CTA. Twenty random subjects with completely normal MRI (including SWI) exam were selected as control. Two neuroradiologists (blinded to the presence or absence of stroke) reviewed the SW images and then compared the findings with CT angiogram (in patients with stroke). The number of MCA segments showing thrombus in each patient was tabulated to estimate the thrombus burden. Thrombus was detected on SWI in one or more MCA segments in 30 out of 35 patients, on the first review. Of the 30, SWI showed thrombus in more than one MCA segments in 7 patients. CTA depicted branch occlusion in 31 cases. Thrombus was seen on both SWI and CTA in 28 patients. Thrombus was noted in two patients on SWI only, with no corresponding abnormality seen on CTA. Two patients with acute MCA showed no vascular occlusion or thrombus on either CTA or SWI. Only two case of false-positive thrombus was reported in normal control subjects. Susceptibility-weighted images had sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 90% respectively, with positive predictive value 94%. Sensitivity was 86% for SWI, compared with 89% for CTA, and this difference was statistically insignificant (P>0.05). Of all the positive cases on CTA (31) corresponding thrombus was seen on SWI in 90% of subjects (28 of 31). Susceptibility-weighted imaging has high sensitivity for detection of thrombus in acute MCA stroke. Moreover, SWI is a powerful technique for estimation of thrombus burden, which can be challenging on CTA.

  3. Study of the effect of the acid-base surface properties of ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxides on their gas sensitivity to ethanol vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Karpova, S. S. Moshnikov, V. A.; Maksimov, A. I.; Mjakin, S. V.; Kazantseva, N. E.

    2013-08-15

    Binary (ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and ternary (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) gas-sensitive oxide materials are synthesized, and the correlation between their sensitivity to ethanol vapor and the functional chemical composition of the surface is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by the technique of the adsorption of acid-base indicators. It is found that the sensitivity to ethanol increases with increasing content of Broensted acid sites with the acidity index pK{sub a} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 and with increasing percentage of surface oxygen involved in OH/CO{sub 3}/C-O groups. This interrelation is attributed to the specific features of interaction between ethanol molecules and hydroxyl groups on the surface of the oxides.

  4. Oxidation of ethanol in the rat brain and effects associated with chronic ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Du, Hongying; Jiang, Lihong; Ma, Xiaoxian; de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L; Mason, Graeme F

    2013-08-27

    It has been reported that chronic and acute alcohol exposure decreases cerebral glucose metabolism and increases acetate oxidation. However, it remains unknown how much ethanol the living brain can oxidize directly and whether such a process would be affected by alcohol exposure. The questions have implications for reward, oxidative damage, and long-term adaptation to drinking. One group of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was treated with ethanol vapor and the other given room air. After 3 wk the rats received i.v. [2-(13)C]ethanol and [1, 2-(13)C2]acetate for 2 h, and then the brain was fixed, removed, and divided into neocortex and subcortical tissues for measurement of (13)C isotopic labeling of glutamate and glutamine by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Ethanol oxidation was seen to occur both in the cortex and the subcortex. In ethanol-naïve rats, cortical oxidation of ethanol occurred at rates of 0.017 ± 0.002 µmol/min/g in astroglia and 0.014 ± 0.003 µmol/min/g in neurons, and chronic alcohol exposure increased the astroglial ethanol oxidation to 0.028 ± 0.002 µmol/min/g (P = 0.001) with an insignificant effect on neuronal ethanol oxidation. Compared with published rates of overall oxidative metabolism in astroglia and neurons, ethanol provided 12.3 ± 1.4% of cortical astroglial oxidation in ethanol-naïve rats and 20.2 ± 1.5% in ethanol-treated rats. For cortical astroglia and neurons combined, the ethanol oxidation for naïve and treated rats was 3.2 ± 0.3% and 3.8 ± 0.2% of total oxidation, respectively. (13)C labeling from subcortical oxidation of ethanol was similar to that seen in cortex but was not affected by chronic ethanol exposure.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet sensitive to ethanol at higher concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Although significant efforts have been made to study ethanol-stress response in past decades, molecular mecha...

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in glucose homeostasis: the acute hyperglycemic and chronic insulin-sensitive effects of nicotine suggest dual opposing roles of the receptors in male mice.

    PubMed

    Vu, Christine U; Siddiqui, Jawed A; Wadensweiler, Paul; Gayen, Jiaur R; Avolio, Ennio; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam K; Biswas, Nilima; Chi, Nai-Wen; O'Connor, Daniel T; Mahata, Sushil K

    2014-10-01

    Cigarette smoking causes insulin resistance. However, nicotine induces anti-inflammation and improves glucose tolerance in insulin-resistant animal models. Here, we determined the effects of nicotine on glucose metabolism in insulin-sensitive C57BL/J6 mice. Acute nicotine administration (30 min) caused fasting hyperglycemia and lowered insulin sensitivity acutely, which depended on the activation of nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and correlated with increased catecholamine secretion, nitric oxide (NO) production, and glycogenolysis. Chlorisondamine, an inhibitor of nAChRs, reduced acute nicotine-induced hyperglycemia. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the liver and muscle express predominantly β4 > α10 > α3 > α7 and β4 > α10 > β1 > α1 mRNA for nAChR subunits respectively, whereas the adrenal gland expresses β4 > α3 > α7 > α10 mRNA. Chronic nicotine treatment significantly suppressed expression of α3-nAChR (predominant peripheral α-subunit) in liver. Whereas acute nicotine treatment raised plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (Epi) levels, chronic nicotine exposure raised only Epi. Acute nicotine treatment raised both basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). After chronic nicotine treatment, basal insulin level was elevated, but GSIS after acute saline or nicotine treatment was blunted. Chronic nicotine exposure caused an increased buildup of NO in plasma and liver, leading to decreased glycogen storage, along with a concomitant suppression of Pepck and G6Pase mRNA, thus preventing hyperglycemia. The insulin-sensitizing effect of chronic nicotine was independent of weight loss. Chronic nicotine treatment enhanced PI-3-kinase activities and increased Akt and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation in an nAChR-dependent manner coupled with decreased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. The latter effects caused suppression of Pepck and G6Pase gene expression. Thus, nicotine causes both

  7. Changes in the Adult GluN2B Associated Proteome following Adolescent Intermittent Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Swartzwelder, H Scott; Risher, Mary-Louise; Miller, Kelsey M; Colbran, Roger J; Winder, Danny G; Wills, Tiffany A

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is the strongest predictor for alcohol use disorders. In rodents, adolescents have distinct responses to acute ethanol, and prolonged alcohol exposure during adolescence can maintain these phenotypes into adulthood. One brain region that is particularly sensitive to the effects of both acute and chronic ethanol exposure is the hippocampus. Adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE) produces long lasting changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology, as well as in the susceptibility to acute ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment. Given the pattern of changes in hippocampal structure and function, one potential target for these effects is the ethanol sensitive GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, which is known to be involved in synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology. Thus we sought to determine if there were persistent changes in hippocampal GluN2B signaling cascades following AIE. We employed a previously validated GluN2B-targeted proteomic strategy that was used to identify novel signaling mechanisms altered by chronic ethanol exposure in the adult hippocampus. We collected adult hippocampal tissue (P70) from rats that had been given 2 weeks of AIE from P30-45. Tissue extracts were fractionated into synaptic and non-synaptic pools, immuno-precipitated for GluN2B, and then analyzed using proteomic methods. We detected a large number of proteins associated with GluN2B. AIE produced significant changes in the association of many proteins with GluN2B in both synaptic and non-synaptic fractions. Intriguingly the number of proteins changed in the non-synaptic fraction was double that found in the synaptic fraction. Some of these proteins include those involved in glutamate signaling cytoskeleton rearrangement, calcium signaling, and plasticity. Disruptions in these pathways may contribute to the persistent cellular and behavioral changes found in the adult hippocampus following AIE. Further, the robust change in

  8. Changes in the Adult GluN2B Associated Proteome following Adolescent Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Swartzwelder, H. Scott; Risher, Mary-Louise; Miller, Kelsey M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Winder, Danny G.; Wills, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is the strongest predictor for alcohol use disorders. In rodents, adolescents have distinct responses to acute ethanol, and prolonged alcohol exposure during adolescence can maintain these phenotypes into adulthood. One brain region that is particularly sensitive to the effects of both acute and chronic ethanol exposure is the hippocampus. Adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE) produces long lasting changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology, as well as in the susceptibility to acute ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment. Given the pattern of changes in hippocampal structure and function, one potential target for these effects is the ethanol sensitive GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, which is known to be involved in synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology. Thus we sought to determine if there were persistent changes in hippocampal GluN2B signaling cascades following AIE. We employed a previously validated GluN2B-targeted proteomic strategy that was used to identify novel signaling mechanisms altered by chronic ethanol exposure in the adult hippocampus. We collected adult hippocampal tissue (P70) from rats that had been given 2 weeks of AIE from P30-45. Tissue extracts were fractionated into synaptic and non-synaptic pools, immuno-precipitated for GluN2B, and then analyzed using proteomic methods. We detected a large number of proteins associated with GluN2B. AIE produced significant changes in the association of many proteins with GluN2B in both synaptic and non-synaptic fractions. Intriguingly the number of proteins changed in the non-synaptic fraction was double that found in the synaptic fraction. Some of these proteins include those involved in glutamate signaling cytoskeleton rearrangement, calcium signaling, and plasticity. Disruptions in these pathways may contribute to the persistent cellular and behavioral changes found in the adult hippocampus following AIE. Further, the robust change in

  9. Fragrance material review on 2-(4-methylphenoxy)ethanol.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Jones, L; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(4-methylphenoxy)ethanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(4-methylphenoxy)ethanol is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohols and is a primary alcohol. The AAAs are a structurally diverse class of fragrance ingredients that includes primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl alcohols covalently bonded to an aryl (Ar) group, which may be either a substituted or unsubstituted benzene ring. The common structural element for the AAA fragrance ingredients is an alcohol group -C-(R1)(R2)OH and generically the AAA fragrances can be represented as an Ar-C-(R1)(R2)OH or Ar-Alkyl-C-(R1)(R2)OH group. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-(4-methylphenoxy)ethanol were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire Aryl Alkyl Alcohols will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Aryl Alkyl Alcohols in fragrances.

  10. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, G; Fernandes-Santos, J; Moreira-Silva, D; Marin, M T

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30-35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a "three-bottle choice" paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors. PMID:26628398

  11. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, G.; Fernandes-Santos, J.; Moreira-Silva, D.; Marin, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30–35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a “three-bottle choice” paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors. PMID:26628398

  12. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, G; Fernandes-Santos, J; Moreira-Silva, D; Marin, M T

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30-35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a "three-bottle choice" paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors.

  13. Repeated episodes of chronic intermittent ethanol promote insensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing effect of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Chandler, L J

    2014-11-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that repeated episodes of alcohol dependence and withdrawal promote escalation of drinking that is presumably associated with alterations in the addiction neurocircuitry. Using a lithium chloride-ethanol pairing procedure to devalue the reinforcing properties of ethanol, the present study determined whether multiple cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor inhalation also alters the sensitivity of drinking behavior to the devaluation of ethanol's reinforcing effects. The effect of devaluation on operant ethanol self-administration and extinction was examined in mice prior to initiation of CIE (short drinking history) and after repeated cycles of CIE or air control exposure (long drinking history). Devaluation significantly attenuated the recovery of baseline ethanol self-administration when tested either prior to CIE or in the air-exposed controls that had experienced repeated bouts of drinking but no CIE. In contrast, in mice that had undergone repeated cycles of CIE exposure that promoted escalation of ethanol drinking, self-administration was completely resistant to the effect of devaluation. Devaluation had no effect on the time course of extinction training in either pre-CIE or post-CIE mice. Taken together, these results are consistent with the suggestion that repeated cycles of ethanol dependence and withdrawal produce escalation of ethanol self-administration that is associated with a change in sensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing properties of ethanol.

  14. Glutathione-S-transferase A3 knockout mice are sensitive to acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ilic, Zoran; Crawford, Dana; Egner, Patricia A.; Sell, Stewart

    2010-02-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in humans. However, mice, a major animal model for the study of AFB1 carcinogenesis, are resistant, due to high constitutive expression, in the mouse liver, of glutathione S-transferase A3 subunit (mGSTA3) that is lacking in humans. Our objective was to establish that a mouse model for AFB1 toxicity could be used to study mechanisms of toxicity that are relevant for human disease, i.e., an mGSTA3 knockout (KO) mouse that responds to toxicants such as AFB1 in a manner similar to humans. Exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 were replaced with a neomycin cassette by homologous recombination. Southern blotting, RT-PCR, Western blotting, and measurement of AFB1-N{sup 7}-DNA adduct formation were used to evaluate the mGSTA3 KO mice. The KO mice have deletion of exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 gene, as expected, as well as a lack of mGSTA3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Three hours after injection of 5 mg/kg AFB1, mGSTA3 KO mice have more than 100-fold more AFB1-N{sup 7}-DNA adducts in their livers than do similarly treated wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, the mGSTA3 KO mice die of massive hepatic necrosis, at AFB1 doses that have minimal toxic effects in WT mice. We conclude that mGSTA3 KO mice are sensitive to the acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AFB1, confirming the crucial role of GSTA3 subunit in protection of normal mice against AFB1 toxicity. We propose the mGSTA3 KO mouse as a useful model with which to study the interplay of risk factors leading to HCC development in humans, as well as for testing of additional possible functions of mGSTA3.

  15. Glutathione-S-transferase A3 knockout mice are sensitive to acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Zoran; Crawford, Dana; Vakharia, Dilip; Egner, Patricia A; Sell, Stewart

    2010-02-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in humans. However, mice, a major animal model for the study of AFB1 carcinogenesis, are resistant, due to high constitutive expression, in the mouse liver, of glutathione S-transferase A3 subunit (mGSTA3) that is lacking in humans. Our objective was to establish that a mouse model for AFB1 toxicity could be used to study mechanisms of toxicity that are relevant for human disease, i.e., an mGSTA3 knockout (KO) mouse that responds to toxicants such as AFB1 in a manner similar to humans. Exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 were replaced with a neomycin cassette by homologous recombination. Southern blotting, RT-PCR, Western blotting, and measurement of AFB1-N(7)-DNA adduct formation were used to evaluate the mGSTA3 KO mice. The KO mice have deletion of exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 gene, as expected, as well as a lack of mGSTA3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Three hours after injection of 5 mg/kg AFB1, mGSTA3 KO mice have more than 100-fold more AFB1-N(7)-DNA adducts in their livers than do similarly treated wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, the mGSTA3 KO mice die of massive hepatic necrosis, at AFB1 doses that have minimal toxic effects in WT mice. We conclude that mGSTA3 KO mice are sensitive to the acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AFB1, confirming the crucial role of GSTA3 subunit in protection of normal mice against AFB1 toxicity. We propose the mGSTA3 KO mouse as a useful model with which to study the interplay of risk factors leading to HCC development in humans, as well as for testing of additional possible functions of mGSTA3. PMID:19850059

  16. Effect of Opuntia humifusa supplementation and acute exercise on insulin sensitivity and associations with PPAR-γ and PGC-1α protein expression in skeletal muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junyong; Lee, Junghun; Kwon, Daekeun; Song, Youngju

    2013-03-28

    This study examined whether Opuntia humifusa (O. humifusa), which is a member of the Cactaceae family, supplementation and acute swimming exercise affect insulin sensitivity and associations with PPAR-γ and PGC-1α protein expression in rats. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups (HS: high fat diet sedentary group, n = 8; HE: high fat diet acute exercise group, n = 8; OS: 5% O. humifusa supplemented high fat diet sedentary group, n = 8; OE: 5% O. humifusa supplemented high fat diet acute exercise group, n = 8). Rats in the HE and OE swam for 120 min. before being sacrificed. Our results indicated that serum glucose level, fasting insulin level and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in OS were significantly lower compared to those of the HS (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.05). In addition, PPAR-γ protein expression in the OS and OE was significantly higher than that of the HS and HE, respectively (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). PGC-1α and GLUT-4 protein expressions in the OS were significantly higher compared to those of the HS (p < 0.05, p < 0.05). From these results, O. humifusa supplementation might play an important role for improving insulin sensitivity through elevation of PPAR-γ, PGC-1α, and GLUT-4 protein expression in rat skeletal muscle.

  17. Effect of Opuntia humifusa Supplementation and Acute Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity and Associations with PPAR-γ and PGC-1α Protein Expression in Skeletal Muscle of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Junyong; Lee, Junghun; Kwon, Daekeun; Song, Youngju

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether Opuntia humifusa (O. humifusa), which is a member of the Cactaceae family, supplementation and acute swimming exercise affect insulin sensitivity and associations with PPAR-γ and PGC-1α protein expression in rats. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups (HS: high fat diet sedentary group, n = 8; HE: high fat diet acute exercise group, n = 8; OS: 5% O. humifusa supplemented high fat diet sedentary group, n = 8; OE: 5% O. humifusa supplemented high fat diet acute exercise group, n = 8). Rats in the HE and OE swam for 120 min. before being sacrificed. Our results indicated that serum glucose level, fasting insulin level and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in OS were significantly lower compared to those of the HS (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.05). In addition, PPAR-γ protein expression in the OS and OE was significantly higher than that of the HS and HE, respectively (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). PGC-1α and GLUT-4 protein expressions in the OS were significantly higher compared to those of the HS (p < 0.05, p < 0.05). From these results, O. humifusa supplementation might play an important role for improving insulin sensitivity through elevation of PPAR-γ, PGC-1α, and GLUT-4 protein expression in rat skeletal muscle. PMID:23538842

  18. Global sensitivity analysis of a mathematical model of acute inflammation identifies nonlinear dependence of cumulative tissue damage on host interleukin-6 responses.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Shibin; Bartels, John; Banerjee, Ipsita; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-10-01

    The precise inflammatory role of the cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 and its utility as a biomarker or therapeutic target have been the source of much debate, presumably due to the complex pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of this cytokine. We previously developed a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) model to explain the dynamics of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS)-induced acute inflammation and associated whole-animal damage/dysfunction (a proxy for the health of the organism), along with the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, IL-10, and nitric oxide (NO). The model was partially calibrated using data from endotoxemic C57Bl/6 mice. Herein, we investigated the sensitivity of the area under the damage curve (AUCD) to the 51 rate parameters of the ODE model for different levels of simulated LPS challenges using a global sensitivity approach called Random Sampling High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR). We explored sufficient parametric Monte Carlo samples to generate the variance-based Sobol' global sensitivity indices, and found that inflammatory damage was highly sensitive to the parameters affecting the activity of IL-6 during the different stages of acute inflammation. The AUCIL6 showed a bimodal distribution, with the lower peak representing healthy response and the higher peak representing sustained inflammation. Damage was minimal at low AUCIL6, giving rise to a healthy response. In contrast, intermediate levels of AUCIL6 resulted in high damage, and this was due to the insufficiency of damage recovery driven by anti-inflammatory responses from IL-10 and the activation of positive feedback sustained by IL-6. At high AUCIL6, damage recovery was interestingly restored in some population of simulated animals due to the NO-mediated anti-inflammatory responses. These observations suggest that the host's health status during acute inflammation depends in a nonlinear fashion on the magnitude of the inflammatory stimulus

  19. Sex Differences in Ethanol’s Anxiolytic Effect and Chronic Ethanol Withdrawal Severity in Mice With a Null Mutation of the 5α-Reductase Type 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tanchuck-Nipper, Michelle A.; Ford, Matthew M.; Hertzberg, Anna; Beadles-Bohling, Amy; Cozzoli, Debra K.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of endogenous levels of the GABAergic neurosteroid allopregnanolone alters sensitivity to some effects of ethanol. Chronic ethanol withdrawal decreases activity and expression of 5α-reductase-1, an important enzyme in allopregnanolone biosynthesis encoded by the 5α-reductase-1 gene (Srd5a1). The present studies examined the impact of Srd5a1 deletion in male and female mice on several acute effects of ethanol and on chronic ethanol withdrawal severity. Genotype and sex did not differentially alter ethanol-induced hypothermia, ataxia, hypnosis, or metabolism, but ethanol withdrawal was significantly lower in female versus male mice. On the elevated plus maze, deletion of the Srd5a1 gene significantly decreased ethanol’s effect on total entries versus wildtype (WT) mice and significantly decreased ethanol’s anxiolytic effect in female knockout (KO) versus WT mice. The limited sex differences in the ability of Srd5a1 genotype to modulate select ethanol effects may reflect an interaction between developmental compensations to deletion of the Srd5a1 gene with sex hormones and levels of endogenous neurosteroids. PMID:25355320

  20. In vitro sensitivity of granulo-monocytic progenitors as a new toxicological cell system and endpoint in the ACuteTox Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrato, Laura; Valeri, Antonio; Bueren, Juan A.; Albella, Beatriz

    2009-07-15

    The ACuteTox Project (part of the EU 6th Framework Programme) was started up in January 2005. The aim of this project is to develop a simple and robust in vitro strategy for prediction of human acute systemic toxicity, which could replace animal tests used for regulatory purposes. Our group is responsible for the characterization of the effect of the reference chemicals on the hematopoietic tissue. CFU-GM assay based on the culture of human mononuclear cord blood cells has been used to characterize the effects of the selected compounds on the myeloid progenitors. Previous results have shown the relevance of the CFU-GM assay for the prediction of human acute neutropenia after treatment of antitumoral compounds, and this assay has been recently approved by the ECVAM's Scientific Advisory Committee. Among the compounds included in the study there were pharmaceuticals, environmental pollutants and industrial chemicals. Eleven out of 55 chemicals did not show any cytotoxic effect at the maximum concentration tested. The correlation coefficients of CFU-GM IC50, IC70 and IC90 values with human LC50 values (50% lethal concentration calculated from time-related sublethal and lethal human blood concentrations) were 0.4965, 0.5106 and 0.5142 respectively. Although this correlation is not improve respect to classical in vitro basal cytotoxicity tests such as 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake, chemicals which deviate substantially in the correlation with these assays (colchicine, digoxin, 5-Fluorouracil and thallium sulfate) fitted very well in the linear regression analysis of the CFU-GM progenitors. The results shown in the present study indicate that the sensitivity of CFU-GM progenitors correlates better than the sensitivity of HL-60 cells with human LC50 values and could help to refine the predictability for human acute systemic toxicity when a given chemical may affect to the hematopoietic myeloid system.

  1. Sensitivity of mottled sculpins (Cottus bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) to acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Mount, David R.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Greer, I. Eugene; May, Thomas W.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of fish communities of streams draining mining areas suggest that sculpins (Cottus spp.) may be more sensitive than salmonids to adverse effects of metals. We compared the toxicity of zinc, copper, and cadmium to mottled sculpin (C. bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) in laboratory toxicity tests. Acute (96-h) and early life-stage chronic (21- or 28-d) toxicity tests were conducted with rainbow trout and with mottled sculpins from populations in Minnesota and Missouri, USA, in diluted well water (hardness = 100 mg/L as CaCO3). Acute and chronic toxicity of metals to newly hatched and swim-up stages of mottled sculpins differed between the two source populations. Differences between populations were greatest for copper, with chronic toxicity values (ChV = geometric mean of lowest-observed-effect concentration and no-observed-effect concentration) of 4.4 μg/L for Missouri sculpins and 37 μg/L for Minnesota sculpins. Cadmium toxicity followed a similar trend, but differences between sculpin populations were less marked, with ChVs of 1.1 μg/L (Missouri) and 1.9 μg/L (Minnesota). Conversely, zinc was more toxic to Minnesota sculpins (ChV = 75 μg/L) than Missouri sculpins (chronic ChV = 219 μg/L). Species-average acute and chronic toxicity values for mottled sculpins were similar to or lower than those for rainbow trout and indicated that mottled sculpins were among the most sensitive aquatic species to toxicity of all three metals. Our results indicate that current acute and chronic water quality criteria for cadmium, copper, and zinc adequately protect rainbow trout but may not adequately protect some populations of mottled sculpins. Proposed water quality criteria for copper based on the biotic ligand model would be protective of both sculpin populations tested.

  2. Sensitivity of mottled sculpins (Cottus bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) to acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Mebane, C.A.; Mount, D.R.; Ivey, C.D.; Kunz, J.L.; Greer, I.E.; May, T.W.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of fish communities of streams draining mining areas suggest that sculpins (Cottus spp.) may be more sensitive than salmonids to adverse effects of metals. We compared the toxicity of zinc, copper, and cadmium to mottled sculpin (C. bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) in laboratory toxicity tests. Acute (96-h) and early life-stage chronic (21- or 28-d) toxicity tests were conducted with rainbow trout and with mottled sculpins from populations in Minnesota and Missouri, USA, in diluted well water (hardness = 100 mg/L as CaCO3). Acute and chronic toxicity of metals to newly hatched and swim-up stages of mottled sculpins differed between the two source populations. Differences between populations were greatest for copper, with chronic toxicity values (ChV = geometric mean of lowest-observed-effect concentration and no-observed-effect concentration) of 4.4 ??g/L for Missouri sculpins and 37 ??g/L for Minnesota sculpins. Cadmium toxicity followed a similar trend, but differences between sculpin populations were less marked, with ChVs of 1.1 ??g/L (Missouri) and 1.9 ??g/L (Minnesota). Conversely, zinc was more toxic to Minnesota sculpins (ChV = 75 ??g/L) than Missouri sculpins (chronic ChV = 219 ??g/L). Species-average acute and chronic toxicity values for mottled sculpins were similar to or lower than those for rainbow trout and indicated that mottled sculpins were among the most sensitive aquatic species to toxicity of all three metals. Our results indicate that current acute and chronic water quality criteria for cadmium, copper, and zinc adequately protect rainbow trout but may not adequately protect some populations of mottled sculpins. Proposed water quality criteria for copper based on the biotic ligand model would be protective of both sculpin populations tested. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  3. Sensitivity of mottled sculpins (Cottus bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) to acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Besser, John M; Mebane, Christopher A; Mount, David R; Ivey, Chris D; Kunz, James L; Greer, I Eugene; May, Thomas W; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2007-08-01

    Studies of fish communities of streams draining mining areas suggest that sculpins (Cottus spp.) may be more sensitive than salmonids to adverse effects of metals. We compared the toxicity of zinc, copper, and cadmium to mottled sculpin (C. bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) in laboratory toxicity tests. Acute (96-h) and early life-stage chronic (21- or 28-d) toxicity tests were conducted with rainbow trout and with mottled sculpins from populations in Minnesota and Missouri, USA, in diluted well water (hardness = 100 mg/L as CaCO3). Acute and chronic toxicity of metals to newly hatched and swim-up stages of mottled sculpins differed between the two source populations. Differences between populations were greatest for copper, with chronic toxicity values (ChV = geometric mean of lowest-observed-effect concentration and no-observed-effect concentration) of 4.4 microg/L for Missouri sculpins and 37 microg/L for Minnesota sculpins. Cadmium toxicity followed a similar trend, but differences between sculpin populations were less marked, with ChVs of 1.1 microg/L (Missouri) and 1.9 microg/L (Minnesota). Conversely, zinc was more toxic to Minnesota sculpins (ChV = 75 microg/L) than Missouri sculpins (chronic ChV = 219 microg/L). Species-average acute and chronic toxicity values for mottled sculpins were similar to or lower than those for rainbow trout and indicated that mottled sculpins were among the most sensitive aquatic species to toxicity of all three metals. Our results indicate that current acute and chronic water quality criteria for cadmium, copper, and zinc adequately protect rainbow trout but may not adequately protect some populations of mottled sculpins. Proposed water quality criteria for copper based on the biotic ligand model would be protective of both sculpin populations tested.

  4. A 70% Ethanol Extract of Mistletoe Rich in Betulin, Betulinic Acid, and Oleanolic Acid Potentiated β-Cell Function and Mass and Enhanced Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Byoung-Seob; Kang, Suna; Moon, Bo Reum; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Park, Sunmin

    2016-01-01

    We investigated that the long-term consumption of the water (KME-W) and 70% ethanol (KME-E) mistletoe extracts had antidiabetic activities in partial pancreatectomized (Px) rats. Px rats were provided with a high-fat diet containing 0.6% KME-E, 0.6% KME-W, and 0.6% dextrin (control) for 8 weeks. As normal-control, Sham-operated rats were provided with 0.6% dextrin. In cell-based studies, the effects of its main terpenoids (betulin, betulinic acid, and oleanolic acid) on glucose metabolism were measured. Both KME-W and KME-E decreased epididymal fat mass by increasing fat oxidation in diabetic rats. KME-E but not KME-W exhibited greater potentiation of first-phase insulin secretion than the Px-control in a hyperglycemic clamp. KME-E also made β-cell mass greater than the control by increasing β-cell proliferation and decreasing its apoptosis. In a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, whole-body glucose infusion rate and hepatic glucose output increased with potentiating hepatic insulin signaling in the following order: Px-control, KME-W, KME-E, and normal-control. Betulin potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake via increased PPAR-γ activity and insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, whereas oleanolic acid enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and cell proliferation in insulinoma cells. In conclusion, KME-E prevented the deterioration of glucose metabolism in diabetic rats more effectively than KME-W and KME-E can be a better therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes than KME-W. PMID:26884795

  5. Influence of age and renal function on high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chenevier-Gobeaux, Camille; Meune, Christophe; Freund, Yonathan; Wahbi, Karim; Claessens, Yann-Erick; Doumenc, Benoit; Zuily, Stéphane; Riou, Bruno; Ray, Patrick

    2013-06-15

    Concerns have been raised about the performance of highly sensitive cardiac troponin assays to accurately detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI), particularly in non-ST segment elevation (NSTEMI), in elderly patients, and in patients with renal failure. We evaluated whether increased age and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) alter diagnostic performance of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (HScTnT). In a prospective multicentric study, HScTnT levels were measured blindly at presentation in patients with acute chest pain. Three hundred and sixty-seven patients were enrolled, including 84 patients ≥70 years. Final diagnosis was AMI for 57 patients (16%) and NSTEMI for 43 patients (12%). NSTEMI was more frequent in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Sensitivity and specificity of HScTnT >14 ng/L at admission for AMI were 96% and 51% in patients ≥70 years versus 91% (NS) and 88% (p <0.0001) in younger patients; the same observations were done for the diagnosis of NSTEMI. Given an HScTnT >53.5 ng/L for the diagnosis of AMI and NSTEMI, respective sensitivities were 87% and 84% and respective specificities were 87% and 87% in elderly patients. Using a cutoff at 35.8 ng/L (for AMI) or 43.2 ng/L (for NSTEMI), sensitivities were 94% and 92%, and specificities were 86% and 88% in patients with low eGFR. Older age, but not low eGFR, was an independent predictive factor of an elevated HScTnT at admission (odds ratio 2.2 [1.2-3.9], p = 0.007). In conclusion, adapted thresholds of HScTnT are required for an accurate diagnosis of AMI/NSTEMI in patients aged ≥70 and in those with low eGFR.

  6. Operant self-administration of ethanol in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Nizhnikov, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The review focuses on operant self-administration of ethanol in immature, infant rats. Several methods for the analysis of ethanol intake in infants are available, yet only oral self-administration models the typical pattern of ethanol consumption found in humans. The study of ethanol intake in infants is important for our understanding of how early alcohol experiences facilitate subsequent engagement with alcohol. It seems that sensitivity to ethanol-induced operant reinforcement is found very early in life, a few hours after birth, and throughout the first three weeks of life. Most of the studies reviewed complied with most, albeit not all, of the criteria for operant behavior (e.g., greater responding than yoked controls and persistence of this difference after withholding the reinforcer). Operant self-administration of ethanol in infant rats seems to be, at least partially, mediated by endogenous opioid transmission and can be enhanced by prior exposure to ethanol. Furthermore, acquisition of ethanol-mediated operant learning seems to facilitate drug self-administration during adolescence. Relative to older subjects, infants exhibit lower sensitivity to ethanol's sedative, hypnotic and motor impairing effects. On the other hand, they exhibit increased sensitivity to the motor stimulant and rewarding effects of ethanol. We suggest that this pattern of response to ethanol may favor the rapid acquisition of operant self-administration in infant rats.

  7. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired. PMID:20739429

  8. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired.

  9. Ethanol promotes T cell apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Aditi A; Patel, Geeta; Goenka, Anuj; Nahar, Nilay; Modi, Neeraj; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Reddy, Krishna; Franki, Nicholas; Patel, Jaimita; Singhal, Pravin C

    2003-01-01

    Clinical reports suggest that acute ethanol intoxication is often associated with lymphopenia. Previously, ethanol was reported to invoke thymocyte apoptosis. We studied the effect of ethanol on T cell apoptosis. In addition, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of ethanol-induced T cell apoptosis. Human T cells harvested from healthy subjects after an alcohol drinking binge showed enhanced T cell apoptosis (before, 0·4 ± 0·2% versus after, 19·6 ± 2·5% apoptotic lymphocytes/field; P < 0·001). In in vitro studies, ethanol in a concentration of 50 mm and higher enhanced the apoptosis of Jurkat cells. DNA isolated from ethanol-treated Jurkat cells displayed integer multiples of 180 base pairs. Ethanol decreased Jurkat cell expression of Bcl-2, whereas ethanol increased Jurkat cell expression of Bax. Jurkat cells treated with ethanol also showed translocation of cytochrome C into cytosol. Moreover, a caspase-9 inhibitor partially inhibited ethanol-induced Jurkat cell apoptosis. In in vivo studies, after binge drinking, T cell expression of Bcl-2 also decreased. In addition, binge