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Sample records for acute fatal disease

  1. Fatal acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Fatal Acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee Yugendar R. Bommineni1, Edward J. Dick Jr.1, J. Scot Estep2, John L. Van de Berg1, and Gene B. Hubbard1...species and several insect vectors demonstrating a wide host distribution and low host specificity. Methods—A 23 year old male chimpanzee died acutely and... chimpanzee . Keywords Ape; nonhuman primate; protozoa; fatal case; Trypanosoma cruzi Introduction CD or American trypanosomiasis is caused by TC, a

  2. A challenging diagnosis for potential fatal diseases: recommendations for diagnosing acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Paolo; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Rocchi, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Acute porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders resulting from a variable catalytic defect of four enzymes out of the eight involved in the haem biosynthesis pathway; they are rare and mostly inherited diseases, but in some circumstances, the metabolic disturbance may be acquired. Many different environmental factors or pathological conditions (such as drugs, calorie restriction, hormones, infections, or alcohol abuse) often play a key role in triggering the clinical exacerbation (acute porphyric attack) of these diseases that may often mimic many other more common acute medical and neuropsychiatric conditions and whose delayed diagnosis and treatment may be fatal. In order to obtain an accurate diagnosis of acute porphyria, the knowledge and the use of appropriate diagnostic tools are mandatory, even in order to provide as soon as possible the more effective treatment and to prevent the use of potentially unsafe drugs, which can severely precipitate these diseases, especially in the presence of life-threatening symptoms. In this paper, we provide some recommendations for the diagnostic steps of acute porphyrias by reviewing literature and referring to clinical experience of the board members of the Gruppo Italiano Porfiria (GrIP).

  3. Non-fatal acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Bernuau, J; Degott, C; Nouel, O; Rueff, B; Benhamou, J P

    1983-01-01

    Four patients are described, admitted during a three-year period, who recovered from acute fatty liver of pregnancy; vomiting and jaundice were the main manifestations of the disease; coma and anuria were absent. During the same period, we observed one patient who died of acute fatty liver of pregnancy. This experience suggests that the non-fatal form of the disorder may be much commoner than the fatal form. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6832629

  4. [Acute hemolytic crisis followed by fulminant hepatic failure with fatal outcome, as a first clinical manifestation of Wilson's disease].

    PubMed

    de Andrade Júnior, D R; Fujita Neto, F G; Vieira, G S; Tibério, I F; Warth, M P; Calich, I

    1994-01-01

    We describe in this work a clinical case of a female patient aged 21 years, bearer of Wilson's disease, a first clinical manifestation of the disease occurred as an acute hemolytic crisis followed by fulminant hepatic failure evolving to death after 26 days' internment. The definitive diagnosis was obtained only as a quantitative measurement of hepatic copper from the necropsy material. The search for Kayser-Fleischer ring was negative and the serum ceruloplasmin level was 9 mg/dl (15 to 60). No involvement of the central nervous system was noted from the pathologic analysis. The patient presented two Coombs negative hemolytic crises during the internment; the first on being admitted to hospital and the second after a transjugular hepatic biopsy carried out on the 16th day after internment. The last hemolytic crisis was accompanied by an increase of serum and urinary copper levels. On this occasion the patient evolved to a progressive hepatic failure with severe jaundice and hepatic encephalopathy. We are presenting the clinical-biochemical evolution of the patient and we shall discuss the existent hypotheses to the pathophysiology of this rare form for manifestation of the Wilson's disease as well the diagnostic difficulties.

  5. A Fatal Case of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia-Methotrexate Related or Primary Autoimmune Disease Related: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Kaeley, Nidhi; Gupta, Priyanka; Gupta, Vibha; Bhatia, Rohan

    2016-03-01

    Methotrexate is being used for many years in the treatment of chronic medical disorders e.g. rheumatoid arthritis since 1951. It has been associated with various systemic toxicities and complications including bone marrow suppression and lymphomas. The development of leukaemia in a patient of chronic rheumatoid arthritis is either related with the primary disease or due to the drugs which are used in the treatment like cyclophosphamide. In our present case, a 70-year-old female who was a known case of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and was on methotrexate once a week orally for the past 20 years presented with complaints of loss of appetite, loss of weight and anaemia since 2 months. After thorough examination and investigation, she was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML-M4) with bilateral chest consolidation.

  6. [Fatal acute silicosis caused by voluntary inhalation of scouring powder].

    PubMed

    Vincent, M; Arthaud, Y; Crettet, G; Gerard, F; Laennec, E; Peyrol, S; Pouchelle, C; Loire, R

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of acute fatal fibrosing silico-proteinosis occurring in nine months in a young woman who had voluntarily inhaled scouring powder. We recall the reports in the literature of the subacute or chronic forms associated with systemic diseases occurring after such inhalational practices. We recall the need for specific questioning and to complete the study, the need for microscopy and electron-microscopy associated with X-ray defraction, either on the alveolar lavage fluid or on a lung biopsy.

  7. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway diseaseacute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal diseaseacute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  8. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalcin, Daniel; Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V

    2016-02-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis.

  9. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis. PMID:26812599

  10. Afatinib-Induced Acute Fatal Pneumonitis in Metastatic Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sang Hoon; Ryu, Jin Ah; Kim, Seo Ree; Oh, Su Yun; Jung, Gu Sung; Lee, Dong Jae; Kwak, Bong Gyu; Nam, Yu Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Afatinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that inhibit Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), and HER4. The common side effects of EGFR TKI are rash, acne, diarrhea, stomatitis, pruritus, nausea, and loss of appetite. Drug induced pneumonitis is the less common adverse effects of EGFR TKI. Afatinib, 2nd generation EGFR TKI is anticipated to overcome drug resistance from 1st generation EGFR TKI according to preclinical study, and several studies are being conducted to compare clinical efficacy between 1st and 2nd EGFR TKI. Several cases of rug induced acute fatal pneumonitis were reported after use of erlotinib or gefitinib. However, a case of acute fatal pneumonitis associated with afatinib was note reported except drug induced pneumonitis in other clinical study. Here, we present a cases of acute severe pneumonitis related with afatinib in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with literature review. PMID:27900074

  11. Presenting symptoms, pre-hospital delay time and 28-day case fatality in patients with peripheral arterial disease and acute myocardial infarction from the MONICA/KORA Myocardial Infarction Registry.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Inge; Amann, Ute; Heier, Margit; Kuch, Bernhard; Thilo, Christian; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christa

    2017-02-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who have a history of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have different characteristics and poorer outcomes than patients without PAD. However, data on short-term mortality are conflicting and it is unclear whether patients with PAD have a different scope of AMI symptoms or differences in pre-hospital delay time (PHDT) compared with patients without PAD. The objective of this study was to determine the associations between a history of PAD and presenting AMI symptoms, PHDT and 28-day case fatality in a population-based sample of patients with AMI. Design This was an observational study. Methods Information on history of PAD was obtained from the patients' medical records and their AMI symptoms were assessed by interviews with patients. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the association of PAD with AMI symptoms and 28-day case fatality. A multivariable linear regression model was developed to examine the relations between PAD and PHDT. Results From the 5848 patients with AMI included in this study, 9.8% had a history of PAD. Patients with PAD were significantly less likely to report chest symptoms (odds ratio (OR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.66) or pain in the upper left extremity (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54-0.84) than patients without PAD. PAD was significantly related with longer PHDT in patients <69 years of age ( p = 0.0117) and men ( p = 0.0104). A significantly higher 28-day case fatality (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.47-2.96) was found in patients with PAD compared with patients without PAD. Conclusions Patients with PAD should receive comprehensive education on the possibility of atypical AMI symptoms and the need to call emergency medical services immediately.

  12. Fatality in Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: A rare phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Barbat, Bianca; Jhaj, Ruby; Khurram, Daniyeh

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD), also known as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is an uncommon condition, typically characterized by lymphadenopathy and fevers. It usually has a benign course; however, it may progress to fatality in extremely rare occasions. The diagnosis is made via lymph node biopsy and histopathology. Our patient was a young female who presented with shortness of breath, fever, and malaise. Physical examination revealed significant cervical and axillary lymphadenopathy. Chest X-ray displayed multilobar pneumonia. She required intubation and mechanical ventilation for progressive respiratory distress. Histopathology of lymph nodes demonstrated variable involvement of patchy areas of necrosis within the paracortex composed of karyorrhectic debris with abundant histiocytes consistent with KFD. After initial stabilization, the patient’s condition quickly deteriorated with acute anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated prothrombin time, partial prothrombin time, and D-dimer levels. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) ensued resulting in the patient’s fatality. DIC in KFD is not well understood, but it is an important cause of mortality in patients with aggressive disease. PMID:28255545

  13. Drug Might Help Some Babies with Rare, Fatal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Might Help Some Babies With Rare, Fatal Disease Spinal muscular atrophy is typically lethal within 2 years, but new ... promise, researchers report. There is no treatment for spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA-1), a degenerative neuromuscular disease ...

  14. Fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leptidis, John; Aloizos, Stavros; Chlorokostas, Panagiotis; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a hemopoietic myeloid stem cell neoplasm. It is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults,and its incidence increases with age. Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. As the leukemic cells keep filling the bone marrow, symptoms of the disease started to appear: fatigue, bleeding, increased frequency of infections, and shortness of breath. Cardiac tamponade or pericardial tamponade is an acute medical condition in which the accumulation of pericardial fluid prevents the function of the heart. Signs and symptoms include Beck triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, and muffled heart sounds), paradoxus pulses, tachycardia, tachypnea, and breathlessness. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are rare and severe complications of leukemia; they often develop during the radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or infections in the course of leukemia. This study sought to assess the fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found no reports in the literature linking these 2 clinical entities. Although the patient had no signs or diagnosis of AML previously, this case was remarkable for the rapidly progressive symptoms and the fatal outcome. The pericardial effusion reaccumulated rapidly after its initial drainage; it is a possible explanation that the leukemic cells interfered with cardiac activity or that they decreased their contractility myocytes secreting a toxic essence.

  15. Fatal acute spontaneous endometritis resulting from Clostridium sordelli.

    PubMed

    Hogan, S F; Ireland, K

    1989-01-01

    Intrauterine clostridial infections have historically been associated with puerperal sepsis, often subsequent to instrumented abortions. Isolated reports have been associated with a malignant neoplasm or degenerating leiomyoma, most often after instrumentation, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. In these cases, well-known risk factors or obvious niduses for growth and causation of disease were identified. The authors report a case of fatal spontaneous endometritis resulting from Clostridum sordellii, which, to their knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature. Characteristics of this rare virulent human pathogen are discussed.

  16. Hypertransaminasemia and fatal lung disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Glycogenosis type II (Pompe disease) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. The classic form is characterized by severe cardiac involvement, generalized hypotonia and exitus early in life. Presenting symptoms and signs of the disease may be neglected or underestimated, thus delaying the diagnosis. Respiratory manifestations mainly occur because of respiratory muscle weakness. However, additional mechanisms can favor the development of pulmonary complications that result in fatal respiratory failure. We herein describe a case of an infant with glycogenosis type II presenting with hepatomegaly and hypertransaminasemia, who rapidly developed fatal lung disease. PMID:23391190

  17. Reduction of fatal complications from combined modality therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mauch, P.M.; Canellos, G.P.; Rosenthal, D.S.; Hellman, S.

    1985-04-01

    A total of 464 pathologically staged IA through IIIB Hodgkin's disease patients were evaluated for the risk of developing acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or a fatal infection after treatment with radiation therapy (RT) alone, initial combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy (CMT), or RT with MOPP administered at relapse. Patients received a standard six cycles of MOPP, and additional maintenance chemotherapy was not administered. Patients receiving total nodal irradiation (TNI) and MOPP chemotherapy have an 11. 9% actuarial risk of developing a fatal complication at ten years, as compared to a 0.8% risk for lesser field irradiation and MOPP. The risk with RT alone is 0.6%. Patients 40 years of age or older have a greater risk for complications. These data report a low risk for fatal complication with CMT when less than TNI is administered and when maintenance chemotherapy is not used.

  18. Factors associated with West Nile virus disease fatalities in horses.

    PubMed

    Epp, Tasha; Waldner, Cheryl; West, Keith; Townsend, Hugh

    2007-11-01

    In 2003, the occurrence and location of horses with clinical signs of West Nile virus infection were identified in the southern portion of Saskatchewan with the help of veterinarians, owners, and the regional laboratory. A total of 133 clinical cases were reported between July 30 and September 19, 2003; however, postseason surveillance suggests that the number of cases was underestimated. The case fatality rate was 43.8% (95% CI 35.2, 52.4). Factors associated with fatality in clinical cases included sex, week of onset of clinical signs, and coat color. Reported clinical cases clustered within regional health authority districts, suggesting regional differences in geographic factors, potentially including climate and mosquito control, that could contribute to the risk of disease. However, most of the variation in the risk of fatality in clinical cases is explained at the individual level rather than the Regional Health Authority level, which suggests the outcome of clinical disease is primarily determined by characteristics of, or management factors affecting, the individual horse.

  19. Ethnic differences in coronary heart disease case fatality rates in Auckland.

    PubMed

    Bullen, C; Beaglehole, R

    1997-12-01

    Data from the Auckland Coronary or Stroke (ARCOS) study for the years 1983 to 1992 were analysed to describe 28-day case fatality rates from coronary heart disease among Europeans, Maori and Pacific Islands people in Auckland, New Zealand. The case fatality rate was consistently higher in each age group and for both sexes among Maori and Pacific Islands people than in Europeans. Age-standardised case fatalities for Maori and Pacific Islands people were similar at around 65 per cent, compared with around 45 per cent among Europeans, and these differences were not explained by ethnic differences in possible underreporting of nonfatal myocardial infarction, in socioeconomic status, smoking, symptoms or past myocardial infarction. There was evidence of a more rapid progression of acute coronary events to a fatal outcome among Maori and Pacific Islands people, partly explained by delays in access to life support and coronary care: greater proportions of Pacific Islands people than Maori or Europeans who died did so within an hour of onset of symptoms (56 per cent of Pacific Islands people, 47 per cent of Maori, 45 per cent of Europeans). Pacific Islands and Maori people with acute coronary events took longer to reach a coronary care unit (mean times: Pacific Islands people 8.6 hours, Maori 7.4 hours, Europeans 6.7 hours, P < 0.05), although the median times were not significantly different; life-support units were used by a majority of Pacific Islands people and Europeans (57 per cent and 55 per cent, respectively), compared with only 46 per cent of Maori, but hospital care was similar for the three groups. Further qualitative and quantitative research is needed to investigate the reasons for these ethnic disparities in case fatality rates.

  20. ANLN truncation causes a familial fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome in Dalmatian dogs

    PubMed Central

    Syrjä, Pernilla; Arumilli, Meharji; Järvinen, Anna-Kaisa; Rajamäki, Minna

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the leading cause of death in critical care medicine. The syndrome is typified by an exaggerated inflammatory response within the lungs. ARDS has been reported in many species, including dogs. We have previously reported a fatal familial juvenile respiratory disease accompanied by occasional unilateral renal aplasia and hydrocephalus, in Dalmatian dogs. The condition with a suggested recessive mode of inheritance resembles acute exacerbation of usual interstitial pneumonia in man. We combined SNP-based homozygosity mapping of two ARDS-affected Dalmatian dogs and whole genome sequencing of one affected dog to identify a case-specific homozygous nonsense variant, c.31C>T; p.R11* in the ANLN gene. Subsequent analysis of the variant in a total cohort of 188 Dalmatians, including seven cases, indicated complete segregation of the variant with the disease and confirmed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Low carrier frequency of 1.7% was observed in a population cohort. The early nonsense variant results in a nearly complete truncation of the ANLN protein and immunohistochemical analysis of the affected lung tissue demonstrated the lack of the membranous and cytoplasmic staining of ANLN protein in the metaplastic bronchial epithelium. The ANLN gene encodes an anillin actin binding protein with a suggested regulatory role in the integrity of intercellular junctions. Our study suggests that defective ANLN results in abnormal cellular organization of the bronchiolar epithelium, which in turn predisposes to acute respiratory distress. ANLN has been previously linked to a dominant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in human without pulmonary defects. However, the lack of similar renal manifestations in the affected Dalmatians suggest a novel ANLN-related pulmonary function and disease association. PMID:28222102

  1. Anaphylaxis Complicated by Acute Respiratory Distress and Fatal Outcome in A Nigerian Family

    PubMed Central

    Agelebe, Efeturi; Musa, Tawakalit Lily; Ajayi, Idowu Adebowale

    2017-01-01

    Reports on hypersensitivity diseases in Nigerians are rare. We report the incidence of anaphylaxis in three siblings following fatal outcome in their mother. Urticarial rashes were noticed in three siblings’ resident in a South Western Nigerian town, one week before presentation at our facility. All the three siblings developed respiratory distress four days after the rash was noticed. Onset of respiratory distress made the family seek care at a private hospital, where they were admitted and treated with intravenous aminophylline and ceftriaxone. The mother of the children had experienced the same symptoms earlier also. She took treatment and died in the same private hospital, where her children received care. Death of the mother and worsening respiratory distress in the children made the father effect transfer of the children to the paediatric emergency unit of Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo. The three children made a slow but uneventful recovery after instituting appropriate management for anaphylaxis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The cases are discussed with a view to create awareness amongst health practitioners about the occurrence of anaphylaxis in our society. The need for prompt recognition and appropriate management, when confronted with this disease is also underscored. PMID:28274015

  2. Fatal Breakthrough Mucormycosis in an Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patient while on Posaconazole Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyun Seon; Bae, Myoung Nam; Kim, Jihye; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Kwan Yong; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-03-01

    Posaconazole is a new oral triazole with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. Posaconazole has also shown a significant advantage of preventing invasive fungal infection compared to fluconazole or itraconazole in patients with prolonged neutropenia. Indeed, posaconazole has been commonly used for antifungal prophylaxis in patients undergoing remission induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. We experienced a case of fatal mucormycosis despite posaconazole prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fatal breakthrough mucormycosis in a patient receiving posaconazole prophylaxis during remission induction chemotherapy in Korea. This case demonstrated that breakthrough fungal infection can occurs in patients receiving posaconazole prophylaxis because of its limited activity against some mucorales.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P.

    2005-11-01

    Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

  5. Estimated rate of fatal automobile accidents attributable to acute solvent exposure at low inhaled concentrations.

    PubMed

    Benignus, Vernon A; Bushnell, Philip J; Boyes, William K

    2011-12-01

    Acute solvent exposures may contribute to automobile accidents because they increase reaction time and decrease attention, in addition to impairing other behaviors. These effects resemble those of ethanol consumption, both with respect to behavioral effects and neurological mechanisms. These observations, along with the extensive data on the relationship between ethanol consumption and fatal automobile accidents, suggested a way to estimate the probability of fatal automobile accidents from solvent inhalation. The problem can be approached using the logic of the algebraic transitive postulate of equality: if A=B and B=C, then A=C. We first calculated a function describing the internal doses of solvent vapors that cause the same magnitude of behavioral impairment as ingestion of ethanol (A=B). Next, we fit a function to data from the literature describing the probability of fatal car crashes for a given internal dose of ethanol (B=C). Finally, we used these two functions to generate a third function to estimate the probability of a fatal car crash for any internal dose of organic solvent vapor (A=C). This latter function showed quantitatively (1) that the likelihood of a fatal car crash is increased by acute exposure to organic solvent vapors at concentrations less than 1.0 ppm, and (2) that this likelihood is similar in magnitude to the probability of developing leukemia from exposure to benzene. This approach could also be applied to other potentially adverse consequences of acute exposure to solvents (e.g., nonfatal car crashes, property damage, and workplace accidents), if appropriate data were available.

  6. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  7. Fatal transfusion related acute lung injury following coronary artery by-pass surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad; Sharif, Hasanat

    2008-01-01

    Background Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a potentially fatal Acute Lung Injury following transfusion of blood components. Hypotheses implicate donor-derived anti-human leukocyte antigen or granulocyte antibodies reacting with recipients' leukocytes, releasing inflammatory mediators. Lack of agreement on underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms renders improving transfusion safety difficult and expensive. Case Presentation Literature search has not revealed any case of TRALI from Pakistan. We report the case of fatal TRALI in a 68 year old male who received blood products after coronary artery by-pass surgery. Conclusion This article aims to create awareness about this complication and suggests that post transfusion cardiopulmonary instability should alert to the possibility of TRALI. PMID:19055759

  8. Fatal proventricular dilatation disease in captive native psittacines in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Donatti, Rogério Venâncio; Resende, Maurício; Ferreira, Francisco Carlos Júnior; Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Ecco, Roselene; Shivaprasad, H L; de Resende, José Sérgio; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

    2014-03-01

    An outbreak of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), a fatal inflammatory disease of psittacines (Aves: Psittaciformes), is described in native Brazilian psittacines. Twenty captive psittacines that died of suspected PDD were necropsied and 10 were submitted to histopathology, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for avian bornavirus (ABV). Examined species were one pileated parrot (Pionopsitta pileata), three vinaceous-breasted parrots (Amazona vinacea), two blue-winged macaws (Primolius maracana), one scarlet macaw (Ara macao), one chestnut-fronted macaw (Ara severa), one scaly-headed parrot (Pionus maximiliani), and one red-browed Amazon parrot (Amazona rhodocorytha). Gross examination and histopathology revealed typical PDD lesions in all birds. The presence of ABV was confirmed in four psittacines including one red-browed Amazon parrot, one blue-winged macaw, one scarlet macaw, and one chestnut-fronted macaw. In the red-browed Amazon parrot and in one blue-winged macaw, IHC demonstrated ABV antigens in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells in various organs. This is the first description of PDD by ABV in Brazilian psittacines and indicates the necessity for adopting a strategic control plan for reducing its impact in native birds.

  9. A novel alphaherpesvirus associated with fatal diseases in banded Penguins.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Florian; Schulze, Christoph; König, Patricia; Franzke, Kati; Bock, Sabine; Hlinak, Andreas; Kämmerling, Jens; Ochs, Andreas; Schüle, André; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    A novel avian alphaherpesvirus, preliminarily designated sphenicid alphaherpesvirus 1 (SpAHV-1), has been independently isolated from juvenile Humboldt and African penguins (Spheniscus humboldti and Spheniscus demersus) kept in German zoos suffering from diphtheroid oropharyngitis/laryngotracheitis and necrotizing enteritis (collectively designated as penguin-diphtheria-like disease). High-throughput sequencing was used to determine the complete genome sequences of the first two SpAHV-1 isolates. SpAHV-1 comprises a class D genome with a length of about 164 kbp, a G+C content of 45.6 mol% and encodes 86 predicted ORFs. Taxonomic association of SpAHV-1 to the genus Mardivirus was supported by gene content clustering and phylogenetic analysis of herpesvirus core genes. The presented results imply that SpAHV-1 could be the primary causative agent of penguin-diphtheria-like fatal diseases in banded penguins. These results may serve as a basis for the development of diagnostic tools in order to investigate similar cases of penguin diphtheria in wild and captive penguins.

  10. Acute gouty arthritis complicated with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction is independently associated with short- and long-term adverse non-fatal cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Lee, Hsin-Fu; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Lin, Yen-Chen; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Chang, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Lung-An

    2014-01-01

    Large epidemiologic studies have associated gouty arthritis with the risk of coronary heart disease. However, there has been a lack of information regarding the outcomes for patients who have gout attacks during hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction. We reviewed the data of 444 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital between 2005 and 2008 due to acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The clinical outcomes were compared between patients with gout attack and those without. Of the 444, 48 patients with acute STEMI developed acute gouty arthritis during hospitalization. The multivariate analysis identified prior history of gout and estimated glomerular filtration rate as independent risk factors of gout attack for patients with acute STEMI (odds ratio (OR) 21.02, 95 % CI 2.96-149.26, p = 0.002; OR 0.92, 95 % CI 0.86-0.99, p = 0.035, respectively). The in-hospital mortality and duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the gouty group and the non-gouty group (controls). During a mean follow-up of 49 ± 28 months, all-cause mortality and stroke were similar for both groups. Multivariate Cox regression showed that gout attack was independently associated with short- and long-term adverse non-fatal cardiac events (hazard ratio (HR) 1.88, 95 % CI 1.09-3.24, p = 0.024; HR 1.82, 95 % CI 1.09-3.03, p = 0.022, respectively). Gout attack among patients hospitalized due to acute STEMI was independently associated with short-term and long-term rates of adverse non-fatal cardiac events.

  11. Fatal Outcome of Multiple Clinical Presentations of Human Herpesvirus 8-related Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vijgen, Sandrine; Wyss, Caroline; Meylan, Pascal; Bisig, Bettina; Letovanec, Igor; Manuel, Oriol; Pascual, Manuel; de Leval, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is the most common human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-related disease described after solid organ transplantation. Multicentric Castleman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome are other potential HHV-8-induced entities but are less frequently reported. We describe the case of a liver transplant recipient who presented with an acute febrile illness 1 year after transplantation with a rapidly fatal outcome. Autopsy revealed 3 distinct HHV-8-related entities: Kaposi sarcoma, HHV-8-associated multicentric Castleman disease with microlymphomas and a severe hemophagocytic syndrome. Retrospective serologic tests suggested that HHV-8 was likely transmitted by the seropositive donor at the time of transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of copresentation of 3 clinical presentations of HHV-8-mediated human disease in the post-transplant setting. Considering the absence of systematic screening of organ donors/recipients for HHV-8 infection, HHV-8-related illness should be suspected in transplant recipients who present with acute febrile illness, systemic symptoms, lymphadenopathies, and/or multiorgan failure to rapidly document the diagnosis and provide timely an adequate treatment.

  12. Acute forces required for fatal compression asphyxia: A biomechanical model and historical comparisons.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Mark W; Still, G Keith; Neuman, Tom S; Graham, Michael A; Griffin, Lanny V

    2017-01-01

    Background Fatalities from acute compression have been reported with soft-drink vending machine tipping, motor vehicle accidents, and trench cave-ins. A major mechanism of such deaths is flail chest but the amount of force required is unclear. Between the range of a safe static chest compression force of 1000 N (102 kg with earth gravity) and a lethal dynamic force of 10-20 kN (falling 450 kg vending machines), there are limited quantitative human data on the force required to cause flail chest, which is a major correlate of acute fatal compression asphyxia. Methods We modeled flail chest as bilateral fractures of six adjacent ribs. The static and dynamic forces required to cause such a ribcage failure were estimated using a biomechanical model of the thorax. The results were then compared with published historical records of judicial "pressing," vending machine fatalities, and automobile safety cadaver testing. Results and conclusion The modeling results suggest that an adult male requires 2550 ± 250 N of chest-applied distributed static force (260 ± 26 kg with earth gravity) or 4050 ± 320 N of dynamic force to cause flail chest from short-term chest compression.

  13. Ebola virus disease: a highly fatal infectious disease reemerging in West Africa.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Tsang, Alan K L; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-02-01

    Ebolavirus can cause a highly fatal and panic-generating human disease which may jump from bats to other mammals and human. High viral loads in body fluids allow efficient transmission by contact. Lack of effective antivirals, vaccines and public health infrastructures in parts of Africa make it difficult to health workers to contain the outbreak.

  14. [Two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with Bacillus cereus bacteremia resulting in fatal intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Moriyama, Y; Tatekawa, T; Tominaga, N; Teshima, H; Hiraoka, A; Masaoka, T; Yoshinaga, T

    1993-12-01

    This manuscript reports Bacillus cereus sepsis in two cases with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who suffered complications of fatal intracranial hemorrhage during remission induction therapy. The first case was 43-year-old male with AML (M0) receiving first consolidation chemotherapy who developed sudden diarrhea, abdominal pain and spiking fever. Two days later, he died of intracranial hemorrhage. The second case was 15-year-old male with AML (M5b) who was receiving first induction chemotherapy. He developed headache and vomiting following spiking fever and diarrhea. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage the next day. In both cases, Bacillus cereus was isolated from blood culture. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage due to severe bleeding tendency caused rapid to death in both cases. These bleeding tendencies might have been induced by B. cereus sepsis. In addition, we should not overlook B. cereus as contamination, but rather consider it as a potential pathogen, when isolated from blood culture.

  15. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine. Clinicians should be aware of this rare clinical presentation since rapid progression to multiorgan failure can occur. Early supportive therapy should be initiated. Lactescent serum and ketoacidosis in severe acute pancreatitis should not be overlooked—initiate insulin therapy and possibly plasmapheresis in case of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia. PMID:24403385

  16. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-08

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine. Clinicians should be aware of this rare clinical presentation since rapid progression to multiorgan failure can occur. Early supportive therapy should be initiated. Lactescent serum and ketoacidosis in severe acute pancreatitis should not be overlooked-initiate insulin therapy and possibly plasmapheresis in case of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia.

  17. Rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae complicated with acute myocarditis and accelerated idioventricular rhythm.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Chou-Jui; Lee, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Pin; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Chen, Wen-Jone; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-08-01

    We describe a previously healthy 52-year-old man with rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient developed acute renal dysfunction, accelerated idioventricular rhythm (acute myocarditis), lactic acidosis and septic shock. He died within 15 hours after admission despite intravenous levofloxacin (750 mg daily) and aggressive medical treatment.

  18. A fatal case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn associated with anti-Jk(b).

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Duck; Lee, Young Hwan

    2006-02-01

    The Kidd blood group is clinically significant since the Jk antibodies can cause acute and delayed transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In general, HDN due to anti-Jk(b) incompatibility is rare and it usually displays mild clinical symptoms with a favorable prognosis. Yet, we apparently experienced the second case of HDN due to anti-Jk(b) with severe clinical symptoms and a fatal outcome. A female patient having the AB, Rh(D)-positive blood type was admitted for jaundice on the fourth day after birth. At the time of admission, the patient was lethargic and exhibited high pitched crying. The laboratory data indicated a hemoglobin value of 11.4 mg/dL, a reticulocyte count of 14.9% and a total bilirubin of 46.1 mg/dL, a direct bilirubin of 1.1 mg/dL and a strong positive result (+++) on the direct Coomb's test. As a result of the identification of irregular antibody from the maternal serum, anti-Jk(b) was detected, which was also found in the eluate made from infant's blood. Despite the aggressive treatment with exchange transfusion and intensive phototherapy, the patient died of intractable seizure and acute renal failure on the fourth day of admission. Therefore, pediatricians should be aware of the clinical courses of hemolytic jaundice due to anti-Jk(b), and they should be ready to treat this disease with active therapeutic interventions.

  19. Spider Bite: A Rare Case of Acute Necrotic Arachnidism with Rapid and Fatal Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Giglio, Anna Maria; Scozzafava, Annamaria; Filippelli, Orazio; Serafino, Giuseppe; Verre, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spider bites are quite frequent and often resolve quickly without leaving outcomes; only some species are capable of causing necrotic and systematic lesions in humans. Among them, we should mention the genus Loxosceles. The venom released from the spider bite of Loxosceles species is composed of proteins, enzymes, and nonenzymatic polypeptides. The phospholipase D family was identified as the active component of the venom. This family of enzymes is responsible for the local and systemic effects observed in loxoscelism. Phospholipases D interact with cell membranes triggering alterations which involve the complement system and activation of neutrophils and they cause the dermonecrotic skin lesions and systemic effects. We describe a fatal case of acute intoxication caused by a spider bite probably belonging to the species Loxosceles. The initial lesion was localized to a finger of a hand. Clinical course was worsening with deep necrotic lesions on limb, shock, hemolysis, acute kidney failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. All therapies were ineffective. This is the first fatal case described in Europe. PMID:27651958

  20. Fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Sepsis in a Patient With Celiac Disease-Associated Hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Ouseph, Madhu M.; Simons, Malorie; Treaba, Diana O.; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with poorly controlled celiac disease (CD) and fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, describe the morphologic findings, and stress the need for monitoring splenic function and pneumococcal vaccination in these patients. PMID:27761478

  1. Rapidly progressing, fatal and acute promyelocytic leukaemia that initially manifested as a painful third molar: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, an uncommon and devastating subtype of leukaemia, is highly prevalent in Latin American populations. The disease may be detected by a dentist since oral signs are often the initial manifestation. However, despite several cases describing oral manifestations of acute promyelocytic leukaemia and genetic analysis, reports of acute promyelocytic leukaemia in Hispanic populations are scarce. The identification of third molar pain as an initial clinical manifestation is also uncommon. This is the first known case involving these particular features. Case presentation A 24-year-old Latin American man without relevant antecedents consulted a dentist for pain in his third molar. After two dental extractions, the patient experienced increased pain, poor healing, jaw enlargement and bleeding. A physical examination later revealed that the patient had pallor, jaw enlargement, ecchymoses and gingival haemorrhage. Laboratory findings showed pancytopaenia, delayed coagulation times, hypoalbuminaemia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Splenomegaly was detected on ultrasonography. Peripheral blood and bone marrow analyses revealed a hypercellular infiltrate of atypical promyelocytic cells. Cytogenetic analysis showing genetic translocation t(15;17) further confirmed acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Despite early chemotherapy, the patient died within one week due to intracranial bleeding secondary to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Conclusion The description of this unusual presentation of acute promyelocytic leukaemia, the diagnostic difficulties and the fatal outcome are particularly directed toward dental surgery practitioners to emphasise the importance of clinical assessment and preoperative evaluation as a minimal clinically-oriented routine. This case may also be of particular interest to haematologists, since the patient's cytogenetic analysis, clinical course and therapeutic response are well documented. PMID:19946580

  2. Acute fulminant necrotizing amoebic colitis: a potentially fatal cause of diarrhoea on the Acute Medical Unit.

    PubMed

    Desai, Purav; Sivaramakrishnan, Nurani

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a common presenting complaint to the Acute Medical Unit. We report a case of acute fulminant necrotizing amebic colitis in a 73 year old man with no recent travel history preceding his admission. Such cases are often difficult to diagnose and hence associated with a high mortality, unless treated promptly and appropriately. This case report highlights the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment.

  3. Acute and Fatal Isoniazid-Induced Hepatotoxicity: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkis, Aline T.; Saroufim, Paola G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a case of an acute and fatal isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity and provides a review of the literature. A 65-year-old female diagnosed with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection was receiving oral isoniazid 300 mg daily. She was admitted to the hospital for epigastric and right sided flank pain of one-week duration. Laboratory results and imaging confirmed hepatitis. After ruling out all other possible causes, she was diagnosed with isoniazid-induced acute hepatitis (probable association by the Naranjo scale). After discharge, the patient was readmitted and suffered from severe coagulopathy, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and cardiorespiratory arrest necessitating two rounds of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite maximal hemodynamic support, the patient did not survive. A review of the literature, from several European countries and the United States of America, revealed a low incidence of mortality due to isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity when used as a single agent for latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. As for the management, the first step consists of withdrawing isoniazid and rechallenge is usually discouraged. Few treatment modalities have been proposed; however there is no robust evidence to support any of them. Routine monitoring for hepatotoxicity in patients receiving isoniazid is warranted to prevent morbidity and mortality. PMID:27648319

  4. A prospective study of acute cerebrovascular disease in the community: the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project--1981-86. 2. Incidence, case fatality rates and overall outcome at one year of cerebral infarction, primary intracerebral and subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Dennis, M; Burn, J; Warlow, C

    1990-01-01

    The age and sex specific incidence rates for cerebral infarction, primary intracerebral haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage in a population of approximately 105,000 are presented. Over four years 675 patients with a first-ever stroke were registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project. The pathological diagnosis was confirmed by computerised tomography (CT) scan, necropsy or lumbar puncture (cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage only) in 78% of cases and a further 17% were diagnosed according to the Guy's Hospital Stroke Diagnostic Score. The proportion of all first-ever strokes by pathological type was: cerebral infarction 81% (95% confidence interval 78-84), primary intracerebral haemorrhage 10% (8-12), subarachnoid haemorrhage 5% (3-7) and uncertain type 5% (3-7). These proportions are similar to other community-based studies. The overall 30 day case fatality rate was 19% (16-22), that for cerebral infarction being 10% (7-13), primary intracerebral haemorrhage 50% (38-62) and subarachnoid haemorrhage 46% (29-63). One year post stroke 23% (19-27) with cerebral infarction were dead and 65% (60-70) of survivors were functionally independent. The figures for primary intracerebral haemorrhage were 62% (43-81) dead and 68% (50-86) of survivors functionally independent and for subarachnoid haemorrhage were 48% (24-72) dead and 76% (56-96) of survivors functionally independent. There are important differences between these rates and those from other sources possibly due to more complete case ascertainment in our study. Nevertheless, the generally more optimistic early prognosis in our study, particularly for cases of cerebral infarction, has important implications for the planning of clinical trials and for the expected impact that any treatment might have on the general population. PMID:2303826

  5. A Fatal Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome in a Patient With Chronic kidney Disease: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ting-Ting; Yang, Qing; Yu, Mei-Hong; Wang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome is a rare but fatal disease, which occurs commonly in immunocompromised patients. Strongyloidiasis among patients with chronic kidney disease is rarely reported.A 55-year-old Chinese male presented to hospital with diarrhea and abdominal pain. He developed acute respiratory failure and progressed to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage owing to disseminated strongyloidiasis immediately. The bronchoalveolar lavage revealed filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis.This patient was diagnosed with Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome. Although albendazole, mechanical ventilator support, fluid resuscitation, vasopressor support, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hydrocortisone, and broadspectrum antimicrobials were actively used, the patient eventually died.Similar cases in patients with chronic kidney disease in the literature are also reviewed. Through literature review, we recommend that strongyloidiasis should be routinely investigated in patients with chronic kidney disease who will undergo immunosuppressive therapy.

  6. Fatal outcome in a Hispanic woman with moyamoya syndrome and Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Suthakar, Perin; Farmand, Farbod

    2016-01-01

    Summary We describe the case of a young Hispanic female who presented with thyrotoxicosis with seizures and ischemic stroke. She was diagnosed with a rare vasculopathy – moyamoya syndrome. After starting antithyroid therapy, her neurologic symptoms did not improve. Acute neurosurgical intervention had relieved her symptoms in the immediate post-operative period after re-anastomosis surgery. However, 2 post-operative days later, she was found to be in status epilepticus and in hyperthyroid state. She quickly deteriorated clinically and had expired a few days afterward. This is the second case in literature of a fatality in a patient with moyamoya syndrome and Graves’ disease. However, unlike the other case report, our patient had undergone successful revascularization surgery. We believe her underlying non-euthyroid state had potentiated her clinical deterioration. Case studies have shown positive correlation between uncontrolled hyperthyroidism and stroke-like symptoms in moyamoya syndrome. Mostly all patients with these two disease processes become symptomatic in marked hyperthyroid states. Thus, it may be either fluctuations in baseline thyroid function or thyrotoxicosis that potentiate otherwise asymptomatic moyamoya vasculopathy. Learning points: Awareness of the association between Graves’ disease and moyamoya syndrome in younger patients presenting with stroke-like symptoms. Obtaining euthyroid states before undergoing revascularization surgery may protect the patient from perioperative mortality and morbidity. Although moyamoya disease is usually thought to be genetically associated, there are reports that thyroid antibodies may play a role in its pathogenesis and have an autoimmune link. Fluctuations in baseline thyroid function for patients with known Graves’ disease may be a potentiating factor in exacerbating moyamoya vasculopathy. PMID:27857839

  7. Fatal congenital Chagas' disease in a non-endemic area: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Chávez, María; Faez, Yamile; Olalla, José M; Cruz, Israel; Gárate, Teresa; Rodríguez, Mercedes; Blanc, Pilar; Cañavate, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The early diagnosis of congenital Chagas' disease is very important if infected newborns, whether symptomatic or not, are to receive adequate treatment. This paper describes the complications arising in the diagnosis of a newborn with fatal congenital Chagas' disease in Spain, a non-endemic area where visceral leishmaniasis is present. PMID:18992159

  8. Fatal inflammatory heart disease in a bonobo (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter; Mahamba, Crispin; Rest, Joan; André, Claudine

    2005-02-01

    We report the first probable identification of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) in a bonobo (Pan paniscus) that had been part of a forest re-introduction programme. Clinical presentation was of episodic acute on chronic heart failure and cerebral infarction with end-stage renal failure rather than sudden death which is more commonly associated with EMCV infection. A postmortem diagnosis of probable EMCV was made using gross pathological and histopathological examination. Findings included acute on chronic heart failure combined with the unusual but characteristic histopathological features of non-suppurative necrotizing myocarditis with mononuclear, inflammatory infiltration of the brain.

  9. Fatal systemic adenoviral infection superimposed on pulmonary mucormycosis in a child with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Mi; Hwang-Bo, Seok; Kim, Seong koo; Han, Seung Beom; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Kang, Jin Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. Case summary: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection. He had received reinduction chemotherapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia under continuing antifungal therapy for previously diagnosed fungal pneumonia. He complained of fever and right shoulder pain 4 days after completing the reinduction chemotherapy. In spite of appropriate antibiotic and antifungal therapy, pneumonia was aggravated and gross hematuria was accompanied. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for respiratory viruses was positive for ADV in a blood sample, and a urine culture was positive for ADV. He received oral ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and intravenous cidofovir therapy; however, he eventually died. Relapsed leukemia, concurrent fungal pneumonia, and delayed cidofovir administration were considered the cause of the grave outcome in this patient. Conclusion: ADV may cause severe infections not only in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, but also in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The risk factors for severe ADV infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy should be determined in the future studies, and early antiviral therapy should be administered to immune compromised patients with systemic ADV infection. PMID:27749571

  10. Enhanced Surveillance for Fatal Dengue-Like Acute Febrile Illness in Puerto Rico, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Aidsa; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge L.; Sharp, Tyler M.; Rivera, Irma; Sanabria, Dario; Blau, Dianna M.; Galloway, Renee; Torres, Jose; Rodriguez, Rosa; Serrano, Javier; Chávez, Carlos; Dávila, Francisco; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Ellis, Esther M.; Caballero, Gladys; Wright, Laura; Zaki, Sherif R.; Deseda, Carmen; Rodriguez, Edda; Margolis, Harold S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a leading cause of morbidity throughout the tropics; however, accurate population-based estimates of mortality rates are not available. Methods/Principal Findings We established the Enhanced Fatal Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance System (EFASS) to estimate dengue mortality rates in Puerto Rico. Healthcare professionals submitted serum and tissue specimens from patients who died from a dengue-like acute febrile illness, and death certificates were reviewed to identify additional cases. Specimens were tested for markers of dengue virus (DENV) infection by molecular, immunologic, and immunohistochemical methods, and were also tested for West Nile virus, Leptospira spp., and other pathogens based on histopathologic findings. Medical records were reviewed and clinical data abstracted. A total of 311 deaths were identified, of which 58 (19%) were DENV laboratory-positive. Dengue mortality rates were 1.05 per 100,000 population in 2010, 0.16 in 2011 and 0.36 in 2012. Dengue mortality was highest among adults 19–64 years and seniors ≥65 years (1.17 and 1.66 deaths per 100,000, respectively). Other pathogens identified included 34 Leptospira spp. cases and one case of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Neisseria meningitidis. Conclusions/Significance EFASS showed that dengue mortality rates among adults were higher than reported for influenza, and identified a leptospirosis outbreak and index cases of melioidosis and meningitis. PMID:27727271

  11. Non-parametric estimation of the case fatality ratio with competing risks data: an application to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

    PubMed

    Jewell, Nicholas P; Lei, Xiudong; Ghani, Azra C; Donnelly, Christl A; Leung, Gabriel M; Ho, Lai-Ming; Cowling, Benjamin J; Hedley, Anthony J

    2007-04-30

    For diseases with some level of associated mortality, the case fatality ratio measures the proportion of diseased individuals who die from the disease. In principle, it is straightforward to estimate this quantity from individual follow-up data that provides times from onset to death or recovery. In particular, in a competing risks context, the case fatality ratio is defined by the limiting value of the sub-distribution function, F(1)(t) = Pr(T infinity, where T denotes the time from onset to death (J = 1) or recovery (J = 2). When censoring is present, however, estimation of F(1)(infinity) is complicated by the possibility of little information regarding the right tail of F(1), requiring use of estimators of F(1)(t(*)) or F(1)(t(*))/(F(1)(t(*))+F(2)(t(*))) where t(*) is large, with F(2)(t) = Pr(T fatality data for individuals infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong in 2003.

  12. Fatal Infectious Disease Surveillance in a Medical Examiner Database1

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Kurt B.; Yoon, Steven S.

    2004-01-01

    Increasing infectious disease deaths, the emergence of new infections, and bioterrorism have made surveillance for infectious diseases a public health concern. Medical examiners and coroners certify approximately 20% of all deaths that occur within the United States and can be a key source of information regarding infectious disease deaths. We hypothesized that a computer-assisted search tool (algorithm) could detect infectious disease deaths from a medical examiner database, thereby reducing the time and resources required to perform such surveillance manually. We developed two algorithms, applied them to a medical examiner database, and verified the cases identified against the opinion of a panel of experts. The algorithms detected deaths with infectious components with sensitivities from 67% to 94%, and predictive value positives ranging from 8% to 49%. Algorithms can be useful for surveillance in medical examiner offices that have limited resources or for conducting surveillance across medical examiner jurisdictions. PMID:15078596

  13. An Acute Butyr-Fentanyl Fatality: A Case Report with Postmortem Concentrations.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Trochta, Amber; Gary, Ray D; Wright, Jennifer; Mena, Othon

    2016-03-01

    In this case report, we present an evaluation of the distribution of postmortem concentrations of butyr-fentanyl in a fatality attributed principally to the drug. A man who had a history of intravenous drug abuse was found unresponsive on the bathroom floor of his home. Drug paraphernalia was located on the bathroom counter. Toxicology testing, which initially screened positive for fentanyl by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, subsequently confirmed butyr-fentanyl, which was then quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-specific ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM) analysis following liquid-liquid extraction. The butyr-fentanyl peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 58 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 97 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 320 ng/g, the vitreous was 40 ng/mL, the urine was 670 ng/mL and the gastric contained 170 mg. Acetyl-fentanyl was also detected in all biological specimens tested. Peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 38 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 32 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 110 ng/g, the vitreous was 38 ng/mL, the urine was 540 ng/mL and the gastric contained <70 mg. The only other drug detected was a relatively low concentration of benzoylecgonine. The cause of death was certified as acute butyr-fentanyl, acetyl-fentanyl and cocaine intoxication, and the manner of death was certified as accident.

  14. Fatal Toxic Megacolon in a Child of Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Pragati A; Taware, Annapurna C; Surve, Ketaki M

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HD) in late childhood is uncommon and often undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. However, in a patient with Hirschsprung disease, of greater significance is the occurrence of life threatening enterocolitis. In its more severe form, this is associated with gross dilatation of the colon and profound toxaemia, the combination being termed toxic megacolon. Because of its relative rarity, we report a case of 10-year-old child who had a history of chronic constipation for nine years. He later developed complications and presented to the emergency department with toxic megacolon, a rare occurrence due to neglected constipation. Though patient’s condition was unstable, laparotomy with right transverse colostomy was performed after appropriate intravenous rehydration. The dilated bowel loops were decompressed and intraoperatively multiple site biopsies were done. Histopathological examination of transition zone biopsy revealed absence of ganglion cells suggestive of Hirschsprung disease. But few hours later patient’s condition worsened and he succumbed. PMID:28208866

  15. Delayed recognition of fatal invasive meningococcal disease in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ezeoke, Ifeoma; Antwi, Mike; Del Rosso, Paula E.; Dorsinville, Marie; Isaac, Beth M.; Hayden, Althea; Hoffman, Robert S.; Weingart, Scott D.; Weiss, Don

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Invasive meningococcal disease can be difficult to detect early in its course when patients may appear well and the severity of their illness is obscured by non-specific complaints. Case presentation: We report five cases of meningococcal sepsis in adult patients who presented to an emergency department early in the course of their disease, but whose severity of illness was not recognized. Conclusion: Suspicion of meningococcal sepsis should be heightened in the setting of hypotension, tachycardia, elevated shock index, leukopaenia with left shift, thrombocytopaenia and hypokalaemia, prompting early sepsis care. PMID:28348753

  16. Trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome: a disease of fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Gul; Kim, Hyung Hun; Song, Bong Gun; Kim, Eun Jin

    2012-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is commonly used as an industrial solvent and degreasing agent. The clinical features of acute and chronic intoxication with trichloroethylene are well-known and have been described in many reports, but hypersensitivity syndrome caused by trichloroethylene is rarely encountered. For managing patients with trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome, avoiding trichloroethylene and initiating glucocorticoid have been generally accepted. Generally, glucocorticoid had been tapered as trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome had ameliorated. However, we encountered a typical case of trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome refractory to high dose glucocorticoid treatment. A 54-year-old Korean man developed jaundice, fever, red sore eyes, and generalized erythematous maculopapular rashes. A detailed history revealed occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. After starting intravenous methylprednisolone, his clinical condition improved remarkably, but we could not reduce prednisolone because his liver enzyme and total bilirubin began to rise within 2 days after reducing prednisolone under 60 mg/day. We recommended an extended admission for complete recovery, but the patient decided to leave the hospital against medical advice. The patient visited the emergency department due to pneumonia and developed asystole, which did not respond to resuscitation.

  17. Avian Bornavirus Associated with Fatal Disease in Psittacine Birds▿

    PubMed Central

    Staeheli, Peter; Rinder, Monika; Kaspers, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Thanks to new technologies which enable rapid and unbiased screening for viral nucleic acids in clinical specimens, an impressive number of previously unknown viruses have recently been discovered. Two research groups independently identified a novel negative-strand RNA virus, now designated avian bornavirus (ABV), in parrots with proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), a severe lymphoplasmacytic ganglioneuritis of the gastrointestinal tract of psittacine birds that is frequently accompanied by encephalomyelitis. Since its discovery, ABV has been detected worldwide in many captive parrots and in one canary with PDD. ABV induced a PDD-like disease in experimentally infected cockatiels, strongly suggesting that ABV is highly pathogenic in psittacine birds. Until the discovery of ABV, the Bornaviridae family consisted of a single species, classical Borna disease virus (BDV), which is the causative agent of a progressive neurological disorder that affects primarily horses, sheep, and some other farm animals in central Europe. Although ABV and BDV share many biological features, there exist several interesting differences, which are discussed in this review. PMID:20219910

  18. A fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis: an unusual rare expression of chronic graft versus host disease. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Violeta, Labžentytė; Silvija, Zemnickienė; Edvardas, Danila; Virginija, Šileikienė; Rolandas, Zablockis; Vygantas, Gruslys

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report a case of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia whose treatment with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was followed by chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) with lung involvement and bronchiectasis. This report illustrates an unusual course of a fast progression of the bronchiectasis due to BMT. Case description. A 33-year-old female was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia. An allogeneic BMT was performed. One month after the transplantation, acute GVHD with skin involvement occurred. Treatment with prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been started. Nine months later, the patient was examined by a pulmonologist due to progressive dyspnoea. A pulmonary computed tomography (CT) scan showed normal parenchyma of the lungs and no changes to the bronchi. A CT scan performed 7 months later revealed bronchiectasis for the first time. No clinical response was associated with the treatment and the patient’s respiratory status progressively deteriorated. During the final hospitalization, a CT scan performed 1 year later revealed huge cystic bronchiectasis in both lungs. Despite the prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, the patient died one year after the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Conclusions. This case demonstrates that a fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis, that occurs after BMT, should always be considered as a possible manifestation of chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) following allogeneic BMT.

  19. Air pollution and fatal lung disease in three Utah counties

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, V.E. )

    1990-11-01

    A unique situation found in two Utah counties has made it possible to estimate the fraction of respiratory cancer and nonmalignant respiratory disease (NMRD) deaths, which are attributable to community air pollution (CAP) in one county. The two counties were very similar in many ways, including low smoking rates, until a steel mill constructed during WW II caused substantial CAP in one of them. Subsequent differences in mortality rates from both respiratory cancer and NMRD are striking. A third county, similar to many counties outside Utah, was included in the analysis for comparison. In one county, 30-40% of the respiratory cancer and NMRD deaths were attributable to CAP. In this county, NMRD deaths (but not respiratory cancer deaths) were slightly more frequent than in Salt Lake County where smoking rates were twice as high.

  20. Venezuelan equine encephalitis in Panama: fatal endemic disease and genetic diversity of etiologic viral strains.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Evelia; Aguilar, Patricia V; Cisneros, Julio; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2009-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961-2004. Recent clusters of cases occurred in Darien (eastern Panama) and Panama provinces (central Panama) near rainforest and swamp habitats. Patients ranged from 10 months to 48 years of age, and the more severe cases with neurological complications, including one fatal infection, were observed in children. The VEE virus strains isolated from these cases all belonged to an enzootic, subtype ID lineage known to circulate among sylvatic vectors and rodent reservoir hosts in Panama and Peru. These findings underscore endemic VEE as an important but usually neglected arboviral disease of Latin America.

  1. Lyme disease: a case report of a 17-year-old male with fatal Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Esther C; Vail, Eric; Kleinman, George; Lento, Patrick A; Li, Simon; Wang, Guiqing; Limberger, Ronald; Fallon, John T

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a systemic infection commonly found in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central regions of the United States. Of the many systemic manifestations of Lyme disease, cardiac involvement is uncommon and rarely causes mortality. We describe a case of a 17-year-old adolescent who died unexpectedly after a 3-week viral-like syndrome. Postmortem examination was remarkable for diffuse pancarditis characterized by extensive infiltrates of lymphocytes and focal interstitial fibrosis. In the cardiac tissue, Borrelia burgdorferi was identified via special stains, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction. The findings support B. burgdorferi as the causative agent for his fulminant carditis and that the patient suffered fatal Lyme carditis. Usually, Lyme carditis is associated with conduction disturbances and is a treatable condition. Nevertheless, few cases of mortality have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare example of fatal Lyme carditis in an unsuspected patient.

  2. FATAL EPISTAXIS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Francis Berchmans

    1961-01-01

    The instances in which nosebleed is potentially fatal are those in which there is a history of recent head injury, severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease or an underlying vascular tumor in the nasal chambers. Fatal nasal bleeding has not been reported in children. An awareness on the part of the physician of the potentially fatal significance of his patient's nosebleed is the very best insurance against such an event. Intelligent history-taking, careful physical and x-ray examination, generous sedation, precise local cauterization and packing, estimation of hemoglobin mass and a search for bleeding and clotting disorders are the best weapons of the physician called to treat epistaxis. These procedures, coupled with adequate blood replacement and an informed attitude toward surgical interruption of the blood supply to the bleeding region should forestall death from fatal nosebleed. PMID:13738727

  3. Standard management of acute respiratory infections in a children's hospital in Pakistan: impact on antibiotic use and case fatality.

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, S. A.; Rehman, G. N.; Khan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are a leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in Pakistan. The National ARI Control Programme was launched in 1989 in order to reduce the mortality attributed to pneumonia, and rationalize the use of drugs in the management of patients with ARI. WHO's standard ARI case management guidelines were adopted to achieve these objectives. The medical staff at the Children's Hospital, Islamabad, were trained in such management in early 1990; further training sessions were conducted when new staff arrived. Data on outpatients were obtained from special ARI abstract registers, which have been maintained in the outpatient department since January 1990. Details on inpatients who were admitted with ARI were obtained from hospital registers. During the period 1989-92, the use of antibiotics in the outpatient department decreased from 54.6% to 22.9% (P < 0.0001). The case fatality rate (CFR) in children admitted with ARI fell from 9.9% to 4.9% (P < 0.0001), while the overall case fatality rate fell from 8.7% to 6.2%. Our results from a tertiary health care facility show that standard ARI case management reduced both antibiotic use and expenditure on drugs. Although the ARI case management criteria, which are more sensitive than the conventional diagnostic criteria of auscultation and radiography, led to more admissions, we believe that this strategy contributed to a significant reduction in the ARI case fatality rate. PMID:9002330

  4. On Arrival High Blood Glucose Level is Associated With Detrimental and Fatal Hospitalization Outcomes for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartopo, Anggoro B.; Setianto, Budi Y.; Gharini, Putrika P.R.; Dinarti, Lucia K.

    2011-01-01

    Background High blood glucose level is frequently encountered in acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the effects of high blood glucose measured on arrival on hospitalization adverse events in acute coronary syndrome. Our study patients were Javanese in ethnicity, which constitute half of population in Indonesia. We hypothesized that elevated blood glucose has detrimental effects on hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome. Methods We designed an observasional cohort study and recruited 148 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome. Venous blood was collected on hospital arrival. High blood glucose level was determined as plasma glucose > 140 mg/dL. Adverse hospitalization events were recorded, i.e. mortality, acute heart failure, cardiogenic shock and heart rhythm disorders. Echocardiography examination was performed to determine left ventricular function. Results The prevalence of on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome was considerably high (36%). On arrival high blood glucose was associated with acute heart failure (P < 0.001) and shock cardiogenic (P = 0.02). Heart rhythm disorders were higher in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.004). Left ventricular dysfunction was more prevalent in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.001) and ejection fraction was lower (P = 0.001). On arrival high blood glucose was independently associated with hospitalization adverse events (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.9, P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 6.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-38.6, P = 0.03). Conclusions Our study suggests that on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome is considerably high and is associated with detrimental and fatal hospitalization outcomes.

  5. Acute fatal pericardial effusion induced by accidental ingestion of cigarette butts in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lim, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A dog was referred for collapse and tachypnea after ingesting cigarette butts. Thoracic radiography and echocardiography indicated pericardial effusion, and an electrocardiogram showed tachycardia, variable QRS complexes, and ventricular premature complexes. This is the first description of fatal pericardial effusion associated with cigarette butt ingestion in a veterinary patient. PMID:26834265

  6. Fatal liver cyst rupture in polycystic liver disease complicated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fang; Liang, Yue; Zhang, Lin; Li, Wenhe; Chen, Peng; Duan, Yijie; Zhou, Yiwu

    2016-05-01

    A 59-year-old man was struck in the abdomen and later presented to the emergency room. His blood pressure dropped and eventually died 16h post trauma and just before emergency exploratory laparotomy. Autopsy revealed two polycystic kidneys and a giant polycystic liver with two ruptures. Blood (2225g) was observed in the peritoneum and the body-surface injury was minor. Genetic testing was performed to confirm that the man had an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) complicated by polycystic liver disease (PLD). Autopsy, histopathology and medical history showed that the cause of death was the ruptures of liver cysts due to trauma. In this communication, we describe a fatal case and hope to increase awareness and recognition of PLD and ADPKD. We also wish to indicate that due to the fragile condition of liver cysts, trauma should be considered even if the body-surface injury is minor in fatal cases of PLD patient with a traumatic history.

  7. A case of fatal disseminated Bartonella henselae infection (cat-scratch disease) with encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Fouch, Brandy; Coventry, Susan

    2007-10-01

    Cat-scratch disease resulting from Bartonella henselae infection is usually a benign, self-limited process in immunocompetent children. Even the rare cases associated with neurologic manifestations are not generally fatal. We report a case of a previously healthy 6-year-old boy with cat-scratch disease, systemic dissemination, and encephalitis that led to his death. Autopsy revealed perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates and microglial nodules in the brain. To our knowledge, this finding has not been previously reported in B. henselae infection, possibly because of the paucity of material available for complete neuropathologic evaluation. This case illustrates the extreme severity of the spectrum with which cat-scratch disease can present and provides evidence of brain histopathology that may be representative of the disease.

  8. The role of healthcare delivery in the outcome of meningococcal disease in children: case-control study of fatal and non-fatal cases

    PubMed Central

    Ninis, Nelly; Phillips, Claire; Bailey, Linda; Pollock, Jon I; Nadel, Simon; Britto, Joseph; Maconochie, Ian; Winrow, Andrew; Coen, Pietro G; Booy, Robert; Levin, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine whether suboptimal management in hospital could contribute to poor outcome in children admitted with meningococcal disease. Design Case-control study of childhood deaths from meningococcal disease, comparing hospital care in fatal and non-fatal cases. Setting National statistics and hospital records. Subjects All children under 17 years who died from meningococcal disease (cases) matched by age with three survivors (controls) from the same region of the country. Main outcome measures Predefined criteria defined optimal management. A panel of paediatricians blinded to the outcome assessed case records using a standardised form and scored patients for suboptimal management. Results We identified 143 cases and 355 controls. Departures from optimal (per protocol) management occurred more frequently in the fatal cases than in the survivors. Multivariate analysis identified three factors independently associated with an increased risk of death: failure to be looked after by a paediatrician, failure of sufficient supervision of junior staff, and failure of staff to administer adequate inotropes. Failure to recognise complications of the disease was a significant risk factor for death, although not independently of absence of paediatric care (P = 0.002). The odds ratio for death was 8.7 (95% confidence interval 2.3 to 33) with two failures, increasing with multiple failures. Conclusions Suboptimal healthcare delivery significantly reduces the likelihood of survival in children with meningococcal disease. Improved training of medical and nursing staff, adherence to published protocols, and increased supervision by consultants may improve the outcome for these children and also those with other life threatening illnesses. PMID:15976421

  9. Fatality due to acute fluoride poisoning following dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid in a palynology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Muriale, L; Lee, E; Genovese, J; Trend, S

    1996-12-01

    A fatal accident involving concentrated hydrofluoric acid in a palynological laboratory is described. Similar deaths due to dermal exposure to concentrated hydrofluoric acid have been reported in the literature. It is evident that rigorous control measures including proper personal protective equipment and first aid are of utmost importance in the prevention of death and injury when handling hydrofluoric acid. Possible factors that may have contributed to the accident are reviewed.

  10. Fatal infectious mononucleosis: a severe complication in the treatment of Crohn's disease with azathioprine.

    PubMed Central

    Posthuma, E F; Westendorp, R G; van der Sluys Veer, A; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Kluin, P M; Lamers, C B

    1995-01-01

    A 19 year old man with a history of Crohn's disease treated with azathioprine and prednisone, died after a primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus. He had the characteristics of the virus associated haemophagocytic syndrome, a rare complication of viral infections, which consists of fever, constitutional symptoms, hepatosplenomegaly, liver function and coagulation abnormalities, and hypertriglyceridaemia. Additionally, there was pain, cytopenia, and histiocytic hyperplasia in the bone marrow, spleen, or lymph nodes. This severe complication has been reported previously in renal transplant patients, but not in those with inflammatory bowel disease taking azathioprine. The immunosuppressive therapy may have contributed to this fatal complication of infectious mononucleosis, and this complication should be considered when treating a patient with inflammatory bowel disease with azathioprine. Images p312-a PMID:7883236

  11. [Acute renal failure secondary to hepatic veno-occlusive disease in a bone marrow transplant patient].

    PubMed

    Borrego, F J; Viedma, G; Pérez del Barrio, P; Gil, J M; de Santis-Scoccia, C; Ramírez Huerta, J M; Alcalá, A; Pérez Bañasco, V

    2003-01-01

    Acute renal failure following bone marrow transplantation is a frequent complication with an incidence ranging 15-30% and with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Numerous potential etiologies can be implicated as chemotherapy regimen, use of nephrotoxic antibiotics, sepsis-induced damage, cyclosporine toxicity and other especific pathologies as graft-v-host disease or veno-occlusive disease of the liver. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and developed and acute renal failure secondary to a fatal veno-occlusive disease of the liver. Incidence, potential predisposing factors, outcome and possibilities of treatment are reviewed.

  12. A Case Report of Postmortem Radiography of Acute, Fatal Abdominal Distension After Binge Eating.

    PubMed

    Usui, Akihito; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Ishizuka, Yuya; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Tomoya; Saito, Haruo; Funayama, Masato

    2016-12-01

    This case report describes a woman who developed fatal gastric dilatation after binge eating. She called an ambulance because of stomach pain. When she arrived at the hospital, she did not look seriously ill. However, she rapidly became unconscious and collapsed immediately after she was laid on the examination table in a supine position. Postmortem chest x-ray and computed tomography showed right shift of the mediastinum and raised left diaphragm caused by massive gastric distension. Computed tomography showed no visible inferior vena cava. We think that her sudden deterioration was caused by movement of her stomach contents. Radiographic images provided some clues to the cause of her rapid collapse and death.

  13. Proapoptotic Bak and Bax guard against fatal systemic and organ-specific autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kylie D.; Lin, Ann; Robb, Lorraine; Josefsson, Emma C.; Henley, Katya J.; Gray, Daniel H. D.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Roberts, Andrew W.; Strasser, Andreas; Huang, David C. S.; Waring, Paul; O’Reilly, Lorraine A.

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of the “intrinsic” apoptotic pathway is associated with the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Bak and Bax are two proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 protein family with overlapping, essential roles in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Their activity is critical for the control of cell survival during lymphocyte development and homeostasis, best demonstrated by defects in thymic T-cell differentiation and peripheral lymphoid homeostasis caused by their combined loss. Because most bak−/−bax−/− mice die perinatally, the roles of Bax and Bak in immunological tolerance and prevention of autoimmune disease remain unclear. We show that mice reconstituted with a Bak/Bax doubly deficient hematopoietic compartment develop a fatal systemic lupus erythematosus-like autoimmune disease characterized by hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies, lymphadenopathy, glomerulonephritis, and vasculitis. Importantly, these mice also develop a multiorgan autoimmune disease with autoantibodies against most solid glandular structures and evidence of glandular atrophy and necrotizing vasculitis. Interestingly, similar albeit less severe pathology was observed in mice containing a hematopoietic compartment deficient for only Bak, a phenotype reminiscent of the disease seen in patients with point mutations in BAK. These studies demonstrate a critical role for Bak and an ancillary role for Bax in safeguarding immunological tolerance and prevention of autoimmune disease. This suggests that direct activators of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, such as BH3 mimetics, may be useful for treatment of diverse autoimmune diseases. PMID:23349374

  14. Columbid herpesvirus-1 in two Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii) with fatal inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Marie E; Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Childress, April L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Kinsel, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    We report two separate naturally occurring cases of fatal herpesviral disease in Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii). Gross lesions included splenomegaly and hepatomegaly, with diffuse pale mottling or scattered small white foci. Histologic lesions included splenic and hepatic necrosis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies characteristic of herpesvirus. In one case, necrosis and inclusions were also noted in bone marrow, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, ceca, and the enteric system. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated viral particles typical of herpesvirus within hepatocyte nuclei and budding from the nuclear membrane. Herpesviral DNA was amplified via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of paraffin-embedded liver and spleen, and sequence data were consistent with columbid herpesvirus-1, an alphaherpesvirus of Rock Pigeons (Columba livia). PCR results provide evidence that this disease is transmitted to raptors via Rock Pigeons, most likely through ingestion of Rock Pigeons as prey.

  15. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-09-13

    Previously, we identified QIL1 as a subunit of mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and demonstrated a role for QIL1 in MICOS assembly, mitochondrial respiration, and cristae formation critical for mitochondrial architecture (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain function in patient muscle. QIL1 absence in patients' fibroblasts was associated with MICOS disassembly, abnormal cristae, mild cytochrome c oxidase defect, and sensitivity to glucose withdrawal. QIL1 expression rescued cristae defects, and promoted re-accumulation of MICOS subunits to facilitate MICOS assembly. MICOS assembly and cristae morphology were not efficiently rescued by over-expression of other MICOS subunits in patient fibroblasts. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence of altered MICOS assembly linked with a human mitochondrial disease and confirm a central role for QIL1 in stable MICOS complex formation.

  16. Influence of Referral Pathway on Ebola Virus Disease Case-Fatality Rate and Effect of Survival Selection Bias

    PubMed Central

    Damkjær, Mads; Lunding, Suzanne; Dornonville de la Cour, Kenn; Young, Alyssa; Brooks, Tim; Sesay, Tom; Salam, Alex P.; Mishra, Sharmistha; Storgaard, Merete

    2017-01-01

    Case-fatality rates in Ebola treatment centers (ETCs) varied widely during the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa. We assessed the influence of referral pathway on ETC case-fatality rates with a retrospective cohort of 126 patients treated at the Mathaska ETC in Port Loko, Sierra Leone. The patients consisted of persons who had confirmed EVD when transferred to the ETC or who had been diagnosed onsite. The case-fatality rate for transferred patients was 46% versus 67% for patients diagnosed onsite (p = 0.02). The difference was mediated by Ebola viral load at diagnosis, suggesting a survival selection bias. Comparisons of case-fatality rates across ETCs and clinical management strategies should account for potential survival selection bias. PMID:28322693

  17. Effectiveness of acute geriatric units on functional decline, living at home, and case fatality among older patients admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-García, Francisco M; López-Arrieta, Jesús; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of acute geriatric units compared with conventional care units in adults aged 65 or more admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library up to 31 August 2008, and references from published literature. Review methods Randomised trials, non-randomised trials, and case-control studies were included. Exclusions were studies based on administrative databases, those that assessed care for a single disorder, those that evaluated acute and subacute care units, and those in which patients were admitted to the acute geriatric unit after three or more days of being admitted to hospital. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data. Results 11 studies were included of which five were randomised trials, four non-randomised trials, and two case-control studies. The randomised trials showed that compared with older people admitted to conventional care units those admitted to acute geriatric units had a lower risk of functional decline at discharge (combined odds ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.99) and were more likely to live at home after discharge (1.30, 1.11 to 1.52), with no differences in case fatality (0.83, 0.60 to 1.14). The global analysis of all studies, including non-randomised trials, showed similar results. Conclusions Care of people aged 65 or more with acute medical disorders in acute geriatric units produces a functional benefit compared with conventional hospital care, and increases the likelihood of living at home after discharge. PMID:19164393

  18. Acute fatal parainfectious cerebellar swelling in two children. A rare or an overlooked situation?

    PubMed

    Roulet Perez, E; Maeder, P; Cotting, J; Eskenazy-Cottier, A C; Deonna, T

    1993-12-01

    We report 2 previously healthy children who developed sudden unexpected respiratory arrest and brain death, during a presumed Epstein-Barr meningitis in one case and a multisystemic infection of unknown etiology in the other. Diffuse swelling of the cerebellum with upward transtentorial and downward tonsillar herniation, shown by brain CT-scan and MRI obtained after the acute event, was the most probable cause of death. Review of CT images performed before or at the onset of deterioration already showed discrete signs of early upward herniation of the cerebellar vermis that were initially overlooked. At autopsy in the first case, an acute lymphomonocytic meningoencephalitis with predominant involvement of the cerebellum was observed. Few similar cases were found in the literature, indicating that acute cerebellar swelling is either a very rare or an unrecognized, possibly preventable cause of death in acute inflammatory or non-inflammatory encephalopathies in children.

  19. ESTIMATED RATE OF FATAL AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS ATTRIBUTABLE TO ACUTE SOLVENT EXPOSURE AT LOW INHALED CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute solvent exposures may contribute to automobile accidents because they increase reaction time and decrease attention, in addition to impairing other behaviors. These effects resemble those of ethanol consumption, both with respect to behavioral effects and neurological mecha...

  20. Erlotinib Induced Fatal Interstitial Lung Disease in a Patient with Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Ankit; Agarwal, Nikki; Carmel, Chou; Lad, Thomas

    2016-09-05

    Erlotinib is one of the most widely used tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor. Since its introduction, it has revolutionized the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Skin rashes and diarrhea are the most often reported side effects of erlotinib however it is also associated with interstitial pneumonitis or interstitial lung disease, which often turns out to be fatal complication of using this medicine. Though reported scarcely in the western world, the association of interstitial lung disease with epidermal growth factor receptor has attracted a lot of attention in the recent times. Various researches working with murine models of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis have found a pro and con role of the receptor in development of the interstitial lung disease. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung with metastasis to brain. He was found to be positive for the human epidermal growth factor mutation and was hence started on erlotinib. Within a few weeks of starting the medicine the patient was admitted with diarrhea. During the course of this admission he developed acute shortness of breath diagnosed as interstitial pneumonitis. The purpose of this case report is to review the literature associated with erlotinib induced interstitial pneumonitis and make the practicing oncologists aware of this rare yet fatal complication of erlotinib. Here we will also review literature, pertaining to the role of epidermal growth factor receptor in development of interstitial lung disease.

  1. [Fatal transmural colitis caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Differential diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, C R; Louw, P

    1993-09-13

    Perforation of the colon is a rare but frequently fatal complication of amoebiasis. We report a case of a 53 year-old male, with no history of travel abroad, who was admitted to hospital with haematochezia. A tumor of the rectum was diagnosed clinically. Due to acute intestinal obstruction, laparotomy was performed, revealing multiple perforations of the large bowel and severe peritonitis leading to subtotal colectomy. The histological examinations revealed transmural amoebic colitis. The patient died due to multi-organ failure.

  2. Fatal postoperative systemic pulmonary hypertension in benfluorex-induced valvular heart disease surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baufreton, Christophe; Bruneval, Patrick; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Fouquet, Olivier; Giraud, Raphael; Banfi, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DI-VHD) remains an under-recognized entity. Patient concerns: This report describes a heart valve replacement which was complicated by intractable systemic pulmonary arterial hypertension in a 61-year-old female with severe restrictive mitral and aortic disease. The diagnosis of valvular disease was preceded by a history of unexplained respiratory distress. The patient had been exposed to benfluorex for 6.5 years. Diagnoses: The diagnostic procedure documented specific drug-induced valvular fibrosis. Interventions: Surgical mitral and aortic valve replacement was performed. Outcomes: Heart valve replacement was postoperatively complicated by unanticipated disproportionate pulmonary hypertension. This issue was fatal despite intensive care including prolonged extracorporeal life support. Lessons: Benfluorex is a fenfluramine derivative which has been marketed between 1976 and 2009. Although norfenfluramine is the common active and toxic metabolite of all fenfluramine derivatives, the valvular and pulmonary arterial toxicity of benfluorex was much less known than that of fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine. The vast majority of benfluorex-induced valvular heart disease remains misdiagnosed as hypothetical rheumatic fever due to similarities between both etiologies. Better recognition of DI-VHD is likely to improve patient outcome. PMID:28079786

  3. Glioblastoma complicated by fatal malignant acute ischemic stroke: MRI finding to assist in tricky surgical decision

    PubMed Central

    Baronnet-Chauvet, Flore; Fioretti, Edith; Mathon, Bertrand; Cornu, Philippe; Nouet, Aurélien; Chauvet, Dorian

    2015-01-01

    Background In most cases, glioblastomas are associated with seizures, headaches, neurological deficits, aphasia, or bleeding. But these tumors are rarely associated with cerebral infarction and never so deadly. Case report A 40-year-old man presented with sudden morning isolated aphasia. One hour later, he developed a motor deficit at right upper member, quickly completed with a total right hemiplegia. Imaging studies revealed a left frontotemporal enhancing glioblastoma with a perilesional edema which produced an important mass effect on the posterior arm of the external capsule, on the primary motor cortex posteriorly and the entire sylvian valley anteriorly. Due to major surgical risks associated with left middle cerebral artery (MCA) inclusion and large edema, we decided to postpone the tumor removal and introduce quickly high concentrations of steroids. Twenty-four hours after his admittance, the patient presented a sudden impaired consciousness, coma, and a left mydriasis. A brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) revealed a left malignant MCA infarction, deadly for the patient. Conclusion To our knowledge, glioblastomas complicated by fatal ischemic stroke have not been reported. We discuss the pathology of such an event and try to figure out if it was predictable based on MRI finding, and inevitable with precocious surgery. PMID:26306931

  4. Influenza Virus-Associated Fatal Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: Role of Nonpermissive Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mungaomklang, Anek; Chomcheoy, Jiraruj; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Joyjinda, Yutthana; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Rodpan, Apaporn; Ghai, Siriporn; Saraya, Abhinbhen; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, two unusual peaks of H1N1 influenza outbreak occurred in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, in Thailand. Among 2,406 cases, one of the 22 deaths in the province included a 6-year-old boy, who initially presented with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. On the other hand, his sibling was mildly affected by the same influenza virus strain, confirmed by whole-genome sequencing, with one silent mutation. Absence of acute necrotizing encephalopathy and other neurological illnesses in the family and the whole province, with near identical whole viral genomic sequences from the two siblings, and an absence of concomitant severe lung infection (cytokine storm) at onset suggest nonpermissive infection as an alternative pathogenetic mechanism of influenza virus. PMID:27812294

  5. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Alice; Munz, Stephanie M.; Dabiri, Darya

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients. PMID:27847654

  6. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah K Y; Quinonez, Rocio B; Chuang, Alice; Munz, Stephanie M; Dabiri, Darya

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients.

  7. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]). The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006. PMID:20205960

  8. Chronic follicular bronchiolitis requires antigen-specific regulatory T cell control to prevent fatal disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Erica G.; Haribhai, Dipica; Jeschke, Jonathan C.; Co, Dominic O.; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yan, Ke; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Mishra, Manoj K.; Simpson, Pippa; Salzman, Nita H.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2014-01-01

    In order to study regulatory T (Treg) cell control of chronic autoimmunity in a lymphoreplete host, we created and characterized a new model of autoimmune lung inflammation that targets the medium and small airways. We generated transgenic mice that express a chimeric membrane protein consisting of hen egg lysozyme (mHEL) and a hemoglobin (Hb) epitope tag under the control of the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) promoter, which largely limited transgene expression to the respiratory bronchioles. When CCSP-mHEL/Hb transgenic mice were crossed to N3.L2 TCR transgenic mice that recognize the Hb epitope, the bigenic progeny developed dense, pseudo-follicular lymphocytic peribronchiolar infiltrates that resembled the histological pattern of follicular bronchiolitis. Aggregates of activated IFN-γ- and IL-17A-secreting CD4+ T cells as well as B cells surrounded the airways. Lung pathology was similar in Ifng−/− and Il17a−/− mice, indicating that either cytokine is sufficient to establish chronic disease. A large number of antigen-specific Treg cells accumulated in the lesions and Treg cell-depletion in the affected mice led to an interstitial spread of the disease that ultimately proved fatal. Thus Treg cells act to restrain autoimmune responses, resulting in an organized and controlled chronic pathological process rather than a progressive disease. PMID:24163409

  9. Acute liver failure: A curable disease by 2024?

    PubMed

    Bernal, William; Lee, William M; Wendon, Julia; Larsen, Fin Stolze; Williams, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Over the last three decades acute liver failure (ALF) has been transformed from a rare and poorly understood condition with a near universally fatal outcome, to one with a well characterized phenotype and disease course. Complex critical care protocols are now applied and emergency liver transplantation (ELT) is an established treatment option. These improvements in care are such that the majority of patients may now be expected to survive (Fig. 1). Key features of the condition have changed dramatically over time, with a remarkable fall in the incidence of cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension, a much feared complication. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of key aspects of the classification, pathophysiology and management of ALF, and discuss the foreseeable challenges that will need to be addressed for further improvements to be achieved.

  10. Lung pathology and infectious agents in fatal feedlot pneumonias and relationship with mortality, disease onset, and treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study charted 237 fatal cases of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) observed from May 2002-May 2003 in one Oklahoma feedyard. The data collected included: agent identification, observed pathology, mortality, and animal treatment information. The cattle died either in the sick pen after treatment ...

  11. [Dipodascus capitatus (Geotrichum capitatum): fatal systemic infection on patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Lafayette, Thereza Christina Sampaio; Oliveira, Loiva Therezinha Otonelli; Landell, Melissa; Valente, Patrícia; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Pereira, Waldir Veiga

    2011-10-01

    The infections caused by Dipodascus capitatus are rare, and the treatment is difficult. We reported a case of a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. The fungus was first isolated from hemocultures, and the phenotypic identification was based on mycological methods. The genotyping was carried out by sequencing the region D1/D2 from 26 rDNA. The susceptibility tests were assayed by Etest® and by the microdilution technique. None of the antifungal treatments employed were effective. The patient died on day 17 after the mycological diagnosis. The authors discussed the emergence of such infections as well as the difficulty regarding the diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Current Understanding of Acute Bovine Liver Disease in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Read, Elizabeth; Edwards, Jacqueline; Deseo, Myrna; Rawlin, Grant; Rochfort, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Acute bovine liver disease (ABLD) is a hepatotoxicity principally of cattle which occurs in southern regions of Australia. Severely affected animals undergo rapid clinical progression with mortalities often occurring prior to the recognition of clinical signs. Less severely affected animals develop photosensitization and a proportion can develop liver failure. The characteristic histopathological lesion in acute fatal cases is severe, with acute necrosis of periportal hepatocytes with hemorrhage into the necrotic areas. Currently there are a small number of toxins that are known to cause periportal necrosis in cattle, although none of these have so far been linked to ABLD. Furthermore, ABLD has frequently been associated with the presence of rough dog’s tail grass (Cynosurus echinatus) and Drechslera spp. fungi in the pasture system, but it is currently unknown if these are etiological factors. Much of the knowledge about ABLD is contained within case reports, with very little experimental research investigating the specific cause(s). This review provides an overview of the current and most recently published knowledge of ABLD. It also draws on wider research and unpublished reports to suggest possible fungi and mycotoxins that may give rise to ABLD. PMID:28035972

  13. A novel mutation in COQ2 leading to fatal infantile multisystem disease.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Bernadette S; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Smeets, Roel J P; de Vries, Maaike C; Hien, Steffen; Schaible, Thomas; Smeitink, Jan A M; Wevers, Ron A; Wortmann, Saskia B; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2013-03-15

    Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone or CoQ10) serves as a redox carrier in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. The reduced form of this lipid-soluble antioxidant (ubiquinol) is involved in other metabolic processes as well, such as preventing reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced damage from the mitochondrial membrane. Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder, often presenting with neurological and/or muscle involvement. Until now, five patients from four families have been described with primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency due to mutations in COQ2 encoding para-hydroxybenzoate polyprenyl transferase. Interestingly, four of these patients showed a distinctive renal involvement (focal segmental glomerular sclerosis, crescentic glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome), which is only very rarely seen in correlation with mitochondrial disorders. The fifth patient deceases due to infantile multi organ failure, also with renal involvement. Here we report a novel homozygous mutation in COQ2 (c.905C>T, p.Ala302Val) in a dizygotic twin from consanguineous Turkish parents. The children were born prematurely and died at the age of five and six months, respectively, after an undulating disease course involving apneas, seizures, feeding problems and generalized edema, alternating with relative stable periods without the need of artificial ventilation. There was no evidence for renal involvement. We would like to raise awareness for this potentially treatable disorder which could be under diagnosed in patients with fatal neonatal or infantile multi-organ disease.

  14. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified QIL1 as a subunit of mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and demonstrated a role for QIL1 in MICOS assembly, mitochondrial respiration, and cristae formation critical for mitochondrial architecture (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain function in patient muscle. QIL1 absence in patients’ fibroblasts was associated with MICOS disassembly, abnormal cristae, mild cytochrome c oxidase defect, and sensitivity to glucose withdrawal. QIL1 expression rescued cristae defects, and promoted re-accumulation of MICOS subunits to facilitate MICOS assembly. MICOS assembly and cristae morphology were not efficiently rescued by over-expression of other MICOS subunits in patient fibroblasts. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence of altered MICOS assembly linked with a human mitochondrial disease and confirm a central role for QIL1 in stable MICOS complex formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17163.001 PMID:27623147

  15. Zika virus epidemic in Brazil. I. Fatal disease in adults: Clinical andlaboratorial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Raimunda S.S.; Araujo, Marialva T.; Martins Filho, Arnaldo J.; Oliveira, Consuelo S.; Nunes, Bruno T.D.; Cruz, Ana C.R.; Nascimento, Ana G.P.A.C.; Medeiros, Rita C.; Caldas, Cezar A.M.; Araujo, Fernando C.; Quaresma, Juarez A.S.; Vasconcelos, Barbara C.B.; Queiroz, Maria G.L.; Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth S.; Henriques, Daniele F.; Silva, Eliana V.P.; Chiang, Jannifer O.; Martins, Lívia C.; Medeiros, Daniele B.A.; Lima, Juliana A.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.; Cardoso, Jedson F.; Silva, Sandro P.; Shi, Pei-Yong; Tesh, Robert B.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) was first detected in Brazil in May 2015 and the country experienced an explosive epidemic. However, recent studies indicate that the introduction of ZIKV occurred in late 2013. Cases of microcephaly and deaths associated with ZIKV infection were identified in Brazil in November, 2015. Objectives To determine the etiology of three fatal adult cases. Study design Here we report three fatal adult cases of ZIKV disease. ZIKV infection in these patients was confirmed by cells culture and/or real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and by antigen detection using immunohistochemical assay. Samples of brain and other selected organs taken at autopsy from three patients were also analyzed by histopathological and immunohistological examination. Results The first patient, a 36-year-old man with lupus and receiving prednisone therapy, developed a fulminant ZIKV infection. At autopsy, RT-qPCR of blood and tissues was positive for ZIKV RNA, and the virus was cultured from an organ homogenate. The second patient, a previously healthy female, 16 years of age, presented classic symptoms of Zika fever, but later developed severe thrombocytopenia, anemia and hemorrhagic manifestations and died. A blood sample taken on the seventh day of her illness was positive RT-PCR for ZIKV RNA and research in the serum was positive for antinuclear factor fine speckled (1/640), suggesting Evans syndrome (hemolytic anemia an autoimmune disorder with immune thrombocytopenic purpura) secondary to ZIKV infection. The third patient was a 20-year-old woman hospitalized with fever, pneumonia and hemorrhages, who died on 13 days after admission. Histopathological changes were observed in all viscera examined. ZIKV antigens were detected by immunohistochemistry in viscera specimens of patients 1 and 3. These three cases demonstrate other potential complications of ZIKV infection, in addition to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), and

  16. Transition of Thalassaemia and Friedreich ataxia from fatal to chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kolnagou, Annita; Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2014-01-01

    Thalassaemia major (TM) and Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) are autosomal recessive inherited diseases related to the proteins haemoglobin and frataxin respectively. In both diseases abnormalities in iron metabolism is the main cause of iron toxicity leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Major efforts are directed towards the prevention of these diseases and also in their treatment using iron chelation therapy. Both TM and FA are endemic in Cyprus, where the frequency per total population of asymptomatic heterozygote carriers and patients is the highest worldwide. Cyprus has been a pioneering nation in preventing and nearly eliminating the birth of TM and FA patients by introducing an organized health structure, including prenatal and antenatal diagnosis. Effective iron chelation therapy, improved diagnostic methods and transfusion techniques as well as supportive therapy from other clinical specializations have improved the survival and quality of life of TM patients. Despite the tiresome clinical management regimes many TM patients are successful in their professional lives, have families with children and some are now living well into their fifties. The introduction of deferiprone led to the elimination of cardiac failure induced by iron overload toxicity, which was the major cause of mortality in TM. Effective combinations of deferiprone with deferoxamine in TM patients caused the fall of body iron to normal physiological ranges. In FA different mechanisms of iron metabolism and toxicity apply to that of TM, which can be targeted with specific iron chelation protocols. Preliminary findings from the introduction of deferiprone in FA patients have increased the hopes for improved and effective therapy in this untreatable condition. New and personalised treatments are proposed in TM and FA. Overall, advances in treatments and in particular of chelation therapy using deferiprone are transforming TM and FA from fatal to chronic conditions. The paradigm of Cyprus

  17. Fatal acute poisoning from massive inhalation of gasoline vapors: case report and comparison with similar cases.

    PubMed

    Papi, Luigi; Chericoni, Silvio; Bresci, Francesco; Giusiani, Mario

    2013-03-01

    We describe a case of an acute lethal poisoning with hydrocarbons resulting from massive accidental inhalation of gasoline vapors. The victim, a 50-year-old man was found unconscious inside a control room for the transport of unleaded fuel. Complete autopsy was performed and showed evidence of congestion and edema of the lungs. Toxicological investigation was therefore fundamental to confirm exposure to fumes of gasoline. Both venous and arterial blood showed high values of volatiles in particular for benzene (39.0 and 30.4 μg/mL, respectively), toluene (23.7 and 20.4 μg/mL), and xylene isomers (29.8 and 19.3 μg/mL). The relatively low values found in the lungs are consistent with the fact that the subject, during the rescue, underwent orotracheal intubation followed by resuscitation techniques, while the low concentrations for all substances found in urine and kidneys could point to a death that occurred in a very short time after first contact with the fumes of gasoline.

  18. Therapeutic effect of long-term melatonin treatment on the course and fatal outcome of modeled acute radiation sickness.

    PubMed

    Vasin, M V; Ushakov, I B; Kovtun, V Yu; Semenova, L A; Koroleva, L V; Galkin, A A; Afanas'ev, R V

    2014-04-01

    We studied the effect of long-term administration of melatonin to male C57Bl/6 mice starting from day 3 after whole-body γ-irradiation (9.5-10.0 Gy, 7.7-17.1 cGy/min). It was found that replacement of drinking water with melatonin solution (5 mg/liter) did not reduce the amount of fluid intake throughout the period of acute radiation injury. The daily dose of melatonin was 0.9-1.2 mg/kg body weight (this parameter was lower at the peak of the disease and increased during the recovery stage). Melatonin by more than 20% (p<0.05) improved survival of mice exposed to γ-irradiation in a dose of LD97/30, reduced leukopenia during the stage of acute manifestations of the disease and maximum mortality, and increased blood leukocyte count by 40% (p<0.05) by day 12 after irradiation.

  19. A large Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Pamplona, Spain: early detection, rapid control and no case fatality

    PubMed Central

    CASTILLA, J.; BARRICARTE, A.; ALDAZ, J.; GARCÍA CENOZ, M.; FERRER, T.; PELAZ, C.; PINEDA, S.; BALADRÓN, B.; MARTÍN, I.; GOÑI, B.; ARATAJO, P.; CHAMORRO, J.; LAMEIRO, F.; TORROBA, L.; DORRONSORO, I.; MARTÍNEZ-ARTOLA, V.; ESPARZA, M. J.; GASTAMINZA, M. A.; FRAILE, P.; ALDAZ, P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY An outbreak of Legionnaire's disease was detected in Pamplona, Spain, on 1 June 2006. Patients with pneumonia were tested to detect Legionella pneumophila antigen in urine (Binax Now; Binax Inc., Scarborough, ME, USA), and all 146 confirmed cases were interviewed. The outbreak was related to district 2 (22 012 inhabitants), where 45% of the cases lived and 50% had visited; 5% lived in neighbouring districts. The highest incidence was found in the resident population of district 2 (3/1000 inhabitants), section 2 (14/1000). All 31 cooling towers of district 2 were analysed. L. pneumophila antigen (Binax Now) was detected in four towers, which were closed on 2 June. Only the strain isolated in a tower situated in section 2 of district 2 matched all five clinical isolates, as assessed by mAb and two genotyping methods, AFLP and PFGE. Eight days after closing the towers, new cases ceased appearing. Early detection and rapid coordinated medical and environmental actions permitted immediate control of the outbreak and probably contributed to the null case fatality. PMID:17662166

  20. Comparison of the injury severity and medical history of disease-related versus trauma-related bicyclist fatalities.

    PubMed

    Hitosugi, Masahito; Koseki, Takeshi; Miyama, Genta; Furukawa, Satoshi; Morita, Satomu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between injury severity and mechanism of death in bicycle fatalities resulting from trauma compared with those resulting from disease, to propose effective measures to prevent fatal bicyclist accidents. Autopsy and accident records were reviewed for bicyclist fatalities who had undergone forensic autopsy at the Dokkyo Medical University School of Medicine between September 1999 and March 2014. Victims' health histories, blood alcohol levels, causes of death, mechanisms of injury, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scores and Injury Severity Scores (ISSs) were determined. Fifty-five bicyclists (43 male and 12 female) with a mean age of 62.5±17.3 years were included in this study. Sixteen victims had driven under the influence of alcohol (mean blood concentration of 1.8±0.7 mg/ml). Mean ISS was 32.4 and the chest had the highest mean AIS score (2.6), followed by the head (2.1) and the neck (1.8). Thirty-nine victims (70.9%) had died of trauma and 16 had died of disease. The disease-death victims had significantly higher prevalence of having diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, heart disease or cerebrovascular diseases (50.0% vs. 22.2%, p=0.03) and a lower rate of drunk driving (6.3% vs. 41.0%, p=0.01) than the trauma-death group. All victims who were affected by disease, and 33.3% of trauma-death victims, had fallen on the road without a vehicle collision (p<0.001). The mean ISS of the trauma-death group was significantly higher than that of the disease-death group (44.0 vs. 4.2, p<0.001). Except for facial injuries, the AIS scores were significantly higher in trauma-death victims than in the disease-death group (p<0.005). To effectively reduce bicyclist fatalities, the authors strongly advocate efforts that will increase compliance with drunk driving prohibitions. For victims of fatal bicycle accidents with a medical history of diseases, a forensic autopsy should be performed to establish a

  1. Low levels of interleukin-8 and interferon-inducible protein-10 in serum are associated with fatal infections in acute Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, S; Bausch, D G; Thomas, R L; Goba, A; Bah, A; Peters, C J; Rollin, P E

    2001-06-15

    To investigate the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of Lassa fever, the levels of a number of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in serum samples collected from hospitalized patients with fatal and nonfatal acute Lassa fever were compared with those from 2 control groups: patients with other febrile illnesses and uninfected individuals. Serum interleukin (IL)-8 and interferon (IFN)-inducible protein (IP)-10 levels were significantly higher in patients with acute nonfatal Lassa fever than in control subjects. In striking contrast, levels of these chemokines were low or undetectable in patients with fatal Lassa fever. IFN-gamma, IL-12, IL-6, and RANTES levels were elevated in all the febrile study groups. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were not elevated in patients with fatal or nonfatal Lassa fever. These data indicate that acute nonfatal Lassa fever is associated with high levels of circulating IL-8 and IP-10 and that low levels or absence of these mediators correlates with a poor outcome.

  2. Fatal herpesvirus hemorrhagic disease in wild and orphan asian elephants in southern India.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Arun; Zong, Jian-Chao; Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Heaggans, Sarah Y; Richman, Laura K; Hayward, Gary S

    2013-04-01

    Up to 65% of deaths of young Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) between 3 mo and 15 yr of age in Europe and North America over the past 20 yr have been attributed to hemorrhagic disease associated with a novel DNA virus called elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV). To evaluate the potential role of EEHV in suspected cases of a similar lethal acute hemorrhagic disease occurring in southern India, we studied pathologic tissue samples collected from field necropsies. Nine cases among both orphaned camp and wild Asian elephants were identified by diagnostic PCR. These were subjected to detailed gene subtype DNA sequencing at multiple PCR loci, which revealed seven distinct strains of EEHV1A and one of EEHV1B. Two orphan calves that died within 3 days of one another at the same training camp had identical EEHV1A DNA sequences, indicating a common epidemiologic source. However, the high level of EEHV1 subtype genetic diversity found among the other Indian strains matches that among over 30 EEHV1 strains that have been evaluated from Europe and North America. These results argue against the previous suggestions that this is just a disease of captive elephants and that the EEHV1 virus has crossed recently from African elephant (Loxodonta africana) hosts to Asian elephants. Instead, both the virus and the disease are evidently widespread in Asia and, despite the disease severity, Asian elephants appear to be the ancient endogenous hosts of both EEHV1A and EEHV1B.

  3. Acute myocardial infarction after heart irradiation in young patients with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, H.

    1989-02-01

    Forty-seven patients younger than 40 years at the time of the diagnosis, and irradiated to the mediastinum for Hodgkin's disease at Turku University Central Hospital from 1977 to 1982, were regularly followed for 56 to 127 months after therapy. Two patients developed an acute myocardial infarction ten and 50 months after cardiac irradiation at the age of only 28 and 24 years, respectively. None of the patients died from lymphoma within five years from the diagnosis, but one of the infarctions was eventually fatal. Since acute myocardial infarction is rare in this age group, the result suggests strongly that prior cardiac irradiation is a risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. The possibility of radiation-induced myocardial infarction should be taken into account both in treatment planning and follow-up of patients with Hodgkin's disease.

  4. Clinico-Pathologic Features of Fatal Disease Attributed to New Variants of Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses in Two Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Garner, M. M.; Helmick, K.; Ochsenreiter, J.; Richman, L. K.; Latimer, E.; Wise, A. G.; Maes, R. K.; Kiupel, M.; Nordhausen, R. W.; Zong, J. C.; Hayward, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    The first herpesviruses described in association with serious elephant disease were referred to as endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHV) because of their ability to infect capillary endothelial cells and cause potentially fatal disease. Two related viruses, EEHV1 and EEHV2, have been described based on genetic composition. This report describes the similarities and differences in clinicopathologic features of 2 cases of fatal endotheliotropic herpesvirus infections in Asian elephants caused by a previously unrecognized virus within the betaherpesvirus subfamily that is markedly divergent from the 2 previously studied fatal probosciviruses, based on polymerase chain reaction sequence analysis of 2 segments of the viral genome. In addition to ascites, widespread visceral edema, petechiae, and capillary damage previously reported, important additional findings with EEHV3 infection were the presence of grossly visible renal medullary hemorrhage, a tropism for larger veins and arteries in various tissues, relatively high density of renal herpetic inclusions, and involvement of the retinal vessels. These findings indicate a less selective organ tropism, and this may confer a higher degree of virulence for EEHV3. PMID:19112123

  5. Fulminant hepatitis and fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell disease) coincident with clarithromycin administration in an alcoholic patient receiving disulfiram therapy.

    PubMed

    Masiá, Mar; Gutiérrez, Félix; Jimeno, Araceli; Navarro, Andrés; Borrás, Joaquín; Matarredona, Jaime; Martín-Hidalgo, Alberto

    2002-02-25

    Disulfiram is widely used in the treatment of chronic alcoholism. Adverse drug reactions with fatal outcome following disulfiram therapy are infrequent, and hepatic failure accounts for most of them. Since disulfiram is a cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system inhibitor, numerous interactions with several drugs metabolized in the liver have been reported. Like disulfiram, clarithromycin inhibits a CYP450 isoenzyme, but, despite its widespread use for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, no interactions with disulfiram have been described as yet. We report a case of fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell disease) and fulminant hepatitis shortly after starting treatment with clarithromycin in a patient who was receiving disulfiram. This is the first case of such a severe dermatosis in a patient receiving either disulfiram or clarithromycin therapy. The temporal relationship between drug administration and clinical symptoms in this case suggests a probable interaction between the 2 drugs.

  6. High activity of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase enzyme predicts disease severity and case fatality in bacteremic patients.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Reetta; Syrjänen, Jaana; Aittoniemi, Janne; Oja, Simo S; Raitala, Annika; Laine, Janne; Pertovaara, Marja; Vuento, Risto; Huhtala, Heini; Hurme, Mikko

    2010-02-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which is the rate-limiting enzyme for tryptophan (trp) catabolism, may play a critical role in various inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on trauma patients have suggested that the degradation of trp is associated with the development of sepsis. The role of IDO activity in bacteremic patients is unclear. We studied IDO activity in 132 patients with bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, beta-hemolytic streptococcae, or Eschericia coli. The serum concentrations of trp and its metabolite kynurenine (kyn) were measured by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography 1 to 4 days after the positive blood culture and on recovery. The kyn-to-trp ratio (kyn/trp), reflecting the activity of the IDO enzyme, was calculated. The maximum value in the ratio for every patient during 1 to 4 days after positive blood culture was used in analysis. The maximum kyn/trp ratio was significantly higher in nonsurvivors versus those who survived (193.7 vs. 82.4 micromol/mmol; P = 0.001). The AUC(ROC) of maximal kyn/trp in the prediction of case fatality was 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.87), and the kyn/trp ratio at a cutoff level of 120 micromol/mmol showed 83% sensitivity and 69% specificity for fatal disease. A kyn/trp ratio greater than 120 micromol/mmol was associated with increased risk of death versus low (fatality in a multivariate model adjusted for potential confounders. The data in this report demonstrate that IDO activity is markedly increased in bacteremia patients, constituting an independent predictor of severe disease and case fatality.

  7. High Plasma Level of Long Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) Is Associated with Fatal Disease in Bacteremic Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Reetta; Hurme, Mikko; Aittoniemi, Janne; Huhtala, Heini; Vuento, Risto; Laine, Janne; Jylhävä, Juulia; Syrjänen, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is an acute-phase protein secreted by various cells, including leukocytes and endothelial cells. Like C-reactive protein (CRP), it belongs to the pentraxin superfamily. Recent studies indicate that high levels of PTX3 may be associated with mortality in sepsis. The prognostic value of plasma PTX3 in bacteremic patients is unknown. Methods Plasma PTX3 levels were measured in 132 patients with bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, β-hemolytic streptococcae and Escherichia coli, using a commercial solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Values were measured on days 1–4 after positive blood culture, on day 13–18 and on recovery. Results The maximum PTX3 values on days 1–4 were markedly higher in nonsurvivors compared to survivors (44.8 vs 6.4 ng/ml, p<0.001) and the AUCROC in the prediction of case fatality was 0.82 (95% CI 0.73–0.91). PTX3 at a cut-off level of 15 ng/ml showed 72% sensitivity and 81% specificity for fatal disease. High PTX3 (>15 ng/ml) was associated with hypotension (MAP <70 mmHg)(OR 7.9;95% CI 3.3–19.0) and high SOFA score (≥4)(OR 13.2; 95% CI 4.9–35.4). The CRP level (maximum value on days 1 to 4) did not predict case fatality at any cut-off level in the ROC curve (p = 0.132). High PTX3 (>15 ng/ml) remained an independent risk factor for case fatality in a logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Conclusions PTX3 proved to be a specific independent prognostic biomarker in bacteremia. PTX3 during the first days after diagnosis showed better prognostic value as compared to CRP, a widely used biomarker in clinical settings. PTX3 measurement offers a novel opportunity for the prognostic stratification of bacteremia patients. PMID:21423699

  8. Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis during primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Liana; Gulletta, Maurizio; Coppini, Davide; Donzelli, Carla; Stellini, Roberto; Manca, Nino; Carosi, Giampiero; Matteelli, Alberto

    2007-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a well recognized manifestation of AIDS, but the disseminated disease is a rare condition and it has not been associated to HIV seroconversion to our knowledge. We describe a fatal episode of disseminated T. gondii acute infection with massive organ involvement during primary HIV infection. The serological data demonstrate primary T. gondii infection. The avidity index for HIV antibodies supports recent HIV-1 infection.

  9. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    In this review article, we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim, namely, evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease. In fact, the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue. In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with “diopathic”pancreatitis, we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis. Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low, we believe that in the future, by increasing our knowledge on the subject, we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:18286678

  10. Transition from an autoimmune-prone state to fatal autoimmune disease in CCR7 and RORγt double-deficient mice is dependent on gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wichner, Katharina; Fischer, André; Winter, Susann; Tetzlaff, Solveig; Heimesaat, Markus M; Bereswill, Stefan; Rehm, Armin; Lipp, Martin; Höpken, Uta E

    2013-12-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with a strong genetic component, but onset and persistence of clinically apparent autoimmune diseases often require an additional environmental trigger. The balance between immunity and tolerance is regulated by numerous molecular factors including nuclear hormone and homeostatic chemokine receptors. The nuclear hormone receptor RORγt and the chemokine receptor CCR7 are both essentially involved in functional lymphoid organogenesis and maintenance of lymphocyte homeostasis. Lack of one or the other impairs thymic T cell development and alters T cell homeostasis. Mice deficient for both, Ccr7(-/-)Rorγt(-/-), succumbed early to acute destructive inflammation, characterized by massive recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes, pro-inflammatory cytokine and autoantibody production, and wasting disease. Antibiotic-treatment of mice before disease onset reduced the overall gut microflora and abrogated the development of fatal mucosal inflammation. Hence, commensal bacteria and a confined tissue-specific inflammatory milieu serve as complementary trigger to initiate the lethal pathophysiologic process in Ccr7(-/-)Rorγt(-/-) mice.

  11. Fatal paradoxical cryptic miliary tuberculosis and immune reconstitution disease in a young non-HIV immunocompromised male patient: case report with autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Man, Milena Adina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Man, Sorin; Streba, Costin Teodor; Olteanu, Mihai; Nitu, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    Non-HIV immunocompromised patients may develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) as an abnormal response to invading microorganisms, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). IRIS consists in a sudden change in the dominant T-helper responses to inflammation, which is not balanced by anti-inflammatory response, playing a critical role in microbial pathogenesis. A patient with restoration of host immunity during anti-tuberculosis treatment can become gravely ill with a paradoxical severe form of tuberculosis (TB) disease named TB immune reconstitution disease (IRD).The diagnosis of acute cryptic miliary TB is difficult and requires an accurate histopathology. We report a fatal association between a generalized lymphadenitis tuberculosis and IRD in a 34-year-old male patient, non-smoker, non-HIV immunocompromised, but with a previously co-morbid diabetes mellitus (DM) type I. The purpose of this report is to describe an unusual and rare case of a progressive extrapulmonary TB disease to a liver involvement, mimicking a hepatotoxicity secondary to anti-tuberculosis therapy. The diagnosis of disseminated miliary TB with cryptic pulmonary was confirmed later after performing necropsy. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pulmonary and extrapulmonary miliary foci were processed for histology and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. This rare entity of cryptic miliary involvement of the lungs is described more in elderly than in young individuals. In the reported case, IRD induced a paradoxical progressive dissemination of TB lesions leading to death in a patient with an apparent uncomplicated form of lymphadenitis TB.

  12. Cathelicidin Insufficiency in Patients with Fatal Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jin-na; Mannam, Praveen; Srivastava, Anup; Yao, Yi; Hacker, Kathryn P.; Raddassi, Khadir; Montgomery, Ruth R.; Shaw, Albert C.; Araújo, Guilherme C.; Nery, Nivison; Relman, David A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide; however, the role of the host immune response in disease progression and high case fatality (>10–50%) is poorly understood. We conducted a multi-parameter investigation of patients with acute leptospirosis to identify mechanisms associated with case fatality. Whole blood transcriptional profiling of 16 hospitalized Brazilian patients with acute leptospirosis (13 survivors, 3 deceased) revealed fatal cases had lower expression of the antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin, and chemokines, but more abundant pro-inflammatory cytokine receptors. In contrast, survivors generated strong adaptive immune signatures, including transcripts relevant to antigen presentation and immunoglobulin production. In an independent cohort (23 survivors, 22 deceased), fatal cases had higher bacterial loads (P = 0.0004) and lower anti-Leptospira antibody titers (P = 0.02) at the time of hospitalization, independent of the duration of illness. Low serum cathelicidin and RANTES levels during acute illness were independent risk factors for higher bacterial loads (P = 0.005) and death (P = 0.04), respectively. To investigate the mechanism of cathelicidin in patients surviving acute disease, we administered LL-37, the active peptide of cathelicidin, in a hamster model of lethal leptospirosis and found it significantly decreased bacterial loads and increased survival. Our findings indicate that the host immune response plays a central role in severe leptospirosis disease progression. While drawn from a limited study size, significant conclusions include that poor clinical outcomes are associated with high systemic bacterial loads, and a decreased antibody response. Furthermore, our data identified a key role for the antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin, in mounting an effective bactericidal response against the pathogen, which represents a valuable new therapeutic approach for leptospirosis. PMID:27812211

  13. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Fatal Cryptococcal Meningitis After Immunosuppression in a Patient With Elderly Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Dipesh H.; Limdi, Jimmy K.; Borg-Bartolo, Simon P.; Bonington, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age and associated comorbidities are-recognized predictors of life-threatening adverse outcomes, such as opportunistic infection following immunosuppressive therapy. We describe the case of an elderly patient with stricturing colonic Crohn’s disease and significant clinical comorbidities, initially controlled with corticosteroid induction followed by infliximab, whose course was complicated by fatal disseminated cryptococcal infection and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Our patient’s case highlights rare, but serious, complications of immunosuppression. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this potentially vulnerable group, maximizing benefit and minimizing harm. PMID:27807560

  14. Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis. A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Babyatsky, Mark

    2015-03-20

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40-50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however, majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  15. Clinical and Pathological Findings of a Fatal Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Zancanaro, Andrea; Serafini, Francesco; Fantin, Giuseppe; Murer, Bruno; Cicardi, Marco; Bonanni, Luca; Dalla Vestra, Michele; Scanferlato, Mauro; Mazzanti, Giovanni; Presotto, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is a rare disorder with episodes of hypotension, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. During attacks endothelial hyperpermeability results in leakage of plasma proteins into the interstitial space. Attacks vary in severity and may be lethal. A 49-year-old previously healthy man was admitted to hospital for hypovolemic shock, anasarca with pleuropericardial effusion, muscle fatigue, and oliguria occurring after a flu-like syndrome. Laboratory data showed an increase in hematocrit (65%), leucocytes (24.590 μ/L), creatinine (2.5 mg/dL), creatine phosphokinase (10.000 U/L), and a decrease in serum albumin (17 g/L) without proteinuria. Immunoglobulins of class G/λ monoclonal gammopathy were detected (1.3 g/L). The initial suspicions addressed to a protein-loosing syndrome or to an effort-related rhabdomyolysis. Initial therapy was based on steroids, albumin, and high molecular weight plasma expanders (hydroxyethyl starch). Because of high hematocrit, phlebotomy was also performed. The patient had complete clinical remission and a diagnosis of SCLS was finally made. He received prophylactic therapy with verapamil and theophylline that was self-stopped for intolerance (hypotension and tachycardia). He had a new crisis 2 days after a physical effort, and was admitted in intensive care unit. The patient died for severe hypovolemic shock with multiorgan failure and sudden cardiac arrest 15 hours after hospital admission. Postmortem investigation revealed massive interstitial edema of main organs with myocardial hyperacute ischemia. Studies on SCLS are limited for the rarity of the disease and its unpredictable course. Both prophylactic and acute crisis treatments are empirical and optimal management of severe attacks is still lacking. PMID:25738482

  16. Clinical and pathological findings of a fatal systemic capillary leak syndrome (Clarkson disease): a case report.

    PubMed

    Zancanaro, Andrea; Serafini, Francesco; Fantin, Giuseppe; Murer, Bruno; Cicardi, Marco; Bonanni, Luca; Dalla Vestra, Michele; Scanferlato, Mauro; Mazzanti, Giovanni; Presotto, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is a rare disorder with episodes of hypotension, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. During attacks endothelial hyperpermeability results in leakage of plasma proteins into the interstitial space. Attacks vary in severity and may be lethal.A 49-year-old previously healthy man was admitted to hospital for hypovolemic shock, anasarca with pleuropericardial effusion, muscle fatigue, and oliguria occurring after a flu-like syndrome. Laboratory data showed an increase in hematocrit (65%), leucocytes (24.590 μ/L), creatinine (2.5 mg/dL), creatine phosphokinase (10.000 U/L), and a decrease in serum albumin (17 g/L) without proteinuria. Immunoglobulins of class G/λ monoclonal gammopathy were detected (1.3 g/L). The initial suspicions addressed to a protein-loosing syndrome or to an effort-related rhabdomyolysis. Initial therapy was based on steroids, albumin, and high molecular weight plasma expanders (hydroxyethyl starch). Because of high hematocrit, phlebotomy was also performed. The patient had complete clinical remission and a diagnosis of SCLS was finally made. He received prophylactic therapy with verapamil and theophylline that was self-stopped for intolerance (hypotension and tachycardia). He had a new crisis 2 days after a physical effort, and was admitted in intensive care unit. The patient died for severe hypovolemic shock with multiorgan failure and sudden cardiac arrest 15 hours after hospital admission. Postmortem investigation revealed massive interstitial edema of main organs with myocardial hyperacute ischemia.Studies on SCLS are limited for the rarity of the disease and its unpredictable course. Both prophylactic and acute crisis treatments are empirical and optimal management of severe attacks is still lacking.

  17. Musculoskeletal disease and injury, now and in the future. Part 1: fractures and fatalities.

    PubMed

    Clegg, P D

    2011-11-01

    Orthopaedic injury is common in the racing Thoroughbred and is a cause of both economic loss to the industry, as well as being an obvious welfare issue. Fatal injuries sustained during racing are an obvious major concern and it is important that all is done to reduce their frequency. As a consequence of the importance of these causes of horse morbidity and mortality, the Horserace Betting Levy Board in the UK has invested considerable resources into research in recent years in this area in an attempt to decrease the frequency of such injuries. This review summarises current knowledge relating to epidemiological investigations relating to fractures, falling and fatalities in the racing Thoroughbred. Studies identify the importance of track surface conditions, the importance of pre-existing orthopaedic pathology, as well as issues relating to the horse's past training and racing experience as important determinants of both injury and death. Such findings can now be used to develop interventions to reduce racehorse injury and death for the benefit of both the industry and the horse.

  18. Stimulation causing the double effect as in dyspraxia, a universal mechanism of disease, and auto-electrocution, the fatal factor.

    PubMed

    Baggot, M G

    1993-05-01

    Almost every action in the body involves the nervous system which uses electricity for its speed and versatility. Operating and controlling muscular activity is a major function of the nervous system. Muscles are paired so every normal contraction requires a reciprocal relaxation of its doppelganger (Newton said 'Equal and opposite'). Minor failures of co-operation, i.e. neuromuscular dysfunction make common survivable diseases. Multiple and major stimuli can create chaotic conflicts within these couplings and lead to fatalities. Excessive, abnormal, even ordinary stimulation will cause the (irritable?) partner(s) which should relax also to contract. Thus function is impaired or impossible. In the limbs faulty neuromuscular co-ordination is obvious as stiffness, Parkinson's Disease, Erb's Palsy etc. Less evident, it is even more important in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory systems.

  19. Investigation of Burkholderia cepacia nosocomial outbreak with high fatality in patients suffering from diseases other than cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, Asem A; Abu-Al-Soud, Waleed; Mahafzah, Azmi; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Abu Khader, Ilham; Ouis, Ibn-Sina; Wadström, Torkel

    2004-01-01

    Over a 1-y period, 26 inpatients at the Jordan University Hospital in Amman were detected with bacteraemia (23 cases) or respiratory tract colonized with B. cepacia (3 cases). A combination of genetic identification and molecular typing has proved that all cases were caused by a single epidemic strain of B. cepacia genomovar IIIa. Nosocomial infections could be documented in 21/26 (81%) patients, mostly with severe underlying or malignant diseases other than cystic fibrosis, but the source of infection was undetected. The overall mortality related to infection with B. cepacia was 42%. All B. cepacia isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amikacin, carbenicillin and gentamicin; and mostly susceptible to piperacillin, chloramphenicol, cotri-moxazole, tetracycline, ceftazidime, and tazocin (62-88%). This study demonstrates the nosocomial and high fatality of B. cepacia genomovar IIIa in Jordanian patients suffering from diseases other than cystic fibrosis.

  20. Transgenic fatal familial insomnia mice indicate prion infectivity-independent mechanisms of pathogenesis and phenotypic expression of disease.

    PubMed

    Bouybayoune, Ihssane; Mantovani, Susanna; Del Gallo, Federico; Bertani, Ilaria; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Tapella, Laura; Baracchi, Francesca; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Mangieri, Michela; Bisighini, Cinzia; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Paladini, Alessandra; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Castilla, Joaquín; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Imeri, Luca; Chiesa, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178) are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP) mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD) mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype.

  1. Transgenic Fatal Familial Insomnia Mice Indicate Prion Infectivity-Independent Mechanisms of Pathogenesis and Phenotypic Expression of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouybayoune, Ihssane; Mantovani, Susanna; Del Gallo, Federico; Bertani, Ilaria; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Tapella, Laura; Baracchi, Francesca; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Mangieri, Michela; Bisighini, Cinzia; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Paladini, Alessandra; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Castilla, Joaquín; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Imeri, Luca; Chiesa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178) are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP) mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD) mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype. PMID:25880443

  2. Informing the patient about a fatal disease: from paternalism to autonomy--the Jewish view.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Until the late 20th century, withholding a fatal diagnosis functioned as a paradigm for sharing other medical information with patients. The obligation of confidentiality was emphasized and disclosure was ignored. Ethicists perceived the doctor-patient relationship as oriented to therapy, reassurance, and avoiding harm. Physicians were to provide lies and truth instrumentally only insofar as they aided therapy (Jameton, A. Information disclosure. Ethical issues. In Encyclopedia of Bioethics. Revised Ed.; Reich, T.N.T., Ed.; MacMillan: New York, 1995; Vol. 3, 1225-1232). This was the era of paternalism. Since the 1960s, opinion on the role of disclosure was changed rapidly in the United States stimulated by the patient's rights movement and the rise of bioethics. The current climate supports honest and complete disclosure of medical information. In 1972, the Board of Trustees of the American Hospital Association affirmed A Patient's Bill of Rights, which states that the patient has the right to obtain from his physician complete current information concerning his diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis in terms the patient can be reasonably expected to understand (Lee, A.L.; Jacobs, G. Workshop airs patient's rights. Hospitals 1973, 47, 39-43). Bioethicists now favor full disclosure as a means of respecting patient autonomy (Katz, J. The Silent World of Doctor and Patient; Free Press: New York, 1984). The American College of Physician Ethics Manual states that disclosure to patients is a fundamental ethical requirement (American College of Physicians. American College of Physicians Ethics Manual, 3rd Ed. Ann. Intern. Med. 1992, 117, 947-960). The era of patient autonomy ended the traditional pattern of withholding information, which was characteristic of the previous era of paternalism. The Jewish view toward full disclosure of a fatal illness to a patient and especially a patient who is terminally ill is in general a negative one because of the fear that the patient

  3. Legionnaire's Disease and Acute Renal Failure: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Boucree, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    A case report is presented of a young man admitted to a general hospital with leukocytosis, elevated temperature, right lower lobe infiltrate, and confusion. A diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, and Legionnaire's disease was made. The patient subsequently had a respiratory arrest and died on the 29th hospital day. This triad is currently an enigma in the field of internal medicine. The diagnosis of each entity is elusive, and in many cases must be made by the astute clinician. Diagnostic features along with early intervention measures and their expected outcomes are discussed. Recognition of the interrelationship of these diseases, risk factors, and vague clinical presentations might allow further prospective intervention methods and diagnostic procedures to be undertaken to avoid the fatal consequences seen in this disease triad. PMID:3074172

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    PubMed

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD?

  5. [Acute meningococcal disease. Its prognostic assessment].

    PubMed

    Bermúdez de la Vega, J A; Gómez Calzado, A; Sobrino Toro, M; Alejo Garcia-Mauricio, A; Romero Cachaza, J; González Hachero, J

    1993-09-01

    We have studied 50 children affected with acute meningococcal disease (AMD). The ages of the children varied between 4 months and 12.58 years, with a mean age of 4.58 years. By using the shock state and DIC syndrome, both of which are indications of the severity of the illness, an evaluation of the discriminatory capacity was done with regard to significantly associate variables and 3 scores, Bjorvatn, Leclerc and PRISM, throughout 8 intervals within the first 48 hours of hospital treatment. We observed a very high survival rate (98%) associated with the early treatment for shock. Leukopenia and disseminated purpura were the best variables in order to discriminate shock and DIC, respectively. The greatest capacity for the diagnosis of the shock state and DIC syndrome were registered during the 0-6 hour period and the 0-12 hour period, respectively. The prognosis improved if the child remained alive 12 hours after the treatment had begun.

  6. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  7. Fatal Bacillus cereus endocarditis masquerading as an anthrax-like infection in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report.

    PubMed

    Cone, Lawrence A; Dreisbach, Luke; Potts, Barbara E; Comess, Barbara E; Burleigh, William A

    2005-01-01

    A 38-year-old male farm worker with relapsing acute lymphoblastic leukemia spontaneously developed an ulcerating ulcer on his anterior thigh which was surrounded by a non-tender area of erythema. Bacillus cereus was isolated from the ulcer and blood, and the patient received intravenous penicillin and vancomycin for one week. When sensitivity studies were returned he was treated with gatifloxacin orally. After two weeks of combined antimicrobial therapy and negative blood cultures, the patient received combination chemotherapy with vincristine, prednisone, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide. He was hospitalized a day after completing chemotherapy with neutropenic sepsis due to B. cereus. He received similar antimicrobial therapy as previously, but died three days later. At autopsy, the patient was found to have acute mitral valve endocarditis and bilateral brain abscesses. This was the first case of B. cereus endocarditis reported in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  8. Investigating and managing the rapid emergence of white-nose syndrome, a novel, fatal, infectious disease of hibernating bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Janet; Clifford, Deana; Castle, Kevin; Cryan, Paul M.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fatal disease of bats that hibernate. The etiologic agent of WNS is the fungus Geomyces destructans, which infects the skin and wing membranes. Over 1 million bats in six species in eastern North America have died from WNS since 2006, and as a result several species of bats may become endangered or extinct. Information is lacking on the pathogenesis of G. destructans and WNS, WNS transmission and maintenance, individual and site factors that contribute to the probability of an outbreak of WNS, and spatial dynamics of WNS spread in North America. We considered how descriptive and analytical epidemiology could be used to fill these information gaps, including a four-step (modified) outbreak investigation, application of a set of criteria (Hill's) for assessing causation, compartment models of disease dynamics, and spatial modeling. We cataloged and critiqued adaptive-management options that have been either previously proposed for WNS or were helpful in addressing other emerging diseases of wild animals. These include an ongoing program of prospective surveillance of bats and hibernacula for WNS, treatment of individual bats, increasing population resistance to WNS (through vaccines, immunomodulators, or other methods), improving probability of survival from starvation and dehydration associated with WNS, modifying hibernacula environments to eliminate G. destructans, culling individuals or populations, controlling anthropogenic spread of WNS, conserving genetic diversity of bats, and educating the public about bats and bat conservation issues associated with WNS.

  9. Guidelines to implement medical examiner/coroner-based surveillance for fatal infectious diseases and bioterrorism ("Med-X").

    PubMed

    Nolte, Kurt B; Fischer, Marc; Reagan, Sarah; Lynfield, Ruth

    2010-12-01

    Medical examiners and coroners investigate deaths that are sudden, unexplained, and violent. Oftentimes these deaths are a consequence of infections, many of which have public health consequences. Additionally, because deaths from bioterrorism are homicides, they fall under the jurisdiction of medical examiners and coroners. Surveillance for infectious disease-related deaths can enhance the opportunities to recognize these deaths. Beginning in 2000, the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator developed and tested a medical examiner surveillance model for bioterrorism and infectious disease mortality ("Med-X") using a set of symptoms to determine which cases should receive an autopsy and a set of pathology-based syndromes for early reporting of cases to public health authorities. This model demonstrated that many of the symptoms had a high predictive value for infections and were useful criteria for autopsy performance. The causative organism was identified for 81% of infections of which 58% were notifiable conditions by public health standards. Uniform criteria for performing autopsies and reporting cases to public health authorities enhance surveillance for notifiable infectious diseases and increase the probability of recognizing fatalities related to bioterrorism. We have developed guidelines for medical examiners, coroners and their public health partners to use in implementing Med-X surveillance in their jurisdictions. These guidelines encompass definitions of symptoms and syndromes, specimen collection and storage procedures, laboratory diagnostic approaches, and processes for case flow, case reporting, and data collection. We also suggest resources for autopsy biosafety information and funding.

  10. Livestock drugs and disease: the fatal combination behind breeding failure in endangered bearded vultures.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Guillermo; Lemus, Jesús A

    2010-11-30

    There is increasing concern about the impact of veterinary drugs and livestock pathogens as factors damaging wildlife health, especially of threatened avian scavengers feeding upon medicated livestock carcasses. We conducted a comprehensive study of failed eggs and dead nestlings in bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus) to attempt to elucidate the proximate causes of breeding failure behind the recent decline in productivity in the Spanish Pyrenees. We found high concentrations of multiple veterinary drugs, primarily fluoroquinolones, in most failed eggs and nestlings, associated with multiple internal organ damage and livestock pathogens causing disease, especially septicaemia by swine pathogens and infectious bursal disease. The combined impact of drugs and disease as stochastic factors may result in potentially devastating effects exacerbating an already high risk of extinction and should be considered in current conservation programs for bearded vultures and other scavenger species, especially in regards to dangerous veterinary drugs and highly pathogenic poultry viruses.

  11. Livestock Drugs and Disease: The Fatal Combination behind Breeding Failure in Endangered Bearded Vultures

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Guillermo; Lemus, Jesús A.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the impact of veterinary drugs and livestock pathogens as factors damaging wildlife health, especially of threatened avian scavengers feeding upon medicated livestock carcasses. We conducted a comprehensive study of failed eggs and dead nestlings in bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus) to attempt to elucidate the proximate causes of breeding failure behind the recent decline in productivity in the Spanish Pyrenees. We found high concentrations of multiple veterinary drugs, primarily fluoroquinolones, in most failed eggs and nestlings, associated with multiple internal organ damage and livestock pathogens causing disease, especially septicaemia by swine pathogens and infectious bursal disease. The combined impact of drugs and disease as stochastic factors may result in potentially devastating effects exacerbating an already high risk of extinction and should be considered in current conservation programs for bearded vultures and other scavenger species, especially in regards to dangerous veterinary drugs and highly pathogenic poultry viruses. PMID:21152405

  12. Interstitial lung disease caused by TS-1: a case of long-term drug retention as a fatal adverse reaction.

    PubMed

    Park, Joong-Min; Hwang, In Gyu; Suh, Suk-Won; Chi, Kyong-Choun

    2011-12-01

    TS-1 is an oral anti-cancer agent for gastric cancer with a high response rate and low toxicity. We report a case of long-term drug retention of TS-1 causing interstitial lung disease (ILD) as a fatal adverse reaction. A 65-year-old woman underwent a total gastrectomy with pathologic confirmation of gastric adenocarcinoma. She received 6 cycles of TS-1 and low-dose cisplatin for post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy followed by single-agent maintenance therapy with TS-1. After 8 months, the patient complained of a productive cough with sputum and mild dyspnea. A pulmonary evaluation revealed diffuse ILD in the lung fields, bilaterally. In spite of discontinuing chemotherapy and the administration of corticosteroids, the pulmonary symptoms did not improve, and the patient died of pulmonary failure. TS-1-induced ILD can be caused by long-term drug retention that alters the lung parenchyma irreversibly, the outcome of which can be life-threatening. Pulmonary evaluation for early detection of disease is recommended.

  13. Cryoglobulins in acute and chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Florin-Christensen, A.; Roux, María E. B.; Arana, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Cryoglobulins were detected in the sera of thirteen patients with acute viral hepatitis and of twelve with chronic hepatic diseases (active chronic hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cryptogenic cirrhosis). Their nature and antibody activity was studied. In both groups, most of them consisted of mixed cryoimmunoglobulins (IgM, IgG and/or IgA), but some were single-class immunoglobulins with one or both types of light chains. Unusual components were also found. α1-fetoprotein was present in four cryoprecipitates: in two as the single constituent and in two associated to immunoglobulins; hepatitis-associated antigen co-existed in one of the latter. Some cryoglobulins showed antibody activity against human IgG, smooth muscle and mitochondrial antigens. In one case, the IgM-kappa of the cryoprecipitate had antibody activity against α1-fetoprotein; this antigen was also present in the cryoprecipitate, suggesting immune-complex formation. Autoantibodies were also looked for in the sera of the twenty-five patients; apart from the most common ones, antibodies to α1-fetoprotein were found in two patients. PMID:4143195

  14. [Fatal poison disease of a child following massive wasp stings (author's transl)[].

    PubMed

    Gädeke, R; Helwig, H; Otto, M; Schindera, F; Weineck, B

    1977-09-16

    A child aged 4 years was stung by more than 250 wasps. There was no anaphylactic shock. There rather were increasingly heavy ictero-hemorrhagic symptoms with simultaneous insufficient kidney function. On the second day of the disease disorders of the CNS started, as well as circulation insufficiency and disorder of the heart function. According to the signs there was no intravasal coagulation or hemolysis. Heavy doses of corticoids were successless, just as a peritoneal dialysis starting on the 3rd day of the disease. The child died 5 and 1/2 day after the wasps' attack. The pathophysiology and the possible therapeutic consequences of the case as well as rapid protective actions in such a case of insect attack are being discussed.

  15. AIFM1 mutation presenting with fatal encephalomyopathy and mitochondrial disease in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah U.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Lidov, Hart G.W.; Shi, Jiahai; Anselm, Irina; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Beggs, Alan H.; Vargas, Sara O.; Agrawal, Pankaj B.

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor mitochondrion-associated 1 (AIFM1), encoded by the gene AIFM1, has roles in electron transport, apoptosis, ferredoxin metabolism, reactive oxygen species generation, and immune system regulation. Here we describe a patient with a novel AIFM1 variant presenting unusually early in life with mitochondrial disease, rapid deterioration, and death. Autopsy, at the age of 4 mo, revealed features of mitochondrial encephalopathy, myopathy, and involvement of peripheral nerves with axonal degeneration. In addition, there was microvesicular steatosis in the liver, thymic noninvolution, follicular bronchiolitis, and pulmonary arterial medial hypertrophy. This report adds to the clinical and pathological spectrum of disease related to AIFM1 mutations and provides insights into the role of AIFM1 in cellular function. PMID:28299359

  16. Fatal ignorance.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The Rajiv Gandhi Foundation (RGF), together with the AIMS-affiliated NGO AIDS Cell, Delhi, held a workshop as part of an effort to raise a 90-doctor RGF AIDS workforce which will work together with nongovernmental organizations on AIDS prevention, control, and management. 25 general practitioners registered with the Indian Medical Council, who have practiced medicine in Delhi for the past 10-20 years, responded to a pre-program questionnaire on HIV-related knowledge and attitudes. 6 out of the 25 physicians did not know what the acronym AIDS stands for, extremely low awareness of the clinical aspects of the disease was revealed, 9 believed in the conspiracy theory of HIV development and accidental release by the US Central Intelligence Agency, 8 believed that AIDS is a problem of only the promiscuous, 18 did not know that the mode of HIV transmission is similar to that of the hepatitis B virus, 12 were unaware that HIV-infected people will test HIV-seronegative during the first three months after initial infection and that they will develop symptoms of full-blown AIDS only after 10 years, 10 did not know the name of even one drug used to treat the disease, 3 believed aspirin to be an effective drug against AIDS, many believed fantastic theories about the modes of HIV transmission, and many were acutely homophobic. Efforts were made to clear misconceptions about HIV during the workshop. It is hoped that participating doctors' attitudes about AIDS and the high-risk groups affected by it were also improved.

  17. The fatal disease of the Byzantine Emperor Andronicus III Palaeologus (1328-1341 AD).

    PubMed Central

    Lascaratos, J; Marketos, S

    1997-01-01

    The Byzantine Emperor Andronicus III Palaeologus (1328-1341 AD) died at age 45 from a disease the nature of which is unknown. However, light is thrown on this by the texts of the Byzantine historians John Cantacuzenus (who became Emperor under the name of John VI) and Nicephorus Gregoras, both of whom belonged to the immediate entourage of the Emperor. From their descriptions of the symptoms it appears that Andronicus suffered from malaria for 20 years (1321-1341). The coma that preceded the Emperor's death was probably a cerebral manifestation of chronic malaria. Images Figure 1 PMID:9068444

  18. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  19. Fatal course of pulmonary Absidia sp. infection in a 4-year-old girl undergoing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Krauze, Agnieszka; Krenke, Katarzyna; Matysiak, Michal; Kulus, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Absidia sp. is a rare etiologic agent responsible for infectious complications in immunosuppressed patients. The authors describe a 4-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with pleuropneumonia caused by an Absidia infection during the induction of remission. A review of the published reports in current literature is included for comparison. To the authors' knowledge only six cases of primary pulmonary absidiomycosis have been published. Despite its uncommon pulmonary presentation, mucormycosis should be considered in patients with an immunosuppressing illness and positive risk factors and when a pulmonary lesion is not responding to appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  20. A longitudinal study of disease incidence and case-fatality risks on small-holder dairy farms in coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Maloo, S H; Rowlands, G J; Thorpe, W; Gettinby, G; Perry, B D

    2001-11-02

    A longitudinal study was carried out in the coastal lowlands coconut-cassava agro-ecological zone of Kaloleni Division, Coast Province, Kenya between June 1990 and December 1991 to estimate disease incidence and cause-specific case-fatality risk in an average of 120 cattle in 26 small-holder dairy herds kept in two grazing-management systems. East Coast fever (ECF) was the predominant disease diagnosed; the mean monthly incidence rate was 2.5 and 6.9% in animals < or = 18 months of age under stall-fed and herded-grazing systems, respectively. In cattle > 18 months of age, the monthly incidence rate was < 1%. The 6-month ECF incidence rate was 20+/-8% (S.E.) in the stall-feeding system compared with 39+/-7% in the herded-grazing systems. There was a gradual increase in antibody prevalence with age to over 90% in cattle over 18 months of age in herded-grazing systems, whilst less than a third of cattle in the stall-feeding systems were sero-positive at any age. Overall accumulated mortality to 18 months of age was estimated to be 56%. Annual mortality in cattle > 18 months averaged 9%. Cattle managed in the herded-grazing system had a 60% higher mortality, although not significantly so, than those fed in stalls. Deaths due to ECF accounted for over two-thirds of the deaths. ECF was then the major disease constraint to small-holder dairy production in the coconut zone of coastal Kenya. Clinical cases occur the whole year round (especially in young stock)--despite apparent tick control, and in both herded-grazing and stall-feeding system.

  1. A fatal neuromuscular disease in an adult patient after poliomyelitis in early childhood: consideration of the pathology of post-polio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takayuki; Kuroha, Yasuko; Tada, Mari; Hasegawa, Arika; Tani, Takashi; Matsubara, Nae; Koike, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    Post-polio syndrome (PPS) characterized by new neuromuscular problems can appear many years after acute poliomyelitis in polio survivors. We report a 77-year-old man with antecedent poliomyelitis who newly developed neuromuscular disease with a clinical course of 27 years, the final 10 years of which were characterized by apparent progression, thus raising doubt as to the clinical diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) following PPS. Pathologically, plaque-like, old poliomyelitis lesions were found almost exclusively in the lumbosacral cord, showing complete neuronal loss and glial scars in the anterior horns. Although less severe, neuronal loss and gliosis were also evident outside the old lesions, including the intermediate zone. Moreover, symmetrical degeneration of the corticospinal tracts, as evidenced by CD68 immunostaining, was a feature of the white matter of the lower spinal cord. In the motor cortex, loss of Betz cells was also confirmed. Synaptophysin immunostaining of the lumbosacral cord also revealed decreased expression outside the old lesions, excluding the posterior horn. Interestingly, decreased expression of synaptophysin was also evident in the cervical anterior horns, where no old lesions were observed. No Bunina bodies, TDP-43 inclusions, or Golgi fragmentation were found. Neurogenic atrophy was evident in the iliopsoas and scalenus muscles, and inclusion body myositis-like changes were also observed in these muscles and the tongue. Was it possible to have diagnosed this patient as having ALS? We consider that the features in this case may have represented the pathology of long-standing and/or fatal PPS itself, and not ALS.

  2. Avian vacuolar myelinopathy: a newly recognized fatal neurologic disease of eagles, waterfowl, and other birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, John R.; Lewis, L.A.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife biologists and health specialists have been frustrated by a long list of negative findings in their AVM investigations, however studies continue to provide pieces of information to aid the determination of the cause and its source. Available data indicated that AVM may have been present since at least 1990, occurs in at least five states, has been documented during October through April at sites of wintering populations of birds where the exposure apparently occurs, and has killed at least 90 bald eagles. Birds with AVM have difficulty or inability to fly, swim, walk, or perch, but there has been resolution of clinical signs in some affected coots. The list of affected species continues to grow, but remains confined to wild avians, including bald eagle, American coot, great horned owl, killdeer, Canada goose, mallard, ring-necked duck and bufflehead. The effects of the AVM agent on mammals, including human beings, are unknown. A neurotoxicant of manmade or natural origin is the suspected cause of AVM because no infectious disease agents, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and prions, have been found, and the lesion and epizootiology of AVM resemble those of toxicoses. Additionally it is documented, experimentally, that exposure to raptors can occur through ingestion of infected coots. Collaborative studies will continue in the effort to identify the cause of AVM, its geographic distribution, and the range of species susceptibility. Hopefully, this information can be used to identify measures that might be taken to reduce the impact of AVM on the wildlife resource. Multiple agencies, institutions, and individuals must rely on each other's expertise in the multidisciplinary approach to this problem, persevere in their efforts and take advantage of serendipity that presents itself during investigations of this newly recognized cause of wild bird mortality.

  3. Emergencies and acute diseases in the collected works of Hippocrates: observation, examination, prognosis, therapy.

    PubMed

    Askitopoulou, Helen; Stefanakis, Georgios; Astyrakaki, Elisabeth E; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Agouridakis, Panagiotis

    2016-12-01

    The collected works οf Hippocrates include a wealth of references to emergencies and acute conditions; if the physician could treat these, he would be considered superior to his colleagues. Works most relevant to current Emergency Medicine are presented. They indicate Hippocrates' remarkable insight and attention to the value of close observation, meticulous clinical examination, and prognosis. Hippocrates and his followers disdained mystery and were not satisfied until they had discovered a rational cause to diseases. They assigned great significance to distressing signs and symptoms - the famous Hippocratic face, the breathing pattern, pain, seizures, opisthotonus - pointing to a fatal outcome, which they reported to their patient. The principles of treatment of emergencies, such as angina, haemorrhage, empyema, ileus, shoulder dislocations and head injuries, are astonishingly similar to the ones used nowadays.

  4. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  5. Pastoral care of patients with Ebola Virus Disease: A medical and canonical opinion about pastoral visits to patients with contagious and highly fatal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Stephen E.; Nguyen, Benedict T.

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola Virus Disease is a contagious and highly fatal illness that up until recently had been geographically limited to remote areas of Africa. In 2014, Ebola patients have been transported to the United States for care or have been newly diagnosed in the United States. With the intensive medical care and isolation policies usually needed by these patients, we inquired whether pastoral care would be possible. Using clinical and canonical considerations, we analyzed the permissibility and logistical challenges pastoral care presents to the priests and lay ministers, as well as the healthcare system. We conclude that with the approval of local, state, and federal health officials, pastoral care, including provision of the sacraments, is possible. It would require proper training, proper equipment and policies, and a significant commitment of time. While the risk to the pastoral team is difficult to define, it seems low in an Ebola-capable medical system. These risks to priests and ministers seem reasonable given the inestimable benefits of receiving the sacraments during critical illness. Lay summary: Traditional pastoral visits to hospitalized patients might prove difficult or impossible for diseases that are contagious and highly fatal. This inquiry examines the feasibility, challenges, and logistical solutions to these visits. With input from bishops, priests, a canon lawyer, an epidemiologist, a physician, the CDC, and others, we conclude that pastoral visits are possible. Visits will require permission of health authorities, commitments of time, training, and a small but significant risk to the health of priests and others who volunteer for this ministry. PMID:25999614

  6. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  7. Fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Hattwick, M A; Retailliau, H; O'Brien, R J; Slutzker, M; Fontaine, R E; Hanson, B

    1978-09-29

    Forty-four fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) occurring in 1974 were compared with 50 nonfatal cases of similar age, sex, date of onset, and place of occurrence. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment in fatal cases were substantially delayed compared with nonfatal cases. Several reasons for this delay were identified: (1) the rash appeared later in the course of illness in the fatal cases, often not until the patient was terminal, (2) a history of tick bite was less often obtained during life or obtained late in the clinical course in fatal cases, and (3) initial nonspecific symptoms or unexpected symptoms led to an initial diagnosis of more common diseases. Only two fatal cases were treated with either tetracycline or chloramphenicol before the sixth day of illness. Presumptive diagnosis of RMSF and initiation of tetracycline therapy before onset of rash may be necessary to reduce mortality.

  8. Association of clinical signs and symptoms of Ebola viral disease with case fatality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Chitta, Swetha; Victor, Darlyn; Kandula, Manasa; Moole, Vishnu; Ghadiam, Harshavardhan; Akepati, Anusha; Yerasi, Charan; Uppu, Achuta; Dharmapuri, Sowmya; Boddireddy, Raghuveer; Fischer, Jacqueline; Lynch, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a public health emergency of international concern. There is limited laboratory and clinical data available on patients with EVD. This is a meta-analysis to assess the utility of clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory data in predicting mortality in EVD. Aim To assess the utility of clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory data in predicting mortality in EVD. Method Study selection criterion: EVD articles with more than 35 EVD cases that described the clinical features were included. Data collection and extraction: Articles were searched in Medline, PubMed, Ovid journals, and CDC and WHO official websites. Statistical methods: Pooled proportions were calculated using DerSimonian Laird method (random effects model). Results Initial search identified 634 reference articles, of which 67 were selected and reviewed. Data were extracted from 10 articles (N=5,792) of EVD which met the inclusion criteria. Bleeding events (64.5% vs. 25.1%), abdominal pain (58.3% vs. 37.5%), vomiting (60.8% vs. 31.7%), diarrhea (69.9% vs. 37.8%), cough (31.6% vs. 22.3%), sore throat (47.7% vs. 19.8%), and conjunctivitis (39.3% vs. 20.3%) were more often present in pooled proportion of fatal cases as compared to EVD survivors. Conclusions Clinical features of EVD that may be associated with higher mortality include bleeding events, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, cough, sore throat, and conjunctivitis. These patients should be identified promptly, and appropriate management should be instituted immediately. PMID:26333864

  9. Jane Austen's lifelong health problems and final illness: New evidence points to a fatal Hodgkin's disease and excludes the widely accepted Addison's.

    PubMed

    Upfal, A

    2005-06-01

    Jane Austen is typically described as having excellent health until the age of 40 and the onset of a mysterious and fatal illness, initially identified by Sir Zachary Cope in 1964 as Addison's disease. Her biographers, deceived both by Cassandra Austen's destruction of letters containing medical detail, and the cheerful high spirits of the existing letters, have seriously underestimated the extent to which illness affected Austen's life. A medical history reveals that she was particularly susceptible to infection, and suffered unusually severe infective illnesses, as well as a chronic conjunctivitis that impeded her ability to write. There is evidence that Austen was already suffering from an immune deficiency and fatal lymphoma in January 1813, when her second and most popular novel, Pride and Prejudice, was published. Four more novels would follow, written or revised in the shadow of her increasing illness and debility. Whilst it is impossible now to conclusively establish the cause of her death, the existing medical evidence tends to exclude Addison's disease, and suggests there is a high possibility that Jane Austen's fatal illness was Hodgkin's disease, a form of lymphoma.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  11. Late-onset acute graft-versus-host disease mimicking hand, foot, and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahabal, Gauri; George, Leni; Bindra, Mandeep; George, Biju

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) classically presents as a pruritic erythematous maculopapular rash. We describe a patient who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and presented with a hand foot and mouth disease like clinical presentation. Histopathology was suggestive of acute GVHD. This case is being reported to make dermatologists aware of this unusual presentation of GVHD. PMID:27990387

  12. Parameter on acute periodontal diseases. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of acute periodontal diseases. Patients should be informed about the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to treat acute periodontal diseases appropriately can result in progressive loss of periodontal supporting tissues, an adverse change in prognosis, and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  13. A Fatal Case of Hepatic Portal Venous Gas Associated With Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Tahmina

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic portal venous gas is a rare cause of acute abdomen caused by leakage of air from the gastrointestinal tract to the portal venous system. The mortality is high, particularly when associated with intestinal ischemia or necrosis. We describe a fatal case of hepatic portal venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis due to hemodialysis-related hypotension and severe atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27800516

  14. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  15. Acute Phase Reactants as Novel Predictors of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. S.; Jadhav, A. B.; Hassan, A.; Meng, Qing H.

    2012-01-01

    Acute phase reaction is a systemic response which usually follows a physiological condition that takes place in the beginning of an inflammatory process. This physiological change usually lasts 1-2 days. However, the systemic acute phase response usually lasts longer. The aim of this systemic response is to restore homeostasis. These events are accompanied by upregulation of some proteins (positive acute phase reactants) and downregulation of others (negative acute phase reactants) during inflammatory reactions. Cardiovascular diseases are accompanied by the elevation of several positive acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, white blood cell count, secretory nonpancreatic phospholipase 2-II (sPLA2-II), ferritin, and ceruloplasmin. Cardiovascular disease is also accompanied by the reduction of negative acute phase reactants such as albumin, transferrin, transthyretin, retinol-binding protein, antithrombin, and transcortin. In this paper, we will be discussing the biological activity and diagnostic and prognostic values of acute phase reactants with cardiovascular importance. The potential therapeutic targets of these reactants will be also discussed. PMID:24049653

  16. Acute myelogenous leukemia and glycogen storage disease 1b.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Maury; Burzynski, Jeffrey; Yhap, Margaret; Fraser, Robert B; Cummings, Brian; Ste-Marie, Micheline

    2002-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease 1b (GSD 1b) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate translocase and the intracellular accumulation of glycogen. The disease presents with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, as well as neutropenia causing increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections. We present a case of a young woman with GSD 1b who developed acute myelogenous leukemia while on long-term granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy. The presence of two rare diseases in a single patient raises suspicion that GSD 1b and acute myelogenous leukemia are linked. Surveillance for acute myelogenous leukemia should become part of the long-term follow-up for GSD 1b.

  17. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  18. Computer Aided Diagnosis of Acute Gynaecologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fengling

    1982-01-01

    In this article, the application of electronic computers for diagnosis of ten common gynaecologic diseases is discussed. Verification by 1038 cases shows that the discussed method of diagnosis has an accuracy of 95.57%.

  19. Acute graft-versus-host disease in pancreas transplantation: a comparison of two case presentations and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Adam; Dexter, David; KuKuruga, Debra L; Philosophe, Benjamin; Hess, John; Klassen, David

    2006-07-15

    As a complication of solid organ transplantation, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is most associated with small bowel and liver transplants. We present two cases of acute GVHD following pancreas transplantation. Case 1 was a 27-year-old female who underwent cadaveric pancreas transplant 9 months after a successful live donor kidney transplant. Case 2 was a 38-year-old male who received a simultaneous cadaveric pancreas and live donor kidney transplant. Both patients presented within 30 days of transplant with nonspecific symptoms. Rejection and infection were ruled out. Both subjects had progressive decline in mentation associated with pancytopenia and hyperbilirubinemia. Rash was not present until late in their hospital course. Skin biopsies demonstrated mixed chimerism with pancreas donor DNA diagnostic of GVHD. Acute GVHD is a rare, often fatal, complication of pancreas transplantation, and its presentation appears to differ from acute GVHD associated with stem cell transplantation.

  20. Acute diarrhoeal disease in less developed countries

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, John E.; Béhar, Moisés; Scrimshaw, Nevin S.

    1964-01-01

    The programme presented in this article for controlling the diarrhoeas and dysenteries of less developed countries is based on epidemiological principles applicable to acute undifferentiated diarrhoeal disease—its specific as well as its non-specific elements. The dominant importance of weanling diarrhoea requires a main emphasis on maternal and child health procedures, with nutrition singled out for attention, along with public health education and medical care of patients: this in addition to the established worth of means for promoting environmental sanitation. The several features of the suggested programme are within four broad divisions: preventive measures; control of patients, contacts and the immediate environment; measures specifically useful in epidemics; and international measures conducive to broad restriction of the syndrome. PMID:14230891

  1. [Tears' immunology in acute eye diseases].

    PubMed

    Ignat, F; Godeanu, L; Davidescu, L; Voiculescu, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study is to research the immunoglobulins' concentration into the tears liquid and into the blood serum at the patients with acute affections of the anterior ocular pole. The study was accomplished on two groups of patients: one group with herpetic Keratitis, the other with anterior uveitis, the second having a different etiology--that the viral one. Another group of patients with senile cataract was used like witness-group. The immunoglobulins concentration were detected into the serum and into the tears by the Mancini method of the radial immunodiffusion. The results indicate a general immunodefficiency signed by the decrease of IgG and IgM into the serum on the one hand, and the increase of local defense mechanisms reflected on the growing of IgA and IgG level into the tears, on the other hand.

  2. Acute Chagas Disease: New Global Challenges for an Old Neglected Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Daniela V.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and although over 100 years have passed since the discovery of Chagas disease, it still presents an increasing problem for global public health. A plethora of information concerning the chronic phase of human Chagas disease, particularly the severe cardiac form, is available in the literature. However, information concerning events during the acute phase of the disease is scarce. In this review, we will discuss (1) the current status of acute Chagas disease cases globally, (2) the immunological findings related to the acute phase and their possible influence in disease outcome, and (3) reactivation of Chagas disease in immunocompromised individuals, a key point for transplantation and HIV infection management. PMID:25077613

  3. Acute Rheumatic Fever: Global Persistence of a Preventable Disease.

    PubMed

    Bono-Neri, Francine

    2016-10-21

    The persistence of acute rheumatic fever continues to be seen globally. Once thought to be eradicated in various parts of the world, the disease came back with a vengeance secondary to a lack of diligence on the part of providers. Today, the global burden of group A streptococcal infection, the culprit of the numerous sequelae manifested in acute rheumatic fever, is considerable. Although a completely preventable disease, rheumatic fever continues to exist. It is a devastating disease that involves long-term, multisystem treatment and monitoring for patients who were unsuccessful at eradicating the precipitating group A streptococcal infection. Prevention is the key to resolving the dilemma of the disease's global burden, yet the method to yield its prevention still remains unknown. Thus, meticulous attention to implementing proper treatment is the mainstay and remains a top priority.

  4. [Acute atrioventricular block in chronic Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vince; Zima, Endre; Gellér, László; Merkely, Béla

    2010-09-26

    The tick bite transmitted Lyme disease is one of the most common antropozoonosis, about 10 000 new infections are reported in Hungary each year. The progress and clinical presentation can vary, and carditis can occur in later stages. A serologically verified Lyme disease caused third degree atrioventricular block in young male presenting with presyncope. Based on the tick-bites mentioned a few weeks prior to hospital admission, Lyme carditis was considered with the administration of antibiotics and monitor observation. Typical skin lesions were not recognized and laboratory findings showed no pathology. An electrophysiological study recorded a predominant supra-His atrioventricular block. Total regression of conduction could be detected later and the serological tests established an underlying Lyme disease. Currently no definite treatment recommendation is available for the potentially reversible Lyme carditis. The tick bite seemed to be the key on our way to diagnosis; however, serological tests proved the disease to be older than one year. A detailed medical history and serological tests are essential in identifying the cause and pacemaker implantation can be avoided.

  5. Murine models of acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Enquist, Ida Berglin; Bianco, Christophe Lo; Ooka, Andreas; Nilsson, Eva; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Ehinger, Mats; Richter, Johan; Brady, Roscoe O.; Kirik, Deniz; Karlsson, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucosidase, beta, acid (GBA) gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucosylceramidase (GCase). GCase deficiency leads to characteristic visceral pathology and, in some patients, lethal neurological manifestations. Here, we report the generation of mouse models with the severe neuronopathic form of GD. To circumvent the lethal skin phenotype observed in several of the previous GCase-deficient animals, we genetically engineered a mouse model with strong reduction in GCase activity in all tissues except the skin. These mice exhibit rapid motor dysfunction associated with severe neurodegeneration and apoptotic cell death within the brain, reminiscent of neuronopathic GD. In addition, we have created a second mouse model, in which GCase deficiency is restricted to neural and glial cell progenitors and progeny. These mice develop similar pathology as the first mouse model, but with a delayed onset and slower disease progression, which indicates that GCase deficiency within microglial cells that are of hematopoietic origin is not the primary determinant of the CNS pathology. These findings also demonstrate that normal microglial cells cannot rescue this neurodegenerative disease. These mouse models have significant implications for the development of therapy for patients with neuronopathic GD. PMID:17954912

  6. Krypton-81m ventilation scanning: acute respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.P.; Irving, H.; Armstrong, J.D. II

    1981-02-01

    From experience with 700 patients undergoing ventilation and perfusion lung scanning with krypton-81m/technetium-99m technique, 34 patients suffering from nonembolic acute respiratory disease were selected for review. In 16 patients with pneumonia, all had defects of ventilation corresponding to, or larger than, the radiologic consolidation. In 13 patients there was some preservation of perfusion in the consolidated region. In two of the three patients with matched defects, the pneumonia was of long standing. In seven patients with collapse or atelectasis and in 11 patients with acute reversible bronchial obstruction and normal volume lungs, a similar pattern or ventillation and perfusion was observed.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  8. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies.

  9. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary.

  10. [Incidence of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Stawarski, Andrzej; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2004-07-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the frequency of acute pancreatitis and the frequency of increased activity of pancreatic enzymes in serum of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Analysis comprises 101 children aged from 3 to 18-years treated because of IBD in the period of 1998-2002: 79 children with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 22 children Crohn's disease (CD). The authors analyzed together 191 admissions because of UC and 51 because of CD. Acute pancreatitis was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 5.1% of children with UC. Significantly more often acute pancreatitis was recognized in children with moderate and severe stage of UC. Hyperamylasemia was observed in 27.3% of children with CD and in 12.7% of children with UC. Hyperlipasemia was observed only in children with UC (3.8%), elevated urinary amylase was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 8.86% children with UC. No correlations between the frequency of acute pancreatitis and medication were observed.

  11. Motor unit involvement in human acute Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Benavente, O R; Patiño, O L; Peña, L B; Lugònes, H; Kalala, E; Meneclier, C R; Genovese, O; Sica, R E

    1989-09-01

    Thirty five patients with acute Chagas' disease who demonstrated parasitaemia at the time of the investigation were submitted to a detailed electromyographical study. With their muscles at rest, 12 patients showed fibrillation potentials and/or positive sharp waves. On volitional contraction, 7 had short duration motor unit potentials (MUPs) and low polyphasic MUPs. On motor and sensory nerve fibers conduction studies, 20 disclosed values below the lower control limit within one or more nerves. Finally, 12 patients produced a muscle decremental response on nerve supramaximal repetitive stimulation. The findings signal that primary muscle involvement, neuropathy and impairement of the neuromuscular transmission, either isolated or combined, may be found in the acute stage of human Chagas' disease.

  12. The Clinical Performance of an Office-Based Risk Scoring System for Fatal Cardiovascular Diseases in North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein; Sharafkhah, Maryam; Ghodsi, Saeed; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Etemadi, Arash; Pourshams, Akram; Pharoah, Paul D.; Abnet, Christian C.; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Kamangar, Farin

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are becoming major causes of death in developing countries. Risk scoring systems for CVD are needed to prioritize allocation of limited resources. Most of these risk score algorithms have been based on a long array of risk factors including blood markers of lipids. However, risk scoring systems that solely use office-based data, not including laboratory markers, may be advantageous. In the current analysis, we validated the office-based Framingham risk scoring system in Iran. Methods The study used data from the Golestan Cohort in North-East of Iran. The following risk factors were used in the development of the risk scoring method: sex, age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, hypertension treatment, current smoking, and diabetes. Cardiovascular risk functions for prediction of 10-year risk of fatal CVDs were developed. Results A total of 46,674 participants free of CVD at baseline were included. Predictive value of estimated risks was examined. The resulting Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) was 0.774 (95% CI: 0.762-0.787) in all participants, 0.772 (95% CI: 0.753-0.791) in women, and 0.763 (95% CI: 0.747-0.779) in men. AUC was higher in urban areas (0.790, 95% CI: 0.766-0.815). The predicted and observed risks of fatal CVD were similar in women. However, in men, predicted probabilities were higher than observed. Conclusion The AUC in the current study is comparable to results of previous studies while lipid profile was replaced by body mass index to develop an office-based scoring system. This scoring algorithm is capable of discriminating individuals at high risk versus low risk of fatal CVD. PMID:26011607

  13. Fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mouse requires T cells that mature in a sf thymic environment: potential model for thymic education.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, V L; Wilkinson, J E; Rinchik, E M; Russell, L B

    1991-07-01

    Characteristic lesions in mice hemi- or homozygous for the X-linked mutation scurfy (sf) include lymphohistiocytic proliferation in the skin and lymphoid organs, Coombs' test-positive anemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and death by 24 days of age. The role of the thymus in the development of fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy mouse was investigated. Neonatal thymectomy doubles the life span of scurfy mice, moderates the histologic lesions, and prevents anemia, despite the continued presence of high levels of serum IgG. Animals bred to be nude and scurfy (nu/nu; sf/Y) are viable, fertile, and free of scurfy lesions. Bone marrow from scurfy mice can reconstitute lethally irradiated, H-2-compatible animals but does not transmit scurfy disease. We conclude, from these data, that scurfy lesions are mediated by T lymphocytes that mature in an abnormal (sf) thymic environment.

  14. Fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mouse requires T cells that mature in a sf thymic environment: Potential model for thymic education

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1991-07-01

    Characteristic lesions in mice hemi- or homozygous for the X-linked mutation scurfy (sf) include lymphohistiocytic proliferation in the skin and lymphoid organs, Coombs' test-positive anemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and death by 24 days of age. The role of the thymus in the development of fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy mouse was investigated. Neonatal thymectomy doubles the life span of scurfy mice, moderates the histologic lesions, and prevents anemia, despite the continued presence of high levels of serum IgG. Animals bred to be nude and scurfy (nu/nu;sf/Y) are viable, fertile, and free of scurfy lesions. Bone marrow from scurfy mice can reconstitute lethally irradiated, H-2-compatible animals but does not transmit scurfy disease. The authors conclude, from these data, that scurfy lesions are mediated by T lymphocytes that mature in an abnormal (sf) thymic environment.

  15. The impact of inflammatory rheumatic diseases on the presentation, severity, and outcome of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Goldenberg, Ilan; Matetzky, Shlomi; Grossman, Chagai; Elis, Avishay; Gavrielov-Yusim, Natalie; Livneh, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD) have a high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), leading to increased mortality and morbidity. However, it is not clear whether increased CVD mortality in IRD is due to a higher incidence or worse outcome of cardiovascular events (higher case fatality). In this observational case-control study, we assessed the outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with IRDs compared to matched controls without IRD, using data from the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey (ACSIS), a large, national, real-life registry detailing the extent, severity, and outcome of ACS. Of 2,193 subjects enrolled to the ACSIS, 20 (nine men) were identified with IRD, including 11 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), three patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and one patient with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The study patients were compared to 120 matched control patients (adjusted for age and risk factors for CVD) without IRD. Compared to controls, IRD patients had similar clinical presentation and similar type of ACS and received identical initial treatment at the ER. The two groups had comparable rates of complications including major adverse cardiovascular events (death, recurrent myocardial infarction, stroke, major bleeding, and definite stent thrombosis) (10 vs. 11.7% in the study and control group, respectively, p > 0.05), re-hospitalization (20 vs. 21.1%, respectively, p > 0.05), and severe congestive heart failure (7.7 vs. 6.9%, respectively, p > 0.05) within 30 days. The outcome and prognosis of ACS in patients with IRD is not worse than that of control, supporting the higher prevalence of CVD in this population as the cause for their excess mortality.

  16. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  17. The disease pyramid for acute gastrointestinal illness in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lake, R J; Adlam, S B; Perera, S; Campbell, D M; Baker, M G

    2010-10-01

    The disease pyramid of under-ascertainment for surveillance of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in New Zealand has been estimated using 2005-2007 data on notifiable diseases, a community telephone survey, and a survey of diagnostic laboratories. For each notified case of AGI there were an estimated 222 cases in the community, about 49 of which visited a general practitioner. Faecal samples were requested from about 15 of these cases, and 13 samples were provided. Of the faecal samples, pathogens were detected in about three cases. These ratios are similar to those reported in other developed countries, and provide baseline measurements of the AGI burden in the New Zealand community.

  18. Genetic variants in loci 1p13 and 9p21 and fatal coronary heart disease in a Norwegian case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Mona Dverdal; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Myhre, Ronny; Høiseth, Gudrun; Mørland, Jørg; Næss, Øyvind; Tambs, Kristian; Magnus, Per

    2014-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in loci 1p13 and 9p21 have previously been found to be associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD). This study aimed to investigate whether these SNPs show associations with fatal CHD in a population-based cohort study after adjustment for socioeconomic- and lifestyle-related CHD risk factors not commonly included in genetic association studies. Using the population-based Cohort of Norway (CONOR), a nested case-cohort study was set up and DNA from 2,953 subjects (829 cases and 2,124 non-cases) were genotyped. The association with fatal CHD was estimated for four SNPs, three from locus 1p13 and one from locus 9p21. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate unstratified and gender-stratified hazard ratios while adjusting for major CHD risk factors. The associations between three SNPs from locus 1p13 and non-HDL cholesterol levels were also estimated. Men homozygous for the risk alleles on rs1333049 (9p21) and rs14000 (1p13) were found to have significantly increased hazard ratios in crude and adjusted models, and the hazard ratios remained statistically significant when both genders were analyzed together. Adjustment for additional socioeconomic- and lifestyle-related CHD risk factors influenced the association estimates only slightly. No significant associations were observed between the other two SNPs in loci 1p13 (rs599839 and rs646776) and CHD mortality in either gender. Both rs599839 and rs646776 showed significant, gradual increases in non-HDL cholesterol levels with increasing number of risk alleles. This study confirms the association between 9p21 (rs1333049) and fatal CHD in a Norwegian population-based cohort. The effect was not influenced by several socioeconomic- and lifestyle-related risk factors. Our results show that 1p13 (rs14000) may also be associated with fatal CHD. SNPs at 1p13 (rs599839 and rs646776) were associated with non-HDL cholesterol levels.

  19. Acute coronary disease Athero-Inflammation: Therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Altman, Raul

    2003-06-20

    Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, but there is now evidence which indicates that by blocking inflammation, thrombosis and thus, acute coronary events, could be lowered. The concept of athero-inflammation emerges as the meeting point of different morbidities; dyslipemia, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, immunity, infection, hyperhomocyteinemia, smoking, etc. usual named as risk factors. Thus, beside specific drugs, earliest treatment, in the stage of inflammation, using anti-inflammatory drugs, should be considered since in patients with increased risk of acute coronary process are likely to have many point of origen throughout the coronary arteries. There are a body of evidences for supporting the potential of anti-inflammatory therapy to the prevention of inflammation and atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibition may decrease endothelial inflammation reducing monocytes infiltration improving vascular cells function, plaque stability and probably resulting in a decrease of coronary atherothrombotic events.Trials including large numbers of patients in prospective double-blind randomized studies worthwhile to confirm the efficacy of NSAID, mainly, COX-2 inhibitors, together with aspirin in the prevention of coronary events in patients with acute coronary disease.

  20. Acute coronary disease Athero-Inflammation: Therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul

    2003-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, but there is now evidence which indicates that by blocking inflammation, thrombosis and thus, acute coronary events, could be lowered. The concept of athero-inflammation emerges as the meeting point of different morbidities; dyslipemia, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, immunity, infection, hyperhomocyteinemia, smoking, etc. usual named as risk factors. Thus, beside specific drugs, earliest treatment, in the stage of inflammation, using anti-inflammatory drugs, should be considered since in patients with increased risk of acute coronary process are likely to have many point of origen throughout the coronary arteries. There are a body of evidences for supporting the potential of anti-inflammatory therapy to the prevention of inflammation and atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibition may decrease endothelial inflammation reducing monocytes infiltration improving vascular cells function, plaque stability and probably resulting in a decrease of coronary atherothrombotic events. Trials including large numbers of patients in prospective double-blind randomized studies worthwhile to confirm the efficacy of NSAID, mainly, COX-2 inhibitors, together with aspirin in the prevention of coronary events in patients with acute coronary disease. PMID:12904261

  1. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M.; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I.; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P.; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S.; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; von der Weid, Nicolas; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O.; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    TCF3-HLF-fusion positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Employing an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression, and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. Recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 were identified in constellation with TCF3-HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin towards a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics, but sensitivity towards glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  2. Clinical Features of and Risk Factors for Fatal Ebola Virus Disease, Moyamba District, Sierra Leone, December 2014–February 2015

    PubMed Central

    Haaskjold, Yngvar Lunde; Bolkan, Håkon Angell; Krogh, Kurt Østhuus; Jongopi, James; Lundeby, Karen Marie; Mellesmo, Sindre; Garcés, Pedro San José; Jøsendal, Ola; Øpstad, Åsmund; Svensen, Erling; Fuentes, Luis Matias Zabala; Kamara, Alfred Sandy; Riera, Melchor; Arranz, Javier; Roberts, David P.; Stamper, Paul D.; Austin, Paula; Moosa, Alfredo J.; Marke, Dennis; Hassan, Shoaib; Eide, Geir Egil; Berg, Åse

    2016-01-01

    The 2013–2016 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa infected >28,000 people, including >11,000 who died, and disrupted social life in the region. We retrospectively studied clinical signs and symptoms and risk factors for fatal outcome among 31 Ebola virus–positive patients admitted to the Ebola Treatment Center in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone. We found a higher rate of bleeding manifestations than reported elsewhere during the outbreak. Significant predictors for death were shorter time from symptom onset to admission, male sex, high viral load on initial laboratory testing, severe pain, diarrhea, bloody feces, and development of other bleeding manifestations during hospitalization. These risk factors for death could be used to identify patients in need of more intensive medical support. The lack of fever in as many as one third of EVD cases may have implications for temperature-screening practices and case definitions. PMID:27268303

  3. Noninvasive imaging in acute coronary disease. A clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Gersh, B J

    1991-09-01

    Numerous highly complex and sensitive noninvasive imaging techniques have enhanced the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Optimum use requires specific objectives to be defined in advance, including a review of the potential impact of the test on subsequent decisions. An additional issue that is subject to scrutiny in the current climate of cost containment relates to the incremental value of a specific examination. The imaging modality to be used will partially depend on other issues, including accessibility, cost, and interindividual or institutional expertise with a particular technique. Major applications in noninvasive imaging in the acute coronary syndromes include the following: 1) diagnosis, including identification of associated diseases and contraindications for acute reperfusion; 2) evaluation and management of complications (mechanical and nonmechanical); 3) determination of prognosis (both early and late); 4) estimation of myocardial viability; 5) assessment of therapeutic efficacy; 6) investigational approaches, including 99mTc-sestamibi tomographic imaging, ultrafast cine computed tomographic scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Previous studies in the prethrombolytic era have documented the powerful impact of radionuclide stress testing on prognosis, but this needs to be reevaluated in the light of the changing current population undergoing stress testing. Preliminary data imply that the prognostic accuracy of stress testing after thrombolytic therapy is diminished. Moreover, the role of the open infarct-related artery in traditional estimates of prognosis (e.g., ejection fraction) requires further study. Noninvasive imaging has multiple applications in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute coronary disease, but the decision to use a specific technology in a particular circumstance mandates good clinical judgment and selectivity.

  4. Mitragynine concentrations in two fatalities.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Olwen; Roider, Gabriele; Stöver, Andreas; Graw, Matthias; Musshoff, Frank; Sachs, Hans; Bicker, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Two cases of fatalities are reported of which the recreational use of Mitragyna speciosa ("kratom") could be confirmed. One of these cases presents with one of the highest postmortem mitragynine concentrations published to date. Our results show that even extremely high mitragynine blood concentrations following the consumption of kratom do not necessarily have to be the direct cause of death in such fatalities as a result of an acute overdose. The two cases are compared with regard to the differences in mitragynine concentrations detected and the role of mitragynine in the death of the subjects. Irrespective of the big differences in mitragynine concentrations in the postmortem blood samples, mitragynine was not the primary cause of death in either of the two cases reported here. Additionally, by rough estimation, a significant difference in ratio of mitragynine to its diastereomers in the blood and urine samples between the two cases could be seen.

  5. Risk of fatal adverse events associated with 17DD yellow fever vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Struchiner, C. J.; Luz, P. M.; Dourado, I.; Sato, H. K.; Aguiar, S. G.; Ribeiro, J. G. L.; Soares, R. C. R.; Codeço, C. T.

    2004-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF), an acute infectious disease, is endemic in the north and central-west of Brazil. This disease can be prevented by the use of a vaccine. In Brazil, four fatal adverse events have been associated with the YF vaccine used in the country (17DD vaccine). We briefly describe the last two fatalities, and estimate the risk of 17DD-associated fatal adverse events under different epidemiological scenarios. Controversies regarding the appropriate denominator that enters the estimation of risk serve as a motivation for each proposed scenario. The statistical procedures used show optimum behaviour when assessing the risk of rare events. Risk estimates vary from 0.043 (95 % CI 0.017-0.110) to 2.131 (95 % CI 0.109-12.071) fatalities per million doses administered. The robust estimates of the risk of fatal adverse events we present constitute an important element in future risk-benefit analysis and point to the need for good quality vaccine coverage and adverse-events surveillance data to assess the risk of vaccination. Although vaccination of YF endemic regions is necessary to maintain low disease prevalence, preventive administration of YF vaccine to the entire population should be cautiously analysed. PMID:15473158

  6. Incidence of Primary Mitochondrial Disease in Children Younger Than 2 Years Presenting With Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    McKiernan, Patrick; Ball, Sarah; Santra, Saikat; Foster, Katherine; Fratter, Carl; Poulton, Joanna; Craig, Kate; McFarland, Robert; Rahman, Shamima; Hargreaves, Iain; Gupte, Girish; Sharif, Khalid; Taylor, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Mitochondrial liver disease (MLD), and in particular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (MDS) is an important cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in infancy. Early and accurate diagnosis is important because liver transplantation (LT) is often contraindicated. It is unclear which methods are the best to diagnose MLD in the setting of ALF. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of MLD in children younger than 2 years with ALF and the utility of routine investigations to detect MLD. Methods: Thirty-nine consecutive infants with ALF were admitted to a single unit from 2009 to 2011. All were extensively investigated using an established protocol. Genes implicated in mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome were sequenced in all cases and tissue mtDNA copy number measured where available. Results: Five infants (17%) had genetically proven MLD: DGUOK (n = 2), POLG (n = 2), and MPV17 (1). Four of these died, whereas 1 recovered. Two had normal muscle mtDNA copy number and 3 had normal muscle respiratory chain enzymes. An additional 8 children had low hepatic mtDNA copy number but pathogenic mutations were not detected. One of these developed fatal multisystemic disease after LT, whereas 5 who survived remain well without evidence of multisystemic disease up to 6 years later. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy did not distinguish between those with and without MLD. Conclusions: Low liver mtDNA copy number may be a secondary phenomenon in ALF. Screening for mtDNA maintenance gene mutations may be the most efficient way to confirm MLD in ALF in the first 2 years of life. PMID:27482763

  7. Acute acalculous cholecystitis and cardiovascular disease: a land of confusion.

    PubMed

    Tana, Marco; Tana, Claudio; Cocco, Giulio; Iannetti, Giovanni; Romano, Marcello; Schiavone, Cosima

    2015-12-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) can be defined as acute inflammatory disease of the gallbladder without evidence of gallstones. The first case was reported in 1844 by Duncan et al.; however, some cases may have been missed previously in view of the complexity of the diagnosis. Several risk factors have been identified, and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in view of its multiple mechanisms of action, seems to play a key role. Atypical clinical onset, paucity of symptoms, overlap with comorbidities, and lack of robust, controlled trials result often in under or misdiagnosed cases. Moreover, laboratory results may be negative or not specific in the late stage of the disease, when a surgical treatment cannot be longer helpful if complications arise. A rapid diagnosis is therefore essential to achieve a prompt treatment and to avoid further clinical deterioration. In this short review, we would present the current evidence regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of the complex relation between AAC and CVD. Then, we fully emphasize the role of ultrasound to achieve an early diagnosis and an appropriate treatment in suspected cases, reducing mortality and complications rates.

  8. Factors promoting acute and chronic diseases caused by yersiniae.

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, R R

    1991-01-01

    The experimental system constructed with the medically significant yersiniae provides a powerful basic model for comparative study of factors required for expression of acute versus chronic disease. The system exploits the close genetic similarity between Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of bubonic plague, and enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica. Y. pestis possesses three plasmids, of which one, shared by the enteropathogenic species, mediates a number of virulence factors that directly or indirectly promote survival within macrophages and immunosuppression. The two remaining plasmids are unique and encode functions that promote acute disease by enhancing bacterial dissemination in tissues and resistance to phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes. These properties are replaced in the enteropathogenic yersiniae by host cell invasins and an adhesin which promote chronic disease; the latter are cryptic in Y. pestis. Additional distinctions include specific mutational losses in Y. pestis which result in loss of fitness in natural environments plus gain of properties that facilitate transmission and infection via fleabite. Images PMID:1889045

  9. A Systematic Review of the Incidence, Risk Factors and Case Fatality Rates of Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) Disease in Africa (1966 to 2014)

    PubMed Central

    Uche, Ifeanyi Valentine; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2017-01-01

    This study systematically reviews the literature on the occurrence, incidence and case fatality rate (CFR) of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease in Africa from 1966 to 2014. Data on the burden of iNTS disease in Africa are sparse and generally have not been aggregated, making it difficult to describe the epidemiology that is needed to inform the development and implementation of effective prevention and control policies. This study involved a comprehensive search of PubMed and Embase databases. It documents the geographical spread of iNTS disease over time in Africa, and describes its reported incidence, risk factors and CFR. We found that Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) have been reported as a cause of bacteraemia in 33 out of 54 African countries, spanning the five geographical regions of Africa, and especially in sub-Saharan Africa since 1966. Our review indicates that NTS have been responsible for up to 39% of community acquired blood stream infections in sub-Saharan Africa with an average CFR of 19%. Salmonella Typhimurium and Enteritidis are the major serovars implicated and together have been responsible for 91%% of the cases of iNTS disease, (where serotype was determined), reported in Africa. The study confirms that iNTS disease is more prevalent amongst Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals, infants, and young children with malaria, anaemia and malnutrition. In conclusion, iNTS disease is a substantial cause of community-acquired bacteraemia in Africa. Given the high morbidity and mortality of iNTS disease in Africa, it is important to develop effective prevention and control strategies including vaccination. PMID:28056035

  10. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  11. Acute Limb Ischemia and Coronary Artery Disease in a Case of Kimura’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Woon; Jun, Hee Jae; Kang, Do Kyun; Min, Ho-Ki; Hwang, Youn-Ho; Kim, Ji Yong; Nam, Kyung Han

    2017-01-01

    Kimura disease (KD) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. KD has many complications associated with hypereosinophilia, including various forms of allergic reactions and eosinophilic lung disease. Additionally, hypereosinophilia is associated with hypercoagulability, which may lead to thromboembolic events. A 36-year-old man with KD presented with acute limb ischemia and coronary artery occlusion. He underwent thrombectomy, partial endarterectomy of both popliteal arteries, and coronary artery stent insertion. KD is a systemic disease that affects many organs and presents with thromboembolism and vasculitis. In a patient with KD, physicians should evaluate the vascular system, including the coronary arteries. PMID:28382271

  12. Fatal intoxication with methoxetamine.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Piotr; Zuba, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Methoxetamine (MXE) is a new synthetic drug of abuse structurally related to ketamine and phencyclidine. A case of a 29-year-old male with acute toxicity related to the analytically confirmed use of MXE is reported. The man was found dead at his residence. Biological material was analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The concentration of MXE in urine of the deceased was 85 μg/mL. Despite the vial containing the blood sample being destroyed during transportation and the blood leaking out into the cardboard packaging, the blood level of MXE was estimated. After determination of the cardboard grammage (approx. 400 g/m(3) ) and the mean mass of the blood obtained after drying (0.1785 ± 0.0173 g per 1 mL), the estimated blood concentration of MXE was found to be 5.8 μg/mL. The high concentration of MXE in blood and urine and the circumstances of the case indicate an unintentional, fatal intoxication with this substance.

  13. Acute hemiplegia associated with cat-scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Rocha, J L; Pellegrino, L N; Riella, L V; Martins, L T

    2004-06-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an infectious illness caused by a Gram-negative rod named Bartonella henselae. Typical CSD is characterized by a small skin lesion at the site of a scratch or a bite, followed by regional lymphadenopathy, one to two weeks later. Atypical forms may present as ocular manifestations, neurological manifestations, hepatosplenic involvement and vertebral osteomyelitis. Among neurological complications, encephalopathy is by far the most common. Other neurological manifestations are very rare. We report a case of an 11-year-old boy, with a posterior cervical lymphadenopathy and fever. Cat scratch disease was diagnosed and treated after a positive "Whartin-Starry" stain on lymph node biopsy. Two weeks after treatment, the patient was readmitted presenting an acute episode of left hemiplegia. A brain MRI demonstrated a right subcortical fronto-parietal lesion with no contrast enhancement. Complete recovery was observed after corticosteroid treatment.

  14. Balloon angioplasty in acute and chronic coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Vlietstra, R.E. )

    1989-04-14

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty has grown exponentially since its introduction. Currently, selection criteria include single-vessel and multivessel disease, stable and unstable angina, and acute infarction. The outcome depends on specific patient and antiographic characteristics. In ideal lesions, success rates should be greater than 90%, with low morbidity and mortality. With more severe and diffuse multivessel disease, success rates are lower and complication rates are higher. In these cases, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty still offers a reasonable option, provided complete revascularization can be achieved or the angina-producing lesion dilated. Numerous issues remain unresolved, including (1) the role of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty vs coronary surgery (currently being tested), (2) restenosis, which occurs in approximately 30% of treated lesions, and (3) organizational adjustments such as training and certification to maintain high standards of care.

  15. Multicentre study of acute alcohol use and non-fatal injuries: data from the WHO collaborative study on alcohol and injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Guilherme; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Orozco, Ricardo; Bond, Jason; Ye, Yu; Macdonald, Scott; Rehm, Jürgen; Poznyak, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the risk of non-fatal injury at low levels and moderate levels of alcohol consumption as well as the differences in risk across modes of injury and differences among alcoholics. METHODS: Data are from patients aged 18 years and older collected in 2001-02 by the WHO collaborative study on alcohol and injuries from 10 emergency departments around the world (n = 4320). We used a case-crossover method to compare the use of alcohol during the 6 hours prior to the injury with the use of alcohol during same day of the week in the previous week. FINDINGS: The risk of injury increased with consumption of a single drink (odds ratio (OR) = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.9-5.7), and there was a 10-fold increase for participants who had consumed six or more drinks during the previous 6 hours. Participants who had sustained intentional injuries were at a higher risk than participants who had sustained unintentional injuries. Patients who had no symptoms of alcohol dependence had a higher OR. CONCLUSION: Since low levels of drinking were associated with an increased risk of sustaining a non-fatal injury, and patients who are not dependent on alcohol may be at higher risk of becoming injured, comprehensive strategies for reducing harm should be implemented for all drinkers seen in emergency departments. PMID:16799729

  16. A fatal case of malignant atrophic papulosis (Degos' disease) in a man with factor V Leinden mutation and lupus anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Hohwy, Thomas; Jensen, Martin Glümer; Tøttrup, Anders; Steiniche, Torben; Fogh, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    Malignant atrophic papulosis (Degos' disease) is a very rare condition characterized by atrophic papular skin lesions and variable association of systemic involvement. We describe a 33-year-old man who presented with a widespread skin eruption consistent with malignant atrophic papulosis. During the course of the disease he even developed penile ulcerations, a symptom that has been reported only a few times previously. He subsequently died of multiple perforations of the small bowel 2.5 years after onset of the disease. Laboratory investigations revealed a mutation of factor V Leiden and the presence of lupus anticoagulant, but no anti-cardiolipin antibodies. The patient was treated with narrow-band ultraviolet (UV)B, prednisolone and, later, aspirin, pentoxifyllin and warfarin. Despite this very intensive anticoagulant and anti-platelet therapy, the treatment had no effect on the skin lesions and could not prevent systemic involvement.

  17. Acute and prolonged treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin therapy in patients with unstable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Husted, S; Kher, A

    2000-12-01

    Unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) are known as unstable coronary artery disease (UCAD). They are syndromes that share a common pathobiology and represent a frequently encountered and potentially life-threatening medical condition. Acute-phase treatment with aspirin is associated with a significant reduction in death and non-fatal MI in patients with UCAD. This benefit is enhanced by the addition of unfractionated heparin (UFH) to the treatment strategy; however, UFH requires careful monitoring and titration. In contrast, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), produced by chemical or enzymatic depolymerization of UFH, yield a predictable and consistent pharmacokinetic profile and anticoagulant response making them an attractive alternative treatment to UFH in patients with UCAD. In several studies, acute-phase treatment with LMWH has been shown to be at least as effective and safe as UFH. The optimal duration of treatment with LMWH is an important question that has been influenced by the observation that reactivation of coagulation occurs following the early and abrupt discontinuation of heparin treatment. In early trials, such as FRISC (Fragmin during instability in coronary artery disease) and FRIC (Fragmin in unstable coronary artery disease), the results of extended treatment were inconclusive; however, the trial populations included patients of relatively low risk and used a once-daily dosing regimen. In the TIMI 11B (Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction) extended treatment beyond the few days of acute treatment with enoxaparin did not add to the beneficial LMWH effect, but in this study 40% of the high-risk patients did not continue on extended treatment. The findings derived from the FRISC II trial, which used a twice-daily dose of dalteparin sodium, suggest a benefit for up to 45 days with extended treatment in high-risk UCAD patients. Although an early invasive treatment strategy is particularly beneficial, patients in

  18. A Fatal Case of Immune Hyperhemolysis with Bone Marrow Necrosis in a Patient with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singavi, Arun; Johnson, Susan T.; Field, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease, hyperhemolysis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transfusion. In this case report, we describe a 61 year-old woman with hemoglobin sickle cell (SC) disease and history of alloimmunization who developed hyperhemolysis associated with a transfusion. She was found to have a warm and a clinically-significant cold autoantibody. Severe anemia (Hb 2.7 g/dL) with reticulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia prompted a bone marrow biopsy, which demonstrated extensive bone marrow necrosis. Despite treatment, the bone marrow failure did not improve and the patient died on hospital day 38. This case illustrates the potential risks of transfusion in a patient with sickle cell disease, especially one with previous hemolytic reactions. While uncommon, hyperhemolysis can cause death, in this case by extensive bone marrow necrosis. In patients with sickle cell disease, judicious use of red cell transfusions with phenotypically-matched units can diminish, but never completely abrogate, the risks associated with transfusion. PMID:28286630

  19. Detection of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Linda; Lightner, Donald; Pantoja, Carlos; Gomez-Jimenez, Silvia

    2014-08-21

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), which has also been referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS), initially emerged as a destructive disease of cultured shrimp species in Asia in 2009. The pathogen associated with the disease, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, subsequently spread to the Western Hemisphere and emerged in Mexico in early 2013. The spread to the Western Hemisphere is a major concern to shrimp producers in the region. To date, the only peer-reviewed published method for determining whether mortalities are due to AHPND is through histological examination. A novel PCR detection method was employed to assess samples from Mexico in order to confirm the presence of the pathogen in this country. This manuscript details the detection methods used to confirm the presence of AHPND in Mexico. Both immersion and per os challenge studies were used to expose the Penaeus vannamei to the bacteria in order to induce the disease. Histological analysis confirmed AHPND status following the challenge studies. Also provided are the details of the molecular test by PCR that was used for screening candidate V. parahaemolyticus isolates. A rapid PCR assay for detection of AHPND may help with early detection and help prevent the spread of AHPND to other countries.

  20. Fatalities in Swedish skydiving.

    PubMed

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2005-11-01

    Exact risk patterns in skydiving fatalities are not well known, but incomplete world injury data indicate that many are preventable. A comprehensive national material for Sweden of 37 skydiving fatalities 1964-2003 were reviewed to identify risk factors. In relation to jump volume, the period 1994-2003 had a fatality rate 11 times lower than 1964-1973. Student skydivers had the highest risk of fatal outcome, often caused by instability in freefall leading to unstable parachute activation with subsequent line entanglement, or parachute activation failure. Unintentional water landings also contributed to student fatality, with life jacket malfunctions, neglect to use life jackets, and automatic reserve parachute activation devices activated by water as aggravating factors. One-third of all fatalities had an inflated and operational parachute at some point prior to injury. A drastic worldwide increase in fatal landing incidents with fast wing parachutes during the 1990s did not occur in Sweden. Every fourth fatality caused by rapid deceleration against ground or water survived impact and died during transports or in hospitals. Rescue units and health care providers can improve management of skydiving incidents from knowledge about the incident and injury mechanisms we have described, and the skydiving community can target risk factors in preventive safety work.

  1. Acute kidney injury in patients with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Rognant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent clinical event in patients with liver disease, compounding their prognosis. Furthermore, it is likely that the occurrence of AKI has a detrimental impact on the subsequent renal function and the long-term survival of these patients. Recently, some authors advocated the use of new diagnostic criteria for detecting acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis. These criteria are based on the rapidity and extent of the creatinine increase comparing to the basal creatinine and also on the kinetics of diuresis decrease. Although their validity in this population requires further studies to be clearly established, these new criteria could have two advantages: (1) to allow earlier diagnosis of AKI and, thus, hepatorenal syndrome for which earlier intervention could improve patients’ survival; and (2) to promote more intensive monitoring of renal function in these patients with high risk of AKI. Finally, recent practice guidelines about the prevention and treatment of general AKI have been published which should be useful in optimising the management of AKI in cirrhotic patients. PMID:25954481

  2. The Role of Alcohol Consumption in the Aetiology of Different Cardiovascular Disease Phenotypes: a CALIBER Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-28

    Chronic Stable Angina; Unstable Angina; Coronary Heart Disease Not Otherwise Specified; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Heart Failure; Ventricular Arrhythmias; Cardiac Arrest; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Ischaemic Stroke; Subarachnoid Haemorrhagic Stroke; Intracerebral Haemorrhagic Stroke; Stroke Not Otherwise Specified; Sudden Cardiac Death; Unheralded Coronary Death; Mortality; Coronary Heart Disease (CHD); Cardiovascular Disease (CVD); Fatal Cardiovascular Disease (Fatal CVD); ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI); Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (nSTEMI); Myocardial Infarction Not Otherwise Specified (MI NOS)

  3. A randomized study of the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, N.K.C.; Kersey, J.H.; Robison, L.L.; McGlave, P.B.; Woods, W.G.; Krivit, W.; Kim, T.H.; Goldman, A.I.; Nesbit, M.E., Jr.

    1982-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease is a major problem in allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. We performed a randomized study to compare the effectiveness of two regimens in the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease. Thirty-five patients received methotrexate alone, and 32 received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone. Of the patients who received methotrexate alone, 48 percent had acute graft-versus-host disease, as compared with 21 per cent of those who received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone (P = 0.01). The age of the recipient was a significant factor in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease: Older patients had a higher incidence of the disease (P = 0.001). We conclude that the combination of methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone significantly decreased the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease and should be used to prevent this disorder in patients receiving allogeneic marrow transplants.

  4. Initiation of acute graft-versus-host disease by angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Riesner, Katarina; Shi, Yu; Jacobi, Angela; Kraeter, Martin; Kalupa, Martina; McGearey, Aleixandria; Mertlitz, Sarah; Cordes, Steffen; Schrezenmeier, Jens-Florian; Mengwasser, Jörg; Westphal, Sabine; Perez-Hernandez, Daniel; Schmitt, Clemens; Dittmar, Gunnar; Guck, Jochen; Penack, Olaf

    2017-01-17

    The inhibition of inflammation-associated angiogenesis ameliorates inflammatory diseases by reducing the recruitment of tissue infiltrating leukocytes. However, it is not known if angiogenesis has an active role during the initiation of inflammation or if it is merely a secondary effect occurring in response to stimuli by tissue infiltrating leukocytes. Here we show that angiogenesis precedes leukocyte infiltration in experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We found that angiogenesis occurred as early as day+2 after allogeneic transplantation mainly in GVHD typical target organs skin, liver and intestines whereas no angiogenic changes appeared due to conditioning or syngeneic transplantation. The initiation phase of angiogenesis was not associated to classical endothelial cell (EC) activation signs, such as Vegfa/VEGFR1+2 upregulation or increased adhesion molecule expression. During early GVHD at day+2, we found significant metabolic and cytoskeleton changes in target organ ECs in gene array- and proteomic analyses. These modifications have significant functional consequences as indicated by profoundly higher deformation in Real-time deformability cytometry. Our results demonstrate that metabolic changes trigger alterations in cell mechanics leading to enhanced migratory and proliferative potential of ECs during the initiation of inflammation. Our study adds evidence to the hypothesis that angiogenesis is involved in the initiation of tissue inflammation during GVHD.

  5. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  6. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  7. From fatalism to mitigation: a conceptual framework for mitigating fetal programming of chronic disease by maternal obesity

    PubMed Central

    Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Messer, Lynne C.; Fortmann, Stephen P.; Wallack, Lawrence; Thornburg, Kent L.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal development is recognized as a critical period in the etiology of obesity and cardiometabolic disease. Potential strategies to reduce maternal obesity-induced risk later in life have been largely overlooked. In this paper, we first propose a conceptual framework for the role of public health and preventive medicine in mitigating the effects of fetal programming. Second, we review a small but growing body of research (through August 2015) that examines interactive effects of maternal obesity and two public health foci – diet and physical activity – in the offspring. Results of the review support the hypothesis that diet and physical activity after early life can attenuate disease susceptibility induced by maternal obesity, but human evidence is scant. Based on the review, we identify major gaps relevant for prevention research, such as characterizing the type and dose response of dietary and physical activity exposures that modify the adverse effects of maternal obesity in the offspring. Third, we discuss potential implications of interactions between maternal obesity and postnatal dietary and physical activity exposures for interventions to mitigate maternal obesity-induced risk among children. Our conceptual framework, evidence review, and future research directions offer a platform to develop, test, and implement fetal programming mitigation strategies for the current and future generations of children. PMID:26522092

  8. From fatalism to mitigation: A conceptual framework for mitigating fetal programming of chronic disease by maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Messer, Lynne C; Fortmann, Stephen P; Wallack, Lawrence; Thornburg, Kent L

    2015-12-01

    Prenatal development is recognized as a critical period in the etiology of obesity and cardiometabolic disease. Potential strategies to reduce maternal obesity-induced risk later in life have been largely overlooked. In this paper, we first propose a conceptual framework for the role of public health and preventive medicine in mitigating the effects of fetal programming. Second, we review a small but growing body of research (through August 2015) that examines interactive effects of maternal obesity and two public health foci - diet and physical activity - in the offspring. Results of the review support the hypothesis that diet and physical activity after early life can attenuate disease susceptibility induced by maternal obesity, but human evidence is scant. Based on the review, we identify major gaps relevant for prevention research, such as characterizing the type and dose response of dietary and physical activity exposures that modify the adverse effects of maternal obesity in the offspring. Third, we discuss potential implications of interactions between maternal obesity and postnatal dietary and physical activity exposures for interventions to mitigate maternal obesity-induced risk among children. Our conceptual framework, evidence review, and future research directions offer a platform to develop, test, and implement fetal programming mitigation strategies for the current and future generations of children.

  9. Epidemiological Survey of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF), a Fatal Infectious Disease in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran, During 1999 - 2015

    PubMed Central

    Sharififard, Mona; Alavi, Sayed Mohammad; Salmanzadeh, Shokrollah; Safdari, Farhad; Kamali, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an arboviral zoonotic disease transmitted to humans mainly through the bite of blood-sucking Ixodidae ticks and also via contact with the blood and tissues of infected livestock. Objectives This study is a retrospective descriptive survey based on data collected from the health center of Khuzestan province, Iran, during 1999 - 2015. Patients and Methods Patients with symptoms of severe headache, high fever, and bleeding were evaluated. Laboratory tests and serological or molecular assays were used to detect probable and confirmed cases, respectively. The epidemiological parameters of this study were analyzed on the basis of probable cases. Results A total of 42 patients were diagnosed as probable cases, and 17 of these (42.5%) were confirmed serologically. Two peaks of the disease occurred in Khuzestan province, in 2003 and 2010, with seven cases each of those years, leading to the deaths of five and two patients, respectively. Men and women comprised 57.1% and 42.9% of the patients, respectively. Of all probable cases, 64.3% were from urban areas and 35.7% were from rural areas. The age groups of 10 - 19 and 20 - 29 years, with a frequency of 26.2% in each group, were exposed to the most infections. Farmers and housewives were the highest at-risk occupational groups with a frequency of 28.6% and 26%, respectively. Fever, bleeding, and thrombocytopenia were reported in 95% of the patients, and the case-fatality ratio was calculated to be 28.6% (12 of 42 cases). Conclusions Continuous training is necessary to improve the knowledge and awareness of the highest-risk groups with regard to the transmission modes, prevention, symptoms, and treatment of this disease. PMID:27540454

  10. Molecular epidemiology of human enterovirus 71 at the origin of an epidemic of fatal hand, foot and mouth disease cases in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Veasna; Mey, Channa; Eloit, Marc; Zhu, Huachen; Danet, Lucie; Huang, Zhong; Zou, Gang; Tarantola, Arnaud; Cheval, Justine; Perot, Philippe; Laurent, Denis; Richner, Beat; Ky, Santy; Heng, Sothy; Touch, Sok; Sovann, Ly; van Doorn, Rogier; Tan Tran, Thanh; Farrar, Jeremy J; Wentworth, David E; Das, Suman R; Stockwell, Timothy B; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Delpeyroux, Francis; Guan, Yi; Altmeyer, Ralf; Buchy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). EV-A71 circulates in many countries and has caused large epidemics, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, since 1997. In April 2012, an undiagnosed fatal disease with neurological involvement and respiratory distress occurred in young children admitted to the Kantha Bopha Children's Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Most died within a day of hospital admission, causing public panic and international concern. In this study, we describe the enterovirus (EV) genotypes that were isolated during the outbreak in 2012 and the following year. From June 2012 to November 2013, 312 specimens were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory patients and tested by generic EV and specific EV-A71 reverse transcription PCR. EV-A71 was detected in 208 clinical specimens while other EVs were found in 32 patients. The VP1 gene and/or the complete genome were generated. Our phylogenetic sequencing analysis demonstrated that 80 EV-A71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenotype and 3 EV-A71 strains belonged to the B5 genotype. Furthermore, some lineages of EV-A71 were found to have appeared in Cambodia following separate introductions from neighboring countries. Nineteen EV A (CV-A6 and CV-A16), 9 EV B (EV-B83, CV-B3, CV-B2, CV-A9, E-31, E-2 and EV-B80) and 4 EV C (EV-C116, EV-C96, CV-A20 and Vaccine-related PV-3) strains were also detected. We found no molecular markers of disease severity. We report here that EV-A71 genotype C4 was the main etiological agent of a large outbreak of HFMD and particularly of severe forms associated with central nervous system infections. The role played by other EVs in the epidemic could not be clearly established. PMID:27651091

  11. Molecular epidemiology of human enterovirus 71 at the origin of an epidemic of fatal hand, foot and mouth disease cases in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Duong, Veasna; Mey, Channa; Eloit, Marc; Zhu, Huachen; Danet, Lucie; Huang, Zhong; Zou, Gang; Tarantola, Arnaud; Cheval, Justine; Perot, Philippe; Laurent, Denis; Richner, Beat; Ky, Santy; Heng, Sothy; Touch, Sok; Sovann, Ly; van Doorn, Rogier; Tan Tran, Thanh; Farrar, Jeremy J; Wentworth, David E; Das, Suman R; Stockwell, Timothy B; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Delpeyroux, Francis; Guan, Yi; Altmeyer, Ralf; Buchy, Philippe

    2016-09-21

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). EV-A71 circulates in many countries and has caused large epidemics, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, since 1997. In April 2012, an undiagnosed fatal disease with neurological involvement and respiratory distress occurred in young children admitted to the Kantha Bopha Children's Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Most died within a day of hospital admission, causing public panic and international concern. In this study, we describe the enterovirus (EV) genotypes that were isolated during the outbreak in 2012 and the following year. From June 2012 to November 2013, 312 specimens were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory patients and tested by generic EV and specific EV-A71 reverse transcription PCR. EV-A71 was detected in 208 clinical specimens while other EVs were found in 32 patients. The VP1 gene and/or the complete genome were generated. Our phylogenetic sequencing analysis demonstrated that 80 EV-A71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenotype and 3 EV-A71 strains belonged to the B5 genotype. Furthermore, some lineages of EV-A71 were found to have appeared in Cambodia following separate introductions from neighboring countries. Nineteen EV A (CV-A6 and CV-A16), 9 EV B (EV-B83, CV-B3, CV-B2, CV-A9, E-31, E-2 and EV-B80) and 4 EV C (EV-C116, EV-C96, CV-A20 and Vaccine-related PV-3) strains were also detected. We found no molecular markers of disease severity. We report here that EV-A71 genotype C4 was the main etiological agent of a large outbreak of HFMD and particularly of severe forms associated with central nervous system infections. The role played by other EVs in the epidemic could not be clearly established.

  12. Pulmonary platelet thrombi and vascular pathology in acute chest syndrome in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Anea, Ciprian B.; Lyon, Matthew; Lee, Itia A.; Gonzales, Joyce N.; Adeyemi, Amidat; Falls, Greer; Kutlar, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests a role for platelets in sickle cell disease (SCD). Despite the proinflammatory, occlusive nature of platelets, a role for platelets in acute chest syndrome (ACS), however, remains understudied. To provide evidence and potentially describe contributory factors for a putative link between ACS and platelets, we performed an autopsy study of 20 SCD cases—10 of whom died from ACS and 10 whose deaths were not ACS‐related. Pulmonary histopathology and case history were collected. We discovered that disseminated pulmonary platelet thrombi were present in 3 out of 10 of cases with ACS, but none of the matched cases without ACS. Those cases with detected thrombi were associated with significant deposition of endothelial vWF and detection of large vWF aggregates adhered to endothelium. Potential clinical risk factors were younger age and higher platelet count at presentation. However, we also noted a sharp and significant decline in platelet count prior to death in each case with platelet thrombi in the lungs. In this study, neither hydroxyurea use nor perimortem transfusion was associated with platelet thrombi. Surprisingly, in all cases, there was profound pulmonary artery remodeling with both thrombotic and proliferative pulmonary plexiform lesions. The severity of remodeling was not associated with a severe history of ACS, or hydroxyurea use, but was inversely correlated with age. We thus provide evidence of undocumented presence of platelet thrombi in cases of fatal ACS and describe clinical correlates. We also provide novel correlates of pulmonary remodeling in SCD. Am. J. Hematol. 91:173–178, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26492581

  13. Fatal thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with childhood-onset vasculo-Behçet's disease: an autopsy report.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, S; Ishihara, A; Kawasaki, S

    2001-11-01

    A 33-year-old man died following sudden unexpected rupture of a saccular thoracic aortic aneurysm. The patient had been treated as suspicious Behçet's disease (BD) for 9 years, however, the medication was discontinued at the age of 24. Autopsy disclosed multiple aneurysms at the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta. Histopathologically, infiltration of inflammatory cells and destruction with loss of elastic and muscle fibers of the aortic medial wall were seen. Taking the clinical course into account, all the postmortem findings were compatible with those of vasculo-BD. It is important that medical follow-up should be implemented even for childhood-onset patients who do not satisfy criteria of BD.

  14. Molecular analysis of SV-40-CAL, a new slow growing SV-40 strain from the kidney of a caged New World monkey with fatal renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zdziarski, Jacqueline M; Sarich, Nicolene A; Witecki, Kelley E; Lednicky, John A

    2004-10-01

    A decline of the Callimico goeldii population in American zoos is presently occurring due to glomerulonephritis of unknown etiology. We hypothesized that this emerging idiopathic fatal renal disease (IFRD) was caused by a virus. We therefore attempted to isolate virus from the kidneys three C. goeldi in Illinois that had IFRD. Along with other viruses, Simian virus 40 (SV-40) strain CAL was isolated. SV-40-CAL is currently the slowest-growing natural isolate of SV-40 in CV-1 cells. Inefficient SV-40-CAL growth in CV-1 cells stems from two features: a suboptimal protoarchetypal regulatory region, and a Large tumor antigen gene sequence like that of SV-40 strain T302, previously considered the slow-growing natural isolate of SV-40. To our knowledge, this is the first documented isolation of SV-40 from a New World monkey outside of a laboratory setting. Though SV-40 is renaltropic, the role of SV-40-CAL in IFRD is uncertain. Transmission of SV-40 to C. goeldii through anthropogenic activity is suspected.

  15. Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics, Quinolones, and General Gnotobiological Isolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Armed Forces Ra ioloy Research Institute Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones, and General...Gnotobiological Isolation Russia State Medical University 19990119 114 Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones...effects of antibiotics and probiotics (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) in mice irradiated with 7 Gy. The effects were studied in normal mice and mice

  16. A rare disease in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis: acute brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Yetkin, Funda; Unlu, Serkan; Yilmaz, Sami; Bentli, Recep; Bazna, Sezai

    2014-01-01

    Some infectious organisms may give rise to acute pancreatitis; brucellosis, however, extremely rarely leads to acute pancreatitis. A 40-year-old man was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, the etiology of which was determined to be acute brucellosis. The patient was discharged without complications approximately 15 days after the initiation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and doxycycline treatment. Brucella infections may rarely be complicated by acute pancreatitis. Thus, brucellosis should be remembered in the etiology of acute pancreatitis in regions such as Turkey, where Brucella infections are endemic.

  17. A mutation in the surfactant protein B gene responsible for fatal neonatal respiratory disease in multiple kindreds.

    PubMed Central

    Nogee, L M; Garnier, G; Dietz, H C; Singer, L; Murphy, A M; deMello, D E; Colten, H R

    1994-01-01

    To determine the molecular defect accounting for the deficiency of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) in full-term neonates who died from respiratory failure associated with alveolar proteinosis, the sequence of the SP-B transcript in affected infants was ascertained. A frameshift mutation consisting of a substitution of GAA for C in codon 121 of the SP-B cDNA was identified. The three affected infants in the index family were homozygous for this mutation, which segregated in a fashion consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance of disease. The same mutation was found in two other unrelated infants who died from alveolar proteinosis, one of whom was also homozygous, and in the parents of an additional unrelated, affected infant, but was not observed in 50 control subjects. We conclude that this mutation is responsible for SP-B deficiency and neonatal alveolar proteinosis in multiple families and speculate that the disorder is more common than was recognized previously. Images PMID:8163685

  18. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  19. Computer Models of Stress, Allostasis, and Acute and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The past century has seen a profound shift in diseases of humankind. Acute, unifactorial diseases are being replaced increasingly by multifactorial disorders that arise from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities and treatments, and time. According to the concept of allostasis, there is no single, ideal set of steady-state conditions in life. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators “homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of a home temperature control system, the temperature can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states) by multiple means (effectors), regulated by a comparator thermostat (homeostat). Stress might exert adverse health consequences via allostatic load. This presentation describes models of homeostatic systems that incorporate negative feedback regulation, multiple effectors, effector sharing, environmental influences, intrinsic obsolescence, and destabilizing positive feedback loops. These models can be used to predict effects of environmental and genetic alterations on allostatic load and therefore on the development of multi-system disorders and failures. PMID:19120114

  20. Fatal big cat attacks.

    PubMed

    Cohle, S D; Harlan, C W; Harlan, G

    1990-09-01

    Two cases of fatal attacks by large cats are presented. In the first case, a 30-year-old female zoo worker was attacked by a jaguar that had escaped its cage. In the second case, a 2-year-old girl was fatally injured by her father's pet leopard. The pattern of injuries in these cases is nearly identical to those of these cats' prey in the wild.

  1. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Simon Y.; Latimer, Erin M.; Hayward, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses—EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7—found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  2. [The Fabry's Disease Cardiomyopathy as Differential Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Störk, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Ertl, Georg; Weidemann, Frank; Nordbeck, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The progressive cardiomyopathy in patients with Fabry disease is often accompanied by angina pectoris and elevated levels of high-sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT), potentially mimicking acute coronary syndrome. Here, we present to representative cases with focus on clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic settings. An overview on the cardiomyopathy associated with Fabry disease and its role as differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome is provided. Fabry cardiomyopathy might exhibit similar clinical and biochemical constellations as seen in acute coronary syndrome. Thus, Fabry cardiomyopathy should be considered a differential diagnosis in acute coronary syndrome, particularly in patients demonstrating left ventricular hypertrophy of unknown origin.

  3. Acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease: current concepts and future implications.

    PubMed

    Archana, Vilasan; Ambili, Ranjith; Nisha, Krishnavilasam Jayakumary; Seba, Abraham; Preeja, Chandran

    2015-05-01

    Periodontal disease has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events by unknown mechanisms. C-reactive protein is a systemic marker released during the acute phase of an inflammatory response and is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease, with elevated serum levels being reported during periodontal disease. Studies also reported elevated levels of various other acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease. It has been reported extensively in the literature that treatment of periodontal infections can significantly lower serum levels of C-reactive protein. Therefore, an understanding of the relationship between acute-phase response and the progression of periodontal disease and other systemic health complications would have a profound effect on the periodontal treatment strategies. In view of this fact, the present review highlights an overview of acute-phase reactants and their role in periodontal disease.

  4. Respiratory viruses in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Akram, Shabir; Potdar, Varsha; Chadha, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and an inexorable decline of lung function. Data from developed countries have shown viruses to be important causes of AECOPD, but data from developing countries like India are scant. We set out to determine the contribution of viruses in the causation of hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Methods: Twin nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs collected from 233 patients admitted with an acute AECOPD and tested for respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus A and B, parainfluenza were (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) A and B, influenza A and B, enterovirus, corona NL65, OC43, and 229E viruses, adenovirus 2 and 4, rhinovirus, and bocavirus, by duplex real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using CDC approved primers and probes. Samples positive for influenza A were subtyped for A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 whereas influenza B samples were subtyped into B/Yamagata and B/Victoria subtypes, using primers and probes recommended by CDC, USA. Results: Respiratory viruses were detected in 46 (19.7%) cases, influenza A/H3N2 and rhinoviruses being the most common viruses detected. More than one virus was isolated in four cases consisting of hMPV-B + adeno-2 + Inf-B; rhino + H3N2, PIV-1 + rhino; and PIV-1+ hMPV-B in one case each. Ancillary supportive therapeutic measures included bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, and ventilation (noninvasive in 42 and invasive in 4). Antiviral therapy was instituted in influenza-positive patients. Three patients with A/H3N2 infection died during hospitalization. Conclusions: We conclude that respiratory viruses are important contributors to AECOPD in India. Our data calls for prompt investigation during an exacerbation for viruses to obviate inappropriate antibiotic use and institute antiviral therapy in viral disease amenable to antiviral therapy. Appropriate

  5. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease among children--American Samoa, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Amanda; Edison, Laura; Introcaso, Camille E; Goh, Lucy; Marrone, James; Mejia, Amelita; Van Beneden, Chris

    2015-05-29

    Acute rheumatic fever is a nonsuppurative, immune-mediated consequence of group A streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat). Recurrent or severe acute rheumatic fever can cause permanent cardiac valve damage and rheumatic heart disease, which increases the risk for cardiac conditions (e.g., infective endocarditis, stroke, and congestive heart failure). Antibiotics can prevent acute rheumatic fever if administered no more than 9 days after symptom onset. Long-term benzathine penicillin G (BPG) injections are effective in preventing recurrent acute rheumatic fever attacks and are recommended to be administered every 3-4 weeks for 10 years or until age 21 years to children who receive a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. During August 2013, in response to anecdotal reports of increasing rates of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, CDC collaborated with the American Samoa Department of Health and the Lyndon B. Johnson Tropical Medical Center (the only hospital in American Samoa) to quantify the number of cases of pediatric acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in American Samoa and to assess the potential roles of missed pharyngitis diagnosis, lack of timely prophylaxis prescription, and compliance with prescribed BPG prophylaxis. Using data from medical records, acute rheumatic fever incidence was calculated as 1.1 and 1.5 cases per 1,000 children aged ≤18 years in 2011 and 2012, respectively; 49% of those with acute rheumatic fever subsequently received a diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease. Noncompliance with recommended prophylaxis with BPG after physician-diagnosed acute rheumatic fever was noted for 22 (34%) of 65 patients. Rheumatic heart disease point prevalence was 3.2 cases per 1,000 children in August 2013. Establishment of a coordinated acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease control program in American Samoa, likely would improve diagnosis, treatment, and patient compliance with BPG prophylaxis.

  6. Fatal Community-acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Re-emergent Human Adenovirus 7d Associated with Higher Severity of Illness and Fatality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiwu; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Pan, Yuxian; Chen, Manjun; Guo, Yonghui; Yu, Nan; Chodosh, James; Fu, Ning; Che, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), such as community-acquired pneumonia. HAdV-7d, a re-emergent genomic variant, has been recently reported in Asia and the United States after a several-decade absence. However, whether HAdV-7d is associated with higher severity than other types is currently unclear. In this study, the clinical and epidemiological investigation showed that fever, cough, and sore throat were the three most common respiratory symptoms of HAdV infections. HAdV-7 caused longer duration of fever, higher morbidity of tachypnea/dyspnea, pleural effusion, diarrhea, hepatosplenomegaly, consciousness alteration, as well as higher rates of pneumonia, mechanical ventilation and higher fatality rate (28.6%) than other types, particularly HAdV-3 and HAdV-2. The genomes of seven HAdV-7d isolates from mild, severe, and fatal cases were sequenced and highly similar with each other. Surprisingly, two isolates (2011, 2012) had 100% identical genomes with an earlier strain from a fatal ARD outbreak in China (2009), which elucidates the virus origin and confirms the unexpected HAdV genomic conservation and stability. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that L1 52/55-kDa DNA packaging protein may be associated with the higher severity of illness and fatality rate of HAdV-7. Clinicians need to be aware of HAdVs in children with ARD. PMID:27848998

  7. Tocilizumab for steroid refractory acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Julianna V F; Haverkos, Bradley M; McBride, Ali; Leininger, Kathryn M; Jaglowski, Samantha; Penza, Sam; Klisovic, Rebecca; Blum, William; Vasu, Sumithira; Hofmeister, Craig C; Benson, Don M; Andritsos, Leslie A; Devine, Steven M; Efebera, Yvonne A

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) is a frequent and often lethal complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant despite prophylaxis. Tocilizumab is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody that has evidence of activity in patients with steroid refractory (SR) GVHD. We retrospectively report on nine patients with grade 3 or 4 SR aGVHD who received tocilizumab. Eight mg/kg of tocilizumab was administered intravenously every 3-4 weeks. aGVHD grading and responses were based on consensus criteria. Median age at transplant was 48 years. Five patients had alternate donor sources. Median time from aGVHD onset to tocilizumab administration was 44 days. Two patients had complete responses and two had partial responses. Median survival from start of tocilizumab was 26 days (range 13-1054). Our limited experience demonstrated an overall response rate of 44% (CR + PR); however, this response was not durable. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal time for tocilizumab initiation.

  8. Tocilizumab for steroid refractory acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Julianna V. F.; Haverkos, Bradley M.; McBride, Ali; Leininger, Kathryn M.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Penza, Sam; Klisovic, Rebecca; Blum, William; Vasu, Sumithira; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Benson, Don M.; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Devine, Steven M.; Efebera, Yvonne A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) is a frequent and often lethal complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant despite prophylaxis. Tocilizumab is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody that has evidence of activity in patients with steroid refractory (SR) GVHD. We retrospectively report on nine patients with grade 3 or 4 SR aGVHD who received tocilizumab. Eight mg/kg of tocilizumab was administered intravenously every 3–4 weeks. aGVHD grading and responses were based on consensus criteria. Median age at transplant was 48 years. Five patients had alternate donor sources. Median time from aGVHD onset to tocilizumab administration was 44 days. Two patients had complete responses and two had partial responses. Median survival from start of tocilizumab was 26 days (range 13–1054). Our limited experience demonstrated an overall response rate of 44% (CR + PR); however, this response was not durable. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal time for tocilizumab initiation. PMID:26140610

  9. Ambroxol for the prevention of acute upper respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Nobata, K; Fujimura, M; Ishiura, Y; Myou, S; Nakao, S

    2006-06-01

    Although acute upper respiratory diseases (AURDs) such as common cold and influenza are common, few interventions have been proven to be effective in their prevention and treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ambroxol for preventing AURD. Fifty-four patients were randomly divided into 3 groups: a rebamipide (non-mucoactive drug) group (300 mg/day), carbocisteine group (1500 mg/day) and ambroxol group (45 mg/day). The study was divided into 2 terms, the first half-year (summer season) and the second half-year (winter season). In the preceding winter, only 19.5% of the patients had been vaccinated against influenza viruses (flu). The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mucoactive drugs in decreasing the frequency of AURD. Treatment with ambroxol, but not carbocisteine, significantly reduced the median number of AURD episodes (P=0.0049 vs. rebamipide). Thirty-three patients without vaccination against flu were assessed especially during the second half-year. Treatment with ambroxol also significantly reduced the median number of AURD episodes in this assessment (P=0.0028 vs. rebamipide in the second half-year). In conclusion, ambroxol may be useful for preventing AURD.

  10. Acute respiratory disease in Spain: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Tellez, A; Perez-Breña, P; Fernandez-Patiño, M V; León, P; Anda, P; Nájera, R

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiologic features of viral and nonviral pathogens involved in acute respiratory diseases are described in the context of cases of infection (especially atypical pneumonia and bronchiolitis) studied at the Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Virología e Immunología Sanitarias in Madrid during a 7-year period (1979-1986). These etiologies were demonstrated in 1,637 (36.2%) of 4,521 cases. Among viruses, respiratory syncytial virus most frequently infected children; influenza virus showed the same pattern of circulation as in other European countries. Of nonviral agents, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and C. burnetii were most often involved in lower respiratory tract infections, with a variable predominance in patients of different ages. A high proportion of cases of M. pneumoniae infection occurred in infants and children aged less than 1 year, and most of these cases occurred during spring and summer. The majority of Q fever cases, including those observed in two outbreaks, occurred in the northern region.

  11. Direct micromethod for diagnosis of acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Feilij, H; Muller, L; Gonzalez Cappa, S M

    1983-01-01

    A microhematocrit concentration method (MH) for immediate diagnosis of Chagas' disease during the acute stage or in congenital cases was standardized. Parasitemia as low as 1,000 parasites per ml was detected, after centrifugation of six 50-microliters capillary tubes, by 10-min microscopic observation of each buffy coat spread between slide and cover glass. Operator's time was reduced by at least one-third when compared with a fresh blood observation (FB). In 12 of the 15 patients studied, diagnosis was performed in 4.9 +/- 3.08 min with MH, whereas 27.0 +/- 12.1 min were necessary when FB was used. In the three remaining patients whose FB results were negative, MH became positive after 13, 16, and 40 min. In our experience, FB proved to be more sensitive than previously reported. Suckling mouse inoculation also proved to be sensitive but, as in xenodiagnosis and in hemoculture, the delay in getting the final result was a limiting factor. PMID:6413530

  12. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient.

  13. Should we screen children with severe acute malnutrition for celiac disease?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Mishra, Kirtisudha; Singh, Preeti; Rai, Kiran

    2012-04-01

    The clinical features of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) often overlap with the common manifestations of celiac disease. In this observational pilot study, 76 children fulfilling the case definition of SAM were investigated for celiac disease, tuberculosis and HIV. Celiac disease was diagnosed in 13.1% of SAM children while tuberculosis and HIV were diagnosed in 9.3% and 4%, respectively.

  14. Measurable residual disease testing in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Hourigan, C S; Gale, R P; Gormley, N J; Ossenkoppele, G J; Walter, R B

    2017-04-07

    There is considerable interest in developing techniques to detect and/or quantify remaining leukaemia cells termed measurable or, less precisely, minimal residual disease (MRD) in persons with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in complete remission defined by cytomorphological criteria. An important reason for AML MRD testing is the possibility of estimating the likelihood (and timing) of leukaemia relapse. A perfect MRD-test would precisely quantify leukaemia cells biologically able and likely to cause leukaemia relapse within a defined interval. AML is genetically diverse and there is currently no uniform approach to detecting such cells. Several technologies focused on immune phenotype or cytogenetic and/or molecular abnormalities have been developed, each with advantages and disadvantages. Many studies report a positive MRD-test at diverse time points during AML therapy identifies persons with a higher risk of leukaemia relapse compared with those with a negative MRD-test even after adjusting for other prognostic and predictive variables. No MRD-test in AML has perfect sensitivity and specificity for relapse prediction at the cohort- or subject-levels and there are substantial rates of false-positive and -negative tests. Despite these limitations, correlations between MRD-test results and relapse risk have generated interest in MRD-test result directed therapy interventions. However, convincing proof that a specific intervention will reduce relapse risk in persons with a positive MRD-test is lacking and needs testing in randomized trials. Routine clinical use of MRD-testing requires further refinements and standardization/harmonization of assay platforms and results reporting. Such data are needed to determine whether results of MRD-testing can be used as a surrogate endpoint in AML therapy trials. This could make drug-testing more efficient and accelerate regulatory approvals. Although MRD-testing in AML has advanced substantially, much remains to be done

  15. [Clinical and microbiological study of acute pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Ovalle, A; Martínez, M A; Casals, A; Yuhaniak, R; Giglio, M S

    1993-01-01

    Upper genital tract infection was investigated in 46 women admitted to hospital with clinic diagnosis of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 62 control women accepted to hospital for laparoscopy Fallopian tubes sterilization. Diagnosis was ratified by laparoscopy in mild and moderate salpingitis; culdocentesis and ultrasonography were performed in severe salpingitis and endometrial sample was made in endometritis. Microbiological specimens were taken from the cervix and abdomen. Antecedents and complete clinical studies were obtained. Patients were treated with antibiotic association sodic G penicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. Risk factors to development PID were: single female (p < 0.05), multiple sexual partner (p < 0.01), previous PID (p < 0.05), infertility (p < 0.05), mean year of IUD use in severe salpingitis (p = 0.05) and mean years of age from women with sexually transmitted bacterias (STB) vs endogenous bacterias (EB) (p < 0.05). In the control group no abdomen bacterias were isolated. In patients with PID, C. trachomatis was detected by serology in 28.3%. N. gonorrhoeae was isolated from the cervix in 23.9% and from the abdomen 17.4%. Besides it was isolated from the abdomen: M. hominis 17.3% and E. coli 15.2%. STB were isolated in 54.3% and EB in 47.8% of the patients. Bacterial association was present on the 37%. Cervix isolation of G. vaginalis and Mycoplasma were not correlated with development of PID. Cervix microbiological samples were useful to know abdomen microbic etiology. They coincide with those in the 90.9%. EB were more frequently isolated from severe salpingitis (p = 0.05) and STB from mild and moderate salpingitis (p = 0.05). Antibiotic association cured all the mild and moderate salpingitis with independence of bacterial etiology. Failure occurred in 2 diffuse peritonitis and 13/14 tubo-ovarian abscesses. Surgery used in severe salpingitis and diffuse peritonitis, principally consisted in anexectomy, peritoneal toilet and

  16. Sporadic Fatal Insomnia in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Blase, Jennifer L.; Cracco, Laura; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Maddox, Ryan A.; Cohen, Yvonne; Cali, Ignazio

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of sporadic prion disease among adolescents is extremely rare. A prion disease was confirmed in an adolescent with disease onset at 13 years of age. Genetic, neuropathologic, and biochemical analyses of the patient’s autopsy brain tissue were consistent with sporadic fatal insomnia, a type of sporadic prion disease. There was no evidence of an environmental source of infection, and this patient represents the youngest documented case of sporadic prion disease. Although rare, a prion disease diagnosis should not be discounted in adolescents exhibiting neurologic signs. Brain tissue testing is necessary for disease confirmation and is particularly beneficial in cases with an unusual clinical presentation. PMID:24488737

  17. Understanding Fatal Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Ralph A.; Gaughan, Daniel C.

    1995-01-01

    Medical, social service, and coroner reports were reviewed for 14 cases of fatal child abuse and neglect identified at a children's hospital from 1988 to 1992. Median age was 6.5 months. Six families had prior protective service involvement (though four of these had involved a sibling). The cause of death in all cases was blunt impact head injury.…

  18. Therapeutic Approach to the Management of Pediatric Demyelinating Disease: Multiple Sclerosis and Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Banwell, Brenda L

    2016-01-01

    Acquired pediatric demyelinating diseases manifest acutely with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or with various other acute deficits in focal or polyfocal areas of the central nervous system. Patients may experience a monophasic illness (as in the case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis) or one that may manifest as a chronic, relapsing disease [e.g., multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The diagnosis of pediatric MS and other demyelinating disorders of childhood has been facilitated by consensus statements regarding diagnostic definitions. Treatment of pediatric MS has been modeled after data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset MS. There are now an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for MS, and many will be formally studied for use in pediatric patients. There are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss acute management as well as chronic immunotherapies in acquired pediatric demyelination.

  19. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Sista, Akhilesh K; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A; Madoff, David C

    2015-07-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  20. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  1. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) Is Associated with Severe Sepsis and Fatal Disease in Emergency Room Patients with Suspected Infection: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo-Seppälä, Raija; Huttunen, Reetta; Aittoniemi, Janne; Koskinen, Pertti; Leino, Aila; Vahlberg, Tero; Rintala, Esa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Early diagnostic and prognostic stratification of patients with suspected infection is a difficult clinical challenge. We studied plasma pentraxin 3 (PTX3) upon admission to the emergency department in patients with suspected infection. Methods The study comprised 537 emergency room patients with suspected infection: 59 with no systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and without bacterial infection (group 1), 67 with bacterial infection without SIRS (group 2), 54 with SIRS without bacterial infection (group 3), 308 with sepsis (SIRS and bacterial infection) without organ failure (group 4) and 49 with severe sepsis (group 5). Plasma PTX3 was measured on admission using a commercial solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The median PTX3 levels in groups 1–5 were 2.6 ng/ml, 4.4 ng/ml, 5.0 ng/ml, 6.1 ng/ml and 16.7 ng/ml, respectively (p<0.001). The median PTX3 concentration was higher in severe sepsis patients compared to others (16.7 vs. 4.9 ng/ml, p<0.001) and in non-survivors (day 28 case fatality) compared to survivors (14.1 vs. 5.1 ng/ml, p<0.001). A high PTX3 level predicted the need for ICU stay (p<0.001) and hypotension (p<0.001). AUCROC in the prediction of severe sepsis was 0.73 (95% CI 0.66–0.81, p<0.001) and 0.69 in case fatality (95% CI 0.58–0.79, p<0.001). PTX3 at a cut-off level for 14.1 ng/ml (optimal cut-off value for severe sepsis) showed 63% sensitivity and 80% specificity. At a cut-off level 7.7 ng/ml (optimal cut-off value for case fatality) showed 70% sensitivity and 63% specificity in predicting case fatality on day 28.In multivariate models, high PTX3 remained an independent predictor of severe sepsis and case fatality after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusions A high PTX3 level on hospital admission predicts severe sepsis and case fatality in patients with suspected infection. PMID:23341967

  2. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  3. Prediction of Acute Respiratory Disease in Current and Former Smokers With and Without COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Victor; Regan, Elizabeth; Williams, André A. A.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Make, Barry J.; Lynch, David A.; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George R.; Bercz, Peter; Soler, Xavier; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Criner, Gerard J.; Ramsdell, Joe; Han, MeiLan K.; Demeo, Dawn; Anzueto, Antonio; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark; Wells, J. Michael; Hersh, Craig P.; MacIntyre, Neil; Martinez, Fernando; Nath, Hrudaya P.; Niewoehner, Dennis; Sciurba, Frank; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Silverman, Edwin K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wilson, Carla; Wendt, Christine; Wise, Robert A.; Curtis, Jeffrey; Kazerooni, Ella; Hanania, Nicola; Alapat, Philip; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Guy, Elizabeth; Lunn, William; Mallampalli, Antara; Trinh, Charles; Atik, Mustafa; DeMeo, Dawn; Hersh, Craig; Jacobson, Francine; Graham Barr, R.; Thomashow, Byron; Austin, John; MacIntyre, Neil; Washington, Lacey; Page McAdams, H.; Rosiello, Richard; Bresnahan, Timothy; McEvoy, Charlene; Tashjian, Joseph; Wise, Robert; Hansel, Nadia; Brown, Robert; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Fischer, Hans; Budoff, Matt; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Niewoehner, Dennis; Allen, Tadashi; Rice, Kathryn; Foreman, Marilyn; Westney, Gloria; Berkowitz, Eugene; Bowler, Russell; Friedlander, Adam; Meoni, Eleonora; Criner, Gerard; Kim, Victor; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Satti, Aditi; James Mamary, A.; Steiner, Robert; Dass, Chandra; Bailey, William; Dransfield, Mark; Gerald, Lynn; Nath, Hrudaya; Ramsdell, Joe; Ferguson, Paul; Friedman, Paul; McLennan, Geoffrey; van Beek, Edwin JR; Martinez, Fernando; Han, MeiLan; Thompson, Deborah; Kazerooni, Ella; Wendt, Christine; Allen, Tadashi; Sciurba, Frank; Weissfeld, Joel; Fuhrman, Carl; Bon, Jessica; Anzueto, Antonio; Adams, Sandra; Orozco, Carlos; Santiago Restrepo, C.; Mumbower, Amy; Crapo, James; Silverman, Edwin; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Samet, Jonathan; Willis, Amy; Stinson, Douglas; Beaty, Terri; Klanderman, Barbara; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Ionita, Iuliana; Santorico, Stephanie; Silverman, Edwin; Lynch, David; Schroeder, Joyce; Newell, John; Reilly, John; Coxson, Harvey; Judy, Philip; Hoffman, Eric; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George; Leek, Rebecca; Zach, Jordan; Kluiber, Alex; Rodionova, Anastasia; Mann, Tanya; Crapo, Robert; Jensen, Robert; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Murphy, James; Everett, Douglas; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute episodes of respiratory disease in current and former smokers who do not have COPD are unknown. METHODS: Eight thousand two hundred forty-six non-Hispanic white and black current and former smokers in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cohort had longitudinal follow-up (LFU) every 6 months to determine acute respiratory episodes requiring antibiotics or systemic corticosteroids, an ED visit, or hospitalization. Negative binomial regression was used to determine the factors associated with acute respiratory episodes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for time to first episode and an acute episode of respiratory disease risk score. RESULTS: At enrollment, 4,442 subjects did not have COPD, 658 had mild COPD, and 3,146 had moderate or worse COPD. Nine thousand three hundred three acute episodes of respiratory disease and 2,707 hospitalizations were reported in LFU (3,044 acute episodes of respiratory disease and 827 hospitalizations in those without COPD). Major predictors included acute episodes of respiratory disease in year prior to enrollment (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24 per exacerbation), airflow obstruction (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96 per 10% change in % predicted FEV1), and poor health-related quality of life (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.08 for each 4-unit increase in St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score). Risks were similar for those with and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute episode of respiratory disease rates are higher in subjects with COPD, risk factors are similar, and at a population level, there are more episodes in smokers without COPD. PMID:24945159

  4. Systemic juvenile xanthogranuloma with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Azorín, Daniel; Torrelo, Antonio; Lassaletta, Alvaro; de Prada, Inmaculada; Colmenero, Isabel; Contra, Trinidad; González-Mediero, Imelda

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma is a benign and self-limited disease which usually appears in the skin of children. Visceral involvement has been rarely reported, as has fatal outcome in some affected individuals. We report a case of systemic juvenile xanthogranuloma in a female newborn with mainly skin, bone marrow, and liver involvement, leading to death at the age of 2 months.

  5. Fatal Case of Listeria innocua Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient. PMID:14605191

  6. Fatal case of Listeria innocua bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-11-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient.

  7. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis in 7 dogs from Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Kjaergaard, Astrid B.; Carr, Anthony P.; Gaunt, M. Casey

    2016-01-01

    Seven dogs diagnosed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis are described. Disease severity ranged from mild in adults to fatal disease in young dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli infection should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhea. PMID:27587889

  8. [Secondary prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism: analysis of 49 fatal cases].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Hajduk, B; Vertun-Baranowska, B; Kober, J; Filipecki, S

    1998-01-01

    The analysis of 49 fatal cases of venous thromboembolism--VTE (15% of total ambulatory patients number during long observation was performed. The advanced age of patients, multiple risk factors, underlying circulatory and respiratory tract diseases, malignancies, previous episodes of VTE especially with secondary pulmonary hypertension were the most important factors determining fatal prognoses in those patients.

  9. The Serum Profile of Hypercytokinemia Factors Identified in H7N9-Infected Patients can Predict Fatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Huang, Fengming; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Wei; Cao, Bin; Zou, Zhen; Liu, Song; Pan, Jingcao; Bao, Changjun; Zeng, Mei; Xiao, Haixia; Gao, Hainv; Yang, Shigui; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Huandi; Zhu, Jingdong; Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Weifeng; Yang, Yida; Zheng, Shufa; Yang, Jiezuan; Diao, Hongyan; Su, Kunkai; Shao, Li; Cao, Hongcui; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Min; Tan, Shuguang; Li, Hui; Xu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Jianmin; Wang, Li; Wang, Jianwei; Xu, Jun; Li, Dangsheng; Zhong, Nanshan; Cao, Xuetao; Gao, George F.; Li, Lanjuan; Jiang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    The novel avian origin influenza A (H7N9) virus has caused severe diseases in humans in eastern China since the spring of 2013. Fatal outcomes of H7N9 infections are often attributed to the severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There is urgent need to discover biomarkers predicting the progression of disease and fatal outcome of potentially lethal flu infections, based on sound statistical analysis. We discovered that 34 of the 48 cytokines and chemokines examined in this study were significantly elevated in the plasma samples from patients infected with H7N9. We report for the first time that the levels of MIF, SCF, MCP-1, HGF, and SCGF-β are highly positively linked to disease severity and the profile of mediators MIF, SCF, MCP-1, HGF, SCGF-β, IP-10, IL-18, and IFN-γ is an independent outcome predictor. PMID:26028236

  10. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    PubMed

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials.

  11. Geriatric multidimensional assessment for elderly patients with acute respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Bellelli, Giuseppe; Bruni, Adriana; Malerba, Mara; Mazzone, Andrea; Aliberti, Stefano; Pesci, Alberto; Annoni, Giorgio

    2014-04-01

    The case of an 87-year-old woman who falls at home and is admitted to the Emergency Department of an acute hospital with delirium exemplify a common situation that physicians face in their everyday clinical practice. We describe the typical context of frailty in which acute illnesses frequently present in frail elderly patients and, in particular, the relationship between comorbidity, disability and frailty. We also report the current knowledge about frailty theories and we focus on the "atypical" presentation of many acute illnesses. Major attention is devoted on delirium and on mobility impairment, two of the most common atypical symptoms of elderly frail subjects. Finally we describe the evidence on the comprehensive geriatric assessment, i.e., the method that is required to identify and understand the ultimate needs of elderly complex subjects.

  12. A fatal mongoose bite.

    PubMed

    Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Bardale, Rajesh Vaijnathrao; Dixit, Pradeep Gangadhar; Deshmukh, Ashutosh Yashwant

    2012-11-19

    Animal bite is a bite wound from a pet, farm or wild animal. Dog bites make up 80-85% of all reported incidents. Cats amount for about 10% of reported bites and other animals such as rodents, rabbits, horses, raccoons, bats and monkeys amount to 5-10%. Bites by mongoose are uncommon. Here, we present a case of fatal mongoose bite to an elderly woman who died as a complication of streptococcal infection at the bite site.

  13. Clinical and morphologic features of acute, subacute and chronic cor pulmonale (pulmonary heart disease).

    PubMed

    Roberts, William Clifford; Shafii, Alexis E; Grayburn, Paul A; Ko, Jong Mi; Weissenborn, Matthew R; Rosenblatt, Randall L; Guileyardo, Joseph M

    2015-03-01

    Described are certain clinical and morphologic features of one patient with acute, another with subacute, and one with chronic cor pulmonale. All 3 had evidence of severe pulmonary hypertension. The patient with acute cor pulmonale 4 days after coronary bypass for unstable angina pectoris suddenly developed severe breathlessness with cyanosis and had fatal cardiac arrest and necropsy disclosed massive pulmonary embolism. The patient with subacute cor pulmonale had severe right-sided heart failure for 5 weeks and necropsy disclosed microscopic-sized neoplastic pulmonary emboli from a gastric carcinoma without parenchymal pulmonary metastases. The patient with chronic cor pulmonale had evidence of right-sided heart failure for years, the result of primary or idiopathic pulmonary hypertension almost certainly present from birth because the pattern of elastic fibers in the pulmonary trunk was that seen in newborns where the pressure in the pulmonary trunk and ascending aorta are similar. The patient with chronic cor pulmonale had plexiform pulmonary lesions indicative of irreversible pulmonary hypertension. Neither the acute nor the subacute patient had chronic pulmonary vascular changes. All 3 patients had dilated right ventricular cavities and non-dilated left ventricular cavities and only the patient with chronic cor pulmonale had right ventricular hypertrophy.

  14. Health Care Seeking Behavior of Persons with Acute Chagas Disease in Rural Argentina: A Qualitative View

    PubMed Central

    Dinardi, Graciela; Canevari, Cecilia; Torabi, Nahal

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is a tropical parasitic disease largely underdiagnosed and mostly asymptomatic affecting marginalized rural populations. Argentina regularly reports acute cases of CD, mostly young individuals under 14 years old. There is a void of knowledge of health care seeking behavior in subjects experiencing a CD acute condition. Early treatment of the acute case is crucial to limit subsequent development of disease. The article explores how the health outcome of persons with acute CD may be conditioned by their health care seeking behavior. The study, with a qualitative approach, was carried out in rural areas of Santiago del Estero Province, a high risk endemic region for vector transmission of CD. Narratives of 25 in-depth interviews carried out in 2005 and 2006 are analyzed identifying patterns of health care seeking behavior followed by acute cases. Through the retrospective recall of paths for diagnoses, weaknesses of disease information, knowledge at the household level, and underperformance at the provincial health care system level are detected. The misdiagnoses were a major factor in delaying a health care response. The study results expose lost opportunities for the health care system to effectively record CD acute cases. PMID:27829843

  15. Fatal Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Mafra, Cláudio Lísias; Calic, Simone Berger; Chamone, Chequer Buffe; Filho, Gracco Cesarino; Olano, Juan Pablo; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence and reemergence of a serious infectious disease are often associated with a high case-fatality rate because of misdiagnosis and inappropriate or delayed treatment. The current reemergence of spotted fever rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in Brazil has resulted in a high proportion of fatal cases. We describe two familial clusters of Brazilian spotted fever in the state of Minas Gerais, involving six children 9 months to 15 years of age; five died. Immunohistochemical investigation of tissues obtained at necropsy of a child in each location, Novo Cruzeiro and Coronel Fabriciano municipalities, established the diagnosis by demonstration of disseminated endothelial infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae. The diagnosis in the two fatal cases from Coronel Fabriciano and the surviving patient from Novo Cruzeiro was further supported by immunofluorescence serologic tests. PMID:14718082

  16. The worldwide epidemiology of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Seckeler, Michael D; Hoke, Tracey R

    2011-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are significant public health concerns around the world. Despite decreasing incidence, there is still a significant disease burden, especially in developing nations. This review provides background on the history of ARF, its pathology and treatment, and the current reported worldwide incidence of ARF and prevalence of RHD. PMID:21386976

  17. Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome during Infliximab Therapy in a Patient with Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schoehl, Johanna; Mechie, Nicolae-Catalin; Schwoerer, Harald; Moerer, Onnen; Quintel, Michael; Buck, Cordula; Ellenrieder, Volker; Neesse, Albrecht; Amanzada, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a noninfectious interstitial lung disease is a rare but life-threatening side effect of infliximab, an antitumor necrosis factor alpha antibody. The following case report of a patient with Crohn disease shows an extremely dramatic progression to a severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27920644

  18. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gabriella; Jallow, Bintou; Le Doare, Kirsty; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Anderson, Suzanne T

    2015-04-01

    Poststreptococcal complications, such as acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD), are common in resource-limited settings, with RHD recognised as the most common cause of paediatric heart disease worldwide. Managing these conditions in resource-limited settings can be challenging. We review the investigation and treatment options for ARF and RHD and, most importantly, prevention methods in an African setting.

  19. Acute exacerbation of preexisting interstitial lung disease after administration of etanercept for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kiyofumi; Sato, Takeo; Takagi-Kobayashi, Shoko; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Shigihara, Nayumi; Akiyama, Osamu

    2007-05-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a 6-year history of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and asymptomatic interstitial lung disease (ILD) began taking etanercept for ongoing arthritis despite treatment with methotrexate (MTX) and bucillamine. MTX was discontinued before introduction of etanercept. She developed lung injury 8 weeks after starting etanercept. Etanercept was discontinued and oral prednisolone 40 mg/day was begun, and her clinical findings gradually improved. Lung injury, although rare, is a recently noticed, potentially fatal adverse effect of all 3 licensed biological anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents. We recommend caution in the use of anti-TNF agents in elderly RA patients with preexisting ILD.

  20. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  1. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  2. The role of rib infarcts in the acute chest syndrome of sickle cell diseases.

    PubMed

    Rucknagel, D L

    2001-01-01

    The acute chest syndrome is a generic term for pulmonary complications of sickle cell diseases with heterogeneous etiologies that include pneumonia, vaso-occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, rib infarction, and fat embolism syndrome. My review summarizes these etiologies, the evidence, and pathophysiology supporting the hypothesis that infarction of segments of ribs by the same vaso-occlusive process responsible for the acute episodes of pain (characteristic of the sickle cell diseases) is often involved in the acute chest structure. Inflammation associated with the infarct then causes splinting, hypoventilation, and hypoxia and further vaso-occlusion. The relationship with adult respiratory distress syndrome and fat embolism is also discussed. Use of the incentive spirometer combined with effective analgesia when chest pain is present is advocated for prevention of the pulmonary infiltrates. Newer understanding of the role of nitric oxide in regulating oxygen transport and its relationship to blood transfusions used in therapy of the acute chest syndrome are discussed.

  3. [Acute gastrointestinal involvement in dengue disease by serotype 4: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Marín, Johan; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Forshey, Brett M; Celis-Salinas, Juan C; Ramal-Asayag, Cesar; Morrison, Amy C; Laguna-Torres, Alberto; Casapía, Martín; Halsey, Eric S

    2013-10-01

    Dengue fever is the world's most important arboviral disease, presenting a wide clinical spectrum. We report for the first time in Peru, a case caused by dengue virus serotype 4 with significant gastrointestinal involvement (acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hepatitis). In addition we carried out a review of the literature atypical presentation illustrating the importance of the characteristics of abdominal pain (right upper quadrant); presence of Murphy's sign, ultrasound, and liver enzymes levels, for appropriate diagnosis and clinical management.

  4. Acute radiation disease and biological dosimetry in 1993.

    PubMed

    Vorobiev, A I

    1997-01-01

    Mankind is at risk for accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. The experience in evaluating and treating victims of radiation exposure is briefly reviewed based upon accidents occurring over the past 25 years. Individual cases of acute toxicities to the skin, gastrointestinal tract, liver and bone marrow are presented. Biodosimetry (utilizing chromosome analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow and electron spin resonance spectrometry of dental enamel) has been utilized in radiation accidents to assess individual dose. Variability in the dose of ionizing radiation received is typical among the population affected by the Chernobyl accident. Whereas the acute radiation syndrome resulting in a high mortality has been well-documented, little information is available regarding the effects of chronic, low-level exposure from the Chernobyl accident.

  5. Life-threatening acute pneumonitis in mixed connective tissue disease: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rath, Eva; Zandieh, Shahin; Löckinger, Alexander; Hirschl, Mirko; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwerina, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare connective tissue disease frequently involving the lungs. The main characteristic is a systemic sclerosis-like picture of slowly progressing interstitial lung disease consistent with lung fibrosis, while pulmonary arterial hypertension is rare. Herein, we present a case of a newly diagnosed MCTD patient developing life-threatening acute pneumonitis similar to lupus pneumonitis. Previous literature on this exceptionally rare complication of MCTD is reviewed and differential diagnosis and management discussed.

  6. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  7. Synergizing acute care and palliative care to optimise nursing care in end-stage cardiorespiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; Introna, Kate; Cockburn, Jill; Daly, John; Dunford, Mary; Paull, Glenn; Dracup, Kathleen

    2002-05-01

    Advances in the practice of medicine and nursing science have increased survival for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory disease. Parallel to this positive outcome is a societal expectation of longevity and cure of disease. Chronic disease and the inevitability of death creates a dilemma, more than ever before, for the health care professional, who is committed to the delivery of quality care to patients and their families. The appropriate time for broaching the issue of dying and determining when palliative care is required is problematic. Dilemmas occur with a perceived dissonance between acute and palliative care and difficulties in determining prognosis. Palliative care must be integrated within the health care continuum, rather than being a discrete entity at the end of life, in order to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Anecdotally, acute and critical care nurses experience frustration from the tensions that arise between acute and palliative care philosophies. Many clinicians are concerned that patients are denied a good death and yet the moment when care should be oriented toward palliation rather than aggressive management is usually unclear. Clearly this has implications for the type and quality of care that patients receive. This paper provides a review of the extant literature and identifies issues in the end of life care for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory diseases within acute and critical care environments. Issues for refinement of acute and critical care nursing practice and research priorities are identified to create a synergy between these philosophical perspectives.

  8. Risk of ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction in a Spanish population: observational prospective study in a primary-care setting

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Alejandro; Medrano, María José; González, José; Pintado, Héctor; Compaired, Vicente; Bárcena, Mario; Fustero, María Victoria; Tisaire, Javier; Cucalón, José M; Martín, Aurelio; Boix, Raquel; Hernansanz, Francisco; Bueno, José

    2006-01-01

    Background Ischaemic heart disease is a global priority of health-care policy, because of its social repercussions and its impact on the health-care system. Yet there is little information on coronary morbidity in Spain and on the effect of the principal risk factors on risk of coronary heart disease. The objective of this study is to describe the epidemiology of coronary disease (incidence, mortality and its association with cardiovascular risk factors) using the information gathered by primary care practitioners on cardiovascular health of their population. Methods A prospective study was designed. Eight primary-care centres participated, each contributing to the constitution of the cohort with the entire population covered by the centre. A total of 6124 men and women aged over 25 years and free of cardiovascular disease agreed to participate and were thus enrolled and followed-up, with all fatal and non-fatal coronary disease episodes being registered during a 5-year period. Repeated measurements were collected on smoking, blood pressure, weight and height, serum total cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoproteins and fasting glucose. Rates were calculated for acute myocardial infarction and ischaemic heart disease. Associations between cardiovascular risk factors and coronary disease-free survival were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. Results Mean age at recruitment was 51.6 ± 15, with 24% of patients being over 65. At baseline, 74% of patients were overweight, serum cholesterol over 240 was present in 35% of patients, arterial hypertension in 37%, and basal glucose over 126 in 11%. Thirty-four percent of men and 13% of women were current smokers. During follow-up, 155 first episodes of coronary disease were detected, which yielded age-adjusted rates of 362 and 191 per 100,000 person-years in men and women respectively. Disease-free survival was associated with all risk factors in univariate analyses. After multivariate

  9. Fatal crocodile attack.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Shee, Biplab; Sukul, Biswajit

    2013-11-01

    Attacks on human beings by various animals leading to varied types of injuries and even death in some cases are not uncommon. Crocodile attacks on humans have been reported from a number of countries across the globe. Deaths in such attacks are mostly due to mechanical injuries or drowning. Bites by the crocodiles often cause the limbs to be separated from the body. The present case refers to an incident of a fatal attack by a crocodile on a 35 years old female where only the mutilated head of the female was recovered. Multiple lacerated wounds over the face and scalp along with fracture of the cranial bones was detected on autopsy. Two distinct bite marks in the form of punched in holes were noted over the parietal and frontal bones. Injuries on the head with its traumatic amputation from the body were sufficient to cause death. However, the presence of other fatal injuries on the unrecovered body parts could not be ruled out.

  10. Air weapon fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Milroy, C M; Clark, J C; Carter, N; Rutty, G; Rooney, N

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To describe characteristics of a series of people accidentally and deliberately killed by air powered weapons. METHODS: Five cases of fatal airgun injury were identified by forensic pathologists and histopathologists. The circumstances surrounding the case, radiological examination, and pathological findings are described. The weapon characteristics are also reported. RESULTS: Three of the victims were adult men, one was a 16 year old boy, and one an eight year old child. Four of the airguns were .22 air rifles, the other a .177 air rifle. Two committed suicide, one person shooting himself in the head, the other in the chest. In both cases the guns were fired at contact range. Three of the cases were classified as accidents: in two the pellet penetrated into the head and in one the chest. CONCLUSIONS: One person each year dies from an air powered weapon injury in the United Kingdom. In addition there is considerable morbidity from airgun injuries. Fatalities and injuries are most commonly accidents, but deliberately inflicted injuries occur. Airguns are dangerous weapons when inappropriately handled and should not be considered as toys. Children should not play with airguns unsupervised. Images PMID:9797730

  11. Disseminated rhinovirus C8 infection with infectious virus in blood and fatal outcome in a child with repeated episodes of bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Julien; Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Morel-Baccard, Christine; Bardet, Julie; Payen, Valérie; Kaiser, Laurent; Constant, Samuel; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Lin-Marq, Nathalie; Lina, Bruno; Morand, Patrice; Tapparel, Caroline

    2015-05-01

    We report a fatal case of acute lower respiratory tract disease with human rhinovirus C (HRV-C) as the unique cause in a 19-month-old girl with a history of repeated episodes of bronchiolitis. HRV-C type 8 nucleic acids were observed in respiratory, stool, and cerebrospinal fluid samples, and infectious virions were isolated from patient serum after inoculation onto reconstituted airway epithelia.

  12. Disseminated Rhinovirus C8 Infection with Infectious Virus in Blood and Fatal Outcome in a Child with Repeated Episodes of Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Morel-Baccard, Christine; Bardet, Julie; Payen, Valérie; Kaiser, Laurent; Constant, Samuel; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Lin-Marq, Nathalie; Lina, Bruno; Morand, Patrice; Tapparel, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    We report a fatal case of acute lower respiratory tract disease with human rhinovirus C (HRV-C) as the unique cause in a 19-month-old girl with a history of repeated episodes of bronchiolitis. HRV-C type 8 nucleic acids were observed in respiratory, stool, and cerebrospinal fluid samples, and infectious virions were isolated from patient serum after inoculation onto reconstituted airway epithelia. PMID:25694520

  13. [Acute pancreatitis due to lupus].

    PubMed

    Hani, Mohamed Aziz; Guesmi, Fethi; Ben Achour, Jamel; Zribi, Riadh; Bouasker, Ibtissem; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2004-02-01

    Among digestive clinical presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, acute pancreatitis remains a serious affection with very poor prognosis. To date, pathogenesis is still unclear. We report two cases of fatal acute pancreatitis related to systemic lupus erythematosus.

  14. Fatal Dengue Myocarditis despite the Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an important mosquitoes-borne viral disease which is endemic in tropics and subtropics region. Rapid spreading of disease to previously unaffected region was found in recent years. Atypical manifestations, such as myocarditis, were reported during large outbreak. There is a wide range of clinical manifestations of cardiac involvement in dengue, but rarely fatal. Here we reported a case of fulminant dengue myocarditis in fatal outcome despite cardiac mechanical support. PMID:28018687

  15. Association of Race and Sex With Risk of Incident Acute Coronary Heart Disease Events

    PubMed Central

    Safford, Monika M.; Brown, Todd M.; Muntner, Paul; Durant, Raegan W.; Glasser, Stephen; Halanych, Jewell; Shikany, James M.; Prineas, Ronald; Samdarshi, Tandaw; Bittner, Vera; Lewis, Cora E.; Gamboa, Christopher; Cushman, Mary; Howard, Virginia; Howard, George

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT It is unknown whether long-standing disparities in incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) among US blacks and whites persist. OBJECTIVE To examine incident CHD by black and white race and by sex. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective cohort study of 24 443 participants without CHD at baseline from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort, who resided in the continental United States and were enrolled between 2003 and 2007 with follow-up through December 31, 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Expert-adjudicated total (fatal and nonfatal) CHD, fatal CHD, and nonfatal CHD (definite or probable myocardial infarction [MI]; very small non–ST-elevation MI [NSTEMI] had peak troponin level <0.5 µg/L). RESULTS Over a mean (SD) of 4.2 (1.5) years of follow-up, 659 incident CHD events occurred (153 in black men, 138 in black women, 254 in white men, and 114 in white women). Among men, the age-standardized incidence rate per 1000 person-years for total CHD was 9.0 (95% CI, 7.5–10.8) for blacks vs 8.1 (95% CI, 6.9–9.4) for whites; fatal CHD: 4.0 (95% CI, 2.9–5.3) vs 1.9 (95% CI, 1.4–2.6), respectively; and nonfatal CHD: 4.9 (95% CI, 3.8–6.2) vs 6.2 (95% CI, 5.2–7.4). Among women, the age-standardized incidence rate per 1000 person-years for total CHD was 5.0 (95% CI, 4.2–6.1) for blacks vs 3.4 (95% CI, 2.8–4.2) for whites; fatal CHD: 2.0 (95% CI, 1.5–2.7) vs 1.0 (95% CI, 0.7–1.5), respectively; and nonfatal CHD: 2.8 (95% CI, 2.2–3.7) vs 2.2 (95% CI, 1.7–2.9). Age- and region-adjusted hazard ratios for fatal CHD among blacks vs whites was near 2.0 for both men and women and became statistically nonsignificant after multivariable adjustment. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for incident nonfatal CHD for blacks vs whites was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.51–0.91) for men and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.58–1.15) for women. Of the 444 nonfatal CHD events, 139 participants (31.3%) had very small NSTEMIs. CONCLUSIONS The higher

  16. Intestinal Schistosomiasis as Unusual Aetiology for Acute Appendicitis, Nowadays a Rising Disease in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    López de Cenarruzabeitia, I.; Landolfi, S.; Armengol Carrasco, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis as unusual aetiology for acute appendicitis, nowadays a rising disease in western countries. Recent changes in global migration has led to an immigration growth in our scenario, upsurging people coming from endemic areas of schistosomiasis. Schistosomal appendicitis, seldom reported in developed countries, is now an expected incrising entity in our hospitals during the near future. Due to this circumstances, we believe that schistosomiasis should be consider as a rising source for acute appendicitis in western countries. In order to illustrate this point, we present a case of a 45-years-old black man, from Africa, was admitted via A&E because of acute abdominal pain, located in right lower quadrant. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he underwent laparotomy and appendectomy. Pathological study by microscope revealed a gangrenous appendix with abscesses and parasitic ova into the submucosal layer of the appendix, suggesting Schistosomiasis. PMID:22792502

  17. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Findings Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable

  18. A male Fabry disease patient treated with intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Jukka T; Sillanpää, Niko; Kantola, Ilkka

    2015-02-01

    The use of intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is associated with improved outcomes. Fabry disease is an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disease with vascular endothelial deposits. Affected males with the classic phenotype develop renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular disease and die prematurely. However, Fabry disease is rare in young men with first ischemic stroke of undetermined cause. We report a 38-year-old man with acute aphasia and a left M2 segment of the middle cerebral artery thrombus with no recanalization who was finally diagnosed with Fabry disease after left ventricular hypertrophy of undetermined cause had been identified. A gene test revealed a R227X mutation typical of Fabry disease with the classical phenotype. To our knowledge our patient is the first reported male Fabry patient who was given intravenous thrombolytic therapy and the first reported Fabry patient who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy between 3 and 4.5 hours of the symptom onset. Despite favorable prognostic indicators on admission imaging, our patient suffered a significant stroke and had an unfavorable clinical outcome. Fortunately, the episode was not complicated by intracranial hemorrhage. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in treating patients with Fabry disease and acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Arginine methylation dysfunction increased risk of acute coronary syndrome in coronary artery disease population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengyu; Zhang, Shuyang; Wang, Hongyun; Wu, Wei; Ye, Yicong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) had been proved to be an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Few studies involved the entire arginine methylation dysfunction. This study was designed to investigate whether arginine methylation dysfunction is associated with acute coronary syndrome risk in coronary artery disease population. In total 298 patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain with the diagnosis of stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndrome from February 2013 to June 2014 were included. Plasma levels of free arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and the methylated form of arginine, ADMA, and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. We examined the relationship between arginine metabolism-related amino acids or arginine methylation index (AMI, defined as ratio of [arginine + citrulline + ornithine]/[ADMA + SDMA]) and acute coronary events. We found that plasma ADMA levels were similar in the stable angina pectoris group and the acute coronary syndrome group (P = 0.88); the AMI differed significantly between 2 groups (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that AMI was an independent risk factor of acute coronary events in patients with coronary artery disease (OR = 0.975, 95% confidence interval 0.956–0.993; P = 0.008). Our study suggested that ADMA levels were very similar in the stable angina and acute coronary syndrome patients; AMI might be an independent risk factor of acute coronary events in coronary artery disease population. PMID:28207514

  20. Acute-on-chronic and Decompensated Chronic Liver Failure: Definitions, Epidemiology, and Prognostication.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jody C

    2016-07-01

    Chronic liver disease is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and represents a major burden for the health care community. Cirrhosis is a progressive disease resulting in end-stage liver failure, which in the absence of liver transplantation is fatal. Acute-on-chronic liver failure carries high short-term mortality but is potentially reversible. Viral hepatitis, alcohol, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease remain the principal causes of liver disease. Though treatments exist for hepatitis B and C, they remain unavailable to many with these diseases. This article reviews the epidemiology of advanced liver disease and the concept of acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  1. The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Notara, Venetia; Kogias, Yannis; Stravopodis, Petros; Antonoulas, Antonis; Zombolos, Spyros; Mantas, Yannis; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated. Methods: From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient’s educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years). Results: Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed. Conclusions: A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity. PMID:27499164

  2. Impaired Fasting Glucose and Recurrent Cardiovascular Disease among Survivors of a First Acute Myocardial Infarction: Evidence of a Sex Difference ? The Western New York Experience

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Richard P; Dorn, Joan M; Stranges, Saverio; Swanson, Mya; Hovey, Kathleen; Trevisan, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims There is little epidemiological evidence regarding the association of impaired glucose metabolism with recurrent cardiovascular events. We therefore examined potential sex differences in the effect of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) on recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a community-based study of survivors of a first acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results This report focuses on 1,226 incident MI cases (28.4% women) discharged alive from area hospitals in the Western New York Acute MI Study (1996–2004). Deaths and underlying cause of death were determined via query of the National Death Index (Plus) Retrieval Program with follow-up through December 31, 2004. Outcomes reported included fatal or nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD) or coronary revascularization surgery and total stroke. Traditional CHD risk factors and other explanatory variables were determined by clinical examination after the first acute event. Impaired fasting glucose was defined as fasting blood glucose between 100 and 125 mg/dl. During a mean follow-up of 4.5 years, there were 91 recurrent events (26.1%) in women and 173 recurrent events (19.7%) in men. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratios for recurrent cardiovascular events were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.15–3.16) and 2.59 (1.56–4.30) in women with IFG and with diabetes, respectively, compared to normoglycemic women. Among men, neither IFG nor diabetes was independently related to risk of recurrence. Conclusions In this study, IFG was a strong risk factor for recurrent cardiovascular events only among women. These results suggest that increased cardiovascular risk in MI survivors begins at lower glucose levels in women than men. PMID:20227262

  3. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  4. Impact of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on acute and chronic exercise responses

    PubMed Central

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Marquis, Karine; Maltais, François; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Several chronic diseases are known to negatively affect the ability of an individual to perform exercise. However, the altered exercise capacity observed in these patients is not solely associated with the heart and lungs dysfunction. Exercise has also been shown to play an important role in the management of several pathologies encountered in the fields of cardiology and pneumology. Studies conducted in our institution regarding the influence of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on the acute and chronic exercise responses, along with the beneficial effects of exercise training in these populations, are reviewed. PMID:17932595

  5. A fatal leopard attack.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Petr

    2010-05-01

    A rare case of a big cat fatal attack is presented. A male leopard that had escaped from its unlocked cage attacked a 26-year-old male zoo worker. The man sustained penetrating injuries to the neck with consequent external bleeding. The man died while being transported to the hospital as a result of the injuries sustained. The wounds discovered on the victim's body corresponded with the known methods of leopard attacks and with findings on the carcasses of animals killed by leopards in the wild. The conclusion of the medicolegal investigation was that the underlying cause of death was a bite wound to the neck which lacerated the left internal jugular vein, the two main branches of the left external carotid artery, and the cervical spine. The cause of death was massive external bleeding. Special attention is paid to the general pattern of injuries sustained from big cat attacks.

  6. Fatal Israeli spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Yagupsky, P; Wolach, B

    1993-11-01

    We describe three Israeli children with fatal spotted fever. Clinical disease was characterized by irreversible shock, encephalopathy, renal failure, bleeding tendency, and death within 24 hours of admission. None of the patients had a history of tick bite, and no tache noire was noted. One child presented without rash, and the other two did not have antibodies to spotted-fever-group rickettsiae. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Rickettsia conorii from the patients' blood and tissues in cell cultures or from susceptible laboratory animals inoculated with human specimens. The present cases demonstrate the existence of a severe form of Israeli spotted fever in this population that resembles Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Because Israeli spotted fever may follow a quick, unpredictable, rapidly fatal clinical course, specific antimicrobial therapy should be promptly administered whenever the diagnosis is suspected.

  7. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology.

  8. Acute Respiratory Disease in US Army Trainees 3 Years after Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine1

    PubMed Central

    McCormic, Zachary D.; Gaydos, Joel C.; Hawksworth, Anthony W.; Jordan, Nikki N.

    2017-01-01

    The 1999 cessation of vaccination against adenovirus types 4 and 7 among US Army trainees resulted in reemergence of acute respiratory disease (ARD) outbreaks. The 2011 implementation of a replacement vaccine led to dramatic and sustained decreases in ARD cases, supporting continuation of vaccination in this population at high risk for ARD. PMID:27748651

  9. [McArdle disease presenting with rhabdomyolisis and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui; Castro, Rui; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Vizcaíno, Ramon; Morgado, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    McArdle disease typically presents in childhood or young adults with myalgia, exercise intolerance, cramps and myoglobinuria. Deficiency of myophosphorylase enzyme results in inability to degrade glycogen stores, causing glycogen accumulation in muscle tissue and energy deficit. Evolution with rhabdomiolysis may occur and can be complicated with acute kidney injury but rarely, in about 11% of cases, is the initial disease manifestation. We report a case of McArdle Disease in a 38-year-old male patient. The disease went unrecognized despite previous symptoms (myalgia, exercise intolerance and single myoglobinuria episode) until an episode of rhabdomyolisis complicated with oliguric acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. The kidney biopsy showed evidence of acute tubular necrosis. Despite normalization of renal function, muscle lysis markers remained abnormal. Metabolic myopathy was suspected and a muscle biopsy was performed. It showed subsarcolemic glycogen deposition and absence of myophosphorylase activity. This case-report underlines the importance of considering metabolic myopathy in patients with acute kidney injury and severe rhabdomyolisis.

  10. Fatal chilli bite.

    PubMed

    Behera, Chittaranjan; Prasad, Hari; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Swain, Rajanikanta

    2016-09-01

    A healthy 2-year-old girl bit a green chilli accidentally following which she had many bouts of vomiting. She became unconscious and was immediately admitted to hospital. In spite of all medical intervention, she died after one day. The autopsy confirmed that the death was caused by respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome following aspiration of gastric contents into tracheobronchial tree. Aspiration of gastric contents resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome and death is not uncommon; however, death following the accidental bite of a chilli is rarely reported in medical-legal literature.

  11. An Analysis of 332 Fatalities Infected with Pandemic 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Balanzat, Ana M.; Hertlein, Christian; Apezteguia, Carlos; Bonvehi, Pablo; Cámera, Luis; Gentile, Angela; Rizzo, Oscar; Gómez-Carrillo, Manuel; Coronado, Fatima; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Chávez, Pollyanna R.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background The apparent high number of deaths in Argentina during the 2009 pandemic led to concern that the influenza A H1N1pdm disease was different there. We report the characteristics and risk factors for influenza A H1N1pdm fatalities. Methods We identified laboratory-confirmed influenza A H1N1pdm fatalities occurring during June-July 2009. Physicians abstracted data on age, sex, time of onset of illness, medical history, clinical presentation at admission, laboratory, treatment, and outcomes using standardize questionnaires. We explored the characteristics of fatalities according to their age and risk group. Results Of 332 influenza A H1N1pdm fatalities, 226 (68%) were among persons aged <50 years. Acute respiratory failure was the leading cause of death. Of all cases, 249 (75%) had at least one comorbidity as defined by Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Obesity was reported in 32% with data and chronic pulmonary disease in 28%. Among the 40 deaths in children aged <5 years, chronic pulmonary disease (42%) and neonatal pathologies (35%) were the most common co-morbidities. Twenty (6%) fatalities were among pregnant or postpartum women of which only 47% had diagnosed co-morbidities. Only 13% of patients received antiviral treatment within 48 hours of symptom onset. None of children aged <5 years or the pregnant women received antivirals within 48 h of symptom onset. As the pandemic progressed, the time from symptom-onset to medical care and to antiviral treatment decreased significantly among case-patients who subsequently died (p<0.001). Conclusion Persons with co-morbidities, pregnant and who received antivirals late were over-represented among influenza A H1N1pdm deaths in Argentina, though timeliness of antiviral treatment improved during the pandemic. PMID:22506006

  12. [Fatal outcome of an hydrogen sulfide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Querellou, E; Jaffrelot, M; Savary, D; Savry, C; Perfus, J-P

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of fatal outcome poisoning by massive exposure to hydrogen sulfide of a sewer worker. This rare event was associated with a moderate intoxication of two members of the rescue team. The death was due to asystole and massive lung oedema. Autopsy analysis showed diffuse necrotic lesions in lungs. Hydrogen sulfide is a direct and systemic poison, produced by organic matter decomposition. The direct toxicity mechanism is still unclear. The systemic toxicity is due to an acute toxicity by oxygen depletion at cellular level. It is highly diffusable and potentially very dangerous. At low concentration, rotten egg smell must trigger hydrogen sulfide suspicion since at higher concentration it is undetectable, making intoxication possible. In case of acute intoxication, there is an almost instantaneous cardiovascular failure and a rapid death. Hydrogen sulfide exposure requires prevention measures and more specifically the use of respiratory equipment for members of the rescue team.

  13. Tryptophan catabolism in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulcev, Makedonka; Reilly, Cavan; Griffin, Timothy J; Broeckling, Corey D; Sandri, Brian J; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Hodgson, Shane W; Woodruff, Prescott G; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exacerbations are a leading cause of morbidity in COPD. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). Methods We measured metabolites via mass spectrometry (MS) in plasma drawn within 24 hours of admission to the hospital for 33 patients with an AECOPD (day 0) and 30 days later and for 65 matched controls. Individual metabolites were measured via selective reaction monitoring with mass spectrometry. We used a mixed-effect model to compare metabolite levels in cases compared to controls and a paired t-test to test for differences between days 0 and 30 in the AECOPD group. Results We identified 377 analytes at a false discovery rate of 5% that differed between cases (day 0) and controls, and 31 analytes that differed in the AECOPD cases between day 0 and day 30 (false discovery rate: 5%). Tryptophan was decreased at day 0 of AECOPD compared to controls corresponding to an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. Conclusion Patients with AECOPD have a unique metabolomic signature that includes a decrease in tryptophan levels consistent with an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. PMID:27729784

  14. Complement C3 on microglial clusters in multiple sclerosis occur in chronic but not acute disease: Implication for disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Iliana; Naessens, Daphne M. P.; Hametner, Simon; Guldenaar, Willemijn; Kooi, Evert‐Jan; Geurts, Jeroen J. G.; Baas, Frank; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Microglial clusters with C3d deposits are observed in the periplaque of multiple sclerosis (MS) brains and were proposed as early stage of lesion formation. As such they should appear in the brain of MS donors with acute disease but thus far this has not been shown. Using postmortem brain tissue from acute (n = 10) and chronic (n = 15) MS cases we investigated whether C3d+ microglial clusters are part of an acute attack against myelinated axons, which could have implications for disease pathogenesis. The specificity of our findings to MS was tested in ischemic stroke cases (n = 8) with initial or advanced lesions and further analyzed in experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI, n = 26), as both conditions are primarily nondemyelinating but share essential features of neurodegeneration with MS lesions. C3d+ microglial clusters were found in chronic but not acute MS. They were not associated with antibody deposits or terminal complement activation. They were linked to slowly expanding lesions, localized on axons with impaired transport and associated with neuronal C3 production. C3d+ microglial clusters were not specific to MS as they were also found in stroke and experimental TBI. We conclude that C3d+ microglial clusters in MS are not part of an acute attack against myelinated axons. As such it is unlikely that they drive formation of new lesions but could represent a physiological mechanism to remove irreversibly damaged axons in chronic disease. GLIA 2017;65:264–277 PMID:27778395

  15. Severe acute exacerbations and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Cataluna, J; Martinez-Garcia, M; Roman, S; Salcedo, E; Navarro, M; Ochando, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often present with severe acute exacerbations requiring hospital treatment. However, little is known about the prognostic consequences of these exacerbations. A study was undertaken to investigate whether severe acute exacerbations of COPD exert a direct effect on mortality. Methods: Multivariate techniques were used to analyse the prognostic influence of acute exacerbations of COPD treated in hospital (visits to the emergency service and admissions), patient age, smoking, body mass index, co-morbidity, long term oxygen therapy, forced spirometric parameters, and arterial blood gas tensions in a prospective cohort of 304 men with COPD followed up for 5 years. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 71 (9) years and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 46 (17)%. Results: Only older age (hazard ratio (HR) 5.28, 95% CI 1.75 to 15.93), arterial carbon dioxide tension (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12), and acute exacerbations of COPD were found to be independent indicators of a poor prognosis. The patients with the greatest mortality risk were those with three or more acute COPD exacerbations (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.80 to 9.41). Conclusions: This study shows for the first time that severe acute exacerbations of COPD have an independent negative impact on patient prognosis. Mortality increases with the frequency of severe exacerbations, particularly if these require admission to hospital. PMID:16055622

  16. The Role of Intestinal Bacteria in Acute Diarrheal Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    E . coli colonization. (2) Testing of E . coli strains isolated from humans with diarrheal disease for enterotoxin production and presence of colonization-specific surface antigens. (3) Methodology for isolation of specific pili (i.e. surface antigens which function in colonization). Characterization of pili. Preparation of pili- specific antisera. (4) In vitro adhesion assays specific for recognition of E . coli strains which are potentially pathogenic for

  17. [Management of coronary artery disease at the acute phase].

    PubMed

    Chatot, Marion; Schiele, François

    2015-03-01

    In patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), early management is of prime importance. However, the median time taken by the patient to call the emergency services is often very long, up to 2 hours. The presence of a physician as first responder ensures good quality resuscitation in case of cardiac arrest, and allows recording of a first ECG, which can be very informative, especially in ACS without ST segment elevation. Treatment at this stage is limited to sublingual nitroglycerin and aspirin. If the first ECG shows ST segment elevation, the patient should be immediately oriented for reperfusion, usually by percutaneous coronary intervention. in the absence of ST segment elevation, the diagnosis of ACS remains unconfirmed. This does not imply that the risk is lesser, but rather that the risk cannot be evaluated accurately in the pre-hospital setting. The use of risk scores can guide the choice of management towards an invasive strategy, including coronary angiography (immediately, or within 24-72 hours). Low-risk patients are candidates for an invasive strategy, provided non-invasive tests demonstrate the presence of ischemia. During the hospital phase, antiplatelet treatment should be initiated and must be adapted to the patient bleeding and thrombotic risk. Clopidogrel is recommended only in patients who are not amenable to prasugrel or ticagrelor. Statin therapy should be initiated from day one, regardless of the initial cholesterol level, preferably with 80 mg atorvastatin. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers should also be prescribed to complete the medical prescription both in-hospital and in the long term.

  18. Cardiac autonomic denervation and functional response to neurotoxins during acute experimental Chagas' disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A L; Fontoura, B F; Freire-Maia, L; Chiari, E; Machado, C R; Teixeira, M M; Camargos, E R

    2001-06-20

    Severe cardiac autonomic denervation occurs in the acute Chagas' disease in rats. The present study aims at verifying whether this denervation was accompanied by impairment of heart function. Scorpionic (Tityus serrulatus) crude venom was used for neurotransmitter release in isolated hearts (Langendorff's preparation). In control hearts, the venom induced significant bradycardia followed by tachycardia. In infected animals, despite the severe (sympathetic) or moderate (parasympathetic) cardiac denervation, the venom provoked similar bradycardia but the tachycardia was higher. The hearts of infected animals beat at significantly lower rate. Atropine prevented this lower rate. Our results demonstrated sympathetic dysfunction during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rats, the parasympathetic function being spared.

  19. Dietary patterns and their association with acute coronary heart disease: Lessons from the REGARDS Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    Shikany et al used data from 17,418 participants in the REGARDS study, a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled between 2003–2007. They examined 536 acute coronary heart disease events at follow-up (median 5.8 years) in relation to five dietary patterns (Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad). After adjustment for baseline variables, the highest consumers of the Southern pattern experienced a 56% higher hazard for acute CHD. PMID:26779528

  20. How I treat acute graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has evolved from a one-size-fits-all approach to a more nuanced strategy based on predicted outcomes. Lower and time-limited doses of immune suppression for patients predicted to have low-risk GVHD are safe and effective. In more severe GVHD, prolonged exposure to immunosuppressive therapies, failure to achieve tolerance, and inadequate clinical responses are the proximate causes of GVHD-related deaths. This article presents acute GVHD-related scenarios representing, respectively, certainty of diagnosis, multiple causes of symptoms, jaundice, an initial therapy algorithm, secondary therapy, and defining futility of treatment. PMID:26729898

  1. Acute myocardial infarction in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Beyranvand, Mohammad-Reza; Namazi, Mohammad-Hassan; Mohsenzadeh, Yusef; Assadpour Piranfar, Mohammad

    2009-05-01

    A 37-year-old man, a known case of Behcet's disease with its vascular complications such as abdominal and thoracic artery aneurysms, was admitted with the diagnosis of acute anterior myocardial infarction and received thrombolytic therapy. Coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention via transradial approach were performed for the patient on the eighth day of admission. The patient did not suffer from any symptoms, myocardial infarction, or readmission in the nine-month follow-up. About 25 cases of myocardial infarction associated with Behcet's disease have been reported previously. Although coronary involvement is rare in Behcet's disease, it is especially important because it affects young individuals and often presents as acute coronary syndromes.

  2. Coexistence of Acute Crescent Glomerulonephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan; Yin, Jianyong; Bao, Hongda; Jiao, Qiong; Wu, Huijuan; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that may involve almost each organ or system. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) refers to renal lesions associated with IgG4-RD. The most frequent morphological type of renal lesions is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) which is associated with increased IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Case Report Herein, we present a rare case with coexisting IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis with concomitant severe tubulointerstitial lesions instead of classic IgG4-TIN. Conclusion IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis can occur in the same patient. This case may give us a clearer viewpoint of the disease. PMID:27504450

  3. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2011-02-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV-GP1 and -GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF proteins and LASV GP antigens in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa.

  4. A case-control study of community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia and melioidosis pneumonia in northeast Thailand: an emerging fatal disease with unique clinical features.

    PubMed

    Patamatamkul, Samadhi; Klungboonkrong, Voravan; Praisarnti, Pakawas; Jirakiat, Kittitouch

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the emerging cause of severe and often fatal gram-negative, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP-AB) in Thailand. Due to its rarity, its specific clinical features are ill defined. In this retrospective study, we compared the demographic data, risk factors, clinical characteristics, radiographic pattern, and microbiological data between CAP-AB and Burkholderia pseudomallei CAP (CAP-BP) to identify the clinical features and risk factors of CAP-AB. CAP-AB was associated with a more productive cough and a shorter duration of symptoms, while CAP-BP was associated with more musculoskeletal symptoms. The white blood cell and neutrophil counts were significantly lower in the CAP-AB group. Gram staining of the sputum revealed a significantly higher amount of bacteria in the CAP-AB group. Lobar infiltration and unilateral right lung involvement were the most common radiographic patterns in the CAP-AB group. CAP-AB is associated with severe pneumonia and has unique clinical features that distinguish it from CAP-BP.

  5. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J.; Bredenbeek, Peter J.; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S.; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2010-01-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV GP1 and GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and –GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF and LASV GP proteins in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa. PMID:21145373

  6. The Burden of Acute Disease in Mahajanga, Madagascar – A 21 Month Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Vijay C.; Andriamalala, Clara N.; Reynolds, Teri A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts to develop effective and regionally-appropriate emergency care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are hindered by a lack of data on both the burden of disease in the region and on the state of existing care delivery mechanisms. This study describes the burden of acute disease presenting to an emergency unit in Mahajanga, Madagascar. Methods and Findings Handwritten patient registries on all emergency department patients presenting between 1 January 2011 and 30 September 2012 were reviewed and data entered into a database. Data included age, sex, diagnosis, and disposition. We classified diagnoses into Clinical Classifications Software (CCS) multi-level categories. The population was 53.5% male, with a median age of 31 years. The five most common presenting conditions were 1) Superficial injury; contusion, 2) Open wounds of head; neck; and trunk, 3) Open wounds of extremities, 4) Intracranial injury, and 5) Unspecified injury and poisoning. Trauma accounted for 48%, Infectious Disease for 15%, Mental Health 6.1%, Noncommunicable 29%, and Neoplasms 1.2%. The acuity seen was high, with an admission rate of 43%. Trauma was the most common reason for admission, representing 19% of admitted patients. Conclusions This study describes the burden of acute disease at a large referral center in northern Madagascar. The Centre Hôpitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga sees a high volume of acutely ill and injured patients. Similar to other reports from the region, trauma is the most common pathology observed, though infectious disease was responsible for the majority of adult mortality. Typhoid fever other intestinal infections were the most lethal CCS-coded pathologies. By utilizing a widely understood classification system, we are able to highlight contrasts between Mahajanga’s acute and overall disease burden as well as make comparisons between this region and the rest of the globe. We hope this study will serve to guide the development of context

  7. The Prevalence of Natural Health Product Use in Patients with Acute Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alherbish, Aws; Charrois, Theresa L.; Ackman, Margaret L.; Tsuyuki, Ross T.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural health products (NHP) use may have implications with respect to adverse effects, drug interactions and adherence yet the prevalence of NHP use by patients with acute cardiovascular disease and the best method to ascertain this information is unknown. Objective To identify the best method to ascertain information on NHP, and the prevalence of use in a population with acute cardiovascular disease. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of consecutive patients admitted with acute cardiovascular disease to the University of Alberta Hospital during January 2009. NHP use was explored using structured and open-ended questions based on Health Canada's definition of NHP. The medical record was reviewed, and documentation of NHP use by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, compared against the gold-standard structured interview. Results 88 patients were interviewed (mean age 62 years, standard deviation [SD 14]; 80% male; 41% admitted for acute coronary syndromes). Common co-morbidities included hypertension (59%), diabetes (26%) and renal impairment (19%). NHP use was common (78% of patients) and 75% of NHP users reported daily use. The category of NHP most commonly used was vitamins and minerals (73%) followed by herbal products (20%), traditional medicines including Chinese medicines (9%), homeopathic preparations (1%) and other products including amino acids, essential fatty acids and probiotics (35%). In a multivariable model, only older age was associated with increased NHP use (OR 1.5 per age decile [95%CI 1.03 to 2.2]). When compared to the interview, the highest rate of NHP documentation was the pharmacist history (41%). NHP were documented in 22% of patients by the physician and 19% by the nurse. Conclusions NHP use is common in patients admitted with acute cardiovascular disease. However, health professionals do not commonly identify NHP as part of the medication profile despite its potential importance. Structured

  8. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  9. [Legionnaires' disease complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure: about a case].

    PubMed

    Bac, Arnaud; Ramadan, Ahmed Sabry; Youatou, Pierre; Mols, Pierre; Cerf, Dominique; Ngatchou, William

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a bacterial disease of the respiratory system caused by a gram-negative germ whose clinical manifestation can be benign limiting to flu-like syndrome or can be more severe being characterized by pneumonia which may be complicated by multisystem disease that can lead to death. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient with rhabdomyolysis complicated by acute renal failure following Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. We here highlight the pathophysiological aspects and treatment of this rare complication during Legionella infection.

  10. Lethal acute demyelinization with encephalo-myelitis as a complication of cured Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Hieronimus, S; Vandenbos, F; Delmont, E; Cua, E; Cherick, F; Paquis, P; Michiels, J-F; Fenichel, P; Brucker-Davis, F

    2010-12-01

    Cushing's disease is usually associated with higher mortality rate, especially from cardiovascular causes. Development or exacerbation of autoimmune or inflammatory diseases is known to occur in patients with hypercortisolism after cure. We report for the first time a 34-year old woman with a psychiatric background, who developed four months after the surgical cure of Cushing's disease an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting initially as a psychiatric illness. We hypothesize that the recent correction of hypercortisolism triggered ADEM and that the atypical presentation, responsible for diagnosis delay, led to the death of this patient.

  11. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  12. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  13. Clinical and histopathological features of fatal cases with dengue and chikungunya virus co-infection in Colombia, 2014 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Marcela; Acosta-Reyes, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Pardo, Lissethe; Rico, Angélica; Campo, Alfonso; Navarro, Edgar; Viasus, Diego

    2016-06-02

    We report clinical features and histopathological findings in fatal cases with dengue (DENV) and chikungunya (CHIKV) co-infection identified at the Colombian National Institute of Health between September 2014 and October 2015. Seven such cases were documented. Dengue serotype 2 virus was identified in six cases. All patients were adults and comorbidities were present in four. Fever, arthralgia or myalgia was present in all cases. The frequency of rash, haemorrhage, oedema, and gastrointestinal symptoms was variable. Laboratory findings such as thrombocytopenia, renal failure, and leukocyte count were also inconsistent between cases. Post-mortem tissue examination documented focal hepatocellular coagulative necrosis in three cases, incipient acute pericarditis in one and tubulointerstitial nephritis in one. This study provides evidence of mortality in patients with DENV and CHIKV co-infection. Fatal cases were characterised by variable clinical and laboratory features. Evaluation of histopathology of autopsy tissues provided evidence of the pathological consequences of the disease.

  14. [Fatal electrocution in prison].

    PubMed

    Grellner, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The clarification of deaths from electric current can be difficult when electric skin marks are missing or overlooked. In the following, the fatal electric accident of a 21-year-old man in prison is reported with a scene which primarily seemed to be inconspicuous. The autopsy disclosed typical electric marks in the skin of the left thumb and the corresponding part of the left index finger. A second inspection of the jail room, which was large enough for three men, but occupied by the deceased alone, led to the finding of widely spread utensils (two forks with signs of corrosion and deformation of the prongs, radio cable with socket, water container) for the self-construction of a kind of "immersion heater" for the heating of water. The man must have suffered electrocution when touching the prongs of the forks. Death supposedly occurred due to disturbances of the cardiac rhythm after a longer interval of maintained ability to act. The case again proves the difficulties in the detection and examination of possible electric deaths in which unusual sources of electricity must be considered.

  15. [Fatal rat bites].

    PubMed

    Yanai, O; Goldin, L; Hiss, J

    1999-04-15

    We present a rare case of infant death due to blood loss resulting from multiple rat bites. Domestic dogs and cats cause most animal bites. Bites of a house rat usually cause bacterial infection, successfully treated with antibiotics. There is little information about death due to house rat bites. Since the wounds they cause tend to occur post-mortem, they are usually wedged, clean and without subcutaneous bleeding. An 11-week-old, malnourished infant girl was bitten to death while sleeping in her mother's bed in a rat-infested home. The infant's clothing was covered with blood, parts of her face were missing and marks of gnawing were present on her neck and extremities. There was subcutaneous bleeding around the wounds indicating that they were inflicted while the child was alive. Autopsy findings revealed profound blood loss. We conclude that a combination of low socio-economic status, severe failure to thrive, and poor hygiene in a rat-infested environment contributed to the fatal outcome in this attack.

  16. Fatal inflammatory hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Elizabeth A; Perros, Petros

    2007-01-01

    A young female patient presented as an acute medical emergency with hypoglycaemia. Investigations revealed panhypopituitarism and an inflammatory pituitary mass. An antibody screen was negative for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies with cytoplasmic distribution (cANCA). Pituitary histology showed lymphocytic infiltration and a few Langerhan's cells. The pituitary mass rapidly expanded to involve the optic nerves and led to bilateral blindness. Later, the patient developed diarrhoea, a vasculitis rash, scleritis, and proteinuria. In subsequent investigations cANCA became positive. The patient responded to steroids and cyclophosphamide treatment and remained in partial remission for six months before dying of severe sepsis. This is the first description of Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with acute anterior pituitary failure in the absence of other organ involvement and negative serology.

  17. Work-related maritime fatalities.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Peter J; O'Connor, Nina

    2006-07-01

    All maritime fatalities investigated by Coroners that occurred in Australia from 1992 to 1998 inclusive have been collated, coded and recorded in the Australian Boating Injury Database: Fatal Injury (ABID:FI). This article focuses on the work-related maritime fatalities recorded in the database. Over the period 1992-1998 there were 74 fatalities involving people who were working for income at the time of the incident: 46 commercial fishermen, 12 seamen involved in the transport of cargo and 16 miscellaneous workers. The fatality rate of commercial fishermen has declined substantially in Australia over recent years. The main contributing factors were: hazardous conditions; an error of judgement; unsafe work practices; and failure to wear a personal flotation device (PFD) in circumstances where, in the opinion of the Coroners, it would have saved life. Hazardous conditions were much more of a factor in fishermen deaths than in other maritime deaths. Most vessels involved had an insufficient number of PFDs for the number of crew on board. The Australian fatal injury database should be updated with the details of recent fatalities in order to further monitor safety performance, causal factors and prevention measures in the maritime industry in Australia. Attention should be focused on reducing alcohol use and increasing PFD availability and usage. In order to continue to improve safety, it is essential that a constructive dialogue is maintained with industry sources, informed by independent research and up-to-date information.

  18. Global earthquake fatalities and population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Savage, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern global earthquake fatalities can be separated into two components: (1) fatalities from an approximately constant annual background rate that is independent of world population growth and (2) fatalities caused by earthquakes with large human death tolls, the frequency of which is dependent on world population. Earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (and 50,000) have increased with world population and obey a nonstationary Poisson distribution with rate proportional to population. We predict that the number of earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (50,000) will increase in the 21st century to 8.7±3.3 (20.5±4.3) from 4 (7) observed in the 20th century if world population reaches 10.1 billion in 2100. Combining fatalities caused by the background rate with fatalities caused by catastrophic earthquakes (>100,000 fatalities) indicates global fatalities in the 21st century will be 2.57±0.64 million if the average post-1900 death toll for catastrophic earthquakes (193,000) is assumed.

  19. [The particularities of acute surgical diseases treatment of abdominal cavity organs in patients with haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Shutov, S A; Karagiulia, S R; Danishian, K I; Zorenko, V Iu; Grzhimolovskiĭ, A V; Polianskaia, T Iu; Shulutko, E M; Galstian, G M

    2014-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 366 patients with haemophilia who were urgently hospitalized in hеmatological Scientific Center over the last 10 years is presented in the article. There were 114 (31.1%) patients with acute diseases of abdominal cavity organs, 150 (41%) patients with bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract, 102 (27.9%) patients with acute hematomas of retroperitoneal space. Urgent operations were performed in 48 (22.2%) patients who were hospitalized with clinical symptoms of acute abdomen syndrome. It was developed the criteria of diagnosis and choice of treatment tactic on the basis of the received results. Application of presented algorithms led to improve the quality of urgent surgical care to patients with haemophilia.

  20. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals.

  1. Prevalence of acute respiratory tract diseases among soldiers deployed for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, K; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Konarski, M; Guzek, A; Prokop, E; Bieniuk, K

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among service personnel assigned to contemporary military operations which are conducted in areas characterized by adverse environmental conditions. This article reviews the results of the studies into the prevalence of acute respiratory tract diseases among soldiers of the Polish Military Contingent deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The article also discusses a number of factors which increase the prevalence of diseases diagnosed in the population of soldiers on a military mission in different climatic and sanitary conditions. Retrospective analysis was based on medical records of Polish troops treated on an outpatient basis in Iraq in 2003-2004 (n = 871) and in Afghanistan in 2003-2005 (n = 400), 2009 (n = 2,300), and 2010 (n = 2,500). The intensity rates were calculated and were then used to calculate the prevalence of diseases per 100 persons in a given population of the military personnel. We found that acute respiratory tract diseases were one of the most common health problems treated in outpatient medical facilities in all four study populations. The incidence rate was 45.6 cases in Iraq in 2003-2004, and in Afghanistan it amounted to 61.8 in 2003-2005, 45.3 in 2009, and 54.8-100 persons in 2010. In conclusion, the prevalence of respiratory diseases was closely related to the environmental factors, such as sand and dust storms, extreme temperature changes, unsatisfactory sanitary conditions, and common disregard of basic principles concerning disease prevention.

  2. Systematic review of acute levodopa and apomorphine challenge tests in the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C; Davies, P

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To perform a systematic review of studies examining the diagnostic accuracy of acute challenge tests with levodopa and/or apomorphine in parkinsonian syndromes to assess their value in the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—A literature search including Medline and the Cochrane Library was performed for studies published in any language comparing acute levodopa and/or apomorphine response with chronic levodopa therapy in parkinsonian syndromes. Abstracted sensitivity and specificity data were summarised using variance weighting and conditional logistic regression for studies comparing two challenge tests.
RESULTS—Thirteen studies were located: four examining de novo patients and nine examining patients with well established idiopathic Parkinson's disease and non-parkinsonian conditions. Despite the significant heterogeneity in the methodologies employed, the comparable results suggest that this had little effect on the accuracy of the tests. The sensitivity for the diagnosis of established idiopathic Parkinson's disease was: apomorphine 0.86 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.78-0.94), acute levodopa 0.75 (95% CI 0.64-0.85), and chronic levodopa therapy 0.91 (95% CI 0.85-0.99). The specificity for the diagnosis of established idiopathic Parkinson's disease was: apomorphine 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.96), acute levodopa 0.87(95% CI 0.77-0.97), and chronic levodopa therapy 0.77 (95% CI 0.61-0.93). The number of patients positive for each test divided by the number with clinically diagnosed de novo disease was: apomorphine 0.63 (95% CI 0.56-0.70), acute levodopa 0.69 (95% CI 0.59-0.80), and chronic levodopa therapy 0.76 (95% CI 0.70-0.82).
CONCLUSIONS—The accuracy of the acute levodopa and apomorphine challenge tests is similar to, but not superior than, that of chronic levodopa therapy in the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. As most patients will be given chronic dopamimetic therapy, these tests add nothing while

  3. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  4. Management of acute respiratory diseases in the pediatric population: the role of oral corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Cutrera, Renato; Baraldi, Eugenio; Indinnimeo, Luciana; Miraglia Del Giudice, Michele; Piacentini, Giorgio; Scaglione, Francesco; Ullmann, Nicola; Moschino, Laura; Galdo, Francesca; Duse, Marzia

    2017-03-23

    Respiratory diseases account for about 25% of all pediatric consultations, and 10% of these are for asthma. The other main pediatric respiratory diseases, in terms of incidence, are bronchiolitis, acute bronchitis and respiratory infections. Oral corticosteroids, in particular prednisolone, are often used to treat acute respiratory diseases given their anti-inflammatory effects. However, the efficacy of treatment with oral corticosteroids differs among the various types of pediatric respiratory diseases. Notably, also the adverse effects of corticosteroid treatment can differ depending on dosage, duration of treatment and type of corticosteroid administered - a case in point being growth retardation in long-course treatment. A large body of data has accumulated on this topic. In this article, we have reviewed the data and guidelines related to the role of oral corticosteroids in the treatment and management of pediatric bronchiolitis, wheezing, asthma and croup in the attempt to provide guidance for physicians. Also included is a section on the management of acute respiratory failure in children.

  5. Fatal and near-fatal animal bite injuries.

    PubMed

    Clark, M A; Sandusky, G E; Hawley, D A; Pless, J E; Fardal, P M; Tate, L R

    1991-07-01

    Fatal and near-fatal maulings of humans by pit bulls have recently become a topic of major public concern, resulting in the passage of laws in some jurisdictions that make the owner of a pit bull criminally liable for manslaughter if his or her pet causes a human death. The authors recently investigated two cases in which children were fatally injured by pet dogs. In the first case, a 17-day-old girl suffered fatal abdominal injuries when attacked by a pregnant Siberian husky. A 2-year-old girl expired from neck wounds inflicted by a pit bull or a rottweiler or both. Because no expert would testify as to which dog caused the fatal injury, the owner of the animals was not charged under a statute which specified criminality only if a pit bull caused the fatal injury. We also examined a 12-year-old boy who attempted to pet a circus tiger; the animal grabbed his arm with its claws and bit off the arm at the shoulder. The arm could not be reattached, but the child survived. These cases and the differentiation of animal bites from other injuries will be presented.

  6. The role of multiparametric flow cytometry in the detection of minimal residual disease in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denise; Grigoriadis, George; Westerman, David

    2015-12-01

    Flow cytometry is the most accessible method for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection due to its availability in most haematological centres. Using a precise combination of different antibodies, immunophenotypic detection of MRD in acute leukaemia can be performed by identifying abnormal combinations or expressions of antigens on malignant cells at diagnosis, during and post treatment. These abnormal phenotypes, referred to as leukaemia-associated immunophenotypes (LAIPs) are either absent or expressed at low frequency in normal bone marrow (BM) cells and are used to monitor the behaviour and quantitate the amount of residual disease following treatment. In paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the level of MRD by multiparametric flow cytometry (MPFC) during therapy is recognised as an important predictor of outcome. Although less extensively studied, adult ALL and adult and paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) have also demonstrated similar findings. The challenge now is incorporating this information for risk-stratification so that therapy can be tailored individually and ultimately improve outcome while also limiting treatment-related toxicity. In this review we will elaborate on the current and future role of MPFC in MRD in acute leukaemia while also addressing its limitations.

  7. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity.

  8. Antioxidant trace elements in serum of draft horses with acute and chronic lower airway disease.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; El-Khodery, Sabry Ahmed; Ibrahim, Hussam Mohamed Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative stress level and antioxidant trace elements status associated with lower airway disease in draft horses. For this purpose, venous blood samples were obtained from draft horses exhibiting signs of lower respiratory tract disorders (n = 83) and from control group (n = 20). Serum trace elements including selenium (Se), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and iron (Fe) were assayed. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels as well as plasma hydrogen peroxides (H₂O₂) concentration and activity of plasma glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) were measured. There was a significant (p < 0.05) decrease of Se, Cu, Zn, and Fe in diseased horses compared with healthy ones, but the Cu/Zn ratio and Mn were increased (p < 0.05). Se was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in chronically affected horses compared with acute cases, but Mn was increased (p < 0.05). There was an increase of MDA, LDL, and H₂O₂ levels and GR activity in diseased cases compared with healthy horses. However, there was a significant (p < 0.05) decrease of GST and CAT activity. MDA and LDL levels were increased (p < 0.05) in horses with chronic respiratory disease compared to acute cases, but CAT activity was decreased (p < 0.05). In horses with acute lower airway disease, there was a negative correlation between GR and H₂O₂ (r = -0.458), and LDL and CAT (r = -0.816). However, in chronic disease, a negative correlation was recorded between Se and MDA (r = -0.590). The results of the present study indicate that oxidative stress, with alteration of antioxidant trace element levels, is a feature of respiratory disease in draft horses.

  9. Neuro-Behçet disease presenting with acute psychosis in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Patel, Puja; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Boneparth, Alexis; Lantos, George

    2014-09-01

    Behçet disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology that can affect the neurologic system. Neuro-Behçet disease is not well defined in children and adolescents, and the diagnosis is difficult to make in this population as they often present with insufficient symptoms to meet diagnostic criteria. Psychiatric symptoms as the initial manifestation of neuro-Behçet disease has rarely been reported. We describe a 17-year-old boy who presented with acute psychosis and was subsequently diagnosed with neuro-Behçet disease. A rare combination of both cerebral venous thrombosis and parenchymal central nervous system involvement was identified by neuroimaging. Although treatment guidelines for neuro-Behçet disease are limited, the patient made demonstrative clinical and radiographic improvement with a combination of corticosteroids, anticoagulation, and immunosuppressants, including a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) blocking agent.

  10. Appendiceal Crohn’s disease clinically presenting as acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hulin; Kim, Hyunsung; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence of appendiceal Crohn’s disease (CD) and to summarize the characteristic histologic features of appendiceal CD. METHODS: We reviewed the pathology files of 2179 appendectomy specimens from January 2007 to May 2013. The computer-assisted retrieval search facility was utilized to collect specimens. We selected those cases that were diagnosed as CD or chronic granulomatous inflammation and defined the final diagnosis according to the histologic findings of CD, including transmural lymphocytic inflammation, non-caseating epithelioid granulomas, thickening of the appendiceal wall secondary to hypertrophy of muscularis mucosa, mucosal ulceration with crypt abscesses, mucosal fissures, and fistula formation. RESULTS: We found 12 cases (7 male and 5 female patients, with an average age of 29.8 years) of appendiceal CD. The incidence of appendiceal CD was 0.55%. The chief complaints were right lower quadrant pain, abdominal pain, lower abdominal pain, and diarrhea. The duration of symptom varied from 2 d to 5 mo. The histologic review revealed appendiceal wall thickening in 11 cases (92%), transmural inflammation in all cases (100%), lymphoid aggregates in all cases (100%), epithelioid granulomas in all cases (100%), mucosal ulceration in 11 cases (92%), crypt abscesses in 5 cases (42%), perforation in 2 cases (17%), muscular hypertrophy in 1 case (8%), neural hyperplasia in 5 cases (42%), and perpendicular serosal fibrosis in 8 cases (67%). CONCLUSION: A typical and protracted clinical course, unusual gross features of the appendix and the characteristic histologic features are a clue in the diagnosis of appendiceal CD. PMID:25516865

  11. Acute Schistosomiasis in Brazilian Traveler: The Importance of Tourism in The Epidemiology of Neglected Parasitic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guiguet Leal, Diego Averaldo; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Neves, Maria Francisca; Simões, Luciana Franceschi; Bastos, Letícia Aparecida Duart; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Zanotti-Magalhães, Eliana Maria; Magalhães, Luiz Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infectious diseases acquired in tourist areas may pose a challenge to physicians and to travel medicine practitioners. Acute schistosomiasis may be seen in returning travelers and migrants after primary infection. This form of schistosomiasis is frequently misdiagnosed due to its temporal delay and its nonspecific presentation and might occur even in countries where the disease is endemic, such as in Brazil. The patient developed the acute phase of schistosomiasis with severe clinical manifestations. The quantitative analysis revealed the presence of 240 eggs per gram of stool. The treatment was administered with oxamniquine, and the control of cure of the patient was monitored and was favorable. The present paper aims to emphasize the importance of a detailed clinical history including information regarding travel history. PMID:22844623

  12. IgD values in children suffering from acute, recurrent and chronic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kikindjanin, V

    1981-01-01

    In 191 children suffered from acute, recurrent and chronic respiratory diseases the IgD values were studied. The method of single radial immunodiffusion was used. The values obtained were expressed in I.U./ml. In children suffered from acute bronchitis, bronchopneumonia and recurrent obstructive bronchitis the IgD values were not increased in relation to group. In children suffered from diseases of tuberculous aetiology the IgD values were significantly increased, p less than 0.05. In children suffered from bronchial asthma and bronchiectasis the IgD values were highly significant increased, p less than 0.001. In discussion th author points at factors which influence the IgD synthesis and cause the increase of its values.

  13. Acute schistosomiasis in brazilian traveler: the importance of tourism in the epidemiology of neglected parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Guiguet Leal, Diego Averaldo; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Neves, Maria Francisca; Simões, Luciana Franceschi; Bastos, Letícia Aparecida Duart; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Zanotti-Magalhães, Eliana Maria; Magalhães, Luiz Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infectious diseases acquired in tourist areas may pose a challenge to physicians and to travel medicine practitioners. Acute schistosomiasis may be seen in returning travelers and migrants after primary infection. This form of schistosomiasis is frequently misdiagnosed due to its temporal delay and its nonspecific presentation and might occur even in countries where the disease is endemic, such as in Brazil. The patient developed the acute phase of schistosomiasis with severe clinical manifestations. The quantitative analysis revealed the presence of 240 eggs per gram of stool. The treatment was administered with oxamniquine, and the control of cure of the patient was monitored and was favorable. The present paper aims to emphasize the importance of a detailed clinical history including information regarding travel history.

  14. CT evaluation of the acute abdomen: bowel pathology spectrum of disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G L; Johnson, P T; Fishman, E K

    1996-08-01

    CT has become the primary imaging modality for the evaluation of the patient with clinical symptoms of an acute abdomen and a confusing clinical picture. Because these patients may have a range of various pathologies, CT has been used successfully to define the presence of disease and localize it to a specific organ or organ system. In this article, we review the various processes that resulted in acute abdomen focusing on the small bowel and colon. Specific entities discussed include appendicitis, diverticulitis, Crohn disease, and ulcerative colitis. Other less common processes, including pseudomembranous colitis, intussusception, and bowel ischemia are also discussed. The specific role of CT scanning and specific CT signs are discussed and addressed. The value of CT in relationship to other modalities and clinical evaluation is discussed and key statistics provided.

  15. Subacute radiation dermatitis: a histologic imitator of acute cutaneous graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    LeBoit, P.E.

    1989-02-01

    The histopathologic changes of radiation dermatitis have been classified either as early effects (necrotic keratinocytes, fibrin thrombi, and hemorrhage) or as late effects (vacuolar changes at the dermal-epidermal junction, atypical radiation fibroblasts, and fibrosis). Two patients, one exposed to radiation therapeutically and one accidentally, are described. Skin biopsy specimens showed an interface dermatitis characterized by numerous dyskeratotic epidermal cells with lymphocytes in close apposition (satellite cell necrosis); that is, the epidermal changes were similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease. Because recipients of bone marrow transplants frequently receive total body irradiation as part of their preparatory regimen, the ability of radiation to cause persistent epidermal changes similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease could complicate the interpretation of posttransplant skin biopsy specimens.

  16. Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    TI FLE CY N Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 SWES% Ot DNA-TR-89-45 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes A. Laupa G. H. Anno...0104 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes PE - 62715H PR - RM 6 AUTHOR(S) TA -RH A. Laupa: G. H. Anno WU - DH026130 7 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...vi 1 INTRODUCTION .......................................... 1I DATA SOURCES ON CHERNOBYL VICTIMS ............... 3 CHERNOBYL

  17. [Molecular genetic detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Koehler, R; Bartram, C R

    2013-05-01

    The treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood and adolescence achieves nowadays cure rates of more than 80%. The detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) via molecular genetic methods provides - in comparison with conventional clinical and biological parameters - much more sensitive approaches to monitor individual treatment response. Here we will discuss the molecular background and technical developments in the framework of the BFM-study group.

  18. The Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation program's role in the prevention of occupational fatalities

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, D; Casini, V; Bost, P; Johnson, W; Rautiainen, R

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—The objective of the Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program is to prevent traumatic occupational fatalities in the United States by identifying and investigating work situations at high risk for injury and formulating and disseminating prevention strategies to those who can intervene in the workplace. Setting—The FACE program is a research program located in the Division of Safety Research, a division of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). NIOSH is an agency of the United States government and is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. NIOSH is responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for prevention of work related illnesses and injuries. FACE investigators conduct traumatic occupational fatality investigations throughout the United States and provide technical assistance to 15 state health or labor departments who have cooperative agreements with NIOSH to conduct traumatic fatality surveillance, targeted investigations, and prevention activities at the state level. Methods—Investigations are conducted at the worksite using the FACE model, an approach derived from the research conducted by William Haddon Jr. This approach reflects the public health perspective that the etiology of injuries is multifactorial and largely preventable. FACE investigators gather information on multiple factors that may have contributed to traumatic occupational fatalities. Information on factors associated with the agent (energy exchange, for example, thermal energy, mechanical energy, electrical energy, chemical energy), host (worker who died), and the environment (the physical and social aspects of the workplace), during the pre-event, event, and post-event time phases of the fatal incident are collected and analyzed. Organizational, behavioral, and environmental factors contributing to the death are detailed and prevention recommendations formulated and disseminated to help

  19. Acute neurologic disease in Porcine rubulavirus experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jenifer; Gómez-Núñez, Luis; Lara-Romero, Rocío; Diosdado, Fernando; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Jasso, Miguel; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical disease, humoral response and viral distribution of recent Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates in experimentally infected pigs. Four, 6-piglet (5-days old) groups were employed (G1-84, G2-93, G3-147, and G4-T). Three viral strains were used for the experimental infection: the reference strain LPMV-1984 (Michoacán 1984) and two other strains isolated in 2013, one in Queretaro (Qro/93/2013) and the other in Michoacán (Mich/147/2013). Each strain was genetically characterized by amplification and sequencing of the gene encoding hemagglutinin-neuroamidase (HN). The inoculation was performed through the oronasal and ocular routes, at a dose of 1×10(6)TCID50/ml. Subsequently, the signs were evaluated daily and necropsies were performed on 3 different days post infection (dpi). We recorded all micro- and macroscopic lesions. Organs from the nervous, lymphatic, and respiratory system were analyzed by quantifying the viral RNA load and the presence of the infectious virus. The presence of the viral antigen in organs was evidenced through immunohistochemistry. Seroconversion was evaluated through the use of a hemagglutination inhibition test. In the characterization of gene HN, only three substitutions were identified in strain Mich/147/2013, two in strain LPMV/1984 (fourth passage) and one in strain Qro/93/2013, with respect to reference strain LPMV-84, these changes had not been identified as virulence factors in previously reported strains. Neurological alterations associated with the infection were found in all three experimental groups starting from 3dpi. Groups G1-84 and G3-147 presented the most exacerbated nervous signs. Group G2-93 only presented milder signs including slight motor incoordination, and an increased rectal temperature starting from day 5 post infection (PI). The main histopathological findings were the presence of a mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate (lymphocytic/monocytic) surrounding the

  20. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction in a pediatric patient with coronary aneurysm and stenosis due to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Drossner, David M; Chappell, Clay; Rab, Tanveer; Kim, Dennis

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of an acutely ill 3-year-old female, with a previous medical history of Kawasaki disease, who presented to care with an acute myocardial infarction. We describe the coordinated therapies employed by pediatric and adult cardiologists aimed to establish coronary revascularization.

  1. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  2. Drugs and acute porphyrias: reasons for a hazardous relationship.

    PubMed

    Roveri, Giulia; Nascimbeni, Fabio; Rocchi, Emilio; Ventura, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    The porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases caused by inherited or acquired enzymatic deficiency in the metabolic pathway of heme biosynthesis. Simplistically, they can be considered as storage diseases, because the partial enzymatic defect gives rise to a metabolic "bottleneck" in the biosynthetic pathway and hence to an accumulation of different metabolic intermediates, potentially toxic and responsible for the various (cutaneous or neurovisceral) clinical manifestations observed in these diseases. In the acute porphyrias (acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, variegate porphyria, and the very rare delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase ALAD-d porphyria), the characteristic severe neurovisceral involvement is mainly ascribed to a tissue accumulation of delta-aminolevulinic acid, a neurotoxic nonporphyrin precursor. Many different factors, both endogenous and exogenous, may favor the accumulation of this precursor in patients who are carriers of an enzymatic defect consistent with an acute porphyria, thus contributing to trigger the serious (and potentially fatal) clinical manifestations of the disease (acute porphyric attacks). To date, many different drugs are known to be able to precipitate an acute porphyric attack, so that the acute porphyrias are also considered as pharmacogenetic or toxygenetic diseases. This article reviews the different biochemical mechanisms underlying the capacity of many drugs to precipitate a porphyric acute attack (drug porphyrogenicity) in carriers of genetic mutations responsible for acute porphyrias, and addresses the issue of prescribing drugs for patients affected by these rare, but extremely complex, diseases.

  3. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named “Melaka virus”) isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms ≈1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house ≈1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans. PMID:17592121

  4. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-07-03

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named "Melaka virus") isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms approximately 1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house approximately 1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans.

  5. Major comorbid disease processes associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Salwa; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-03-06

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen amongst critically ill and hospitalized patients. Individuals with certain co-morbid diseases have an increased risk of developing AKI. Thus, recognizing the co-morbidities that predispose patients to AKI is important in AKI prevention and treatment. Some of the most common co-morbid disease processes that increase the risk of AKI are diabetes, cancer, cardiac surgery and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This review article identifies the increased risk of acquiring AKI with given co-morbid diseases. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AKI in relation to co-morbid diseases are discussed to understand how the risk of acquiring AKI is increased. This paper reviews the effects of various co-morbid diseases including: Diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and HIV AIDS, which all exhibit a significant increased risk of developing AKI. Amongst these co-morbid diseases, inflammation, the use of nephrotoxic agents, and hypoperfusion to the kidneys have been shown to be major pathological processes that predisposes individuals to AKI. The pathogenesis of kidney injury is complex, however, effective treatment of the co-morbid disease processes may reduce its risk. Therefore, improved management of co-morbid diseases may prevent some of the underlying pathology that contributes to the increased risk of developing AKI.

  6. Major comorbid disease processes associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Salwa; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen amongst critically ill and hospitalized patients. Individuals with certain co-morbid diseases have an increased risk of developing AKI. Thus, recognizing the co-morbidities that predispose patients to AKI is important in AKI prevention and treatment. Some of the most common co-morbid disease processes that increase the risk of AKI are diabetes, cancer, cardiac surgery and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This review article identifies the increased risk of acquiring AKI with given co-morbid diseases. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AKI in relation to co-morbid diseases are discussed to understand how the risk of acquiring AKI is increased. This paper reviews the effects of various co-morbid diseases including: Diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and HIV AIDS, which all exhibit a significant increased risk of developing AKI. Amongst these co-morbid diseases, inflammation, the use of nephrotoxic agents, and hypoperfusion to the kidneys have been shown to be major pathological processes that predisposes individuals to AKI. The pathogenesis of kidney injury is complex, however, effective treatment of the co-morbid disease processes may reduce its risk. Therefore, improved management of co-morbid diseases may prevent some of the underlying pathology that contributes to the increased risk of developing AKI. PMID:26981437

  7. Kienböck's disease: unusual cause of acute onset wrist pain in a dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Eriguchi, Rieko; Toyonaga, Jiro; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Fujimi, Satoru; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Kienböck's disease is a rare disorder that presents with wrist pain and limitation of motion and is caused by avascular necrosis of the lunate bone. Dialysis patients occasionally present with wrist pain. However, Kienböck's disease is rarely reported in dialysis patients. We report a case of 52-year-old woman with a 28-year history of hemodialysis who presented with acute wrist pain. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse low intensity of the lunate bone, consistent with the diagnosis of Kienböck's disease. Because this disease can lead to chronic debilitating wrist pain, prompt diagnosis, accurate staging, and provision of appropriate treatment is mandatory.

  8. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  9. DNA-binding antibodies and hepatitis B markers in acute and chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Rassam, S; Ganguly, N; Mcguire, M J; Nasrat, B; Holgate, S T; Triger, D R; Wright, R

    1978-01-01

    A Farr technique has been used to assay antibodies to double-stranded DNA in the serum of patients with acute and chronic liver disease and carriers of HBsAg from the United Kingdom and Iraq. These antibodies were found in all groups from both countries. The highest levels were found in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis. In the Iraqi patients there was a strongly positive correlation between DNA-binding antibody levels and the presence of hepatitis B markers but not with disease activity. In the patients from the United Kingdom there was little correlation with disease activity and none with autoantibodies. Ninety-five per cent of asymptomatic carriers of HBsAG had elevated DNA-binding antibodies. It is suggested that hepatitis B-specific DNA might be one trigger to DNA antibody formation, though in liver disease a variety of factors are clearly operative. PMID:309808

  10. Heat-induced immunoreactivity of tau protein in neocortical neurons of fire fatalities.

    PubMed

    Kibayashi, Kazuhiko; Shojo, Hideki

    2003-10-01

    Tau protein is the main component of neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Immunohistochemistry of tau protein is useful in the diagnosis of AD but produces diffuse staining of neocortical neurons in fire fatalities. To learn the cause of this phenomenon, we examined the temporal neocortex of 13 fire fatalities and 9 fatalities unrelated to fire. The diffuse tau immunoreactive neurons were observed in 10 fire fatalities with heat coagulation of the cerebrum. Diffuse staining was not found in the three fire fatalities without heat coagulation of the cerebrum or in fatalities unrelated to fire. The immunoreactivity progressively increased as a function of the degree of cerebral heat coagulation. These results demonstrate that diffuse tau immunoreactivity of neocortical neurons is a post-mortem phenomenon caused by prolonged exposure of the head to intense heat. Forensic pathologists should consider this phenomenon when they diagnose AD in fire fatalities.

  11. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  12. Cyclosporine and methotrexate-related pharmacogenomic predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Laverdière, Isabelle; Guillemette, Chantal; Tamouza, Ryad; Loiseau, Pascale; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Robin, Marie; Couture, Félix; Filion, Alain; Lalancette, Marc; Tourancheau, Alan; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Lévesque, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Effective immunosuppression is mandatory to prevent graft-versus-host disease and to achieve a successful clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we tested whether germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes related to methotrexate and cyclosporine metabolism and activity influence the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders. Recipient genetic status of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 transporters, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/ inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase within the methotrexate pathway, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) loci exhibit a remarkable influence on severe acute graft-versus-host disease prevalence. Indeed, an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in association with single nucleotide polymorphisms located in 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (hazard ratio=3.04; P=0.002), nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) (hazard ratio=2.69; P=0.004), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 (hazard ratio=3.53; P=0.0018) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 (hazard ratio=3.67; P=0.0005). While donor single nucleotide polymorphisms of dihydrofolate reductase and solute carrier family 19 (member 1) genes are associated with a reduced risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio=0.32–0.41; P=0.0009–0.008), those of nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 2) are found to increase such risk (hazard ratio=3.85; P=0.0004). None of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, by targeting drug-related biologically relevant genes, this work emphasizes the potential

  13. Three-view bedside ultrasound to differentiate acute decompensated heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun

    2013-04-01

    Identifying the cause of acute dyspnea in the emergency department is often challenging, even for the most experienced provider. Distinguishing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease from acute decompensated heart failure in the acutely dyspneic patient who presents in respiratory distress is often difficult. Patients are often unable to give a detailed history when in extremis, yet primary management needs to be initiated before further testing can be completed. Bedside diagnostic ultrasound has emerged as a tool for emergency physicians to rapidly evaluate the cardiopulmonary status in patients presenting with undifferentiated shortness of breath [1-3]. A rapid 3-view sonographic evaluation of the heart, lungs, and inferior vena cava or “Triple Scan” may be a useful tool in identifying the cause of acute dyspnea and may aid the clinician in the initial management of the critically ill dyspneic patient. We present a case where a 3-view ultrasound examination, the “Triple Scan,” allowed for detection of new onset congestive heart failure and initiation of appropriate medical therapy without waiting for further standard diagnostic testing.

  14. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF.

  15. Re-emergent human adenovirus genome type 7d caused an acute respiratory disease outbreak in Southern China after a twenty-one year absence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suhui; Wan, Chengsong; Ke, Changwen; Seto, Jason; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Zou, Lirong; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zetao; Jing, Shuping; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Wan, Xuan; Wu, Xianbo; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2014-12-08

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), among other illnesses. Of the ARD genotypes, HAdV-7 presents with more severe morbidity and higher mortality than the others. We report the isolation and identification of a genome type HAdV-7d (DG01_2011) from a recent outbreak in Southern China. Genome sequencing, phylogenetic analysis, and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) comparisons with past pathogens indicate HAdV-7d has re-emerged in Southern China after an absence of twenty-one years. Recombination analysis reveals this genome differs from the 1950s-era prototype and vaccine strains by a lateral gene transfer, substituting the coding region for the L1 52/55 kDa DNA packaging protein from HAdV-16. DG01_2011 descends from both a strain circulating in Southwestern China (2010) and a strain from Shaanxi causing a fatality and outbreak (Northwestern China; 2009). Due to the higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with HAdV-7, the surveillance, identification, and characterization of these strains in population-dense China by REA and/or whole genome sequencing are strongly indicated. With these accurate identifications of specific HAdV types and an epidemiological database of regional HAdV pathogens, along with the HAdV genome stability noted across time and space, the development, availability, and deployment of appropriate vaccines are needed.

  16. An outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by a virus associated RNA II gene mutation strain of human adenovirus 7 in China, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Beibei; Wu, Fuli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Sheng, Chunyu; Ma, Qiuxia; Yang, Chaojie; Xie, Jing; Li, Peng; Jia, Leili; Wang, Ligui; Du, Xinying; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7 (HAdV-7) strains are a major cause of acute respiratory disease (ARD) among adults and children, associated with fatal pneumonia. An ARD outbreak caused by HAdV-7 that involved 739 college students was reported in this article. To better understand the underlying cause of this large-scale epidemic, virus strains were isolated from infected patients and sequence variations of the whole genome sequence were detected. Evolutionary trees and alignment results indicated that the major capsid protein genes hexon and fibre were strongly conserved among serotype 7 strains in China at that time. Instead, the HAdV-7 strains presented three thymine deletions in the virus associated RNA (VA RNA) II terminal region. We also found that the mutation might lead to increased mRNA expression of an adjacent gene, L1 52/55K, and thus promoted faster growth. These findings suggest that sequence variation of VA RNA II gene was a potential cause of such a severe HAdV-7 infection and this gene should be a new-emerging factor to be monitored for better understanding of HAdV-7 infection. PMID:28225804

  17. An outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by a virus associated RNA II gene mutation strain of human adenovirus 7 in China, 2015.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Qiongshu; Liang, Beibei; Wu, Fuli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Sheng, Chunyu; Ma, Qiuxia; Yang, Chaojie; Xie, Jing; Li, Peng; Jia, Leili; Wang, Ligui; Du, Xinying; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7 (HAdV-7) strains are a major cause of acute respiratory disease (ARD) among adults and children, associated with fatal pneumonia. An ARD outbreak caused by HAdV-7 that involved 739 college students was reported in this article. To better understand the underlying cause of this large-scale epidemic, virus strains were isolated from infected patients and sequence variations of the whole genome sequence were detected. Evolutionary trees and alignment results indicated that the major capsid protein genes hexon and fibre were strongly conserved among serotype 7 strains in China at that time. Instead, the HAdV-7 strains presented three thymine deletions in the virus associated RNA (VA RNA) II terminal region. We also found that the mutation might lead to increased mRNA expression of an adjacent gene, L1 52/55K, and thus promoted faster growth. These findings suggest that sequence variation of VA RNA II gene was a potential cause of such a severe HAdV-7 infection and this gene should be a new-emerging factor to be monitored for better understanding of HAdV-7 infection.

  18. Circulating Microbial Products and Acute Phase Proteins as Markers of Pathogenesis in Lymphatic Filarial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; George, P. Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, N.; Fay, Michael P.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+) or without (CP Ag−) active infection; with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF); and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]). Comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF) and those without active infection (CP Ag− compared to EN) were used preliminarily to identify markers of pathogenesis. Thereafter, we tested for group effects among all the four groups using linear models on the log transformed responses of the markers. Our data suggest that circulating levels of microbial translocation products (lipopolysaccharide and LPS-binding protein), acute phase proteins (haptoglobin and serum amyloid protein-A), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α) are associated with pathogenesis of disease in lymphatic filarial infection and implicate an important role for circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins. PMID:22685406

  19. Undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted to an acute assessment unit

    PubMed Central

    Eikhof, Karin D.; Olsen, Kristine R.; Wrengler, N. C. H.; Nielsen, Carl; Boedtger, Uffe; Titlestad, Ingrid L.; Weinreich, Ulla M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is very prevalent worldwide, yet underdiagnosed. Aim: This study investigates feasibility of performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission as well as the prevalence of undiagnosed COPD in the same cohort. Methods: During a two-week period, all patients admitted to three large acute assessment units were evaluated. Patients ≥ 18 years, able to perform spirometry, with no surgery to the thorax or abdomen within the last weeks and no known COPD was included. Patients with FEV1/FEV6 ≤ 0.7 or FEV1 < 80% or FEV6 < 80% were offered follow-up visit after 6 weeks. Results: Of the 1145 admitted patients, 46% were eligible: 28% of those had an abnormal spirometry. The offered follow-up visit was attended by 51% and in this group 17% were diagnosed with lung disease. COPD was the most prevalent diagnosis (73%), and 2/3 was in GOLD group A. In total, 75% of the patients with airflow obstruction at the initial examination remained obstructive. Conclusion: Performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission is feasible, abnormal findings are common, and COPD is the most prevalent diagnosis. PMID:28326181

  20. Precision and prognostic value of clone-specific minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Pierre; Tang, Ruoping; Abermil, Nassera; Flandrin, Pascale; Moatti, Hannah; Favale, Fabrizia; Suner, Ludovic; Lorre, Florence; Marzac, Christophe; Fava, Fanny; Mamez, Anne-Claire; Lapusan, Simona; Isnard, Françoise; Mohty, Mohamad; Legrand, Ollivier; Douay, Luc; Bilhou-Nabera, Chrystele; Delhommeau, François

    2017-03-16

    The genetic landscape of adult acute myeloid leukemias has been recently unraveled. However, due to their genetic heterogeneity, only a handful of markers are currently used for the evaluation of minimal residual disease. Recent studies using multi-target strategies indicate that detection of residual mutations in less than 5% of cells in complete remission is associated with a better survival. Here, in a series of 69 acute myeloid leukemias with known clonal architecture, we design a clone-specific strategy based on fluorescent in situ hybridization and high-sensitivity next generation sequencing to detect chromosomal aberrations and mutations, respectively, in follow-up samples. The combination of these techniques allows tracking chromosomal and genomic lesions down to 0.5-0.4% of the cell population in remission samples. By testing all lesions in follow-up samples from 65/69 evaluable patients, we find that initiating events often persist, and appear to be, alone, inappropriate markers to predict short term relapse. In contrast, the persistence of two or more lesions in more than 0.4% of the cells from remission samples is strongly associated with lower leukemia-free and overall survivals in univariate and multivariate analyses. Although larger prospective studies are needed to extend these results, our data show that a personalized, clone-specific, minimal residual disease follow-up strategy is feasible in the vast majority of acute myeloid leukemia cases.

  1. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  2. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders.

  3. Effects of Patient Controlled Analgesia Hydromorphone during Acute Painful Episodes in Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2008-01-01

    The use of hydromorphone is increasing but little is known about its effects during painful episodes in adolescents with sickle cell disease. This pilot study examined the intensity, location, and quality of pain and evaluated the amount of relief and side effects from PCA hydromorphone during acute painful episodes in five adolescents with sickle cell disease. Data suggest that hydromorphone may provide a better alternative than morphine, the most commonly prescribed opioid in patients with sickle cell disease. Hydromorphone may provide improved pain control and recovery from acute painful episodes in patients with sickle cell disease.

  4. Prospective Evaluation for Respiratory Pathogens in Children With Sickle Cell Disease and Acute Respiratory Illness

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wang, Winfred C.; Gaur, Aditya; Smith, Teresa; Gu, Zhengming; Kang, Guolian; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human rhinovirus (HRV), human coronavirus (hCoV), human bocavirus (hBoV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in children with sickle cell disease have not been well studied. Procedure Nasopharyngeal wash specimens were prospectively collected from 60 children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, over a 1-year period. Samples were tested with multiplexed-PCR, using an automated system for nine respiratory viruses, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis. Clinical characteristics and distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with and without acute chest syndrome (ACS) were evaluated. Results A respiratory virus was detected in 47 (78%) patients. Nine (15%) patients had ACS; a respiratory virus was detected in all of them. The demographic characteristics of patients with and without ACS were similar. HRV was the most common virus, detected in 29 of 47 (62%) patients. Logistic regression showed no association between ACS and detection of HRV, hCoV, hBoV, hMPV, and other respiratory pathogens. Co-infection with at least one additional respiratory virus was seen in 14 (30%) infected patients, and was not significantly higher in patients with ACS (P=0.10). Co-infections with more than two respiratory viruses were seen in seven patients, all in patients without ACS. Bacterial pathogens were not detected. Conclusion HRV was the most common virus detected in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Larger prospective studies with asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with ACS in children with sickle cell disease. PMID:24123899

  5. Dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines in a novel acute mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Barak, Larry S; Wetsel, William C; Caron, Marc G; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2005-08-01

    Brain dopamine is critically involved in movement control, and its deficiency is the primary cause of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. Here we report development of an animal model of acute severe dopamine deficiency by using mice lacking the dopamine transporter. In the absence of transporter-mediated recycling mechanisms, dopamine levels become entirely dependent on de novo synthesis. Acute pharmacological inhibition of dopamine synthesis in these mice induces transient elimination of striatal dopamine accompanied by the development of a striking behavioral phenotype manifested as severe akinesia, rigidity, tremor, and ptosis. This phenotype can be reversed by administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, or by nonselective dopamine agonists. Surprisingly, several amphetamine derivatives were also effective in reversing these behavioral abnormalities in a dopamine-independent manner. Identification of dopamine transporter- and dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines suggests a novel paradigm in the search for prospective anti-Parkinsonian drugs.

  6. Acute cervical motor radiculopathy induced by neck and limb immobilization in a patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman with Parkinson disease (PD) presented with acute monoplegia of her left upper extremity after the neck and limb immobilization for several hours. Her sensory function was normal, and the chest X-ray showed left phrenic nerve palsy. Electrophysiological studies showed multi-segment muscle involvement (C3 to T1) including denervation potentials and reduced interference of motor units in needle electromyography. M wave amplitude in peripheral nerve stimulation was preserved except for the ulnar nerve, suggesting both axonal injury and conduction block at the anterior spinal roots. The patient showed fair recovery in several months, suggesting sufficient reinnervation and recovery of conduction block. Incomplete root avulsion was thought to be the pathomechanism of acute cervical motor radiculopathy.

  7. Thymic atrophy in acute experimental Chagas disease is associated with an imbalance of stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Frias Carvalho, Vinícius; Morrot, Alexandre; Savino, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    Disorders in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are associated with the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. During the acute phase of this disease, increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids (GCs) correlate with thymic atrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that this phenomenon is paralleled by a decrease of prolactin (PRL) secretion, another stress hormone that seems to counteract many immunosuppressive effects of GCs. Both GCs and PRL are intrathymically produced and exhibit mutual antagonism through the activation of their respective receptors, GR, and PRLR. Considering that GCs induce apoptosis and inhibit double-positive (DP) thymocyte proliferation and that PRL administration prevents these effects, it seems plausible that a local imbalance of GR-PRLR crosstalk underlies the thymic involution occurring in acute T. cruzi infection. In this respect, preserving PRLR signaling seems to be crucial for protecting DP from GC-induced apoptosis.

  8. [Mathematical analysis of complicated course of acute surgical diseases of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Vozniuk, S M; Pol'ovyĭ, V P; Sydorchuk, R I; Palianytsia, A S

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the results of diagnosis and treatment of 130 patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity, complicated by peritonitis. We proposed the method of estimating the severity of the patients using a coefficient of status severity (C(SS)), developed a scale for prediction of complicated outcomes of acute surgical pathology of the abdominal cavity and abdominal sepsis, which is adapted to the working conditions of local clinics. Using the C(SS) and the scale prediction, allowed timely identification of patients' risk group with possible complicated course, assign adequate treatment, reduce postoperative complications by 5%, relaparotomies by 4.4%, decrease postoperative mortality by 3.9%.

  9. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  10. Acute onset anarthria without hepatic manifestation: a rare presentation of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Bhandari, Aveg; Tiwari, Navin; Chaudhari, Tejendra S

    2013-08-20

    Wilson disease (WD) is one of the few inherited but treatable disorder mainly affecting the liver and brain resulting in severe disability or death if left untreated. Hence, it is important to keep a high index of suspicion for diagnosing this clinical entity in appropriate clinical settings. The clinical presentation can be quite variable and they may present solely with neurological features sans hepatic symptoms. Such neurological manifestations usually follow subacute to chronic course. Acute onset anarthria as the heralding and predominant presenting feature has been rarely reported in the literature. We reported a case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with acute onset anarthria and dystonia of 1-month duration. On further evaluation, a diagnosis of WD was made. The patient showed partial improvement after she was started on copper chelating agents and anticholinergics.

  11. Acute onset anarthria without hepatic manifestation: a rare presentation of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Bhandari, Aveg; Tiwari, Navin; Chaudhari, Tejendra S

    2013-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is one of the few inherited but treatable disorder mainly affecting the liver and brain resulting in severe disability or death if left untreated. Hence, it is important to keep a high index of suspicion for diagnosing this clinical entity in appropriate clinical settings. The clinical presentation can be quite variable and they may present solely with neurological features sans hepatic symptoms. Such neurological manifestations usually follow subacute to chronic course. Acute onset anarthria as the heralding and predominant presenting feature has been rarely reported in the literature. We reported a case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with acute onset anarthria and dystonia of 1-month duration. On further evaluation, a diagnosis of WD was made. The patient showed partial improvement after she was started on copper chelating agents and anticholinergics. PMID:23966348

  12. [Legionnaires' disease with acute renal failure caused by Legionella pneumophilla serogroup 4].

    PubMed

    Hase, Isano; Chibana, Kazuyuki; Ohara, Tetsuya; Takizawa, Hidenori; Furihata, Tomoe; Yamada, Issei; Fukushima, Yasutugu; Ishii, Yoshiki; Fukuda, Takeshi; Koide, Michio; Saitou, Atsushi

    2005-11-01

    A 77-year-old man who had fever and chest pain was admitted to a neighboring hospital on a diagnosis of pneumonia. Chest X-ray film finding deteriorated despite treatment with 2 g cefotaxime per day. Because of accompanying acute renal failure, he was transferred to our hospital. Hemodialysis with intravenous administration of erythromycin and meropenem resulted in recovery from acute renal failure, and his general condition improved. Because of liver dysfunction, erythromycin was changed to pazufloxacin. Although he was negative for Legionella urinary antigen determined with a rapid assay kit, Binax NOW, his serum titer for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was elevated. Finally, a diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was established.

  13. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD.

  14. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD. PMID:18268918

  15. Presentation with gastrointestinal symptoms and high case fatality associated with group W meningococcal disease (MenW) in teenagers, England, July 2015 to January 2016.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Helen; Parikh, Sydel R; Borrow, Ray; Kaczmarski, Ed; Ramsay, Mary E; Ladhani, Shamez N

    2016-01-01

    Atypical clinical presentations associated with group W meningococcal disease (MenW) are well-described and include pneumonia, septic arthritis, endocarditis and epiglottitis/supraglottitis. Following anecdotal reports of teenagers presenting with predominantly gastrointestinal symptoms, we undertook a case review of MenW cases in 15 to 19 year-olds diagnosed in England between July 2015 and January 2016. Of the 15 cases, seven presented with a short history of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea; five of these seven cases died within 24 hours of presentation to hospital.

  16. Guillain-Barré Syndrome with Fatal Outcome during HIV-1-Seroconversion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pontali, Emanuele; Feasi, Marcello; Crisalli, Maria Paola; Cassola, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute or subacute peripheral polyneuropathy characterized by symmetrical muscle weakness. Its occurrence has been reported during acute HIV seroconversion since 1985. Among HIV-infected subjects, GBS has generally a favourable outcome. We report a case of GBS with fatal outcome during HIV seroconversion. PMID:22567484

  17. Health-related QOL in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doll, Helen; Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of emphasis on health-related QOL (HR-QOL) changes associated with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (CB) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this review is to examine the use of HR-QOL instruments to evaluate acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, so as to form recommendations for future research.A literature search of papers published between 1966 and July 2003 identified more than 300 articles that used acute exacerbation of CB or COPD as the search term. However, only 21 of these studies employed HR-QOL measures as predictors of outcome or in the assessment of the impact, evolution or treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD or CB. A variety of HR-QOL measures were used, both generic and disease specific. The disease-specific St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), devised for patients with stable CB and with a recall period of 1-12 months, was the most widely used measure, with the Chronic Respiratory disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Baseline and Transitional Dyspnoea Index (BDI, TDI) being the only other disease-specific measures used. Most measures, both generic and disease specific, performed adequately when used during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD and indicated poor HR-QOL during acute exacerbation, which improved on resolution of the exacerbation. Relationships were evident between HR-QOL during an acute exacerbation and various outcomes, including post-exacerbation functional status, hospital re- admission for acute exacerbation or COPD, and mortality. There is a need for studies of treatments for acute exacerbation of CB or COPD to include an appropriate HR-QOL instrument to aid in the stratification of patients so as to target the right treatment to the right patient group. While a new instrument could be developed to measure HR-QOL during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, currently available disease-specific measures such as the CRQ and the SGRQ appear to be acceptable to patients during acute

  18. Acute renal graft-versus-host disease in a murine model of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Peter M; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Schmid, Karin; Birner, Christoph; Schach, Christian; Maier, Lars S; Holler, Ernst; Endemann, Dierk H

    2017-03-23

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a very common complication after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and associated with poor prognosis. Generally kidneys are assumed to be no direct target of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and renal impairment is often attributed to several other factors occurring in the early phase after BMT. Our study aimed to prove the existence of renal GvHD in a fully MHC-mismatched model of BALB/c mice conditioned and transplanted according to two different intensity protocols. Syngeneically transplanted and untreated animals served as controls. 4 weeks after transplantation, allogeneic animals developed acute GvHD that was more pronounced in the high-intensity protocol (HIP) group than in the low-intensity protocol (LIP) group. Urea and creatinine as classic serum markers of renal function could not verify renal impairment 4 weeks after BMT. Creatinine levels were even reduced as a result of catabolic metabolism and loss of muscle mass due to acute GvHD. Proteinuria, albuminuria, and urinary N-acetyl-beta-Dglucosaminidase (NAG) levels were measured as additional renal markers before and after transplantation. Albuminuria and NAG were only significantly increased after allogeneic transplantation, correlating with disease severity between HIP and LIP animals. Histological investigations of the kidneys showed renal infiltration of T-cells and macrophages with endarteriitis, interstitial nephritis, tubulitis, and glomerulitis. T-cells consisted of CD4+, CD8+, and FoxP3+ cells. Renal expression analysis of allogeneic animals showed increases in indoleamine-2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), different cytokines (TNFα, IFN-γ, IL-1α, IL2, IL-6, and IL-10), and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1), resembling findings from other tissues in acute GvHD. In summary, our study supports the entity of renal GvHD with histological features suggestive of cell-mediated renal injury. Albuminuria and urinary NAG levels may serve as early markers of renal

  19. Urinalysis for interleukin-8 in the non-invasive diagnosis of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Taha, A; Grant, V; Kelly, R

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Given its role in mediating inflammation, the use of urinary interleukin-8 (IL-8) was assessed in the non-invasive diagnosis of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Methods: IL-8 was measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in random urine samples (1 ml each) carrying code numbers and taken from 208 patients: 177 adults and 31 children presenting with a range of active or inactive inflammatory conditions. Results: In the appropriate controls and in patients with inactive inflammation, the median urinary IL-8 levels ranged from 7–12 pg/ml, compared with 104 pg/ml in active ulcerative colitis (p = 0.002), 54 in active Crohn's disease (p = 0.025), 93 in active rheumatoid arthritis (p = 0.001), 107 in acute cholecystitis (p<0.0001), 127 in acute appendicitis (p = 0.0001), and 548 pg/ml in urinary tract infection (p<0.0001). Children with non-viral inflammation/infection also had higher IL-8 values (median, 199 pg/ml; p = 0.0001) than those with viral infection (median, 7 pg/ml) or non-specific conditions (median, 10 pg/ml). In the study group as a whole urinary IL-8 values correlated positively with peripheral blood white cell count (r = 0.32; p < 0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.41; p<0.001), and C-reactive protein (r = 0.33; p<0.001). Conclusion: Taking the appropriate clinical situation into account, urinary IL-8 measurement helps in the non-invasive assessment of active inflammation in at least a number of common acute and chronic conditions. PMID:12697917

  20. Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy and its Differentiation from Other Liver Diseases in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Maier, J T; Schalinski, E; Häberlein, C; Gottschalk, U; Hellmeyer, L

    2015-08-01

    Background: There are a number of threatening liver diseases that occur during pregnancy. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease associated with high maternal and foetal mortality. Case Report: We report on a young gravida 1 woman who presented to our level 1 perinatal centre in the 36 + 5 week of pregnancy with an isolated elevation of transaminases together with diffuse upper abdominal complaints. After comprehensive diagnostic work-up we performed an emergency delivery by Caesarean section. This was followed by interdisciplinary management. Discussion: The differentiation from other liver diseases seems not to be obvious in all cases. Here we consider the following differential diagnoses: hyperemesis gravidarum, intrahepatic gestational cholestasis, preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome. Conclusion: Rapid diagnosis and delivery as well as interdisciplinary aftercare are necessary in order to reduce maternal and foetal mortality.

  1. Fatal nosocomial Legionnaires' disease: relevance of contamination of hospital water supply by temperature-dependent buoyancy-driven flow from spur pipes.

    PubMed

    Patterson, W J; Seal, D V; Curran, E; Sinclair, T M; McLuckie, J C

    1994-06-01

    The investigation, epidemiology, and effectiveness of control procedures during an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease involving three immunosuppressed patients are described. The source of infection appeared to be a network of fire hydrant spurs connected directly to the incoming hospital mains water supply. Removal of these hydrants considerably reduced, but failed to eliminate, contamination of water storage facilities. As an emergency control procedure the incoming mains water was chlorinated continuously. Additional modifications to improve temperature regulation and reduce stagnation also failed to eliminate the legionellae. A perspex test-rig was constructed to model the pre-existing hospital water supply and storage system. This showed that through the hydraulic mechanism known as 'temperature buoyancy', contaminated water could be efficiently and quickly exchanged between a stagnant spur pipe and its mains supply. Contamination of hospital storage tanks from such sources has not previously been considered a risk factor for Legionnaires' disease. We recommend that hospital water storage tanks are supplied by a dedicated mains pipe without spurs.

  2. Fatal nosocomial Legionnaires' disease: relevance of contamination of hospital water supply by temperature-dependent buoyancy-driven flow from spur pipes.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, W. J.; Seal, D. V.; Curran, E.; Sinclair, T. M.; McLuckie, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    The investigation, epidemiology, and effectiveness of control procedures during an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease involving three immunosuppressed patients are described. The source of infection appeared to be a network of fire hydrant spurs connected directly to the incoming hospital mains water supply. Removal of these hydrants considerably reduced, but failed to eliminate, contamination of water storage facilities. As an emergency control procedure the incoming mains water was chlorinated continuously. Additional modifications to improve temperature regulation and reduce stagnation also failed to eliminate the legionellae. A perspex test-rig was constructed to model the pre-existing hospital water supply and storage system. This showed that through the hydraulic mechanism known as 'temperature buoyancy', contaminated water could be efficiently and quickly exchanged between a stagnant spur pipe and its mains supply. Contamination of hospital storage tanks from such sources has not previously been considered a risk factor for Legionnaires' disease. We recommend that hospital water storage tanks are supplied by a dedicated mains pipe without spurs. PMID:8005217

  3. Plasma levels of microRNA in chronic kidney disease: patterns in acute and chronic exercise.

    PubMed

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H; Ledeganck, Kristien J; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Jürgens, Angelika; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Fransen, Erik; Adams, Volker; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Verpooten, Gert A; Vrints, Christiaan J; Couttenye, Marie M; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2015-12-15

    Exercise training is an effective way to improve exercise capacity in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the underlying mechanisms are only partly understood. In healthy subjects (HS), microRNA (miRNA or miR) are dynamically regulated following exercise and have, therefore, been suggested as regulators of cardiovascular adaptation to exercise. However, these effects were not studied in CKD before. The effect of acute exercise (i.e., an acute exercise bout) was assessed in 32 patients with CKD and 12 age- and sex-matched HS (study 1). miRNA expression in response to chronic exercise (i.e., a 3-mo exercise training program) was evaluated in 40 CKD patients (study 2). In a subgroup of study 2, the acute-exercise induced effect was evaluated at baseline and at follow-up. Plasma levels of a preselected panel miRNA, involved in exercise adaptation processes such as angiogenesis (miR-126, miR-210), inflammation (miR-21, miR-146a), hypoxia/ischemia (miR-21, miR-210), and progenitor cells (miR-150), were quantified by RT-PCR. Additionally, seven miRNA involved in similar biological processes were quantified in the subgroup of study 2. Baseline, studied miRNA were comparable in CKD and HS. Following acute exercise, miR-150 levels increased in both CKD (fold change 2.12 ± 0.39, P = 0.002; and HS: fold change 2.41 ± 0.48 P = 0.018, P for interaction > 0.05). miR-146a acutely decreased in CKD (fold change 0.92 ± 0.13, P = 0.024), whereas it remained unchanged in HS. Levels of miR-21, miR-126, and miR-210 remained unaltered. Chronic exercise did not elicit a significant change in the studied miRNA levels. However, an acute exercise-induced decrease in miR-210 was observed in CKD patients, only after training (fold change 0.76 ± 0.15). The differential expression in circulating miRNA in response to acute and chronic exercise may point toward a physiological role in cardiovascular adaptation to exercise, also in CKD.

  4. Plasma levels of microRNA in chronic kidney disease: patterns in acute and chronic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ledeganck, Kristien J.; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Jürgens, Angelika; Hoymans, Vicky Y.; Fransen, Erik; Adams, Volker; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Verpooten, Gert A.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Couttenye, Marie M.; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training is an effective way to improve exercise capacity in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the underlying mechanisms are only partly understood. In healthy subjects (HS), microRNA (miRNA or miR) are dynamically regulated following exercise and have, therefore, been suggested as regulators of cardiovascular adaptation to exercise. However, these effects were not studied in CKD before. The effect of acute exercise (i.e., an acute exercise bout) was assessed in 32 patients with CKD and 12 age- and sex-matched HS (study 1). miRNA expression in response to chronic exercise (i.e., a 3-mo exercise training program) was evaluated in 40 CKD patients (study 2). In a subgroup of study 2, the acute-exercise induced effect was evaluated at baseline and at follow-up. Plasma levels of a preselected panel miRNA, involved in exercise adaptation processes such as angiogenesis (miR-126, miR-210), inflammation (miR-21, miR-146a), hypoxia/ischemia (miR-21, miR-210), and progenitor cells (miR-150), were quantified by RT-PCR. Additionally, seven miRNA involved in similar biological processes were quantified in the subgroup of study 2. Baseline, studied miRNA were comparable in CKD and HS. Following acute exercise, miR-150 levels increased in both CKD (fold change 2.12 ± 0.39, P = 0.002; and HS: fold change 2.41 ± 0.48 P = 0.018, P for interaction > 0.05). miR-146a acutely decreased in CKD (fold change 0.92 ± 0.13, P = 0.024), whereas it remained unchanged in HS. Levels of miR-21, miR-126, and miR-210 remained unaltered. Chronic exercise did not elicit a significant change in the studied miRNA levels. However, an acute exercise-induced decrease in miR-210 was observed in CKD patients, only after training (fold change 0.76 ± 0.15). The differential expression in circulating miRNA in response to acute and chronic exercise may point toward a physiological role in cardiovascular adaptation to exercise, also in CKD. PMID:26475583

  5. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Methods Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Results Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29–155; p < 0.001) and performance status (≥2; odds ratio = 4.22; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–20.8; p = 0.049) were significant predictive factors. Further analysis of the 84 patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease revealed that involvement of more than 10% of the lung field was the only independent predictive factor associated with the risk of acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0–37.4); p = 0.038). Conclusions Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied

  6. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Samuel P

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto(®) (rivaroxaban).

  7. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban). PMID:26236607

  8. Fatal-mixed cutaneous zygomycosis-aspergillosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cateau, Estelle; Randriamalala, Edouard; Elsendoorn, Antoine; Giot, Jean-Philippe; du Sorbier, Christophe Monegier; Rodier, Marie-Helene

    2013-12-01

    Mucorales and Aspergillus are molds responsible for infections in immunocompromised patients. In this report, we describe a case of a rare extensively mixed cutaneous infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus in a neutropenic patient suffering from an acute leukemia. The fatal outcome of this patient can be attributed to its hematologic malignancy, the extensive nature of the lesions and the resistance of the strains to antifungals.

  9. Diving fatality investigations: recent changes.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl; Caruso, James

    2014-06-01

    Modifications to the investigation procedures in diving fatalities have been incorporated into the data acquisition by diving accident investigators. The most germane proposal for investigators assessing diving fatalities is to delay the drawing of conclusions until all relevant diving information is known. This includes: the accumulation and integration of the pathological data; the access to dive computer information; re-enactments of diving incidents; post-mortem CT scans and the interpretation of intravascular and tissue gas detected. These are all discussed, with reference to the established literature and recent publications.

  10. Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease: an integrated clinical syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kimmel, Paul L

    2012-09-01

    The previous conventional wisdom that survivors of acute kidney injury (AKI) tend to do well and fully recover renal function appears to be flawed. AKI can cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) directly, and increase the risk of developing incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and worsening of underlying CKD. In addition, severity, duration, and frequency of AKI appear to be important predictors of poor patient outcomes. CKD is an important risk factor for the development and ascertainment of AKI. Experimental data support the clinical observations and the bidirectional nature of the relationships between AKI and CKD. Reductions in renal mass and nephron number, vascular insufficiency, cell cycle disruption, and maladaptive repair mechanisms appear to be important modulators of progression in patients with and without coexistent CKD. Distinction between AKI and CKD may be artificial. Consideration should be given to the integrated clinical syndrome of diminished GFR, with acute and chronic stages, where spectrum of disease state and outcome is determined by host factors, including the balance of adaptive and maladaptive repair mechanisms over time. Physicians must provide long-term follow-up to patients with first episodes of AKI, even if they presented with normal renal function.

  11. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in plasma of AIDS patients during acute visceral disease by DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, S A; Merrill, R; Wolf, D; Dankner, W M

    1992-01-01

    By using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification procedure, 19 (83%) of 23 plasma specimens obtained from individuals with AIDS and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) visceral disease were found to be positive for plasma viremia as detected by PCR (PV-PCR), whereas 78% of cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes from the same samples were found to be positive. All 11 specimens prospectively obtained from individuals with acute HCMV disease were positive by PV-PCR. Plasma specimens from patients who received ganciclovir therapy rapidly became both culture and PV-PCR negative, and there was an excellent correlation between the two procedures. DNA detected by PV-PCR was unaffected by filtering plasma through a 0.2-microns-pore-size filter, although a conserved cellular gene, HLA-DQ alpha, was undetectable by PCR following filtration. HCMV DNA in plasma could be quantitated by PV-PCR by using endpoint serial dilutions, with detectable virus being present in 10(1) to 10(-2) microliters of plasma. A low titer of infectious virus could be detected in 2 of 11 plasma samples. The detection of HCMV DNA in plasma by PV-PCR promises to be a useful procedure for monitoring patients with AIDS suspected of having impending, acute, or recurrent HCMV visceral disease and suggests an additional route by which virus may disseminate in the immunocompromised host. Images PMID:1328287

  12. Association between the concentration of fine particles in the atmosphere and acute respiratory diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Antônio Paula; Santos, Jane Meri; Mill, José Geraldo; de Souza, Juliana Bottoni; Reis, Neyval Costa; Reisen, Valdério Anselmo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between fine particulate matter concentration in the atmosphere and hospital care by acute respiratory diseases in children. METHODS Ecological study, carried out in the region of Grande Vitória, Espírito Santo, in the winter (June 21 to September 21, 2013) and summer (December 21, 2013 to March 19, 2014). We assessed data of daily count for outpatient care and hospitalization by respiratory diseases (ICD-10) in children from zero to 12 years in three hospitals in the Region of Grande Vitória. For collecting fine particulate matter, we used portable samplers of particles installed in six locations in the studied region. The Generalized Additive Model with Poisson distribution, fitted for the effects of predictor covariates, was used to evaluate the relationship between respiratory outcomes and concentration of fine particulate matter. RESULTS The increase of 4.2 µg/m3 (interquartile range) in the concentration of fine particulate matter increased in 3.8% and 5.6% the risk of medical care or hospitalization, respectively, on the same day and with six-day lag from the exposure. CONCLUSIONS We identified positive association between outpatient care and hospitalizations of children under 12 years due to acute respiratory diseases and the concentration of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. PMID:28099552

  13. Acute and Chronic Airway Disease After Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Cotton Rats (Sigmodon hispidus).

    PubMed

    Grieves, Jessica L; Yin, Zhiwei; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E

    2015-08-01

    Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) generally presents as a mild, upper airway disease in human patients but may cause severe lower airway disease in the very young and very old. Progress toward understanding the mechanisms of RSV pathogenesis has been hampered by a lack of relevant rodent models. Mice, the species most commonly used in RSV research, are resistant to upper respiratory infection and do not recapitulate the pattern of virus spread in the human host. To address the need for better rodent models of RSV infection, we have characterized the acute and chronic pathology of RSV infection of a relatively permissive host, cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus). We demonstrate that virus delivered to the upper airway results in widespread RSV replication in the ciliated respiratory epithelial cells of the nasal cavity and, to a lesser extent, of the lung. Although acute inflammation is relatively mild and rapidly eliminated after viral clearance, chronic, eosinophilic lung pathology persists. These data support the use of cotton rats as a robust rodent model of human RSV disease, including the association between RSV pneumonia and subsequent development of allergic asthma.

  14. Acute and Chronic Airway Disease After Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Cotton Rats (Sigmodon hispidus)

    PubMed Central

    Grieves, Jessica L; Yin, Zhiwei; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) generally presents as a mild, upper airway disease in human patients but may cause severe lower airway disease in the very young and very old. Progress toward understanding the mechanisms of RSV pathogenesis has been hampered by a lack of relevant rodent models. Mice, the species most commonly used in RSV research, are resistant to upper respiratory infection and do not recapitulate the pattern of virus spread in the human host. To address the need for better rodent models of RSV infection, we have characterized the acute and chronic pathology of RSV infection of a relatively permissive host, cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus). We demonstrate that virus delivered to the upper airway results in widespread RSV replication in the ciliated respiratory epithelial cells of the nasal cavity and, to a lesser extent, of the lung. Although acute inflammation is relatively mild and rapidly eliminated after viral clearance, chronic, eosinophilic lung pathology persists. These data support the use of cotton rats as a robust rodent model of human RSV disease, including the association between RSV pneumonia and subsequent development of allergic asthma. PMID:26310461

  15. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Spectrum of glomerular diseases causing acute kidney injury; 25 years experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Rubina; Mubarak, Muhammed; Ahmed, Ejaz; Akhtar, Fazal; Bhatti, Sajid; Naqvi, Anwar; Rizvi, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in nephro-urological practice. Its incidence, prevalence and etiology vary widely, mainly due to variations in the definitions of AKI. Objectives: We aim to report the spectrum of glomerular diseases presenting as AKI at a kidney referral center in Pakistan. Patients and Methods: An observational cohort of patients identified as having AKI which was defined according to RIFLE criteria, with normal size, non-obstructed kidneys on ultrasonography, along with active urine sediment, edema and new onset hypertension. Results: From 1990 to 2014, 236 cases of AKI secondary to acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) registered at this institution. Mean age of patients was 27.94± 12.79 years and M:F ratio was 0.77:1. Thirty percent patients revealed crescents on renal biopsy. AGN without crescents was seen in 33.05% of cases. Postinfectious GN was found in 14.4%, lupus nephritis in 8.5% and mesangiocapillary GN in 3.4% cases. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) required in 75.84% patients. Pulse steroids were given in 45.33% cases followed by oral steroids. Pulse cyclophoshphamide was given in 23.7% cases and plasmapheresis was used in 3.38% cases. Complete recovery was seen in 44%, while 11.44% died during acute phase of illness. About 19.49 % developed chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 25.84% were lost to long- term follow-up. Conclusion: Although glomerular diseases contribute only 4.19 % of total AKI at this center, morbidity associated with illness and its treatment is more marked than other AKI groups. Another notable factor is late referral of these patients to specialized centers resulting in undesirable outcome. PMID:26693497

  17. The cell biology of disease: Acute promyelocytic leukemia, arsenic, and PML bodies.

    PubMed

    de Thé, Hugues; Le Bras, Morgane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2012-07-09

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by a chromosomal translocation whose product, the PML/retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARA) fusion protein, affects both nuclear receptor signaling and PML body assembly. Dissection of APL pathogenesis has led to the rediscovery of PML bodies and revealed their role in cell senescence, disease pathogenesis, and responsiveness to treatment. APL is remarkable because of the fortuitous identification of two clinically effective therapies, RA and arsenic, both of which degrade PML/RARA oncoprotein and, together, cure APL. Analysis of arsenic-induced PML or PML/RARA degradation has implicated oxidative stress in the biogenesis of nuclear bodies and SUMO in their degradation.

  18. Predicting acute affective symptoms after deep brain stimulation surgery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Frank; Reske, Martina; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Wojtecki, Lars; Timmermann, Lars; Brosig, Timo; Backes, Volker; Amir-Manavi, Atoosa; Sturm, Volker; Habel, Ute; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate predictive markers for acute symptoms of depression and mania following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fourteen patients with PD (7 males) were included in a prospective longitudinal study. Neuropsychological tests, psychopathology scales and tests of motor functions were administered at several time points prior to and after neurosurgery. Pre-existing psychopathological and motor symptoms predicted postoperative affective side effects of DBS surgery. As these can easily be assessed, they should be considered along with other selection criteria for DBS surgery.

  19. [Discussions on acute pharyngo - laryngeal diseases treated with acupuncture by physicians of successive ages].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Li, Z

    1999-07-01

    Originated from Neijing, the acupuncture treatment for acute pharyngo-laryngeal diseases was applied by Zhang Zhongjing under the guidance of Neijing and many acupuncture treatments for the disorders were mentioned by Huangfu Mi in his first monograph on acupuncture- moxibustion. Sun Simiao of the Tang dynasty further developed this technique and different therapeutic styles were developed by the Four Schools of Jinyuan dynasties. It was further supplemented by Yang Jizhou and Xue Ji of the Ming dynasty, and the scope of acupuncture treatment was further expanded by Zheng Meijian with disciplinary features and therapeutic mechanism. All the above descriptions from successive ages further pushed forward the development in this field.

  20. IgG4-related disease manifesting as an acute gastric-pericardial fistula.

    PubMed

    Frydman, James; Grunner, Shahar; Kluger, Yoram

    2014-11-28

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized entity linked initially to autoimmune pancreatitis and has been subsequently described in nearly every organ system. Men over the age of 50 represent the most affected demographic group and a comprehensive set of diagnostic criteria has been developed to aid treating clinicians. Though elevated levels of IgG4 in the serum are suggestive of the disease, definitive diagnosis is made on histopathology. Treatment is tailored to the clinical presentation with corticosteroid therapy known to have proven efficacy. Gastric manifestations of the IgG4-related disease primarily come in two varieties, notably chronic ulceration or pseudotumor formation. Autoimmune pancreatitis conveys increased risk for IgG4-related disease of the stomach, which is independent of Helicobacter pylori status. In this case report, we present an acute gastric-pericardial fistula secondary to IgG4-related disease that required urgent operative management. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature describing this complication of IgG4-related disease.

  1. The effect of lunar phases on the occurrence of acute cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertoprud, V. E.; Gurfinkel', Yu. I.; Goncharova, E. E.; Ivanov-Kholodnyi, G. S.; Kanonidi, H. D.; Mitrofanova, T. A.; Trubina, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper analyzes the possible impact of lunar phases on the dynamics of acute cardiovascular diseases: acute myocardial infarctions (MIs) and acute brain strokes (BSs) at different levels of heliogeomagnetic activity. The superposed epoch analysis (SEA) has been applied with dates of the new moon and full moon used as reference days. A statistical analysis of a 14-year-long (1992 to 2005) series of everyday medical data from the Central Clinical Hospital no. 1 of Russian Railways (Moscow) and the parameters of heliogeomagnetic activity was carried out. It was found that daily occurrences of MIs and BSs vary with the phase of the moon. These variations are significant; they continue at different levels of heliogeomagnetic activity and are not related to the variations in geomagnetic activity identified by the same method. The effect of lunar phases on MIs and BSs is quite different. New moons and full moons have qualitatively the same effect on MIs; however, there are significant differences in the incidence of BSs during new moons and full moons.

  2. Development of a positive psychology intervention for patients with acute cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Jeff C; Mastromauro, Carol A; Boehm, Julia K; Seabrook, Rita; Fricchione, Gregory L; Denninger, John W; Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2011-09-29

    The management of depression and other negative psychological states in cardiac patients has been a focus of multiple treatment trials, though such trials have not led to substantial improvements in cardiac outcomes. In contrast, there has been minimal focus on interventions to increase positive psychological states in cardiac patients, despite the fact that optimism and other positive states have been associated with superior cardiovascular outcomes. Our objective was to develop an 8-week, phone-based positive psychology intervention for patients hospitalized with acute cardiac disease (acute coronary syndrome or decompensated heart failure). Such an intervention would consist of positive psychology exercises adapted for this specific population, and it would need to be feasible for practitioners and patients in real-world settings. By adapting exercises that were previously validated in healthy individuals, we were able to generate a positive psychology telemedicine intervention for cardiac patients that focused on optimism, kindness, and gratitude. In addition, we successfully created a companion treatment manual for subjects to enhance the educational aspects of the intervention and facilitate completion of exercises. Finally, we successfully performed a small pilot trial of this intervention, and found that the positive psychology intervention appeared to be feasible and well-accepted in a cohort of patients with acute cardiac illness. Future studies should further develop this promising intervention and examine its impact on psychological and medical outcomes in this vulnerable population of cardiac patients.

  3. The Role of Purine Metabolites as DAMPs in Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Apostolova, Petya; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) causes high mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. An early event in the classical pathogenesis of acute GvHD is tissue damage caused by the conditioning treatment or infection that consecutively leads to translocation of bacterial products [pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)] into blood or lymphoid tissue, as well as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), mostly intracellular components that act as pro-inflammatory agents, once they are released into the extracellular space. A subtype of DAMPs is nucleotides, such as adenosine triphosphate released from dying cells that can activate the innate and adaptive immune system by binding to purinergic receptors. Binding to certain purinergic receptors leads to a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and promotes allogeneic T cell priming. After priming, T cells migrate to the acute GvHD target organs, mainly skin, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract and induce cell damage that further amplifies the release of intracellular components. This review summarizes the role of different purinergic receptors in particular P2X7 and P2Y2 as well as nucleotides in the pathogenesis of GvHD. PMID:27818661

  4. Proteomic Biomarkers for Acute Interstitial Lung Disease in Gefitinib-Treated Japanese Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takao; Nagasaka, Keiko; Takami, Sachiko; Wada, Kazuya; Tu, Hsiao-Kun; Otsuji, Makiko; Kyono, Yutaka; Dobashi, Tae; Komatsu, Yasuhiko; Kihara, Makoto; Akimoto, Shingo; Peers, Ian S.; South, Marie C.; Higenbottam, Tim; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakata, Koichiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kudoh, Shoji; Clausen, Ib Groth; Nishimura, Toshihide; Marko-Varga, György; Kato, Harubumi

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) events have been reported in Japanese non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We investigated proteomic biomarkers for mechanistic insights and improved prediction of ILD. Blood plasma was collected from 43 gefitinib-treated NSCLC patients developing acute ILD (confirmed by blinded diagnostic review) and 123 randomly selected controls in a nested case-control study within a pharmacoepidemiological cohort study in Japan. We generated ∼7 million tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements with extensive quality control and validation, producing one of the largest proteomic lung cancer datasets to date, incorporating rigorous study design, phenotype definition, and evaluation of sample processing. After alignment, scaling, and measurement batch adjustment, we identified 41 peptide peaks representing 29 proteins best predicting ILD. Multivariate peptide, protein, and pathway modeling achieved ILD prediction comparable to previously identified clinical variables; combining the two provided some improvement. The acute phase response pathway was strongly represented (17 of 29 proteins, p = 1.0×10−25), suggesting a key role with potential utility as a marker for increased risk of acute ILD events. Validation by Western blotting showed correlation for identified proteins, confirming that robust results can be generated from an MS/MS platform implementing strict quality control. PMID:21799770

  5. Monitoring the acute phase response to vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J; Stone, P C; Akinola, N O; Gallimore, J R; Pepys, M B

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To identify suitable acute phase proteins as objective markers of tissue ischaemia during painful vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. METHODS--The prodromal and established phases of 14 vaso-occlusive crises were studied longitudinally in 10 patients with sickle cell anaemia. Automated solid phase enzyme immunoassays were used to measure the fast responding acute phase proteins C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein. Slower responding glycoproteins (fibrinogen, orosomucoid, sialic acid and concanavalin-A binding) were measured in parallel. RESULTS--C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein increased early in crisis, sometimes within the early (prodromal) phase. Crises that resolved within 24 hours in hospital showed a minor and transient rise compared with crises that required treatment for four days or more. In eight crises treated by patients at home the acute phase response ranged from minor to a level consistent with extensive tissue ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS--Sensitive enzyme immunoassays for C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein are of potential value for monitoring the onset of tissue ischaemia in sickle cell crisis and for confirming subsequent resolution. PMID:7510726

  6. Methanobactin reverses acute liver failure in a rat model of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Lichtmannegger, Josef; Leitzinger, Christin; Wimmer, Ralf; Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Eberhagen, Carola; Rieder, Tamara; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Straub, Beate K.; Schirmacher, Peter; DiSpirito, Alan A.; Bandow, Nathan; Baral, Bipin S.; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Denk, Gerald; Reiter, Florian P.; Hohenester, Simon; Eckardt-Schupp, Friedericke; Dencher, Norbert A.; Sauer, Vanessa; Niemietz, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H.J.; Merle, Uta; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Kroemer, Guido; Weiss, Karl Heinz

    2016-01-01

    In Wilson disease (WD), functional loss of ATPase copper-transporting β (ATP7B) impairs biliary copper excretion, leading to excessive copper accumulation in the liver and fulminant hepatitis. Current US Food and Drug Administration– and European Medicines Agency–approved pharmacological treatments usually fail to restore copper homeostasis in patients with WD who have progressed to acute liver failure, leaving liver transplantation as the only viable treatment option. Here, we investigated the therapeutic utility of methanobactin (MB), a peptide produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, which has an exceptionally high affinity for copper. We demonstrated that ATP7B-deficient rats recapitulate WD-associated phenotypes, including hepatic copper accumulation, liver damage, and mitochondrial impairment. Short-term treatment of these rats with MB efficiently reversed mitochondrial impairment and liver damage in the acute stages of liver copper accumulation compared with that seen in untreated ATP7B-deficient rats. This beneficial effect was associated with depletion of copper from hepatocyte mitochondria. Moreover, MB treatment prevented hepatocyte death, subsequent liver failure, and death in the rodent model. These results suggest that MB has potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute WD. PMID:27322060

  7. Early Diagnosis and Management of Acute Vertigo from Vestibular Migraine and Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry; Kaski, Diego; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular migraine is the most common cause of acute episodic vestibular symptoms after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In contrast, Ménière's disease is an uncommon disorder. For both conditions, early and accurate diagnosis (or its exclusion) enables the correct management of patients with acute episodic vestibular symptoms. Long-term management of migraine requires changes in lifestyle to avoid triggers of migraine and/or prophylactic drugs if attacks become too frequent. The long-term management of Ménière's disease also involves lifestyle changes (low salt diet), medications (betahistine, steroids), and ablative therapy applied to the diseased ear (eg, intratympanic gentamicin).

  8. Suppression of Swine NK Cell Function During Acute Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects cloven-hoofed animals and causes an economically devastating disease. This highly acute infection has multiple negative effects on the innate response, presumably contributing to the rapid spread of virus within the host. Understanding the regulation of in...

  9. Host-specific exposure and fatal neurologic disease in wild raptors from highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 during the 2006 outbreak in Germany.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, Judith Ma; Krone, Oliver; Wolf, Peter U; van de Bildt, Marco W G; van Amerongen, Geert; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2015-03-05

    Raptors may contract highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 by hunting or scavenging infected prey. However, natural H5N1 infection in raptors is rarely reported. Therefore, we tested raptors found dead during an H5N1 outbreak in wild waterbirds in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, in 2006 for H5N1-associated disease. We tested 624 raptors of nine species-common buzzard (385), Eurasian sparrowhawk (111), common kestrel (38), undetermined species of buzzard (36), white-tailed sea eagle (19), undetermined species of raptor (12), northern goshawk (10), peregrine falcon (6), red kite (3), rough-legged buzzard (3), and western marsh-harrier (1)-for H5N1 infection in tracheal or combined tracheal/cloacal swabs of all birds, and on major tissues of all white-tailed sea eagles. H5N1 infection was detected in two species: common buzzard (12 positive, 3.1%) and peregrine falcon (2 positive, 33.3%). In all necropsied birds (both peregrine falcons and the six freshest common buzzards), H5N1 was found most consistently and at the highest concentration in the brain, and the main H5N1-associated lesion was marked non-suppurative encephalitis. Other H5N1-associated lesions occurred in air sac, lung, oviduct, heart, pancreas, coelomic ganglion, and adrenal gland. Our results show that the main cause of death in H5N1-positive raptors was encephalitis. Our results imply that H5N1 outbreaks in wild waterbirds are more likely to lead to exposure to and mortality from H5N1 in raptors that hunt or scavenge medium-sized birds, such as common buzzards and peregrine falcons, than in raptors that hunt small birds and do not scavenge, such as Eurasian sparrowhawks and common kestrels.

  10. The role of danger signals and ectonucleotidases in acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Petya; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents the only curative treatment approach for many patients with benign or malignant diseases of the hematopoietic system. However, post-transplant morbidity and mortality are significantly increased by the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). While alloreactive T cells act as the main cellular mediator of the GvH reaction, recent evidence suggests a critical role of the innate immune system in the early stages of GvHD initiation. Danger-associated molecular patterns released from the intracellular space as well as from the extracellular matrix activate antigen-presenting cells and set pro-inflammatory pathways in motion. This review gives an overview about danger signals representing therapeutic targets with a clinical perspective with a particular focus on extracellular nucleotides and ectonucleotidases.

  11. First presentation of Addison's disease as hyperkalaemia in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Maki, Sara; Kramarz, Caroline; Maria Heister, Paula; Pasha, Kamran

    2016-05-11

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder that frequently presents with non-specific symptoms, but may deteriorate rapidly into life-threatening Addisonian crisis if left untreated. Diagnosis can be difficult in patients without a suggestive medical history. We describe a case of a 37-year-old man who was admitted with acute kidney injury and hyperkalaemia, resistant to treatment with insulin/dextrose and calcium gluconate. On clinical examination, he was found to be hyperpigmented; a subsequent random serum cortisol of 49 nmol/L affirmed the preliminary diagnosis of Addison's disease. The patient's hyperkalaemia improved on treatment with hydrocortisone, and a follow-up morning adrenocorticotropic hormone of 1051 ng/L confirmed the diagnosis.

  12. Pharmacological management of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in neonates.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Jennifer G; Sorenson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are seen more frequently in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as advances in supportive care improve the survival of critically ill infants as well as those with severe, congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies. Many aspects of the infant's care, including fluid balance, electrolyte and mineral homeostasis, acid-base balance, and growth and nutrition require close monitoring by and collaboration among neonatologists, nephrologists, dieticians, and pharmacologists. This educational review summarizes the therapies widely used for neonates with AKI and CKD. Use of these therapies is extrapolated from data in older children and adults or based on clinical experience and case series. There is a critical need for more research on the use of therapies in infants with kidney disease as well as for the development of drug delivery systems and preparations scaled more appropriately for these small patients.

  13. Incubation Period Duration and Severity of Clinical Disease Following Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Virlogeux, Victor; Fang, Vicky J.; Wu, Joseph T.; Ho, Lai-Ming; Malik Peiris, J. S.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few previous studies have investigated the association between the severity of an infectious disease and the length of incubation period. Methods We estimated the association between the length of the incubation period and the severity of infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, using data from the epidemic in 2003 in Hong Kong. Results We estimated the incubation period of SARS based on a subset of patients with available data on exposure periods and a separate subset of patients in a putative common source outbreak, and we found significant associations between shorter incubation period and greater severity in both groups after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusions Our findings suggest that patients with a shorter incubation period proceeded to have more severe disease. Further studies are needed to investigate potential biological mechanisms for this association. PMID:26133021

  14. Acute pulmonary involvement by paracoccidiodomycosis disease immediately after kidney transplantation: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Radisic, Marcelo V; Linares, Laura; Afeltra, Javier; Pujato, Natalia; Vitale, Roxana G; Bravo, Martin; Dotta, Ana C; Casadei, Domingo H

    2017-04-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, one of the most important systemic mycoses in Latin America. Human disease has been observed in a limited geographic and ecological niche, and it is attributed to exposure to the fungus in soil. Most primary infections are subclinical, as the infection is contained by the host mainly through cell-mediated immune response. However, as the fungus has the ability to survive in a dormant state for long periods, an impairment of the immune response may lead to reactivation and clinical disease. Surprisingly, paracoccidioidomycosis has rarely been reported in transplanted patients. The aim of this communication is to report a case occurring in a kidney recipient in an acute clinical form immediately after transplantation, and to review the available information on previously reported cases.

  15. Mitochondrion-Permeable Antioxidants to Treat ROS-Burst-Mediated Acute Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Liu, Ting; Yuan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and cytokine outbreak, such as during virus infections, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, antioxidant is an important medicine to ROS-related diseases. For example, ascorbic acid (vitamin C, VC) was suggested as the candidate antioxidant to treat multiple diseases. However, long-term use of high-dose VC causes many side effects. In this review, we compare and analyze all kinds of mitochondrion-permeable antioxidants, including edaravone, idebenone, α-Lipoic acid, carotenoids, vitamin E, and coenzyme Q10, and mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ and SkQ and propose astaxanthin (a special carotenoid) to be the best antioxidant for ROS-burst-mediated acute diseases, like avian influenza infection and ischemia-reperfusion. Nevertheless, astaxanthins are so unstable that most of them are inactivated after oral administration. Therefore, astaxanthin injection is suggested hypothetically. The drawbacks of the antioxidants are also reviewed, which limit the use of antioxidants as coadjuvants in the treatment of ROS-associated disorders.

  16. A patient fatality following the ingestion of a small amount of chlorfenapyr

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Changwoo; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Dong Seob

    2014-01-01

    Chlorfenapyr has been used worldwide for agricultural pest control since 1995. Despite its widespread use, acute human poisoning data are insufficient; only a small number of fatalities from chlorfenapyr poisoning have been reported. The signs and symptoms of chlorfenapyr toxicity include nausea, vomiting, fever, rhabdomyolysis, among others. In addition, central nervous system effects in association with delayed toxicity have also been observed. Here, we detail a fatality resulting from delayed chlorfenapyr toxicity following the ingestion of a small amount of pesticide. PMID:25114438

  17. A patient fatality following the ingestion of a small amount of chlorfenapyr.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changwoo; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Dong Seob

    2014-07-01

    Chlorfenapyr has been used worldwide for agricultural pest control since 1995. Despite its widespread use, acute human poisoning data are insufficient; only a small number of fatalities from chlorfenapyr poisoning have been reported. The signs and symptoms of chlorfenapyr toxicity include nausea, vomiting, fever, rhabdomyolysis, among others. In addition, central nervous system effects in association with delayed toxicity have also been observed. Here, we detail a fatality resulting from delayed chlorfenapyr toxicity following the ingestion of a small amount of pesticide.

  18. A Puzzle of Vestibular Physiology in a Meniere's Disease Acute Attack

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present for the first time the functional evaluation of each of the vestibular receptors in the six semicircular canals in a patient diagnosed with Meniere's disease during an acute attack. A 54-year-old lady was diagnosed with left Meniere's disease who during her regular clinic review suffers an acute attack of vertigo, with fullness and an increase of tinnitus in her left ear. Spontaneous nystagmus and the results in the video head-impulse test (vHIT) are shown before, during, and after the attack. Nystagmus was initially left beating and a few minutes later an upbeat component was added. No skew deviation was observed. A decrease in the gain of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) and the presence of overt saccades were observed when the stimuli were in the plane of the left superior semicircular canal. At the end of the crisis nystagmus decreased and vestibuloocular reflex returned to almost normal. A review of the different possibilities to explain these findings points to a hypothetical utricular damage. PMID:26167320

  19. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials to Ascertain Fatal Gastrointestinal Bleeding Events Attributable to Preventive Low-Dose Aspirin: No Evidence of Increased Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dolwani, Sunil; Graziano, J. Michael; Lanas, Angel; Longley, Marcus; Phillips, Ceri J.; Roberts, Stephen E.; Soon, Swee S.; Steward, Will

    2016-01-01

    Background Aspirin has been shown to lower the incidence and the mortality of vascular disease and cancer but its wider adoption appears to be seriously impeded by concerns about gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Unlike heart attacks, stroke and cancer, GI bleeding is an acute event, usually followed by complete recovery. We propose therefore that a more appropriate evaluation of the risk-benefit balance would be based on fatal adverse events, rather than on the incidence of bleeding. We therefore present a literature search and meta-analysis to ascertain fatal events attributable to low-dose aspirin. Methods In a systematic literature review we identified reports of randomised controlled trials of aspirin in which both total GI bleeding events and bleeds that led to death had been reported. Principal investigators of studies in which fatal events had not been adequately described were contacted via email and asked for further details. A meta-analyses was then performed to estimate the risk of fatal gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to low-dose aspirin. Results Eleven randomised trials were identified in the literature search. In these the relative risk (RR) of ‘major’ incident GI bleeding in subjects who had been randomised to low-dose aspirin was 1.55 (95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and the risk of a bleed attributable to aspirin being fatal was 0.45 (95% CI 0.25, 0.80). In all the subjects randomised to aspirin, compared with those randomised not to receive aspirin, there was no significant increase in the risk of a fatal bleed (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.41, 1.43). Conclusions The majority of the adverse events caused by aspirin are GI bleeds, and there appears to be no valid evidence that the overall frequency of fatal GI bleeds is increased by aspirin. The substantive risk for prophylactic aspirin is therefore cerebral haemorrhage which can be fatal or severely disabling, with an estimated risk of one death and one disabling stroke for every 1,000 people taking aspirin

  20. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction in a pediatric patient with giant coronary aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Mongiovì, Maurizio; Alaimo, Annalisa; Vernuccio, Federica; Pieri, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of acute myocardial infarction in an 8-year-old boy with a history of Kawasaki disease and giant coronary aneurysms in the right and left coronary arteries. We performed coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention 4 hours after the onset of symptoms. This case suggests that primary percutaneous coronary intervention might be safe and effective in the long-term treatment of acute myocardial infarction due to coronary sequelae of Kawasaki.

  1. Identification of new molecular alterations in Fatal Familial Insomnia.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is an autosomal dominant prion disease caused by a D178N mutation in PRNP in combination with methionine (Met) at codon 129 in the mutated allele of the same gene (D178N-129M haplotype). The present study analyzes pathological and molecular features in seven FFI cases c...

  2. Identification of new molecular alterations in Fatal Familial Insomnia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI) is a rare disease caused by a D178N mutation in combination with methionine (Met) at codon 129 in the mutated allele of PRNP (D178N-129M haplotype). FFI is manifested by sleep disturbances with insomnia, autonomic disorders, hallucinations, delirium, and spontaneous and...

  3. Expert consensus on acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bai-qiang; Cai, Shao-xi; Chen, Rong-chang; Cui, Li-ying; Feng, Yu-lin; Gu, Yu-tong; Huang, Shao-guang; Liu, Rong-yu; Liu, Guang-nan; Shi, Huan-zhong; Shi, Yi; Song, Yuan-lin; Sun, Tie-ying; Wang, Chang-zheng; Wang, Jing-lan; Wen, Fu-qiang; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Yong-jian; Yan, Xi-xin; Yao, Wan-zhen; Yu, Qin; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Jin-ping; Liu, Jie; Bai, Chun-xue

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease that severely threatens human health. Acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) is a major cause of disease progression and death, and causes huge medical expenditures. This consensus statement represents a description of clinical features of AECOPD in the People’s Republic of China and a set of recommendations. It is intended to provide clinical guidelines for community physicians, pulmonologists and other health care providers for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AECOPD. PMID:24812503

  4. 76 FR 31613 - NIOSH Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program (FFFIPP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and... progress and future directions of the NIOSH Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program... and expectations of the U.S. fire service, and to identify ways in which the program can be...

  5. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Kristy; Mullen, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children's hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists.

  6. Fatal myocardial infarction after hydrochloric acid ingestion in a suicide attempt.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ibrahim; Zengin, Suat; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Davutoglu, Vedat; Yildirim, Cuma

    2008-06-01

    Ingestion of acid-containing household products either accidentally or for suicide attempt is a common form of intoxication. Hydrochloric acid is widely used as an antirust compound or cleaner in homes and is highly corrosive and generally causes coagulation necrosis which could lead to perforation in the gastrointestinal system. Although hydrochloric acid ingestion is mainly harmful to the gastrointestinal system, it may also cause metabolic acidosis, hemolysis, renal failure, and fatality as well. Cardiovascular manifestations of hydrochloric acid ingestion are extremely rare, and we report a 48-year-old man who died of acute inferolateral myocardial infarction after hydrochloric acid ingestion in a suicide attempt who had no history of coronary artery disease. In conclusion, although cardiovascular manifestations of hydrochloric acid ingestion are extremely rare, the ingestion may still cause myocardial infarction which could be fatal. Physicians dealing with hydrochloric acid ingestion in the ED should be aware of this possibility and always obtain serial electrocardiograms even if the patient has no cardiac complaint.

  7. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  8. Epidemiology of Child Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries and Fatalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Durbin, Dennis R.

    Although children represent only 10-15 % of the overall traffic fatality burden in the United States, motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) remain the leading cause of death and disability for children and young adults; and, close to half of all unintentional injury deaths to children and adolescents (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System [CDC NCIPC WISQARS] 2010). Moreover, their exposure to motor vehicle risk is significant because they travel by motor vehicles nearly as much as adults. Prevention of the fatalities, injuries and disability associated with MVC must be a priority for ensuring our children's overall health.

  9. Estimating the burden of acute gastroenteritis, foodborne disease, and pathogens commonly transmitted by food: an international review.

    PubMed

    Flint, James A; Van Duynhoven, Yvonne T; Angulo, Fredrick J; DeLong, Stephanie M; Braun, Peggy; Kirk, Martyn; Scallan, Elaine; Fitzgerald, Margaret; Adak, Goutam K; Sockett, Paul; Ellis, Andrea; Hall, Gillian; Gargouri, Neyla; Walke, Henry; Braam, Peter

    2005-09-01

    The burden of foodborne disease is not well defined in many countries or regions or on a global level. The World Health Organization (WHO), in conjunction with other national public health agencies, is coordinating a number of international activities designed to assist countries in the strengthening of disease surveillance and to determine the burden of acute gastroenteritis. These data can then be used to estimate the following situations: (1) the burden associated with acute gastroenteritis of foodborne origin, (2) the burden caused by specific pathogens commonly transmitted by food, and (3) the burden caused by specific foods or food groups. Many of the scientists collaborating with the WHO on these activities have been involved in quantifying the burden of acute gastroenteritis on a national basis. This article reviews these key national studies and the international efforts that are providing the necessary information and technical resources to derive national, regional, and global burden of disease estimates.

  10. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  11. Vasculitis and rheumatologic diseases may play role in the pathogenesis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM).

    PubMed

    Sabayan, B; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali

    2007-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is defined as a multifocal, monophasic, demyelinating, and inflammatory disease involving the central nervous system. It typically begins within 6 weeks of an antigenic challenge such as infection or immunization. Perivenous inflammation, edema and demyelination are the pathological hallmarks of ADEM. Reactivity of T-cells against myelin components such as myelin basic protein has been found in children with ADEM. The triggers for immune responses in ADEM are not known, but the two most widely accepted hypotheses are molecular mimicry and self-sensitization secondary to CNS infection. Inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 2 (IL2) and interferon gamma (INFgamma) are thought to be important in lesion formation in ADEM. Due to the active role of inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of ADEM, any disease contributing to systemic formation of inflammatory cytokines can potentially be an etiologic factor for the initiation of ADEM. In vasculitis and rheumatologic diseases the number of T-cells, T helper type 1 cytokines and other inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha increase substantially. We present this hypothesis that in such setting of inflammation, adhesion molecules are up-regulated on the brain capillary endothelium by cytokines and other inflammatory mediators, altering the permeability of the brain blood barrier and so allowing for inflammatory cell migration. The migratory cells attack the basic myelin protein and the final result is the demyelination seen in ADEM. So we propose that vasculitis and rheumatologic diseases may play role in the pathogenesis of ADEM.

  12. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-05-23

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms.

  13. A case-control study of acute diarrheal disease among school-age children in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hirata, M; Kuropakornpong, V; Arun, S; Sapchatura, M; Kumnurak, S; Sukpipatpanont, B; Chongsuvivatwong, V; Funahara, Y; Sato, S

    1997-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study of school-age children in Phatthalung, a province in southern Thailand using a questionnaire to investigate associations of children's hygiene-related behavior and hygienic conditions in their homes with acute diarrheal disease. We compared 69 acute diarrhea (less than 7 days duration) cases that attended two hospitals in Phatthalung during August 1995 to June 1996 with 69 age-, sex- and address-matched controls in primary schools who had not suffered from diarrheal disease for the past one year before August 1995. Three factors were found to be significantly associated with acute diarrheal disease: farmer or gum planter as the occupation of father [Odds ratio (OR) 6.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-26.1, p < 0.01], installation of a refrigerator in children's homes (OR 0.2; CI 0.1-0.8, p < 0.05), and drinking untreated water (OR 2.3; CI 0.9-6.1, p < 0.1). There was no significant difference for sources of drinking water between cases and controls. Considering the data on drinking water, the results indicated that there are some problems with quality of sources of drinking water. The results also suggested that having a refrigerator could have preventive effects on acute diarrheal disease, while inadequate behavior and unhygienic environment in the homes of farmers and gum planters might be related to acute diarrheal among school-age children.

  14. Fire fatalities in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Elder, A T; Squires, T; Busuttil, A

    1996-05-01

    Fatal dwelling-house fires account for 10% of all accidental deaths in the United Kingdom with one-quarter of the deaths being of elderly people. No study had described the characteristics of elderly individuals who die in fires. We report results from a retrospective review of all fatal dwelling-house fires in Scotland from 1980 to 1990. Of 1096 people dying in fires, 243 (23%) were aged over 75. When compared with patients under the age of 75, older patients were significantly less likely to be smokers. Significantly more fires killing elderly people were caused by faulty or misused electrical items in the house, particularly electric blankets. These differences between elderly and younger individuals dying in dwelling-house fires may suggest that preventive strategies for the elderly population require a different emphasis from those for younger people.

  15. Determining the Community Prevalence of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness and Gaps in Surveillance of Acute Gastroenteritis and Foodborne Diseases in Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Rambaran, Pheona; Wilson, Alexis; James, Colin; Indar, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Guyana is an English-speaking country in South America and, culturally, it is part of the Caribbean. Objective of this study was to determine the community prevalence and true burden and economic impact of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and foodborne diseases (FBDs) in Guyana. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted in 7 of the 10 regions in Guyana during August and November 2009 to capture the high- and low-AGE season respectively. Overall, 1,254 individual surveys were administered at a response rate of 96.5%. The overall monthly prevalence of self-reported cases of AGE was 7.7% (97 cases) (95% CI 6.3-9.3), and the yearly incidence was 1.0 episodes per person-year. The highest monthly prevalence of AGE was observed in region 4 (8.9%) and in children aged 1-4 year(s) (12.7%). Of the 97 AGE cases, 23% sought medical care; 65% reported spending time at home due to their illness [range 1-20 day(s), mean 2.7 days], of whom 51% required other individuals to look after them while ill. The maximum number of stools per 24 hours ranged from 3 to 9 (mean 4.5), and number of days an individual suffered from AGE ranged from 1 to 21 day(s) (mean 2.7 days). The burden of syndromic AGE cases in the population for 2009 was estimated to be 131,012 cases compared to the reported 30,468 cases (76.7% underreporting), which implies that, for every syndromic case of AGE reported, there were additional 4.3 cases occurring in the community. For every laboratory-confirmed case of FBD/AGE pathogen reported, it was estimated that approximately 2,881 more cases were occurring in the population. Giardia was the most common foodborne pathogen isolated. The minimum estimated annual cost associated with the treatment for AGE was US$ 2,358,233.2, showing that AGE and FBD pose a huge economic burden on Guyana. Underreporting of AGE and foodborne pathogens, stool collection, and laboratory capacity were major gaps, affecting the surveillance of AGE in Guyana.

  16. Role of Tyrosine Isomers in Acute and Chronic Diseases Leading to Oxidative Stress - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Gergő A.; Kun, Szilárd; Sélley, Eszter; Kertész, Melinda; Szélig, Lívia; Csontos, Csaba; Böddi, Katalin; Bogár, Lajos; Miseta, Attila; Wittmann, István

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a variety of acute and chronic diseases. Measurement of the oxidative stress-related end products may be performed, e.g. that of structural isomers of the physiological para-tyrosine, namely meta- and ortho-tyrosine, that are oxidized derivatives of phenylalanine. Recent data suggest that in sepsis, serum level of meta-tyrosine increases, which peaks on the 2nd and 3rd days (p<0.05 vs. controls), and the kinetics follows the intensity of the systemic inflammation correlating with serum procalcitonin levels. In a similar study subset, urinary meta-tyrosine excretion correlated with both need of daily insulin dose and the insulin-glucose product in non-diabetic septic cases (p<0.01 for both). Using linear regression model, meta-tyrosine excretion, urinary meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine, urinary ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine and urinary (meta- + ortho-tyrosine)/para-tyrosine proved to be markers of carbohydrate homeostasis. In a chronic rodent model, we tried to compensate the abnormal tyrosine isomers using para-tyrosine, the physiological amino acid. Rats were fed a standard high cholesterol-diet, and were given para-tyrosine or vehicle orally. High-cholesterol feeding lead to a significant increase in aortic wall meta-tyrosine content and a decreased vasorelaxation of the aorta to insulin and the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, that both could be prevented by administration of para-tyrosine. Concluding, these data suggest that meta- and ortho-tyrosine are potential markers of oxidative stress in acute diseases related to oxidative stress, and may also interfere with insulin action in septic humans. Competition of meta- and ortho-tyrosine by supplementation of para-tyrosine may exert a protective role in oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:26785996

  17. Molecular characterization of human calicivirus associated with acute diarrheal disease in mexican children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human caliciviruses (HuCV) are emerging enteric pathogens that are a common cause of diarrhea in humans worldwide. Due to the paucity of information on the molecular characterization of HuCV circulating in Mexico, the aim of this work was to investigate the diversity and molecular epidemiology of the HuCV infection associated with acute diarrheal disease in Mexican children aged up to 5 years. Results Of the 131/414 (32%) HuCV positive-specimens analyzed, 128 were identified as Norovirus (NoV) and three as Sapovirus (SaV). Of the NoV positive specimens, 118/128 (92%) were NoV GII and 10/128(8%) were untypeable by RT-PCR in both polymerase and capsid genes, whereas one SaV isolate was further confirmed by sequencing as GI.2. Phylogenetic analysis based on polymerase partial gene sequences from 89/131 (68%) HuCV isolates showed that 86/89 (97%) belong to NoV GII.4 with three main variant clusters of this genotype, 2/89 (2%) to NoV GII.2, and 1/89 (1%) to SaV GI.2. Furthermore, partial sequencing of the capsid gene VP1 of 63/131 (48%) strains indicated that 61/63 (97%) correlated with NoV GII.4, whereas only 2/63 (3%) clustered to NoV GII.2. HuCV infections were detected throughout the year, and the highest number of cases positive for NoV was found in children between 7 and 18 months of age (60%). Conclusions This study highlights the usefulness of analyzing both polymerase and capsid genes for molecular characterization of HuCV and demonstrates the relatedness and predominance of NoV GII.4 with acute diarrheal disease in young Mexican children, thus contributing to better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of this disease. PMID:22361160

  18. Impact of weaning from acute dialytic therapy on outcomes of chronic kidney disease following urgent-start dialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Ming; Li, Wen-Yi; Wu, Vin-Cent; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Lin, Shih-Hwa; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuation of acute, unplanned dialysis is always an important therapeutic goal in dialysis-requiring patients with existing chronic kidney disease. Only a limited proportion of patients could be weaned off dialysis and remained dialysis-free. Here we performed a multicenter, observational study to investigate factors associated with successful weaning from acute dialysis, and to explore the potential impact of weaning itself on outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease following urgent-start dialysis. We recruited 440 chronic kidney disease patients with a baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate <45 ml/min per 1/73 m2, and used propensity score-adjusted Cox regression analysis to measure the effect of weaning from acute dialysis on death during the index hospitalization and death or readmission after discharge. Over 2 years, 64 of 421 (15.2%) patients who survived >1 month died, and 36 (8.6%) were removed from dialysis, with 26 (6.2%) remaining alive and dialysis-free. Logistic regression analysis found that age ≧ 65 years, ischemic acute tubular necrosis, nephrotoxic exposure, urinary obstruction, and higher predialysis estimated glomerular filtration rate and serum hemoglobin were predictors of weaning off dialysis. After adjustment for propensity scores for dialysis weaning, Cox proportional hazards models showed successful weaning from dialysis (adjusted hazard ratio 0.06; 95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.35), along with a history of hypertension and serum albumin, were independent protectors for early death. Conversely, a history of stroke, peripheral arterial disease and cancer predicted the occurrence of early mortality. In conclusion, this prospective cohort study shows that compared to patients with chronic kidney disease who became end-stage renal disease after acute dialysis, patients who could be weaned off acute dialytic therapy were associated with reduced risk of premature death over a 2-year observation period.

  19. Reversal of the Progression of Fatal Coronavirus Infection in Cats by a Broad-Spectrum Coronavirus Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunjeong; Liu, Hongwei; Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C.; Weerasekara, Sahani; Hua, Duy H.; Groutas, William C.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Pedersen, Niels C.

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect animals and humans causing a wide range of diseases. The diversity of coronaviruses in many mammalian species is contributed by relatively high mutation and recombination rates during replication. This dynamic nature of coronaviruses may facilitate cross-species transmission and shifts in tissue or cell tropism in a host, resulting in substantial change in virulence. Feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) causes inapparent or mild enteritis in cats, but a highly fatal disease, called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), can arise through mutation of FECV to FIP virus (FIPV). The pathogenesis of FIP is intimately associated with immune responses and involves depletion of T cells, features shared by some other coronaviruses like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus. The increasing risks of highly virulent coronavirus infections in humans or animals call for effective antiviral drugs, but no such measures are yet available. Previously, we have reported the inhibitors that target 3C-like protease (3CLpro) with broad-spectrum activity against important human and animal coronaviruses. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of our 3CLpro inhibitor in laboratory cats with FIP. Experimental FIP is 100% fatal once certain clinical and laboratory signs become apparent. We found that antiviral treatment led to full recovery of cats when treatment was started at a stage of disease that would be otherwise fatal if left untreated. Antiviral treatment was associated with a rapid improvement in fever, ascites, lymphopenia and gross signs of illness and cats returned to normal health within 20 days or less of treatment. Significant reduction in viral titers was also observed in cats. These results indicate that continuous virus replication is required for progression of immune-mediated inflammatory disease of FIP. These findings may provide important insights into devising therapeutic strategies and selection of antiviral compounds for further

  20. Reversal of the Progression of Fatal Coronavirus Infection in Cats by a Broad-Spectrum Coronavirus Protease Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunjeong; Liu, Hongwei; Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C; Weerasekara, Sahani; Hua, Duy H; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Pedersen, Niels C

    2016-03-01

    Coronaviruses infect animals and humans causing a wide range of diseases. The diversity of coronaviruses in many mammalian species is contributed by relatively high mutation and recombination rates during replication. This dynamic nature of coronaviruses may facilitate cross-species transmission and shifts in tissue or cell tropism in a host, resulting in substantial change in virulence. Feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) causes inapparent or mild enteritis in cats, but a highly fatal disease, called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), can arise through mutation of FECV to FIP virus (FIPV). The pathogenesis of FIP is intimately associated with immune responses and involves depletion of T cells, features shared by some other coronaviruses like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus. The increasing risks of highly virulent coronavirus infections in humans or animals call for effective antiviral drugs, but no such measures are yet available. Previously, we have reported the inhibitors that target 3C-like protease (3CLpro) with broad-spectrum activity against important human and animal coronaviruses. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of our 3CLpro inhibitor in laboratory cats with FIP. Experimental FIP is 100% fatal once certain clinical and laboratory signs become apparent. We found that antiviral treatment led to full recovery of cats when treatment was started at a stage of disease that would be otherwise fatal if left untreated. Antiviral treatment was associated with a rapid improvement in fever, ascites, lymphopenia and gross signs of illness and cats returned to normal health within 20 days or less of treatment. Significant reduction in viral titers was also observed in cats. These results indicate that continuous virus replication is required for progression of immune-mediated inflammatory disease of FIP. These findings may provide important insights into devising therapeutic strategies and selection of antiviral compounds for further

  1. 2009 H1N1 fatalities: the New Mexico experience.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Erin G; Bryce, Clare H; Avery, Catherine; Smelser, Chad; Thompson, Deborah; Nolte, Kurt B

    2012-11-01

    Histopathologic features of New Mexico 2009 H1N1 fatalities have not been representative of those reported nationwide. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of all New Mexico 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) fatalities (n = 50). In cases in which autopsy was performed (n = 12), histologic sections and culture results were examined. In contrast to previously published studies, the majority of our fatalities did not have diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) (2/12; 16.7%). Common findings included pulmonary interstitial inflammation and edema, tracheobronchitis, and pneumonia. Two cases had significant extra-pulmonary manifestations: myocarditis and cerebral edema with herniation. The majority had a rapid disease course: range from 1 to 12 days (median, 2 days), and Native Americans were disproportionately represented among fatalities. These findings suggest that New Mexico H1N1 fatalities generally did not survive long enough to develop the classic picture of DAD. Pathologists should be aware that H1N1 may cause extra-pulmonary pathology and perform postmortem cultures and histologic sampling accordingly.

  2. Role of the mycobiome in human acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Walter J F M; Netea, Mihai G; de Haan, Anton F J; Huls, Gerwin A; Donnelly, J Peter; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2013-02-01

    A role for gut bacteria in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has been firmly established; however, the role of Candida spp, which form part of the mycobiome, remains unknown. In a homogenous group of patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), we found a significant impact of Candida colonization on the occurrence of acute GVHD. Patients colonized with Candida spp developed significantly more grade II-IV acute GVHD compared with noncolonized patients (50% vs 32%; P = .03), as well as more gastrointestinal (GI)-GVHD (33% vs 19%; P = .05). Colonization with Candida spp was more frequent in patients bearing the loss-of-function polymorphism Y238X, which results in dectin-1 dysfunction, compared with patients with the wild-type allele (73% vs 31%; P = .002). There was no direct effect of dectin-1 dysfunction on acute GVHD, although it did influence the occurrence of GVHD indirectly through Candida colonization. The exact mechanism of GVHD induction by Candida spp colonization of the mucosa is unknown, but the link might prove to be the induction of Th 17/IL-23 responses through activation of pattern recognition receptors by fungal motifs, including β-d-glucan and mannans. These data indicate a role for the mycobiome in the pathogenesis of GVHD and suggest that altering the mycobiome by antifungal drugs can help ameliorate GI-GVHD. In addition, given that the genetic constitution of patients affects susceptibility to both Candida colonization and GVHD, whether identifying gene polymorphisms will facilitate personalized treatment of SCT recipients remains to be determined.

  3. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity.

  4. Pulmonary Artery Dilation and Right Ventricular Function in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Numano, Fujito; Shimizu, Chisato; Tremoulet, Adriana H; Dyar, Dan; Burns, Jane C; Printz, Beth F

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery inflammation and aneurysm formation are the most common complications of Kawasaki disease (KD). Valvulitis and myocarditis are also well described and may lead to valvar regurgitation and left ventricular dysfunction. However, functional changes in the right heart have rarely been reported. We noted several acute KD patients with dilated pulmonary arteries (PA) and thus sought to systematically characterize PA size and right-heart function in an unselected cohort of KD patients cared for at a single clinical center. Clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic data from 143 acute KD subjects were analyzed. PA dilation was documented in 23 subjects (16.1 %); these subjects had higher median right ventricle myocardial performance index (RV MPI), higher ratio of early tricuspid inflow velocity to tricuspid annular early diastolic velocity (TV E/e'), and lower median TV e' velocity compared to the non-PA dilation group (0.50 vs 0.38 p < 0.01, 4.2 vs 3.6 p < 0.05, and 13.5 vs 15.2 cm/s p < 0.01, respectively). Almost all subjects with PA dilation had improved PA Z-score, RV MPI, and TV E/e' in the subacute phase (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in indices of left ventricle function between PA dilation group and non-PA dilation group. In summary, PA dilation was documented in 16 % of acute KD subjects. These subjects were more likely to have echocardiographic indices consistent with isolated RV dysfunction that improved in the subacute phase. The long-term consequence of these findings will require longitudinal studies of this patient population.

  5. Subjective assessment of visual verticality in follow-up of patients with acute vestibular disease.

    PubMed

    Gómez García, Angélica; Jáuregui-Renaud, Kathrine

    2003-06-01

    We conducted a study of 10 patients with acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure in order to assess their ability to perceive visual verticality during the acute stage of their disease and during recovery. We also evaluated 31 healthy volunteers to test the reproducibility of our assessment methods. The 10 patients were first evaluated within 4 days of the onset of their vestibular failure, and follow-up tests were conducted 2 and 4 weeks later. The healthy subjects were similarly tested at 2 and 4 weeks following their baseline evaluation. All patients and subjects were tested 10 times during each evaluation session, and results from each as well as from the groups as a whole were calculated as a mean of all responses. The mean visual vertical tilt (the amount of deviation from true verticality) among the 10 patients declined from 8.4 degrees (+/- 2.4 degrees) at the first examination to 3.2 degrees (+/- 1.6 degrees) at week 2 and to 1.4 degrees (+/- 0.7 degree) at week 4. These decreases coincided with the pace of the resolution of their vestibular symptoms. The rates of reproducibility among the 31 healthy volunteers at 2 and 4 weeks following their initial assessment were 95 and 97%, respectively. We concluded that repeated measurements of the static visual vertical can be useful as a follow-up tool for patients with vestibular neuritis.

  6. No influence of chromosome Y haplogroup variation in acute graft-versus-host disease in sardinia.

    PubMed

    Orofino, Maria Grazia; Contu, Daniela; Argiolu, Francesca; Sanna, Maria Adele; Gaziev, Javid; La Nasa, Giorgio; Vacca, Adriana; Cao, Antonio; Cucca, Francesco

    2006-12-15

    The donor-recipient sex-related mismatch has been reported as a risk factor for acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, the results obtained in previous studies appear to be contradictory. Here we evaluate the impact of donor-recipient sex-related mismatch in a series of 204 Sardinian individuals (92.1% of them affected by Beta- Thalassemia major) who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical siblings. In all, 78 of these patients had acute GVHD (aGVHD). We found that also in this homogenous group of patients from a homogenous population, the donor-female/recipient-male pair provided an increased risk for aGVHD when compared with a reference donor-male/recipient-male pair (POR=2.3, P=0.042). This data could be consistent with a role of variation in the male-specific portion of the Y chromosome in aGVHD. To assess this, we compared the distribution of the main Y-chromosome haplogroups in 28 male patients, who had aGVHD and underwent BMT from HLA-identical sisters, and 366 ethnically-matched controls. No significant differences were observed. These findings do not support the presence of Y chromosome founder variants contributing significantly to aGVHD in the Sardinian population.

  7. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katharina J.; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas. PMID:26618925

  8. Homocysteine levels after acute levodopa intake in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Kuhn, Wilfried

    2009-07-15

    Levodopa (L-dopa) administered with a dopadecarboxylase inhibitor (DDI) increases homocysteine plasma levels. This may support the onset of atherosclerosis-related disorders and neuropsychiatric complications in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This homocysteine elevation is considered as long-term effect of chronic L-dopa/DDI treatment. Little is known about the acute effects of L-dopa/DDI intake on homocysteine generation. The objective of this trial was to investigate the relations between L-dopa and homocysteine after acute L-dopa/DDI administration in PD patients with different L-dopa metabolism. Thirty PD patients were divided into groups with superior (I) and less (II) L-dopa absorption after standardized intake of 125 mg L-dopa/benserazide with determination of L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD) and homocysteine in plasma at baseline, 30, 60, and 90 minutes. There was a homocysteine increase in Group I (F = 5; P = 0.005) and a moderate decrease in Group II (F = 4.27; P = 0.01). A rise of 3-OMD (F = 10.51; P < 0.0001) appeared in Group I, but not in Group II (F = 0.91; P = 0.44), accordingly L-dopa accumulation was better in Group I than in Group II. Thus, in conclusion, L-dopa metabolism is an important component for homocysteine elevation after one time L-dopa/DDI administration in PD patients.

  9. Improved accuracy of acute graft-versus-host disease staging among multiple centers.

    PubMed

    Levine, John E; Hogan, William J; Harris, Andrew C; Litzow, Mark R; Efebera, Yvonne A; Devine, Steven M; Reshef, Ran; Ferrara, James L M

    2014-01-01

    The clinical staging of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) varies significantly among bone marrow transplant (BMT) centers, but adherence to long-standing practices poses formidable barriers to standardization among centers. We have analyzed the sources of variability and developed a web-based remote data entry system that can be used by multiple centers simultaneously and that standardizes data collection in key areas. This user-friendly, intuitive interface resembles an online shopping site and eliminates error-prone entry of free text with drop-down menus and pop-up detailed guidance available at the point of data entry. Standardized documentation of symptoms and therapeutic response reduces errors in grade assignment and allows creation of confidence levels regarding the diagnosis. Early review and adjudication of borderline cases improves consistency of grading and further enhances consistency among centers. If this system achieves widespread use it may enhance the quality of data in multicenter trials to prevent and treat acute GVHD.

  10. Acute ischemic stroke in a child with cyanotic congenital heart disease due to non-compliance of anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Misbahuddin; James, Anish F.; Qureshi, Raheel S.; Saraf, Sapan; Ahluwalia, Tina; Mukherji, Joy Dev; Kole, Tamorish

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a common presentation in geriatric patients in emergency department but rarely seen in pediatric patients. In case of acute ischemic stroke in pediatric age group, management is different from that of adult ischemic stroke where thrombolysis is a good op. METHODS: We report a case of a 17-year-old male child presenting in emergency with an episode of acute ischemic stroke causing left hemiparesis with left facial weakness and asymmetry. The patient suffered from cyanotic congenital heart disease for which he had undergone Fontan operation previously. He had a history of missing his daily dose of warfarin for last 3 days prior to the stroke. RESULTS: The patient recovered from acute ischemic stroke without being thrombolyzed. CONCLUSION: In pediatric patients, acute ischemic stroke usually is evolving and may not require thrombolysis. PMID:25215056

  11. Endothelial Fas-Ligand in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and in Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kokkonen, Tuomo S.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Fas-mediated induction of apoptosis is a major factor in the selection of lymphocytes and downregulation of immunological processes. In the present study, we have assessed endothelial Fas-ligand (FasL) expression in normal human ileum, appendix, and colon, and compared the expression levels with that in inflammatory bowel disease and in acute appendicitis. In a normal appendix, endothelial FasL levels were constant in almost half of the mucosal vessels; but, in the normal ileum and colon, endothelial FasL was practically restricted to areas in close proximity to lymphatic follicles, and was expressed mainly in the submucosal aspect of the follicles in the vessels with high endothelium. In samples from subjects with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, the extent of endothelial FasL expression was elevated in the submucosa and associated with an elevated number of lymphoid follicles. In inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers and areas with a high density of mononuclear cells expressing FasL also showed an elevated density of blood vessels with endothelial FasL expression. Although the function of endothelial FasL remains unclear, such a specific expression pattern suggests that endothelial FasL expression has a role in the regulation of lymphocyte access to the peripheral lymphoid tissues, including the intestinal mucosa. PMID:26374830

  12. High prevalence of and potential mechanisms for chronic kidney disease in patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Mami, Iadh; Schmitt, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; François, Arnaud; Rabant, Marion; Nochy, Dominique; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Xu-Dubois, Yichum; Thervet, Eric; Puy, Hervé; Karras, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder of the synthesis of heme caused by a deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), leading to the overproduction of the porphyrin precursors δ-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biological characteristics, the renal pathology, and the cellular mechanisms of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP. A total of 415 patients with HMBS deficiency followed up in the French Porphyria Center were enrolled in 2003 in a population-based study. A follow-up study was conducted in 2013, assessing patients for clinical, biological, and histological parameters. In vitro models were used to determine whether porphyrin precursors promote tubular and endothelial cytotoxicity. Chronic kidney disease occurred in up to 59% of the symptomatic AIP patients, with a decline in the glomerular filtration rate of ~1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) annually. Proteinuria was absent in the vast majority of the cases. The renal pathology was a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, associated with a fibrous intimal hyperplasia and focal cortical atrophy. Our experimental data provide evidence that porphyrin precursors promote endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and epithelial phenotypic changes in proximal tubular cells. In conclusion, the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP should be considered in cases of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy and/or focal cortical atrophy with severe proliferative arteriosclerosis.

  13. Acute Myocardial Ischemia in Adults Secondary to Missed Kawasaki Disease in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Sherif RY; El Said, Galal; Daniels, Lori B; Burns, Jane C; El Said, Howaida; Sorour, Khaled A; Gharib, Soliman; Gordon, John B

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms that occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki disease (KD) patients may remain clinically silent for decades and then thrombose resulting in myocardial infarction. Although KD is now the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in Asia, the United States, and Western Europe, the incidence of KD in Egypt is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that young adults in Egypt presenting with acute myocardial ischemia may have coronary artery lesions due Kawasaki disease (KD) in childhood. We reviewed a total of 580 angiograms of patients ≤ 40 years of age presenting with symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Coronary artery aneurysms were noted in 46 patients (7.9 %) of whom nine presented with myocardial infarction. The likelihood of antecedent KD as the cause of the aneurysms was classified as definite (n=10), probable (n=29), or equivocal (n=7). Compared to the definite and probable groups, the equivocal group had more traditional cardiovascular risk factors, smaller sized aneurysms, and fewer coronary arteries affected. In conclusion, in a major metropolitan center in Egypt, 6.7% of adults age 40 years or younger undergoing angiography for evaluation of possible myocardial ischemia had lesions consistent with antecedent KD. Because of the unique therapeutic challenges associated with these lesions, adult cardiologists should be aware that coronary artery aneurysms in young adults may be due to missed KD in childhood. PMID:25555655

  14. Automated analysis of acute myeloid leukemia minimal residual disease using a support vector machine

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wanmao; Hu, Beili; Zheng, Cuiping; Tong, Yin; Wang, Lei; Li, Qing-qing; Tong, Xiangmin; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of support vector machines (SVM) to analyze minimal residual disease (MRD) in flow cytometry data from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) automatically, objectively and standardly. The initial disease data and MRD review data in the form of 159 flow cytometry standard 3.0 files from 36 CD7-positive AML patients in whom MRD was detected more than once were exported. SVM was used for training with setting the initial disease data to 1 as the flag and setting 15 healthy persons to set 0 as the flag. Based on the two training groups, parameters were optimized, and a predictive model was built to analyze MRD data from each patient. The automated analysis results from the SVM model were compared to those obtained through conventional analysis to determine reliability. Automated analysis results based on the model did not differ from and were correlated with results obtained through conventional analysis (correlation coefficient c = 0.986, P > 0.05). Thus the SVM model could potentially be used to analyze flow cytometry-based AML MRD data automatically, objectively, and in a standardized manner. PMID:27713120

  15. Immune Responses in Acute and Convalescent Patients with Mild, Moderate and Severe Disease during the 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, Kristin G.-I.; Cox, Rebecca Jane; Tunheim, Gro; Berdal, Jan Erik; Hauge, Anna Germundsson; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Peters, Bjoern; Oftung, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of immune responses influencing clinical severity during pandemic influenza infection is important for improved treatment and vaccine development. In this study we recruited 46 adult patients during the 2009 influenza pandemic and characterized humoral and cellular immune responses. Those included were either acute hospitalized or convalescent patients with different disease severities (mild, moderate or severe). In general, protective antibody responses increased with enhanced disease severity. In the acute patients, we found higher levels of TNF-α single-producing CD4+T-cells in the severely ill as compared to patients with moderate disease. Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a subset of acute patients with peptide T-cell epitopes showed significantly lower frequencies of influenza specific CD8+ compared with CD4+ IFN-γ T-cells in acute patients. Both T-cell subsets were predominantly directed against the envelope antigens (HA and NA). However, in the convalescent patients we found high levels of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells directed against conserved core antigens (NP, PA, PB, and M). The results indicate that the antigen targets recognized by the T-cell subsets may vary according to the phase of infection. The apparent low levels of cross-reactive CD8+ T-cells recognizing internal antigens in acute hospitalized patients suggest an important role for this T-cell subset in protective immunity against influenza. PMID:26606759

  16. [Research Progress on Notch Signal Pathway in Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease -Review].

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Mei; Li, Ban-Ban; Li, Chun-Pu; Teng, Qing-Liang

    2017-02-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved cell signaling system that plays an essential role in many biological processes. Notch signaling regulates multiple aspects of hematopoiesis, especially during T cell develop-ment. Recent data suggest that Notch also regulates mature T cell differentiation and function. The latest data show that Notch also plays an essential role in alloreactive T cells mediating acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), the most severe complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Notch inhibition in donor-derived T cells or blockade of individual Notch ligands and receptors after transplantation can reduce GVHD severity and mortality in mouse models of allo-HSCT, without causing global immunosuppression. These findings indicate Notch in T cells as an attractive therapeutic target to control aGVHD. In this article, the pathophysiology of aGVHD, the Notch signal pathway and aGVHD are reviewed.

  17. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense 99mTechnetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of “coated aorta” or “hairy kidneys”. ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27648170

  18. Atraumatic splenic rupture as a complication of acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis, an unusual disease.

    PubMed

    Moya Sánchez, Elena; Medina Benítez, Antonio

    2017-02-27

    We report the case of a patient with acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis and he suffered an atraumatic splenic rupture. Splenic rupture not associated with trauma is a rare entity that can occurs in normal spleen (spontaneous) or damaged spleen (pathological). This entity may be associated with local inflammatory processes, such as pancreatitis. Ultrasound is a non-invasive technique which is used in unstable patients. CT is useful for making a diagnosis of extension in patients with hemodynamic stability. Atraumatic splenic rupture as a complication of chronic pancreatitis is an unusual disease that requires a high index of suspicion which allows us an early diagnosis because it is a treatable entity that compromises the patient's life.

  19. Kinetic and organ-specific patterns of cytokine expression in acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, K S; Allen, R D; Roths, J B; Sidman, C L

    1995-04-01

    Although many cytokines have been previously implicated in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), no study to date has comprehensively evaluated their expression over time or in different tissues affected by GVHD. Using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR technique and a murine model of acute GVHD, we have evaluated the expression levels of mRNA for a wide range of cytokines in spleen, gut and liver tissues at weekly intervals after bone marrow transfer. The earliest cytokine responses seen were increases in IL-2, IL-10, IFN-gamma, MIP-1 alpha and TNF-alpha in the spleen, suggesting a primarily Th1 pathway. Other cytokines (IL-1 alpha, IL-10 and MIP-1 alpha) were persistently elevated in GVHD mice, but were variable depending on the tissue. These data demonstrate that a wide range of cytokines are involved in the GVHD response and that their kinetic pattern of expression is different in various affected tissues.

  20. Acute liver failure at 26 weeks' gestation in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Mara; Daugherty, Tami J; Elihu, Arvand; Sharaf, Ravi; Concepcion, Waldo; Druzin, Maurice; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2009-10-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for acute liver failure (ALF) during pregnancy is an uncommon occurrence with variable outcomes. In pregnancy-related liver failure, prompt diagnosis and immediate delivery are essential for a reversal of the underlying process and for maternal and fetal survival. In rare cases, the reason for ALF during pregnancy is either unknown or irreversible, and thus OLT may be necessary. This case demonstrates the development of cryptogenic ALF during the 26th week of pregnancy in a woman with sickle cell disease. She underwent successful cesarean delivery of a healthy male fetus at 27 weeks with concurrent OLT. This report provides a literature review of OLT in pregnancy and examines the common causes of ALF in the pregnant patient. On the basis of the management and outcome of our case and the literature review, we present an algorithm for the suggested management of ALF in pregnancy.

  1. Acute kidney injury in children with sickle cell disease-compounding a chronic problem.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Cherry; Bissonnette, Mei Lin; Matsell, Douglas G

    2017-03-28

    In an article recently published in Pediatric Nephrology, Baddam and colleagues discuss the relatively underreported clinical problem of repeated episodes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Their report is a cautionary note about the importance of repeated kidney injury on the background of underlying chronic kidney injury and its potential implications on long-term kidney outcome. In children and adults with SCD, this includes the effects of repeated vaso-occlusive crises and the management of these painful episodes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here we review the scope of kidney involvement in SCD in children and discuss the potential short- and long-term consequences of AKI in children with SCD.

  2. Novel molecular and cellular therapeutic targets in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Alix E.; Reid, Gregor S. D.; Teachey, David T.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2010-01-01

    While the outcome for pediatric patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) or lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has improved dramatically, patients often suffer from therapeutic sequelae. Additionally, despite intensified treatment, the prognosis remains dismal for patients with refractory or relapsed disease. Thus, novel biologically targeted treatment approaches are needed. These targets can be identified by understanding how a loss of lymphocyte homeostasis can result in LPD or ALL. Herein, we review potential molecular and cellular therapeutic strategies that (i) target key signaling networks (e.g., PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT, Notch1, and SRC kinase family-containing pathways) which regulate lymphocyte growth, survival, and function; (ii) block the interaction of ALL cells with stromal cells or lymphoid growth factors secreted by the bone marrow microenvironment; or (iii) stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:18716718

  3. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia of Adults: Determination, Prognostic Impact and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Maurillo, Luca; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Consalvo, Maria Irno; Sarlo, Chiara; Conti, Consuelo; De Santis, Giovanna; De Bellis, Eleonora; Di Veroli, Ambra; Palomba, Patrizia; Attrotto, Cristina; Zizzari, Annagiulia; Paterno, Giovangiacinto; Voso, Maria Teresa; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Arcese, William; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment assessment of cytogenetic/genetic signature of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been consistently shown to play a major prognostic role but also to fail at predicting outcome on individual basis, even in low-risk AML. Therefore, we are in need of further accurate methods to refine the patients' risk allocation process, distinguishing more adequately those who are likely to recur from those who are not. In this view, there is now evidence that the submicroscopic amounts of leukemic cells (called minimal residual disease, MRD), measured during the course of treatment, indicate the quality of response to therapy. Therefore, MRD might serve as an independent, additional biomarker to help to identify patients at higher risk of relapse. Detection of MRD requires the use of highly sensitive ancillary techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiparametric flow cytometry(MPFC). In the present manuscript, we will review the current approaches to investigate MRD and its clinical applications in AML management.

  4. Changes in executive function after acute bouts of passive cycling in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ridgel, Angela L; Kim, Chul-Ho; Fickes, Emily J; Muller, Matthew D; Alberts, Jay L

    2011-04-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) often experience cognitive declines. Although pharmacologic therapies are helpful in treating motor deficits in PD, they do not appear to be effective for cognitive complications. Acute bouts of moderate aerobic exercise have been shown to improve cognitive function in healthy adults. However, individuals with PD often have difficulty with exercise. This study examined the effects of passive leg cycling on executive function in PD. Executive function was assessed with Trail-Making Test (TMT) A and B before and after passive leg cycling. Significant improvements on the TMT-B test occurred after passive leg cycling. Furthermore, the difference between times to complete the TMT-B and TMT-A significantly decreased from precycling to postcycling. Improved executive function after passive cycling may be a result of increases in cerebral blood flow. These findings suggest that passive exercise could be a concurrent therapy for cognitive decline in PD.

  5. Fatal Folic Acid Toxicity in Humans.

    PubMed

    Devnath, Gerard Pradeep; Kumaran, Senthil; Rajiv, R; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Nagaraj, Ashok

    2017-03-06

    Folic acid is B-9 vitamin. Folic acid is prescribed commonly for pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects in the fetus, patients under chemotherapy, pernicious anemia and to reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. Acute or chronic ingestion of a large dose of folic acid generally manifests as neurological complications, which are reversible. In this present case, a 23-year-old pregnant woman committed suicide by consuming folic acid tablets and succumbed to death within 36 h. Postmortem toxicological analysis detected folic acid in viscera. Death following acute consumption of folic acid is rare and has been not reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge.

  6. [Psychiatric drugs as risk factor in fatal heat stroke].

    PubMed

    Fijnheer, R; van de Ven, P J; Erkelens, D W

    1995-07-08

    Two men aged 33 and 31 years suffered a fatal heat stroke on a warm summer day. One of them used pimozide and clomipramine, the other zuclopenthixol, dexetimide, droperidol, promethazine and propranolol as psychiatric medication. Both of them had a body temperature > 42.3 degrees C, without perspiring. At first only a comatose situation with practically normal laboratory values existed; this was rapidly followed by massive liver damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, anaemia, thrombopenia and acute renal failure. In spite of adequate and rapid treatment these complications were fatal. Both patients used medication with an antidopaminergic and anticholinergic (side) effect. The set point of the temperature regulation centre can be elevated by the antidopaminergic activity of antipsychotics. Use of anticholinergic medication can disturb the thermoregulation via inhibition of the parasympathicomimetically mediated sweat secretion. It is recommended to point out the danger of unusually high outdoor temperatures to patients using this medication.

  7. Esophageal foreign bodies as child abuse. Potential fatal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nolte, K B

    1993-12-01

    Foreign bodies being forced into the esophagus as a form of fatal child abuse is rare. A 4.5-month-old female infant presented to clinicians with respiratory distress. Several coins were recovered from the esophagus. One month later, she was found dead in her crib. At autopsy, there were three coins in the esophagus. In addition, there were cutaneous contusions of various ages, acute and partially healed fractures of the extremities, old aspirated foreign material in the lungs, and pulmonary fat emboli. Although the fat emboli may have contributed to the death, several potentially fatal mechanisms from the esophageal foreign bodies deserve consideration. These include vagal stimulation from esophageal distention, aspiration of swallowed fluids after esophageal obstruction, compression of the trachea or the heart by the coins, and cardiac compression or airway occlusion by the introducing finger.

  8. Lichtheimia ramosa: A Fatal Case of Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Mouronte-Roibás, Cecilia; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Botana-Rial, Maribel; Ramos-Hernández, Cristina; Lago-Preciado, Guillermo; Fiaño-Valverde, Concepción; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis due to Lichtheimia ramosa is an infrequent opportunistic infection that can potentially be angioinvasive when affecting inmunocompromised hosts. We present a fatal case of mucormycosis, affecting a 56-year-old male with diabetes mellitus and siderosis, initially admitted to our hospital due to an H1N1 infection. The subject's clinical condition worsened and he finally died because of a necrotizing bilateral pneumonia with disseminated mycotic thromboses due to Lichtheimia ramosa, which is an emerging Mucoralean fungus. This is an infrequent case because of the extent to which it affected a subject without overt immunocompromise. This case underlines the importance of an early premortem diagnosis and treatment in order to prevent rapid progression of this disease, as well as the need of considering mucormycosis when facing subjects with multiple emboli and fever unresponsive to usual antimicrobials. PMID:27445521

  9. Chronic fatal pneumocystosis in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Goto, Y; Yamazaki, S; Fujiwara, K

    1977-12-01

    A chronic pulmonary disease was encountered in nude mice of a barrier sustained colony, and Pneumocystis carinii was identified as the causative agent histopathologically as well as on impression smear preparations in the affected lungs. Fatal infection was seen only in old nude mice aged more than 6 months, while focal pulmonary lesions were developed without clinical signs in young adult nudes 2 to 3 months of age. The lesions produced in aged nude mice were characterized by propagation of mononuclear cells with the presence of foamy masses of P. carinii. Heterozygous littermates were much less susceptible to the infection but pneumocystic lesions could be produced readily by multiple treatment with immunosuppressants. The infection could be transmitted without immunosuppressant to non-infected nudes but not to heterozygous littermates after intranasal inoculation of affected tissue emulsion or by cage mating with severely affected nudes.

  10. Military parachute mishap fatalities: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mellen, P F; Sohn, S S

    1990-12-01

    Military parachuting is relatively safe. Most injuries involve vertebral bodies or the lower extremity, and fatalities are rare. We studied 49 military parachute accident facilities occurring during 1964-1989. Causes of the accidents included accidental deployment of reserve parachute in aircraft, static line failures and entanglements, equipment (canopy) failures, in-air collisions, landing injuries, drowning, and dragging. Rarely, preexisting illness such as coronary artery disease caused or contributed to an accident. Pathologic findings revealed a high proportion of deceleration and blunt force injuries: cardiac, aortic and liver laceration, and skull, pelvic and extremity fractures. Isolated head injury, strangulation, and post traumatic pulmonary embolus were occasionally noted. Toxicological examination demonstrated contributing factors such as alcohol intoxication or antihistamine use in a small number of cases. Background investigations, scene inspections, autopsy and toxicology studies all yielded important data or pertinent negatives during investigations. We propose an investigation protocol.

  11. Acute renal failure associated with liver disease in India: etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Sural, S; Sharma, R K; Gupta, A; Sharma, A P; Gulati, S

    2000-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) associated with liver disease is a commonly encountered clinical problem of varied etiology and high mortality. We have prospectively analyzed patients with liver disease and ARF to determine the etiology, clinical spectrum, prognosis and factors affecting the outcome. Other than hepatorenal syndrome patients, out of 221 cases, 66 developed ARF secondary to various liver disease like cirrhosis (n = 29, mortality 8, risk factors-older age p < 0.01, grade III/IV encephalopathy p < 0.05), fulminant hepatic failure (n = 25, mortality 15, risk factor-prolonged prothrombin time p < 0.01), and obstructive jaundice (n = 12, mortality 7, risk factor-sepsis p < 0.01). In these three groups the factors leading to ARF were volume depletion (24), gastrointestinal bleed (28), sepsis (34), drugs (27) [aminoglycosides (9) and NSAID (18)] along with hyperbilirubinemia. Various types of ARF with contemporaneous liver injury were malaria (n = 37, mortality 15, risk factors-higher bilirubin p < 0.001, higher creatinine p < 0.05, anuria p < 0.05 and dialysis dependency p < 0.05), sepsis (n = 36, mortality 22, risk factors-age p < 0.001, higher bilirubin p < 0.01, oliguria p < 0.05), hypovolemia with ischemic hepatic injury (n = 14, mortality 5, risk factors-higher creatinine p < 0.05 and SGPT p < 0.01), acute pancreatitis (n = 12, mortality 4, risk factors-higher bilirubin p < 0.001, higher SGPT p < 0.01, dialysis dependency p < 0.05), rifampicin toxicity (n = 10, no mortality), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (n = 3, no mortality), CuSO4 poisoning (n = 3 mortality 2), post abortal (n = 11, mortality 6, risk factors higher creatinine p < 0.05 and SGPT p < 0.01), ARF following delivery including HELLP syndrome (n = 12, mortality 4, risk factors-higher bilirubin p < 0.01 and SGPT p < 0.01), and of uncertain etiology (n= 14 mortality 4). 133 patients (60.2%), required hemodialysis hemodialfiltration or peritoneal dialysis. ARF associated with liver disease is

  12. Ornicetil on encephalopathy. Effect of ornicetil (ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate) on encephalopathy in patients with acute and chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chainuvati, T; Plengvanit, U; Viranuvatti, V

    1977-12-01

    Di-L (+)-ornithine, alpha ketogluterate infusions were compared with infusions of dextrose water in 27 comatosed patients with acute and chronic liver disease. Of 7 patients with acute liver disease no improvement of conciousness was found in any of these patients. Of 20 patients with chronic liver disease, lowering of blood ammonia level during ornicetil therapy occurred in 8, during the control infusion in 6, and no effect was seen in 4. Improvement of conciousness during ornicetil occurred in 11, during the control infusion in 6 and 3 had no improvement. Among those who improved, 4 in the ornicetil group and 2 in the control group improved after the precipitating causes were controlled or corrected. This study indicated that ornicetil has no beneficial effect on the treatment of coma in various forms of hepatic disease.

  13. Burden of acute respiratory disease of epidemic and pandemic potential in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, A; Malik, M; Pebody, R G; Elkholy, A A; Khan, W; Bellos, A; Mala, P

    2016-10-02

    There are gaps in the knowledge about the burden of severe respiratory disease in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). This literature review was therefore conducted to describe the burden of epidemicand pandemic-prone acute respiratory infections (ARI) in the Region which may help in the development of evidence-based disease prevention and control policies. Relevant published and unpublished reports were identified from searches of various databases; 83 documents fulfilled the search criteria. The infections identified included: ARI, avian influenza A(H5N1), influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. Pneumonia and ARIs were leading causes of disease and death in the Region. Influenza A(H1N1) was an important cause of morbidity during the 2009 pandemic. This review provides a descriptive summary of the burden of acute respiratory diseases in the Region, but there still remains a lack of necessary data.

  14. [Fatal exposure to Aconitum napellus].

    PubMed

    German Jørgensen, Jørgen Rahr; Andersen, Anne Elsborg

    2013-06-10

    Fatal exposure to poisonous plants in northern Europe is a rare condition. In this case report we describe an intended poisoning with Aconitum napellus (monkshood), which contains the toxin aconitine. The lethal dose in adults is 3-6 mg. The toxin affects excitable cells such as neurons and myocytes causing degrees of unconsciousness, hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. There is no antidote and treatment is symptomatic. We describe a patient who had eaten monkshood. She was treated with infusion of lidocaine and survived. After 24 hours of treatment and monitoring she was discharged from the intensive care unit.

  15. [Fatal poisoning due to Indigofera].

    PubMed

    Labib, S; Berdai, M-A; Bendadi, A; Achour, S; Harandou, M

    2012-01-01

    Indigo, also known in Morocco as Nila, is a dye widely used in the coloring of Moroccan handicrafts. It is obtained from fermentation reactions on the leaves and branches of true indigo, Indigofera tinctoria, which is a widespread plant in tropical Africa and Asia. We report a case of fatal poisoning in a 3-year-old child after administration of indigo for therapeutic purposes. Death resulted from multiple organ failure. The toxicity of this compound is little known in the literature and deserves to be explored through toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic studies, in order to better determine the toxic constituents of the dye.

  16. Comparison of chronic kidney disease and risk for presenting with painless versus nonpainless acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Goo; Jeong, Myung Ho; Lee, Ki Hong; Park, Keun Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Yoon, Nam Sik; Kim, Kye Hun; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2012-09-15

    Chronic kidney disease increases the risk for developing ischemic heart disease, but it has not been well known whether it also affects the manifestation of painless acute myocardial infarction (AMI), which has important clinical implications. The aim of this study was to identify whether chronic kidney disease is associated with the presentation of painless AMI. A total of 2,656 consecutively hospitalized patients with AMI from January 2008 to February 2012 were enrolled. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using calibrated serum creatinine and the abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation. Patient clinical characteristics, angiographic findings, and the use of medications were reviewed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of reduced eGFR and presentation with painless AMI. A total of 2,176 adults with painful AMI and 480 adults with painless AMI were studied, and baseline eGFR was calculated. Mean eGFR was lower in subjects with painless AMI compared to those with painful AMI. Compared to an eGFR >90 ml/min/1.73 m(2), a strong, graded, independent association was observed between reduced eGFR and presentation with painless AMI, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.65 (95% confidence interval 1.16 to 2.36) for an eGFR of 60 to 89 ml/min/1.73 m(2), 2.92 (95% confidence interval 1.89 to 4.52) for an eGFR of 45 to 59 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and 3.44 (95% confidence interval 2.20 to 5.38) for an eGFR <45 ml/min/1.73 m(2). In conclusion, lower eGFR was a strong, independent predictor of presentation with painless AMI versus painful AMI.

  17. [Comparison of hospital prevalence of rheumatic heart diseases and acute rheumatic arthritis in France and Africa].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Gérard, R

    1993-03-01

    This study reports the results of a multicentre enquiry performed in France in 1990 which included 41,242 adults hospitalised in Cardiology Units, 33,907 children hospitalised in Pediatric departments and 8,868 soldiers. A comparative enquiry was also carried out in North Africa (Tunis) and West Africa (Abidjan, Ouagadougou). The results of the French arm of the enquiry showed that rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has become very rare in adults (3.1% of all cardiac disease) and that it tends to occur in older subjects (average 54.4 years of age). There is practically no RHD in young adults. This decreased prevalence of RHD is confirmed in children in whom this diagnosis represents only 0.04% of cases of all cardiac disease--of which 87.5% are of extra-European origin. In contrast, there is a high frequency of RHD in Tunisia (29.3%) and West Africa (13.2% in Abidjan and 13% in Ouagadougou). The disease remains active as is shown by the age of affected adults in Africa (average 21 and 27 years of age). The results also show a reduction to a very low prevalence of acute rheumatic fever in French pediatric departments (0.005%). The authors discuss the reasons for the persistence of endemic infection in Africa: virulence of the streptococcus, predisposing factors (HLA group?), geographic factors and, above all, socioeconomic factors and difficulties in obtaining treatment and prophylaxis. A movement of international cooperation is suggested in order to combat RHD in Africa, especially with regards to its prevention in childhood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Naturally acquired bovine besnoitiosis: histological and immunohistochemical findings in acute, subacute, and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Langenmayer, M C; Gollnick, N S; Majzoub-Altweck, M; Scharr, J C; Schares, G; Hermanns, W

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine besnoitiosis, a disease of increasing concern within Europe, is still incompletely understood. In this study, disease progression after natural infection with the causative apicomplexan Besnoitia besnoiti was monitored in histological skin sections of 5 individual female cattle over time. High-frequency skin sampling of 2 cattle with mild and 2 with severe acute, subacute, and chronic besnoitiosis, as well as from 1 animal during subclinical disease, enabled documentation from the beginning of the disease. Skin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa, periodic acid-Schiff reaction, and anti-Besnoitia immunohistochemistry. In all 4 clinically affected animals, tachyzoite-like endozoites could be detected for the first time by immunohistochemistry, and tissue cyst evolution was monitored. Besnoitiosis-associated lesions were not detected in the animal showing the subclinical course. Because of the inconsistency of the nomenclature of Besnoitia tissue cyst layers in the literature, a new nomenclature for B. besnoiti cyst wall layers is proposed: tissue cysts consist of a hypertrophied host cell with enlarged nuclei, an intracytoplasmic parasitophorous vacuole with bradyzoites, a sometimes vacuolated inner cyst wall, and an outer cyst wall in more developed cysts. Inner and outer cyst walls can be readily distinguished by using special stains. In 1 animal, extracystic B. besnoiti zoites were immunohistochemically detected during the chronic stage. At necropsy, the 2 severely affected cows displayed large numbers of B. besnoiti cysts in a variety of tissues, including the corium of the claws, contributing mainly to the development of chronic laminitis in these 2 cases.

  19. Idelalisib sensitivity and mechanisms of disease progression in relapsed TCF3-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eldfors, S; Kuusanmäki, H; Kontro, M; Majumder, M M; Parsons, A; Edgren, H; Pemovska, T; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Gökbuget, N; Burmeister, T; Porkka, K; Heckman, C A

    2017-01-01

    TCF3-PBX1 (E2A-PBX1) is a recurrent gene fusion in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL), which is caused by the translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13). TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL patients typically benefit from chemotherapy; however, many relapse and subsequently develop resistant disease with few effective treatment options. Mechanisms driving disease progression and therapy resistance have not been studied in TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL. Here, we aimed to identify novel treatment options for TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL by profiling leukemia cells from a relapsed patient, and determine molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and progression. By drug-sensitivity testing of leukemic blasts from the index patient, control samples and TCF3-PBX1 positive and negative BCP-ALL cell lines, we identified the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase delta (p110δ) inhibitor idelalisib as an effective treatment for TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL. This was further supported by evidence showing TCF3-PBX1 directly regulates expression of PIK3CD, the gene encoding p110δ. Other somatic mutations to TP53 and MTOR, as well as aberrant expression of CXCR4, may influence additional drug sensitivities specific to the index patient and accompanied progression of the disease. Our results suggest that idelalisib is a promising treatment option for patients with TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL, whereas other drugs could be useful depending on the genetic context of individual patients. PMID:27461063

  20. Neuropathology of a fatal case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kheir, John N; Lawlor, Michael W; Ahn, Edward S; Lehmann, Leslie; Riviello, James J; Silvera, V Michelle; McManus, Michael; Folkerth, Rebecca D

    2010-01-01

    The pathology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is undefined, since it is rarely fatal and is biopsied in only exceptional circumstances. We describe rapidly progressive PRES following stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After development of altered mental status, this 8-year-old girl had T2 prolongation of the white matter in a posterior-dominant distribution, eventually developing cerebellar edema, hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and herniation. Despite surgical and medical management, she died 36 hours later. At autopsy, the occipital and cerebellar white matter and focal occipital cortical gray matter showed a spectrum of microvascular changes, including dilated perivascular spaces containing proteinaceous exudates and macrophages, as well as fibrinoid necrosis and acute hemorrhage, in a distribution corresponding to the neuroimaging abnormalities and reminiscent of those seen in patients with acute hypertensive encephalopathy. Of note, similar microvascular changes were not seen in the kidney or other systemic sites. Thus, the findings indicate a brain-specific microvascular compromise as the substrate of PRES, at least in the rare instance of cases progressing to fatal outcome.

  1. Patient-tailored analysis of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Erik B R; Ståhlman, Sara; Rehammar, Anna; Samuelsson, Tore; Alm, Sofie J; Kristiansson, Erik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Garelius, Hege; Pettersson, Louise; Ehinger, Mats; Palmqvist, Lars; Fogelstrand, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques have revealed that leukemic cells in acute myeloid leukemia often are characterized by a limited number of somatic mutations. These mutations can be the basis for the detection of leukemic cells in follow-up samples. The aim of this study was to identify leukemia-specific mutations in cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and to use these mutations as markers for minimal residual disease. Leukemic cells and normal lymphocytes were simultaneously isolated at diagnosis from 17 patients with acute myeloid leukemia using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Exome sequencing of these cells identified 240 leukemia-specific single nucleotide variations and 22 small insertions and deletions. Based on estimated allele frequencies and their accuracies, 191 of these mutations qualified as candidates for minimal residual disease analysis. Targeted deep sequencing with a significance threshold of 0.027% for single nucleotide variations and 0.006% for NPM1 type A mutation was developed for quantification of minimal residual disease. When tested on follow-up samples from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia, targeted deep sequencing of single nucleotide variations as well as NPM1 was more sensitive than minimal residual disease quantification with multiparameter flow cytometry. In conclusion, we here describe how exome sequencing can be used for identification of leukemia-specific mutations in samples already at diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. We also show that targeted deep sequencing of such mutations, including single nucleotide variations, can be used for high-sensitivity quantification of minimal residual disease in a patient-tailored manner.

  2. Optimizing nonpharmacological management following an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Samantha L; Goldstein, Roger; Desveaux, Laura; Tulloch, Verity; Brooks, Dina

    2014-01-01

    Though the guidelines for the optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following an acute exacerbation (AE) are well established, issues associated with poor adherence to nonpharmacological interventions such as self-management advice and pulmonary rehabilitation will impact on hospital readmission rates and health care costs. Systems developed for clinically stable patients with COPD may not be sufficient for those who are post-exacerbation. A redesign of the manner in which such interventions are delivered to patients following an AECOPD is necessary. Addressing two or more components of the chronic care model is effective in reducing health care utilization in patients with COPD, with self-management support contributing a key role. By refining self-management support to incorporate the identification and treatment of psychological symptoms and by providing health care professionals adequate time and training to deliver respiratory-specific advice and self-management strategies, adherence to nonpharmacological therapies following an AE may be enhanced. Furthermore, following up patients in their own homes allows for the tailoring of advice and for the delivery of consistent health care messages which may enable knowledge to be retained. By refining the delivery of nonpharmacological therapies following an AECOPD according to components of the chronic care model, adherence may be improved, resulting in better disease management and possibly reducing health care utilization.

  3. The quality of medical care during an acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pradan, Liana; Ferreira, Ivone; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of global morbidity and mortality, with a substantial economic impact. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) represent a dramatic event in the course of the disease; is an important cause of morbidity and the fourth cause of mortality worldwide. During the hospitalization for AECOPD mortality is 10%. AECOPD are also associated with a significant reduction of functional capacity and health-related quality of life. Despite these alarming evidence-based data the response of the healthcare system globally is not adequate to the gravity of the situation. A recently published study done in a Canadian hospital reveals that the treatment of the AECOPD is sub-optimal. The management of the COPD exacerbations prior, during and after the hospitalization showed inadequate adherence of the physicians (respirologists, internists and hospitalists) to the current guidelines. This review outlines the worrisome findings of this study and the proposed measures suggested by the authors in order to optimize the management of AECOPD.

  4. Continuous haemodynamic monitoring using transoesophageal Doppler during acute normovolaemic haemodilution in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Licker, M; Sierra, J; Tassaux, D; Diaper, J

    2004-02-01

    Transoesophageal Doppler monitoring allows non-invasive assessment of stroke volume. We studied haemodynamic changes during acute normovolemic haemodilution (ANH) in anaesthetised patients with coronary artery disease. Twenty patients were randomly assigned to either ANH or a control group. During ANH, a mean (SD) blood volume of 15.3 (3.4) ml.kg(-1) was withdrawn decreasing systemic oxygen delivery from 12.7 (3.3) to 9.3 (1.8) ml.kg(-1).min(-1) (p < 0.001). In the control group, haemodynamic data remained unchanged, whereas in the ANH group, stroke volume and central venous pressure increased significantly (mean = +21 ml [95% CI: 18-25 ml.min(-1)]; mean = +2.5 mmHg [95% CI: 2.2-2.8 mmHg], respectively) and heart rate decreased (mean = -6 beat.min(-1)[95% CI: 6-8 beat.min(-1)], p < 0.05). According to the Frank-Starling relationship, individual changes in stroke volume compared with central venous pressure fitted a quadratic regression model (R2 > 0.91). A reduced viscosity associated with ANH resulted in improved venous return, higher cardiac preload and increased cardiac output. In summary, this study demonstrated that ANH to a haemoglobin value of 8.6 g.dl(-1) was well tolerated in patients with coronary artery disease.

  5. Disordered macrophage cytokine secretion underlies impaired acute inflammation and bacterial clearance in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew M; Rahman, Farooq Z; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Graham, Simon J; Marks, Daniel J B; Sewell, Gavin W; Palmer, Christine D; Wilde, Jonathan; Foxwell, Brian M J; Gloger, Israel S; Sweeting, Trevor; Marsh, Mark; Walker, Ann P; Bloom, Stuart L; Segal, Anthony W

    2009-08-31

    The cause of Crohn's disease (CD) remains poorly understood. Counterintuitively, these patients possess an impaired acute inflammatory response, which could result in delayed clearance of bacteria penetrating the lining of the bowel and predispose to granuloma formation and chronicity. We tested this hypothesis in human subjects by monitoring responses to killed Escherichia coli injected subcutaneously into the forearm. Accumulation of (111)In-labeled neutrophils at these sites and clearance of (32)P-labeled bacteria from them were markedly impaired in CD. Locally increased blood flow and bacterial clearance were dependent on the numbers of bacteria injected. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by CD macrophages was grossly impaired in response to E. coli or specific Toll-like receptor agonists. Despite normal levels and stability of cytokine messenger RNA, intracellular levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were abnormally low in CD macrophages. Coupled with reduced secretion, these findings indicate accelerated intracellular breakdown. Differential transcription profiles identified disease-specific genes, notably including those encoding proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. Intracellular destruction of TNF was decreased by inhibitors of lysosomal function. Together, our findings suggest that in CD macrophages, an abnormal proportion of cytokines are routed to lysosomes and degraded rather than being released through the normal secretory pathway.

  6. Acute myocardial ischemia in adults secondary to missed Kawasaki disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Sherif R Y; El Said, Galal; Daniels, Lori B; Burns, Jane C; El Said, Howaida; Sorour, Khaled A; Gharib, Soliman; Gordon, John B

    2015-02-15

    Coronary artery aneurysms that occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki disease (KD) patients may remain clinically silent for decades and then thrombose resulting in myocardial infarction. Although KD is now the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in Asia, the United States, and Western Europe, the incidence of KD in Egypt is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that young adults in Egypt presenting with acute myocardial ischemia may have coronary artery lesions because of KD in childhood. We reviewed a total of 580 angiograms of patients ≤40 years presenting with symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Coronary artery aneurysms were noted in 46 patients (7.9%), of whom 9 presented with myocardial infarction. The likelihood of antecedent KD as the cause of the aneurysms was classified as definite (n = 10), probable (n = 29), or equivocal (n = 7). Compared with the definite and probable groups, the equivocal group had more traditional cardiovascular risk factors, smaller sized aneurysms, and fewer coronary arteries affected. In conclusion, in a major metropolitan center in Egypt, 6.7% of adults aged ≤40 years who underwent angiography for evaluation of possible myocardial ischemia had lesions consistent with antecedent KD. Because of the unique therapeutic challenges associated with these lesions, adult cardiologists should be aware that coronary artery aneurysms in young adults may be because of missed KD in childhood.

  7. Acute inflammatory bowel disease complicating chronic alcoholism and mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

  8. Acute Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complicating Chronic Alcoholism and Mimicking Carcinoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome. PMID:22949895

  9. Indium 111-labeled granulocyte scan in the diagnosis and management of acute inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.L.; Subramanian, K.; Gasparaitis, A.; Abcarian, H.; Pavel, D.G. )

    1990-06-01

    The indium 111 granulocyte scan was used to evaluate 39 individuals known to have or suspected of having inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty-three of these individuals had positive scans and 16 had negative scans. Eighty-seven confirmatory studies, which consisted of barium radiography, endoscopy, operative findings, and histopathology, were performed in 37 of these individuals. The remaining two negative scans corroborated only by clinical course, CBC, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. In addition, 10 follow-up scans were performed in six of the 39 patients to monitor therapy or investigate a change in symptoms. As an anatomic indicator of acute granulocytic infiltration of the intestinal lamina propria and crypts, the authors found that this scan had a 97 percent rate of sensitivity and 100 percent specificity. Specific indications for the use of the indium 111-labeled granulocyte scan are described. For the authors, in general, this test has become a vital adjunct to endoscopy and radiography in the diagnosis and management of patients with symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Acute Chagas' disease (Trypanosomiasis americana) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oddó, D; Casanova, M; Acuña, G; Ballesteros, J; Morales, B

    1992-01-01

    Two heterosexual men, aged 31 and 40 years, with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and presenting with the acute form of Chagas' disease are reported. The first patient, a carrier of hemophilia A, was treated for 20 years with Chilean and Brazilian cryoprecipitates. This patient acquired both diseases through this medium. The second patient, an inhabitant of northern Chile (fourth region), was allegedly bitten by Triatoma infestans and was an intravenous drug addict. The hemophilic patient presented with a neurologic syndrome; a brain biopsy showed a necrotizing encephalitis with an obliterative angiitis and abundant macrophages. The second patient developed intractable congestive heart failure; necropsy showed a dilated myocarditis with rupture of myofibers and an inflammatory infiltrate rich in plasma cells, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Using light and electron microscopy, abundant amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were seen in brain tissue, especially in the cytoplasm of macrophages, as well as in some myocardial fibers. In both cases, determination of anti-T cruzi antibodies (indirect hemagglutination technique) and xenodiagnosis were positive.

  11. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T.; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Background No studies to-date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to 1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and 2) identify bio-psychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with Sickle Cell Disease. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African-American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. Results A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African-American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of bio-psychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Conclusion Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and to explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  12. Minimal residual disease detection in Tunisian B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, S.; Hamadou, W.S.; Boulland, M.L.; Youssef, Y.B.; Achour, B.; Regaieg, H.; Khelif, A.; Fest, T.; Soua, Z.

    2017-01-01

    IGH gene rearrangement and IGK-Kde gene deletion can be used as molecular markers for the assessment of B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Minimal residual disease detected based on those markers is currently the most reliable prognosis factor in B-ALL. The aim of this study was to use clonal IGH/IGK-Kde gene rearrangements to confirm B-ALL diagnosis and to evaluate the treatment outcome of Tunisian leukemic patients by monitoring the minimal residual disease (MRD) after induction chemotherapy. Seventeen consecutive newly diagnosed B-ALL patients were investigated by multiplex PCR assay and real time quantitative PCR according to BIOMED 2 conditions. The vast majority of clonal VH-JH rearrangements included VH3 gene. For IGK deletion, clonal VK1f/6-Kde recombinations were mainly identified. These rearrangements were quantified to follow-up seven B-ALL after induction using patient-specific ASO. Four patients had an undetectable level of MRD with a sensitivity of up to 10-5. This molecular approach allowed identification of prognosis risk group and adequate therapeutic decision. The IGK-Kde and IGH gene rearrangements might be used for diagnosis and MRD monitoring of B-ALL, introduced for the first time in Tunisian laboratories. PMID:28099581

  13. Phenotypic changes in acute myeloid leukaemia: implications in the detection of minimal residual disease.

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, A; San Miguel, J F; Vidriales, M B; López-Berges, M C; García-Marcos, M A; Gonzalez, M; Landolfi, C; Orfão, A

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of phenotypic changes as possible limiting factors in the immunological detection of minimal residual disease in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). METHODS: 20 relapses were evaluated, with special attention to changes in the criteria used for the definition of a phenotype as "aberrant". In all cases the same monoclonal antibody and fluorochrome were used at diagnosis and in relapse. RESULTS: Six out of the 16 patients showed aberrant phenotypes at diagnosis. At relapse, no changes in the aberrant phenotypes were detected in most of the patients; nevertheless, in two of the four patients with asynchronous antigen expression this aberration disappeared at relapse. At diagnosis in both cases there were already small blast cell subpopulations showing the phenotype of leukaemic cells at relapse. Ten out of the 16 cases analysed showed significant changes in the expression of at least one of the markers analysed. CONCLUSIONS: At relapse in AML the "leukaemic phenotypes" usually remained unaltered, while other phenotypic features--not relevant for distinguishing leukaemic blast cells among normal progenitors--changed frequently; however, they were not a major limitation in the immunological detection of minimal residual disease. PMID:8666678

  14. Acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma in a newborn infant with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Horikawa, Masahiro; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Hashimoto, Jyunya; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) in newborn infants is rare compared with other types of intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, posterior fossa EDH is extremely rare. We present a case of posterior fossa EDH in an infant with Menkes disease with accessory bones in the occiput. A male infant with a condition diagnosed with Menkes disease by prenatal testing was born at 39 weeks via vacuum extraction. The patient presented with a mild tremor at 2 days after delivery. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed an acute EDH in the posterior fossa, extending into the occipitoparietal area. Three-dimensional CT and bone window CT scan revealed several accessory bones, diastasis of 1 accessory suture, a communicated fracture, and a linear fracture in the occipital bone. Furthermore, a bone fragment from a communicated fracture displaced toward the inside. The patient was treated conservatively for EDH because of his good general condition. The hematoma gradually resolved, and his tremor did not recur. We suggest the following mechanism of posterior fossa EDH development in our patient: (1) external force was applied to the occiput inside the birth canal during delivery, resulting in diastasis; (2) a communicated fracture occurred, and a bone fragment displaced toward the inside (linear fracture was caused indirectly by the force); (3) a transverse sinus was injured by the fragment; and (4) EDH developed in both the posterior fossa and supratentorial region. Copper deficiency can also cause fragility of connective tissues, vessels, and bones.

  15. Disordered macrophage cytokine secretion underlies impaired acute inflammation and bacterial clearance in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew M.; Rahman, Farooq Z.; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Graham, Simon J.; Marks, Daniel J.B.; Sewell, Gavin W.; Palmer, Christine D.; Wilde, Jonathan; Foxwell, Brian M.J.; Gloger, Israel S.; Sweeting, Trevor; Marsh, Mark; Walker, Ann P.; Bloom, Stuart L.

    2009-01-01

    The cause of Crohn's disease (CD) remains poorly understood. Counterintuitively, these patients possess an impaired acute inflammatory response, which could result in delayed clearance of bacteria penetrating the lining of the bowel and predispose to granuloma formation and chronicity. We tested this hypothesis in human subjects by monitoring responses to killed Escherichia coli injected subcutaneously into the forearm. Accumulation of 111In-labeled neutrophils at these sites and clearance of 32P-labeled bacteria from them were markedly impaired in CD. Locally increased blood flow and bacterial clearance were dependent on the numbers of bacteria injected. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by CD macrophages was grossly impaired in response to E. coli or specific Toll-like receptor agonists. Despite normal levels and stability of cytokine messenger RNA, intracellular levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were abnormally low in CD macrophages. Coupled with reduced secretion, these findings indicate accelerated intracellular breakdown. Differential transcription profiles identified disease-specific genes, notably including those encoding proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. Intracellular destruction of TNF was decreased by inhibitors of lysosomal function. Together, our findings suggest that in CD macrophages, an abnormal proportion of cytokines are routed to lysosomes and degraded rather than being released through the normal secretory pathway. PMID:19652016

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi infection enhances polyreactive antibody response in an acute case of human Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Grauert, M R; Houdayer, M; Hontebeyrie-Joskowciz, M

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of antibody response in an acute case of human Chagas' disease was investigated. Hypergammaglubulinaemia appeared at day 17 of infection, and persisted after 66 days of infection, at which time parasitaemia became undetectable. Titration of immunoglobulins showed that the three principal isotypes were involved in the response, emphasizing polyclonal B cell activation. Total IgA was detected before total IgM, and the latter before total IgG. High titres of autoantibodies were found among IgM and IgG subclasses. IgA was also the first isotype to be detected among specific anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. However, the maximal parasite antibody response was attained after 30 days of infection for all isotypes. With regard to possible cross-reactivity between molecules of host and parasite, adsorption experiments on T. cruzi-specific immunosorbent were designed. Specific antibodies, present in the eluates, also recognized natural antigens, especially laminin. In order to characterize the alpha-galactose epitope of laminin, adsorption experiments on sheep erythrocytes were performed, and revealed the possible presence of another epitope on the glycoprotein. Our results indicate that in the case of Chagas' disease investigated here, polyclonal activation occurred; moreover, they suggest that molecular mimicry may play a role by increasing autoantibodies, probably via a parasite-driven mechanism. PMID:7686828

  17. Paraproteins with antibody activity in acute viral hepatitis and chronic autoimmune liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Maria E. B.; Florin-Christensen, A.; Arana, R. M.; Doniach, Deborah

    1974-01-01

    Of 27 patients with liver disease and cryoglobulinaemia 18 proved to have paraproteins. Six of these monoclonal immunoglobulins were shown to have antibody activity, directed to human gamma globulin, alpha1-fetoprotein, smooth muscle, and mitochondria. Eight of the patients suffered from acute viral hepatitis, five of whom were HB Ag positive; in all these cases the monoclonal spikes were transient and their antibody activities were directed against IgG in two cases and alpha1-fetoprotein in one. Seven of the patients had active chronic hepatitis and in these the paraproteinaemia persisted, though remaining quantitatively unchanged over several years. One of them had a cryoprecipitable monoclonal smooth muscle antibody. Three patients had primary biliary cirrhosis and in two of them monoclonal IgM mitochondrial antibodies were demonstrated. In three out of the 18 cases there was a double M-component. Since these monoclonal antibodies are directed to autoantigens not unlike the polyclonal ones usually seen in autoimmune hepatic diseases, it is suggested that the factor which triggers the uncontrolled plasma cell proliferation to produce paraproteins must meet cells from an already expanding clone. PMID:18668850

  18. Fatal neglect of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, C; Fechner, G; Bajanowski, T; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    Maltreatment of the elderly is a common problem that affects more than 3% of the elderly. We report on two cases of fatal neglect. Risk factors of victims and caregivers were analysed in the context of the social history. In both cases, the victims had a dominant personality and the abusers (the sons) had been strictly controlled and formed by the parent. The victims showed typical risk factors such as living together with the abuser, isolation, dependence on care, income and money administration. Initially, the victims declined help from outside and self-neglect occurred. The unemployed perpetrators lived in social isolation and depended financially and mentally on the victims. In both cases no mental illness was present but there was a decrease of social competence. Legal medicine is predominantly involved in fatal cases in connection with external post-mortem examinations and autopsies. Also in the living, the medico-legal expert can assist in the identification of findings in elderly persons in cases of suspected abuse.

  19. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute e