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Sample records for acute febrile encephalopathy

  1. Acute febrile encephalopathy in adults from Northwest India

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Ashish; Suri, Vika; Varma, Subhash; Sharma, Navneet; Mahi, Sushil; Singh, Paramjeet; Khandelwal, Niranjan K

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute onset fever with altered mentation is a common problem encountered by the physician practicing in tropical countries. Central nervous system (CNS) infections are the most common cause resulting in fever with altered mentation in children. Aim: In this study, we have tried to analyze the cause of encephalopathy following short febrile illness in adults presenting to a tertiary care center in Northwestern part of India. Setting and Design: A prospective observational study carried out in a tertiary care center in the Northwestern India over a period of 1 year. Material and Methods A total of 127 patients with fever of less than 2 weeks duration along with alteration in mentation were studied prospectively over a period of 12 months. The demographic variables were recorded in detail. In addition to routine investigations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, along with magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all the subjects. Statistical Analysis The results were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The values were expressed as mean with standard deviation for contiguous variable as percentage for the others. Results and Conclusion Out of these, 70% had primary CNS infection as the etiology. A total of 33% patients had meningitis, 29.9% had evidence of meningoencephalitis, and 12.7% were diagnosed as sepsis-associated encephalopathy. These were followed by cerebral malaria, leptospirosis, and brain abscess as the cause of febrile encephalopathy in adults. Among the noninfectious causes, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cortical venous thrombosis, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome were documented in 2.36% each. In 11% of the patients, the final diagnosis could not be made in spite of the extensive investigations. Our study demonstrates that acute febrile encephalopathy in adults is a heterogeneous syndrome with primary CNS infections being the commonest etiology. PMID:20930964

  2. Distinguishing Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion from Prolonged Febrile Seizures by Acute Phase EEG Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Fukuda, Chisako; Kishi, Kazuko; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Lee, Sooyoung; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Toyoshima, Mitsuo; Sejima, Hitoshi; Kaji, Shunsaku; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Okanishi, Toru; Tomita, Yutaka; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background To differentiate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) after status epileptics in febrile children with final diagnosis of either febrile seizure (FS) or acute encephalopathy for an early diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively collected data from 68 children who had status epilepticus and for whom EEGs were recorded within 120 h. These included subjects with a final diagnosis of FS (n = 20), epileptic status (ES; n = 11), acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD; n = 18), mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS; n = 7), other febrile encephalopathies (n = 10), hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (n = 1), and intracranial bleeding (n = 1). Initially, all EEGs were visually assessed and graded, and correlation with outcome was explored. Representative EEG epochs were then selected for quantitative analyses. Furthermore, data from AESD (n = 7) and FS (n = 16) patients for whom EEG was recorded within 24 h were also compared. Results Although milder and most severe grades of EEG correlated with neurological outcome, the outcome of moderate EEG severity group was variable and was not predictable from usual inspection. Frequency band analysis revealed that solid delta power was not significantly different among the five groups (AESD, MERS, FS, ES and control), and that MERS group showed the highest theta band power. The ratios of delta/alpha and (delta + theta)/(alpha + beta) band powers were significantly higher in the AESD group than in other groups. The alpha and beta band powers in EEGs within 24 h from onset were significantly lower in the AESD group. The band powers and their ratios showed earlier improvement towards 24 h in FS than in AESD. Conclusion Sequential EEG recording up to 24 h from onset appeared to be helpful for distinction of AESD from FS before emergence of the second phase of AESD. PMID:27046946

  3. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, HamidReza; Sajjadi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term “geriatric syndrome” is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed. PMID:26989409

  4. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Sajjadi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term "geriatric syndrome" is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed. PMID:26989409

  5. [Pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy have been clarified in this decade, although many unknown mechanisms remain to be elucidated. According to progress of MRI and neuroimmunological analysis and the observation of clinical findings, many new syndromes were found, which enhanced our understanding of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy. The pathogenesis of encephalitis is divided into infection and immune mediated mechanisms. The antibodies to neuronal surface antigens(NSA) such as NMDA receptors, leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and aquaporin 4 were demonstrated in specific encephalitis, limbic encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica. Anti-NSA antibody encephalitis should be treated by immunotherapy such as corticosteroid and plasmapheresis. Acute encephalitis with refractory repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a devastating postinfectious disease in children and adults, although the pathogenesis of AERRPS is poorly understood. Influenza associated encephalopathy(IAE) is characterized by it's high incidence in Japanese children between 1 year and 5 years of age, its onset in the first or the second day of illness and its high mortality (15-30%) and morbidity (25-40%). We proposed the classification of IAE with poor prognosis from the neuroradiological findings. Four types of encephalopathy seem to be differentiated from each other, acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) type, hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) type, acute brain swelling (ABS) type, febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) type. The notable radiological features are thalamic lesions in ANE, diffuse cerebral cortical cytotoxic edema in HSES, reversible cerebral swelling in ABS which sometimes reaches lethal brain herniation, and in FCSE type, dendritic high signal in subcortical white matter by DWI ("bright tree appearance") appears simultaneously with the later onset of repetitive focal seizure. These four types are

  6. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Islambulchilar, Mina; Asvadi, Iraj; Sanaat, Zohreh; Esfahani, Ali; Sattari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally). Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years). The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05) increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05) lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes. PMID:25789226

  7. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management.

    PubMed

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; El Kerouiti, Zakaria; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought.

  8. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management

    PubMed Central

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; Kerouiti, Zakaria El; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought PMID:26328000

  9. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  10. Febrile neutropenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal; Tüysüz, Gülen; Çelik, Nigar; Yantri, Leman; Erginöz, Ethem; Apak, Hilmi; Özkan, Alp; Yıldız, İnci; Celkan, Tiraje

    2016-01-01

    Aim: An important life-threatening complication of intensive chemotherapy administered in children with leukemia is febrile neutropenia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and consequences of febrile neutropenia attacks in children who were treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Material and Methods: Nighty-six children who received chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in our center between January 1995 and December 2010 were included in the study. The data related to demographic characteristics, treatment features, relapse and febrile neutropenia incidences, risk factors, culture results and prognosis were retrospectively evaluated from the patients’ files. Results: A total of two hundred-ninety nine febrile neutropenia attacks observed in the patients during initial treatment and relapse treatment were evaluated. When the incidence of febrile neutropenia was evaluated by years, it was observed that the patients treated after year 2000 had statistically significantly more febrile neutopenia attacks compared to the patients treated before year 2000. When the incidences of febrile neutropenia during initial treatment and during relapse treatment were compared, it was observed that more febrile neutropenia attacks occured during relapse treatment. Fifty-nine percent of all febrile neutropenia attacks were fever of unknown origin. Eighty microorganisms grew in cultures during febrile neutropenia throughout treatment in 75 patients; 86% were bacterial infections (50% gram positive and 50% gram negative), 8% were viral infections and 6% were fungal infections. Coagulase negative staphylococcus (n=17) was the most frequent gram positive pathogen; E. Coli (n=17) was the most commonly grown gram negative pathogen. Conclusions: In this study, it was found that an increase in the incidence of febrile neutropenia occured in years. Increments in treatment intensities increase the incidence of febrile neutropenia while improving

  11. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  12. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  13. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  14. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  15. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion associated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Rieko; Okumura, Akihisa; Nakazawa, Tomoyuki; Hara, Satoshi; Yamakawa, Yoko; Kamata, Ayako; Kinoshita, Keiji; Obinata, Kaoru; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    We reported a girl with HHV-6 infection associated with both acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion, and hemophagocytic syndrome. She had a prolonged convulsion after a one-day history of febrile illness. Cerebrospinal fluid or brain CT showed no abnormalities on admission and her consciousness was recovered on the next day. However, a prolonged seizure and deterioration of consciousness appeared on the sixth day of illness. Diffusion-weighted images revealed marked reduction of water diffusion in the bilateral frontal areas. HHV-6 infection was virologically proven by polymerase chain reaction. She was treated with gamma-globulin, steroid pulse therapy, and brain hypothermia. In addition, decrease in white blood cells and platelet counts, and elevation of liver enzymes and ferritin were noted on the fourth day of illness. Hemophagocytic macrophages were revealed by bone marrow aspiration on the sixth day. Her hematological and blood chemistry abnormalities recovered gradually after steroid pulse therapy. An elevation of interleukin-6, -8, and -10, and tumor necrosis factor in the serum and that of interleukin-4, -6, and-8 in the cerebrospinal fluid were observed at the onset of a late seizure. These facts suggested that hypercytokinemia will be related to the pathogenesis of acute encephalopathy of our patient. PMID:19556082

  16. Acute encephalopathy and tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaito, Hiroshi; Kamei, Koichi; Ogura, Masao; Kikuchi, Eriko; Hoshino, Hideki; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Abe, Jun; Ito, Shuichi

    2012-12-01

    We report the case of a 28-month-old boy with encephalopathy and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis possibly associated with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yp) infection. He was transferred to our center because of impairment of renal function and altered consciousness. He had fever for 5 days after recurrent vomiting and diarrhea. Computed tomography scan was normal, but electroencephalogram (EEG) analyses showed generalized slow wave patterns. Continuous hemodialysis was undergone and then his renal function was improved, but altered consciousness persisted. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) revealed abnormally low signals at entire field, which suggested that he was suffered from encephalopathy. Phenobarbital administration and post-encephalopathy rehabilitation were started, and he recovered in fully premorbid state with normal EEG and SPECT findings on the 33rd hospital day. Various bacterial cultures were negative, but both Yp antibody and Yp-derived mitogen (YPM) antibody, the antibody of a specific Yp exotoxin, had an extremely high titer. This is the first report of encephalopathy potentially caused by Yp, indicated by the presence of a high Yp and YPM antibody titer.

  17. Acute Liver Failure and Hepatic Encephalopathy After Cleft Palate Repair.

    PubMed

    Kocaaslan, Nihal Durmuş; Tuncer, Fatma Betul; Tutar, Engin; Celebiler, Ozhan

    2015-09-01

    Paracetamol is the most commonly used analgesic after cleft palate repair. It has rarely caused acute hepatic failure at therapeutic or supratherapeutic doses. Only one case of therapeutic paracetamol toxicity after cleft palate repair had been reported previously. Here, we present a similar patient who developed acute liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy after an uncomplicated cleft palate surgery. Lack of large prospective trials in young children due to ethical concerns increases the value of the case reports of acetaminophen toxicity at therapeutic doses. The dosing recommendations of paracetamol may need to be reconsidered after cleft palate surgery.

  18. Acute encephalopathy of Bacillus cereus mimicking Reye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kazushi; Gakumazawa, Masayasu; Inaba, Aya; Shiga, Kentaro; Takeshita, Saoko; Mori, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Nobuyuki

    2010-09-01

    We present an 11-year-old boy diagnosed as having acute encephalopathy and liver failure with the underlying condition of a metabolic dysfunction. He developed convulsions and severe consciousness disturbance following gastroenteritis after the ingestion of some fried rice. He showed excessive elevation of transaminases, non-ketotic hypoglycemia and hyperammonemia, which were presumed to reflect a metabolic dysfunction of the mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and he exhibited severe brain edema throughout the 5th hospital day. He was subjected to mild hypothermia therapy for encephalopathy, and treated with high-dose methylprednisolone, cyclosporine and continuous hemodiafiltration for liver failure, systemic organ damage and hyperammonemia. The patient recovered with the sequela of just mild intelligence impairment. In this case, Bacillus cereus, producing emetic toxin cereulide, was detected in a gastric fluid specimen, a stool specimen and the fried rice. It was suggested that the cereulide had toxicity to mitochondria and induced a dysfunction of the beta-oxidation process. The patient was considered as having an acute encephalopathy mimicking Reye syndrome due to food poisoning caused by cereulide produced by B. cereus.

  19. Chikungunya as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Akoroda, Ufuoma; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikaarachchi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Chua, Robert; Hou, Yan'an; Chow, Angelia; Sessions, October M.; Østbye, Truls; Gubler, Duane J.; Woods, Christopher W.; Bodinayake, Champica

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) re-emerged in Sri Lanka in late 2006 after a 40-year hiatus. We sought to identify and characterize acute chikungunya infection (CHIK) in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in unstudied rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka in 2007. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled febrile patients ≥ 2 years of age, collected uniform epidemiologic and clinical data, and obtained serum samples for serology, virus isolation, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Serology on paired acute and convalescent samples identified acute chikungunya infection in 3.5% (28/797) patients without acute dengue virus (DENV) infection, 64.3% (18/28) of which were confirmed by viral isolation and/or real-time RT-PCR. No CHIKV/DENV co-infections were detected among 54 patients with confirmed acute DENV. Sequencing of the E1 coding region of six temporally distinct CHIKV isolates (April through October 2007) showed that all isolates posessed the E1-226A residue and were most closely related to Sri Lankan and Indian isolates from the same time period. Except for more frequent and persistent musculoskeletal symptoms, acute chikungunya infections mimicked DENV and other acute febrile illnesses. Only 12/797 (1.5%) patients had serological evidence of past chikungunya infection. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest CHIKV is a prominent cause of non-specific acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka. PMID:24312651

  20. Uncommon cause of acute encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Dieuvil, Monique; Malaty, John

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman with a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis status post-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (post-TIPS) in 2012, and ongoing alcohol abuse, presented to the hospital, with haematuria. CT intravenous pyelogram (IVP) was normal except for 'a large intrahepatic cystic mass adjacent to the TIPS, causing intrahepatic biliary duct dilation'. The patient also presented with acute encephalopathy, jaundice, right upper quadrant abdominal pain and hyperbilirubinaemia (total bilirubin of 8.1 mg/dL with direct bilirubin of 3.0 mg/dL). She remained encephalopathic despite adequate treatment for alcohol withdrawal, hepatic encephalopathy and enterococcus urinary tract infection. MRI of the abdomen later confirmed presence of an obstructing biloma. The biloma, drained by CT-guided percutaneous drains, demonstrated an Escherichia coli and ESBL Klebsiella infection. The patient's encephalopathy completely resolved after treatment of the infected biloma. With adequate drainage, her hyperbilirubinaemia resolved to her post-TIPS baseline (total bilirubin of 3.7 mg/dL with direct bilirubin of 3.3 mg/dL). PMID:27194673

  1. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) After Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Tara; Al-Sharief, Khalid; Sethi, Vineeta; Ranger, Gurpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an unusual condition typified by acute visual impairment caused by sudden, marked parieto-occipital vasogenic edema. Thought to be inflammatory in origin, it has been described in patients undergoing chemotherapy, with autoimmune disease, and in some infections. We report a case of PRES that occurred one week after an episode of acute pancreatitis in an otherwise healthy 40-year-old female. There was progressive visual impairment over a 24-hour period with almost complete visual loss, with characteristic findings on magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment with steroids, the visual loss recovered. Clinicians should retain an index of suspicion of this rare condition in patients with visual impairment after acute pancreatitis. PMID:26759673

  2. Specific HLA genotypes confer susceptibility to acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, A; Saitoh, M; Miyagawa, T; Kubota, M; Takanashi, J-I; Miyamoto, A; Tokunaga, K; Oka, A; Mizuguchi, M

    2016-09-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare and severe syndrome of acute encephalopathy triggered by viral infections. Cytokine storm is considered as the main pathogenetic mechanism of ANE. ANE is prevalent in East Asia, suggesting the association of host genetic factors. To elucidate the genetic background of Japanese ANE, we examined genotypes of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, C, B, DRB1, DQB1 and DPB1 in 31 patients. Significant positive association was observed in both the allele frequency and positivity of DRB1*09:01 (P=0.043 and 0.025, respectively), as well as those of DQB1*03:03 (P=0.034 and 0.026, respectively). The carrier frequency of DRB1*09:01 and DQB1*03:03 alleles was higher in the patients (45.16%) than in controls (28.57%). These alleles are more common in East Asian than in European populations, and are reportedly associated with various autoimmune diseases in Japanese patients. Our data provide further evidence that altered immune response based on individual HLA genotypes may contribute to ANE pathogenesis. PMID:27467284

  3. A Clinical Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Tropical Acute Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ajay; Prabhu, Mangalore Venkatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tropical Acute Febrile Illness (TAFI) is one of the most common causes of morbidity within the community. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) due to infective and non infective causes is a major complication. Presence of AKI is a major cause of mortality among patients with TAFI. Aim To study the spectrum of tropical acute febrile illness; the proportion, spectrum and staging of acute kidney injury; Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) initiation and in-hospital mortality. Materials and Methods A total of 600 TAFI patients were prospectively studied at a tertiary care centre in coastal Karnataka between September 2012 and September 2014 for the aetiology of TAFI; the development and staging of AKI based on Kidney disease: Improving global outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines; the initiation of RRT and in-hospital mortality. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0 with statistical significance calculated using chi-square and Fisher’s exact t-test for which p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results The spectrum of TAFI, in decreasing order, was vivax malaria, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria, mixed malaria, enteric fever, scrub typhus and the most common aetiology was malaria. The proportion of AKI was 54%. The most common cause of AKI, its stages 2 and 3, RRT initiation and in-hospital mortality was leptospirosis; and AKI stage 1 was dengue fever. KDIGO AKI stage 1, 2 and 3 was seen in 46.9%, 31.2% and 21.9% of AKI patients, respectively. RRT initiation was required in 10.2% of AKI patients and in-hospital mortality was 3% among all patients. AKI, RRT initiationand in-hospital mortality were significantly associated with older age, fever duration and other presenting complaints, examination findings, renal function and other parameters, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria. Conclusion The aetiology in about half of TAFI patients in coastal Karnataka was malaria. More than 50% develop AKI with greater than one

  4. Infectious Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illness among Patients Seeking Health Care in South-Central Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Matthew R.; Blair, Patrick J.; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Putnam, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations. PMID:22302857

  5. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  6. Study of Aetiology and Outcome in Acute Febrile Illness Patients with Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muthaiah, Bhanukumar; Kondareddy, Srinivas; Chikkegowda, Prathima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute febrile illness with Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) carries significant morbidity and mortality despite standard therapy in intensive care settings. Infections are the most common cause of MODS followed by polytrauma. Present study was undertaken in medical intensive care units of a tertiary hospital to study the aetiology and outcome among patients with acute febrile illness developing MODS. Aim 1) To study the aetiology of acute febrile illness in patients developing MODS. 2) To study the final outcome among these patients. Materials and Methods The present study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in Mysuru, Karnataka, India, over a period of 6 months from July 2013 to December 2013. The Institutional Ethics Committee Approval (IEC) was obtained before the commencement of the study. A total of 213 cases admitted in intensive care unit with acute febrile illness with two or more organ dysfunction were screened for the inclusion and exclusion criterias. Results A total of 213 cases of acute febrile illness with one or more organ dysfunction were screened. Of the screened patients 75 patients were finally included in the study out of which 46 (61.3%) patients were males and 29 (38.7%) patients were females. Aetiology for acute febrile illness with MODS could be established in 49 (65.3%) patients and it was obscure in 26 (34.7%) patients despite repeated investigations. Dengue infection (29.3%) was the commonest cause of febrile illness with MODS followed by leptospirosis (22.7%). Majority of these patients had haematological derangements (78.7%) and liver function test abnormalities (68%). Out of these 75 cases, 54 (72%) patients recovered completely and 21 (28%) patients died. Among males (N=46), 35 (76.1%) patients recovered and 11 (23.9%) patients died where as among females (N=29), 19 (65.5%) patients recovered and 10 (34.5%) patients died. Mortality was proportionate with the number of organ dysfunction, especially Central

  7. [Esophageal aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Besa, Santiago; Kattan, Eduardo; Cid, Ximena; Claro, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillosis usually compromises the respiratory system, but can also affect others. We report a 46 yo female with acute myeloid leukemia, developed febrile neutropenia and dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed esophageal cytomegalovirus-like ulcers, but biopsies showed Aspergillus spp. It's important to consider aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions in high-risk patients.

  8. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  9. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in rural Cambodia: a 3-year prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Tara C; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects.

  10. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Forshey, Brett M.; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Cespedes, Manuel; Vargas, Jorge; Gianella, Alberto; Vallejo, Efrain; Madrid, César; Aguayo, Nicolas; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Suarez, Victor; Morales, Ana Maria; Beingolea, Luis; Reyes, Nora; Perez, Juan; Negrete, Monica; Rocha, Claudio; Morrison, Amy C.; Russell, Kevin L.; J. Blair, Patrick; Olson, James G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are among the most common agents of human febrile illness worldwide and the most important emerging pathogens, causing multiple notable epidemics of human disease over recent decades. Despite the public health relevance, little is know about the geographic distribution, relative impact, and risk factors for arbovirus infection in many regions of the world. Our objectives were to describe the arboviruses associated with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in participating clinics in four countries in South America and to provide detailed epidemiological analysis of arbovirus infection in Iquitos, Peru, where more extensive monitoring was conducted. Methodology/Findings A clinic-based syndromic surveillance system was implemented in 13 locations in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Serum samples and demographic information were collected from febrile participants reporting to local health clinics or hospitals. Acute-phase sera were tested for viral infection by immunofluorescence assay or RT-PCR, while acute- and convalescent-phase sera were tested for pathogen-specific IgM by ELISA. Between May 2000 and December 2007, 20,880 participants were included in the study, with evidence for recent arbovirus infection detected for 6,793 (32.5%). Dengue viruses (Flavivirus) were the most common arbovirus infections, totaling 26.0% of febrile episodes, with DENV-3 as the most common serotype. Alphavirus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV] and Mayaro virus [MAYV]) and Orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus [OROV], Group C viruses, and Guaroa virus) infections were both observed in approximately 3% of febrile episodes. In Iquitos, risk factors for VEEV and MAYV infection included being male and reporting to a rural (vs urban) clinic. In contrast, OROV infection was similar between sexes and type of clinic. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide a better understanding of the geographic range of arboviruses in South

  11. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction in acute lead encephalopathy: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, T W; Mushak, P; O'Tuama, L A; Krigman, M R

    1975-12-01

    Acute lead encephalopathy was induced in adult guinea pigs by administering daily oral doses of lead carbonate. During the development of the encephalopathy, the structural and functional integrity of the blood-brain barrier was evaluated with electron microscopy and tracer probes. Blood, cerebral gray matter, liver, and kidney were analyzed for lead, calcium, and magnesium content. The animals regularly developed an encephalopathy after four doses of lead. There were no discernible pathomorphologic alterations in the cerebral capillaries or perivascular glial sheaths. Furthermore, no evidence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction was demonstrated with Evans blue-albumin complex or horseradish peroxidase. Blood-brain barrier permeability to radiolead was not increased in the intoxicated animals. During the development of the encephalopathy there was a progressive rise in the lead concentration in all tissues. Concurrently, there was a significant rise in brain calcium. These results suggest that the encephalopathic effects of lead may be mediated directly at the neuronal level.

  12. Dengue fever causing febrile neutropenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an unknown entity.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Mohammed; Yadav, Satya Prakash; Dinand, Veronique; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2013-06-01

    Dengue fever is endemic in many parts of the world but it has not been described as a cause of febrile neutropenia. We describe here clinical features, laboratory values and outcome in 10 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and with dengue fever as a cause of febrile neutropenia. These data are compared to an age-matched control population of 22 children with proven dengue infection without ALL. Except for fever in all patients and plethoric face in one patient, typical symptoms of dengue such as abdominal pain, myalgias, and headaches, were absent. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.3±2.0 days in ALL patients vs. 5.0±2.0 in controls (p=0.096). Median platelet count was 13,000/cmm (range 1000-28,000) in cases vs. 31,500 (range 13,000-150,000) in controls (p=0.018). Mean time for recovery for platelet was 6.0±1.3days in ALL patients vs. 2.5±0.9days in controls (p<0.001). All 10 patients survived. In endemic areas, high suspicion of dengue fever should be maintained in children with ALL and febrile neutropenia although typical symptoms may be lacking. Platelet recovery may be significantly delayed.

  13. Unsuspected Dengue as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Children and Adults in Western Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Jadi, Ramesh S.; Broadwater, Anne; Walker, Katie; Woods, Christopher; Mayorga, Orlando; Matute, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Suspected dengue, especially in children in Nicaragua’s heavily-urbanized capital of Managua, has been well documented, but unsuspected dengue among children and adults with undifferentitated fever has not. Methodology/Principal Findings To prospectively study dengue in semi-urban and rural western Nicaragua, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data as well as acute and convalescent sera (2 to 4 weeks after onset of illness) from a convenience sample (enrollment Monday to Saturday daytime to early evening) of consecutively enrolled patients (n = 740) aged ≥ 1 years presenting with acute febrile illness. We tested paired sera for dengue IgG and IgM and serotyped dengue virus using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Among 740 febrile patients enrolled, 90% had paired sera. We found 470 (63.5%) were seropositive for dengue at enrollment. The dengue seroprevalance increased with age and reached >90% in people over the age of 20 years. We identified acute dengue (serotypes 1 and 2) in 38 (5.1%) patients. Only 8.1% (3/37) of confirmed cases were suspected clinically. Conclusions/Significance Dengue is an important and largely unrecognized cause of fever in rural western Nicaragua. Since Zika virus is transmitted by the same vector and has been associated with severe congenital infections, the population we studied is at particular risk for being devastated by the Zika epidemic that has now reached Central America. PMID:27792777

  14. Unsuspected Dengue and Acute Febrile Illness in Rural and Semi-Urban Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Broadwater, Anne; Østbye, Truls; de Silva, Aravinda; Woods, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a globally emerging cause of undifferentiated fever, has been documented in the heavily urbanized western coast of Sri Lanka since the 1960s. New areas of Sri Lanka are now being affected, and the reported number and severity of cases have increased. To study emerging DENV in southern Sri Lanka, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data and acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from patients >2 years old with febrile illness. We tested paired serum samples for DENV IgG and IgM and serotyped virus by using isolation and reverse transcription PCR. We identified acute DENV infection (serotypes 2, 3, and 4) in 54 (6.3%) of 859 patients. Only 14% of patients had clinically suspected dengue; however, 54% had serologically confirmed acute or past DENV infection. DENV is a major and largely unrecognized cause of fever in southern Sri Lanka, especially in young adults. PMID:22304972

  15. Unsuspected dengue and acute febrile illness in rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J; Broadwater, Anne; Østbye, Truls; de Silva, Aravinda; Woods, Christopher W

    2012-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a globally emerging cause of undifferentiated fever, has been documented in the heavily urbanized western coast of Sri Lanka since the 1960s. New areas of Sri Lanka are now being affected, and the reported number and severity of cases have increased. To study emerging DENV in southern Sri Lanka, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data and acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from patients >2 years old with febrile illness. We tested paired serum samples for DENV IgG and IgM and serotyped virus by using isolation and reverse transcription PCR. We identified acute DENV infection (serotypes 2, 3, and 4) in 54 (6.3%) of 859 patients. Only 14% of patients had clinically suspected dengue; however, 54% had serologically confirmed acute or past DENV infection. DENV is a major and largely unrecognized cause of fever in southern Sri Lanka, especially in young adults.

  16. Enhanced Surveillance for Fatal Dengue-Like Acute Febrile Illness in Puerto Rico, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Aidsa; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge L.; Sharp, Tyler M.; Rivera, Irma; Sanabria, Dario; Blau, Dianna M.; Galloway, Renee; Torres, Jose; Rodriguez, Rosa; Serrano, Javier; Chávez, Carlos; Dávila, Francisco; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Ellis, Esther M.; Caballero, Gladys; Wright, Laura; Zaki, Sherif R.; Deseda, Carmen; Rodriguez, Edda; Margolis, Harold S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a leading cause of morbidity throughout the tropics; however, accurate population-based estimates of mortality rates are not available. Methods/Principal Findings We established the Enhanced Fatal Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance System (EFASS) to estimate dengue mortality rates in Puerto Rico. Healthcare professionals submitted serum and tissue specimens from patients who died from a dengue-like acute febrile illness, and death certificates were reviewed to identify additional cases. Specimens were tested for markers of dengue virus (DENV) infection by molecular, immunologic, and immunohistochemical methods, and were also tested for West Nile virus, Leptospira spp., and other pathogens based on histopathologic findings. Medical records were reviewed and clinical data abstracted. A total of 311 deaths were identified, of which 58 (19%) were DENV laboratory-positive. Dengue mortality rates were 1.05 per 100,000 population in 2010, 0.16 in 2011 and 0.36 in 2012. Dengue mortality was highest among adults 19–64 years and seniors ≥65 years (1.17 and 1.66 deaths per 100,000, respectively). Other pathogens identified included 34 Leptospira spp. cases and one case of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Neisseria meningitidis. Conclusions/Significance EFASS showed that dengue mortality rates among adults were higher than reported for influenza, and identified a leptospirosis outbreak and index cases of melioidosis and meningitis. PMID:27727271

  17. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  18. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products.

  19. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  20. Identification of Viruses in Cases of Pediatric Acute Encephalitis and Encephalopathy Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Torii, Yuka; Okada, Ryo; Hayano, Satoshi; Ando, Shotaro; Kamiya, Yasuko; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Acute encephalitis/encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome that is occasionally associated with viral infection. Comprehensive virus detection assays are desirable because viral pathogens have not been identified in many cases. We evaluated the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for detecting viruses in clinical samples of encephalitis/encephalopathy patients. We first determined the sensitivity and quantitative performance of NGS by comparing the NGS-determined number of sequences of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) in clinical serum samples with the HHV-6 load measured using real-time PCR. HHV-6 was measured as it occasionally causes neurologic disorders in children. The sensitivity of NGS for detection of HHV-6 sequences was equivalent to that of real-time PCR, and the number of HHV-6 reads was significantly correlated with HHV-6 load. Next, we investigated the ability of NGS to detect viral sequences in 18 pediatric patients with acute encephalitis/encephalopathy of unknown etiology. A large number of Coxsackievirus A9 and mumps viral sequences were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of 2 and 1 patients, respectively. In addition, Torque teno virus and Pepper mild mottle viral sequences were detected in the sera of one patient each. These data indicate that NGS is useful for detection of causative viruses in patients with pediatric encephalitis/encephalopathy. PMID:27625312

  1. Identification of Viruses in Cases of Pediatric Acute Encephalitis and Encephalopathy Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Jun-ichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Torii, Yuka; Okada, Ryo; Hayano, Satoshi; Ando, Shotaro; Kamiya, Yasuko; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Acute encephalitis/encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome that is occasionally associated with viral infection. Comprehensive virus detection assays are desirable because viral pathogens have not been identified in many cases. We evaluated the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for detecting viruses in clinical samples of encephalitis/encephalopathy patients. We first determined the sensitivity and quantitative performance of NGS by comparing the NGS-determined number of sequences of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) in clinical serum samples with the HHV-6 load measured using real-time PCR. HHV-6 was measured as it occasionally causes neurologic disorders in children. The sensitivity of NGS for detection of HHV-6 sequences was equivalent to that of real-time PCR, and the number of HHV-6 reads was significantly correlated with HHV-6 load. Next, we investigated the ability of NGS to detect viral sequences in 18 pediatric patients with acute encephalitis/encephalopathy of unknown etiology. A large number of Coxsackievirus A9 and mumps viral sequences were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of 2 and 1 patients, respectively. In addition, Torque teno virus and Pepper mild mottle viral sequences were detected in the sera of one patient each. These data indicate that NGS is useful for detection of causative viruses in patients with pediatric encephalitis/encephalopathy. PMID:27625312

  2. Hepatic encephalopathy in patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Montagnese, Sara; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy in a hospitalized cirrhotic patient is associated with a high mortality rate and its presence adds further to the mortality of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The exact pathophysiological mechanisms of HE in this group of patients are unclear but hyperammonemia, systemic inflammation (including sepsis, bacterial translocation, and insulin resistance) and oxidative stress, modulated by glutaminase gene alteration, remain as key factors. Moreover, alcohol misuse, hyponatremia, renal insufficiency, and microbiota are actively explored. HE diagnosis requires exclusion of other causes of neurological, metabolic and psychiatric dysfunction. Hospitalization in the ICU should be considered in every patient with overt HE, but particularly if this is associated with ACLF. Precipitating factors should be identified and treated as required. Evidence-based specific management options are limited to bowel cleansing and non-absorbable antibiotics. Ammonia lowering drugs, such as glycerol phenylbutyrate and ornithine phenylacetate show promise but are still in clinical trials. Albumin dialysis may be useful in refractory cases. Antibiotics, prebiotics, and treatment of diabetes reduce systemic inflammation. Where possible and not contraindicated, large portal-systemic shunts may be embolized but liver transplantation is the most definitive step in the management of HE in this setting. HE in patients with ACLF appears to be clinically and pathophysiologically distinct from that of acute decompensation and requires further studies and characterization.

  3. Epidemiological and clinical features of dengue versus other acute febrile illnesses amongst patients seen at government polyclinics.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, B; Hani, A W Asmah; Chem, Y K; Mariam, M; Khairul, A H; Abdul Rasid, K; Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    Classical dengue fever is characterized by the clinical features of fever, headache, severe myalgia and occasionally rash, which can also be caused by a number of other viral and bacterial infections. Five hundred and fifty eight patients who fulfilled the criteria of clinical diagnosis of acute dengue from 4 government outpatient polyclinics were recruited in this prospective field study. Of the 558 patients, 190 patients were categorized as acute dengue fever, 86 as recent dengue and 282 as non-dengue febrile illnesses based on the results of a number of laboratory tests. Epidemiological features of febrile patients showed that the mean age of patients in the dengue fever group was significantly younger in comparison with patients in the non-dengue group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to gender but there was significant ethnic difference with foreign workers representing a higher proportion in the dengue fever group. Patients with acute dengue fever were more likely to have patient-reported rash and a history of dengue in family or neighbourhood but less likely to have respiratory symptoms, sore-throat and jaundice in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. As with patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have history of patient-reported rash and a history of dengue contact and less likely to have respiratory symptoms in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. In contrast to patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have abdominal pain and jaundice in comparison to non-dengue febrile patients. The finding strongly suggests that a proportion of patients in the recent dengue group may actually represent a subset of patients with acute dengue fever at the late stage of illness.

  4. Influenza Virus-Associated Fatal Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: Role of Nonpermissive Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mungaomklang, Anek; Chomcheoy, Jiraruj; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Joyjinda, Yutthana; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Rodpan, Apaporn; Ghai, Siriporn; Saraya, Abhinbhen; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, two unusual peaks of H1N1 influenza outbreak occurred in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, in Thailand. Among 2,406 cases, one of the 22 deaths in the province included a 6-year-old boy, who initially presented with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. On the other hand, his sibling was mildly affected by the same influenza virus strain, confirmed by whole-genome sequencing, with one silent mutation. Absence of acute necrotizing encephalopathy and other neurological illnesses in the family and the whole province, with near identical whole viral genomic sequences from the two siblings, and an absence of concomitant severe lung infection (cytokine storm) at onset suggest nonpermissive infection as an alternative pathogenetic mechanism of influenza virus. PMID:27812294

  5. Frequency of Epstein - Barr Virus in Patients Presenting with Acute Febrile Illness in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masakhwe, Clement; Ochanda, Horace; Nyakoe, Nancy; Ochiel, Daniel; Waitumbi, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Most acute febrile illnesses (AFI) are usually not associated with a specific diagnosis because of limitations of available diagnostics. This study reports on the frequency of EBV viremia and viral load in children and adults presenting with febrile illness in hospitals in Kenya. Methodology/Principal Findings A pathogen surveillance study was conducted on patients presenting with AFI (N = 796) at outpatient departments in 8 hospitals located in diverse regions of Kenya. Enrollment criterion to the study was fever without a readily diagnosable infection. All the patients had AFI not attributable to the common causes of fever in Kenyan hospitals, such as malaria or rickettsiae, leptospira, brucella and salmonella and they were hence categorized as having AFI of unknown etiology. EBV was detected in blood using quantitative TaqMan-based qPCR targeting a highly conserved BALF5 gene. The overall frequency of EBV viremia in this population was 29.2%, with significantly higher proportion in younger children of <5years (33.8%, p = 0.039) compared to patients aged ≥5 years (26.3% for 5–15 years or 18.8% for >15 years). With respect to geographical localities, the frequency of EBV viremia was higher in the Lake Victoria region (36.4%), compared to Kisii highland (24.6%), Coastal region (22.2%) and Semi-Arid region (25%). Furthermore, patients from the malaria endemic coastal region and the Lake Victoria region presented with significantly higher viremia than individuals from other regions of Kenya. Conclusions/Significance This study provides profiles of EBV in patients with AFI from diverse eco-regions of Kenya. Of significant interest is the high frequency of EBV viremia in younger children. The observed high frequencies of EBV viremia and elevated viral loads in residents of high malaria transmission areas are probably related to malaria induced immune activation and resultant expansion of EBV infected B-cells. PMID:27163791

  6. Causes of acute, undifferentiated, febrile illness in rural Thailand: results of a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Suttinont, C; Losuwanaluk, K; Niwatayakul, K; Hoontrakul, S; Intaranongpai, W; Silpasakorn, S; Suwancharoen, D; Panlar, P; Saisongkorh, W; Rolain, J M; Raoult, D; Suputtamongkol, Y

    2006-06-01

    The adult patients who, between July 2001 and June 2002, presented at any of five hospitals in Thailand with acute febrile illness in the absence of an obvious focus of infection were prospectively investigated. Blood samples were taken from all of the patients and checked for aerobic bacteria and leptospires by culture. In addition, at least two samples of serum were collected at different times (on admission and 2-4 weeks post-discharge) from each patient and tested, in serological tests, for evidence of leptospirosis, rickettsioses, dengue and influenza. The 845 patients investigated, of whom 661 were male, had a median age of 38 years and a median duration of fever, on presentation, of 3.5 days. Most (76.5%) were agricultural workers and most (68.3%) had the cause of their fever identified, as leptospirosis (36.9%), scrub typhus (19.9%), dengue infection or influenza (10.7%), murine typhus (2.8%), Rickettsia helvetica infection (1.3%), Q fever (1%), or other bacterial infection (1.2%). The serological results indicated that 103 (12.2%) and nine (1%) of the patients may have had double and triple infections, respectively. Leptospirosis and rickettsioses, especially scrub typhus, were thus found to be major causes of acute, undifferentiated fever in Thai agricultural workers.

  7. [Acute encephalopathy due to late-onset maple syrup urine disease in a school boy].

    PubMed

    Qu, Su-Qing; Yang, Li-Cai; Luan, Zuo; Du, Kan; Yang, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Maple syrup urine disease is a common amino acids metabolic disease. In most patients, onset occurs in the neonatal period and infancy. In this study, the case of a school boy with acute encephalopathy due to late-onset maple syrup urine disease is summarized. The boy (8.5 years) was admitted because of acute encephalopathy after suffering from infection for two days at the age of eight and a half years. Metabolic acidosis, hyperuricemia and decreased protein level in cerebrospinal fluid were found by general laboratory tests. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed signal intensity abnormalities in the bilateral cerebellum dentate nucleus, brainstem, thalamus, putamen, caudate nucleus and cortex of the cerebral hemispheres. On T1WI and T2WI scanning, hyperintensive signal was found. Blood leucine and valine were significantly elevated. Urinary 2-hydroxy isovaleric acid, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, 2-keto isovaleric acid, and 2-keto acid also increased. Both the blood amino acid and urine organic acid profiles led to the diagnosis of maple syrup urine disease. In the acute period, the patient was treated with a large dose of vitamin B1, glucose, L-carnitine and a protein-restrict diet. The patient's condition improved significantly after five days of treatment, and he recovered completely two days later. Afterwards, treatment with vitamin B1, L-carnitine and a protein-restrict diet (1 g/kg/day) was continued. One and a half months later, blood amino acids and urine organic acids returned to normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain also indicated a great improvement. It was concluded that inborn metabolic disease should be considered in the patients with an onset similar to acute encephalopathy. Early diagnosis and proper treatment can prevent brain damage and improve prognosis.

  8. Acute multiple focal neuropathies and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Che; Yang, Hsiu-Chun; Chen, Yao-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Acute-onset alcohol-associated neuropathy is only occasionally reported, and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy is rare. Here, we report a male who developed acute multiple focal neuropathies and later delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication. He had hypoxia and rhabdomyolysis, presenting with acute renal failure initially, and cardiopulmonary support, including mechanical ventilation, led to improvement of the patient at the acute stage. He suffered from bilateral hand numbness and mild weakness of the right lower limb thereafter. Nerve-conduction study revealed no pickup of compound muscle action potential or sensory nerve action potential in the bilateral ulnar nerve, but showed attenuated amplitude of compound muscle action potential in the right femoral nerve. Multiple focal neuropathies were suspected, and he received outpatient rehabilitation after being discharged. However, the patient developed gradual onset of weakness in four limbs and cognitive impairment 23 days after the hypoxia event. Brain computed tomography showed low attenuation over bilateral globus pallidus, and brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed diffuse increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in bilateral white matter. He was admitted again under the impression of delayed postanoxic brain injury. Supportive treatment and active rehabilitation were given. He had gradual improvement in motor and functional status after rehabilitation. He could walk with festinating gait under supervision, and needed only minimal assistance in performing activities of daily living approximately 1 year later. PMID:26229472

  9. Two-Color Lateral Flow Assay for Multiplex Detection of Causative Agents Behind Acute Febrile Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoho; Mehta, Saurabh; Erickson, David

    2016-09-01

    Acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AFIs) represent a significant health burden worldwide. AFIs can be caused by infection with a number of different pathogens including dengue (DENV) and Chikungunya viruses (CHIKV), and their differential diagnosis is critical to the proper patient management. While rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for the detection of IgG/IgM against a single pathogen have played a significant role in enabling the rapid diagnosis in the point-of-care settings, the state-of-the-art assay scheme is incompatible with the multiplex detection of IgG/IgM to more than one pathogen. In this paper, we present a novel assay scheme that uses two-color latex labels for rapid multiplex detection of IgG/IgM. Adapting this assay scheme, we show that 4-plex detection of the IgG/IgM antibodies to DENV and CHIKV is possible in 10 min by using it to correctly identify 12 different diagnostic scenarios. We also show that blue, mixed, and red colorimetric signals corresponding to IgG, IgG/IgM, and IgM positive cases, respectively, can be associated with distinct ranges of hue intensities, which could be exploited by analyzer systems in the future for making accurate, automated diagnosis. This represents the first steps toward the development of a single RDT-based system for the differential diagnosis of numerous AFIs of interest. PMID:27490379

  10. Acute oral candidiasis during febrile episodes in immunocompromised patients with haematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, O J; Andersen, P L

    1990-01-01

    To estimate clinical, pathogenic and serological aspects of acute oral candidiasis (AOC) during febril episodes in patients with haematologic malignancies, 23 consecutive patients who developed AOC within 7 days from start of fever were compared with 23 consecutive patients who did not develop AOC. The duration of fever and severe granulocytopenia (less than 0.5 x 10(9)/l) was significantly longer in patients with AOC than in patients without AOC, the median differences between the patients with and without AOC being 4 and 3 days, respectively. Development of AOC could not be correlated to a change in the qualitative composition of the oral microflora. The thrombocyte count was lower in patients with AOC on day 4, whereas no differences were found in leukocyte counts. The prevalences of Candida albicans agglutinin titres greater than or equal to 5 were similar in patients with (24%) and without AOC (33%), and in controls (29%). Seroconversion or a significant increase in the agglutinin titre occurred in 4 patients with AOC and long-lasting fever, who became afebrile after systemic antifungal therapy. It is concluded that AOC is associated with long-lasting fever and decreased bone marrow function as judged by low thrombocyte counts, but not related to specific bacteria in the oral cavity or to an increased occurrence of C. albicans antibodies in the serum.

  11. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... febrile seizure does not mean a child has epilepsy, since that disorder is characterized by reoccurring seizures ... outcome but carry an increased risk of developing epilepsy. How common are febrile seizures? Febrile seizures are ...

  12. [Acute edematous encephalopathy presenting with refractory generalized status epilepticus: an autopsy case].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Yamamoto, T; Yasuda, T

    2001-11-01

    A previously healthy, 29-year-old man developed generalized convulsion with disturbed consciousness 3 days after the flu-like symptoms. On the next day, his convulsion evolved into generalized status epilepticus (GSE) that was unresponsive to administration of various anticonvulsants. Then, intravenous anesthetic agents, including midazolam, propofol and vecuronium sodium, were continuously infused. During the following 9 days, despite of high-dose infusion of these anesthetic agents, his GSE could not be suppressed, and complex partial seizure with secondary generalization frequently occurred. The patient was comatose and mechanically ventilated, whereas the brainstem reflexes were preserved. Electroencephalogram revealed a diffuse slowing of the background activity and occasional focal spike and wave complexes with secondary generalization. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein concentration. Cranial CT scans obtained on day 8 demonstrated brain edema. On day 10, his GSE ceased with abolition of the brainstem reflexes, and he lapsed into brain death resulting from the progressive brain edema. Over the following six days, his systemic circulation gradually worsened, and he died on day 16. On postmortem examination, the brain was markedly edematous and showed the findings consistent with acute anoxic encephalopathy with extensive circulatory stasis. Mild gliosis was observed in the insular cortex, yet no evidence of inflammatory disease was found throughout the brain. This patient was characterized by acutely progressive severe brain edema without inflammatory changes, suggesting that his primary disease was acute toxic encephalopathy presumably induced by viral infection. His GSE was refractory and unresponsive to the intensive treatment with the intravenous anesthetic agents. This case epitomizes the difficulties in controlling refractory seizures in some patients with encephalopathy or encephalitis.

  13. Acute encephalopathy associated with ingestion of a mushroom, Pleurocybella porrigens (angel's wing), in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Obara, Koji; Wada, Chizu; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Enomoto, Katsuhiko; Yagishita, Saburo; Toyoshima, Itaru

    2008-04-01

    The authors report an autopsy case of acute encephalopathy in which generalized convulsion and coma occurred after ingestion of Pleurocybella porrigens (angel's wing mushroom). The patient was a 65-year-old man who had undergone hemodialysis for 3 months due to chronic renal failure. Pathologic examination of the brain revealed extensive postinfarction-like cystic necrosis in the bilateral putamens and multiple spotty necroses in the deep cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In 2004, similar acute encephalopathy related to ingestion of the mushroom was endemic in Japan, the pathogenesis of which remains to be elucidated.

  14. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. Purpose: This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46–60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6–10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6–10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. Conclusion: IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness. PMID:27365916

  15. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  16. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Arthur J.; Forte, Sophie S.; Bhatti, Nasir A.; Gelda, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 63 Final Diagnosis: Drug-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy Symptoms: Seizures • coma Medication: Hypertonic 3% saline infusion Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), this condition readily resolves following discontinuation of the responsible pharmacological agent. Here, we present an unusual case of life-threatening encephalopathy due to adverse drug-related effects, in which a rapid clinical response facilitated emergent treatment to avert life-threatening acute cerebral edema. Case Report: A 63-year-old woman with refractory depression was admitted for inpatient psychiatric care with a normal physical examination and laboratory values, including a serum sodium [Na+] of 144 mEq/L. She had a grand mal seizure and became unresponsive on the fourth day of treatment with the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine while being continued on a thiazide-containing diuretic for a hypertensive disorder. Emergent infusion of intravenous hypertonic (3%) saline was initiated after determination of a serum sodium [Na+] of 103 mEq/L with a urine osmolality of 314 mOsm/kg H20 and urine [Na+] of 12 mEq/L. Correction of hyposmolality in accordance with current guidelines resulted in progressive improvement over several days, and she returned to her baseline mental status. Conclusions: Seizures with life-threatening hyponatremic encephalopathy in this case likely resulted from co-occurring SIADH and sodium depletion due to duloxetine and hydrochlorothiazide, respectively. A rapid clinical response expedited diagnosis and emergent treatment to reverse life-threatening acute cerebral edema

  17. Periodic synchronous discharge occurred in an elderly with acute valacyclovir-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Mitsuyoshi; Tsukino, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2016-07-28

    An 81-year-old woman suffering from sarcoidosis, chronic renal failure caused by hypertention was treated by valacyclovir 500 mg/day, for the diagnosis of herpes zoster of her right back. Her consciousness gradually became worse, and 3 days after taking the drug, she was sent to the emergency department of the hospital. Her conscious level was E2V2M5 (Glasgow Coma Scale) and myoclonus especially in her lower extremities occurred. Head CT and MRI show no obvious, acute abnormal findings other than chronic ischemic lesions, while an electroencephalogram (EEG) shows periodic synchronous discharges (PSDs) and disorganized background activity. Based on these findings, she was diagnosed as valacyclovir-associated acute encephalopathy. After conservative therapy of maintenance hemodialysis, her consciousness gradually improved, and PSDs disappeared accordingly and background activity of EEG became improved. In this case report, we presented valacyclovir-associated neurotoxicity with PSDs in EEG as potentially a surrogate marker. We should be cautious to use valaciclovir which may cause drug-induced encephalopathy especially in elderly or patients with renal failure even though the dose was adjusted in advance. PMID:27356736

  18. Sweet's syndrome – a comprehensive review of an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2007-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome (the eponym for acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms, physical features, and pathologic findings which include fever, neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions (papules, nodules, and plaques), and a diffuse infiltrate consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils that are typically located in the upper dermis. Several hundreds cases of Sweet's syndrome have been published. Sweet's syndrome presents in three clinical settings: classical (or idiopathic), malignancy-associated, and drug-induced. Classical Sweet's syndrome (CSS) usually presents in women between the age of 30 to 50 years, it is often preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection and may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy. Approximately one-third of patients with CSS experience recurrence of the dermatosis. The malignancy-associated Sweet's syndrome (MASS) can occur as a paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with an established cancer or individuals whose Sweet's syndrome-related hematologic dyscrasia or solid tumor was previously undiscovered; MASS is most commonly related to acute myelogenous leukemia. The dermatosis can precede, follow, or appear concurrent with the diagnosis of the patient's cancer. Hence, MASS can be the cutaneous harbinger of either an undiagnosed visceral malignancy in a previously cancer-free individual or an unsuspected cancer recurrence in an oncology patient. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome (DISS) most commonly occurs in patients who have been treated with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, however, other medications may also be associated with DISS. The pathogenesis of Sweet's syndrome may be multifactorial and still remains to be definitively established. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that cytokines have an etiologic role. Systemic corticosteroids are the therapeutic gold standard for Sweet's syndrome. After initiation of treatment with systemic

  19. An Analysis of Hematological Parameters as a Diagnostic test for Malaria in Patients with Acute Febrile Illness: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jairajpuri, Zeeba Shamim; Rana, Safia; Hassan, Mohd Jaseem; Nabi, Farhat; Jetley, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hematological changes are among the most common complications encountered in malaria. This study analyzes and statistically evaluates the hematological changes as a diagnostic test for malaria in patients with acute febrile illness and whether these could guide the physician to institute specific antimalarial treatment. Methods The present study was an observational study, conducted from January to December 2012. A total of 723 patients presenting with acute febrile illness at our hospital were evaluated. A complete blood count and malarial parasite microscopy were performed for each patient. Results The findings showed that 172 out of 723 patients (24%) were diagnosed to have malaria by positive smear report. There were 121 males and 51 females with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. Maximum number of cases were seen in the 20-30 years age group. There was a statistically significant reduction in hemoglobin (p<0.005), platelet count (p<0.001) and total leukocyte count (p<0.001) levels in patients with malaria compared to those without the disease. Likelihood ratios for a positive result of platelets (6.2) and total leukocyte count (3.4) was relevant as compared to hemoglobin (1.61) and Red cell distribution width (1.79). The negative predictive values for hemoglobin (79%), total leukocyte count (86%), platelets (94%) and Red cell distribution width (93%) were significant. Red cell distribution width values were found to be higher in patients with malaria than in patients without malaria (p<0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that routinely used laboratory findings such as hemoglobin, leukocytes, platelet counts and even red cell distribution width values can provide a diagnostic clue in a patient with acute febrile illness in endemic areas, thus increasing the probability of malaria and enhancing prompt initiation of treatment. PMID:24498476

  20. Acute confusional state caused by Hashimoto's encephalopathy in a patient with hypothyroidism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nookala, Vinod; Srivastava, Anupam; Qazizadeh, Salim; Fischman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Hashimoto's Encephalopathy is an unusual condition associated with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. This immune-mediated, steroid-dependent entity was first described thirty years ago. In this case report, we discuss the importance of considering this diagnosis in the evaluation of confusion. Case presentation The patient is a 55-year-old African-American woman residing in United States, who was admitted to the hospital with a four-day history of mental status changes. Her past medical history was significant for type II Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and Hypothyroidism. There was no reported seizure activity. The patient's vital signs were stable on admission. On examination, the patient was awake, alert, oriented to place and time. Her neurological examination revealed agraphia and dyslexia. Her speech showed lack of fluency and hesitation. Her complete blood count and electrolytes were within normal limits. The patient's brain CT scan did not reveal any significant findings. Her Magnetic Resonance Imaging only revealed mild chronic microangiopathy, which caused by “small vessel disease.” Her Electroencephalogram did not reveal any finding consistent with seizure activity. Cerebral spinal fluid analysis was likewise did not reveal a cause for this patient's acute onset of confusion. In contrast to the above negative finding, this patient's Thyroid stimulating hormone was discovered to be 15 UIU/ml. She was subsequently given 1000 mg of intravenous Methylprednisolone daily for 3 days. This three-day course of high-dose, intravenous steroids resulted complete resolution of the patient's symptoms. She was then discharged on an eleven-day course of oral prednisone 60 mg. Conclusion Hashimoto's Encephalopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an acute confusional state since it is responsive to steroid therapy and represents a readily reversible cause acute mental status changes. Clues to this diagnosis include elevated antithyroid

  1. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  2. Long-term survival in acute arsenic encephalopathy. Follow-up using newer measures of electrophysiologic parameters.

    PubMed

    Fincher, R M; Koerker, R M

    1987-03-01

    A 20-year-old man survived acute massive arsenic ingestion. The resultant severe encephalopathy and peripheral neuropathy showed limited long-term recovery over the following two years. The patient's clinical course was followed using visual and auditory evoked potentials, computed tomography, electroencephalography, and electromyography.

  3. Possible Role of Rickettsia felis in Acute Febrile Illness among Children in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mourembou, Gaël; Lekana-Douki, Jean Bernard; Mediannikov, Oleg; Nzondo, Sydney Maghendji; Kouna, Lady Charlene; Essone, Jean Claude Biteghe Bi; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Rickettsia felis has been reported to be a cause of fever in sub-Saharan Africa, but this association has been poorly evaluated in Gabon. We assessed the prevalence of this bacterium among children <15 years of age in 4 areas of Gabon; the locations were in urban, semiurban, and rural areas. DNA samples from 410 febrile children and 60 afebrile children were analyzed by quantitative PCR. Overall, the prevalence of R. felis among febrile and afebrile children was 10.2% (42/410 children) and 3.3% (2/60 children), respectively. Prevalence differed among febrile children living in areas that are urban (Franceville, 1.3% [1/77]), semiurban (Koulamoutou, 2.1% [3/141]), and rural (Lastourville, 11.2% [15/134]; Fougamou, 39.7% [23/58]). Furthermore, in a rural area (Fougamou), R. felis was significantly more prevalent in febrile (39.7% [23/58]) than afebrile children (5.0% [1/20]). Additional studies are needed to better understand the pathogenic role of R. felis in this part of the world.

  4. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prolonged seizures are a risk factor for epilepsy but most children who experience febrile seizures do ... develop the reoccurring seizures that re characteristic of epilepsy. Certain children who have febrile seizures face an ...

  5. Syndromic surveillance: etiologic study of acute febrile illness in dengue suspicious cases with negative serology. Brazil, Federal District, 2008.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ailton Domicio da; Evangelista, Maria do Socorro Nantua

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of identifying the etiology of acute febrile illness in patients suspected of having dengue, yet with non reagent serum, a descriptive study was conducted with 144 people using secondary serum samples collected during convalescence. The study was conducted between January and May of 2008. All the exams were re-tested for dengue, which was confirmed in 11.8% (n = 17); the samples that remained negative for dengue (n = 127) were tested for rubella, with 3.9% (n = 5) positive results. Among those non reactive for rubella (n = 122), tests were made for leptospirosis and hantavirus. Positive tests for leptospirosis were 13.9% (n = 17) and none for hantavirus. Non reactive results (70.8%) were considered as Indefinite Febrile Illness (IFI). Low schooling was statistically associated with dengue, rubella and leptospirosis (p = 0.009), dyspnea was statistically associated with dengue and leptospirosis (p = 0.012), and exanthem/petechia with dengue and rubella (p = 0.001). Among those with leptospirosis, activities in empty or vacant lots showed statistical association with the disease (p = 0.013). Syndromic surveillance was shown to be an important tool in the etiologic identification of IFI in the Federal District of Brazil.

  6. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  7. Update: outbreak of acute febrile illness among athletes participating in Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000--Borneo, Malaysia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-01-19

    During September 7-11, 2000, CDC was notified by the Idaho Department of Health, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, and the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network of at least 20 cases of acute febrile illness in three countries; all ill patients had participated in the Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000 multisport expedition race in Borneo, Malaysia, during August 21-September 3, 2000. Participants included athletes from 29 U.S. states and 26 countries. This report updates the ongoing investigation of this outbreak through December 2, which suggests that Leptospira were the cause of illness and that water from the Segama River was the primary source of infection. Participants in adventure sports and exotic tourism should be aware of potential exposure to unusual and emerging infectious agents. PMID:11215718

  8. Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance in a Tertiary Hospital Emergency Department: Comparison of Influenza and Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Olga D.; Gregory, Christopher J.; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M.; Oberste, M. Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2–7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs. PMID:23382160

  9. Acute febrile illness surveillance in a tertiary hospital emergency department: comparison of influenza and dengue virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Olga D; Gregory, Christopher J; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M; Oberste, M Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M

    2013-03-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2-7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs.

  10. Acute febrile illness surveillance in a tertiary hospital emergency department: comparison of influenza and dengue virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Olga D; Gregory, Christopher J; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M; Oberste, M Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M

    2013-03-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2-7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs. PMID:23382160

  11. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity on EEG.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Diosely C; Bashir, Mahrukh; Daniel, Joshua; Lucena, Michelle H; Bonpietro, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 20-year-old patient with a 6-month history of recurrent abdominal pain and a 3-day history of vomiting, hypertension, seizures, and encephalopathy. The brain MRI showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, and continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring showed lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity. Comprehensive CSF studies were negative. Because of severe abdominal pain without a definite etiology, we requested urine porphobilinogen and serum and fecal porphyrins, which suggested acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The patient had a complete resolution of her symptoms with carbohydrate loading and high caloric diet. Acute intermittent porphyria is potentially life-threatening without proper management and prevention of triggers if it is not recognized.

  12. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity on EEG.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Diosely C; Bashir, Mahrukh; Daniel, Joshua; Lucena, Michelle H; Bonpietro, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 20-year-old patient with a 6-month history of recurrent abdominal pain and a 3-day history of vomiting, hypertension, seizures, and encephalopathy. The brain MRI showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, and continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring showed lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity. Comprehensive CSF studies were negative. Because of severe abdominal pain without a definite etiology, we requested urine porphobilinogen and serum and fecal porphyrins, which suggested acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The patient had a complete resolution of her symptoms with carbohydrate loading and high caloric diet. Acute intermittent porphyria is potentially life-threatening without proper management and prevention of triggers if it is not recognized. PMID:27660746

  13. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  14. Acute encephalopathy of the temporal lobes leading to m.3243A>G. When MELAS is not always MELAS.

    PubMed

    Caldarazzo Ienco, Elena; Orsucci, Daniele; Simoncini, Costanza; Montano, Vincenzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Siciliano, Gabriele; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo

    2016-09-01

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a rare genetic condition whose differential diagnosis is often posed with juvenile stroke, but more rarely even with inflammatory/infectious encephalitis, causing diagnostic challenges. Here we report the case of a young man harbouring the m.3243A>G MELAS mutation presenting an acute onset mimicking the clinical and neuroimaging features of infective encephalitis.

  15. [Recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy due to vasospasm and cerebral hypoperfusionin in acute leukemia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hiraide, Takuya; Matsubayashi, Tomoko; Ishigaki, Hidetoshi; Asahina, Miki; Sakaguchi, Kimiyoshi; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). She was diagnosed with B-precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and was administered remission-induction chemotherapy. On day 28 of the induction therapy, she experienced seizure and prolonged unconsciousness. Blood pressure was slightly elevated. MRI revealed cortical cytotoxic edema in the right temporal and occipital lobes. In the right occipital white matter the lesion with vasogenic edema also existed. Three days later, MRI showed vasogenic edema in subcortical white matter of the right temporal right occipital and bilateral occipital lobes. The lesions had receded with time. Since the seizure occurred, the chemotherapy had been discontinued. The episodes of seizure and prolonged consciousness recurred 22 days later. MRI revealed vasogenic edema in the right occipital lobe, and MR angiography demonstrated vessel irregularity and reduced branch visualization in the middle and posterior cerebral arteries. Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) showed hypoperfusion in both occipital lobes. It suggests that vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion could lead to recurrent PRES in this case. It is possible that ASL might be more sensitive than MRI in detecting the lesions of PRES. It should be noted that PRES might recur in leukemia. PMID:26717647

  16. A new approach to define acute kidney injury in term newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Massaro, An N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current definitions of acute kidney injury (AKI) are not sufficiently sensitive to identify all newborns with AKI during the first week of life. Methods To determine whether the rate of decline of serum creatinine (SCr) during the first week of life can be used to identify newborns with AKI, we reviewed the medical records of 106 term neonates at risk of AKI who were treated with hypothermia for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Results Of the newborns enrolled in the study, 69 % showed a normal rate of decline of SCr to ≥50 % and/or reached SCr levels of ≤0.6 mg/dl before the 7th day of life, and therefore had an excellent clinical outcome (control group). Thirteen newborns with HIE (12 %) developed AKI according to an established neonatal definition (AKI–KIDGO group), and an additional 20 newborns (19 %) showed a rate of decline of SCr of <33, <40, and <46 % from birth to days 3, 5, or 7 of life, respectively (delayed rise in estimated SCr clearance group). Compared to the control group, newborns in the other two groups required more days of mechanical ventilation and vasopressor drugs and had higher gentamicin levels, more fluid overload, lower urinary epidermal growth factor levels, and a prolonged length of stay. Conclusions The rate of decline of SCr provides a sensitive approach to identify term newborns with AKI during the first week of life. PMID:26857710

  17. A case of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis that developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Belde; Çarman, Kürşat Bora; Yiş, Uluç

    2014-12-01

    A 10-year male patient presented with swelling in the face, legs and scrotal area which developed 8 days after tonsillitis treatment. Acute post-sterotococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN) was considered in the patient whose urinalysis revealed hematuria and proteinuria at nephrotic level, whose urea, creatinine, lipid profile and anti-streptolysine O antibody levels were increased, albumin and C3 value were decreased and whose 24-hour urine test revealed proteinuria. Renal biopsy was found to be compatible with APSGN. In the follow-up, severe headache, vomiting and convulsion were observed under antihypertensive and diuretic treatment and when the blood pressure was 130/80 mmHg (the 99(th) percentile for the patient: 129/88 mmHg). During the follow-up, the blood pressure values increased to 160/90 mmHg. The electroencephalogram (EEG) performed was found to be normal and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compatible with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). MRI was found to be normal at the first month following antihypertensive and anticonvulsive treatment. In the first year of the follow-up, the blood pressure, neurological examination and urinalysis findings were found to be normal. This patient was presented to draw attention to the fact that PRES can also present with a blood pressure tending to increase and with blood pressure values which are not so high. PMID:26078688

  18. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  19. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  20. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  1. Prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infections among acute febrile patients in Nong Khai Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lertanekawattana, Sujet; Anantapreecha, Surapee; Jiraphongsa, Chuleeporn; Duan-ngern, Pawinee; Potjalongsin, Sathit; Wiittayabamrung, Wisanu; Daroon, Pamol; Techolarn, Meta

    2013-09-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study at three hospitals of Nong Khai Province, Thailand to determine the prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infection among patients who sought care. The study population was acute febrile patients who visited these hospitals during 1 August -31 October, 2010 who were aged 2-60 years and had clinical symptoms compatible with the case definition. Dengue and chikungunya cases were confirmed by an ELISA IgM titer or RT-PCR. We also reviewed surveillance data of dengue and chikungunya infections from 2003-2009. Of the 200 participants recruited into the study, 103 patients (51.5%) were confirmed to have acute dengue infection; dengue serotype 2 was the most prevalence serotype. The ages of confirmed dengue cases ranged from 2-37 years old. The distribution of cases showed that dengue morbidity tended to be clustered in adjacent areas, particularly in Mueang District. Only a small proportion of the patients uses mosquito repellant and had screens on their windows. One patient (0.5%) had laboratory confirmed chikungunya infection. She was from Rattanawapi District, an area where no chikungunya had been reported before. Since the disease varies by age and geographic location, increased awareness of health care workers and public health officers about the diseases in the area is needed for early detection of cases and to promote early prevention and control measures.

  2. Acute necrotising encephalopathy in a child with H1N1 influenza infection: a clinicoradiological diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; James, Ebor Jacob; Thomas, Maya Mary

    2016-01-11

    Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a fulminant disorder with rapid progressive encephalopathy, seizures and poor outcome. It has been reported in association with various viral infections. We describe the clinicoradiological findings and short-term follow-up in a child with H1N1 influenza-associated ANEC. Laminar, target or tricolour pattern of involvement of the thalami was seen on apparent diffusion coefficient images. Our patient had significant morbidity at discharge despite early diagnosis and management with oseltamivir and immunoglobulin. Repeat imaging after 3 months had shown significant resolution of thalamic swelling, but there was persistence of cytotoxic oedema involving bilateral thalami. She was pulsed with intravenous steroids and maintained on a tapering schedule of oral steroids. This report emphasises the need for a high index of suspicion to establish early diagnosis, promotion of widespread immunisation strategies to prevent influenza outbreak, and more research to establish standard treatment protocols for this under-recognised entity.

  3. Acute Uncomplicated Febrile Illness in Children Aged 2-59 months in Zanzibar – Aetiologies, Antibiotic Treatment and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Elfving, Kristina; Shakely, Deler; Andersson, Maria; Baltzell, Kimberly; Ali, Abdullah S.; Bachelard, Marc; Falk, Kerstin I.; Ljung, Annika; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Omar, Rahila S.; Parola, Philippe; Xu, Weiping; Petzold, Max; Trollfors, Birger; Björkman, Anders; Lindh, Magnus; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that a large proportion of children with fever in Africa present at primary health care facilities, few studies have been designed to specifically study the causes of uncomplicated childhood febrile illness at this level of care, especially in areas like Zanzibar that has recently undergone a dramatic change from high to low malaria transmission. Methods We prospectively studied the aetiology of febrile illness in 677 children aged 2–59 months with acute uncomplicated fever managed by IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) guidelines in Zanzibar, using point-of-care tests, urine culture, blood-PCR, chest X-ray (CXR) of IMCI-pneumonia classified patients, and multiple quantitative (q)PCR investigations of nasopharyngeal (NPH) (all patients) and rectal (GE) swabs (diarrhoea patients). For comparison, we also performed NPH and GE qPCR analyses in 167 healthy community controls. Final fever diagnoses were retrospectively established based on all clinical and laboratory data. Clinical outcome was assessed during a 14-day follow-up. The utility of IMCI for identifying infections presumed to require antibiotics was evaluated. Findings NPH-qPCR and GE-qPCR detected ≥1 pathogen in 657/672 (98%) and 153/164 (93%) of patients and 158/166 (95%) and 144/165 (87%) of controls, respectively. Overall, 57% (387/677) had IMCI-pneumonia, but only 12% (42/342) had CXR-confirmed pneumonia. Two patients were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Respiratory syncytial virus (24.5%), influenza A/B (22.3%), rhinovirus (10.5%) and group-A streptococci (6.4%), CXR-confirmed pneumonia (6.2%), Shigella (4.3%) were the most common viral and bacterial fever diagnoses, respectively. Blood-PCR conducted in a sub-group of patients (n = 83) without defined fever diagnosis was negative for rickettsiae, chikungunya, dengue, Rift Valley fever and West Nile viruses. Antibiotics were prescribed to 500 (74%) patients, but only 152 (22%) had an infection

  4. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuville, Marie; Hustinx, Roland; Jacques, Jessica; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI) and hemorrhage (CyH), there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic. Design ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT). CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Results Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172) and/or fever (n = 33). 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11) or probable (n = 12) CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%. Conclusions This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical–fever–and biological–CRP–parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations

  5. Leptospirosis as Frequent Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Flom, Judith E.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Woods, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the proportion of fevers caused by leptospirosis, we obtained serum specimens and epidemiologic and clinical data from patients in Galle, Sri Lanka, March–October 2007. Immunoglobulin M ELISA was performed on paired serum specimens to diagnose acute (seroconversion or 4-fold titer rise) or past (titer without rise) leptospirosis and seroprevalence (acute). We compared (individually) the diagnostic yield of acute-phase specimens and clinical impression with paired specimens for acute leptospirosis. Of 889 patients with paired specimens, 120 had acute leptosoirosis and 241 had past leptospirosis. The sensitivity and specificity of acute-phase serum specimens were 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2%–25.5%) and 69.2% (95% CI 65.5%–72.7%), respectively, and of clinical impression 22.9% (95% CI 15.4%–32.0%) and 91.7% (95% CI 89.2%–93.8%), respectively. For identifying acute leptospirosis, clinical impression is insensitive, and immunoglobulin M results are more insensitive and costly. Rapid, pathogen-based tests for early diagnosis are needed. PMID:21888794

  6. A novel autoantibody against ephrin type B receptor 2 in acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is characterized by symmetrical brain necrosis, suggested to be due to breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). We experienced a rare case of ANE complicated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and found that the patient’s serum (V10-5) had binding activity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By SARF (Serological identification system for Autoantigens using a Retroviral vector and Flow cytometry) method using V10-5 IgG, a clone bound to V10-5 IgG was isolated. This cell clone was integrated with cDNA identical to EphB2, which plays critical roles in neuronal cells and endothelial cells. HUVECs and human brain microvascular endothelial cells expressed EphB2 and the V10-5 IgG bound specifically to EphB2-transfected cells. Anti-EphB2 antibody was not detected in other SLE patients without ANE. In this report, we identified EphB2 as a novel autoantigen, and anti-EphB2 antibody may define a novel group of brain disorders. Anti-EphB2 antibody can interfere not only with endothelial cells including those of the BBB (acting as an anti-endothelial cell antibody), but also neuronal cells (acting as an anti-neuronal antibody) if the BBB has been breached. Future studies should determine the clinical prevalence and specificity of anti-EphB2 antibody, and the molecular mechanisms by which anti-EphB2 antibody mediates neuronal and vascular pathological lesions. PMID:24139226

  7. A novel autoantibody against ephrin type B receptor 2 in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao; Watanabe, Ryu; Shirota, Yuko; Saito, Shinichiro; Ishii, Tomonori; Nose, Masato; Harigae, Hideo

    2013-10-18

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is characterized by symmetrical brain necrosis, suggested to be due to breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We experienced a rare case of ANE complicated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and found that the patient's serum (V10-5) had binding activity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By SARF (Serological identification system for Autoantigens using a Retroviral vector and Flow cytometry) method using V10-5 IgG, a clone bound to V10-5 IgG was isolated. This cell clone was integrated with cDNA identical to EphB2, which plays critical roles in neuronal cells and endothelial cells. HUVECs and human brain microvascular endothelial cells expressed EphB2 and the V10-5 IgG bound specifically to EphB2-transfected cells. Anti-EphB2 antibody was not detected in other SLE patients without ANE. In this report, we identified EphB2 as a novel autoantigen, and anti-EphB2 antibody may define a novel group of brain disorders. Anti-EphB2 antibody can interfere not only with endothelial cells including those of the BBB (acting as an anti-endothelial cell antibody), but also neuronal cells (acting as an anti-neuronal antibody) if the BBB has been breached. Future studies should determine the clinical prevalence and specificity of anti-EphB2 antibody, and the molecular mechanisms by which anti-EphB2 antibody mediates neuronal and vascular pathological lesions.

  8. Human African trypanosomiasis (T.b. gambiense): a study of 16 fatal cases of sleeping sickness with some observations on acute reactive arsenical encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Adams, J H; Haller, L; Boa, F Y; Doua, F; Dago, A; Konian, K

    1986-01-01

    The principal clinical and pathological findings in 16 fatal cases of human African trypanosomiasis caused by T.b. Gambiense are described. The changes in the brain took the form of a non-specific lymphoplasmacytic meningo-encephalitis of varying intensity. Other features included morular cells, diffuse microglial hyperplasia, and large reactive astrocytes in the white matter. Carditis was identified in 10 cases. Acute reactive arsenical encephalopathy appeared to be the principal cause of death in 10 patients. Convulsions figured prominently in this type of encephalopathy in seven patients and were sufficiently severe to produce hypoxic brain damage. In three cases of acute reactive arsenical encephalopathy the structural changes in the brain were those of acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalopathy.

  9. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not have a history of seizure disorders (epilepsy). A tonic-clonic seizure involves the entire body. ... no evidence that they cause death, brain damage, epilepsy, or learning problems. Most children outgrow febrile seizures ...

  10. West Nile virus documented in Indonesia from acute febrile illness specimens.

    PubMed

    Myint, Khin Saw Aye; Kosasih, Herman; Artika, I Made; Perkasa, Aditya; Puspita, Mita; Ma'roef, Chairin Nisa; Antonjaya, Ungke; Ledermann, Jeremy P; Powers, Ann M; Alisjahbana, Bachti

    2014-02-01

    We report the presence of West Nile virus in a cryopreserved, dengue-negative serum specimen collected from an acute fever case on Java in 2004-2005. The strain belongs to genotype lineage 2, which has recently been implicated in human outbreaks in Europe.

  11. Dengue encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hendarto, S K; Hadinegoro, S R

    1992-06-01

    Dengue encephalopathy or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with CNS involvement used to be considered a relatively rare condition; but the number of cases reported in human studies has been increasing every year. Diagnosis of dengue encephalopathy is based on clinically diagnosed DHF according to the W.H.O. criteria (1980), with CNS manifestations consisting of abrupt onset of hyperpyrexia, non-transient alteration of consciousness, headache, vomiting--with or without seizures--and normal CSF. Many factors may be considered to be directly or indirectly associated with CNS signs and symptoms in DHF, the main pathology being leakage of plasma into serous spaces and abnormal hemostasis, leading to hypovolemic shock and hemorrhage in many organs of the body. Acute liver failure is considered to be one of the main factors causing brain pathology. One hundred fifty-two cases of dengue encephalopathy admitted during 3 periods at the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta were studied retrospectively. The overall incidence was 152 out of 2,441 DHF cases, or 6.2%. The most pronounced symptoms were hyperpyrexia, alteration of consciousness and convulsions. Laboratory examination showed an unusually high increase of serum transaminases, hyponatremia, and hypoxia. Neurologic abnormalities detected were hemiparesis and tetraparesis of the extremities, and second nerve atrophy; such abnormalities were found in 10 out of the 152 cases, or 6.5%.

  12. [Presence of antibodies against Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus subtype VI in patients with acute febrile illness].

    PubMed

    Contigiani, M S; de Basualdo, M; Cámara, A; Ramírez, A; Díaz, G; González, D; Medeot, S; Osuna, D

    1993-01-01

    In Argentina, there is no record of human cases produced by Dengue virus (Flavivirus), but Paraguay and Brasil (neighbouring countries) have notified human outbreaks of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. In this report, we inform the serological results of a limited human outbreak of a Dengue-like acute illness that occurred in General Belgrano Island, Formosa, Argentina in April 1989. This island is 35 km far from Clorinda city of Paraguay river, with a human population of 150 inhabitants. The weather of this area is humid with abundant rainfall, favouring mosquitoes proliferation. Two samples of serum from 28 human notified cases were studied using hemagglutination inhibition test (HI), complement fixation (CF), and plaque reduction neutralization (NT) test in Vero cell cultures. All tested sera were negative to Dengue, St. Louis encephalitis, Yellow Fever, Bussuquara, Rocio, Eastern and Western Equine Encephalitis arboviruses as well as Influenza and Rubella viruses. By contrast, infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE), subtype VI-AG80-663 strain was demonstrated (34.5% positive by HI, 39.1% by CF and 51.6% by NT). Seroconversion was detected by NT in six cases and only five were positive by CF. The 26.8% of the sera reacted also with VEE subtype I AB by NT. Considering that no cross reaction were detected in NT with these two subtypes, our results suggest that both viruses are concomitantly circulating in the studied area. Furthermore, the seroconversions detected with AG80-663 strain firmly indicate that during the outbreak this virus subtype was circulating in the island, although we could not assure that it was the causal agent of the acute disease.

  13. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed.

  14. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  15. [Scapular and vertebral osteopathies during acute myoclonic bismuth encephalopathies. Apropos of 8 cases].

    PubMed

    Emile, J; De Bray, J M; Bernat, M; Morer, T; Allain, P

    1979-01-01

    Among 59 cases of bismuth encephalopathy, 8 patients were observed to have osteo-articular lesions of the shoulders and dorsal vertebral. These included osteonecrosis of the head of the humerus, which has been reported previously, uni- or bi-lateral fractures of the upper end of the humerus, and vertebral fractures. Severe and repeated myoclonic spasms appear to be capable of causing fractures; microscopic fractures in the spongy bone could explain the osteonecrotic images observed. PMID:434718

  16. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome with acute encephalopathy in a pregnant woman infected with epidemic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: characteristic brain images and cytokine profiles.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Shiozaki, A; Shimizu, M; Saito, S

    2015-05-01

    A food-poisoning outbreak due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) occurred in Toyama, Japan. The case of a 26-year-old pregnant woman with hemolytic-uremic syndrome who developed acute encephalopathy due to EHEC infection after eating raw meat is presented herein. On day 2 following admission, a cesarean section was performed because of a non-reassuring fetal status. Fecal bacterial culture confirmed an O111/O157 superinfection. Intensive care therapies including continuous hemodiafiltration and plasma exchange were performed. After the operation, the patient developed encephalopathy for which steroid pulse therapy was added. Her condition improved gradually and she was discharged 55 days after delivery.

  17. Outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B P14H11F14 in a military training camp in Shandong China.

    PubMed

    Dongliu, Yuan; Guoliang, Yang; Haocheng, Xu; Shuaijia, Qing; Li, Bing; Yanglei, Jia

    2016-09-01

    This study reports an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B [P14H11F14] in a military training center in China between May and June 2014. In total, 164 military personnel were affected, and two patients were admitted into the intensive care unit of the military regional central hospital. A HAdV-B [P14H11F14] virus was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of this acute outbreak of febrile respiratory illness based on clinical manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, specific molecular detection results, phylogenetic analysis, and serological assays. The virus was isolated by the rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture method, and the complete sequences of the E1A, penton base, hexon, and fiber genes were determined and deposited in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic and sequence homology analyses indicated that the isolated strain is most closely related to some HAdV-55 strains from mainland China. However, this strain appeared to be less virulent than former HAdV-55 strains. According to the chest X-ray results of 31 affected patients, there was no radiological evidence of pneumonia. The most frequent symptoms in these patients were sore throat (95.12 %, 156/164) and tonsillitis (93.29 %, 153/164). During the course of the outbreak, incorrect response measures and some potential risk factors, such as fire training and marching training, may have exacerbated the spread of the infection. This outbreak illustrates the urgent need to improve the epidemiological and etiological surveillance of HAdV infections and to improve the ability of doctors and health officials in basic units of the Chinese army to respond effectively to febrile respiratory illness. PMID:27352268

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Lizardi-Cervera, Javier; Almeda, Paloma; Guevara, Luis; Uribe, Misael

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication that presents in as many as 28% of patients with cirrhosis, and reported up to ten years after the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Commonly, it is observed in patients with severe hepatic failure and is characterized by neuropsychiatric manifestations that can range in severity from a mild alteration in mental state to a coma; additionally, some neuromuscular symptoms can be observed. This complication of either acute or chronic hepatic disease is the result of a diminished hepatic reservoir and inability to detoxify some toxins that originate in the bowel. Today, the role of astrocytes, specifically the Alzheimer type II cells, is known to be very important in the pathogenesis of the hepatic encephalopathy, and will be reviewed later. In conclusion, the objectives of this review are: To understand the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, To recognize the precipitating factors, as well as preventive measures for the development of the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the new classification of hepatic encephalopathy and its clinical implications, To recognize the clinical manifestations and stages of the disease, To understand the main diagnostic tests used to detect the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the main therapeutic treatments of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:15115963

  19. Utility of the tourniquet test and the white blood cell count to differentiate dengue among acute febrile illnesses in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher J; Lorenzi, Olga D; Colón, Lisandra; García, Arleene Sepúlveda; Santiago, Luis M; Rivera, Ramón Cruz; Bermúdez, Liv Jossette Cuyar; Báez, Fernando Ortiz; Aponte, Delanor Vázquez; Tomashek, Kay M; Gutierrez, Jorge; Alvarado, Luisa

    2011-12-01

    Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT) and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm(3)) in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2-7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12%) patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections), and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001), 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001). The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue.

  20. Utility of the Tourniquet Test and the White Blood Cell Count to Differentiate Dengue among Acute Febrile Illnesses in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Christopher J.; Lorenzi, Olga D.; Colón, Lisandra; Sepúlveda García, Arleene; Santiago, Luis M.; Cruz Rivera, Ramón; Cuyar Bermúdez, Liv Jossette; Ortiz Báez, Fernando; Vázquez Aponte, Delanor; Tomashek, Kay M.; Gutierrez, Jorge; Alvarado, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT) and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm3) in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2–7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12%) patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections), and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001), 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001). The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue. PMID:22163057

  1. The Role of Human Coronaviruses in Children Hospitalized for Acute Bronchiolitis, Acute Gastroenteritis, and Febrile Seizures: A 2-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jevšnik, Monika; Steyer, Andrej; Pokorn, Marko; Mrvič, Tatjana; Grosek, Štefan; Strle, Franc; Lusa, Lara; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are associated with a variety of clinical presentations in children, but their role in disease remains uncertain. The objective of our prospective study was to investigate HCoVs associations with various clinical presentations in hospitalized children up to 6 years of age. Children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis (AB), acute gastroenteritis (AGE), or febrile seizures (FS), and children admitted for elective surgical procedures (healthy controls) were included in the study. In patients with AB, AGE, and FS, a nasopharyngeal (NP) swab and blood sample were obtained upon admission and the follow-up visit 14 days later, whereas in children with AGE a stool sample was also acquired upon admission; in healthy controls a NP swab and stool sample were taken upon admission. Amplification of polymerase 1b gene was used to detect HCoVs in the specimens. HCoVs-positive specimens were also examined for the presence of several other viruses. HCoVs were most often detected in children with FS (19/192, 9.9%, 95% CI: 6–15%), followed by children with AGE (19/218, 8.7%, 95% CI: 5.3–13.3%) and AB (20/308, 6.5%, 95% CI: 4.0–9.8%). The presence of other viruses was a common finding, most frequent in the group of children with AB (19/20, 95%, 95% CI: 75.1–99.8%), followed by FS (10/19, 52.6%, 95% CI: 28.9–75.6%) and AGE (7/19, 36.8%, 95% CI: 16.3–61.6%). In healthy control children HCoVs were detected in 3/156 (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.4–5.5%) NP swabs and 1/150 (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.02–3.3%) stool samples. It seems that an etiological role of HCoVs is most likely in children with FS, considering that they had a higher proportion of positive HCoVs results than patients with AB and those with AGE, and had the highest viral load; however, the co-detection of other viruses was 52.6%. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00987519 PMID:27171141

  2. [A young patient of acute encephalitis complicated with acyclovir encephalopathy without renal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Tomori, Koji; Isozumi, Kazuo; Motohashi, Sachiko; Komatsumoto, Satoru; Fukuuchi, Yasuo

    2003-08-01

    A previously healthy 30-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of impaired consciousness after convulsion. A temporary diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was made, and intravenous acyclovir (ACV) therapy (250 mg four times daily in normal saline over 2 hours) was started. Three days later, she became confused, and was having hallucinations, dysarthria and generalized painful seizures occurred without focal neurologic deficit. Whether the neuropsychiatric symptoms were related to herpes simplex encephalitis or acyclovir neurotoxity was initially unclear. The brain MRI and lumbar puncture findings were initially normal, but abnormal FLAIR lesions appeared later. ACV-associated encephalopathy was considered. ACV was discontinued, and she recovered from the neurological disorder within 24 hours. Although blood levels of acyclovir were not determined, it is unlikely that they were in a toxic range, in view of her normal renal function.

  3. MR Imaging Findings in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Cozzolino, Attilio; Serino, Antonietta; Fenza, Giacomo; Manto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area) and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex), is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease. PMID:25050351

  4. Epidemiological analysis of a large enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O111 outbreak in Japan associated with haemolytic uraemic syndrome and acute encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Y; Misaki, T; Ishida, Y; Nagira, M; Watahiki, M; Isobe, J; Terajima, J; Iyoda, S; Mitobe, J; Ohnishi, M; Sata, T; Taniguchi, K; Tada, Y; Okabe, N

    2015-10-01

    A large outbreak of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O111 and O157 occurred in Japan in April 2011. We conducted an unmatched case-control study and trace-back investigation to determine the source of EHEC O111 infection and risk factors for severe complications. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to help define cases. A total of 86 individuals met the case definition. Of these, 40% experienced haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), 24% acute encephalopathy, and 6% died. Illness was significantly associated with eating the raw beef dish yukhoe (odds ratio 19·64, 95% confidence interval 7·03-54·83), the likely food vehicle. EHEC O111 and its closely related stx-negative variants were found in the beef. HUS occurred most frequently in individuals aged 5-9 years, and this age group was significantly associated with acute encephalopathy. The prevalence of HUS and acute encephalopathy was higher than in previous non-O157-related outbreaks, indicating a high risk of severe complications. PMID:25600435

  5. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea.

  6. Prevalence of malaria among acute febrile patients clinically suspected of having malaria in the Zeway Health Center, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Sendeaw M; Animut, Abebe; Belay, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    Malaria diagnosis is a common challenge in developing countries with limited diagnostic services. Common febrile illnesses were assessed in 280 malaria-suspected patients, and each case was subjected to clinical and laboratory examinations for malaria, relapsing fever, typhoid fever, typhus, and brucellosis. Data were entered and analyzed using Epi Info version 3.1 software. Malaria accounted for 17% (CI, 12.6-21.4%) of febrile illnesses. The remaining cases were associated with typhoid fever (18.5%; CI, 13.95-23.05%), typhus (17.8%; CI, 13.32-22.28%), brucellosis (1%; CI, -0.17-2.17%), relapsing fever (2%; CI, 0.36-3.64%), and unknown causes (44%). Approximately 7% of patients had coinfections, and 2% of patients treated as monoinfections. Approximately 1.4% of the nonmalarial patients received antimalarial treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of the CareStart Pf/pan rapid diagnostic tests in comparison with those of microscopy were 100% and 91%, respectively, with positive- and negative-predictive values of 94% and 100%, respectively. Compared with microscopy, the positive-predictive value of each malaria symptom was much lower than that of the symptoms combined: fever, 17%; sweating, 30%; headache, 18%; general body ache, 22%; loss of appetite, 21%. The study findings revealed a high proportion of nonmalarial illnesses were clinically categorized as malaria. Parasite-based diagnosis is recommended for the management of malarial and nonmalarial cases. PMID:25420658

  7. Challenges of Establishing the Correct Diagnosis of Outbreaks of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Africa: The Case of a Likely Brucella Outbreak among Nomadic Pastoralists, Northeast Kenya, March–July 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ari, Mary D.; Guracha, Argata; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Njuguna, Charles; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Kalani, Rosalia; Abdi, Hassan; Warfu, Osman; Omballa, Victor; Tetteh, Christopher; Breiman, Robert F.; Pimentel, Guillermo; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of acute febrile illness was reported among Somali pastoralists in remote, arid Northeast Kenya, where drinking raw milk is common. Blood specimens from 12 patients, collected mostly in the late convalescent phase, were tested for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. All were negative for viral and typhoid serology. Nine patients had Brucella antibodies present by at least one of the tests, four of whom had evidence suggestive of acute infection by the reference serologic microscopic agglutination test. Three patients were positive for leptospiral antibody by immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and two were positive for malaria. Although sensitive and specific point-of-care testing methods will improve diagnosis of acute febrile illness in developing countries, challenges of interpretation still remain when the outbreaks are remote, specimens collected too late, and positive results for multiple diseases are obtained. Better diagnostics and tools that can decipher overlapping signs and symptoms in such settings are needed. PMID:22049048

  8. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  9. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  10. Eosinophilic Fasciitis and Acute Encephalopathy Toxicity from Pembrolizumab Treatment of a Patient with Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Maurice, Catherine; Chappell, MaryAnne; MacMillan, Leslie; Al-Habeeb, Ayman S; Al-Faraidy, Nada; Butler, Marcus O; Rogalla, Patrik; Mason, Warren; Joshua, Anthony M; Hogg, David

    2016-03-01

    Anti-PD-1 inhibitors have significant activity in metastatic melanoma. Responses often occur early and may be sustained. The optimal duration of treatment with these agents is unknown. Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old woman treated with pembrolizumab, as part of the Keynote-001 trial, as first-line treatment for metastatic disease. She experienced a complete response after 13.8 months of treatment with no adverse events. One month after the last drug infusion and 18 months from starting treatment, the patient presented with eosinophilic fasciitis. She then developed acute confusion and weakness, thought to be due to intracranial vasculitis. High-dose steroids were initiated with resolution of the fasciitis. Aspirin was commenced for presumed vasculitis with resolution of the neurologic symptoms. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports of eosinophilic fasciitis or cerebral vasculitis due to anti-PD-1 agents. This case demonstrates that toxicity may occur in association with pembrolizumab treatment after a prolonged period of treatment without toxicity. Future trials should explore the optimal duration of treatment with pembrolizumab.

  11. Eosinophilic Fasciitis and Acute Encephalopathy Toxicity from Pembrolizumab Treatment of a Patient with Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Maurice, Catherine; Chappell, MaryAnne; MacMillan, Leslie; Al-Habeeb, Ayman S; Al-Faraidy, Nada; Butler, Marcus O; Rogalla, Patrik; Mason, Warren; Joshua, Anthony M; Hogg, David

    2016-03-01

    Anti-PD-1 inhibitors have significant activity in metastatic melanoma. Responses often occur early and may be sustained. The optimal duration of treatment with these agents is unknown. Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old woman treated with pembrolizumab, as part of the Keynote-001 trial, as first-line treatment for metastatic disease. She experienced a complete response after 13.8 months of treatment with no adverse events. One month after the last drug infusion and 18 months from starting treatment, the patient presented with eosinophilic fasciitis. She then developed acute confusion and weakness, thought to be due to intracranial vasculitis. High-dose steroids were initiated with resolution of the fasciitis. Aspirin was commenced for presumed vasculitis with resolution of the neurologic symptoms. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports of eosinophilic fasciitis or cerebral vasculitis due to anti-PD-1 agents. This case demonstrates that toxicity may occur in association with pembrolizumab treatment after a prolonged period of treatment without toxicity. Future trials should explore the optimal duration of treatment with pembrolizumab. PMID:26822024

  12. Aquaporin-4 Deletion in Mice Reduces Encephalopathy and Brain Edema in Experimental Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.; Verkman, A. S.; Curtis, Kevin M.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema and associated astrocyte swelling leading to increased intracranial pressure are hallmarks of acute liver failure (ALF). Elevated blood and brain levels of ammonia have been implicated in the development of brain edema in ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with ammonia have been shown to undergo cell swelling and such swelling was associated with an increase in the plasma membrane expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) protein. Further, silencing the AQP4 gene in cultured astrocytes was shown to prevent the ammonia-induced cell swelling. Here, we examined the evolution of brain edema in AQP4-null mice and their wild type counterparts (WT-mice) in different models of ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA) or acetaminophen (APAP). Induction of ALF with TAA or APAP significantly increased brain water content in WT mice (by 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.3 ± 0.4 %, respectively). AQP4 protein was significantly increased in brain plasma membranes of WT mice with ALF induced by either TAA or APAP. In contrast to WT-mice, brain water content did not increase in AQP4-null mice. Additionally, AQP4-null mice treated with either TAA or APAP showed a remarkably lesser degree of neurological deficits as compared to WT mice; the latter displayed an inability to maintain proper gait, and demonstrated a markedly reduced exploratory behavior, with the mice remaining in one corner of the cage with its head tilted downwards. These results support a central role of AQP4 in the brain edema associated with ALF. PMID:24321433

  13. Clinical profile and treatment outcome of febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome in South Indian children

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sandeep B.; Roy, Arun Grace; Vinayan, Kollencheri Puthenveettil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the clinical features and outcome of febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES), a catastrophic epileptic encephalopathy, in a cohort of South Indian children. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of a cohort of children with previously normal development who presented with status epilepticus or encephalopathy with recurrent seizures following a nonspecific febrile illness during the period between January 2007 and January 2012. They were divided into two groups super refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE) depending on the duration and severity of the seizures. Key Findings: Fifteen children who met the inclusion criteria were included for the final analysis. The age of the children at presentation ranged 3-15 years (median 6.3 years). All the children presented with prolonged or recurrent seizures occurring 1-12 days (median 4 days) after the onset of fever. Eight children had SRSE while seven children had refractory seizures with encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was done in all the children in the acute phase, and the cell count ranged 0-12 cells/μL (median 2 cells/μL) with normal sugar and protein levels. Initial neuroimaging done in all children (MRI in 10 and CT in 5), and it was normal in 13 children. Treatment modalities included multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (4-9 drugs) (median 5 drugs). Midazolam (MDZ) infusion was administered in seven patients. Eight patients required barbiturate coma to suppress the seizure activity. The duration of the barbiturate coma ranged 2-90 days (median 3 days). Steroids were used in 14 children and intravenous immunoglobulin (2 g/kg) in 7 children. Three children died in the acute phase. All children were maintained on multiple AEDs till the last follow-up, the number of AEDs ranged 1-6 (median 5 AEDs). The patients with super refractory status in the acute phase were found to be more severely disabled at

  14. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  15. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  16. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  17. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Acute-Febrile-Illness Outbreak Investigation and Surveillance of Emerging Pathogens, Including Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ochieng, Caroline; Wiersma, Steve; Ströher, Ute; Towner, Jonathan S; Whitmer, Shannon; Nichol, Stuart T; Moore, Christopher C; Kersh, Gilbert J; Kato, Cecilia; Sexton, Christopher; Petersen, Jeannine; Massung, Robert; Hercik, Christine; Crump, John A; Kibiki, Gibson; Maro, Athanasia; Mujaga, Buliga; Gratz, Jean; Jacob, Shevin T; Banura, Patrick; Scheld, W Michael; Juma, Bonventure; Onyango, Clayton O; Montgomery, Joel M; Houpt, Eric; Fields, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Acute febrile illness (AFI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet an etiologic agent is often not identified. Convalescent-phase serology is impractical, blood culture is slow, and many pathogens are fastidious or impossible to cultivate. We developed a real-time PCR-based TaqMan array card (TAC) that can test six to eight samples within 2.5 h from sample to results and can simultaneously detect 26 AFI-associated organisms, including 15 viruses (chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever [CCHF] virus, dengue, Ebola virus, Bundibugyo virus, Sudan virus, hantaviruses [Hantaan and Seoul], hepatitis E, Marburg, Nipah virus, o'nyong-nyong virus, Rift Valley fever virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus), 8 bacteria (Bartonella spp., Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira spp., Rickettsia spp., Salmonella enterica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Yersinia pestis), and 3 protozoa (Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., and Trypanosoma brucei). Two extrinsic controls (phocine herpesvirus 1 and bacteriophage MS2) were included to ensure extraction and amplification efficiency. Analytical validation was performed on spiked specimens for linearity, intra-assay precision, interassay precision, limit of detection, and specificity. The performance of the card on clinical specimens was evaluated with 1,050 blood samples by comparison to the individual real-time PCR assays, and the TAC exhibited an overall 88% (278/315; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84% to 92%) sensitivity and a 99% (5,261/5,326, 98% to 99%) specificity. This TaqMan array card can be used in field settings as a rapid screen for outbreak investigation or for the surveillance of pathogens, including Ebola virus.

  18. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Acute-Febrile-Illness Outbreak Investigation and Surveillance of Emerging Pathogens, Including Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ochieng, Caroline; Wiersma, Steve; Ströher, Ute; Towner, Jonathan S; Whitmer, Shannon; Nichol, Stuart T; Moore, Christopher C; Kersh, Gilbert J; Kato, Cecilia; Sexton, Christopher; Petersen, Jeannine; Massung, Robert; Hercik, Christine; Crump, John A; Kibiki, Gibson; Maro, Athanasia; Mujaga, Buliga; Gratz, Jean; Jacob, Shevin T; Banura, Patrick; Scheld, W Michael; Juma, Bonventure; Onyango, Clayton O; Montgomery, Joel M; Houpt, Eric; Fields, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Acute febrile illness (AFI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet an etiologic agent is often not identified. Convalescent-phase serology is impractical, blood culture is slow, and many pathogens are fastidious or impossible to cultivate. We developed a real-time PCR-based TaqMan array card (TAC) that can test six to eight samples within 2.5 h from sample to results and can simultaneously detect 26 AFI-associated organisms, including 15 viruses (chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever [CCHF] virus, dengue, Ebola virus, Bundibugyo virus, Sudan virus, hantaviruses [Hantaan and Seoul], hepatitis E, Marburg, Nipah virus, o'nyong-nyong virus, Rift Valley fever virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus), 8 bacteria (Bartonella spp., Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira spp., Rickettsia spp., Salmonella enterica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Yersinia pestis), and 3 protozoa (Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., and Trypanosoma brucei). Two extrinsic controls (phocine herpesvirus 1 and bacteriophage MS2) were included to ensure extraction and amplification efficiency. Analytical validation was performed on spiked specimens for linearity, intra-assay precision, interassay precision, limit of detection, and specificity. The performance of the card on clinical specimens was evaluated with 1,050 blood samples by comparison to the individual real-time PCR assays, and the TAC exhibited an overall 88% (278/315; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84% to 92%) sensitivity and a 99% (5,261/5,326, 98% to 99%) specificity. This TaqMan array card can be used in field settings as a rapid screen for outbreak investigation or for the surveillance of pathogens, including Ebola virus. PMID:26491176

  19. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Acute-Febrile-Illness Outbreak Investigation and Surveillance of Emerging Pathogens, Including Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ochieng, Caroline; Wiersma, Steve; Ströher, Ute; Towner, Jonathan S.; Whitmer, Shannon; Nichol, Stuart T.; Moore, Christopher C.; Kersh, Gilbert J.; Kato, Cecilia; Sexton, Christopher; Petersen, Jeannine; Massung, Robert; Hercik, Christine; Crump, John A.; Kibiki, Gibson; Maro, Athanasia; Mujaga, Buliga; Gratz, Jean; Jacob, Shevin T.; Banura, Patrick; Scheld, W. Michael; Juma, Bonventure; Onyango, Clayton O.; Montgomery, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile illness (AFI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet an etiologic agent is often not identified. Convalescent-phase serology is impractical, blood culture is slow, and many pathogens are fastidious or impossible to cultivate. We developed a real-time PCR-based TaqMan array card (TAC) that can test six to eight samples within 2.5 h from sample to results and can simultaneously detect 26 AFI-associated organisms, including 15 viruses (chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever [CCHF] virus, dengue, Ebola virus, Bundibugyo virus, Sudan virus, hantaviruses [Hantaan and Seoul], hepatitis E, Marburg, Nipah virus, o'nyong-nyong virus, Rift Valley fever virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus), 8 bacteria (Bartonella spp., Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira spp., Rickettsia spp., Salmonella enterica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Yersinia pestis), and 3 protozoa (Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., and Trypanosoma brucei). Two extrinsic controls (phocine herpesvirus 1 and bacteriophage MS2) were included to ensure extraction and amplification efficiency. Analytical validation was performed on spiked specimens for linearity, intra-assay precision, interassay precision, limit of detection, and specificity. The performance of the card on clinical specimens was evaluated with 1,050 blood samples by comparison to the individual real-time PCR assays, and the TAC exhibited an overall 88% (278/315; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84% to 92%) sensitivity and a 99% (5,261/5,326, 98% to 99%) specificity. This TaqMan array card can be used in field settings as a rapid screen for outbreak investigation or for the surveillance of pathogens, including Ebola virus. PMID:26491176

  20. Infection-Triggered Familial or Recurrent Cases of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Caused by Mutations in a Component of the Nuclear Pore, RANBP2

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M.D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a susceptibility locus (ANE1) in a family segregating recurrent ANE as an incompletely penetrant, autosomal-dominant trait. We now report that all affected individuals and obligate carriers in this family are heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.1880C→T, p.Thr585Met) in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). To determine whether this mutation is the susceptibility allele, we screened controls and other patients with ANE who are unrelated to the index family. Patients from 9 of 15 additional kindreds with familial or recurrent ANE had the identical mutation. It arose de novo in two families and independently in several other families. Two other patients with familial ANE had different RANBP2 missense mutations that altered conserved residues. None of the three RANBP2 missense mutations were found in 19 patients with isolated ANE or in unaffected controls. We conclude that missense mutations in RANBP2 are susceptibility alleles for familial and recurrent cases of ANE. PMID:19118815

  1. Acute encephalopathy associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli O157: H7 and rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Imataka, G; Wake, K; Suzuki, M; Yamanouchi, H; Arisaka, O

    2015-05-01

    We reported a case of a 22-months child with hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with encephalopathy. As the cause of this case, the involvements of verotoxin 1 and 2 caused by O157: the H7 strain of the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and rotavirus were presumed. We administered brain hypothermic therapy and steroid pulse therapy in the intensive care unit, but we were not able to save his life and the child died on the 6th day from the onset.

  2. Molecular Characterisation of Chikungunya Virus Infections in Trinidad and Comparison of Clinical and Laboratory Features with Dengue and Other Acute Febrile Cases.

    PubMed

    Sahadeo, Nikita; Mohammed, Hamish; Allicock, Orchid M; Auguste, Albert J; Widen, Steven G; Badal, Kimberly; Pulchan, Krishna; Foster, Jerome E; Weaver, Scott C; Carrington, Christine V F

    2015-11-01

    Local transmission of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was first documented in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) in July 2014 preceding a large epidemic. At initial presentation, it is difficult to distinguish chikungunya fever (CHIKF) from other acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs), including life-threatening dengue disease. We characterised and compared dengue virus (DENV) and CHIKV infections in 158 patients presenting with suspected dengue fever (DF) and CHIKF at a major hospital in T&T, and performed phylogenetic analyses on CHIKV genomic sequences recovered from 8 individuals. The characteristics of patients with and without PCR-confirmed CHIKV were compared using Pearson's χ2 and student's t-tests, and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using logistic regression. We then compared signs and symptoms of people with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV and DENV infections using the Mann-Whitney U, Pearson's χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. Among the 158 persons there were 8 (6%) RT-qPCR-confirmed DENV and 30 (22%) RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV infections. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the CHIKV strains belonged to the Asian genotype and were most closely related to a British Virgin Islands strain isolated at the beginning of the 2013/14 outbreak in the Americas. Compared to persons who were RT-qPCR-negative for CHIKV, RT-qPCR-positive individuals were significantly more likely to have joint pain (aOR: 4.52 [95% CI: 1.28-16.00]), less likely to be interviewed at a later stage of illness (days post onset of fever--aOR: 0.56 [0.40-0.78]) and had a lower white blood cell count (aOR: 0.83 [0.71-0.96]). Among the 38 patients with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV or DENV, there were no significant differences in symptomatic presentation. However when individuals with serological evidence of recent DENV or CHIKV infection were included in the analyses, there were key differences in clinical presentation between CHIKF and other AUFIs including DF, which

  3. Molecular Characterisation of Chikungunya Virus Infections in Trinidad and Comparison of Clinical and Laboratory Features with Dengue and Other Acute Febrile Cases.

    PubMed

    Sahadeo, Nikita; Mohammed, Hamish; Allicock, Orchid M; Auguste, Albert J; Widen, Steven G; Badal, Kimberly; Pulchan, Krishna; Foster, Jerome E; Weaver, Scott C; Carrington, Christine V F

    2015-11-01

    Local transmission of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was first documented in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) in July 2014 preceding a large epidemic. At initial presentation, it is difficult to distinguish chikungunya fever (CHIKF) from other acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs), including life-threatening dengue disease. We characterised and compared dengue virus (DENV) and CHIKV infections in 158 patients presenting with suspected dengue fever (DF) and CHIKF at a major hospital in T&T, and performed phylogenetic analyses on CHIKV genomic sequences recovered from 8 individuals. The characteristics of patients with and without PCR-confirmed CHIKV were compared using Pearson's χ2 and student's t-tests, and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using logistic regression. We then compared signs and symptoms of people with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV and DENV infections using the Mann-Whitney U, Pearson's χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. Among the 158 persons there were 8 (6%) RT-qPCR-confirmed DENV and 30 (22%) RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV infections. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the CHIKV strains belonged to the Asian genotype and were most closely related to a British Virgin Islands strain isolated at the beginning of the 2013/14 outbreak in the Americas. Compared to persons who were RT-qPCR-negative for CHIKV, RT-qPCR-positive individuals were significantly more likely to have joint pain (aOR: 4.52 [95% CI: 1.28-16.00]), less likely to be interviewed at a later stage of illness (days post onset of fever--aOR: 0.56 [0.40-0.78]) and had a lower white blood cell count (aOR: 0.83 [0.71-0.96]). Among the 38 patients with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV or DENV, there were no significant differences in symptomatic presentation. However when individuals with serological evidence of recent DENV or CHIKV infection were included in the analyses, there were key differences in clinical presentation between CHIKF and other AUFIs including DF, which

  4. [Hashimoto encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Pocsay, Gábor; Gazdag, Andrea; Engelhardt, József; Szaniszló, István; Szolnoki, Zoltán; Forczek, Gabriella; Mikló, László

    2013-08-18

    The authors present a case report and review the literature on Hashimoto encephalopathy. The onset of the disease may be marked by focal and then progressively generalized seizures or other neurological symptoms, but a cognitive decline or various psychiatric symptoms may also emerge. High levels of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies and/or anti-thyroglobulin antibodies are present in the serum. Corticosteroid treatment usually results in an improvement of symptoms. The syndrome is frequently overlooked and, therefore, the authors strongly recommend testing serum thyroid autoantibodies in cases with encephalopathy of unknown origin independently on the presence of thyroid disease in the patient or family history. The importance of long-term immunosuppressive treatment should also be stressed.

  5. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  6. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Nicoline; Pardo, Carlos A

    2008-10-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial neurological disorder that comprises a heterogenous group of neurological symptoms that manifest in patients with high titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of HE may include encephalopathic features such as seizures, behavioral and psychiatric manifestations, movement disorders, and coma. Although it has been linked to cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis or thyroid dysfunction, the most common immunological feature of HE is the presence of high titers of antithyroglobulin or anti-TPO (antimicrosomal) antibodies. At present, it is unclear whether antithyroid antibodies represent an immune epiphenomenon in a subset of patients with encephalopathic processes or they are really associated with pathogenic mechanisms of the disorder. The significance of classifying encephalopathies under the term HE will be determined in the future once the relevance of the role of antithyroid antibodies is demonstrated or dismissed by more detailed experimental and immunopathological studies. The responsiveness of HE to steroids or other therapies such as plasmapheresis supports the hypothesis that this is a disorder that involves immune pathogenic mechanisms. Further controlled studies of the use of steroids, plasmapheresis, or immunosuppressant medications are needed in the future to prove the concept of the pathogenic role of antithyroid antibodies in HE. PMID:18990131

  7. Febrile seizures in Kaduna, north western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eseigbe, E. E.; Adama, S. J.; Eseigbe, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Febrile seizure is the most common seizure of childhood and has a good prognosis. However its presentation is fraught with poor management, with grave consequences, in our environment. Thus a review of its current status is important. Objective: To review the status of febrile seizures in Kaduna metropolis. Materials and Methods: A review of cases seen in the Department of Paediatrics, 44 Nigeria Army Reference Hospital, Kaduna between June 2008 and June 2010. Results: Out of the 635 cases admitted in the department 17 (2.7%) fulfilled the criteria for febrile seizures. There were 11 Males and 6 Females (M: F, 1.8:1). Age range was from 9 months to 5 years with a mean of 2.2 years ± 1.1 and peak age of 3 years. Twelve (70.6%) were in the upper social classes (I-III). Fever, convulsion, catarrh and cough were major presenting symptoms. Incidence of convulsion was least on the 1st day of complaint. Fourteen (82.4%) of the cases were simple febrile seizures while 3 were complex. There was a positive family history in 5 (29.4%) of the cases. Eleven (64.7%) had orthodox medication at home, before presentation, 5 (29.4%) consulted patient medicine sellers and 7 (41.7%) received traditional medication as part of home management. Malaria and acute respiratory infections were the identifiable causes. Standard anti-malaria and anti-biotic therapy were instituted, where indicated. All recovered and were discharged. Conclusion: There was a low prevalence of febrile seizures among the hospitalized children and a poor pre-hospitalization management of cases. It highlighted the need for improved community awareness on the prevention and management of febrile seizures. PMID:23293414

  8. Reversible laminar signal intensity in deep cortical gray matter in T1-weighted images and FLAIR after mild acute hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Treusch, N A; van de Loo, S; Hattingen, E

    2012-12-01

    Soporific acute hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy (aHE) can induce considerable changes in cerebral white and gray matter. This report describes a patient in the subacute phase of aHE grade I without disturbed consciousness and with reversible fine laminar cortical involvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 59-year-old patient had esophageal varices bleeding due to primary biliary cirrhosis (ammonium blood level: 140 mmoL/L) and presented with sensory Jacksonian seizures, dysarthria, and increased drowsiness and fatigue. MRI revealed patchy hyperintense (T2-weighted, T2w) white-matter lesions and bilateral signal intensities in the striatum (T1w). During a rise of ammonium blood level to 220 mmoL/L, the patient had increased drowsiness, persistent dysarthria and mild temporary hemiparesis without loss of consciousness. Two weeks later, the patient was asymptomatic and blood ammonium level had reverted to normal value. MRI at that time revealed bihemispheric fine laminar subcortical hyperintensities on T2w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging, and partially on T1w sequences, with no swelling or restricted diffusion; the hyperintensities were fully reversible a month later. Such a distinct cortical signal increase not only on T2w images, but also on T1w, in a patient after a mild form of aHE is a new MR finding.

  9. Mechanisms of acute uremic encephalopathy: early activation of Fos and Fra-2 gene products in different nuclei/areas of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Heidland, August; Sebekova, Katarina; Klassen, André; Palkovits, Miklós

    2010-09-01

    High levels of various uremic toxins such as guanidino compounds and advanced glycation endproducts, as well as an excess of parathyroid hormones, are involved in the pathogenesis of acute uremic encephalopathy. Moreover, distant effects of the damaged kidney with enhanced production of inflammatory mediators are implicated. Data on the pump activity of an abnormal Na-K-ATPase and inhibition of the organic anion transporter system in the brain have been published previously. Recently, the effect of an experimentally induced acute renal failure (ARF) on the neuronal cell activation of Fos and Fra-2 in the rat brain was investigated by immunohistochemistry. ARF was induced by using the following 3 rat models: bilateral nephrectomy, bilateral ureter ligation, and uranyl acetate injection with corresponding controls. The Fos and the Fra-2 immunoreactive neurons of the brain were determined in a total of 120 brain areas over a period of 3 days post bilateral nephrectomy and bilateral ureter ligation and 12 days after uranyl acetate. An activation response was observed in 73 of 120 areas of the brain. The responses were classified into 4 groups: (1) biogenic amines (noradrenaline, adrenaline, histamine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine), (2) stress-sensitive forebrain areas, (3) neuronal cell groups involved in the regulation of water and electrolyte homeostasis, and (4) central autonomic cell groups. In the uranyl acetate-induced ARF, activation of Fos and Fra-2 immunoreactivity took place at the earliest time-point (3 hours) which persisted even after improvement of ARF. This suggests the involvement of the toxic effects of uranium as a result of its accumulation in the brain.

  10. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a cause of febrile hemolytic anemia in travelers].

    PubMed

    Ficko, C; Andriamanantena, D; Flateau, F; Mangouka, L; Soler, C; Carmoi, T; Rapp, C

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae can cause varied hematologic manifestations that are frequently associated with lower respiratory tract infections. Acute febrile hemolysis without respiratory symptoms is quite rare. We describe the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for acute fever with hemolysis, after returning from Djibouti. M. pneumoniae infection was proved by serological testing. A favorable outcome followed macrolide treatment. PMID:23352983

  11. Rapid encephalopathy associated with anti-D immune globulin treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Golla, Sunitha; Horkan, Clare; Dogaru, Grigore; Teske, Thomas E; Christopher, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Rho (D) immune globulin intravenous (IV RhIG, WinRho SDF) has been shown to be a safe treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Common side effects of IV RhIG include mild hemolysis, febrile reaction and headache. Significant hemolysis with renal impairment is infrequently noted. A single case of irreversible encephalopathy following IV RhIG has been reported. We report a second case of encephalopathy following an infusion of IV RhIG for treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  12. Elevated VGKC-Complex Antibodies in a Boy with Fever-Induced Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy in School-Age Children (FIRES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Marjorie A.; Hanrahan, Donncha; Anderson, Claire E.; O'Kane, Kathryn; Anderson, Jennifer; Casey, Maureen; de Sousa, Carlos; Cross, J. Helen; Wright, Sukvhir; Dale, Russell C.; Vincent, Angela; Kurian, Manju A.

    2011-01-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES) is a clinically recognized epileptic encephalopathy of unknown aetiology. Presentation in previously healthy children is characterized by febrile status epilepticus. A pharmacoresistant epilepsy ensues, occurring in parallel with dramatic cognitive decline and…

  13. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials.

  14. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  15. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  16. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy with Hepatic Encephalopathy in Hepatitis B Virus-related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhao-Ni; Zuo, Yong-Qing; Hu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important neuropsychiatry complication of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). PPI therapy may increase the intestinal bacterial overgrowth and infections. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess whether PPI use in ACLF is associated with HE. Patients and Methods: A retrospective case-control study was performed. Fifty five admitted patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related ACLF complicated by Stage II-IV HE developed after admission between January 2008 and December 2012 were matched (by sex, age, and MELD score) with comparable HBV-related ACLF patients (n = 110) who did not develop this complication during hospitalization. We excluded combined HE upon admission and other neurological disorders in patients with ACLF. Univariate and multivariate analyses of 30 variables (laboratory examination, predisposition, treatment, etc.) before the occurrence of HE were carried out to identify the factors predictive of HE. Results: In univariate analysis, patients with HE in ACLF had a significantly higher rate of PPI use (89.1%) compared with non-HE (63.6%, P = 0.001). In addition, clinical and standard laboratory variables were significantly different between the two groups regarding the infection rate, hyponatremia, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Arginine Hydrochloride use and Lactulose use. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the combined effects of the variables with HE as the outcome. HE in ACLF was associated with hyponatremia (odds ratio (OR) = 6. 318, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2. 803-14.241; P = 0. 000), PPI use was independently associated with HE (OR = 4. 392, CI = 1. 604-12.031; P = 0. 004), and lactulose use was protective (OR = 0. 294, CI = 0. 136-0.675; P = 0. 003). Conclusions: The occurrence of HE is associated with hyponatremia and PPI use in patients with ACLF. PMID:24748895

  17. Infusion-related febrile reaction after haploidentical stem cell transplantation in children is associated with higher rates of engraftment syndrome and acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Feng-Rong; Han, Wei; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Yu-Qian; Xu, Lan-Ping

    2015-12-01

    The clinical significance and prognostic impact of IRFR in pediatric recipients of haploidentical SCT are not clearly understood. Therefore, we attempted to determine how IRFR affects clinical outcomes in children. Clinical data from 100 consecutive pediatric patients (60 boys and 40 girls; median age, 12 yr [range, 2-18 yr] after haploidentical SCT between January 2010 and December 2012 were collected retrospectively. IRFR was described as unexplained fever (>38 °C) within 24 h after the infusion of haploidentical PBSCs. Thirty-eight (38.0%) cases met the criteria for IRFR. ES was found in 24 (63.2%) of the 38 children with IRFR, with the median time of developing ES of +9 (7-16) days, while only 15 (25.4%) of the 59 children without IRFR were found with ES (p < 0.001). Similarly, the cumulative incidence rates of grade II-IV aGVHD were 50.0% in the IRFR group and 29.3% (p = 0.012) in the non-febrile group. Multivariate analysis identified IRFR as the risk factor for ES and aGVHD. In the haploidentical setting, IRFR is associated with the development of ES and aGVHD. We attempted to determine how IRFR affects clinical outcomes in children after haploidentical SCT. Thirty-eight children comprised the IRFR group, and 59 were in the control (non-IRFR) group. High incidence of ES was observed in children with the occurrence of IRFR. Similarly, the incidence of stage I-IV and II-IV aGVHD was significantly higher in the febrile group. Multivariate analysis showed IRFR to be the risk factor for ES and aGVHD.

  18. Evaluation of a combined MxA and CRP point-of-care immunoassay to identify viral and/or bacterial immune response in patients with acute febrile respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Sambursky, Robert; Shapiro, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Challenges in the clinical differentiation of viral and/or bacterial respiratory infection lead to the misappropriation of antibiotics and increased healthcare costs. A tool to facilitate rapid and accurate point-of-care (POC) differentiation is needed. Methods and findings A prospective, single center, blinded, observational clinical trial was conducted at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from December 2012 to August 2013 to determine the accuracy of a POC immunoassay to identify a clinically significant immune response to viral and/or bacterial infection. Sixty patients with acute febrile respiratory infection (19 pharyngitis and 41 lower respiratory tract infection [LRTI]) were enrolled. Participants provided fingerstick blood for immunoassay testing (myxovirus A [MxA] and c-reactive protein [CRP]) and four oropharyngeal samples for viral PCR and routine bacterial cell culture. A venous blood sample was collected. An ELISA was used to measure CRP and MxA. Paired serological testing was used to confirm atypical bacteria. A urine sample was provided for Streptococcus and Legionella antigen testing. Patients with suspected LRTI had sputum and blood cultures, chest X-ray, and WBC count measured. Viral infection was confirmed if oropharyngeal PCR was positive for viral pathogens. Bacterial infection was confirmed in positive throat or sputum cultures. Elevated immunoglobulin M antibodies or twofold increase in IgG antibodies between acute and convalescent phase indicated atypical bacteria. Positive Streptococcus or Legionella urine antigen assays also confirmed bacterial infection. The immunoassay correctly categorized subjects as 92% (22/24) negative, 80% (16/20) with bacterial infection, and 70% (7/10) with viral infection. Conclusions The interplay between an MxA value and a semi-quantitative CRP value can aid in the differentiation of infectious etiology. In isolation, neither MxA nor CRP alone is sensitive or specific. However, the pattern of

  19. Contribution of dengue fever to the burden of acute febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea: an age-specific prospective study.

    PubMed

    Senn, Nicolas; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Manong, Doris; Siba, Peter Max; McBride, William John Hannan

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is a major contributor to the burden of febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Dengue fever (DF) is likely to contribute; however, its epidemiology in PNG is poorly understood. We performed a prospective age-stratified study in outpatient clinics investigating the prevalence of DF; 578 patients were enrolled, and 317 patients with a negative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for malaria were tested for dengue. Malaria was confirmed in 52% (301/578, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48-56%), DF was diagnosed in 8% (46/578, 95% CI = 6-10%), and 40% (95% CI = 36-44%) had neither diagnosis. Among the 317 malaria RDT-negative patients, 14% (45/317, 95% CI = 10-18%) had DF. The seroprevalence of dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG) was 83% (204/247, 95% CI = 78-87%), and no dengue hemorrhagic fever was seen. This study provides good evidence for the first time that DF is common in PNG and is responsible for 8% of fever episodes. The common occurrence of DF in a population with presumed previous exposure to dengue is an important observation.

  20. Undifferentiated febrile illnesses in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Burns, Daniel S; Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Undifferentiated febrile illnesses (UFIs) present with acute symptoms, objective fever and no specific organ focus on clinical assessment. The term is mostly used in developing and tropical countries where a wide range of infections may be responsible. Laboratory diagnosis often requires specialist microbiology investigations that are not widely available, and serology tests that only become positive during convalescence. Optimal clinical management requires a good travel history, awareness of local endemic diseases, an understanding of the features that may help distinguish different causes and appropriate use of empirical antibiotics. This review describes the most common examples of UFI in military personnel on overseas deployments, and provides a practical approach to their initial management.

  1. Hashimoto Encephalopathy or Neurosarcoidosis? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Biggya L.; Pitiyanuvath, Nataria

    2015-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased antithyroid antibody levels. Neurosarcoidosis is also a rare entity that occurs in less than 5% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. Neurosarcoidosis usually presents with cranial neuropathies, myelopathy, or new-onset seizure. We report a case of a 49-year-old caucasian woman, previously healthy, who initially presented for a workup of a new-onset seizure. She had a gradually progressive course with neurocognitive decline and recurrent partial seizures refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs. Her seizures responded well to a course of intravenous immunoglobulin. She was subsequently diagnosed with HE and pulmonary sarcoidosis based on serological and pathological studies. She improved neurologically once the seizures were controlled. Hashimoto encephalopathy is a rare condition that is potentially treatable and presents with various neuropsychiatric manifestations. It is a diagnosis of exclusion that requires a strong clinical suspicion and is often underrecognized. PMID:25829987

  2. Progressive multicystic encephalopathy: is there more than hypoxia-ischemia?

    PubMed

    Garten, Lars; Hueseman, Dieter; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Weizsaecker, Katharina; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen; Obladen, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Progressive multicystic encephalopathy following prenatal or perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a well-described phenomenon in the literature. The authors report on a term infant with a devastating encephalopathy and severe neuronal dysfunction immediately after delivery without a known antecedent of prenatal or perinatal hypoxia or distress. Clinical and paraclinical findings in the patient are compared with those described in the literature. The authors focus on the specific results guiding to the final diagnosis of progressive multicystic encephalopathy and the timing of morphologic changes. As in this case, if the criteria of an acute hypoxic event sufficient to cause neonatal encephalopathy are not met, then factors other than hypoxia-ischemia may be leading to progressive multicystic encephalopathy.

  3. Epileptic Encephalopathies: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sonia; Al Baradie, Raidah

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are an epileptic condition characterized by epileptiform abnormalities associated with progressive cerebral dysfunction. In the classification of the International League Against Epilepsy eight age-related epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are recognized. These syndromes include early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, West syndrome and Dravet syndrome in infancy, myoclonic status in nonprogressive encephalopathies, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, and epilepsy with continuous spike waves during slow wave sleep in childhood and adolescences. Other epileptic syndromes such as migrating partial seizures in infancy and severe epilepsy with multiple independent spike foci may be reasonably added. In this paper, we provide an overview of epileptic encephalopathies including clinical neurophysiological features, cognitive deterioration, and management options especially that these conditions are generally refractory to standard antiepileptic drugs. PMID:23213494

  4. [An unusual cause of febrile neutropenia: brucellosis].

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Soner; Asma, Süheyl; Ozdoğu, Hakan; Yeral, Mahmut; Turunç, Tuba

    2014-10-01

    Febrile neutropenia which is a common complication of cancer treatment, is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Several gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are responsible for infections in neutropenic patients, however the most common microorganisms are Escherichia coli and coagulase-negative staphylococci, in decreasing order. Although Brucella spp. infections are endemic in Turkey, brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia has only rarely been reported. In this report, a case of brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia in a patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was presented. A 56-year-old male patient presenting with fever, petechiae/purpura, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory studies revealed a hemoglobin level of 8.27 g/dl, leukocyte count of 77.100 k/ml, absolute neutrophil count of 200 k/ml, and platelets at 94.200 k/ml. The patient was diagnosed as AML-M1 and piperacillin/tazobactam was started as the first-line antibiotic therapy due to the febrile neutropenia. On admission, blood and urine cultures were negative. Once the fever was controlled, remission/induction chemotherapy was initiated. However, fever developed again on the eight day, and vancomycin was added to the therapy. Since the fever persisted, the antibiotic therapy was gradually replaced with meropenem and linezolid. However, fever continued and the patient's general condition deteriorated. Subsequently performed Brucella tube agglutination test revealed positivity at 1/320 titer and the microorganism grown in blood culture (Bactec 9050; BD, USA) was identified as B.melitensis by conventional methods. Rifampicin and doxycycline therapy was started immediately, however, the patient died due to septic shock. If the tests for brucellosis were performed earlier when response to second step antibiotic therapy lacked in this patient, it was assumed that mortality could be prevented by the prompt initiation of the

  5. [An unusual cause of febrile neutropenia: brucellosis].

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Soner; Asma, Süheyl; Ozdoğu, Hakan; Yeral, Mahmut; Turunç, Tuba

    2014-10-01

    Febrile neutropenia which is a common complication of cancer treatment, is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Several gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are responsible for infections in neutropenic patients, however the most common microorganisms are Escherichia coli and coagulase-negative staphylococci, in decreasing order. Although Brucella spp. infections are endemic in Turkey, brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia has only rarely been reported. In this report, a case of brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia in a patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was presented. A 56-year-old male patient presenting with fever, petechiae/purpura, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory studies revealed a hemoglobin level of 8.27 g/dl, leukocyte count of 77.100 k/ml, absolute neutrophil count of 200 k/ml, and platelets at 94.200 k/ml. The patient was diagnosed as AML-M1 and piperacillin/tazobactam was started as the first-line antibiotic therapy due to the febrile neutropenia. On admission, blood and urine cultures were negative. Once the fever was controlled, remission/induction chemotherapy was initiated. However, fever developed again on the eight day, and vancomycin was added to the therapy. Since the fever persisted, the antibiotic therapy was gradually replaced with meropenem and linezolid. However, fever continued and the patient's general condition deteriorated. Subsequently performed Brucella tube agglutination test revealed positivity at 1/320 titer and the microorganism grown in blood culture (Bactec 9050; BD, USA) was identified as B.melitensis by conventional methods. Rifampicin and doxycycline therapy was started immediately, however, the patient died due to septic shock. If the tests for brucellosis were performed earlier when response to second step antibiotic therapy lacked in this patient, it was assumed that mortality could be prevented by the prompt initiation of the

  6. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malavige, G N; Ranatunga, P K; Jayaratne, S D; Wijesiriwardana, B; Seneviratne, S L; Karunatilaka, D H

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%), electrolyte imbalances (80%) and shock (40%). Five (33.3%) patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%). Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3%) of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy: An update of pathophysiologic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hazell, A S; Butterworth, R F

    1999-11-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that occurs in both acute and chronic liver failure. Although the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for HE are not completely understood, a deficit in neurotransmission rather than a primary deficit in cerebral energy metabolism appears to be involved. The neural cell most vulnerable to liver failure is the astrocyte. In acute liver failure, the astrocyte undergoes swelling resulting in increased intracranial pressure; in chronic liver failure, the astrocyte undergoes characteristic changes known as Alzheimer type II astrocytosis. In portal-systemic encephalopathy resulting from chronic liver failure, astrocytes manifest altered expression of several key proteins and enzymes including monoamine oxidase B, glutamine synthetase, and the so-called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors. In addition, expression of some neuronal proteins such as monoamine oxidase A and neuronal nitric oxide synthase are modified. In acute liver failure, expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is reduced, leading to increased extracellular concentrations of glutamate. Many of these changes have been attributed to a toxic effect of ammonia and/or manganese, two substances that are normally removed by the hepatobiliary route and that in liver failure accumulate in the brain. Manganese deposition in the globus pallidus in chronic liver failure results in signal hyperintensity on T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and may be responsible for the extrapyramidal symptoms characteristic of portal-systemic encephalopathy. Other neurotransmitter systems implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy include the serotonin system, where a synaptic deficit has been suggested, as well as the catecholaminergic and opioid systems. Further elucidation of the precise nature of these alterations could result in the design of novel pharmacotherapies for the prevention and treatment of hepatic

  8. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity.

    PubMed

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain. PMID:27570396

  9. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain. PMID:27570396

  10. Mechanisms of epileptogenesis in pediatric epileptic syndromes: Rasmussen encephalitis, infantile spasms, and febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES).

    PubMed

    Pardo, Carlos A; Nabbout, Rima; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2014-04-01

    The mechanisms of epileptogenesis in pediatric epileptic syndromes are diverse, and may involve disturbances of neurodevelopmental trajectories, synaptic homeostasis, and cortical connectivity, which may occur during brain development, early infancy, or childhood. Although genetic or structural/metabolic factors are frequently associated with age-specific epileptic syndromes, such as infantile spasms and West syndrome, other syndromes may be determined by the effect of immunopathogenic mechanisms or energy-dependent processes in response to environmental challenges, such as infections or fever in normally-developed children during early or late childhood. Immune-mediated mechanisms have been suggested in selected pediatric epileptic syndromes in which acute and rapidly progressive encephalopathies preceded by fever and/or infections, such as febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome, or in chronic progressive encephalopathies, such as Rasmussen encephalitis. A definite involvement of adaptive and innate immune mechanisms driven by cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes and neuroglial responses has been demonstrated in Rasmussen encephalitis, although the triggering factor of these responses remains unknown. Although the beneficial response to steroids and adrenocorticotropic hormone of infantile spasms, or preceding fever or infection in FIRES, may support a potential role of neuroinflammation as pathogenic factor, no definite demonstration of such involvement has been achieved, and genetic or metabolic factors are suspected. A major challenge for the future is discovering pathogenic mechanisms and etiological factors that facilitate the introduction of novel targets for drug intervention aimed at interfering with the disease mechanisms, therefore providing putative disease-modifying treatments in these pediatric epileptic syndromes. PMID:24639375

  11. Portal systemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Schenker, S; Bay, M K

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this article is to update the status of Portal systemic encephalopathy (PSE) in the light of new data. First, PSE is the context of other types of hepatic encephalopathy. Subsequently, current views of the pathogenesis of the disorder are discussed, followed by an analysis of therapeutic options. Diagnosis will not be considered, as no major new developments have recently been documented in this area.

  12. Methotrexate Treatment in Children with Febrile Ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann Disease: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bulur, Isil; Kaya Erdoğan, Hilal; Nurhan Saracoglu, Zeynep; Arık, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Febrile Ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease is a rare and potentially fatal variant of pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta and is characterized by high fever, constitutional symptoms, and acute oncet of ulceronecrotic lesions. We present an 11-year-old male with Febrile Ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease who was cured with methotrexate and review the use of methotrexate for this disorder in the pediatric age group with the relevant literature. PMID:26413356

  13. Undifferentiated febrile illnesses in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Burns, Daniel S; Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Undifferentiated febrile illnesses (UFIs) present with acute symptoms, objective fever and no specific organ focus on clinical assessment. The term is mostly used in developing and tropical countries where a wide range of infections may be responsible. Laboratory diagnosis often requires specialist microbiology investigations that are not widely available, and serology tests that only become positive during convalescence. Optimal clinical management requires a good travel history, awareness of local endemic diseases, an understanding of the features that may help distinguish different causes and appropriate use of empirical antibiotics. This review describes the most common examples of UFI in military personnel on overseas deployments, and provides a practical approach to their initial management. PMID:24109142

  14. Rapid irreversible encephalopathy associated with anti-D immune globulin treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Kenneth; Horkan, Clare; Barb, Ilie T; Arbelaez, Christian; Hodgdon, Travis A; Yodice, Paul C

    2004-11-01

    Intravenous Rho (D) immune globulin (IV RhIG, WinRho SDF) has been shown to be a safe treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Common side effects of IV RhIG include mild hemolysis, febrile reaction, and headache. Significant hemolysis with renal impairment following IV RhIG has been reported. We report a case of irreversible encephalopathy 48 hr following an infusion of IV RhIG for treatment of ITP.

  15. The encephalopathy of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A C; Gilbert, J J; Young, G B; Bolton, C F

    1985-11-01

    Twelve fatal cases of encephalopathy associated with sepsis were examined in a ten-year retrospective study. The sources of infection and organisms isolated were variable. Six of the patients had focal neurologic signs; five had seizures. The level of consciousness varied from drowsiness to deep coma, and electroencephalograms revealed diffuse or multifocal abnormalities. Computed tomographic head scans and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were usually unremarkable. Eight patients had disseminated microabscesses in the brain at autopsy. Four patients had proliferation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral cortex, a feature associated with metabolic encephalopathies. Additional findings included cerebral infarcts, brain purpura, multiple small white matter hemorrhages, and central pontine myelinolysis. Although sepsis may cause encephalopathy by producing disturbances in cerebral synaptic transmission and cerebral energy production through a toxic mechanism, bacterial invasion of the brain with the formation of disseminated microabscesses is also an important cause.

  16. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Latt, N; Dore, G

    2014-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute, reversible neuropsychiatric emergency due to thiamine deficiency. Urgent and adequate thiamine replacement is necessary to avoid death or progression to Korsakoff syndrome with largely irreversible brain damage. Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome refers to a condition where features of Wernicke encephalopathy are mixed with those of Korsakoff syndrome. Although thiamine is the cornerstone of treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy, there are no universally accepted guidelines with regard to its optimal dose, mode of administration, frequency of administration or duration of treatment. Currently, different dose recommendations are being made. We present recommendations for the assessment and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy based on literature review and our clinical experience.

  17. Immunosuppressive measles encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, F K; Schiøtz, P O; Valerius, N H; Hertz, H

    1978-01-01

    A case of measles infection without a rash, which was followed by a severe encephalopathy after two months, is described in a 2 1/2 year old boy. At the age of 8 months he had been irradiated for an inoperable intrathoracic neuroblastoma, and at the time of exposure to measles he was being treated with cyclophosphamide and vincristine. This case closely resembles other cases recently described and termed immunosuppressive measles encephalopathy. The syndrome is believed to represent the effect of measles virus in patients with deficient cellular immunity induced by antineoplastic treatment. The importance of protecting children on immunosuppressive treatment for contracting measles is stressed.

  18. Clinical manifestations and treatment response of steroid in pediatric Hashimoto encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Seo, Dae Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2014-07-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical symptoms are characterized by behavioral and cognitive changes, speech disturbance, seizures, myoclonus, psychosis, hallucination, involuntary movements, cerebellar signs, and coma. The standard treatment is the use of corticosteroids along with the treatment of any concurrent dysthyroidism. Other options are immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. We described symptoms and outcomes on 3 teenage girls with Hashimoto encephalopathy. Presenting symptoms were seizure or altered mental status. One patient took levothyroxine due to hypothyroidism before presentation of Hashimoto encephalopathy. After confirmation of elevated antithyroid antibodies, all patients were treated with steroids. One patient needed plasmapheresis because of the lack of response to steroids and immunoglobulins. Hashimoto encephalopathy should be considered in any patient presenting with acute or subacute unexplained encephalopathy and seizures. Even though the use of steroids is the first line of treatment, plasmapheresis can rescue steroid-resistant patients.

  19. Management of Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Waghray, Nisheet; Mullen, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible progressive neuropsychiatric disorder that encompasses a wide clinical spectrum. Covert hepatic encephalopathy is defined as patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I encephalopathy by West-Haven Criteria. Terminology such as “sub-clinical”, “latent”, and “minimal” appear to trivialize the disease and have been replaced by the term covert. The lack of clinical signs means that covert hepatic encephalopathy is rarely recognized or treated outside of clinical trials with options for therapy based on patients with episodic hepatic encephalopathy. This review discusses the current available options for therapy in covert hepatic encephalopathy and focuses on non-absorbable disacharides (lactulose or lactitol), antibiotics (rifaximin), probiotics/synbiotics and l-ornithine-l-aspartate. PMID:26041963

  20. [Bovine spongiform encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Suárez Fernández, G

    2001-01-01

    An histórical and conceptual review is made about Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or mad cows disease and an epidemiological analysis as a present and future health problem. This analysis of BSE should not be negative, considering the truths that we know today. PMID:11783042

  1. KCNQ2 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millichap, John J.; Park, Kristen L.; Tsuchida, Tammy; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Carmant, Lionel; Flamini, Robert; Joshi, Nishtha; Levisohn, Paul M.; Marsh, Eric; Nangia, Srishti; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Patterson, Marc C.; Pearl, Phillip L.; Porter, Brenda; Ramsey, Keri; McGinnis, Emily L.; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Tracy, Molly; Tran, Baouyen; Venkatesan, Charu; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To advance the understanding of KCNQ2 encephalopathy genotype–phenotype relationships and to begin to assess the potential of selective KCNQ channel openers as targeted treatments. Methods: We retrospectively studied 23 patients with KCNQ2 encephalopathy, including 11 treated with ezogabine (EZO). We analyzed the genotype–phenotype relationships in these and 70 previously described patients. Results: The mean seizure onset age was 1.8 ± 1.6 (SD) days. Of the 20 EEGs obtained within a week of birth, 11 showed burst suppression. When new seizure types appeared in infancy (15 patients), the most common were epileptic spasms (n = 8). At last follow-up, seizures persisted in 9 patients. Development was delayed in all, severely in 14. The KCNQ2 variants identified introduced amino acid missense changes or, in one instance, a single residue deletion. They were clustered in 4 protein subdomains predicted to poison tetrameric channel functions. EZO use (assessed by the treating physicians and parents) was associated with improvement in seizures and/or development in 3 of the 4 treated before 6 months of age, and 2 of the 7 treated later; no serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: KCNQ2 variants cause neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy of widely varying severity. Pathogenic variants in epileptic encephalopathy are clustered in “hot spots” known to be critical for channel activity. For variants causing KCNQ2 channel loss of function, EZO appeared well tolerated and potentially beneficial against refractory seizures when started early. Larger, prospective studies are needed to enable better definition of prognostic categories and more robust testing of novel interventions. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that EZO is effective for refractory seizures in patients with epilepsy due to KCNQ2 encephalopathy.

  2. KCNQ2 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millichap, John J.; Park, Kristen L.; Tsuchida, Tammy; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Carmant, Lionel; Flamini, Robert; Joshi, Nishtha; Levisohn, Paul M.; Marsh, Eric; Nangia, Srishti; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Patterson, Marc C.; Pearl, Phillip L.; Porter, Brenda; Ramsey, Keri; McGinnis, Emily L.; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Tracy, Molly; Tran, Baouyen; Venkatesan, Charu; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To advance the understanding of KCNQ2 encephalopathy genotype–phenotype relationships and to begin to assess the potential of selective KCNQ channel openers as targeted treatments. Methods: We retrospectively studied 23 patients with KCNQ2 encephalopathy, including 11 treated with ezogabine (EZO). We analyzed the genotype–phenotype relationships in these and 70 previously described patients. Results: The mean seizure onset age was 1.8 ± 1.6 (SD) days. Of the 20 EEGs obtained within a week of birth, 11 showed burst suppression. When new seizure types appeared in infancy (15 patients), the most common were epileptic spasms (n = 8). At last follow-up, seizures persisted in 9 patients. Development was delayed in all, severely in 14. The KCNQ2 variants identified introduced amino acid missense changes or, in one instance, a single residue deletion. They were clustered in 4 protein subdomains predicted to poison tetrameric channel functions. EZO use (assessed by the treating physicians and parents) was associated with improvement in seizures and/or development in 3 of the 4 treated before 6 months of age, and 2 of the 7 treated later; no serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: KCNQ2 variants cause neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy of widely varying severity. Pathogenic variants in epileptic encephalopathy are clustered in “hot spots” known to be critical for channel activity. For variants causing KCNQ2 channel loss of function, EZO appeared well tolerated and potentially beneficial against refractory seizures when started early. Larger, prospective studies are needed to enable better definition of prognostic categories and more robust testing of novel interventions. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that EZO is effective for refractory seizures in patients with epilepsy due to KCNQ2 encephalopathy. PMID:27602407

  3. Pharmacoeconomics of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Neff, Guy

    2010-05-01

    Understanding and appreciating the science of pharmacoeconomics have become even more important for health care providers and insurers during the recent economic downturn. Evaluating the true costs of any disease is complex; both direct costs, such as costs of drug therapy and the provision of care, and indirect costs, such as lost earnings and reduced quality of life, must be taken into account. With chronic liver disease, the most recent data indicate that direct costs were more than $2 billion whereas indirect costs were more than $450 million. Hepatic encephalopathy, a common complication of chronic liver disease, contributes to this economic burden. Although patients' length of stay during hospitalization for hepatic encephalopathy decreased from almost 9 days to 6 days (and has remained stable over the past few years) from 1993 to 2007, hospitalization costs rose from $13,000 to $30,000/hospital stay. In addition, 22% of patients were discharged directly to nursing homes or rehabilitation centers, which increases total costs. When assessing therapy for hepatic encephalopathy, it is important to consider the total costs of the disease, not just treatment costs. Although more expensive on a daily basis than lactulose, rifaximin has been shown to reduce hospitalization rates, has a better adverse-effect profile, and increases patient compliance. One study found that rifaximin produced a cost savings/patient/year of more than $3000 over lactulose therapy. PMID:20412038

  4. [Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Signaté, A; Olindo, S; Chausson, N; Cassinoto, C; Edimo Nana, M; Saint Vil, M; Cabre, P; Smadja, D

    2009-03-01

    Ingestion of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) can induce severe intoxication in subjects with chronic renal failure. Oxalate plays a key role in the neurotoxicity of star fruit. We report the cases of two patients with unknown chronic renal insufficiency who developed severe encephalopathy after ingestion of star fruit. The two patients developed intractable hiccups, vomiting, impaired consciousness and status epilepticus. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging showed cortical and thalamic hyperintense lesions related to epileptic status. They improved after being submitted to continuous hemofiltration which constitutes the most effective treatment during the acute phase.

  5. A diagnostic algorithm combining clinical and molecular data distinguishes Kawasaki disease from other febrile illnesses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease is an acute vasculitis of infants and young children that is recognized through a constellation of clinical signs that can mimic other benign conditions of childhood. The etiology remains unknown and there is no specific laboratory-based test to identify patients with Kawasaki disease. Treatment to prevent the complication of coronary artery aneurysms is most effective if administered early in the course of the illness. We sought to develop a diagnostic algorithm to help clinicians distinguish Kawasaki disease patients from febrile controls to allow timely initiation of treatment. Methods Urine peptidome profiling and whole blood cell type-specific gene expression analyses were integrated with clinical multivariate analysis to improve differentiation of Kawasaki disease subjects from febrile controls. Results Comparative analyses of multidimensional protein identification using 23 pooled Kawasaki disease and 23 pooled febrile control urine peptide samples revealed 139 candidate markers, of which 13 were confirmed (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC 0.919)) in an independent cohort of 30 Kawasaki disease and 30 febrile control urine peptidomes. Cell type-specific analysis of microarrays (csSAM) on 26 Kawasaki disease and 13 febrile control whole blood samples revealed a 32-lymphocyte-specific-gene panel (ROC AUC 0.969). The integration of the urine/blood based biomarker panels and a multivariate analysis of 7 clinical parameters (ROC AUC 0.803) effectively stratified 441 Kawasaki disease and 342 febrile control subjects to diagnose Kawasaki disease. Conclusions A hybrid approach using a multi-step diagnostic algorithm integrating both clinical and molecular findings was successful in differentiating children with acute Kawasaki disease from febrile controls. PMID:22145762

  6. Simple febrile convulsions: evidence for best practice.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, D L

    2000-01-01

    Febrile convulsions are common in early childhood and may be the first sign of an illness. Witnessing the convulsion and experiencing the subsequent admission is extremely stressful for parents. Children's nurses need to identify the evidence for best practice in the management of febrile convulsions. Parent education is an essential component of the management of care. PMID:11855470

  7. No association between ApoE polymorphism and febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta; Cachat, François; Gehri, Mario; Juvet, Typhaine

    2016-01-01

    Seizures associated with fever are a common pediatric problem, affecting about 2-7 % of children between 3 months and 5 years of age. Differentiation of febrile seizures from acute symptomatic seizures secondary to central nervous system infections or seizures associated with fever in children with epilepsy is essential to provide appropriate treatment and follow-up care. Here, we tested the hypothesis that children who exhibit simple febrile seizures during early childhood, but do not develop epileptic seizures later in life, might preferentially carry the ApoE2 allele of the gene coding for the apolipoprotein E. We did not find any differences in the distribution of ApoE alleles or genotypes between individuals who exhibited simple febrile seizures (n = 93) and age-matched, typically developing subjects (n = 80). We found that the observed allele and genotype frequencies did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, which suggests that the frequencies of ApoE alleles and genotypes are stable in the Swiss population from which our samples were derived. Across both groups of subjects (n = 173), we found an ApoE2 allele frequency of 0.064, an ApoE3 frequency of 0.829 and an ApoE4 frequency of 0.107. Our findings are consistent with previous reports of the distribution of ApoE polymorphism for European subjects free of any neurological disorders, and show that the different alleles of the gene coding for the apolipoprotein E are not associated with the occurrence of simple febrile seizures. PMID:26233231

  8. Toxic encephalopathy induced by capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Niemann, B; Rochlitz, C; Herrmann, R; Pless, M

    2004-01-01

    Toxic encephalopathy is a rarely described side effect of 5-fluorouracil which usually presents with cerebellar, neuropsychiatric, and focal neurological symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging findings are described as patchy white matter alterations. We report the 1st case of capecitabine-induced toxic encephalopathy with epilepsy-like symptoms and diffuse white matter alterations on magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Febrile Illness with Skin Rashes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Skin rashes that appear during febrile illnesses are in fact caused by various infectious diseases. Since infectious exanthematous diseases range from mild infections that disappear naturally to severe infectious diseases, focus on and basic knowledge of these diseases is very important. But, these include non-infectious diseases, so that comprehensive knowledge of these other diseases is required. Usually, early diagnostic testing for a febrile illness with a rash is inefficient. For clinical diagnosis of diseases accompanied by skin rash and fever, a complete history must be taken, including recent travel, contact with animals, medications, and exposure to forests and other natural environments. In addition, time of onset of symptoms and the characteristics of the rash itself (morphology, location, distribution) could be helpful in the clinical diagnosis. It is also critical to understand the patient's history of specific underlying diseases. However, diagnostic basic tests could be helpful in diagnosis if they are repeated and the clinical course is monitored. Generally, skin rashes are nonspecific and self-limited. Therefore, it could be clinically meaningful as a characteristic diagnostic finding in a very small subset of specific diseases. PMID:26483989

  10. Childhood Sjögren syndrome presenting as acute brainstem encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoriko; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Ohara, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by dry mouth and eyes, known as sicca symptoms. The exact spectrum of neurological involvement, especially of the central nervous system, in childhood Sjögren syndrome has not been well defined. We report a girl who presented with acute febrile brainstem encephalitis. In retrospect, she had exhibited a preceding history of recurrent conjunctivitis and strong halitosis that could be considered as sicca symptoms. The histopathology results of a minor salivary biopsy, the presence of anti-SSA/Ro antibody, and keratoconjunctivitis confirmed the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome. Commonly observed features in previously reported patients with childhood Sjögren syndrome and central nervous system complications have included fever at the time of neurologic presentation, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, abnormal neuroimaging, and positivity for several specific antibodies. In children presenting with unknown acute febrile encephalopathy, Sjögren syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially when sicca symptoms are present.

  11. Childhood Sjögren syndrome presenting as acute brainstem encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoriko; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Ohara, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by dry mouth and eyes, known as sicca symptoms. The exact spectrum of neurological involvement, especially of the central nervous system, in childhood Sjögren syndrome has not been well defined. We report a girl who presented with acute febrile brainstem encephalitis. In retrospect, she had exhibited a preceding history of recurrent conjunctivitis and strong halitosis that could be considered as sicca symptoms. The histopathology results of a minor salivary biopsy, the presence of anti-SSA/Ro antibody, and keratoconjunctivitis confirmed the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome. Commonly observed features in previously reported patients with childhood Sjögren syndrome and central nervous system complications have included fever at the time of neurologic presentation, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, abnormal neuroimaging, and positivity for several specific antibodies. In children presenting with unknown acute febrile encephalopathy, Sjögren syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially when sicca symptoms are present. PMID:26006751

  12. Diets in Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Abdelsayed, George G

    2015-08-01

    As many as 80% of patients with end-stage liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy have significant protein-calorie malnutrition. Because of the severe hypercatabolic state of cirrhosis, the provision of liberal amounts of carbohydrate (at least 35 to 40 kcal/kg per day), and between 1.2 and 1.6 g/kg of protein is necessary. Protein restriction is not recommended. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation and vegetable protein are associated with improved outcomes. Dietary supplementation with vitamins, minerals (with the notable exception of zinc) and probiotics should be decided on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26195204

  13. Seeing more clearly through the fog of encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute confusional states (often referred to as encephalopathy or delirium) pose diagnostic and management challenges for treating physicians. Encephalopathy is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and the diagnosis rests on clinical grounds but may also be supported by the finding of electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence for diffuse cerebral dysfunction. The myriad cerebral transmitter and metabolic disruptions are generated by systemic organ system failures, principal among which are those of the liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, and endocrine system, along with the effects of exogenous toxins and medications. In most cases, several of these organ failures together contribute to the confusional state, frequently in the context of a diffuse cerebral atrophy that affects the aging brain. This special issue of the Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology is dedicated to exploring the electrophysiology of these conditions. It reviews the pathophysiology, psychiatric manifestations, clinical and imaging correlations of the many causes and types of encephalopathy. A literature review of the EEG abnormalities in the various types of encephalopathy provides an overview that ranges from paraneoplastic causes, through organ system failures, postcardiorespiratory arrest, to postoperative delirium. The issue is supplemented by tables of relevant clinical correlations, graphs, Venn diagrams, and the use of mathematical modeling used to explain how defects in the neuronal interplay might generate the EEG patterns seen in encephalopathy. We hope that this assembly will act as a springboard for further discussion and investigation into the EEG underpinnings, clinical correlations, diagnosis. and prognostication of these common and morbid disturbances of brain function.

  14. A Rare Complication Developing After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Wernicke’s Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Tan, Meliha; Demir, Şenay; Yeral, Mahmut; Korur, Aslı; Boğa, Can; Özdoğu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin. Thiamine deficiency can present as a central nervous system disorder known as Wernicke’s encephalopathy, which classically manifests as confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke’s encephalopathy has rarely been reported following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, we report Wernicke’s encephalopathy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who had been receiving prolonged total parenteral nutrition after haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported from Turkey in the literature. PMID:25912759

  15. Identification of Bartonella infections in febrile human patients from Thailand and their potential animal reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kosoy, Michael; Bai, Ying; Sheff, Kelly; Morway, Christina; Baggett, Henry; Maloney, Susan A; Boonmar, Sumalee; Bhengsri, Saithip; Dowell, Scott F; Sitdhirasdr, Anussorn; Lerdthusnee, Kriangkrai; Richardson, Jason; Peruski, Leonard F

    2010-06-01

    To determine the role of Bartonella species as causes of acute febrile illness in humans from Thailand, we used a novel strategy of co-cultivation of blood with eukaryotic cells and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of Bartonella-specific DNA products. Bartonella species were identified in 14 blood clots from febrile patients. Sequence analysis showed that more than one-half of the genotypes identified in human patients were similar or identical to homologous sequences identified in rodents from Asia and were closely related to B. elizabethae, B. rattimassiliensis, and B. tribocorum. The remaining genotypes belonged to B. henselae, B. vinsonii, and B. tamiae. Among the positive febrile patients, animal exposure was common: 36% reported owning either dogs or cats and 71% reported rat exposure during the 2 weeks before illness onset. The findings suggest that rodents are likely reservoirs for a substantial portion of cases of human Bartonella infections in Thailand. PMID:20519614

  16. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether they could increase the risk of developing epilepsy later. Febrile seizures are defined as seizures that ... brains of patients who underwent surgery for severe epilepsy. 3 The children with FSE were com- pared ...

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy: historical remarks.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Piero

    2015-03-01

    The history of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is briefly reviewed since the beginning of western medicine by Hippocrates. For about 2000 years the main evidence was the mere association between jaundice, fever and delirium. A clear link between delirium and cirrhosis was proven in the 17th century by Morgagni. In subsequent times the focus was manly the descriptions of symptoms and the only pathophysiological improvement was the evidence that jaundice, per se, does not alter brain function. Only at the end of the 19th century Hann et al proved the role of portal-systemic shunt and pf nitrogenous derivates in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. A terrific development of knowledge occurred in the last 60 years, after the works of Sherlock in London. Nowadays some consensus about HE was reached, so that new developments will likely occur. PMID:26041956

  18. [Bromide encephalopathies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Loubrieu, G; Bourin, M; Bizière, K; Breteau, M; Autret, A

    1979-07-01

    Bromide encephalopathies are frequently reported in Northern America and Great Britain. There is no characteristic clinical pattern, the neurological symptoms are multiple, this is readily explained by the diffusion of bromide ions to all regions in the central nervous system. An accurate history (bromide intake, followed by the slow onset of digestive and neuropsychiatric symptoms) as well as an apparent hyperchloremia are of the greatest aid in suggesting the diagnosis. The incidence of this type of intoxication is greater in women over 50. The association of a salt free diet to bromide therapy favors the onset of clinical symptoms because of the competition between bromide and chloride at the choroid plexus and at the renal tubule.

  19. [Prevention of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Morillas, Rosa M; Sala, Marga; Planas, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of cirrhosis which, in addition to producing a great social impact, deteriorates the quality of life of patients and is considered a sign of advanced liver disease and therefore a clinical indication for liver transplant evaluation. Patients who have had episodes of HE have a high risk of recurrence. Thus, after the HE episode resolves, it is recommended: control and prevention of precipitating factors (gastrointestinal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, use of diuretics with caution, avoid nervous system depressant medications), continued administration of non-absorbable disaccharides such as lactulose or lactitol, few or non-absorbable antibiotics such as rifaximin and assess the need for a liver transplant as the presence of a HE episode carries a poor prognosis in cirrhosis.

  20. STEC:O111-HUS complicated by acute encephalopathy in a young girl was successfully treated with a set of hemodiafiltration, steroid pulse, and soluble thrombomodulin under plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Yada, Noritaka; Fujioka, Masayuki; Bennett, Charles L; Inoki, Kazuya; Miki, Toyokazu; Watanabe, Akihiko; Yoshida, Toshiko; Hayakawa, Masaki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-01

    We report a 14-year-old girl, who developed shigatoxin-producing E. coli (STEC)-HUS complicated by encephalopathy. She was successfully treated with hemodiafiltration, high-dose methylprednisolone pulse therapy, and soluble recombinant thrombomodulin under plasma exchange. von Willebrand factor multimers analysis provides potential insights into how the administered therapies might facilitate successful treatment of STEC-HUS.

  1. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  2. Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy: a clinical and radiological investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, L A; Kendall, B E; Marshall, J

    1981-01-01

    Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's type) was diagnosed in a group of patients with hypertension or arteriosclerosis, who showed acute and subacute neurological deficits, dementia, reduced cerebral blood flow, and white matter low attenuation with mild atrophy and infarcts as the predominant CT scan features. This set of clinical and radiological criteria could be used to make the diagnosis in life, as confirmed neuropathologically in one patient. Images PMID:7241156

  3. Severe febrile respiratory illnesses as a cause of mass critical care.

    PubMed

    Sandrock, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Febrile respiratory illnesses with respiratory failure are one of the most common reasons for admission to the intensive care unit. Most causes of febrile respiratory illness are bacterial and viral agents of community-acquired pneumonia. However, a small number of rare and highly contagious agents can initially present as febrile respiratory illnesses, which can lead to an epidemic that can greatly impact the health care system. This impact includes sustained mass critical care, with potential scarcity of critical resources (eg, positive-pressure ventilators), spread of disease to health care workers, sustained spread within the community, and extensive morbidity and mortality. The main agents of febrile respiratory illness that would lead to an epidemic include influenza, the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome, smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fever, plague, tularemia, and anthrax. Recognition of these agents occurs largely based on epidemiological clues, and management consists of antibiotics, antivirals, supportive care, and positive-pressure ventilation. Acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome occur with these agents, so a lung-protective (low tidal volume) ventilation strategy is indicated. Additional respiratory care measures, such as nebulized medications, bronchoscopy, humidified oxygen, and airway suctioning, potentiate aerosolization of the virus or bacteria and increase the risk of transmission to health care workers and patients. Thus, appropriate personal protective equipment, including an N95 mask or powered air-purifying respirator, is indicated. A basic understanding of the epidemiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of these agents will provide a foundation for early isolation, evaluation, infection control, and public health involvement and response in cases of a febrile respiratory illness that causes respiratory failure. PMID:18173859

  4. Prevalence of Bacterial Febrile Illnesses in Children in Kilosa District, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Chipwaza, Beatrice; Mhamphi, Ginethon G.; Ngatunga, Steve D.; Selemani, Majige; Amuri, Mbaraka; Mugasa, Joseph P.; Gwakisa, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial etiologies of non-malaria febrile illnesses have significantly become important due to high mortality and morbidity, particularly in children. Despite their importance, there are few reports on the epidemiology of these diseases in Tanzania, and the true burden of such illnesses remains unknown. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of leptospirosis, brucellosis, typhoid fever and urinary tract infections and their rate of co-infections with malaria. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Kilosa district hospital in Tanzania for 6 months. Febrile children aged from 2–13 years were recruited from the outpatient department. Patients were screened by serological tests such as IgM and IgG ELISA, and microscopic agglutination test. Results A total of 370 patients were enrolled; of these 85 (23.0%) had malaria parasites, 43 (11.6%) had presumptive acute leptospirosis and 26/200 (13%) had confirmed leptospirosis. Presumptive acute brucellosis due to B. abortus was identified among 26 (7.0%) of patients while B. melitensis was detected in 57 (15.4%) of the enrolled patients. Presumptive typhoid fever due to S. Typhi was identified in thirty eight (10.3%) of the participants and 69 (18.6%) had urinary tract infections. Patients presented with similar symptoms; therefore, the identification of these diseases could not be done based on clinical ground alone. Co-infections between malaria and bacterial febrile illnesses were observed in 146 patients (39.5%). Although antibacterials and/or anti-malarials were prescribed in most patients, some patients did not receive the appropriate treatment. Conclusion The study has underscored the importance of febrile bacterial diseases including zoonoses such as leptospirosis and brucellosis in febrile children, and thus such illnesses should be considered by clinicians in the differential diagnoses of febrile diseases. However, access to diagnostic tests for discrimination of febrile illnesses is

  5. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  6. Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole. PMID:23905041

  7. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  8. [Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease].

    PubMed

    Benureau, A; Meyer, P; Maillet, O; Leboucq, N; Legras, S; Jeziorski, E; Fournier-Favre, S; Jeandel, C; Gaignard, P; Slama, A; Rivier, F; Roubertie, A; Carneiro, M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal-recessive syndrome, resulting from mutations in the TYMP gene, located at 22q13. The mutation induces a thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficit, which leads to a nucleotide pool imbalance and to instability of the mitochondrial DNA. The clinical picture regroups gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy. The prognosis is unfavorable. We present the case of a 14-year-old Caucasian female whose symptoms started in early childhood. The diagnosis was suspected after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed given the atypical features of mental anorexia, which revealed white matter abnormalities. She presented chronic vomiting, postprandial abdominal pain, and problems gaining weight accompanied by cachexia. This diagnosis led to establishing proper care, in particular an enteral and parenteral nutrition program. There is no known specific effective treatment, but numerous studies are in progress. In this article, after reviewing the existing studies, we discuss the main diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. We argue for the necessity of performing a cerebral MRI given the atypical features of a patient with suspected mental anorexia (or when the clinical pattern of a patient with mental anorexia seems atypical), so that MNGIE can be ruled out. PMID:25282463

  9. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  10. A study of'febrile illnesses on the Thai-Myanmar border: predictive factors of rickettsioses.

    PubMed

    PicKard, Amy L; McDaniel, Philip; Miller, R Scott; Uthaimongkol, Nichapat; Buathong, Nillawan; Murray, Clinton K; Telford, Sam R; Parola, Philippe; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2004-09-01

    We have performed a case-control analysis to determine the significance of clinical, laboratory and epidemiological features as predictive factors of rickettsioses among patients in Sangkhla Buri, Thailand (Thai-Myanmar border). Fifteen serologically-confirmed rickettsiosis patients including Spotted Fever Group (SFG) rickettsioses, scrub typhus, and murine typhus were classified as 'cases'; one hundred and sixty-three acutely febrile patients presenting to the same hospital during the same time period, who had no serological evidence of acute rickettsiosis, were classified as 'controls'. Patients' report of rash/arthropod bite [Odds ratio (OR) 22.90, 95% CI (confidence interval) 6.23, 84.13] and history of jungle trips (OR 5.30, 95% CI 1.69-16.62) were significant risk factors. Elevated ALT (OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.04, 8.88) and depressed platelet count (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.13, 10.10) were also useful differentiating markers of rickettsioses in this population. Definitive diagnosis of rickettsioses is difficult without specialized diagnostic capabilities that are rarely available in remote areas such as Sangkhla Buri, where other acute febrile illnesses with similar presentation are commonly found. The relative importance of predictive factors presented here may provide clinicians with some useful guidance in distinguishing rickettsioses from other acute febrile illnesses. Timely administration of empiric treatment in highly suspicious cases can deter potential morbidity from these arthropod-borne infections.

  11. Brucellosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Bouley, Andrew J.; Biggs, Holly M.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  12. Brucellosis among hospitalized febrile patients in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bouley, Andrew J; Biggs, Holly M; Stoddard, Robyn A; Morrissey, Anne B; Bartlett, John A; Afwamba, Isaac A; Maro, Venance P; Kinabo, Grace D; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A

    2012-12-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  13. [Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by the use of diet pills and unbalanced diet].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Adrián; Aradi, Gabriella; Várallyay, György; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Bereczki, Dániel; Vastagh, Ildikó

    2014-03-23

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially life-threatening, neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed and, without prompt treatment, the condition can lead to the chronic form of the disease, Korsakoff's syndrome or even death. In developed countries Wernicke's encephalopathy has been associated with alcoholism, but in recent years there has been an increasing number of non-alcoholic cases. Authors report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed oculomotor dysfunction, encephalopathy and ataxia as a result of an extreme diet and use of diet pills. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was supported by the resolution of neurological signs after parenteral thiamine replacement. This case is presented because of the rare etiology and diagnostic difficulty, and the latest diagnostic and therapic guidelines are also highlighted. PMID:24631935

  14. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes. PMID:26697219

  15. Approach to clinical syndrome of jaundice and encephalopathy in tropics.

    PubMed

    Anand, Anil C; Garg, Hitendra K

    2015-03-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture.

  16. STEC:O111-HUS complicated by acute encephalopathy in a young girl was successfully treated with a set of hemodiafiltration, steroid pulse, and soluble thrombomodulin under plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Noritaka; Fujioka, Masayuki; Bennett, Charles L; Inoki, Kazuya; Miki, Toyokazu; Watanabe, Akihiko; Yoshida, Toshiko; Hayakawa, Masaki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a 14-year-old girl, who developed shigatoxin-producing E. coli (STEC)-HUS complicated by encephalopathy. She was successfully treated with hemodiafiltration, high-dose methylprednisolone pulse therapy, and soluble recombinant thrombomodulin under plasma exchange. von Willebrand factor multimers analysis provides potential insights into how the administered therapies might facilitate successful treatment of STEC-HUS. PMID:25914810

  17. Reversible encephalopathy associated with cholesterol embolism syndrome: magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, F; Marro, B; Khoury, N EI; Seilhean, D; Alamowitch, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a patient found to have acute diffuse and reversible encephalopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with cholesterol emboli syndrome (CES). The initial MRI showed extensive white matter, basal ganglia and cortical damage without evidence of brain infarction. Dramatic clinical and MRI improvement was observed with corticosteroids. Pathologically, cholesterol crystal emboli were found in the lumen of skin and brain arteries and were associated with varying degrees of inflammation of the arteriole wall. This case suggests that CES may be responsible for extensive, acute and reversible encephalopathy underlined by an inflammation of brain arteries. PMID:17229746

  18. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Chorea.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Abhijeet; Sengupta, Sarbani; Mukhopadhyay, Sarmishtha; Ghosh, Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a steroid-responsive relapsing neuropsychiatric disorder associated with high titers of antithyroid antibody with or without thyroid dysfunction. We report a case of HE in a 78 year old female who developed sudden onset behavioral abnormalities associated with choreiform movement of extremities. All causes of vascular, infective, metabolic, autoimmune, paraneoplastic and toxic encephalopathy were excluded. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibody was found to be raised with very high titre. A diagnosis of HE was made. Prompt treatment with high dose steroid led to dramatic improvement of symptoms including choreiform movement. PMID:27608878

  19. A clinical study of febrile myoclonus in children.

    PubMed

    Onoe, Sachiko; Nishigaki, Toshinori

    2004-08-01

    Fever is sometimes associated with chill, myoclonus, delirium and convulsion. We previously reported EEG findings of febrile delirium, when we found that 18% of patients showed febrile myoclonus simultaneously with febrile delirium. The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of febrile myoclonus and to investigate the relation to febrile convulsion. Myoclonic episodes were studied in 11 patients, aged 8 months to 11 years. EEG was recorded in eight patients. In the past history, febrile convulsion was noted in two patients and one of them also had febrile delirium. The age range of patients with febrile myoclonus was similar to those developing febrile convulsion except for one case. The duration of febrile myoclonus was usually from several to 30 min, but was longer than 2 h in four patients. Seventy-three percent of patients showed fear, surprise and shouting. EEG was abnormal in four patients and spike components were found in two patients. Myoclonic jerks were seen during the EEG recording in two patients and EEG findings were not concordant with epileptic myoclonic attack. Ten patients were followed for 1-2 years, and none had afebrile seizures. Febrile myoclonus is a benign symptom associated with fever. Mood change, fear or surprise and shouting with myoclonic jerks may suggest action of cytokine on the hypothalamus induced by infection. Febrile myoclonus, delirium and convulsion were seen in one patient in his first 3 years of life. These three symptoms seem to appear in children depending on their predisposition. PMID:15165673

  20. The burden of hepatic encephalopathy in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Bustios Sanchez, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior, and personality, as well as by transient neurological symptoms and electroencephalographic changes, which occur in the context of acute or chronic liver failure. Cirrhosis is the main disease associated to HE, and it is known that its incidence is increasing worldwide. As a cause of mortality, cirrhosis is ranked 14 worldwide, but 10 in developed countries. It has been demonstrated that the incidence of liver disease is increasing, in part because of the ascending prevalence of NAFLD, HCV, HCC, as well of alcohol consumption. The real incidence of cirrhosis in Latin America is unknown, although in some Latin American countries that provided national data, cirrhosis death rates were between 5 and 17/100,000 for men and 3 and 5/100,000 for women. Disability, quality of life, and social aspects should be considered when assessing the impact of a disease. In this context, preliminary estimates of the global burden of disease attributable to chronic liver disease seem to be substantial. Hepatic encephalopathy, a main complication of liver failure, occurs in 30-45% of patients as overt encephalopathy, but when subclinical or minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is considered, estimates of the incidence of encephalopathy vary from 20 to 60%. In USA, the 2009 NIH Report on the Costs of Digestive Diseases stated that liver disease was the second most costly disease in direct and indirect costs (13.1 billion dollars). Although the economic cost of HE has not been assessed, it is obvious that the economic impact of HE on daily activities of living is extremely high, as the costs of diminished work performance and lost wages are substantial.

  1. Cytokine-related and sodium channel polymorphism as candidate predisposing factors for childhood encephalopathy FIRES/AERRPS.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, M; Kobayashi, K; Ohmori, I; Tanaka, Y; Tanaka, K; Inoue, T; Horino, A; Ohmura, K; Kumakura, A; Takei, Y; Hirabayashi, S; Kajimoto, M; Uchida, T; Yamazaki, S; Shiihara, T; Kumagai, T; Kasai, M; Terashima, H; Kubota, M; Mizuguchi, M

    2016-09-15

    Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES), or acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS), is an epileptic encephalopathy beginning with fever-mediated seizures. The etiology remains unclear. To elucidate the genetic background of FIRES/AERRPS (hereafter FIRES), we recruited 19 Japanese patients, genotyped polymorphisms of the IL1B, IL6, IL10, TNFA, IL1RN, SCN1A and SCN2A genes, and compared their frequency between the patients and controls. For IL1RN, the frequency of a variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) allele, RN2, was significantly higher in the patients than in controls (p=0.0067), and A allele at rs4251981 in 5' upstream of IL1RN with borderline significance (p=0.015). Haplotype containing RN2 was associated with an increased risk of FIRES (OR 3.88, 95%CI 1.40-10.8, p=0.0057). For SCN1A, no polymorphisms showed a significant association, whereas a missense mutation, R1575C, was found in two patients. For SCN2A, the minor allele frequency of G allele at rs1864885 was higher in patients with borderline significance (p=0.011). We demonstrated the association of IL1RN haplotype containing RN2 with FIRES, and showed a possible association of IL1RN rs4251981 G>A and SCN2A rs1864885 A>G, in Japanese patients. These preliminary findings suggest the involvement of multiple genetic factors in FIRES, which needs to be confirmed by future studies in a larger number of FIRES cases. PMID:27538648

  2. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease. PMID:23921686

  3. Contributions of microdialysis to new alternative therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-08-05

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  4. Bilirubin Encephalopathy in a Domestic Shorthair Cat With Increased Osmotic Fragility and Cholangiohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E T; Giger, U; Malmberg, J L; Quimby, J M; Schaffer, P A

    2016-05-01

    A 7-month-old female domestic shorthair cat was diagnosed with chronic regenerative hemolytic anemia characterized by increased osmotic fragility of unknown etiology. At 13 months of age, the cat was evaluated for acute collapse. The cat was icteric with severe hyperbilirubinemia but no hematocrit changes. Severe obtundation and lateral recumbency progressed to tetraparesis and loss of proprioception in all 4 limbs, and a cerebellar or brainstem lesion was suspected. Postmortem examination revealed suppurative cholangiohepatitis and acute neuronal necrosis in the nuclei of the brainstem and cerebellum, consistent with bilirubin encephalopathy. This is the first known occurrence of cholangiohepatitis and bilirubin encephalopathy in an adult cat with chronic hemolytic anemia. Although rare, bilirubin encephalopathy should be considered a possible sequela to hyperbilirubinemia in adult patients. It remains unknown whether increased osmotic fragility was related to the cholangiohepatopathy.

  5. Pharmacotherapy for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Phongsamran, Paula V; Kim, Jiwon W; Cupo Abbott, Jennifer; Rosenblatt, Angela

    2010-06-18

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a challenging clinical complication of liver dysfunction with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities that range from mild disturbances in cognitive function and consciousness to coma and death. The pathogenesis of HE in cirrhosis is complex and multifactorial, but a key role is thought to be played by circulating gut-derived toxins of the nitrogenous compounds, most notably ammonia. Therapeutic treatment options for HE are currently limited and have appreciable risks and benefits associated with their use. Management of HE primarily involves avoidance of precipitating factors, limitation of dietary protein intake, and administration of various ammonia-lowering therapies such as non-absorbable disaccharides and select antimicrobial agents. Non-absorbable disaccharides, such as lactulose, have traditionally been regarded as first-line pharmacotherapy for patients with HE. However, multiple adverse events have been associated with their use. In addition, recent literature has questioned the true efficacy of the disaccharides for this indication. Neomycin, metronidazole and vancomycin may be used as alternative treatments for patients intolerant or unresponsive to non-absorbable disaccharides. Antimicrobials reduce bacterial production of ammonia and other bacteria-derived toxins through suppression of intestinal flora. Neomycin has been reported to be as effective as lactulose, and similar efficacy has been reported with vancomycin and metronidazole for the management of HE. However, the adverse effects frequently associated with these antimicrobials limit their use as first-line pharmacological agents. Neomycin is the most commonly used antimicrobial for HE and, although poorly absorbed, systemic exposure to the drug in sufficient amounts causes hearing loss and renal toxicity. Long-term neomycin therapy requires annual auditory testing and continuous monitoring of renal function. Long-term use of metronidazole has been

  6. De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stephan; Møller, Rikke S.; Maher, Bridget; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Synofzik, Matthis; Caglayan, Hande S.; Arslan, Mutluay; Serratosa, José M.; Nothnagel, Michael; May, Patrick; Krause, Roland; Löffler, Heidrun; Detert, Katja; Dorn, Thomas; Vogt, Heinrich; Krämer, Günter; Schöls, Ludger; Mullis, Primus E.; Linnankivi, Tarja; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Sterbova, Katalin; Craiu, Dana C.; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Korff, Christian M.; Weber, Yvonne G.; Steinlin, Maja; Gallati, Sabina; Bertsche, Astrid; Bernhard, Matthias K.; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Kiess, Wieland; Gonzalez, Michael; Züchner, Stephan; Palotie, Aarno; Suls, Arvid; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Biskup, Saskia; Wolff, Markus; Maljevic, Snezana; Schüle, Rebecca; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R.

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features1-6. Using next generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild-moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype revealed an almost complete loss-of-function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a novel gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders by two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons. PMID:25751627

  7. Encephalopathy after persistent vomiting: Three cases of non-alcohol-related Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Antel, K; Singh, N; Chisholm, B; Heckmann, J M

    2015-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency. Although WE is commonly viewed in the context of alcoholism, it can be caused by thiamine deficiency secondary to persistent vomiting. Non-alcohol-related WE may be more catastrophic in onset and less likely to present with the classic features than WE with alcoholism as a cause. We describe three cases of WE due to persistent vomiting without alcoholism in patients with hyperemesis gravidarum, drug-induced hyperlactataemia, and an acute gastrointestinal illness in an already malnourished individual. Our cases highlight the importance of recognising WE when undernutrition, which may be caused by gastrointestinal disease or surgery, or malignancy, is compounded by vomiting. Expert guidelines suggest that WE must be considered in the emergency room in any individual with disturbed consciousness of unknown cause. Treatment is with parenteral thiamine before glucose administration. PMID:26716155

  8. Inheritance of febrile seizures in sudden unexplained death in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ingrid A; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R; Kinney, Hannah C; Krous, Henry F

    2012-04-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians.

  9. Chikungunya and dengue fever among hospitalized febrile patients in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Julian T; Munishi, O Michael; Ooi, Eng Eong; Howe, Shiqin; Lim, Wen Yan; Chow, Angelia; Morrissey, Anne B; Bartlett, John A; Onyango, Jecinta J; Maro, Venance P; Kinabo, Grace D; Saganda, Wilbrod; Gubler, Duane J; Crump, John A

    2012-01-01

    Consecutive febrile admissions were enrolled at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed acute Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Dengue virus (DENV), and flavivirus infection were defined as a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result. Presumptive acute DENV infection was defined as a positive anti-DENV immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunsorbent assay (ELISA) result, and prior flavivirus exposure was defined as a positive anti-DENV IgG ELISA result. Among 870 participants, PCR testing was performed on 700 (80.5%). Of these, 55 (7.9%) had confirmed acute CHIKV infection, whereas no participants had confirmed acute DENV or flavivirus infection. Anti-DENV IgM serologic testing was performed for 747 (85.9%) participants, and of these 71 (9.5%) had presumptive acute DENV infection. Anti-DENV IgG serologic testing was performed for 751 (86.3%) participants, and of these 80 (10.7%) had prior flavivirus exposure. CHIKV infection was more common among infants and children than adults and adolescents (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, P = 0.026) and among HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression (OR 10.5, P = 0.007). CHIKV infection is an important but unrecognized cause of febrile illness in northern Tanzania. DENV or other closely related flaviviruses are likely also circulating.

  10. Preterm Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gopagondanahalli, Krishna Revanna; Li, Jingang; Fahey, Michael C.; Hunt, Rod W.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic–ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic–ischemic injury (HII), its clinical course, monitoring, and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic–ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia–ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools, and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27812521

  11. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease. PMID:24379094

  12. Hepatic encephalopathy: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Melissa; Cortes, Yonaira

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neurologic syndrome resulting from the synergistic action of multiple pathologic factors, which are discussed in a companion article. Early recognition of the clinical signs can improve treatment outcome, as well as reduce the incidence of risk factors. Multimodal treatment of HE is usually indicated. Studies on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in people may shed new light on further treatment modalities in small animal patients. PMID:23677823

  13. [Epidemiological surveillance of febrile rash illness].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Gabriela Fidela; Rojas-Mendoza, Teresita; Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; Maldonado-Burgos, Martha Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: en 2011 se detectaron tres casos importados de sarampión, por lo que se intensificó la vigilancia epidemiológica con emisión de alertas epidemiológicas. El objetivo de este estudio es describir el fenómeno de la intensificación de la vigilancia epidemiológica de enfermedad febril exantemática ante la importación de casos confirmados de sarampión en el territorio nacional en el Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Métodos: se obtuvieron los casos del sistema especial de vigilancia epidemiológica de 2011, se compararon con el año previo. Se determinó t de Student para diferencia de medias, prueba de Wilson para proporciones; ambas con un valor alfa del 0.05. Resultados: en 2011 se notificaron 2786 casos de enfermedad febril exantemática, 51.2 % más casos que el año anterior; el número de casos reportados con relación a los esperados aumentó en 29 de las 35 Delegaciones del IMSS con un incremento en el promedio de casos notificados a partir de la semana 26. El 67.4 % de los casos notificados se concentró en los menores de 5 años de edad. Conclusiones: se apreció un incremento importante de casos notificados de enfermedad febril exantemática en comparación con el año previo. El Instituto cuenta con un sistema de vigilancia epidemiológica de enfermedad febril exantemática robusto y flexible, que ha permitido identificar riesgos a la población.

  14. Current Concepts in the Pathophysiology and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) represents a broad continuum of neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with acute or chronic liver disease and/or portosystemic shunting of blood flow. The pathophysiology of this disease is quite complex, as it involves overproduction and reduced metabolism of various neurotoxins, particularly ammonia. Recent hypotheses implicate low-grade cerebral edema as a final common pathway for the pathophysiology of HE. Management of this condition is multifaceted and requires several steps: elimination of precipitating factors; removal of toxins, both by reducing them at their source and by augmenting scavenging pathways; modulation of resident fecal flora; proper nutritional support; and downregulation of systemic and gut-derived inflammation. PMID:21857820

  15. Contemporary Understanding and Management of Overt and Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    NeSmith, Meghan; Ahn, Joseph; Flamm, Steven L

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of liver disease that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Caring for hospitalized patients with HE is becoming more complex, and the economic burden of HE continues to rise. Defining and diagnosing HE, particularly covert HE (CHE), remain challenging. In this article, we review new tools and those currently under development for the diagnosis of CHE and the latest advances in the acute and long-term management of overt HE (OHE) and CHE. In particular, we review the latest data on the use of lactulose and rifaximin for treatment of OHE and summarize the data on adjunctive agents such as sodium benzoate and probiotics.

  16. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anselm Chi-wai; Siao-ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets. PMID:22184532

  17. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anselm Chi-Wai; Siao-Ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-08-31

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets.

  18. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anselm Chi-Wai; Siao-Ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-08-31

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets. PMID:22184532

  19. Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).

    PubMed

    Raj, Shashi; Killinger, James; Overby, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Children with sickle cell disease have a very high risk of lifelong neurologic morbidity and mortality. Cerebrovascular accidents are a known complication in children with sickle cell disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a constellation of acute neurologic findings increasingly recognized in pediatric critical care population with evidence of vasogenic edema on brain imaging possibly due to cerebral vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. This report, for the first time, describes a young adult with sickle cell disease who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following blood transfusion. PMID:22899796

  20. Serum Endocan Levels in Children with Febrile Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kiral, Eylem; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Bozkurt-Turhan, Ayse; Bor, Ozcan; Akgun, Yurdanur; Akgun, Necat Akdeniz

    2016-03-17

    Endocan is an endotelial cell specific molecule; previous studies have shown that serum endocan levels increased in cancer and sepsis and are also related to the severity of sepsis. There are no clinical study about serum endocan levels in children with febrile neutropenia. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum endocan levels in pediatric leukemia patients with febrile neutropenia (n=33) and compare them with children with leukemia without fever (n=33) and also with healthy children (n=24). The median serum endocan level in the first group (children with febrile neutropenia) was statistically significantly higher compared to the leukemic children without febrile neutropenia and also control group (P<0.01 for both). No difference was determined between the serum endocan levels of the leukaemia patients without febrile neutropenia and the healthy control group (P>0.05). Serum endocan levels were also similar with febrile neutropenia due to bacterial causes comparing with the idiopathic febril neutropenia. The results of this study showed increased serum endocan in children with leukemia during the febrile neutropenia episode, and no changes of serum endocan levels in children without leukemia without infection/fever. The monitoring of a series of serum endocan levels would be helpful for the course of febrile neutropenia.

  1. Serum Endocan Levels in Children with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Kiral, Eylem; Bozkurt-Turhan, Ayse; Bor, Ozcan; Akgun, Yurdanur; Akgun, Necat Akdeniz

    2016-01-01

    Endocan is an endotelial cell specific molecule; previous studies have shown that serum endocan levels increased in cancer and sepsis and are also related to the severity of sepsis. There are no clinical study about serum endocan levels in children with febrile neutropenia. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum endocan levels in pediatric leukemia patients with febrile neutropenia (n=33) and compare them with children with leukemia without fever (n=33) and also with healthy children (n=24). The median serum endocan level in the first group (children with febrile neutropenia) was statistically significantly higher compared to the leukemic children without febrile neutropenia and also control group (P<0.01 for both). No difference was determined between the serum endocan levels of the leukaemia patients without febrile neutropenia and the healthy control group (P>0.05). Serum endocan levels were also similar with febrile neutropenia due to bacterial causes comparing with the idiopathic febril neutropenia. The results of this study showed increased serum endocan in children with leukemia during the febrile neutropenia episode, and no changes of serum endocan levels in children without leukemia without infection/fever. The monitoring of a series of serum endocan levels would be helpful for the course of febrile neutropenia. PMID:27103976

  2. Susceptibility to febrile seizures: more than just a faulty thermostat!

    PubMed

    Prasad, Asuri N; Seshia, Shashi S

    2009-05-01

    Febrile seizures, always a hot topic, continue to fire up the interest of a wide spectrum of clinical and basic neuroscientists. Several clinical investigators, amongst them the Halifax group (spearheaded by the Camfields to whom we owe a great debt of gratitude for their contributions in this field), have provided us with a sound foundation for clinical management. We now need to explore febrile seizures in new ways to clarify factors and identify mechanisms that contribute to the intriguing age-dependent susceptibility. The complex processes involved in thermoregulation and the febrile response are important pieces of the puzzle. The contributory factors are likely different for isolated simple febrile, recurrent febrile and complex febrile seizures. A 'systems biology approach' is needed to investigate the intricate genome-proteome-metabolome interaction in determining susceptibility. Population studies that incorporate current clinical, experimental, infectious and molecular genetic knowledge in their concept and design will help to 'conquer' the final frontiers of febrile seizures. In 2006, Engel suggested that febrile seizures could 'encompass many different entities', an increasingly plausible opinion. A higher profile for febrile seizures and related syndromes in the ILAE classification scheme will further catalyze progress in the field. The resultant knowledge can only improve management. PMID:19534326

  3. Susceptibility of European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) to alimentary challenge with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dagleish, Mark P; Martin, Stuart; Steele, Philip; Finlayson, Jeanie; Eaton, Samantha L; Sisó, Sílvia; Stewart, Paula; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Hamilton, Scott; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Reid, Hugh W; Goldmann, Wilfred; González, Lorenzo; Castilla, Joaquín; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) are susceptible to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, when challenged intracerebrally but their susceptibility to alimentary challenge, the presumed natural route of transmission, is unknown. To determine this, eighteen deer were challenged via stomach tube with a large dose of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent and clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, presence and distribution of abnormal prion protein and the attack rate recorded. Only a single animal developed clinical disease, and this was acute with both neurological and respiratory signs, at 1726 days post challenge although there was significant (27.6%) weight loss in the preceding 141 days. The clinically affected animal had histological lesions of vacuolation in the neuronal perikaryon and neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Abnormal prion protein, the diagnostic marker of transmissible encephalopathies, was primarily restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems although a very small amount was present in tingible body macrophages in the lymphoid patches of the caecum and colon. Serial protein misfolding cyclical amplification, an in vitro ultra-sensitive diagnostic technique, was positive for neurological tissue from the single clinically diseased deer. All other alimentary challenged deer failed to develop clinical disease and were negative for all other investigations. These findings show that transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to European red deer via the alimentary route is possible but the transmission rate is low. Additionally, when deer carcases are subjected to the same regulations that ruminants in Europe with respect to the removal of specified offal from the human food chain, the zoonotic risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, from consumption of venison is probably

  4. Outcome After Therapeutic Hypothermia in Term Neonates With Encephalopathy and a Syndromic Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Shimotake, Thomas K; Glass, Hannah C

    2015-10-01

    The large randomized, controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy excluded neonates with congenital disorders. The objective of this study was to report our experience using hypothermia in neonates with signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and a syndromic disorder or brain anomaly. Subjects were identified from a database of neonates admitted to the Neuro-Intensive Care Nursery at University of California, San Francisco. Of 169 patients fulfilling criteria for hypothermia, 8 (5%) had a syndromic disorder and were cooled per guidelines for nonsyndromic neonates. Perinatal characteristics of infants with and without syndromic disorder were not significantly different. Overall outcome was poor: 38% had evidence of acute hypoxic-ischemic injury, 3 subjects died, and 2 survivors had low developmental quotient (ie, 25). The risk versus benefit of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy among neonates with congenital brain malformations or syndromic diagnoses is uncertain.

  5. Outcome After Therapeutic Hypothermia in Term Neonates With Encephalopathy and a Syndromic Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Shimotake, Thomas K; Glass, Hannah C

    2015-10-01

    The large randomized, controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy excluded neonates with congenital disorders. The objective of this study was to report our experience using hypothermia in neonates with signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and a syndromic disorder or brain anomaly. Subjects were identified from a database of neonates admitted to the Neuro-Intensive Care Nursery at University of California, San Francisco. Of 169 patients fulfilling criteria for hypothermia, 8 (5%) had a syndromic disorder and were cooled per guidelines for nonsyndromic neonates. Perinatal characteristics of infants with and without syndromic disorder were not significantly different. Overall outcome was poor: 38% had evidence of acute hypoxic-ischemic injury, 3 subjects died, and 2 survivors had low developmental quotient (ie, 25). The risk versus benefit of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy among neonates with congenital brain malformations or syndromic diagnoses is uncertain. PMID:25762585

  6. Palatal-Myoclonus as a Presentation of Hashimoto Encephalopathy: an interesting case report

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Rohani, Mohammad; Nabavi, Mohammad; Aghaei, Mahbubeh; Akhoundi, Fahimeh Haji

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is known as a steroid- responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis or nonvascular inflammation-related autoimmune meningoencephalitis. The average age of onset of HE is approximately 50 years; and it is more common in women. The onset of HE may be acute or subacute. The course of most HE cases is relapsing and remitting, which is similar to that of vasculitis and stroke. Methods In this article, we present a previously healthy 32 years old;veterinarian male with palatal myoclonus, as a rare presentation of this disorder, and review the neurologic aspects of hashimoto encephalitis. Results The clinical presentation of HE is characterized by progressive cognitive decline tremor, transient aphasia, seizures, abnormal gait, sleep disorder and stroke-like episodes. Myoclonus, either generalized or multifocal, and tremor, often of the bilateral upper extremities, is the most frequently observed involuntary movements in HE. Conclusion The rapidly progressive cognitive dysfunction and encephalopathies observed. PMID:24454425

  7. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vijay PB; Tognarelli, Joshua M; Massie, Nicolas; Crossey, Mary ME; Cook, Nicola A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that “those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief ”. He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. PMID:26719720

  8. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Grover, Vijay Pb; Tognarelli, Joshua M; Massie, Nicolas; Crossey, Mary Me; Cook, Nicola A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that "those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief ". He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. PMID:26719720

  9. Outpatient management of febrile neutropenia: time to revise the present treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Mads; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    We reviewed medical literature on the efficacy and safety of outpatient versus hospital-based therapy of low-risk febrile neutropenia in adult cancer patients. A PubMed search for all studies evaluating the outpatient treatment of adults diagnosed with solid tumors who suffered from low-risk febrile neutropenia was completed; reference lists from identified articles also were used. In all, 10 trials were included in the analysis, which showed no significant difference in clinical failure rates and mortality for ambulatory regimens and standard hospital-based therapy. Subgroup analysis according to the type of fever episode showed no significant differences in clinical failure rates for fever of unknown origin and fever due to documented infections. Subgroup analyses in two independent trials identified an absolute neutrophil count < 100 cells/ mm3 as being predictive of outpatient treatment failure (P < 0.04). These findings need to be confirmed by further trials. Thus, outpatient management of adult cancer patients with low-risk febrile neutropenia is safe, effective, and comparable to standard hospital-based therapy. Patients at low risk are outpatients and are hemodynamically stable; they have no organ failure, they are able to take oral medications, and they do not suffer from acute leukemia. Low-risk prediction also may be based on the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer risk index.

  10. [Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease].

    PubMed

    Dupin, A; Bosset, D; Atger, L; Chevallier, B; Saiag, P; Benoist, G

    2016-01-01

    Pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA) is an inflammatory skin disease that is unknown to pediatricians. The ulceronecrotic febrile form is a rare and potentially lethal variant. We report the case of a 7-year-old boy with a papulovesicular eruption lasting for 4 weeks, secondarily associated with ulcers and necrotic crusts, fever, and systemic signs. After exploring infectious causes such as chickenpox, we discussed and confirmed PLEVA with histological analysis. Systemic steroids and methotrexate improved the symptoms. It is necessary to mention PLEVA in case of prolonged papulovesicular eruption. Prompt diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, although there is no consensus on therapeutic guidelines. PMID:26552626

  11. Pedigree analysis in families with febrile seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.G.; Kugler, S.L.; Stenroos, E.S.; Meulener, M.C.

    1996-02-02

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures, occurring in an estimated 2-5% of North American children. We carried out a systematic pedigree study of febrile seizure probands. Forty of 52 probands (77%) in a referral population selected for increased severity had more than one case per family: one family had 10 cases, one family had 7, 3 families had 6, 2 had 5, 3 had 4, 13 had 3, and 17 had 2 cases. Mode of inheritance in the multicase families best fit the hypothesis of autosomal dominance with reduced penetrance. Polygenic inheritance could not be excluded for some of the smaller families. There was no support for X-linked or mitochondrial inheritance. Penetrance was calculated to be 0.64. Because the cases were selected for increased severity, this represents a useful estimate of the upper limit of penetrance and is in agreement with twin studies. Simulated lod scores showed adequate power for a linkage study in the absence of heterogeneity. Individual families had simulated average lod scores as high as 2.1. However, with potential heterogeneity, assuming only 70% of families share the same disease locus, average lod scores were marginal, and a high density map of marker loci and additional families would be required to document linkage. 41 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure in the skull, prolonged exposure to toxic elements (including solvents, drugs, radiation, paints, industrial chemicals, and certain metals), chronic progressive trauma, poor nutrition, ...

  13. Treatment of Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Norman L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined by an altered mental status in the setting of portosystemic shunting, with or without cirrhosis. The basis of HE is probably multi-factorial, but increased ammonia delivery to the brain is thought to play a pivotal role. Medical therapies have typically focused on reducing blood ammonia concentrations. These measures are moderately effective, but further improvements will require identification of new therapeutic targets. Two medications, lactulose and rifaximin, are currently approved for the treatment of HE in the USA - new compounds are available off-label, and are in clinical trials. The presence of HE is associated with a higher risk of death in cirrhotic patients. Liver transplantation typically cures HE, but HE does not increase the MELD score, and therefore does not contribute to the likelihood of liver transplantation. PMID:26195208

  14. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships. PMID:26449269

  15. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  16. Infusion of branched-chain enriched amino acid solution in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Dienstag, J; Lehrich, J; Yoshimura, N; Bradford, R R; Rosen, H; Atamian, S; Slemmer, E; Holroyde, J; Fischer, J E

    1982-08-01

    Hospitalized patients with hepatic insufficiency often suffer from severe catabolic states and are in urgent need of nutritional support during their acute illness. Protein intolerence, however, remains a significant problem with respect to the provision of adequate nutrition, either enterally or parenterally. The following report is an anecdotal series of 63 consecutive patients in a large urban hospital treated prospectively with nutritional support using a prototype high branched-chain amino acid solution (FO80) given by technique of total parenteral nutrition by the subclavian or internal jugular route with hypertonic dextrose. Sixty-three patients, of which 42 had chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) with acute decompensation and 17 with acute hepatic injury as well as four with hepatorenal syndrome, are the subject of this report. All required intravenous nutritional support and were either intolerant to commercially available parenteral nutrition solutions or were in hepatic encephalopathy at the time they were initially seen. The cirrhotic patients had been hospitalized for a mean of 14.5 +/- 1.9 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 13 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma for 4.8 +/- 0.7 days despite standard therapy. Patients with acute hepatitis had been in the hospital for 16.2 +/- 4.1 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 25 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma 5.2 +/- 1.6 days before therapy. Routine tests of liver function, blood chemistries, amino acids, EEGs, and complex neurological testing including Reitan trailmaking tests were used in the evaluation of these patients. Up to 120 grams of synthetic amino acid solution with hypertonic dextrose was tolerated in these patients with improvement noted in encephalopathy of at least one grade in 87% of the patients with cirrhosis and 75% of the patients with hepatitis. Nitrogen balance was achieved when 75 to 80 grams of synthetic amino acids were administered. Survival was 45% in the cirrhotic group

  17. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: "mad cow disease".

    PubMed

    1996-07-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as "mad cow disease," is a fatal brain disease of cattle first recognized in the United Kingdom. In humans, the most common transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease (CJD). Although no cases of CJD have been directly linked to beef consumption, an advisory committee has reported that 10 recent cases of a CJD variant may be associated with BSE. This announcement has alarmed consumers well beyond the borders of the United Kingdom.

  18. Etiology of Severe Non-malaria Febrile Illness in Northern Tanzania: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crump, John A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Nicholson, William L.; Massung, Robert F.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Galloway, Renee L.; Ooi, Eng Eong; Maro, Venance P.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Kinabo, Grace D.; Muiruri, Charles; Bartlett, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of fever is a commonly presenting complaint among persons seeking healthcare in low-resource areas, yet the public health community has not approached fever in a comprehensive manner. In many areas, malaria is over-diagnosed, and patients without malaria have poor outcomes. Methods and Findings We prospectively studied a cohort of 870 pediatric and adult febrile admissions to two hospitals in northern Tanzania over the period of one year using conventional standard diagnostic tests to establish fever etiology. Malaria was the clinical diagnosis for 528 (60.7%), but was the actual cause of fever in only 14 (1.6%). By contrast, bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal bloodstream infections accounted for 85 (9.8%), 14 (1.6%), and 25 (2.9%) febrile admissions, respectively. Acute bacterial zoonoses were identified among 118 (26.2%) of febrile admissions; 16 (13.6%) had brucellosis, 40 (33.9%) leptospirosis, 24 (20.3%) had Q fever, 36 (30.5%) had spotted fever group rickettsioses, and 2 (1.8%) had typhus group rickettsioses. In addition, 55 (7.9%) participants had a confirmed acute arbovirus infection, all due to chikungunya. No patient had a bacterial zoonosis or an arbovirus infection included in the admission differential diagnosis. Conclusions Malaria was uncommon and over-diagnosed, whereas invasive infections were underappreciated. Bacterial zoonoses and arbovirus infections were highly prevalent yet overlooked. An integrated approach to the syndrome of fever in resource-limited areas is needed to improve patient outcomes and to rationally target disease control efforts. PMID:23875053

  19. Hepatic encephalopathy: An approach to its multiple pathophysiological features

    PubMed Central

    Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Tallis, Silvina; Delfante, Amalia; Souto, Pablo Andrés; Lemberg, Abraham; Eizayaga, Francisco Xavier; Romay, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complex syndrome, ranging from subtle behavioral abnormalities to deep coma and death. Hepatic encephalopathy emerges as the major complication of acute or chronic liver failure. Multiplicity of factors are involved in its pathophysiology, such as central and neuromuscular neurotransmission disorder, alterations in sleep patterns and cognition, changes in energy metabolism leading to cell injury, an oxidative/nitrosative state and a neuroinflammatory condition. Moreover, in acute HE, a condition of imminent threat of death is present due to a deleterious astrocyte swelling. In chronic HE, changes in calcium signaling, mitochondrial membrane potential and long term potential expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate-cGMP and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors alterations, and changes in the mRNA and protein expression and redistribution in the cerebral blood flow can be observed. The main molecule indicated as responsible for all these changes in HE is ammonia. There is no doubt that ammonia, a neurotoxic molecule, triggers or at least facilitates most of these changes. Ammonia plasma levels are increased two- to three-fold in patients with mild to moderate cirrhotic HE and up to ten-fold in patients with acute liver failure. Hepatic and inter-organ trafficking of ammonia and its metabolite, glutamine (GLN), lead to hyperammonemic conditions. Removal of hepatic ammonia is a differentiated work that includes the hepatocyte, through the urea cycle, converting ammonia into GLN via glutamine synthetase. Under pathological conditions, such as liver damage or liver blood by-pass, the ammonia plasma level starts to rise and the risk of HE developing is high. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of HE is rapidly expanding and identification of focally localized triggers has led the development of new possibilities for HE to be considered. This editorial will focus on issues where, to the best of our knowledge, more research is needed in

  20. Pediatric febrile seizures and childhood headaches in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, J; Bentti, A L

    2000-03-01

    Febrile seizures and migraine headaches in children are two of the most common neurological diagnoses seen by primary care practitioners. It is essential that a knowledge base be developed to better care for this population. This article reviews pediatric febrile seizures, including management and treatment recommendations and childhood headaches, with an emphasis on migraine headaches. Diagnosis, management, and referral criteria are also reviewed. PMID:10673570

  1. Febrile episode among a floating population of C.R.P.F. Jawans stationed at Calcutta.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, N; De, P M; Chakravarti, S K; Chakraborty, M S; Neogi, D K; Mukherjee, K K

    1995-06-01

    A virological investigation was carried out to establish the etiologic agent of a febrile outbreak amongst a floating population of C.R.P.F. Jawans, stationed at Calcutta during May-July, 1993. The illness was associated with fever, severe headache, bodyache and arthralgia which lasted for 2-4 days in most of the cases. Fifty cases were examined clinically and blood samples (both acute and convalescent) were subjected to virological study. One mouse-pathogenic agent could be isolated in suckling mice and identified as DEN-3. Sero-investigation of 50 single sera by HI & CF method revealed evidence of presumptive dengue infection in 33, while sero-conversion could be noted in 10 out of 25 available paired sera tested. Results of MAC ELISA revealed evidence of primary dengue infection in 6 out of 12 acute phase sera examined. Thus, the study shows that the episode is strongly suggestive of primary dengue infection.

  2. [Prevention and treatment of febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Montemurro, F; Gallicchio, M; Aglietta, M

    1997-01-01

    Many chemotherapy regimens are associated with variable periods of myelosuppression. In cancer patients, neutropenia (less than 500 neutrophils/microL) is the most important risk factor for infections. The incidence and severity of infectious complications are related to depth and duration of neutropenia, with the highest risk if neutrophils are less than 100/microL for more than a week. The period required for neutrophil recovery is usually short with standard regimens, but prolonged after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous bone marrow transplant (-ABMT) or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) infusion. Under these conditions, the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates neutrophil recovery and shortens the duration of hospitalization. In standard chemotherapy settings, prophylactic use of CSF's is a matter of debate. Several studies have reached contrasting conclusion, but, combining effectiveness and costs, it results that this use of CSF'S is not to be recommended unless the risk of infections (elderly patients, reduced marrow reserve) is high. The administration of G-CSF or GM-CSF to a febrile neutropenic patient (cfr CSF's therapy) shortens the duration of neutropenia, although no great clinical benefits are evident. Nevertheless the identification of subsets of patients with additional risk factors (i.e. absolute neutrophil count < 100/microL at the onset of fever or delayed neutrophil recovery) should be helpful in establishing the role of CSF's therapy. When prolonged periods of severe neutropenia (less than 500 neutrophils/microL) are expected, antibiotics should be prophylactically administered. Fluoroquinolones seem to be the optimal choice in heavily myelosuppressed patients (ie. bone marrow transplant recipients). Fluoroquinolones are effective in reducing the frequency of gram-negative bacteremia, but, because of incomplete coverage, gram

  3. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    PubMed

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. PMID:26253448

  4. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-01-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption. PMID:25984155

  5. Joseph Haydn's encephalopathy: new aspects.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    With increasing age, Joseph Haydn complained of progressive forgetfulness preventing him from composing for about the last 8 years of his life. He spent his days more and more inactive and immobilized, suffering from a disabling gait disturbance. Still, most biographers consider diffuse atherosclerosis and congestive heart failure to be reasons for Haydn's medical condition and physical decline during the last years of his life. A more sophisticated and detailed inspection of documents and sources, however, leads to the diagnosis of subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE), caused by progressive cerebral small vessel disease. Important features of the disease are mood changes, urinary symptoms, and in particular a characteristic gait disturbance, while dementia is only mild and occurs later in the course. Haydn was severely disabled by the symptoms of SVE for several years and often reported difficulties in the completion of his last oratorio "Die Jahreszeiten" (The Seasons). Subsequently, the disease prevented him from composing another large oratorio, "Das jüngste Gericht" (The last judgement), which had been already drafted. Finally, the progress of SVE stopped his long career as a composer and conductor at the age of 73 years. PMID:25684297

  6. Clinical Neurophysiology of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Piero; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has relevant impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers and causes relevant costs because of hospitalizations and work days lost. Its quantification is important to perform adequate clinical trials on this relevant complication of cirrhosis and portal-systemic shunting. Clinical neurophysiology, which detects functional alterations of the nervous system, has been applied to the study of HE for over 60 years. This review aims at summarizing and clarifying the role of neurophysiologic techniques in the study of HE. Methods A narrative review was performed aiming at interpreting the cited papers and the techniques on the basis of their physiological and pathophysiological meaning. Results The potential role of EEG, quantified EEG, evoked potentials—both exogenous, endogenous and motor—have been clarified to the reader that may be unfamiliar with neurophysiology. Conclusions The EEG, reflecting the oscillatory changes of neural network is the preferable tool to detect and monitor HE, with the exception of its most severe stage, when EEG flattens. SSEP and MEP have indication to detect and monitor transmission alterations that are likely related to myelin changes and microedema. PMID:26041960

  7. Gut microbiota and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Radha K

    2013-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut; while the portal venous system receives blood from the gut, and its contents may affect liver functions, liver in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion. There is robust evidence that the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is linked to alterations in gut microbiota and their by-products such as ammonia, indoles, oxindoles, endotoxins, etc. In the setting of intestinal barrier and immune dysfunction, these by-products are involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis including HE and systemic inflammation plays an important role. Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics may exhibit efficacy in the treatment of HE by modulating the gut flora. They improve derangement in flora by decreasing the counts of pathogenic bacteria and thus improving the endotoxemia, HE and the liver disease. Current evidence suggest that the trials evaluating the role of probiotics in the treatment of HE are of not high quality and all trials had high risk of bias and high risk of random errors. Therefore, the use of probiotics for patients with HE cannot be currently recommended. Further RCTs are required. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut flora and HE, both in terms of the pathogenesis and the treatment of HE.

  8. Joseph Haydn's encephalopathy: new aspects.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    With increasing age, Joseph Haydn complained of progressive forgetfulness preventing him from composing for about the last 8 years of his life. He spent his days more and more inactive and immobilized, suffering from a disabling gait disturbance. Still, most biographers consider diffuse atherosclerosis and congestive heart failure to be reasons for Haydn's medical condition and physical decline during the last years of his life. A more sophisticated and detailed inspection of documents and sources, however, leads to the diagnosis of subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE), caused by progressive cerebral small vessel disease. Important features of the disease are mood changes, urinary symptoms, and in particular a characteristic gait disturbance, while dementia is only mild and occurs later in the course. Haydn was severely disabled by the symptoms of SVE for several years and often reported difficulties in the completion of his last oratorio "Die Jahreszeiten" (The Seasons). Subsequently, the disease prevented him from composing another large oratorio, "Das jüngste Gericht" (The last judgement), which had been already drafted. Finally, the progress of SVE stopped his long career as a composer and conductor at the age of 73 years.

  9. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  10. SPTAN1 encephalopathy: distinct phenotypes and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Jun; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Nabatame, Shin; Gaik-Siew, Ch'ng; Miyata, Rie; Rener-Primec, Zvonka; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo

    2015-04-01

    Recent progress in genetic analysis reveals that a significant proportion of cryptogenic epileptic encephalopathies are single-gene disorders. Mutations in numerous genes for early-onset epileptic encephalopathies have been rapidly identified, including in SPTAN1, which encodes α-II spectrin. The aim of this review is to delineate SPTAN1 encephalopathy as a distinct clinical syndrome. To date, a total of seven epileptic patients with four different in-frame SPTAN1 mutations have been identified. The major clinical features of SPTAN1 mutations include epileptic encephalopathy with hypsarrhythmia, no visual attention, acquired microcephaly, spastic quadriplegia and severe intellectual disability. Brainstem and cerebellar atrophy and cerebral hypomyelination, as observed by magnetic resonance imaging, are specific hallmarks of this condition. A milder variant is characterized by generalized epilepsy with pontocerebellar atrophy. Only in-frame SPTAN1 mutations in the last two spectrin repeats in the C-terminal region lead to dominant negative effects and these specific phenotypes. The last two spectrin repeats are required for α/β spectrin heterodimer associations and the mutations can alter heterodimer formation between the two spectrins. From these data we suggest that SPTAN1 encephalopathy is a distinct clinical syndrome owing to specific SPTAN1 mutations. It is important that this syndrome is recognized by pediatric neurologists to enable proper diagnostic work-up for patients. PMID:25631096

  11. Hypothermia for hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, C Michael; Shankaran, Seetha

    2010-01-01

    Moderate to severe hypoxic–ischemic injury in newborn infants, manifested as encephalopathy immediately or within hours after birth, is associated with a high risk of either death or a lifetime with disability. In recent multicenter clinical trials, hypothermia initiated within the first 6 postnatal hours has emerged as a therapy that reduces the risk of death or impairment among infants with hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy. Prior to hypothermia, no therapies directly targeting neonatal encephalopathy secondary to hypoxic–ischemic injury had convincing evidence of efficacy. Hypothermia therapy is now becoming increasingly available at tertiary centers. Despite the deserved enthusiasm for hypothermia, obstetric and neonatology caregivers, as well as society at large, must be reminded that in the clinical trials more than 40% of cooled infants died or survived with impairment. Although hypothermia is an evidence-based therapy, additional discoveries are needed to further improve outcome after HIE. In this article, we briefly present the epidemiology of neonatal encephalopathy due to hypoxic–ischemic injury, describe the rationale for the use of hypothermia therapy for hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy, and present results of the clinical trials that have demonstrated the efficacy of hypothermia. We also present findings noted during and after these trials that will guide care and direct research for this devastating problem. PMID:20625441

  12. Severe hypoglycemic encephalopathy due to hypoallergenic formula in an infant.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Erika; Ishige, Mika; Takahashi, Yuno; Kodama, Hiroko; Fuchigami, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Shori

    2016-08-01

    A 7-month-old girl was brought to hospital due to vomiting. Upon admission, she was in a convulsive state and stupor with extremely low blood glucose. Head computed tomography showed brain edema, and comprehensive treatment for acute encephalopathy was initiated immediately. Severe hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis, elevation of ammonia and serum transaminases and creatine kinase suggested metabolic decompensation. Infusion of a high-glucose solution containing vitamins, biotin, and l-carnitine resolved the metabolic crisis quickly, but brain damage was irreversible. She was found to have been fed exclusively on a hypoallergenic formula (HF) for 7 months, although she was found later to be non-allergic. Evidence of inborn metabolic diseases was absent, therefore biotin deficiency and carnitine deficiency were concluded to be a consequence of reliance on a HF for a prolonged period. Health-care professionals should warn parents of the consequences of using HF. PMID:27324861

  13. Association of Serum Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Levels in Malignant Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Bacteremia and Fungemia

    PubMed Central

    Arzanian, Mohammad-Taghi; Soltani, Babak; Fahimzad, Alireza; Shiva, Farideh; Shamshiri, Ahmad-Reza; Karimi, Abdollah

    2011-01-01

    Objective Infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in febrile neutropenic patients with malignancy. Rapid diagnostic tests are needed for prompt diagnosis and early treatment which is crucial for optimal management. We assessed the utility of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM-1) in the diagnosis of bacteremia and fungemia in febrile neutropenic patients. Methods Sixty-five febrile neutropenic children with malignancy hospitalized in Mofid Children's Hospital during a period of one year from January 2007 were recruited for this cross sectional study (mean age 66.2± 37 months; 35 females and 30 males). Thirty patients (46.2%) had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 2 (3.1%) acute myeloid leukemia, one (1.5%) lymphoma and 32 (49.2%) were under treatment for solid tumors. Simultaneous blood samples were collected for measurement of serum sTREM-1 levels and for blood cultures which were grown in BACTEC media. Gold standard for the presence of infection was a positive BACTEC culture as a more sensitive method compared to current blood culture techniques. Findings Blood cultures with BACTEC system were positive in 13(20%) patients (12 bacterial and one fungal culture). The mean serum sTREM-1 level in BACTEC positive patients was 948.2±592.9 pg/ml but in BACTEC negative cases it was 76.3±118.8 pg/ml (P<0.001). The optimal cut-off point of sTREM-1 for detecting patients with positive result of BACTEC was 525 pg/ml with sensitivity and specificity of 84.6% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Our study revealed a significant association between serum sTREM-1 level and bacteremia and fungemia in febrile neutropenic patients suffering malignancy with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. PMID:23056805

  14. Febrile neutropenia in children treated for malignancy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Chris D; Waugh, Lucy K; Nielsen, Maryke J; Paulus, Stéphane

    2015-06-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) in children treated for malignancy is a common and direct sequela of chemotherapy. Episodes of FN can be life-threatening, and demand prompt recognition, assessment and treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics. While in the majority of episodes no causal infection is identified, 10-20% are secondary to a bloodstream infection (BSI). A reduction in episodes of BSI could be achieved through robust infection prevention strategies, such as CVL care bundles. Alongside good antimicrobial stewardship, these strategies could reduce the risk of emergent, multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections. Emerging bacterial pathogens in BSI include Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS) and Enterobacteriaceae such as Klebsiella spp. which are known for their ability to carry MDR genes. There is also increased recognition of the role of invasive fungal infection (IFI) in FN, in particular with Aspergillus spp. Novel diagnostics, including multiplex blood and respiratory polymerase chain reaction assays can identify infections early in FN, facilitating targeted therapy, and reducing unnecessary antimicrobial exposure. Given appropriate, and sensitive rapid diagnostics, potential also exists to safely inform the risk assessment of patients with FN, identifying those at low risk of complication, who could be treated in the out-patient setting. Several clinical decision rules (CDR) have now been developed and validated in defined populations, for the risk assessment of children being treated for cancer. Future research is needed to develop a universal CDR to improve the management of children with FN.

  15. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  16. Why the confusion in Hashimoto's encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Bodiabaduge A P; McShane, Michael Anthony; Roy, Prem; Anand, Geetha

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl presented with an afebrile seizure followed by prolonged confusion and visual hallucinations. Initial investigations in the form of blood tests, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and head imaging by CT, were normal. She represented with two further episodes within a period of 3 weeks. Further investigations considering infective, metabolic and some autoimmune causes of encephalopathy were negative. An MRI head scan was normal. Thyroid function testing disclosed primary hypothyroidism and elevated antithyroid antibodies. She responded well to glucocorticoid therapy for presumed Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE). HE describes patients with various neurological manifestations with elevated titres of antithyroid antibodies. There are no clear criteria for diagnosis, with many cases labelled as HE. Responses to corticosteroid therapy are favourable. In patients with unexplained encephalopathy, HE should be considered given the favourable response to glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:22691944

  17. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  18. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  19. Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies: Pathophysiology and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Rong; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are syndromes in which seizures or interictal epileptiform activity contribute to or exacerbate brain function, beyond that caused by the underlying pathology. These severe epilepsies begin early in life, are associated with poor lifelong outcome, and are resistant to most treatments. Therefore, they represent an immense challenge for families and the medical care system. Furthermore, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the epileptic encephalopathies are poorly understood, hampering attempts to devise novel treatments. This article reviews animal models of the three classic epileptic encephalopathies-West syndrome (infantile spasms), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and continuous spike waves during sleep or Landau-Kleffner syndrome-with discussion of how animal models are revealing underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that might be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:27544466

  20. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  1. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  2. Transmissible encephalopathies: speculations and realities.

    PubMed

    Manuelidis, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs), such as scrapie, CJD, and BSE, are caused by a type of infectious particle that remains enigmatic. The language of prion theory supersedes the reality of what is, and what is not known. This review questions the predictive value, consistency and accuracy of this now dominant assumption. Many people believe the normal cellular prion protein (PrP) self-converts into an infectious amyloid protein or prion. Although the amyloidogenic capacity of proteins is well established, the concept of an infectious protein without nucleic acid was "revolutionary." Diverse experiments have repeatedly shown, however, that this protein alone, in any form, is incapable of reproducing transmissible infection. In contrast, the infectious agent copurifies with many other molecules, including nucleic acids, while it separates from the majority of PrP. The infectious particle has a homogeneous viral size of ~25 nm, and infectivity is markedly reduced by conditions that disrupt viral core components but do not disrupt multimers of PrP amyloid. Additionally, the infectious agent replicates to high levels before any PrP abnormalities can be detected. Hence, we initially proposed that PrP changes are part of the host's pathologic response to high levels of infectious agent, but not the agent itself. Newer data clarifying a role for myeloid cells in the spread of infection, the unique character of two different agent strains propagated in a single animal, and the demonstration of long nucleic acids in a variety of simplified high titer preparations continue to raise serious questions for the prion hypothesis. Moreover, the epidemic spread of TSEs, and the activation of host innate immune mechanisms by infection, further indicate these agents are recognizably foreign, and probably viral.

  3. Experimental Interspecies Transmission Studies of the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies to Cattle: Comparison to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Since the emergence of BSE and its pr...

  4. Dengue fever with encephalopathy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Row, D; Weinstein, P; Murray-Smith, S

    1996-03-01

    During an epidemic of dengue type 2 virus in the rural community of Charters Towers, North Queensland, Australia, in 1993, 210 cases presented to the local hospital with signs and symptoms of classic dengue fever. Two cases were noteworthy because of neurologic complications, which included drowsiness, short term memory loss, agitation, and seizure. The cases are presented in detail because they are the first cases of dengue-associated encephalopathy to be documented in Australia. An increasing number of cases of encephalopathy associated with classic dengue fever is being reported world wide, but the etiology of this clinical syndrome remains unknown.

  5. Prediction of Cortical Defect Using C-Reactive Protein and Urine Sodium to Potassium Ratio in Infants with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, urine protein-creatinine ratio (uProt/Cr), and urine electrolytes can be useful for discriminating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from other febrile illnesses or the presence of a cortical defect on 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scanning (true APN) from its absence in infants with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Materials and Methods We examined 150 infants experiencing their first febrile UTI and 100 controls with other febrile illnesses consecutively admitted to our hospital from January 2010 to December 2012. Blood (CRP, electrolytes, Cr) and urine tests [uProt/Cr, electrolytes, and sodium-potassium ratio (uNa/K)] were performed upon admission. All infants with UTI underwent DMSA scans during admission. All data were compared between infants with UTI and controls and between infants with or without a cortical defect on DMSA scans. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the ability of the parameters to predict true APN was analyzed. Results CRP levels and uProt/Cr were significantly higher in infants with true APN than in controls. uNa levels and uNa/K were significantly lower in infants with true APN than in controls. CRP levels and uNa/K were relevant factors for predicting true APN. The method using CRP levels, u-Prot/Cr, u-Na levels, and uNa/K had a sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 65%, positive predictive value of 60%, and negative predictive value of 95% for predicting true APN. Conclusion We conclude that these parameters are useful for discriminating APN from other febrile illnesses or discriminating true APN in infants with febrile UTI. PMID:26632389

  6. Febrile seizures associated with influenza A.

    PubMed

    Hara, Keita; Tanabe, Takuya; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Inoue, Nao; Tamaki, Hirohumi; Okamoto, Nami; Okasora, Keisuke; Morimoto, Takahiro; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the clinical impact of influenza A on the development of febrile seizures (FS), consecutive FS patients brought to our hospital between October 2003 and September 2004 were prospectively surveyed. Patients infected with influenza A (influenza A patients) and those uninfected with influenza (non-influenza patients) were compared with regard to clinical characteristics of FS. Influenza infection was determined by rapid antigen test and/or serologically. Associations of influenza A with atypical findings of FS, including partial seizures, prolonged seizures, multiple seizures during the same illness, and 30-min or longer prolonged postictal impairment of consciousness (PPIC), were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. A total of 215 patients (47 influenza A and 168 non-influenza patients) were enrolled in the study. Age was significantly higher in the influenza A group (39.85+/-22.16 months vs. 27.51+/-17.14 months, P<0.001). Of 42 patients aged 48 months or older, which corresponded to the 80th percentile for age, 15 (35.7%) were influenza A patients, with a significantly higher incidence of such patients than in the subgroup of patients aged 47 months or younger (32/173, 18.5%) (P=0.015). On multiple logistic regression analysis, influenza A was independently associated with PPIC (odds ratio: 4.44, 95% confidence interval: 1.52-12.95, P=0.006), but not with other atypical findings. The positive association of influenza A with PPIC suggests that influenza may affect state of consciousness at the same time that it induces seizures with fever.

  7. Febrile illness experience among Nigerian nomads

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An understanding of the febrile illness experience of Nigerian nomadic Fulani is necessary for developing an appropriate strategy for extending malaria intervention services to them. An exploratory study of their malaria illness experience was carried out in Northern Nigeria preparatory to promoting malaria intervention among them. Methods Ethnographic tools including interviews, group discussions, informal conversations and living-in-camp observations were used for collecting information on local knowledge, perceived cause, severity and health seeking behaviour of nomadic Fulani in their dry season camps at the Gongola-Benue valley in Northeastern Nigeria. Results Nomadic Fulani regarded pabboje (a type of "fever" that is distinct from other fevers because it "comes today, goes tomorrow, returns the next") as their commonest health problem. Pabboje is associated with early rains, ripening corn and brightly coloured flora. Pabboje is inherent in all nomadic Fulani for which treatment is therefore unnecessary despite its interference with performance of duty such as herding. Traditional medicines are used to reduce the severity, and rituals carried out to make it permanently inactive or to divert its recurrence. Although modern antimalaria may make the severity of subsequent pabboje episodes worse, nomads seek treatment in private health facilities against fevers that are persistent using antimalarial medicines. The consent of the household head was essential for a sick child to be treated outside the camp. The most important issues in health service utilization among nomads are the belief that fever is a Fulani illness that needs no cure until a particular period, preference for private medicine vendors and the avoidance of health facilities. Conclusions Understanding nomadic Fulani beliefs about pabboje is useful for planning an acceptable community participatory fever management among them. PMID:22292982

  8. Lymphocytes subsets in children with febrile convulsions.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Karaman, Sait; Caksen, Hüseyin; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabas, Dursun; Yilmaz, Cahide; Atas, Bülent

    2007-07-01

    In this study, lymphocytes subsets including blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were analyzed in children with febrile convulsion (FC) to determine whether there was the association of lymphocytes subsets in the pathogenesis of FC. The study includes 48 children with FC, and 55 healthy age matched control subjects, followed in Yüzüncü Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics between October 2003 and June 2004. Blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were examined in the study and control groups. The analyses were performed in the Hematology Laboratory, Yüzüncü Yil University Faculty of Medicine, with flow cytometer device (Coulter Epics XL2, Flow Cytometer). A total of 48 children [17 girls (35.5%) and 31 boys (64.5%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 22.20 +/- 13.75 months) with FC and 55 healthy children [28 girls (51%) and 27 boys (49%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 28.87 +/- 17.04 months) were included in the study. When compared with the control group, the study found significantly decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values in the study group (p <.05). However, there was not significant difference in CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values between the control and study groups (p >.05). When comparing the children with and without positive family history for FC, the study did not find any difference for all CD values between the groups (p >.05). Similarly, there was not significant difference in CD values between the children with simple and complex FC (p >.05). The findings suggested that decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values might be responsible for the infections connected with FC or that they might be related to the pathogenesis of FC in some children.

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Incedayi, Mehmet; Mutlu, Hakan; Meral, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that affects the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and the kidneys. The disease primarily affects children, but may occur in elderly children with allergic purpura and also in adults. Central nervous system involvement may be the first sign; however, it is rarely encountered. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome of encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbance and seizures. Its radiological signs can be observed in grey and white matter at the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. HSP should be considered in children with PRES in the presence of rash, joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. We reported a 5-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure and PRES by reason of HSP. PMID:23946524

  10. [Progressive multifocal encephalopathy in a LED patient].

    PubMed

    Tikkakoski, Tapani; Ingo, Sinikka; Julin, Lillemor; Kanckos, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal encephalopathy (PML) is a rare demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, caused by the reactivation of the JC virus in the body during immunosuppression. The use of monoclonal antibodies predisposes to PML, and the epidemiology of the disease has changed. We describe the first PML published from Finland and associated with rituximab treatment in a LED patient.

  11. Phenytoin-induced encephalopathy in a child

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin is a commonly used antiepileptic medication in the pediatric age group, but it has a narrow therapeutic range. Various adverse effects have been reported commonly. We report a relatively rare case of encephalopathy in a child from overdose of injectable phenytoin due to ignorance of the previous treatment. Scrutiny of medical records and history is of utmost importance while administering such medications.

  12. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  13. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Greenlee, M Heather West

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein-misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) in mink, and Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. These diseases are associated with the accumulation of a protease-resistant, disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (called PrP(Sc)) in the central nervous system and other tissues, depending on the host species. Typically, TSEs are acquired through exposure to infectious material, but inherited and spontaneous TSEs also occur. All TSEs share pathologic features and infectious mechanisms but have distinct differences in transmission and epidemiology due to host factors and strain differences encoded within the structure of the misfolded prion protein. The possibility that BSE can be transmitted to humans as the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has brought attention to this family of diseases. This review is focused on the TSEs of livestock: bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle and scrapie in sheep and goats.

  14. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Greenlee, M Heather West

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein-misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) in mink, and Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. These diseases are associated with the accumulation of a protease-resistant, disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (called PrP(Sc)) in the central nervous system and other tissues, depending on the host species. Typically, TSEs are acquired through exposure to infectious material, but inherited and spontaneous TSEs also occur. All TSEs share pathologic features and infectious mechanisms but have distinct differences in transmission and epidemiology due to host factors and strain differences encoded within the structure of the misfolded prion protein. The possibility that BSE can be transmitted to humans as the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has brought attention to this family of diseases. This review is focused on the TSEs of livestock: bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle and scrapie in sheep and goats. PMID:25991695

  15. Psychometric tests for diagnosing minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Karin

    2013-06-01

    While it is consensus that minimal hepatic encephalopathy (mHE) has significant impact on a patient's daily living, and thus should be diagnosed and treated, there is no consensus about the optimal diagnostic tools. At present the most frequently used psychometric methods for diagnosing minimal hepatic encephalopathy are the Inhibitory Control Test and the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score PHES. Another frequently used method is Critical Flicker Frequency. The PHES and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status have been recommended for diagnosing mHE by a working party commissioned by the International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism. Recently the Continuous Reaction Time Test, which has been used in the 1980ies, has gained new interest. Today, no data are available that allow to decide which of these methods is the most appropriate. In fact, even basic information such as dependence on age, sex and education or influence of diseases that frequently accompany liver cirrhosis upon test results is missing for most of them. Future studies must address these questions to improve diagnosis of mHE. PMID:22993201

  16. Cerebral Abscess Presenting as a Complex Febrile Seizure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Anjoli; Salas, Alicia; Mahl, Evan; Levine, Marla C

    2015-07-01

    Currently, there is no standardized approach to the management of complex febrile seizures in children and there are no published practice guidelines for the procurement of neuroimaging. Presented is a 2-year-old female patient who experienced a 3- to 5-minute episode of staring and unilateral mouth twitching associated with high fever. On initial presentation, the patient appeared well and had a normal neurological examination. No focus of infection was identified, and she was diagnosed with complex febrile seizure. The patient was discharged home with close neurology and primary care follow-up but returned the following day with altered mental status, toxic appearance, and right lower extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed left-sided cranial empyema and the patient was managed with antibiotics and surgical drainage. A literature review to answer the question "Do children with complex febrile seizures require emergent neuroimaging?" yielded a small number of retrospective reviews describing the utility of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture in the work-up of febrile seizures. Current evidence indicates that neuroimaging is not indicated in an otherwise healthy child who presents with complex febrile seizure if the patient is well appearing and has no evidence of focal neurological deficit on examination. As this case demonstrates, however, serious conditions such as meningitis and brain abscess (though rare) should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complex febrile seizure and physicians should remain aware that the need for neuroimaging and/or lumbar puncture may arise in the appropriate clinical setting.

  17. Cerebral Abscess Presenting as a Complex Febrile Seizure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Anjoli; Salas, Alicia; Mahl, Evan; Levine, Marla C

    2015-07-01

    Currently, there is no standardized approach to the management of complex febrile seizures in children and there are no published practice guidelines for the procurement of neuroimaging. Presented is a 2-year-old female patient who experienced a 3- to 5-minute episode of staring and unilateral mouth twitching associated with high fever. On initial presentation, the patient appeared well and had a normal neurological examination. No focus of infection was identified, and she was diagnosed with complex febrile seizure. The patient was discharged home with close neurology and primary care follow-up but returned the following day with altered mental status, toxic appearance, and right lower extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed left-sided cranial empyema and the patient was managed with antibiotics and surgical drainage. A literature review to answer the question "Do children with complex febrile seizures require emergent neuroimaging?" yielded a small number of retrospective reviews describing the utility of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture in the work-up of febrile seizures. Current evidence indicates that neuroimaging is not indicated in an otherwise healthy child who presents with complex febrile seizure if the patient is well appearing and has no evidence of focal neurological deficit on examination. As this case demonstrates, however, serious conditions such as meningitis and brain abscess (though rare) should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complex febrile seizure and physicians should remain aware that the need for neuroimaging and/or lumbar puncture may arise in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:26151351

  18. Pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy: role of ammonia and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Dominic R; Tranah, Edward J; Shawcross, Debbie L

    2015-03-01

    The syndrome we refer to as Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE) was first characterized by a team of Nobel Prize winning physiologists led by Pavlov and Nencki at the Imperial Institute of Experimental Medicine in Russia in the 1890's. This focused upon the key observation that performing a portocaval shunt, which bypassed nitrogen-rich blood away from the liver, induced elevated blood and brain ammonia concentrations in association with profound neurobehavioral changes. There exists however a spectrum of metabolic encephalopathies attributable to a variety (or even absence) of liver hepatocellular dysfunctions and it is this spectrum rather than a single disease entity that has come to be defined as HE. Differences in the underlying pathophysiology, treatment responses and outcomes can therefore be highly variable between acute and chronic HE. The term also fails to articulate quite how systemic the syndrome of HE can be and how it can be influenced by the gastrointestinal, renal, nervous, or immune systems without any change in background liver function. The pathogenesis of HE therefore encapsulates a complex network of interdependent organ systems which as yet remain poorly characterized. There is nonetheless a growing recognition that there is a complex but influential synergistic relationship between ammonia, inflammation (sterile and non-sterile) and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis HE which develops in an environment of functional immunoparesis in patients with liver dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies are thus moving further away from the traditional specialty of hepatology and more towards novel immune and inflammatory targets which will be discussed in this review. PMID:26041962

  19. Recurrent encephalopathy? No I'm a sleeping beauty!

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mehtab; Prasad, Manish; Ritey, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    To describe the clinical presentation of 'Kleine-Levin (sleeping beauty) syndrome' in a child, who presented with recurrent episodes consistent with encephalopathy, associated with excessive sleepiness, cognitive and behavioural disturbance and hyper sexuality. 14 years old boy presented acutely with excessive tiredness, sleeping excessively, abnormal behaviour and hypersexuality following a viral throat infection. On examination he was sleepy but easily arousable. His GCS (15/15) and rest of the neurological examination including fundoscopy and other systemic examination was completely unremarkable. All his initial investigations including electrolytes, LFTs, CSF, virology screen and MRI brain scan were normal. Detailed autoimmune screening was also negative. EEG showed non-specific diffuse slowing consistent with encephalopathy. His excessive sleepiness gradually improved together with his altered behaviour in about two weeks after presentation. Hyper sexuality became more overt during this phase. All these symptoms completely disappeared three weeks after his presentation and he attended school as before. He was readmitted six weeks later with exactly similar presentation and again only positive result being diffuse non-specific slowing of EEG. His recovery was also similar and he was completely back to his normal self in three weeks time. His recurrent symptoms were consistent with 'Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS)' or 'sleeping beauty syndrome'. KLS is a rare disorder which mainly affects adolescent males. Common symptoms include hypersomnia (100%), cognitive changes (96%), eating disturbances (80%), hypersexuality, compulsions, and depressed mood. The syndrome usually lasts for 8 years, with on an average seven episode of 10 days each recurring every 3.5 months. It is most frequently precipitated by infections and somnolence decreases using stimulants in nearly 40% of cases.

  20. Recurrent encephalopathy? No I’m a sleeping beauty!

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mehtab; Prasad, Manish; Ritey, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    To describe the clinical presentation of ‘Kleine-Levin (sleeping beauty) syndrome’ in a child, who presented with recurrent episodes consistent with encephalopathy, associated with excessive sleepiness, cognitive and behavioural disturbance and hyper sexuality. 14 years old boy presented acutely with excessive tiredness, sleeping excessively, abnormal behaviour and hypersexuality following a viral throat infection. On examination he was sleepy but easily arousable. His GCS (15/15) and rest of the neurological examination including fundoscopy and other systemic examination was completely unremarkable. All his initial investigations including electrolytes, LFTs, CSF, virology screen and MRI brain scan were normal. Detailed autoimmune screening was also negative. EEG showed non-specific diffuse slowing consistent with encephalopathy. His excessive sleepiness gradually improved together with his altered behaviour in about two weeks after presentation. Hyper sexuality became more overt during this phase. All these symptoms completely disappeared three weeks after his presentation and he attended school as before. He was readmitted six weeks later with exactly similar presentation and again only positive result being diffuse non-specific slowing of EEG. His recovery was also similar and he was completely back to his normal self in three weeks time. His recurrent symptoms were consistent with ‘Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS)’ or ‘sleeping beauty syndrome’. KLS is a rare disorder which mainly affects adolescent males. Common symptoms include hypersomnia (100%), cognitive changes (96%), eating disturbances (80%), hypersexuality, compulsions, and depressed mood. The syndrome usually lasts for 8 years, with on an average seven episode of 10 days each recurring every 3.5 months. It is most frequently precipitated by infections and somnolence decreases using stimulants in nearly 40% of cases. PMID:24891916

  1. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Role of Ammonia and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Dominic R.; Tranah, Edward J.; Shawcross, Debbie L.

    2015-01-01

    The syndrome we refer to as Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE) was first characterized by a team of Nobel Prize winning physiologists led by Pavlov and Nencki at the Imperial Institute of Experimental Medicine in Russia in the 1890's. This focused upon the key observation that performing a portocaval shunt, which bypassed nitrogen-rich blood away from the liver, induced elevated blood and brain ammonia concentrations in association with profound neurobehavioral changes. There exists however a spectrum of metabolic encephalopathies attributable to a variety (or even absence) of liver hepatocellular dysfunctions and it is this spectrum rather than a single disease entity that has come to be defined as HE. Differences in the underlying pathophysiology, treatment responses and outcomes can therefore be highly variable between acute and chronic HE. The term also fails to articulate quite how systemic the syndrome of HE can be and how it can be influenced by the gastrointestinal, renal, nervous, or immune systems without any change in background liver function. The pathogenesis of HE therefore encapsulates a complex network of interdependent organ systems which as yet remain poorly characterized. There is nonetheless a growing recognition that there is a complex but influential synergistic relationship between ammonia, inflammation (sterile and non-sterile) and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis HE which develops in an environment of functional immunoparesis in patients with liver dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies are thus moving further away from the traditional specialty of hepatology and more towards novel immune and inflammatory targets which will be discussed in this review. PMID:26041962

  2. Food Safety: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease).

    PubMed

    Acheson, David W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is just one of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Only recently has it become recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are likely due to proteins known as prions. Although it has been recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may readily spread within species, the recent observations that bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle may have originated from another transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep, known as scrapie, is cause for concern. Further, bovine spongiform encephalopathy has now been strongly linked with a universally fatal human neurologic disease known as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Currently the only approach to preventing bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and subsequent new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, from ingestion of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-infected material is to avoid consumption of contaminated food. Little can be done to treat food that will destroy prions and leave a palatable product. At this stage we are continuing to learn about transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and their implications on human health. This is an ever-changing situation and has an unpredictable element in terms of the extent of the current outbreaks in England and other parts of Europe. PMID:11984426

  3. Limitations of indium-111 leukocyte scanning in febrile renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sebrechts, C.; Biberstein, M.; Klein, J.L.; Witztum, K.F.

    1986-04-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scanning was evaluated as a technique for investigating possible abscess as the cause of fever in 10 renal allograft recipients under therapy for rejection, acute tubular necrosis, or urinary infection. The usefulness of the method in this setting was found to be limited by marked nonspecificity of renal, pulmonary, and other focal leukocyte accumulation. Although wound infections were correctly identified, false-positive scans resulted in multiple nonproductive consultations and radiologic procedures (some invasive) and contributed to the decision to perform one negative exploratory laparotomy. Such generalized nonspecificity in this patient population is in distinct contrast to the experience with this diagnostic test in nontransplant patients, and has not previously been reported. Possible explanations and implications of these findings are discussed. Consequently, great caution is recommended in the use of indium-111 leukocyte scans to diagnose infection in febrile renal transplant patients who present in a similar clinical setting.

  4. Measurements of procalcitonin facilitate targeting of endotoxin adsorption treatment in febrile neutropenic patients suffering from shock.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku; Ando, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Immediate initiation of hemoperfusion treatment with polymixin B immobilized fiber (PMX-DHP) is a potent strategy to improve hemodynamics in septic patients with critical circulatory failure. However, it is often difficult to accurately and rapidly differentiate between bacterial infections and non-infectious causes of shock in acutely critically-ill patients. Procalcitonin (PCT) measurements may assist in the early identification of bacterial infection/sepsis and determination of severity in such patients. We present two febrile neutropenic (FN) patients who developed severe shock after chemotherapy for hematological malignancies. PCT levels were markedly elevated in both patients (≥ 10 ng/ml), suggesting a high likelihood of bacterial infectious etiology as the cause of their shock, and thus they were promptly treated with PMX-DHP. Measurements of PCT may facilitate targeting of PMX-DHP treatment among FN patients suffering from shock, which may lead to better prognosis.

  5. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  6. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  7. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  8. Prevalence of recent immunisation in children with febrile convulsions

    PubMed Central

    Motala, Leya; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children under 7 years of age presenting for febrile convulsions. METHODS This is a retrospective study of all children under the age of seven presenting with febrile convulsions to a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. A total of 78 cases occurred in the period January 2011 to July 2012 and were included in the study. Data was extracted from medical records to provide a retrospective review of the convulsions. RESULTS Of the 78 total cases, there were five medical records which contained information on whether or not immunisation had been administered in the preceding 48 h to presentation to the emergency department. Of these five patients only one patient (1.28% of the study population) was confirmed to have received a vaccination with Infanrix, Prevnar and Rotavirus. The majority of cases reported a current infection as a likely precipitant to the febrile convulsion. CONCLUSION This study found a very low prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children with febrile convulsions presenting to an emergency department at a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. This finding, however, may have been distorted by underreporting of vaccination history.

  9. Prevalence of recent immunisation in children with febrile convulsions

    PubMed Central

    Motala, Leya; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children under 7 years of age presenting for febrile convulsions. METHODS This is a retrospective study of all children under the age of seven presenting with febrile convulsions to a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. A total of 78 cases occurred in the period January 2011 to July 2012 and were included in the study. Data was extracted from medical records to provide a retrospective review of the convulsions. RESULTS Of the 78 total cases, there were five medical records which contained information on whether or not immunisation had been administered in the preceding 48 h to presentation to the emergency department. Of these five patients only one patient (1.28% of the study population) was confirmed to have received a vaccination with Infanrix, Prevnar and Rotavirus. The majority of cases reported a current infection as a likely precipitant to the febrile convulsion. CONCLUSION This study found a very low prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children with febrile convulsions presenting to an emergency department at a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. This finding, however, may have been distorted by underreporting of vaccination history. PMID:27610346

  10. Evidence on the use of paracetamol in febrile children.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Fiona M.; Shann, Frank; Curtis, Nigel; Mulholland, Kim

    2003-01-01

    Antipyretics, including acetaminophen (paracetamol), are prescribed commonly in children with pyrexia, despite minimal evidence of a clinical benefit. A literature review was performed by searching Medline and the Cochrane databases for research papers on the efficacy of paracetamol in febrile illnesses in children and adverse outcomes related to the use of paracetamol. No studies showed any clear benefit for the use of paracetamol in therapeutic doses in febrile children with viral or bacterial infections or with malaria. Some studies suggested that fever may have a beneficial role in infection, although no definitive prospective studies in children have been done to prove this. The use of paracetamol in therapeutic doses generally is safe, although hepatotoxicity has occurred with recommended dosages in children. In developing countries where malnutrition is common, data on the safety of paracetamol are lacking. The cost of paracetamol for poor families is substantial. No evidence shows that it is beneficial to treat febrile children with paracetamol. Treatment should be given only to children who are in obvious discomfort and those with conditions known to be painful. The role of paracetamol in children with severe malaria or sepsis and in malnourished, febrile children needs to be clarified. PMID:12856055

  11. 76 FR 38667 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory... available at the following link. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee...

  12. Does aetiology of neonatal encephalopathy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy influence the outcome of treatment?

    PubMed

    Mcintyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve; Nelson, Karin B

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy, a clinical syndrome affecting term-born and late preterm newborn infants, increases the risk of perinatal death and long-term neurological morbidity, especially cerebral palsy. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, a treatment designed for hypoxic or ischaemic injury, associated mortality and morbidity rates have decreased. Unfortunately, only about one in eight neonates (95% confidence interval) who meet eligibility criteria for therapeutic cooling apparently benefit from the treatment. Studies of infants in representative populations indicate that neonatal encephalopathy is a potential result of a variety of antecedents and that asphyxial complications at birth account for only a small percentage of neonatal encephalopathy. In contrast, clinical case series suggest that a large proportion of neonatal encephalopathy is hypoxic or ischaemic, and trials of therapeutic hypothermia are specifically designed to include only infants exposed to hypoxia or ischaemia. This review addresses the differences, definitional and methodological, between infants studied and investigations undertaken, in population studies compared with cooling trials. It raises the question if there may be subgroups of infants with a clinical diagnosis of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in whom the pathobiology of neonatal neurological depression is not fundamentally hypoxic or ischaemic and, therefore, for whom cooling may not be beneficial. In addition, it suggests approaches to future trials of cooling plus adjuvant therapy that may contribute to further improvement of care for these vulnerable neonates.

  13. Does aetiology of neonatal encephalopathy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy influence the outcome of treatment?

    PubMed

    Mcintyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve; Nelson, Karin B

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy, a clinical syndrome affecting term-born and late preterm newborn infants, increases the risk of perinatal death and long-term neurological morbidity, especially cerebral palsy. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, a treatment designed for hypoxic or ischaemic injury, associated mortality and morbidity rates have decreased. Unfortunately, only about one in eight neonates (95% confidence interval) who meet eligibility criteria for therapeutic cooling apparently benefit from the treatment. Studies of infants in representative populations indicate that neonatal encephalopathy is a potential result of a variety of antecedents and that asphyxial complications at birth account for only a small percentage of neonatal encephalopathy. In contrast, clinical case series suggest that a large proportion of neonatal encephalopathy is hypoxic or ischaemic, and trials of therapeutic hypothermia are specifically designed to include only infants exposed to hypoxia or ischaemia. This review addresses the differences, definitional and methodological, between infants studied and investigations undertaken, in population studies compared with cooling trials. It raises the question if there may be subgroups of infants with a clinical diagnosis of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in whom the pathobiology of neonatal neurological depression is not fundamentally hypoxic or ischaemic and, therefore, for whom cooling may not be beneficial. In addition, it suggests approaches to future trials of cooling plus adjuvant therapy that may contribute to further improvement of care for these vulnerable neonates. PMID:25800486

  14. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A rare proteiform disorder.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela; D'Aurizio, Federica; Tozzoli, Renato; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Giovanella, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians. The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism, demonstrating an excellent response to high dose steroids is presented together with a systematic review of the literature. PMID:26849953

  15. Hepatic encephalopathy after treatment with temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Goldbecker, Annemarie; Tryc, Anita Blanka; Raab, Peter; Worthmann, Hans; Herrmann, Julian; Weissenborn, Karin

    2011-05-01

    Temozolomide in combination with radiation has been in use for more than 5 years for the therapy of glioblastoma. Known adverse effects concerning the gastrointestinal system are elevation of liver enzymes. We present the case of a patient treated with temozolomide who developed severe cholestatic liver damage and consecutive hepatic encephalopathy. Neurological symptoms were mistaken as being caused by focal brain damage for more than 9 months. After the correct diagnosis had been made and the treatment had been started, the patient's condition ameliorated. In conclusion, neurological deficits in patients with known brain lesion should not be attributed automatically to the pre-existing damage even if it is progressive but should be examined carefully, also including toxic and metabolic encephalopathies into the differential diagnosis. Furthermore, new side effects of drugs have to be considered. At least this case might lead to a closer monitoring of liver enzymes during temozolomide therapy.

  16. [Metabolic encephalopathy secondary to vitamin D intoxication].

    PubMed

    Herrera Martínez, Aura; Viñals Torràs, Montserrat; Muñoz Jiménez, Ma Concepción; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio Pablo; Molina Puerta, Ma José; Manzano García, Gregorio; Gálvez Moreno, Ma Ángeles; Calañas-Continente, Alfonso

    2014-10-25

    The association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of, among others, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases has lead in the last years to an enhanced interest in the usage of supplements to achieve the normalization of plasmatic values at 25(OH) D. Apparently this search for normalization is resulting in an higher incidence on vitamin D intoxication. We present the case of an 81 years old woman with metabolic encephalopathy and renal failure secondary to iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication. Calcium and vitamin D oral supplements were prescribed after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture. The patient improved clinically as well as analytically after receiving treatment with diuretics and hydration. We emphasize the importance of discarding hypercalcemia as a cause of metabolic encephalopathy; moreover we highly recommend keeping vitamin D intoxication in mind as an uncommon although always possible etiology of reversible hypercalcemia and renal failure.

  17. Head stereotypies in STXBP1 encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Korff, Christian M; Villaluz, Mel Michel G; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-08-01

    STXBP1 encephalopathy is associated with a range of movement disorders. We observed head stereotypies in three patients. These comprised a slow (<1Hz), high-amplitude, horizontal, 'figure-of-eight' pattern, beginning at age 4-6 years and resulting in neck muscle hypertrophy, in two males; a faster (2-3Hz), side-to-side, 'no' movement, starting at the age of 9 years 6 months was observed in one female. Upper limb and truncal stereotypies and vocalization occurred intermittently with the head movements. The stereotypies increased with excitement but settled with concentration and sleep. Head and upper limb stereotypies are valuable clinical clues to the diagnosis of STXBP1 encephalopathy in patients with profound impairments.

  18. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  19. The Role of the Neurointensive Care Nursery for Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Rowitch, David H

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy due to intrapartum events is estimated at 1 to 2 per 1000 live births in high-income countries. Outcomes have improved over the past decade due to implementation of therapeutic hypothermia, the only clinically available neuroprotective strategy for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Neonatal encephalopathy is the most common condition treated within a neonatal neurocritical care unit. Neonates with encephalopathy benefit from a neurocritical care approach due to prevention of secondary brain injury through attention to basic physiology, earlier recognition and treatment of neurologic complications, consistent management using guidelines and protocols, and use of optimized teams at dedicated referral centers. PMID:27524453

  20. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew S; Berkovic, Samuel F; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E; Epstein, Michael P; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B; Johnson, Michael R; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R Z; Marson, Anthony G; Mefford, Heather C; Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; O'Brien, Terence J; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Sherr, Elliott H; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K; Bautista, Jocelyn F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E; Knowlton, Robert C; Kossoff, Eric H; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; McGuire, Shannon M; Motika, Paul V; Novotny, Edward J; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M; Parent, Jack M; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott H; Shih, Jerry J; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C; Sullivan, Joseph; Lin Thio, Liu; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P G; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Weisenberg, Judith L; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R

    2013-09-12

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown. Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115). We sequenced the exomes of 264 probands, and their parents, and confirmed 329 de novo mutations. A likelihood analysis showed a significant excess of de novo mutations in the ∼4,000 genes that are the most intolerant to functional genetic variation in the human population (P = 2.9 × 10(-3)). Among these are GABRB3, with de novo mutations in four patients, and ALG13, with the same de novo mutation in two patients; both genes show clear statistical evidence of association with epileptic encephalopathy. Given the relevant site-specific mutation rates, the probabilities of these outcomes occurring by chance are P = 4.1 × 10(-10) and P = 7.8 × 10(-12), respectively. Other genes with de novo mutations in this cohort include CACNA1A, CHD2, FLNA, GABRA1, GRIN1, GRIN2B, HNRNPU, IQSEC2, MTOR and NEDD4L. Finally, we show that the de novo mutations observed are enriched in specific gene sets including genes regulated by the fragile X protein (P < 10(-8)), as has been reported previously for autism spectrum disorders.

  1. Extending the KCNQ2 encephalopathy spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Weckhuysen, Sarah; Ivanovic, Vanja; Hendrickx, Rik; Van Coster, Rudy; Hjalgrim, Helle; Møller, Rikke S.; Grønborg, Sabine; Schoonjans, An-Sofie; Ceulemans, Berten; Heavin, Sinead B.; Eltze, Christin; Horvath, Rita; Casara, Gianluca; Pisano, Tiziana; Giordano, Lucio; Rostasy, Kevin; Haberlandt, Edda; Albrecht, Beate; Bevot, Andrea; Benkel, Ira; Syrbe, Steffan; Sheidley, Beth; Guerrini, Renzo; Poduri, Annapurna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Mandelstam, Simone; Scheffer, Ingrid; Angriman, Marco; Striano, Pasquale; Marini, Carla; Suls, Arvid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of KCNQ2 mutations in patients with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (NEE), and to expand the phenotypic spectrum of KCNQ2 epileptic encephalopathy. Methods: Eighty-four patients with unexplained NEE were screened for KCNQ2 mutations using classic Sanger sequencing. Clinical data of 6 additional patients with KCNQ2 mutations detected by gene panel were collected. Detailed phenotyping was performed with particular attention to seizure frequency, cognitive outcome, and video-EEG. Results: In the cohort, we identified 9 different heterozygous de novo KCNQ2 missense mutations in 11 of 84 patients (13%). Two of 6 missense mutations detected by gene panel were recurrent and present in patients of the cohort. Seizures at onset typically consisted of tonic posturing often associated with focal clonic jerking, and were accompanied by apnea with desaturation. One patient diagnosed by gene panel had seizure onset at the age of 5 months. Based on seizure frequency at onset and cognitive outcome, we delineated 3 clinical subgroups, expanding the spectrum of KCNQ2 encephalopathy to patients with moderate intellectual disability and/or infrequent seizures at onset. Recurrent mutations lead to relatively homogenous phenotypes. One patient responded favorably to retigabine; 5 patients had a good response to carbamazepine. In 6 patients, seizures with bradycardia were recorded. One patient died of probable sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Conclusion: KCNQ2 mutations cause approximately 13% of unexplained NEE. Patients present with a wide spectrum of severity and, although rare, infantile epilepsy onset is possible. PMID:24107868

  2. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  3. Using saccades to diagnose covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, Nicholas; Munby, Henry; Chan, Shona; Saatci, Defne; Edison, Eric; Carpenter, R H S; Massey, Dunecan

    2015-06-01

    Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy (CHE), previously known as Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy, is a subtle cognitive defect found in 30-70 % of cirrhosis patients. It has been linked to poor quality of life, impaired fitness to drive, and increased mortality: treatment is possible. Despite its clinical significance, diagnosis relies on psychometric tests that have proved unsuitable for use in a clinical setting. We investigated whether measurement of saccadic latency distributions might be a viable alternative. We collected data on 35 cirrhosis patients at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, with no evidence of clinically overt encephalopathy, and 36 age-matched healthy controls. Performance on standard psychometric tests was evaluated to determine those patients with CHE as defined by the World Congress of Gastroenterology. We then compared visually-evoked saccades between those with CHE and those without, as well as reviewing blood test results and correlating saccadic latencies with biochemical parameters and prognostic scores. Cirrhosis patients have significantly longer median saccadic latencies than healthy controls. Those with CHE had significantly prolonged saccadic latencies when compared with those without CHE. Analysis of a cirrhosis patient's saccades can diagnose CHE with a sensitivity of 75 % and a specificity of 75 %. We concluded that analysis of a cirrhosis patient's saccadic latency distributions is a fast and objective measure that can be used as a diagnostic tool for CHE. This improved early diagnosis could direct avoidance of high-risk activities such as driving, and better inform treatment strategies. PMID:25586511

  4. Dexmedetomidine controls twitch-convulsive syndrome in the course of uremic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Koichi; Scurlock, Corey; Bronster, David

    2011-12-01

    An 85 year old man with a history of chronic renal insufficiency was admitted to the cardiothoracic intensive care unit after aortic valve replacement. His postoperative course was marked by acute oliguric renal failure for high blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and acute hyperactive delirium. At this time he also developed tremors with muscle twitching; he received no other form of sedatives. A neurology consult made the diagnosis of twitch-convulsive syndrome associated with uremic encephalopathy. While the patient was receiving the dexmedetomidine infusion, the signs of the twitch-convulsive syndrome, particularly the twitching and tremors, disappeared. Within 30 minutes of the end of the dexmedetomidine infusion, symptoms of the twitch-convulsive syndrome returned, manifesting as acute tremulousness. After several dialysis treatments, his BUN decreased and the dexmedetomidine was weaned, without return of the symptoms of twitch-convulsive syndrome. PMID:22137518

  5. Determining Prevalence of Acute Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Developing Countries

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-11

    Demonstrate BIND II Score of >=5, is Valid for Detecting Moderate to Severe ABE in Neonates <14 Days Old.; Demonstrate Community-BIND Instrument, a Modified BIND II, is a Valid and Reliable Tool for Detecting ABE.; Demonstrate That Community-BIND Can be Used for Acquiring Population-based Prevalence of ABE in the Community.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: acute necrotizing encephalopathy type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... interacts with a protein complex known as the nuclear pore. The nuclear pore is a channel that allows transport of ... transport of proteins and other molecules through the nuclear pore and helps modify proteins coming into or ...

  7. Encephalopathy in Acute Leukaemia Associated with Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, H. E. M.; Knapton, P. J.; O'Sullivan, J. P.; Wells, D. G.; Harris, Ruth F.; Innes, Elizabeth M.; Stuart, J.; Schwartz, F. C. M.; Thompson, Eileen N.

    1972-01-01

    Seven patients are described in whom dementia developed during treatment with methotrexate for meningeal leukaemia. The patients presented with confusion, tremor, ataxia, irritability, and somnolence. There were major epileptic fits in two cases and in one case there was progression to coma and death. Necropsy findings in the latter showed infarcted areas in the temporal and parietal lobes, with no evidence of active leukaemic disease or of viral encephalitis. The condition has not responded to radiotherapy and no positive evidence of viral encephalitis has been obtained. On the other hand, when treated with folinic and folic acid the deterioration has been arrested and there has been some improvement; thus the condition appears to be due to methotrexate. The occurrence of so many cases within the past year of a condition not previously described is probably attributable to the introduction of intensive cytotoxic therapy directed against meningeal leukaemia. ImagesFIG. 2.FIG. 3.FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4504035

  8. Early detection of hepatic encephalopathy by recording visual evoked potential (VEP).

    PubMed

    Zamir, Doron; Storch, Shimon; Kovach, Ivan; Storch, Rita; Zamir, Chen

    2002-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) record in response to a pattern stimulus is a non invasive and reliable method of detecting central and peripheral nerve system abnormalities. VEP recording have been used in animals with fulminant hepatic failure, and also in-patients with hepatic encephalopathy and acute severe hepatitis. Our aims were: a. to evaluate the potency of PVEP in assessing hepatic encephalopathy. b. to find the rate of pathologic PVEP in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. VEP was recorded in 14 chronic liver cirrhotic patients (6 alcoholic, 6 HCV-related, 2 cryptogenic) and 14 controls. Patients with any neurologic abnormalities were excluded from the study. All patients were subjected to the Mental State Score (MSS) test, and venous blood ammonia was measured on the same day of VEP recording. In 10/14 (71%) patients some VEP recording abnormality was detected. In the cirrhotic patients, P100 latency was significantly longer (P < 0.05) than in controls. Low amplitude was observed in 8 patients compared to controls. Marked increase of N75 (3 patients) and marked increase of N145 (2 patients) were observed. Mean blood ammonia and MSS score were normal in all patients. No correlation was found between both MSS score and blood ammonia levels and the P100 delay. Five out of 10 patients with pathologic VEP developed hepatic encephalpathy during a follow-up of one year, compared to one out of 4 patients with no pathology on VEP recording. VEP recording may be a valuable tool in assessing patients with early hepatic encephalopathy and in predicting encephalopathy. PMID:12533959

  9. Liver transplant for intentional acetaminophen overdose and hepatic encephalopathy: a conflict between beneficence and justice.

    PubMed

    Willey, Joshua Z; Tolchin, Benjamin David

    2014-06-01

    In cases of severe acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy, liver transplant can be the only real hope for neurologic recovery and indeed survival. In such cases, the bioethical principles of beneficence and justice often come into conflict. This article examines a case in which a neurologist managing an acetaminophen-overdose patient in the neurologic intensive care unit is faced with a conflict between her patient's need for a liver transplant and the needs of other patients on the transplant list.

  10. CACNA1A haploinsufficiency causes cognitive impairment, autism and epileptic encephalopathy with mild cerebellar symptoms.

    PubMed

    Damaj, Lena; Lupien-Meilleur, Alexis; Lortie, Anne; Riou, Émilie; Ospina, Luis H; Gagnon, Louise; Vanasse, Catherine; Rossignol, Elsa

    2015-11-01

    CACNA1A loss-of-function mutations classically present as episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), with brief episodes of ataxia and nystagmus, or with progressive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA6). A minority of patients carrying CACNA1A mutations develops epilepsy. Non-motor symptoms associated with these mutations are often overlooked. In this study, we report 16 affected individuals from four unrelated families presenting with a spectrum of cognitive impairment including intellectual deficiency, executive dysfunction, ADHD and/or autism, as well as childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathy with refractory absence epilepsy, febrile seizures, downbeat nystagmus and episodic ataxia. Sequencing revealed one CACNA1A gene deletion, two deleterious CACNA1A point mutations including one known stop-gain and one new frameshift variant and a new splice-site variant. This report illustrates the phenotypic heterogeneity of CACNA1A loss-of-function mutations and stresses the cognitive and epileptic manifestations caused by the loss of CaV2.1 channels function, presumably affecting cerebellar, cortical and limbic networks.

  11. Febrile temperatures induce cytoadherence of ring-stage Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Pipitaporn, Busaba; Silamut, Kamolrat; Pinches, Robert; Kyes, Sue; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Newbold, Christopher; White, Nicholas J

    2002-09-01

    In falciparum malaria, the malaria parasite induces changes at the infected red blood cell surface that lead to adherence to vascular endothelium and other red blood cells. As a result, the more mature stages of Plasmodium falciparum are sequestered in the microvasculature and cause vital organ dysfunction, whereas the ring stages circulate in the blood stream. Malaria is characterized by fever. We have studied the effect of febrile temperatures on the cytoadherence in vitro of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Freshly obtained ring-stage-infected red blood cells from 10 patients with acute falciparum malaria did not adhere to the principle vascular adherence receptors CD36 or intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). However, after a brief period of heating to 40 degrees C, all ring-infected red blood cells adhered to CD36, and some isolates adhered to ICAM-1, whereas controls incubated at 37 degrees C did not. Heating to 40 degrees C accelerated cytoadherence and doubled the maximum cytoadherence observed (P < 0.01). Erythrocytes infected by ring-stages of the ICAM-1 binding clone A4var also did not cytoadhere at 37 degrees C, but after heating to febrile temperatures bound to both CD36 and ICAM-1. Adherence of red blood cells infected with trophozoites was also increased considerably by brief heating. The factor responsible for heat induced adherence was shown to be the parasite derived variant surface protein PfEMP-1. RNA analysis showed that levels of var mRNA did not differ between heated and unheated ring-stage parasites. Thus fever-induced adherence appeared to involve increased trafficking of PfEMP-1 to the erythrocyte membrane. Fever induced cytoadherence is likely to have important pathological consequences and may explain both clinical deterioration with fever in severe malaria and the effects of antipyretics on parasite clearance. PMID:12177447

  12. Urinary Colorimetric Sensor Array and Algorithm to Distinguish Kawasaki Disease from Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo; Deng, Xiaohong; Hu, Guang; Liu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jie; Jin, Hua; Huang, Min; Kanegaye, John T.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Burns, Jane C.; Wu, Jianmin; Cohen, Harvey J.; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute pediatric vasculitis of infants and young children with unknown etiology and no specific laboratory-based test to identify. A specific molecular diagnostic test is urgently needed to support the clinical decision of proper medical intervention, preventing subsequent complications of coronary artery aneurysms. We used a simple and low-cost colorimetric sensor array to address the lack of a specific diagnostic test to differentiate KD from febrile control (FC) patients with similar rash/fever illnesses. Study Design Demographic and clinical data were prospectively collected for subjects with KD and FCs under standard protocol. After screening using a genetic algorithm, eleven compounds including metalloporphyrins, pH indicators, redox indicators and solvatochromic dye categories, were selected from our chromatic compound library (n = 190) to construct a colorimetric sensor array for diagnosing KD. Quantitative color difference analysis led to a decision-tree-based KD diagnostic algorithm. Results This KD sensing array allowed the identification of 94% of KD subjects (receiver operating characteristic [ROC] area under the curve [AUC] 0.981) in the training set (33 KD, 33 FC) and 94% of KD subjects (ROC AUC: 0.873) in the testing set (16 KD, 17 FC). Color difference maps reconstructed from the digital images of the sensing compounds demonstrated distinctive patterns differentiating KD from FC patients. Conclusions The colorimetric sensor array, composed of common used chemical compounds, is an easily accessible, low-cost method to realize the discrimination of subjects with KD from other febrile illness. PMID:26859297

  13. Comparison of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy Isolates in Raccoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to its susceptibility to various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and relatively short incubation times, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has been suggested as a model for TSE strain differentiation. Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of undetermined origin in...

  14. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  15. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  16. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  17. [Complex febrile crises: should we change the way we act?].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cayuelas, E; Herraiz-Martinez, M; Villacieros-Hernandez, L; Cean-Cabrera, L; Martinez-Salcedo, E; Alarcon-Martinez, H; Domingo-Jimenez, R; Perez-Fernandez, V

    2014-11-16

    Introduccion. Las convulsiones febriles son una de las causas mas frecuentes de consulta. Hasta ahora, los pacientes con convulsiones febriles complejas (CFC) deben ingresar, dado el mayor porcentaje de epilepsia y complicaciones agudas descrito clasicamente. En la actualidad hay estudios que apoyan ser menos invasivos en el abordaje de estos pacientes. Objetivo. Describir las caracteristicas de los pacientes ingresados por CFC y proponer un nuevo protocolo de actuacion. Pacientes y metodos. Analisis retrospectivo de historias clinicas de ingresados por CFC (enero de 2010-diciembre de 2013). Se ofrecen datos epidemiologicos, clinicos, pruebas complementarias y evolucion. Resultados. Las CFC suponian un 4,2% de los ingresos de neuropediatria (n = 67). Edad media al evento: 25 meses. El 47% tenia antecedentes familiares patologicos, y el 31%, antecedentes personales de convulsion febril previa. En el 54% de los pacientes, la CFC duro menos de cinco minutos; hubo recurrencia, la mayoria con un total de dos crisis y durante el primer dia (las CFC por recurrencia son las mas frecuentes). De las pruebas complementarias realizadas, ninguna de ellas sirvio como apoyo diagnostico en el momento agudo. Durante su seguimiento, cinco pacientes presentaron complicaciones. Los pacientes con antecedentes familiares de convulsiones febriles presentan mayor riesgo de epilepsia o recurrencia (p = 0,02), sin diferencias significativas respecto a la edad, numero de crisis, intervalo de fiebre, estado epileptico o tipo de CFC. Conclusiones. Las CFC no asocian mayores complicaciones agudas; las exploraciones complementarias no permiten discriminar precozmente a los pacientes de riesgo. Su ingreso podria evitarse en ausencia de otros signos clinicos y limitarse a casos seleccionados.

  18. Modeling Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Way Forward for Future Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ryan C.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Robson, Matthew J.; Lee, John M.; Bailes, Julian E.; Dashnaw, Matthew L.; Huber, Jason D.; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Rosen, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive media coverage associated with the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), our fundamental understanding of the disease pathophysiology remains in its infancy. Only recently have scientific laboratories and personnel begun to explore CTE pathophysiology through the use of preclinical models of neurotrauma. Some studies have shown the ability to recapitulate some aspects of CTE in rodent models, through the use of various neuropathological, biochemical, and/or behavioral assays. Many questions related to CTE development, however, remain unanswered. These include the role of impact severity, the time interval between impacts, the age at which impacts occur, and the total number of impacts sustained. Other important variables such as the location of impacts, character of impacts, and effect of environment/lifestyle and genetics also warrant further study. In this work, we attempt to address some of these questions by exploring work previously completed using single- and repetitive-injury paradigms. Despite some models producing some deficits similar to CTE symptoms, it is clear that further studies are required to understand the development of neuropathological and neurobehavioral features consistent with CTE-like features in rodents. Specifically, acute and chronic studies are needed that characterize the development of tau-based pathology. PMID:26579067

  19. Modeling Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Way Forward for Future Discovery.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Robson, Matthew J; Lee, John M; Bailes, Julian E; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Huber, Jason D; Petraglia, Anthony L; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive media coverage associated with the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), our fundamental understanding of the disease pathophysiology remains in its infancy. Only recently have scientific laboratories and personnel begun to explore CTE pathophysiology through the use of preclinical models of neurotrauma. Some studies have shown the ability to recapitulate some aspects of CTE in rodent models, through the use of various neuropathological, biochemical, and/or behavioral assays. Many questions related to CTE development, however, remain unanswered. These include the role of impact severity, the time interval between impacts, the age at which impacts occur, and the total number of impacts sustained. Other important variables such as the location of impacts, character of impacts, and effect of environment/lifestyle and genetics also warrant further study. In this work, we attempt to address some of these questions by exploring work previously completed using single- and repetitive-injury paradigms. Despite some models producing some deficits similar to CTE symptoms, it is clear that further studies are required to understand the development of neuropathological and neurobehavioral features consistent with CTE-like features in rodents. Specifically, acute and chronic studies are needed that characterize the development of tau-based pathology. PMID:26579067

  20. Imaging in sepsis-associated encephalopathy--insights and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Daniel J; Yamamoto, Adam K; Menon, David K

    2013-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) refers to a clinical spectrum of acute neurological dysfunction that arises in the context of sepsis. Although the pathophysiology of SAE is incompletely understood, it is thought to involve endothelial activation, blood-brain barrier leakage, inflammatory cell migration, and neuronal loss with neurotransmitter imbalance. SAE is associated with a high risk of mortality. Imaging studies using MRI and CT have demonstrated changes in the brains of patients with SAE that are also seen in disorders such as stroke. Next-generation imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and PET, as well as experimental imaging modalities, provide options for early identification of patients with SAE, and could aid in identification of pathophysiological processes that represent possible therapeutic targets. In this Review, we explore the recent literature on imaging in SAE, relating the findings of these studies to pathological data and experimental studies to obtain insights into the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated neurological dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest how novel imaging technologies can be used for early-stage proof-of-concept and proof-of-mechanism translational studies, which may help to improve diagnosis in SAE.

  1. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A rare cause of recurrent encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Raashda Ainuddin; Shaheen, Marwan Yassin; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Bakshi, Nasir Ahmed; Kaya, Namik; Aldosary, Mazhor; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report an unusual case of recurrent encephalopathy due to acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in a patient with propionic acidemia (PA). PA is an inherited metabolic disorder in which patients often present with encephalopathy and pancytopenia during metabolic decompensation. However, these patients may rarely develop HLH with similar presentation. This case illustrates the need to distinguish HLH induced encephalopathy from the one secondary to metabolic decompensation in these patients, as early diagnosis and treatment of HLH improves prognosis. This case also highlights the importance of considering HLH in patients presenting with unexplained encephalopathy, as early diagnosis and treatment is lifesaving in this otherwise lethal condition. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acquired HLH presenting as recurrent encephalopathy followed by complete recovery, in a metabolically stable patient with PA.

  2. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A rare cause of recurrent encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Raashda Ainuddin; Shaheen, Marwan Yassin; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Bakshi, Nasir Ahmed; Kaya, Namik; Aldosary, Mazhor; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2016-08-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent encephalopathy due to acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in a patient with propionic acidemia (PA). PA is an inherited metabolic disorder in which patients often present with encephalopathy and pancytopenia during metabolic decompensation. However, these patients may rarely develop HLH with similar presentation. This case illustrates the need to distinguish HLH induced encephalopathy from the one secondary to metabolic decompensation in these patients, as early diagnosis and treatment of HLH improves prognosis. This case also highlights the importance of considering HLH in patients presenting with unexplained encephalopathy, as early diagnosis and treatment is lifesaving in this otherwise lethal condition. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acquired HLH presenting as recurrent encephalopathy followed by complete recovery, in a metabolically stable patient with PA. PMID:27672548

  3. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A rare cause of recurrent encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Raashda Ainuddin; Shaheen, Marwan Yassin; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Bakshi, Nasir Ahmed; Kaya, Namik; Aldosary, Mazhor; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2016-08-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent encephalopathy due to acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in a patient with propionic acidemia (PA). PA is an inherited metabolic disorder in which patients often present with encephalopathy and pancytopenia during metabolic decompensation. However, these patients may rarely develop HLH with similar presentation. This case illustrates the need to distinguish HLH induced encephalopathy from the one secondary to metabolic decompensation in these patients, as early diagnosis and treatment of HLH improves prognosis. This case also highlights the importance of considering HLH in patients presenting with unexplained encephalopathy, as early diagnosis and treatment is lifesaving in this otherwise lethal condition. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acquired HLH presenting as recurrent encephalopathy followed by complete recovery, in a metabolically stable patient with PA.

  4. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A rare cause of recurrent encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Raashda Ainuddin; Shaheen, Marwan Yassin; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Bakshi, Nasir Ahmed; Kaya, Namik; Aldosary, Mazhor; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report an unusual case of recurrent encephalopathy due to acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in a patient with propionic acidemia (PA). PA is an inherited metabolic disorder in which patients often present with encephalopathy and pancytopenia during metabolic decompensation. However, these patients may rarely develop HLH with similar presentation. This case illustrates the need to distinguish HLH induced encephalopathy from the one secondary to metabolic decompensation in these patients, as early diagnosis and treatment of HLH improves prognosis. This case also highlights the importance of considering HLH in patients presenting with unexplained encephalopathy, as early diagnosis and treatment is lifesaving in this otherwise lethal condition. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acquired HLH presenting as recurrent encephalopathy followed by complete recovery, in a metabolically stable patient with PA. PMID:27672548

  5. The Expanding Clinical Spectrum of Genetic Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Shbarou, Rolla; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric epileptic encephalopathies represent a clinically challenging and often devastating group of disorders that affect children at different stages of infancy and childhood. With the advances in genetic testing and neuroimaging, the etiologies of these epileptic syndromes are now better defined. The various encephalopathies that are reviewed in this article include the following: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy or Ohtahara syndrome, early myoclonic encephalopathy, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome, severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet syndrome), Landau-Kleffner syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. Their clinical features, prognosis as well as underlying genetic etiologies are presented and updated. PMID:27544470

  6. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Movement Disorders: Update.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, Apameh; Tator, Charles H; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Association of repetitive brain trauma with progressive neurological deterioration has been described since the 1920s. Punch drunk syndrome and dementia pugilistica (DP) were introduced first to explain symptoms in boxers, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been used to describe a neurodegenerative disease in athletes and military personal with a history of multiple concussions. Although there are many similarities between DP and CTE, a number of key differences are apparent especially when comparing movement impairments. The aim of this review is to compare clinical and pathological aspects of DP and CTE with a focus on disorders of movement. PMID:27021775

  7. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern.

  8. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern. PMID:27637402

  9. Zinc supplementation prolongs the latency of hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Aydın, L; Erdem, S R; Yazıcı, C

    2016-03-01

    Some studies have shown a relationship between febrile seizures and zinc levels. The lowest dose zinc supplementation in pentylenetetrazole seizure model has a protective effect. But, zinc pretreatment has no effect in maximal electroshock model. However, it is unclear how zinc supplementation affects hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc supplementation on febrile seizures in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Zinc supplementation was commenced 5 days prior to febrile seizure induction by placing the animals in a water bath at 45°C. We measured the rectal temperature and determined the febrile seizure latency, duration, and stage. In the zinc-supplemented group, both the seizure latency and the rectal temperature triggering seizure initiation were significantly higher than in the other groups. We suggest that zinc supplementation can positively modulate febrile seizure pathogenesis in rats.

  10. Atypical presentation of human bocavirus: Severe respiratory tract infection complicated with encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Akturk, Hacer; Sık, Guntulu; Salman, Nuran; Sutcu, Murat; Tatli, Burak; Ciblak, Meral Akcay; Erol, Oguz Bulent; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Citak, Agop; Somer, Ayper

    2015-11-01

    Human bocavirus (HBOV) has been reported as a worldwide distributed respiratory pathogen. It has also been associated with encephalitis recently by detection of the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presented with encephalitis. This retrospective study aimed to present clinical features of HBOV infections in children with respiratory symptoms and describe unexplained encephalopathy in a subgroup of these patients. Results of 1,143 pediatric nasal samples from mid-December 2013 to July 2014 were reviewed for detection of HBOV. A multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction assay was used for viral detection. Medical records of the patients were retrospectively analyzed. HBOV was detected in 30 patients (2.6%). Median age was 14 months (5-80). Clinical diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (n = 10), bronchopneumonia (n = 9), acute bronchiolitis (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 4), acute bronchitis (n = 1), and asthma execarbation (n = 1). Hospitalization was required in 16 (53.3%) patients and 10 (62.5%) of them admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Noninvasive mechanical ventilation modalities was applied to four patients and mechanical ventilation to four patients. Intractable seizures developed in four patients while mechanically ventilated on the 2nd-3rd days of PICU admission. No specific reason for encephalopathy was found after a thorough investigation. No mortality was observed, but two patients were discharged with neurological sequela. HBOV may lead to respiratory infections in a wide spectrum of severity. This report indicates its potential to cause severe respiratory infections requiring PICU admission and highlights possible clinical association of HBOV and encephalopathy, which developed during severe respiratory infection. PMID:25966820

  11. Three-dimensional brain metabolic imaging in patients with toxic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, T.J.; Duhon, D.; Ristovv, M. ); Morrow, L. ); Subramanian, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Thirty-three workers, ages 24 to 63, developed clinical toxic encephalopathy after exposure to neurotoxins and were studied by SPECT brain scans. Five were exposed to pesticides, 13 were acutely exposed to mixtures of solvents, 8 were chronically exposed to mixtures of hazardous wastes that contained organic solvents, 2 were acutely exposed to phosgene and other toxins, and 5 had exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Twenty-nine had neuropsychological testing and all had a medical history and physical. Of the workers who had a clinical diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy, 31 (93.9%) had abnormal SPECT brain scans with the most frequent areas of abnormality being temporal lobes (67.7%), frontal lobes (61.3%), basal ganglia (45.2%), thalamus (29.0%), parietal lobes (12.9%), motorstrip (9.68%), cerebral hemisphere (6.45%), occipital lobes (3.23%), and caudate nucleus (3.23%). Twenty-three out of 29 (79.3%) neuropsychological evaluations were abnormal. Other modalities when performed included the following percentages of abnormals: NCV, 33.3%; CPT sensory nerve testing, 91.3%, vestibular function testing, 71.4%; olfactory testing, 89.2%; sleep EEG analysis, 85.7%; EEG, 8.33%; CT, 7.14%; and MRI brain scans, 28.6%. The complex of symptoms seen in toxic encephalopathy implies dysfunction involving several CNS regions. This series of patients adds to the previous experience of brain metabolic imaging and demonstrates that certain areas of the brain are typically affected despite differences in toxin structure, that these lesions can be globally defined by SPECT/PET brain scans, that these lesions correlate well with clinical and neuropsychological testing, and that such testing is a useful adjunct to previous methods. EEG and structural brain imaging such as CT and MRI are observed to have poor sensitivity in this type of patient. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karanbir; Gupta, Rajesh; Kamal, Haris; Silvestri, Nicholas J; Wolfe, Gil I

    2015-03-01

    The appearance of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after blood transfusion is rare and has only been reported in three patients to our knowledge. We report a fourth patient with PRES secondary to blood transfusion. A 36-year-old woman with a history of menorrhagia presented to the emergency department with severe fatigue. She had a hemoglobin of 1.7 g/dl and received four units of red blood cells over 15 hours. On day 6 post-transfusion she returned with confusion, headache and a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The MRI of her brain was consistent with PRES. The following day her confusion worsened, repeat MRI of the brain showed new T2-weighted lesions. Over next 10 days her mental status gradually improved close to her baseline. A repeat MRI of the brain showed resolution of the T2-weighted lesions. The clinical presentation, radiological findings and disease progression in our patient was consistent with PRES. Other than the blood transfusions, there were no apparent risk factors for PRES. The prior three patients with post-transfusion PRES have been reported in middle-aged women with uterine fibroids. It is suspected that these patients have a subacute to chronic anemic state due to ongoing menorrhagia. It is interesting to note that no cases of PRES post-transfusion have been reported in the setting of acute blood loss, such as from trauma. It is postulated that an abrupt increase in hemoglobin causes a rapid rise in blood viscosity and loss of hypoxic vasodilation. Subsequent endothelial damage and brain capillary leakage results in PRES. This constellation of changes may not occur after transfusion in patients with more acute blood loss.

  13. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with First Episode Febrile Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Sharawat, Indar Kumar; Singh, Jitender; Singh, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Febrile seizure (FS) is the single most common type of seizure seen in children between 6 months to 5 years of age. The purpose of our study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures, which would help in the better management and preventive measures in children at risk for FS episodes. Aim To evaluate the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures in Indian children. Materials and Methods This was a hospital based, case control study. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first FS episode in children. Seventy (70) children between age 6 months to 5 years with their first episode of FS were compared with 70 children with fever but without seizures based on various risk factors. Results The mean age was 24.90±16.11 months in cases and 26.34±16.93 months in controls. Male: female ratio was 2:1. A positive family history was found in 31.4% of first degree and 11.4% in second degree relatives. Mean maximum temperature was 102.06±1.1°F and URI (upper respiratory infection) was most common cause of fever. Antenatal complication was significantly higher in the case group. RBC (Red Blood Cells) indices like lower mean haemoglobin, MCV (Mean Corpuscular Volume), MCH (Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin concentration) and higher RDW (Red Cell Distribution Width) values were seen in patients. Serum sodium, Serum calcium and random blood sugar values of the cases were significantly lower than those of controls (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study shows that male gender, family history of febrile seizures, peak body temperature, underlying cause of fever, antenatal complications, low serum calcium, sodium, blood sugar and microcytic hypochromic anaemia are the risk factors associated with the occurrence of first episode of febrile seizure and, thus, preventive measures in removing these risk factors could lead to a decrease in incidence of FS. PMID:27437319

  14. Febrile convulsions in selected large families: a single-major-locus mode of inheritance?

    PubMed

    Maher, J; McLachlan, R S

    1997-02-01

    As part of a genetic linkage study of febrile convulsions, families with at least four members with the disorder were identified. By applying known principles of human inheritance, possible modes of transmission of febrile convulsions and factors which might impede progress in understanding their inheritance were analyzed. In eight families, 75 of 333 members had febrile convulsions. Inheritance of the disorder occurred in 43, 51, and 46% of children, siblings and all first-degree relatives of probands respectively. Vertical transmission occurred through three to four generations, including from male to male. In these families with multiple affected members, the findings support an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance of febrile convulsions.

  15. A neurologist's approach to delirium: diagnosis and management of toxic metabolic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vaishnav; Leung, Lester Y; Caplan, Louis R

    2014-02-01

    Toxic metabolic encephalopathies (TMEs) present as an acute derangement in consciousness, cognition and behavior, and can be brought about by various triggers, including endocrine and metabolic disturbances, exogenous toxins, pain and infection. Also referred to as "delirium" or "acute confusional states," TMEs are characterized by (1) an altered level of consciousness and activity, (2) global changes in cognition with inattention, (3) a fluctuating course with disturbances in the sleep-wake cycle, and (4) asterixis and myoclonus. The pathophysiology of this syndrome is poorly understood. Imbalanced neurotransmitter signaling and pathologically heightened brain inflammatory cytokine signaling have been proposed as candidate mechanisms. Focal brain lesions can also occasionally mimic TMEs. A neurological examination is required to identify the presence of focal findings, which when present, identify a new focal lesion or the recrudescence of prior ischemic, inflammatory or neoplastic insults. Diagnostic testing must include a search for metabolic and infectious derangements. Offending medications should be withdrawn. Magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electroencephalography should be considered in select clinical situations. In addition to being an unpleasant experience for the patient and family, this condition is associated with extended hospital stays, increased mortality and high costs. In individuals with diminished cognitive reserve, episodes of TME lead to an accelerated decline in cognitive functioning. Starting with an illustrative case, this paper provides a neurologist's approach to the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and management of toxic metabolic encephalopathies.

  16. Management options for minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2008-12-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a neurocognitive dysfunction that is present in the majority of patients with cirrhosis. MHE has a characteristic cognitive profile that cannot be diagnosed clinically. This cognitive dysfunction is independent of sleep dysfunction or problems with overall intelligence. MHE has a significant impact on quality of life, the ability to function in daily life and progression to overt hepatic encephalopathy. Driving ability can be impaired in MHE and this may be a significant factor behind motor vehicle accidents. A crucial aspect of the clinical care of MHE patients is their driving history, which is often ignored during routine care and can add a vital dimension to the overall disease assessment. Driving history should be an integral part of the care of patients with MHE. The preserved communication skills and lack of specific signs and insight make MHE difficult to diagnose. The predominant strategies for MHE diagnosis are psychometric or neurophysiological testing. These are usually limited by financial, normative or time constraints. Studies into inhibitory control, cognitive drug research and critical flicker frequency tests are encouraging. These tests do not require a psychologist for administration and interpretation. Lactulose and probiotics have been studied for their potential use as therapies for MHE, but these are not standard-of-care practices at this time. Therapy can improve the quality of life in MHE patients but the natural history, specific diagnostic strategies and treatment options are still being investigated. PMID:19090738

  17. Clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Baugh, Christine M.; Seichepine, Daniel R.; Montenigro, Philip H.; Riley, David O.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Stamm, Julie M.; Robbins, Clifford A.; McHale, Lisa; Simkin, Irene; Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Cantu, Robert C.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in neuropathologically confirmed cases. Methods: Thirty-six adult male subjects were selected from all cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE at the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy brain bank. Subjects were all athletes, had no comorbid neurodegenerative or motor neuron disease, and had next-of-kin informants to provide retrospective reports of the subjects' histories and clinical presentations. These interviews were conducted blind to the subjects' neuropathologic findings. Results: A triad of cognitive, behavioral, and mood impairments was common overall, with cognitive deficits reported for almost all subjects. Three subjects were asymptomatic at the time of death. Consistent with earlier case reports of boxers, 2 relatively distinct clinical presentations emerged, with one group whose initial features developed at a younger age and involved behavioral and/or mood disturbance (n = 22), and another group whose initial presentation developed at an older age and involved cognitive impairment (n = 11). Conclusions: This suggests there are 2 major clinical presentations of CTE, one a behavior/mood variant and the other a cognitive variant. PMID:23966253

  18. A Case of Chronic Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: A Neuropsychological Study

    PubMed Central

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C. W.

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was diagnosed with WE in a general hospital. During the course of the disease, minimal change to the acute situation occurred, with chronic confusion, attention deficits, and incoherent behavior symptoms most notable unlike classical Korsakoff’s syndrome. Neuropsychological assessment after 4 and 16 months after admission to the hospital revealed global cognitive decline, with striking impairments in attentional, executive, and memory functions. The present case study suggests that the state of confusion and the neuropsychological symptoms in WE can become chronic in case of very late treatment. We therefore recommend that confused alcoholics should receive appropriate parenteral thiamine according to the current clinical standards. PMID:24904442

  19. Efficacy of liver assisting in patients with hepatic encephalopathy with special focus on plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Stenbøg, Poul; Busk, Troels; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2013-06-01

    Severe liver injury result in development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and often also in brain edema that is a potentially fatal complication. HE and brain edema are correlated to the level and persistence of hyperammonemia and the presence of systemic inflammation. Treatment of HE and brain edema is based on restoring and keeping normal physiological variables including tonicity, blood gasses, lactate, temperature and vascular resistance by a wide variety of interventions. In addition liver support devices improve the stage of HE, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen and glucose, and are used either as a bridge to liver transplantation or liver recovery in patients with fulminant hepatic failure and in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. This short review will mainly focus on the management and efficacy of doing plasma exchange on HE in patients with acute HE. PMID:23572273

  20. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning – A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  1. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning - A Rare Complication.

    PubMed

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Subramani, Parimala; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy-the Old and the New.

    PubMed

    Kandiah, Prem A; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy occurs ubiquitously in all causes of advanced liver failure, however, its implications on mortality diverge and vary depending upon acuity and severity of liver failure. This associated mortality has decreased in subsets of liver failure over the last 20 years. Aside from liver transplantation, this improvement is not attributable to a single intervention but likely to a combination of practical advances in critical care management. Misconceptions surrounding many facets of hepatic encephalopathy exists due to heterogeneity in presentation, pathophysiology and outcome. This review is intended to highlight the important concepts, rationales and strategies for managing hepatic encephalopathy.

  3. Severe early onset ethylmalonic encephalopathy with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Papetti, Laura; Garone, Giacomo; Schettini, Livia; Giordano, Carla; Nicita, Francesco; Papoff, Paola; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Spalice, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset encephalopathy, chronic diarrhoea, petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis and defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain. High levels of lactic, ethylmalonic and methylsuccinic acids are detected in body fluids. EE is caused by mutations in ETHE1 gene, a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase. Neurologic signs and symptoms include progressively delayed development, hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal movements. We report on the clinical, electroencephalographic and MRI findings of a baby with a severe early onset encephalopathy associated with novel ETHE1 gene mutation. This is the first case described in literature with an early pure epileptic onset, presenting with West syndrome.

  4. Legal Responsibilities of Physicians When They Diagnose Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Vierling, John M

    2015-08-01

    Both covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) impair the ability to operate machinery. The legal responsibilities of US physicians who diagnose and treat patients with hepatic encephalopathy vary among states. It is imperative that physicians know the laws regarding reporting in their state. OHE represents a neuropsychiatric impairment that meets general reporting criteria. The medical advisory boards of the states have not identified OHE as a reportable condition. In the absence of validated diagnostic guidelines, physicians are not obligated to perform tests for CHE. There is a need for explicit guidance from professional associations regarding this issue.

  5. Febrile Urinary Tract Infection after Radical Cystectomy and Ileal Neobladder in Patients with Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common complications after radical cystectomy and orthotopic neobladder reconstruction. This study investigated the incidence and implicated pathogen of febrile UTI after ileal neobladder reconstruction and identify clinical and urodynamic parameters associated with febrile UTI. From January 2001 to May 2015, 236 patients who underwent radical cystectomy and ileal neobladder were included in this study. Fifty-five episodes of febrile UTI were identified in 46 patients (19.4%). The probability of febrile UTI was 17.6% and 19.8% at 6 months and 24 months after surgery, respectively. While, Escherichia coli was the most common implicated pathogen (22/55, 40.0%), Enterococcus spp. were the most common pathogen during the first month after surgery (18/33, 54.5%). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, ureteral stricture was an independent risk factor associated with febrile UTI (OR 5.93, P = 0.023). However, ureteral stricture accounted for only 6 episodes (10.9%, 6/55) of febrile UTI. Most episodes of febrile UTI occurred within 6 months after surgery. Thus, to identify risk factors associated with febrile UTI in the initial postoperative period, we assessed videourodynamics within 6 months after surgery in 38 patients. On videourodyamic examination, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was identified in 16 patients (42.1%). The rate of VUR presence in patients who had febrile UTI was not significantly different from those in patients without febrile UTI (50% vs. 39.3%, P = 0.556). Patients with febrile UTI had significantly larger residual urine volume (212.0 ± 193.7 vs. 90.5 ± 148.2, P = 0.048) than those without. E. coli and Enterococcus spp. are common pathogens and ureteral stricture and residual urine are risk factors for UTI after ileal neobladder reconstruction. PMID:27366009

  6. Spiroplasma spp. from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy brains or ticks induce spongiform encephalopathy in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Frank O; Sanders, Dearl E; Forbes, Will A; Hagius, Sue D; Walker, Joel V; Henk, William G; Enright, Fred M; Elzer, Philip H

    2007-09-01

    Spiroplasma, small motile wall-less bacteria, are linked by molecular and serological studies to the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), which include scrapie in sheep, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. In this study, two experiments were undertaken to determine the role of spiroplasma in the pathogenesis of TSE. In experiment 1, Spiroplasma mirum, a rabbit tick isolate that had previously been shown to experimentally induce spongiform encephalopathy in rodents, was inoculated intracranially (IC) into ruminants. S. mirum-inoculated deer manifested clinical signs of TSE after 1.5 to 5.5 months incubation. The deer, as well as sheep and goats, inoculated with S. mirum developed spongiform encephalopathy in a dose-dependent manner. In experiment 2, spiroplasma closely related to S. mirum were isolated from TSE-affected brains via passage in embryonated eggs, and propagated in cell-free M1D media. Spiroplasma spp. isolates from scrapie-affected sheep brain and from CWD-affected deer brain inoculated IC into sheep and goats induced spongiform encephalopathy closely resembling natural TSE in these animals. These data show spiroplasma to be consistently associated with TSE, and able experimentally to cause TSE in ruminant animal models, therein questioning the validity of studies that have concluded the prion, a miss-folded protease-resistant protein that builds up in TSE brains during the course of the disease, to be the sole causal agent. The spiroplasma infection models reported here will be important for investigating factors involved in the pathogenesis of TSE since ruminants are the natural hosts.

  7. Management of hepatic encephalopathy in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Leise, Michael D; Poterucha, John J; Kamath, Patrick S; Kim, W Ray

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in up to 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is a feature of decompensated cirrhosis. With the goal of reviewing the evidence for treatment and prevention of overt hepatic encephalopathy, pubmed was searched using search terms hepatic encephalopathy AND treatment, limited to human studies from January 1, 2003, through December 1, 2013, and supplemented by key references. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000 annually, and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails 2 phases: induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant HE are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications, or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE, and treatment should be initiated with a nonabsorbable disaccharide (ie, lactulose) in most patients. Rifaximin (off label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferred alternative to rifaximin owing to its adverse effect profile. Other therapies, including zinc, L-ornithine-L-aspartate, and branched-chain amino acids, can be considered for patients not responding to disaccharides and nonabsorbable antibiotics. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well-compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe HE who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant HE continue maintenance therapy at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a first-time episode of HE can be administered lactulose, and careful instructions should be provided to patients and caregivers about dose titration to achieve 3 bowel movements daily. Patients with recurrent HE episodes

  8. Variation in Rates of Diagnosis of Acute Otitis Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berwick, Donald M.; Thibodeau, Lawrence A.

    1980-01-01

    Over 13 weeks during two periods in 1978 the diagnostic rate for acute otitis media was monitored among febrile children in the emergency room of a large children's hospital. Temporal variation in diagnostic rates by physicians was largely attributable to differences among individual providers and independent of level of training. (Author/MLW)

  9. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes.

    PubMed

    Galgano, Michael A; Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE. PMID:27088064

  10. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus disguising as hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yong Min; Lee, Sung Wook; Han, Sang Young; Baek, Yang Hyun; Ahn, Ji Hye; Choi, Won Jong; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Yoon, Byeol A

    2015-04-28

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus has become an important issue in modern neurology and epileptology. This is based on difficulty in definitively elucidating the condition and its various clinical phenomena and on our inadequate insight into the intrinsic pathophysiological processes. Despite nonconvulsive status epilepticus being a situation that requires immediate treatment, this disorder may not be appreciated as the cause of mental status impairment. Although the pathophysiology of nonconvulsive status epilepticus remains unknown, this disorder is thought to lead to neuronal damage, so its identification and treatment are important. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. We report a case of a 52-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. He was initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus by electroencephalogram.

  11. Does this patient have hypertensive encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Foteini; Rizos, Evangelos C; Kosta, Paraskevi; Argyropoulou, Maria I; Elisaf, Moses

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for further investigation and management of brain metastases. The patient was initially presented with a 4-day history of confusion. On the day of admission, the patient was confused, agitated, disorientated in place and time, and had visual disturbances. His blood pressure was repeatedly recorded high, with levels of systolic blood pressure between 170-210 mm Hg. A brain magnetic resonance imaging showed areas of high signal on T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images, located bilaterally in the white matter of the occipital regions and unilateral in the left frontal lobe, suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Aggressive treatment of hypertension resulted in complete resolution of the clinical and radiologic features of the syndrome. PMID:26896240

  12. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  13. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Dileep K; Prakash, Ravi; Mullen, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder seen in patients with advanced liver disease or porto-systemic shunts. Based on etiology and severity of HE, the World Congress of Gastroenterology has divided HE into categories and sub-categories. Many user-friendly computer-based neuropsychiatric tests are being validated for diagnosing covert HE. Currently, emphasis is being given to view HE deficits as a continuous spectrum rather than distinct stages. Ammonia is believed to play crucial role in pathogenesis of HE via astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, evidence has been building up which supports the synergistic role of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurosteroids in pathogenesis of HE. At present, treatment of HE aims at decreasing the production and intestinal absorption of ammonia. But as the role of new pathogenetic mechanisms becomes clear, many potential new treatment strategies may become available for clinician. PMID:25755319

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Davis, Karen D; Green, Robin E A; Wennberg, Richard; Mikulis, David; Ezerins, Leo J; Keightley, Michelle; Tator, Charles

    2014-01-01

    "Chronic traumatic encephalopathy" (CTE) is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The aim of this "perspective" is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE. PMID:27088064

  16. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  17. Subacute necrotising encephalopathy in an Alaskan husky.

    PubMed

    Wakshlag, J J; de Lahunta, A; Robinson, T; Cooper, B J; Brenner, O; O'Toole, T D; Olson, J; Beckman, K B; Glass, E; Reynolds, A J

    1999-12-01

    A 29-month-old female Alaskan husky was presented recumbent, tetraparetic and in a state of dementia, with blindness and cranial nerve deficits. The dog's progress was followed for over two months, as the signs resolved to an non-progressive mild hypermetria with slight proprioceptive ataxia, a diminished menace response and inability to prehend food. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral cavitation extending from the thalamus to the medulla, with less pronounced degenerative lesions in the caudate nucleus, putamen and claustrum. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate and pyruvate concentrations were in their normal ranges. Necropsy and histological examination confirmed the MRI findings as well as neuronal degeneration of the cerebellar cortex in the vermis and degenerative changes in the neocortex at the depths of the cerebral sulci. In view of the similarity of lesions to subacute necrotising encephalomyelopathy, known as Leigh's disease in humans, a tentative diagnosis of a mitochondrial encephalopathy was made.

  18. Febrile Seizures and Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Preschool Children: An Old Issue Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deonna, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The possible deleterious role of febrile seizures on development is an old issue. It took a long time to realize that impaired development or occurrence of chronic epilepsy affected a very small minority of children with febrile seizures. These children either had pre-existing brain damage, specific genetic epileptic conditions, or seizure-induced…

  19. Common variants associated with general and MMR vaccine-related febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Bjarke; Pasternak, Björn; Geller, Frank; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Wang, Tongfei; Huang, Fen; Eitson, Jennifer L; Hollegaard, Mads V; Svanström, Henrik; Vestergaard, Mogens; Hougaard, David M; Schoggins, John W; Jan, Lily Yeh; Melbye, Mads; Hviid, Anders

    2014-12-01

    Febrile seizures represent a serious adverse event following measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination. We conducted a series of genome-wide association scans comparing children with MMR-related febrile seizures, children with febrile seizures unrelated to vaccination and controls with no history of febrile seizures. Two loci were distinctly associated with MMR-related febrile seizures, harboring the interferon-stimulated gene IFI44L (rs273259: P = 5.9 × 10(-12) versus controls, P = 1.2 × 10(-9) versus MMR-unrelated febrile seizures) and the measles virus receptor CD46 (rs1318653: P = 9.6 × 10(-11) versus controls, P = 1.6 × 10(-9) versus MMR-unrelated febrile seizures). Furthermore, four loci were associated with febrile seizures in general, implicating the sodium channel genes SCN1A (rs6432860: P = 2.2 × 10(-16)) and SCN2A (rs3769955: P = 3.1 × 10(-10)), a TMEM16 family gene (ANO3; rs114444506: P = 3.7 × 10(-20)) and a region associated with magnesium levels (12q21.33; rs11105468: P = 3.4 × 10(-11)). Finally, we show the functional relevance of ANO3 (TMEM16C) with electrophysiological experiments in wild-type and knockout rats.

  20. Febrile Seizures and Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Preschool Children: The Generation R Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Annemarie M.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Schenk, Jacqueline J.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; Moll, Henriette A.; Arts, Willem Frans M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: General developmental outcome is known to be good in school-aged children who experienced febrile seizures. We examined cognitive and behavioural outcomes in preschool children with febrile seizures, including language and executive functioning outcomes. Method: This work was performed in the Generation R Study, a population-based cohort…

  1. Breastfeeding During Early Infancy is Associated with a Lower Incidence of Febrile Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Libraty, Daniel H; Capeding, Rosario Z; Obcena, Anamae; Brion, Job D; Tallo, Veronica

    2013-06-24

    Human breast milk is known to contain immunoprotective, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory agents. In a prospective clinical study of dengue virus infections during infancy, we examined the correlation between breastfeeding and the development of febrile illnesses in an infant population. We found that breastfeeding status and the frequency of breastfeeding during early infancy was associated with a lower incidence of febrile illnesses.

  2. Prion biology relevant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Novakofski, J; Brewer, M S; Mateus-Pinilla, N; Killefer, J; McCusker, R H

    2005-06-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk are a threat to agriculture and natural resources, as well as a human health concern. Both diseases are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), or prion diseases, caused by autocatalytic conversion of endogenously encoded prion protein (PrP) to an abnormal, neurotoxic conformation designated PrPsc. Most mammalian species are susceptible to TSE, which, despite a range of species-linked names, is caused by a single highly conserved protein, with no apparent normal function. In the simplest sense, TSE transmission can occur because PrPsc is resistant to both endogenous and environmental proteinases, although many details remain unclear. Questions about the transmission of TSE are central to practical issues such as livestock testing, access to international livestock markets, and wildlife management strategies, as well as intangible issues such as consumer confidence in the safety of the meat supply. The majority of BSE cases seem to have been transmitted by feed containing meat and bone meal from infected animals. In the United Kingdom, there was a dramatic decrease in BSE cases after neural tissue and, later, all ruminant tissues were banned from ruminant feed. However, probably because of heightened awareness and widespread testing, there is growing evidence that new variants of BSE are arising "spontaneously," suggesting ongoing surveillance will continue to find infected animals. Interspecies transmission is inefficient and depends on exposure, sequence homology, TSE donor strain, genetic polymorphism of the host, and architecture of the visceral nerves if exposure is by an oral route. Considering the low probability of interspecies transmission, the low efficiency of oral transmission, and the low prion levels in nonnervous tissues, consumption of conventional animal products represents minimal risk. However, detection of rare events is challenging, and TSE

  3. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  4. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: MECP2-related severe neonatal encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... onset encephalopathy with microcephaly Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Rare Disease Clinical Research Network: Rett Syndrome, MECP2 Duplication and Rett-Related Disorders Natural History Study RettSyndrome.org GeneReviews (1 link) MECP2- ...

  6. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed.

  7. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  8. Spongiform encephalopathy in a captive puma (Felis concolor).

    PubMed

    Willoughby, K; Kelly, D F; Lyon, D G; Wells, G A

    1992-11-01

    A captive adult puma developed ataxia, a hypermetric gait and whole body tremor. The signs progressed over a period of six weeks. Histopathological examination following euthanasia demonstrated spongiform encephalopathy, gliosis and mild non-suppurative meningoencephalitis. Immunostaining with a polyclonal antiserum revealed prion protein (PrP) associated with these changes in sections of cervical spinal cord and medulla. This is the first confirmed case of a scrapie-like spongiform encephalopathy described in a non-domestic cat in the United Kingdom.

  9. Refining the ammonia hypothesis: a physiology-driven approach to the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Jiang, Z Gordon; Patwardhan, Vilas R

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the most important complications of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Although the etiology is incompletely understood, it has been linked to ammonia directly and indirectly. Our goal is to review for the clinician the mechanisms behind hyperammonemia and the pathogenesis of HE to explain the rationale for its therapy. We reviewed articles collected through a search of MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar between October 1, 1948, and December 8, 2014, and by a manual search of citations within retrieved articles. Search terms included hepatic encephalopathy, ammonia hypothesis, brain and ammonia, liver failure and ammonia, acute-on-chronic liver failure and ammonia, cirrhosis and ammonia, portosytemic shunt, ammonia and lactulose, rifaximin, zinc, and nutrition. Ammonia homeostatsis is a multiorgan process involving the liver, brain, kidneys, and muscle as well as the gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, hyperammonemia may be the first clue to poor functional reserves, malnutrition, and impending multiorgan dysfunction. Furthermore, the neuropathology of ammonia is critically linked to states of systemic inflammation and endotoxemia. Given the complex interplay among ammonia, inflammation, and other factors, ammonia levels have questionable utility in the staging of HE. The use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics, and probiotics reduces gut ammoniagenesis and, in the case of antibiotics and probiotics, systemic inflammation. Nutritional support preserves urea cycle function and prevents wasting of skeletal muscle, a significant site of ammonia metabolism. Correction of hypokalemia, hypovolemia, and acidosis further assists in the reduction of ammonia production in the kidney. Finally, early and aggressive treatment of infection, avoidance of sedatives, and modification of portosystemic shunts are also helpful in reducing the neurocognitive effects of hyperammonemia. Refining the

  10. Thermal instability of compound variants of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II and impaired mitochondrial fuel utilization in influenza-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dengbing; Mizuguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Miyoko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Chida, Junji; Shikata, Koji; Kido, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is characterized by persistent high fever, febrile convulsions, severe brain edema, and high mortality in otherwise apparently healthy individuals. We have reported that a large proportion of patients suffering from disabling or fatal IAE, with transiently elevated serum acylcarnitine during high fever, exhibit a thermolabile phenotype of compound homo-/heterozygous variants of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II, gene symbol CPT2). We characterized the enzymatic properties of five single and three compound CPT II variants in patients with IAE. The kinetic characteristics of WT and variant CPT IIs, expressed in COS-7 cells, indicated that the variants exert a dominant-negative effect on the homotetrameric protein of the enzyme. Among the variants, three compound variations found in patients with severe encephalopathy; [c.1055T>G (p.Phe352Cys); c.1102G>A (p.Val368Ile)], [c.1511C>T (p.Pro504Leu); c.1813G>C (p.Val605Leu)], and [c.1055T>G (p.Phe352Cys); c.1102G>A (p.Val368Ile); c.1813G>C (p.Val605Leu)], showed reduced activities, thermal instability, and short half-lives compared with the WT. Like other disease-causing mutant proteins, these variant proteins were poly-ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded by a lactacystin-sensitive proteasome pathway. COS-7 cells transfected with the compound variants had their fatty acid beta-oxidation decreased to 30-59% and intracellular ATP levels to 48-79%, and a marked reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential at 41 degrees C, compared with control cells transfected with WT at 37 degrees C. The unstable CPT II variants with decreased enzymatic activities may bring mitochondrial fuel utilization below the phenotypic threshold during high fever, and thus may play an important etiopathological role in the development of brain edema of IAE.

  11. Sporadic infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in PCDH19 resembles Dravet syndrome but mainly affects females.

    PubMed

    Depienne, Christel; Bouteiller, Delphine; Keren, Boris; Cheuret, Emmanuel; Poirier, Karine; Trouillard, Oriane; Benyahia, Baya; Quelin, Chloé; Carpentier, Wassila; Julia, Sophie; Afenjar, Alexandra; Gautier, Agnès; Rivier, François; Meyer, Sophie; Berquin, Patrick; Hélias, Marie; Py, Isabelle; Rivera, Serge; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Ruberg, Merle; Brice, Alexis; Nabbout, Rima; Leguern, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the SCN1A-negative patients, 41 probands were screened for micro-rearrangements with Illumina high-density SNP microarrays. A hemizygous deletion on chromosome Xq22.1, encompassing the PCDH19 gene, was found in one male patient. To confirm that PCDH19 is responsible for a Dravet-like syndrome, we sequenced its coding region in 73 additional SCN1A-negative patients. Nine different point mutations (four missense and five truncating mutations) were identified in 11 unrelated female patients. In addition, we demonstrated that the fibroblasts of our male patient were mosaic for the PCDH19 deletion. Patients with PCDH19 and SCN1A mutations had very similar clinical features including the association of early febrile and afebrile seizures, seizures occurring in clusters, developmental and language delays, behavioural disturbances, and cognitive regression. There were, however, slight but constant differences in the evolution of the patients, including fewer polymorphic seizures (in particular rare myoclonic jerks and atypical absences) in those with PCDH19 mutations. These results suggest that PCDH19 plays a major role in epileptic encephalopathies, with a clinical spectrum overlapping that of DS. This disorder mainly affects females. The identification of an affected mosaic male strongly supports the hypothesis that cellular interference is the pathogenic mechanism.

  12. Persistence of Cognitive Impairment after Resolution of Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Schubert, Christine M; Heuman, Douglas M; Wade, James B; Gibson, Douglas P; Topaz, Allyne; Saeian, Kia; Hafeezullah, Muhammad; Bell, Debulon E; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, R Todd; Luketic, Velimir; White, Melanie B; Sanyal, Arun J

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims In patients with cirrhosis, hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has acute but reversible as well as chronic components. We investigated the extent of residual cognitive impairment following clinical resolution of overt HE (OHE). Methods Cognitive function of cirrhotic patients was evaluated using psychometric tests (digit symbol [DS], block design [BD], and number connection [NCT-A&B]) and the inhibitory control test (ICT). Improvement (reduction) in ICT lures and 1st minus 2nd halves (ΔL1–2) were used to determine learning of response inhibition. Two cross-sectional studies (A and B) compared data from stable cirrhotics, with or without prior OHE. We then prospectively assessed cognitive performance, before and after the first episode of OHE. Results In study A, (226 cirrhotic patients) 54 had experienced OHE, 120 had minimal HE and 52 with no minimal HE. Despite normal mental status on lactulose after OHE, cirrhotics were cognitively impaired, based on results from all tests. Learning of response inhibition (ΔL1–2 ≥1), was evident in patients with minimal HE and no minimal HE, but was lost after OHE. In study B (50 additional patients who developed ≥1 documented OHE episode during follow-up), the number of OHE hospitalizations correlated with severity of residual impairment, indicated by ICT lures (r=0.5, P=0.0001), DST (r=−0.39, P=0.002) and NCT-B (r=0.33, P=0.04). In the prospective study (59 cirrhotics without OHE), 15 developed OHE; ICT lure response worsened significantly after OHE (12 before vs.18 after, P=0.0003) and learning of response inhibition was lost. The 44 patients who did not experience OHE did not have deteriorations in cognitive function in serial testing. Conclusion In cirrhosis, episodes of OHE are associated with persistent and cumulative deficits in working memory, response inhibition, and learning. PMID:20178797

  13. Prolonged sleep fragmentation of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ringgold, Kristyn M.; Barf, R. Paulien; George, Amrita; Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep disruption is a frequent occurrence in modern society. Whereas many studies have focused on the consequences of total sleep deprivation, few have investigated the condition of sleep disruption. New Method We disrupted sleep of mice during the light period for 9 consecutive days using an intermittently-rotating disc. Results Electroencephalogram (EEG) data demonstrated that non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was severely fragmented and REM sleep was essentially abolished during the 12 h light period. During the dark period, when sleep was not disrupted, neither NREM sleep nor REM sleep times differed from control values. Analysis of the EEG revealed a trend for increased power in the peak frequency of the NREM EEG spectra during the dark period. The fragmentation protocol was not overly stressful as body weights and water consumption remained unchanged, and plasma corticosterone did not differ between mice subjected to 3 or 9 days of sleep disruption and home cage controls. However, mice subjected to 9 days of sleep disruption by this method responded to lipopolysaccharide with an exacerbated febrile response. Comparison with existing methods Existing methods to disrupt sleep of laboratory rodents often subject the animal to excessive locomotion, vibration, or sudden movements. This method does not suffer from any of these confounds. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prolonged sleep disruption of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide. This device provides a method to determine mechanisms by which chronic insufficient sleep contributes to the etiology of many pathologies, particularly those with an inflammatory component. PMID:23872243

  14. Evaluation of six risk factors for the development of bacteremia in children with cancer and febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Asturias, E.J.; Corral, J.E.; Quezada, J.

    2010-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a well-known entity in children with cancer, being responsible for the high risk for infection that characterizes this population. For this reason, cancer patients are hospitalized so that they can receive prophylactic care. Risk factors have been used to classify patients at a high risk for developing bacteremia. The present study evaluates whether those risk factors (C-reactive protein, hypotension, leukemia as the cancer type, thrombocytopenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute malnutrition) apply to patients at the Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica. We evaluated 102 episodes in 88 patients, in whom risk factors and blood cultures were tested. We observed no statistical relationship between the six risk factors and bacteremia. There was also no relationship between bacteremia and the simultaneous presence of two, three, or more risk factors. A significant relationship of C-reactive protein and platelet count with other outcome factors was observed. PMID:20404980

  15. Evaluation of six risk factors for the development of bacteremia in children with cancer and febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Asturias, E J; Corral, J E; Quezada, J

    2010-04-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a well-known entity in children with cancer, being responsible for the high risk for infection that characterizes this population. For this reason, cancer patients are hospitalized so that they can receive prophylactic care. Risk factors have been used to classify patients at a high risk for developing bacteremia. The present study evaluates whether those risk factors (C-reactive protein, hypotension, leukemia as the cancer type, thrombocytopenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute malnutrition) apply to patients at the Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica. We evaluated 102 episodes in 88 patients, in whom risk factors and blood cultures were tested. We observed no statistical relationship between the six risk factors and bacteremia. There was also no relationship between bacteremia and the simultaneous presence of two, three, or more risk factors. A significant relationship of C-reactive protein and platelet count with other outcome factors was observed.

  16. Usefulness of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in young children with febrile urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song Yi; Lee, I Re; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute pyelonephritis (APN) is a serious bacterial infection that can cause renal scarring in children. Early identification of APN is critical to improve treatment outcomes. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a prognostic marker of many diseases, but it has not yet been established in urinary tract infection (UTI). The aim of this study was to determine whether NLR is a useful marker to predict APN or vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Methods We retrospectively evaluated 298 pediatric patients (age≤36 months) with febrile UTI from January 2010 to December 2014. Conventional infection markers (white blood cell [WBC] count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], C-reactive protein [CRP]), and NLR were measured. Results WBC, CRP, ESR, and NLR were higher in APN than in lower UTI (P<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that NLR was a predictive factor for positive dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) defects (P<0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was high for NLR (P<0.001) as well as CRP (P<0.001) for prediction of DMSA defects. NLR showed the highest area under the ROC curve for diagnosis of VUR (P<0.001). Conclusion NLR can be used as a diagnostic marker of APN with DMSA defect, showing better results than those of conventional markers for VUR prediction. PMID:27186221

  17. The Risk of Serious Bacterial Infection in Neutropenic Immunocompetent Febrile Children.

    PubMed

    Barg, Assaf A; Kozer, Eran; Mordish, Yair; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Kventsel, Iris; Goldman, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Only few reports have looked into the risk of invasive bacterial infection in children with neutropenia that is not malignancy related. The objective of the current study was to determine the clinical significance of neutropenia as a predictor of serious bacterial infection (SBI) in immunocompetent children. We conducted a retrospective case-control study including children 3 months to 18 years of age with fever ≥ 38°C hospitalized or presenting to the emergency department. Patients who had neutropenia ≤ 1000 ANC/μL and had a blood culture taken were matched for age with the consecutive febrile patients for whom a blood culture was taken. The main outcome was the rate of SBI. SBIs were more prevalent among the control group than in the group of children with neutropenia, 19/71 and 6/71, respectively (P = 0.0005). More children were treated with antibiotics among the control group than in the group of children with neutropenia, 39/71 and 20/71, respectively (P < 0.0001). Acute-phase reactants including CRP and platelets were higher in the control group. We concluded that immunocompetent patients with fever and moderate neutropenia do not carry a higher risk for SBIs compared with patients with fever who do not have neutropenia.

  18. T2 relaxation time post febrile status epilepticus predicts cognitive outcome.

    PubMed

    Barry, Jeremy M; Choy, ManKin; Dube, Celine; Robbins, Ashlee; Obenaus, Andre; Lenck-Santini, Pierre Pascal; Scott, Rod C; Baram, Tallie Z; Holmes, Gregory L

    2015-07-01

    Evidence from animal models and patient data indicates that febrile status epilepticus (FSE) in early development can result in permanently diminished cognitive abilities. To understand the variability in cognitive outcome following FSE, we used MRI to measure dynamic brain metabolic responses to the induction of FSE in juvenile rats. We then compared these measurements to the ability to learn an active avoidance spatial task weeks later. T2 relaxation times were significantly lower in FSE rats that were task learners in comparison to FSE non-learners. While T2 time in whole brain held the greatest predictive power, T2 in hippocampus and basolateral amygdala were also excellent predictors. These signal differences in response to FSE indicate that rats that fail to meet metabolic and oxygen demand are more likely to develop spatial cognition deficits. Place cells from FSE non-learners had significantly larger firing fields and higher in-field firing rate than FSE learners and control animals and imply increased excitability in the pyramidal cells of FSE non-learners. These findings suggest a mechanistic cause for the spatial memory deficits in active avoidance and are relevant to other acute neurological insults in early development where cognitive outcome is a concern. PMID:25939697

  19. Experimental febrile seizures impair interastrocytic gap junction coupling in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilaware; Dupper, Alexander; Deshpande, Tushar; Graan, Pierre N E De; Steinhäuser, Christian; Bedner, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Prolonged and focal febrile seizures (FSs) have been associated with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), although the underlying mechanism and the contribution of predisposing risk factors are still poorly understood. Using a kainate model of TLE, we previously provided strong evidence that interruption of astrocyte gap junction-mediated intercellular communication represents a crucial event in epileptogenesis. To elucidate this aspect further, we induced seizures in immature mice by hyperthermia (HT) to study the consequences of FSs on the hippocampal astrocytic network. Changes in interastrocytic coupling were assessed by tracer diffusion studies in acute slices from mice 5 days after experimental FS induction. The results reveal that HT-induced FSs cause a pronounced reduction of astrocyte gap junctional coupling in the hippocampus by more than 50%. Western blot analysis indicated that reduced connexin43 protein expression and/or changes in the phosphorylation status account for this astrocyte dysfunction. Remarkably, uncoupling occurred in the absence of neuronal death and reactive gliosis. These data provide a mechanistic link between FSs and the subsequent development of TLE and further strengthen the emerging view that astrocytes have a central role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26931373

  20. Comorbidities among patients with cancer who do and do not develop febrile neutropenia during the first chemotherapy cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Luthra, Rakesh; Morrow, Phuong K; Fisher, Maxine D; Reiner, Maureen; Barron, Richard L; Langeberg, Wendy J

    2016-10-01

    Patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy with certain comorbidities are at increased risk of febrile neutropenia. A comprehensive evaluation of febrile neutropenia-related comorbidities across cancers is needed. This study compared comorbidity prevalence among patients with cancer who did and did not develop febrile neutropenia during the first chemotherapy cycle. This case-control study used administrative claims from adult patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, or gastric cancer who received chemotherapy between 2007 and 2012. Each patient who developed febrile neutropenia (case) was matched with up to four patients without febrile neutropenia (controls) by cancer type, metastasis, chemotherapy regimen, age group, and sex. For each comorbidity (identified in the year before chemotherapy began), the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for febrile neutropenia by cancer type was evaluated using conditional logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Of 31,331 eligible patients, 672 developed febrile neutropenia in the first chemotherapy cycle. A total of 3312 febrile neutropenia cases and matched controls were analyzed. Across tumor types, comorbidity prevalence was higher in patients who developed febrile neutropenia than in those without febrile neutropenia. Among patients with breast cancer, osteoarthritis was more prevalent in patients with febrile neutropenia (aOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.18). Among patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, renal disease was more prevalent in patients with febrile neutropenia (aOR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.23 to 4.11). Patients who developed febrile neutropenia in the first chemotherapy cycle presented with comorbidities more often than otherwise similar patients who did not develop febrile neutropenia. These findings warrant further investigation and support the inclusion of comorbidities into febrile neutropenia risk models.

  1. Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Damage Induced by Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury and Prolonged Febrile Convulsions in Immature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Joo Yeon; Sun, Woong; Kim, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and prolonged febrile seizures (pFS) are common neurologic problems that occur during childhood. However, there is insufficient evidence from experimental studies to conclude that pFS directly induces hippocampal injury. We studied cognitive function and histological changes in a rat model and investigated which among pFS, HIE, or a dual pathologic effect is most detrimental to the health of children. Methods A rat model of HIE at postnatal day (PD) 7 and a pFS model at PD10 were used. Behavioral and cognitive functions were investigated by means of weekly open field tests from postnatal week (PW) 3 to PW7, and by daily testing with the Morris water maze test at PW8. Pathological changes in the hippocampus were observed in the control, pFS, HIE, and HIE+pFS groups at PW9. Results The HIE priming group showed a seizure-prone state. The Morris water maze test revealed a decline in cognitive function in the HIE and HIE+pFS groups compared with the pFS and control groups. Additionally, the HIE and HIE+pFS groups showed significant hippocampal neuronal damage, astrogliosis, and volume loss, after maturation. The pFS alone induced minimal hippocampal neuronal damage without astrogliosis or volume loss. Conclusion Our findings suggest that pFS alone causes no considerable memory or behavioral impairment, or cellular change. In contrast, HIE results in lasting memory impairment and neuronal damage, gliosis, and tissue loss. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the developing brain concerning conditions caused by HIE or pFS. PMID:26279809

  2. Mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion in children.

    PubMed

    Liptai, Zoltán; Ivády, Balázs; Barsi, Péter; Várallyay, György; Rudas, Gábor; Fogarasi, András

    2013-01-30

    Authors, most of them Japanese, have recently published an increasing number of articles on mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. We report on two new white European patients and compare published data with our own observations. A 15-year-old girl developed headache, fever, dizziness, vomiting and nuchal rigidity over four days. CSF showed elevated protein and cell count, with the lowest serum Na being 131 mmol/L. MRI on day seven was normal, but she remained febrile, had cerebral edema and episodes of confusion. MRI on day 11 showed a small T2-hyperintense lesion with restricted diffusion in the callosal splenium. Adenoviral infection was proved, and the girl underwent a protracted course of recovery. MRI signal changes improved in six days and disappeared after four months. A 12.5-year-old girl developed headache, lethargy, drowsiness and vomiting. On day five she experienced right-sided numbness, weakness and inability to speak which lasted 12 hours. She was confused and disoriented. MRI disclosed a tiny area of increased T2-signal and restricted diffusion in the splenium. Serum Na was 133 mmol/L, CSF cell count and protein was markedly elevated, and enteroviral infection was detected. Echocardiography showed no changes predisposing to clot formation and no thrombophilia was found. Her symptoms resolved in a week and MRI was normal two months later. These two non-epileptic children increase the small number of white European patients with MERS reported so far. Both had hyponatremia and encephalitis and patient 2 had transient ischemic attack, possibly due to the cerebral edema also resulting in the splenial lesion.

  3. An Evaluation of Cerebral and Systemic Predictors of 18-Month Outcomes for Neonates With Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Kushwaha, Juhi S; Plegue, Melissa A; Selewski, David T; Barks, John D E

    2015-10-01

    Amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) is a commonly used predictor of outcome after hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Cerebral and systemic near-infrared spectroscopy and acute kidney injury might also have prognostic value. The authors monitored neonates with aEEG, cerebral and systemic near-infrared spectroscopy during therapeutic hypothermia, assigned an acute kidney injury stage, and measured neurodevelopmental outcome. For 18 infants, cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy variables did not differentiate between those with favorable (n = 13) versus adverse (death or moderate-severe disability; n = 5) 18-month outcomes. However, systemic rSO2 variability was higher during hours 48-72 of cooling among those with favorable outcomes (.02 < P < .03). Mean aEEG amplitude during hours 24 to 48 of cooling was higher among those with good outcomes (.027 < P < .032). The aEEG lower margin was also higher during hours 12 to 48 for those with good outcomes (.014 < P < .035). Acute kidney injury did not predict outcome (P > .05). aEEG is a useful prognostic tool for outcomes after neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, but the role of near-infrared spectroscopy in the hypothermia-treated population remains uncertain.

  4. An Evaluation of Cerebral and Systemic Predictors of 18-Month Outcomes for Neonates With Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Kushwaha, Juhi S; Plegue, Melissa A; Selewski, David T; Barks, John D E

    2015-10-01

    Amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) is a commonly used predictor of outcome after hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Cerebral and systemic near-infrared spectroscopy and acute kidney injury might also have prognostic value. The authors monitored neonates with aEEG, cerebral and systemic near-infrared spectroscopy during therapeutic hypothermia, assigned an acute kidney injury stage, and measured neurodevelopmental outcome. For 18 infants, cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy variables did not differentiate between those with favorable (n = 13) versus adverse (death or moderate-severe disability; n = 5) 18-month outcomes. However, systemic rSO2 variability was higher during hours 48-72 of cooling among those with favorable outcomes (.02 < P < .03). Mean aEEG amplitude during hours 24 to 48 of cooling was higher among those with good outcomes (.027 < P < .032). The aEEG lower margin was also higher during hours 12 to 48 for those with good outcomes (.014 < P < .035). Acute kidney injury did not predict outcome (P > .05). aEEG is a useful prognostic tool for outcomes after neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, but the role of near-infrared spectroscopy in the hypothermia-treated population remains uncertain. PMID:25724376

  5. Topiramate increases the risk of valproic acid-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Moon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a rare but serious complication of valproic acid (VPA) therapy that usually presents with impaired consciousness or increased seizure frequency. Although it has been suggested that topiramate (TPM) increases the risk of VPA-induced encephalopathy, the additional risk in patients receiving TPM therapy has not been evaluated. We reviewed all adult patients who took VPA between January 2005 and February 2009 at the Seoul National University Hospital and identified patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy based on clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) data. Information on sex, age, serum ammonia level, serum VPA level, liver function test, and EEG was collected from patient registry and medical data. We enrolled 8,372 patients who received VPA therapy and 1,236 patients who received VPA/TPM combination therapy. We identified 11 patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy (0.13%), 7 of whom received a combination therapy of VPA and TPM. The odds ratio of VPA-induced encephalopathy with TPM over that without TPM was 10.16. There were no significant differences in sex distribution, number of antiepileptic agents, ammonia level, VPA serum level, underlying diseases, dosage of VPA, duration of VPA treatment, treatment of encephalopathy, and outcomes between the two groups. Our study showed that the prevalence of VPA-induced encephalopathy is approximately 0.1% among patients treated with VPA and that the risk of this condition, although still low, can increase by approximately 10 times in the presence of TPM therapy. Based on these results, we suggest that TPM should be carefully used in patients receiving VPA treatment.

  6. Neuropsychological sequelae of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a 20-year-old woman: selective impairment of a frontal memory system.

    PubMed

    Parkin, A J; Dunn, J C; Lee, C; O'Hara, P F; Nussbaum, L

    1993-01-01

    This article reports the neuropsychological sequelae of Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a 20-year-old woman. After amelioration of acute symptoms, the patient showed a range of cognitive impairments the most marked of which was a severe impairment on free recall tasks involving both verbal and nonverbal material. In contrast, recognition memory appeared remarkably well preserved. Some evidence of frontal lobe and general intellectual impairment was also noted. The case is discussed in terms of the pathophysiology of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, criteria for its diagnosis, and the multicomponent nature of memory deficits.

  7. 78 FR 11207 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies...

  8. The Neuropathology of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Kiernan, Patrick T.; Alvarez, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. PMID:25904048

  9. Benign encephalopathy of pregnancy. Preliminary clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Poser, C M; Kassirer, M R; Peyser, J M

    1986-01-01

    A survey of 67 pregnancies in 51 professional women (physicians, psychologists, nurses, administrators, etc.) revealed the occurrence of symptoms of cognitive dysfunction such as forgetfulness, disorientation, confusion and reading difficulties in 28 pregnancies occurring in 21 women. These were unrelated to such factors as age of delivery, percentage weight gain, the baby's sex or birth weight, alcohol consumption, smoking, a history of migraine or allergy or other symptoms occurring during pregnancy such as sleepiness and lack of concentration, irritability, loss of interest in job or nightmares. Nor was there any correlation with hypertension, proteinuria, glycosuria, ketonuria, anemia, or morning sickness. Furthermore, these cognitive disturbances were not related to depression or sleep deprivation. Despite these symptoms, none of the women suffering from them were forced to interrupt their professional activities during pregnancy. The syndrome of benign encephalopathy of pregnancy should be recognized so that simple precautions can be taken to prevent any interference with professional or other activities. The etiology of the syndrome is unknown.

  10. A critical review of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L; Gardner, Andrew J; McCrory, Paul; Zafonte, Ross; Castellani, Rudy J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been described in the literature as a neurodegenerative disease with: (i) localized neuronal and glial accumulations of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) involving perivascular areas of the cerebral cortex, sulcal depths, and with a preference for neurons within superficial cortical laminae; (ii) multifocal axonal varicosities and axonal loss involving deep cortex and subcortical white matter; (iii) relative absence of beta-amyloid deposits; (iv) TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions and neurites; and (v) broad and diverse clinical features. Some of the pathological findings reported in the literature may be encountered with age and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, the focality of the p-tau cortical findings in particular, and the regional distribution, are believed to be unique to CTE. The described clinical features in recent cases are very similar to how depression manifests in middle-aged men and with frontotemporal dementia as the disease progresses. It has not been established that the described tau pathology, especially in small amounts, can cause complex changes in behavior such as depression, substance abuse, suicidality, personality changes, or cognitive impairment. Future studies will help determine the extent to which the neuropathology is causally related to the diverse clinical features. PMID:26183075

  11. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Complicating Traumatic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sigurtà, Anna; Terzi, Valeria; Regna-Gladin, Caroline; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We are reporting a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) developed in an unusual clinical scenario without the presence of the most described symptoms. PRES is a neurological and radiological syndrome described in many different clinical conditions. In children it has been mostly reported in association with hematological and renal disorders. Our patient was a 15 years old boy, admitted to our intensive care unit for pancreatitis after blunt abdominal trauma. During the stay in the intensive care unit, he underwent multiple abdominal surgical interventions for pancreatitis complications. He had a difficult management of analgesia and sedation, being often agitated with high arterial pressure, and he developed a bacterial peritonitis. After 29 days his neurological conditions abruptly worsened with neuroimaging findings consistent with PRES. His clinical conditions progressively improved after sedation and arterial pressure control. He was discharged at home with complete resolution of the neurological and imaging signs 2 months later. The pathophysiology of PRES is controversial and involves disordered autoregulation ascribable to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. In this case both hypertension and endothelial activation, triggered by sepsis and pancreatitis, could represent the culprits of PRES onset. Even if there is no specific treatment for this condition, a diagnosis is mandatory to start antihypertensive and supportive treatment. We are therefore suggesting to consider PRES in the differential diagnosis of a neurological deterioration preceded by hypertension and/or septic state, even without other “typical” clinical features. PMID:27258506

  12. Mycophenolate-Induced Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Bhavik; Khajuria, Mansi; Agrawal, Yashwant

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman presented with diffuse anasarca and shortness of breath. Workup revealed a creatinine of 3.3 and a glomerular filtration rate of 17. The patient was also found to be pancytopenic with evidence of hemolytic anemia. A renal biopsy showed evidence of stage IV lupus nephritis with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her lupus was further classified as ANA negative and anti-dsDNA positive. Mycophenolate and triweekly hemodialysis were started along with a steroid burst of methylprednisolone 1 g for 3 days followed by prednisone 60 mg daily. Four days after discharge, the patient represented with a witnessed 3-minute seizure involving bowel incontinence, altered mental status, and tongue biting. She was given 2 mg intravenous lorazepam and loaded with 1000 mg levetiracetam for seizure prophylaxis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed bilateral posterior hemispheric subcortical edema, and the diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was made. Mycophenolate was immediately discontinued and replaced with cyclophosphamide. Strict blood pressure control below 140/90 mm Hg was maintained initially with intravenous nicardipine drip and then transitioned to oral nifedipine, clonidine, losartan, and minoxidil. A repeat head magnetic resonance imaging 8 days later showed resolved subcortical edema consistent with the patient's improved mental status. No permanent neurologic sequelae were recorded as a result of this hospital episode. PMID:25933141

  13. Sodium Benzoate for Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Misel, Michael L.; Patton, Heather; Mendler, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious but usually reversible neuropsychiatric complication of cirrhosis, inborn errors of metabolism involving disorders of the urea cycle, and noncirrhotic portosystemic shunting that most commonly arises from a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting procedure. Symptoms can include alterations in cognitive function, neuromuscular activity, and consciousness, as well as sleep disorders and mood changes. HE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and, if not properly treated, will lead to increased hospital admissions and healthcare costs. Although the standard therapies of lactulose and rifaximin (Xifaxan, Salix) are effective for most patients, these drugs may be associated with significant adverse effects and expense and, in some patients, inadequate therapeutic response. A need for adjunctive therapies exists. Drugs that target serum and tissue ammonia metabolism and elimination may be important adjuncts to drugs that reduce ammonia production and absorption from the gastrointestinal tract for patients with severe or persistent overt symptoms of HE. Sodium benzoate is an inexpensive adjunctive agent that can be used in addition to lactulose and rifaximin and may provide an option for some select patients with refractory HE who have failed to respond to standard therapies or who cannot afford them. Although sodium benzoate does not share the same adverse effect profiles of standard therapies for HE, its efficacy has not been well established. Given the significant dose-dependent sodium content of this therapy, it may not be appropriate for patients with significant fluid retention or kidney dysfunction. PMID:24711766

  14. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  15. [Characteristics of acupuncture in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Febrile Diseases)].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zi-Yu; Chen, Shu-Kai; Guo, Chang-Qing; Liu, Nai-Gang

    2010-07-01

    Through summarization and analysis on etiology, pathology and acupoint selection in chapters about acupuncture in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Febrile Diseases), written by ZHANG Zhong-jing, famous physician of the Eastern Han Dynasty, five features of acupuncture in the book are concluded: to cut off the pathway of pathogenic factors to prevent progress of diseases; to adopt both acupuncture and herbal medicine to give full play to their respective advantages in treatment; to distinguish pathogenesis carefully and select the proper acupoints; to observe the progressing tendency of diseases to give treatment accordingly; and to understand that yang channels are appropriate for acupuncture, while yin channels can also be selected in treatment. In this way, the law of acupuncture of ZHANG Zhong-jing is expected to be better understood.

  16. Two USA Ehrlichia spp. cause febrile illness in goats.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Amanda D; Levin, Michael L; Spurlock, J Paul

    2008-08-25

    Ehrlichia spp. are not currently recognized as a cause of illness in goats in the USA, but three Ehrlichia are enzootic in lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) in the eastern USA, and related bacteria in other countries cause illness in goats. We exposed naïve goats to Ehrlichia-infected Amblyomma and demonstrated that infection and clinical illness can be caused by two USA species, E. ewingii and the recently discovered Panola Mountain Ehrlichia sp. Clinical features in all five goats are described; ehrlichioses were associated with pyrexia, serous nasal discharge, inappetance, lethargy, decreased alkaline phosphatase, and, in most cases, neutropenia. Goats remained chronically infected for several months following exposure to ehrlichiae and transmitted the pathogens to uninfected ticks. In the eastern USA, undifferentiated febrile illness in goats might be caused by previously unrecognized ehrlichial infections, and pastures housing-infected goats could become infested with a large number of infected ticks. PMID:18328644

  17. [Exanthema as a main symptom in the febrile child].

    PubMed

    Aebi, C

    2005-08-01

    Distinguishing in febrile children between harmless rashes and those, which require specific action, is a common problem in pediatric primary care. Major exanthematous diseases necessitating emergency hospitalization include invasive meningococcal disease and rarely gram-negative septicaemia caused by other pathogens, staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, endocarditis, fever and rash in travellers returning from tropical countries and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. Therapeutic intervention is also necessary in patients with scarlet fever, rheumatic fever, varicella in postpuberal and immunocompromised individuals, in Kawasaki's disease, in Still's disease and in other non-infectious, inflammatory diseases (e.g., familial mediterranean fever). Finally, various specific measures need to be taken in reportable diseases, erythema infectiosum (parvovirus B19), primary HIV infection and in Henoch-Schölein purpura.

  18. Two USA Ehrlichia spp. cause febrile illness in goats.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Amanda D; Levin, Michael L; Spurlock, J Paul

    2008-08-25

    Ehrlichia spp. are not currently recognized as a cause of illness in goats in the USA, but three Ehrlichia are enzootic in lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) in the eastern USA, and related bacteria in other countries cause illness in goats. We exposed naïve goats to Ehrlichia-infected Amblyomma and demonstrated that infection and clinical illness can be caused by two USA species, E. ewingii and the recently discovered Panola Mountain Ehrlichia sp. Clinical features in all five goats are described; ehrlichioses were associated with pyrexia, serous nasal discharge, inappetance, lethargy, decreased alkaline phosphatase, and, in most cases, neutropenia. Goats remained chronically infected for several months following exposure to ehrlichiae and transmitted the pathogens to uninfected ticks. In the eastern USA, undifferentiated febrile illness in goats might be caused by previously unrecognized ehrlichial infections, and pastures housing-infected goats could become infested with a large number of infected ticks.

  19. Differentiation of ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy isolate types, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and CH1641 scrapie.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J G; Sauer, M; van Keulen, L J M; Tang, Y; Bossers, A; Langeveld, J P M

    2011-01-01

    With increased awareness of the diversity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains in the ruminant population, comes an appreciation of the need for improved methods of differential diagnosis. Exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been associated with the human TSE, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, emphasizing the necessity in distinguishing low-risk TSE types from BSE. TSE type discrimination in ruminants such as cattle, sheep, goats and deer, requires the application of several prion protein (PrP)-specific antibodies in parallel immunochemical tests on brain homogenates or tissue sections from infected animals. This study uses in a single incubation step, three PrP-specific antibodies and fluorescent Alexa dye-labelled anti-mouse Fabs on a Western blot. The usual amount of brain tissue needed is 0.5 mg. This multiplex application of antibodies directed towards three different PrP epitopes enabled differential diagnosis of all established main features of classical scrapie, BSE and Nor98-like scrapie in sheep and goats, as well as the currently known BSE types C, H and L in cattle. Moreover, due to an antibody-dependent dual PrP-banding pattern, for the first time CH1641 scrapie of sheep can be reliably discriminated from the other TSE isolate types in sheep.

  20. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE) is a serious neurological disorder characterized by a classical triad of acute mental confusion, ataxia, and opthalmoplegia due to thiamine deficiency. It was initially described in chronic alcoholics; however, any condition resulting in poor nutritional status places the patient at risk of WE. Bariatric surgery is now considered as an emergent cause of WE. The number of bariatric surgery is increasing for morbid obesity. We present a case of a 40-year-old male who presented with confusion and difficulty in maintaining the balance while walking 3 months after Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery. Diagnosis of WE was made on clinical ground and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, which showed bilateral hyperintense signals in paramedian thalami. Parenteral thiamine replacement was started, and patient showed complete recovery. PMID:26620994

  1. Iatrogenic Coagulopathy and the Development of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after L-asparaginase Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Vallisa, Daniele; Morelli, Nicola; Scagnelli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiological syndrome mostly related to hypertension, eclampsia, renal failure, or to chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Although the PRES pathophysiology is multifactorial, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction are hypothesized to be the pivotal factors. Here we report a case of PRES in an adult patient after chemotherapy (Escherichia coli L-asparaginase [L-ASP], daunorubicin, vincristine, and intrathecal methotrexate) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The development of the PRES was strictly associated with an iatrogenic coagulopathy induced by L-ASP, which inhibits the biosynthesis of hepatic coagulation factors. The nadir of platelet count, antithrombin III (ATIII) and fibrinogen curve was coincident with the onset of the PRES neurological picture; subsequently, the normalization of the ATIII and fibrinogen levels seemed to parallel the good clinical evolution. This case seems to provide new insights into the PRES pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27014503

  2. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image.

  3. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  4. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients.

    PubMed

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image. PMID:27483175

  5. Outcome After Therapeutic Hypothermia in Term Neonates with Encephalopathy and a Syndromic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Shimotake, Thomas K.; Glass, Hannah C.

    2015-01-01

    The large randomized, controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) excluded neonates with congenital disorders. The objective of this study was to report our experience using hypothermia in neonates with signs of HIE and a syndromic disorder or brain anomaly. Subjects were identified from a database of neonates admitted to the Neuro-Intensive Care Nursery at University of California, San Francisco. Of 169 patients fulfilling criteria for hypothermia, eight (5%) had a syndromic disorder, and were cooled as per guidelines for non-syndromic neonates. Perinatal characteristics of infants with and without syndromic disorder were not significantly different. Overall outcome was poor: 38% had evidence of acute HI injury, 3 subjects died, two survivors had low developmental quotient (DQ 25). The risk versus benefit of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE among neonates with congenital brain malformations or syndromic diagnoses is uncertain. PMID:25762585

  6. Electroencephalogram of Age-Dependent Epileptic Encephalopathies in Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Nickels, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are disorders in which the epileptiform abnormalities are thought to contribute to a progressive cerebral dysfunction. Characteristic electroencephalogram findings have an important diagnostic value in classification of epileptic encephalopathy syndromes. In this paper, we focus on electroencephalogram findings of childhood epileptic encephalopathy syndromes and provide sample illustrations. PMID:24024028

  7. 78 FR 72859 - Concurrence With OIE Risk Designations for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk designations for 14 regions. The OIE recognizes these regions as being... ``Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products,'' Docket No. APHIS-2008... regions for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk. Section 92.5 of the regulations provides that...

  8. Calcineurin Inhibitors Associated Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Turun; Rao, Zhengsheng; Tan, Qiling; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Jinpeng; Huang, Zhongli; Wang, Xianding; Lin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare neurologic side effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) with poorly understood clinical features. We report cases of 2 patients with PRES developing after kidney transplantation and summarize PRES clinical features through a literature review. The 1st case was a 28-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a deceased donor. Initial immunosuppressive therapy consisted of tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. He developed headache and blurred vision with visual field loss15 days after transplantation and generalized seizures 4 days later. The 2nd case was a 34-year-old man who received a living kidney transplant. His initial immunosuppressive therapy comprised tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. Two months after transplantation, he developed seizures. Both patients were diagnosed with PRES based on neurological symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings; they recovered after switching from tacrolimus to either a cyclosporine or a lower tacrolimus dose. CNI-associated PRES is an acute neurological syndrome with seizures, encephalopathy, visual abnormalities, headache, focal neurological deficits, and nausea/vomiting. It is always accompanied by hypertension. A fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal MRI scan typically shows reversible subcortical white matter changes in the posterior cerebral hemisphere that usually occur within the 1st month after transplantation. CNI-associated PRES has a generally favorable prognosis with early diagnosis and prompt treatment including alternating or discontinuing CNIs and blood pressure control. CNI-associated PRES should be considered in patients exhibiting acute neurological symptoms after transplantation. Early diagnosis and immediate treatment are critical for a favorable prognosis. PMID:27057842

  9. Use of Peptide-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay followed by Immunofluorescence Assay To Document Ehrlichia chaffeensis as a Cause of Febrile Illness in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Matute, Armando J; Dumler, J Stephen; Woods, Christopher W; Mayorga, Orlando; Reller, Megan E

    2016-06-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), has been extensively studied as a cause of acute febrile illness and an emerging tick-borne zoonosis in the United States. Limited data suggest its presence in other regions, including Central and South America but not Nicaragua to date. Diagnosis of E. chaffeensis infection by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) is the reference standard due to its presumed high sensitivity and specificity, but IFA is impractical, variably reproducible, and cumbersome for large epidemiologic studies and for clinical diagnosis in resource-poor regions. We evaluated a high-throughput, objective peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for use alone or in combination with IFA. We found that it performed best as a screening test (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 84%) to reduce the proportion of serum samples that were required by the more cumbersome and subjective IFA testing to <20%. Using a two-step diagnostic approach (IFA is performed if the ELISA is positive), we identified E. chaffeensis or a serologically and antigenically similar organism as a heretofore unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in humans in Nicaragua and demonstrated the utility of the peptide ELISA as a screening tool for large-scale clinical studies.

  10. Use of Peptide-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay followed by Immunofluorescence Assay To Document Ehrlichia chaffeensis as a Cause of Febrile Illness in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Matute, Armando J; Dumler, J Stephen; Woods, Christopher W; Mayorga, Orlando; Reller, Megan E

    2016-06-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), has been extensively studied as a cause of acute febrile illness and an emerging tick-borne zoonosis in the United States. Limited data suggest its presence in other regions, including Central and South America but not Nicaragua to date. Diagnosis of E. chaffeensis infection by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) is the reference standard due to its presumed high sensitivity and specificity, but IFA is impractical, variably reproducible, and cumbersome for large epidemiologic studies and for clinical diagnosis in resource-poor regions. We evaluated a high-throughput, objective peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for use alone or in combination with IFA. We found that it performed best as a screening test (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 84%) to reduce the proportion of serum samples that were required by the more cumbersome and subjective IFA testing to <20%. Using a two-step diagnostic approach (IFA is performed if the ELISA is positive), we identified E. chaffeensis or a serologically and antigenically similar organism as a heretofore unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in humans in Nicaragua and demonstrated the utility of the peptide ELISA as a screening tool for large-scale clinical studies. PMID:27053675

  11. Clinical practice in febrile neutropenia risk assessment and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor primary prophylaxis of febrile neutropenia in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska, Ewa; Filipczyk-Cisarż, Emilia; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof; Leśniewski-Kmak, Krzysztof; Litwiniuk, Maria M.; Wieruszewska-Kowalczyk, Karolina; Kosno-Kruszewska, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The first aim was to investigate the knowledge and awareness of oncologists concerning febrile neutropenia (FN) risk assessment and indications for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis (PP), based on current therapeutic guidelines (PTOK and EORTC). The second aim was to educate the oncologists on best practices for risk assessment and neutropenia management. Material and methods The project participants included 169 oncologists from 7 regions working in large specialist oncological centres, university hospitals, regional and city hospitals, specialist outpatient clinics, and oncological wards in small local hospitals. The participants completed a questionnaire based on seven prepared clinical cases of patients with different tumour types and patient characteristics, receiving chemotherapy (CT), and with different levels of FN risk. Participants answered questions related to FN risk assessment and G-CSF use. After completing the questionnaire, the participants proceeded to an educational module in which they were provided with an analysis of correct diagnostic and therapeutic procedures according to the PTOK and EORTC guidelines. Results and Conclusions Febrile neutropenia risk assessment was found to be a routine procedure performed for over 90% of the clinical cases by the participant oncologists. However, the FN risk assessment of clinical cases was correct and consistent with therapeutic guidelines in only 65% of responses. Indications for G-CSF PP were properly identified in 76% of responses and it appeared that indications for G-CSF PP were more likely to be correctly identified in patients receiving high-risk or low-risk regimens than in those receiving intermediate-risk regimens, where the decision to give G-CSF PP is based on additional assessment of patient risk factors. The vast majority of participants who correctly identified the need for PP administered G-CSF in accordance with the dose and schedule

  12. Measles-associated encephalopathy in children with renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Turner, A; Jeyaratnam, D; Haworth, F; Sinha, M D; Hughes, E; Cohen, B; Jin, L; Kidd, I M; Rigden, S P A; MacMahon, E

    2006-06-01

    Two children, boys of 8 and 13 years, presented with measles-associated encephalopathy several years after kidney transplantation for congenital nephrotic syndrome. In the absence of prior clinical measles, the neurological symptoms initially eluded diagnosis, but retrospective analysis of stored samples facilitated the diagnosis of measles-associated encephalopathy without recourse to biopsy of deep cerebral lesions. Each had received a single dose of measles mumps and rubella vaccine before 12 months of age. Prior vaccination, reduction of immunosuppression and treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and ribavirin may have contributed to their survival. Persistent measles virus RNA shedding, present in one child, was not controlled by treatment with i.v. ribavirin. Two years later, both patients continue to have functioning allografts with only minimal immunosuppression. These cases illustrate the difficulty in diagnosing measles-associated encephalopathy in the immunocompromised host, even in the era of molecular diagnostics, and highlight the renewed threat of neurological disease in communities with incomplete herd immunity.

  13. Useful Tests for Hepatic Encephalopathy in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, Eiman; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious complication of liver disease and portosystemic shunting that represents a continuum of neuropsychiatric changes and altered consciousness. It is classified as overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) when clinically apparent or as covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) in its mildest form. Progression of CHE to OHE and its impact of quality of life make its early diagnosis imperative. Several diagnostic techniques ranging from simple clinical scales to sophisticated computerized tests exist yet diagnosis remains a challenge due to the time, cost and personnel involved. Psychometric tests appear promising due to their high sensitivity and low cost but results are variable depending on age and education. The pros and cons of current diagnostic methods for overt and covert HE are reviewed along with strategy to CHE testing. PMID:24357348

  14. Leptospirosis mimicking acute cholecystitis among athletes participating in a triathlon.

    PubMed

    Guarner, J; Shieh, W J; Morgan, J; Bragg, S L; Bajani, M D; Tappero, J W; Zaki, S R

    2001-07-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease acquired by exposure to contaminated water, is characterized by fever accompanied by various symptoms, including abdominal pain. An acute febrile illness occurred in athletes who participated in an Illinois triathlon in which the swimming event took place in a freshwater lake. Of 876 athletes, 120 sought medical care and 22 were hospitalized. Two of the athletes had their gallbladders removed because of abdominal pain and clinical suspicion of acute cholecystitis. We applied an immunohistochemical test for leptospirosis to these gallbladders and demonstrated bacterial antigens staining (granular and filamentous patterns) around blood vessels of the serosa and muscle layer. Rare intact bacteria were seen in 1 case. These results show that leptospirosis can mimic the clinical symptoms of acute cholecystitis. If a cholecystectomy is performed in febrile patients with suspicious environmental or animal exposure, pathologic studies for leptospirosis on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues may be of great value.

  15. Predictors of neonatal encephalopathy in full-term infants.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, S. J.; Alessandri, L. M.; Badawi, N.; Burton, P. R.; Pemberton, P. J.; Stanley, F.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Preliminary investigation of the contribution of adverse antepartum and intrapartum factors to neonatal encephalopathy in singleton neonates born full term. DESIGN--Matched case-control study based on incidence density sampling of controls. SETTING--Two major teaching hospitals (one paediatric and one obstetric) and three peripheral maternity hospitals in Perth, Western Australia (population 1.2 million). SUBJECTS--89 cases, all the full term singleton neonates born during an eight month period in 1992 who fulfilled one or more of six criteria during the first week of life (seizures, abnormal conscious state, persistent hypertonia or hypotonia, and feeding or respiratory difficulties of central origin). One full term control infant without neonatal encephalopathy was matched to each case by sex, hospital of delivery, time of day and day of the week of birth, and maternal health insurance status. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratio estimates of relative risk of neonatal encephalopathy associated with antepartum and intrapartum factors. RESULTS--Estimated incidence of moderate or severe encephalopathy in first week of life was 3.75 per 1000 full term live births. Thirteen cases and no controls had evidence suggestive of important intrapartum hypoxia, and in only five of these cases was the neurological condition at birth attributed to events during the intrapartum period. Univariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified significant differences between cases and controls for maternal vaginal bleeding in pregnancy, maternal thyroxine treatment, congenital abnormalities, induction of labour, interval from membrane rupture to delivery, maternal pyrexia in labour, augmentation of labour, abnormal intrapartum cardiotocograms, and meconium in labour. Family history of convulsions also approached significance. CONCLUSIONS--Our preliminary results suggest that intrapartum hypoxia, according to currently used criteria, was not the cause of neonatal

  16. Preclinical Models of Encephalopathy of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy of prematurity (EoP) encompasses the central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities associated with injury from preterm birth. Although rapid progress is being made, limited understanding exists of how cellular and molecular CNS injury from early birth manifests as the myriad of neurological deficits in children who are born preterm. More importantly, this lack of direct insight into the pathogenesis of these deficits hinders both our ability to diagnose those infants who are at risk in real time and could potentially benefit from treatment and our ability to develop more effective interventions. Current barriers to clarifying the pathophysiology, developmental trajectory, injury timing, and evolution include preclinical animal models that only partially recapitulate the molecular, cellular, histological, and functional abnormalities observed in the mature CNS following EoP. Inflammation from hypoxic-ischemic and/or infectious injury induced in utero in lower mammals, or actual prenatal delivery of more phylogenetically advanced mammals, are likely to be the most clinically relevant EOP models, facilitating translation to benefit infants. Injury timing, type, severity, and pathophysiology need to be optimized to address the specific hypothesis being tested. Functional assays of the mature animal following perinatal injury to mimic EoP should ideally test for the array of neurological deficits commonly observed in preterm infants, including gait, seizure threshold and cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. Here, we review the merits of various preclinical models, identify gaps in knowledge that warrant further study and consider challenges that animal researchers may face in embarking on these studies. While no one model system is perfect, insights relevant to the clinical problem can be gained with interpretation of experimental results within the context of inherent limitations of the chosen model system. Collectively, optimal use of multiple models

  17. Gut microbiota: its role in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rahul; Saraswat, Vivek A; Dhiman, Radha K

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia, a key factor in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), is predominantly derived from urea breakdown by urease producing large intestinal bacteria and from small intestine and kidneys, where the enzyme glutaminases releases ammonia from circulating glutamine. Non-culture techniques like pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid are used to characterize fecal microbiota. Fecal microbiota in patients with cirrhosis have been shown to alter with increasing Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) and Model for End stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores, and with development of covert or overt HE. Cirrhosis dysbiosis ratio (CDR), the ratio of autochthonous/good bacteria (e.g. Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae and Clostridiales) to non-autochthonous/pathogenic bacteria (e.g. Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae), is significantly higher in controls and patients with compensated cirrhosis than patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Although their stool microbiota do not differ, sigmoid colonic mucosal microbiota in liver cirrhosis patients with and without HE, are different. Linkage of pathogenic colonic mucosal bacteria with poor cognition and inflammation suggests that important processes at the mucosal interface, such as bacterial translocation and immune dysfunction, are involved in the pathogenesis of HE. Fecal microbiome composition does not change significantly when HE is treated with lactulose or when HE recurs after lactulose withdrawal. Despite improving cognition and endotoxemia as well as shifting positive correlation of pathogenic bacteria with metabolites, linked to ammonia, aromatic amino acids and oxidative stress, to a negative correlation, rifaximin changes gut microbiome composition only modestly. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of lactulose and rifaximin could be associated with a change in microbial metabolic function as well as an improvement in dysbiosis. PMID:26041954

  18. Towards Improving Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Non-malaria Febrile Illness: A Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Decuypere, Saskia; Maltha, Jessica; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Issa, Guiraud; Bérenger, Kaboré; Lompo, Palpouguini; Tahita, Marc C.; Ruspasinghe, Thusitha; McConville, Malcolm; Goodacre, Royston; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-malaria febrile illnesses such as bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) are a leading cause of disease and mortality in the tropics. However, there are no reliable, simple diagnostic tests for identifying BSI or other severe non-malaria febrile illnesses. We hypothesized that different infectious agents responsible for severe febrile illness would impact on the host metabololome in different ways, and investigated the potential of plasma metabolites for diagnosis of non-malaria febrile illness. Methodology We conducted a comprehensive mass-spectrometry based metabolomics analysis of the plasma of 61 children with severe febrile illness from a malaria-endemic rural African setting. Metabolite features characteristic for non-malaria febrile illness, BSI, severe anemia and poor clinical outcome were identified by receiver operating curve analysis. Principal Findings The plasma metabolome profile of malaria and non-malaria patients revealed fundamental differences in host response, including a differential activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. A simple corticosteroid signature was a good classifier of severe malaria and non-malaria febrile patients (AUC 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70–0.93). Patients with BSI were characterized by upregulated plasma bile metabolites; a signature of two bile metabolites was estimated to have a sensitivity of 98.1% (95% CI: 80.2–100) and a specificity of 82.9% (95% CI: 54.7–99.9) to detect BSI in children younger than 5 years. This BSI signature demonstrates that host metabolites can have a superior diagnostic sensitivity compared to pathogen-detecting tests to identify infections characterized by low pathogen load such as BSI. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential use of plasma metabolites to identify causality in children with severe febrile illness in malaria-endemic settings. PMID:26943791

  19. Bilateral reductions in hippocampal volume in adults with epilepsy and a history of febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Barr, W.; Ashtari, M.; Schaul, N.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the degree and frequency of reductions in hippocampal volume in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with and without a history of febrile seizures.
METHODS—In vivo measures of hippocampal volume were computed from three dimensional gradient echo (FLASH) images in 44 patients undergoing comprehensive evaluations for epilepsy surgery. Twenty one patients (48%) reported a history of febrile seizures. The volumes from these patients were compared with those from 23 patients without a history of febrile seizures and 34 healthy controls.
RESULTS—The febrile seizure group had significant reductions in volume, both ipsilateral (30% decrease) and contralateral (15% decrease), to the EEG seizure focus. Twelve of 18 patients with febrile seizures exhibited clinically significant ipsilateral volume reductions, defined as volumes falling 2 SD below the mean obtained from the control sample. Only four of 19 patients without febrile seizures exhibited this degree of reduction. No significant correlations were found between seizure variables (for example, duration of epilepsy, seizure frequency) and ipsilateral reductions in volume. However, a significant inverse correlation (r=−0.45, P<0.05) between seizure frequency and the volume of the hippocampus contralateral to the seizure focus was found in the febrile seizure group.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that a history of febrile seizures is associated with the finding of a smaller hippocampus on the side ipsilateral to the subsequent temporal lobe focus whereas chronic factors seem to be be related to pathology contralateral to the seizure focus.

 PMID:9343124

  20. Role of nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation in mechanisms of febrile convulsions in Wistar rat pups.

    PubMed

    Klyueva, Y A; Bashkatova, V G; Vitskova, G Y; Narkevich, V B; Mikoyan, V D; Vanin, A F; Chepurnov, S A; Chepurnova, N E

    2001-01-01

    Generation of nitric oxide and the content of lipid peroxidation products in the brain are increased in rat pups during febrile convulsions. NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine in a dose of 250 mg/kg prevented hyperthermia-induced accumulation of nitric oxide, increased the latency febrile convulsions, and had no effect on the content of lipid peroxidation products. PMID:11329081

  1. Breastfeeding During Early Infancy is Associated with a Lower Incidence of Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Libraty, Daniel H.; Capeding, Rosario Z.; Obcena, AnaMae; Brion, Job D.; Tallo, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Human breast milk is known to contain immunoprotective, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory agents. In a prospective clinical study of dengue virus infections during infancy, we examined the correlation between breastfeeding and the development of febrile illnesses in an infant population. We found that breastfeeding status and the frequency of breastfeeding during early infancy was associated with a lower incidence of febrile illnesses. PMID:24465289

  2. Breastfeeding During Early Infancy is Associated with a Lower Incidence of Febrile Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Libraty, Daniel H; Capeding, Rosario Z; Obcena, Anamae; Brion, Job D; Tallo, Veronica

    2013-06-24

    Human breast milk is known to contain immunoprotective, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory agents. In a prospective clinical study of dengue virus infections during infancy, we examined the correlation between breastfeeding and the development of febrile illnesses in an infant population. We found that breastfeeding status and the frequency of breastfeeding during early infancy was associated with a lower incidence of febrile illnesses. PMID:24465289

  3. Prophylaxis and reversal of ifosfamide encephalopathy with methylene-blue.

    PubMed

    Küpfer, A; Aeschlimann, C; Wermuth, B; Cerny, T

    1994-03-26

    The antineoplastic ifosfamide produces dose-dependent signs of neurotoxicity. After ifosfamide overdose in a patient, we found excessive urinary excretion of glutaric acid and sarcosine, which is compatible with glutaric aciduria type II, a defect in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation that results from defective electron transfer to flavoproteins. We therefore used the electron-accepting drug methylene-blue as an antidote for ifosfamide encephalopathy. In one patient, ifosfamide neurotoxicity was rapidly reversed by methylene-blue 50 mg intravenously. In another patient with previous episodes of ifosfamide encephalopathy, methylene-blue was administered orally prophylactically. No symptoms of neurotoxicity were noted.

  4. Toxic encephalopathy due to colchicine--Gloriosa superba poisoning.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Inuka Kishara; Weeratunga, Praveen; Caldera, Manjula; Gamage, Ranjanie

    2014-10-01

    Gloriosa superba, a flowering plant widespread in South and Southeast Asia, is implicated in many cases of self-poisoning. Colchicine is concentrated in the seeds and tubers and this mediates its toxicity. We describe a 28-year-old woman who developed delayed encephalopathy after eating G superba tubers. MR scan of brain showed bilateral symmetrical T2 basal ganglia hyperintensities in the caudate and lentiform nuclei. The delay in onset of encephalopathy is attributable to a direct-effect colchicine, probably mediated through its effect on microtubular transport.

  5. [Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy of children].

    PubMed

    Sivkova, S N; Bogdanov, E I; Zaĭkova, F M; Morozova, E A; Aiupova, V A; Zabbarova, A T; Shaĭmardanova, R M

    2013-01-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy of school-age children is a rare epileptic syndrome that causes difficulties in diagnosis at the initial stage of disease. It is characterized by sudden onset with multifocal refractory status epilepticus in previously healthy children with normal development. Later, children suffer from resistant focal epilepsy in the combination with cognitive deficit and behavioral difficulties. Authors describe a clinical case of fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy of school-age children in a child of 7 years old. Aspects of etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the disease are discussed.

  6. Fatal Encephalopathy Associated with Influenza in a Health Care Professional.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Kiyoshi; Furuta, Kiyoshi; Kanai, Shinichiro; Takei, Yo-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year-old nurse was referred to our hospital with a fever and disturbed consciousness. She tested positive for influenza antigen. CT and MRI findings revealed low density and intensity areas in the right occipital and lateral lobes with remarkable brain edema, which led to a diagnosis of influenza encephalopathy. Influenza A antibodies in the serum were below the detection limit despite the patient receiving previous vaccination three months earlier. A PCR analysis revealed that the influenza HA gene was classified into clade 3C.2a, subclass AH3N2. The present case indicates the potential development of encephalopathy in adults under certain conditions. PMID:26935378

  7. Neonatal Encephalopathy: Update on Therapeutic Hypothermia and Other Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M; Juul, Sandra E

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is standard treatment for newborns at 36 weeks of gestation or greater with intrapartum hypoxia-related NE. Term and late preterm infants with moderate to severe encephalopathy show improved survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of age after TH. TH can increase survival without increasing major disability, rates of an IQ less than 70, or cerebral palsy. Neonates with severe NE remain at risk of death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment. This review discusses the evidence supporting TH for term or near term neonates with NE. PMID:27524449

  8. Estimating the Burden of Leptospirosis among Febrile Subjects Aged below 20 Years in Kampong Cham Communities, Cambodia, 2007-2009

    PubMed Central

    Hem, Sopheak; Ly, Sowath; Votsi, Irene; Vogt, Florian; Asgari, Nima; Buchy, Philippe; Heng, Seiha; Picardeau, Mathieu; Sok, Touch; Ly, Sovann; Huy, Rekol; Guillard, Bertrand; Cauchemez, Simon; Tarantola, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an emerging but neglected public health challenge in the Asia/Pacific Region with an annual incidence estimated at 10–100 per 100,000 population. No accurate data, however, are available for at-risk rural Cambodian communities. Method We conducted anonymous, unlinked testing for IgM antibodies to Leptospira spp. on paired sera of Cambodian patients <20 years of age between 2007–2009 collected through active, community-based surveillance for febrile illnesses in a convenience sample of 27 rural and semi-rural villages in four districts of Kampong Cham province, Cambodia. Leptospirosis testing was done on paired serological samples negative for Dengue, Japanese encephalitis and Chikungunya viruses after random selection. Convalescent samples found positive while initial samples were negative were considered as proof of acute infection. We then applied a mathematical model to estimate the risk of fever caused by leptospirosis, dengue or other causes in rural Cambodia. Results A total of 630 samples are coming from a randomly selected subset of 2358 samples. IgM positive were found on the convalescent serum sample, among which 100 (15.8%) samples were IgM negative on an earlier sample. Seventeen of these 100 seroconversions were confirmed using a Microagglutination Test. We estimated the probability of having a fever due to leptospirosis at 1. 03% (95% Credible Interval CI: 0. 95%–1. 22%) per semester. In comparison, this probability was 2. 61% (95% CI: 2. 55%, 2. 83%) for dengue and 17. 65% (95% CI: 17. 49%, 18. 08%) for other causes. Conclusion Our data from febrile cases aged below 20 years suggest that the burden of leptospirosis is high in rural Cambodian communities. This is especially true during the rainy season, even in the absence of identified epidemics. PMID:27043016

  9. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27377741

  10. Albumin dialysis with molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kobashi-Margáin, Ramón A; Gavilanes-Espinar, Juan G; Gutiérrez-Grobe, Ylse; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Angel A; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez Sánchez, Nahum

    2011-06-01

    Acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver diseases are major health issues worldwide, and most cases end with the need for liver transplantation. Up to 90% of the patients die waiting for an organ to be transplanted. Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome that usually accompanies liver failure and impacts greatly on the quality of life. The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is a recently developed form of artificial liver support that functions on a base of albumin dialysis. It facilitates the dialysis of albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins, allowing the patient to survive and even improving some clinical features of liver failure. The following manuscript reviews the technical features of MARS operation and some of the clinical trials that analyze the efficacy of the system in the therapy of liver diseases.

  11. Preclinical Models of Encephalopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy of prematurity (EoP) encompasses the central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities associated with injury from preterm birth. Although rapid progress is being made, limited understanding exists of how the cellular and molecular CNS injury from early birth manifests as the myriad of neurological deficits in children who are born preterm. More importantly, this lack of direct insight into the pathogenesis of these deficits hinders both our ability to diagnose those infants who are at risk in real-time and could potentially benefit from treatment, and our ability to develop more effective interventions. Current barriers to clarifying the pathophysiology, developmental trajectory, injury timing and evolution include preclinical animal models that only partially recapitulate the molecular, cellular, histological and functional abnormalities observed in the mature CNS following EoP. Inflammation from hypoxic-ischemic and/or infectious injury induced in utero in lower mammals, or actual prenatal delivery of more phylogenetically-advanced mammals, are likely to be the most clinically relevant EOP models, facilitating translation to benefit infants. Injury timing, type, severity and pathophysiology need to be optimized to address the specific hypothesis being tested. Functional assays of the mature animal following perinatal injury to mimic EoP should ideally test for the array of neurological deficits commonly observed in preterm infants including gait, seizure threshold, cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. Here, we review the merits of various preclinical models, identify gaps in knowledge that warrant further study and consider challenges that animal researchers may face in embarking on these studies. While no one model system is perfect, insights relevant to the clinical problem can be gained with interpretation of experimental results within the context of inherent limitations of the chosen model system. Collectively, optimal use of multiple models will

  12. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Sweden: an H-type variant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) had never been detected in Sweden until 2006, when the active surveillance identified a case in a 12-year-old cow. The case was an unusual form since several molecular features of the protease-resistant prion protein (PrP**res) were different from classical BSE...

  13. Neuropsychiatric Manifestation of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy in an Adolescent and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ransing, Ramdas Sarjerao; Mishra, Kshirod Kumar; Sarkar, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is usually underdiagnosed and untreated because of complex neuropsychiatric manifestation. We report a case of an adolescent female with Hashimoto's encephalopathy who responded well to a combination of aspirin and levothyroxine. A 16-year-old girl presented at psychiatric emergency services with a depressive episode, menstrual irregularities, and a 5-month past history of thyroid swelling. On clinical examination, she was in a euthyroid state with insignificant neurological history. However, her previous investigation revealed a hypothyroid state. Her magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated infarcts in the bilateral gangliocapsular region and left frontal periventricular deep white matter lesion. Ultrasonography of the thyroid and fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed lymphocytic thyroiditis. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (289 IU/ml) antibody titer was elevated (289 IU/mL). Her depressive symptoms responded well to antidepressants, mood stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levothyroxine. She remained in the euthyroid state and then in the euthymic state for 3 years. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Most researchers have observed a dramatic response to steroids with or without levothyroxine. A clinician may consider aspirin as an alternative to a steroid in long-term management to avoid steroid-related side effects and contraindications. PMID:27570351

  14. Recurring hyperammonemic encephalopathy induced by bacteria usually not producing urease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperammonemic encephalopathy may occur when urease-positive bacteria in the urinary tract produce ammonium which directly enters systemic circulation. Predisposing conditions such as a neurogenic bladder can increase both urinary tract infection and urine stagnation. Case presentation We describe the case of a 66 years old woman with a neurogenic bladder who twice developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy following urinary tract infection. During the second episode Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis have been isolated in the urine. The neurologic examination showed psychomotor slowing, weak photomotor reflex, nystagmus in the lateral gaze and asterixis. The EEG showed triphasic waves which disappeared along with clinical recovery. Conclusion Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis are commonly considered urease-negative bacteria. Although frequently involved in urinary tract infections, their role in causing hyperammonemic encephalopathy have not been previously reported. Moreover, despite only one case with a neurogenic bladder have been described so far, our is the first patient with reoccurring hyperammonemic encephalopathy secondary to urinary tract infections. PMID:24884855

  15. A rare case of glycine encephalopathy unveiled by valproate therapy.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Velusamy; Kadiyala, Pramila; Hariharan, Praveen; Neeraj, E

    2015-01-01

    Glycine encephalopathy (GE) or nonketotic hyperglycinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder due to a primary defect in glycine cleavage enzyme system. It is characterized by elevated levels of glycine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid usually presenting with seizures, hypotonia, and developmental delay. In our case, paradoxical increase in seizure frequency on starting sodium valproate led us to diagnose GE. PMID:26167219

  16. Neuropsychiatric Manifestation of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy in an Adolescent and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ransing, Ramdas Sarjerao; Mishra, Kshirod Kumar; Sarkar, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is usually underdiagnosed and untreated because of complex neuropsychiatric manifestation. We report a case of an adolescent female with Hashimoto's encephalopathy who responded well to a combination of aspirin and levothyroxine. A 16-year-old girl presented at psychiatric emergency services with a depressive episode, menstrual irregularities, and a 5-month past history of thyroid swelling. On clinical examination, she was in a euthyroid state with insignificant neurological history. However, her previous investigation revealed a hypothyroid state. Her magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated infarcts in the bilateral gangliocapsular region and left frontal periventricular deep white matter lesion. Ultrasonography of the thyroid and fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed lymphocytic thyroiditis. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (289 IU/ml) antibody titer was elevated (289 IU/mL). Her depressive symptoms responded well to antidepressants, mood stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levothyroxine. She remained in the euthyroid state and then in the euthymic state for 3 years. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Most researchers have observed a dramatic response to steroids with or without levothyroxine. A clinician may consider aspirin as an alternative to a steroid in long-term management to avoid steroid-related side effects and contraindications. PMID:27570351

  17. Kidney imaging in management of delayed febrile urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Sayedzadeh, Sayed Abolhassan; Malaki, Majid; Shoaran, Maryam; Nemati, Massood

    2011-11-01

    We report a cross-sectional study performed to evaluate the imaging findings of 40 children, aged one month to five years (16.65 ± 14.97 months), who presented with protracted fever of more than 48 hours due to urinary tract infection (UTI). About 85% of the patients had positive Tc99-Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan and 58% had vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Kidney sonography aided in the diagnosis and treatment in 10% of the patients. Age, sex, presence or laterality of VUR did not contribute to defective DMSA scan (pyelonephritis) (P > 0.05). Delayed diagnosis and treatment of febrile UTI is associated with a high incidence of positive findings of DMSA scan irrespective of age, sex or presence/absence of VUR. In mild VUR, the DMSA scan may be normal while in patients with moderate and severe VUR the DMSA scan is almost always abnormal. Thus, our study shows that a normal DMSA scan can help in ruling out moderate to severe forms of VUR and that cystography remains an excellent and standard tool for the diagnosis of VUR.

  18. [Efficacy of Levofloxacin Hydrate in Febrile Neutropenia for Outpatient Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Manato; Sato, Junya; Nihei, Satoru; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-05-01

    Management of febrile neutropenia (FN) is important for the safety of patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy. Oral antimicrobials are usually prescribed as the initial treatment for FN, and outpatients are instructed to begin medication prior to chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness and safety of the use of these oral antibiotics have not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin hydrate (LVFX) for breast cancer patients with FN, and the factors associated with the onset of FN in 134 breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy including the anticancer drug anthracycline (total, 513 courses), in an outpatient chemotherapy department. The effectiveness and safety of LVFX were defined respectively as defervescence within 5 days, and the appearance of side effects such as diarrhea and rashes. Fever was observed in 89 (66%) of the 134 patients, and during 164 (32%) of 513 courses. Defervescence was observed with the LVFX medication in 149 (93%) of 160 courses. The primary side effect was the development of rashes, and only 2 (1%) of the 160 courses were discontinued. Onset of stomatitis during chemotherapy was observed as a factor of FN (odds ratio: 1.36, p<0.05). Our results suggest that the use of LVFX according to the patients' discretion might be an effective and safe option for the management of FN during outpatient chemotherapy.

  19. Predictors of malaria in febrile children in Sokoto, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay; Madaki, Aboi J.K.; Jiya, Nma M.; Singh, Rupashree; Thacher, Tom D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presumptive diagnosis of malaria is widespread, even where microscopy is available. As fever is very nonspecific, this often leads to over diagnosis, drug wastage and loss of opportunity to consider alternative causes of fever, hence the need to improve on the clinical diagnosis of malaria. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional comparative study, we examined 45 potential predictors of uncomplicated malaria in 800 febrile children (0-12 years) in Sokoto, Nigeria. We developed a clinical algorithm for malaria diagnosis and compared it with a validated algorithm, Olaleye's model. Results: Malaria was confirmed in 445 (56%). In univariate analysis, 13 clinical variables were associated with malaria. In multivariate analysis, vomiting (odds ratio, OR 2.6), temperature ≥ 38.5°C (OR 2.2), myalgia (OR 1.8), weakness (OR 1.9), throat pain (OR 1.8) and absence of lung crepitations (OR 5.6) were independently associated with malaria. In children over age 3 years, any 3 predictors had a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 47% for malaria. An Olaleye score ≥ 5 had a sensitivity of 62% and a specificity of 51%. Conclusion: In hyperendemic areas, the sensitivity of our algorithm may permit presumptive diagnosis of malaria in children. Algorithm positive cases can be presumptively treated, and negative cases can undergo parasitological testing to determine need for treatment. PMID:25538366

  20. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  1. [Efficacy of Levofloxacin Hydrate in Febrile Neutropenia for Outpatient Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Manato; Sato, Junya; Nihei, Satoru; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-05-01

    Management of febrile neutropenia (FN) is important for the safety of patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy. Oral antimicrobials are usually prescribed as the initial treatment for FN, and outpatients are instructed to begin medication prior to chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness and safety of the use of these oral antibiotics have not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin hydrate (LVFX) for breast cancer patients with FN, and the factors associated with the onset of FN in 134 breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy including the anticancer drug anthracycline (total, 513 courses), in an outpatient chemotherapy department. The effectiveness and safety of LVFX were defined respectively as defervescence within 5 days, and the appearance of side effects such as diarrhea and rashes. Fever was observed in 89 (66%) of the 134 patients, and during 164 (32%) of 513 courses. Defervescence was observed with the LVFX medication in 149 (93%) of 160 courses. The primary side effect was the development of rashes, and only 2 (1%) of the 160 courses were discontinued. Onset of stomatitis during chemotherapy was observed as a factor of FN (odds ratio: 1.36, p<0.05). Our results suggest that the use of LVFX according to the patients' discretion might be an effective and safe option for the management of FN during outpatient chemotherapy. PMID:27210089

  2. Metformin Inhibits Glutaminase Activity and Protects against Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Javier; Ranchal, Isidora; Nuñez, David; Díaz-Herrero, María del Mar; Maraver, Marta; del Campo, José Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Camacho, Inés; Figueruela, Blanca; Bautista, Juan D.; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. Methods Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin) and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment). Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. Results Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82): 4.9% (2/41) in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41) in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2–108.8); p = 0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04–1.2); p = 0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5–71.6); p = 0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8–163.4); p = 0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM) decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin

  3. CADASIL: Migraine, Encephalopathy, Stroke and Their Inter-Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine is common in Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) but its treatment responses are not well described, and its relationship to stroke risk unknown. Encephalopathy is a less common presentation; it has been suggested it is related to migraine. We characterised migraine patterns and treatment responses in CADASIL, and examined associations between migraine and both stroke risk and encephalopathy. Methods 300 symptomatic CADASIL patients were prospectively recruited from a national referral clinic over a nineteen year period, from 1996 to 2015. Data was collected using a standardised questionnaire. Migraine was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). A cross-sectional analysis was carried out on the data collected. Results Migraine was present in 226 (75.3%), and the presenting feature in 203 (67.7%). It was usually accompanied by aura (89.8%). Patients showed variable responses to a variety of drugs for migraine. Of 24 given triptans, 45.5% had consistent or partial responses. None had complications following triptans. Thirty-three (11.0%) patients experienced encephalopathy lasting on average 8.1 ± 3.4 days. Patients with migraine with aura had higher odds of encephalopathy (OR = 5.4; 95%CI 1.6–28.4; p = 0.002). Patients with confusional aura had higher odds of encephalopathy than those with other aura types (OR = 2.5, 95%CI = 1.0–5.8, p = 0.04). There was also no increase in risk of encephalopathy with sex or age at onset of migraine. Migraineurs had a lower stroke risk than non-migraineurs (HR = 0.46, 95%CI 0.3–0.6, p = 2.1x10-6). Conclusions Migraine with aura is a prominent feature of CADASIL. Treatment responses are similar to those seen in the general migraine population and no complications were observed with triptans. Migraine with aura was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy suggesting

  4. Prospective cohort study of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy: CSPOR-BC FN study.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Narui, Kazutaka; Kaise, Hiroshi; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Mukai, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing use of adjuvant chemotherapy for treating early breast cancer, febrile neutropenia management has become crucial. Guidelines for febrile neutropenia management are mostly based on a Caucasian population survey although ethnic differences are reported in terms of adverse events. We survey the current status of febrile neutropenia and risk factors in Japanese female breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens potential for febrile neutropenia. Subsequently, we plan to conduct a multicenter prospective cohort study involving 1000 patients with operable breast cancer. With the current state of oral antibiotics being routinely prescribed without hematology tests, we survey febrile neutropenia based on two different definitions, namely, true febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and Grade 4 neutropenia, and surrogate febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and oral antibiotic and antipyretic intake. The comparison of true febrile neutropenia and surrogate febrile neutropenia incidences is anticipated to provide information on the safety and feasibility of chemotherapy management without performing blood tests.

  5. SCN8A encephalopathy: Research progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Meisler, Miriam H; Helman, Guy; Hammer, Michael F; Fureman, Brandy E; Gaillard, William D; Goldin, Alan L; Hirose, Shinichi; Ishii, Atsushi; Kroner, Barbara L; Lossin, Christoph; Mefford, Heather C; Parent, Jack M; Patel, Manoj; Schreiber, John; Stewart, Randall; Whittemore, Vicky; Wilcox, Karen; Wagnon, Jacy L; Pearl, Phillip L; Vanderver, Adeline; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2016-07-01

    On April 21, 2015, the first SCN8A Encephalopathy Research Group convened in Washington, DC, to assess current research into clinical and pathogenic features of the disorder and prepare an agenda for future research collaborations. The group comprised clinical and basic scientists and representatives of patient advocacy groups. SCN8A encephalopathy is a rare disorder caused by de novo missense mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN8A, which encodes the neuronal sodium channel Nav 1.6. Since the initial description in 2012, approximately 140 affected individuals have been reported in publications or by SCN8A family groups. As a result, an understanding of the severe impact of SCN8A mutations is beginning to emerge. Defining a genetic epilepsy syndrome goes beyond identification of molecular etiology. Topics discussed at this meeting included (1) comparison between mutations of SCN8A and the SCN1A mutations in Dravet syndrome, (2) biophysical properties of the Nav 1.6 channel, (3) electrophysiologic effects of patient mutations on channel properties, (4) cell and animal models of SCN8A encephalopathy, (5) drug screening strategies, (6) the phenotypic spectrum of SCN8A encephalopathy, and (7) efforts to develop a bioregistry. A panel discussion of gaps in bioregistry, biobanking, and clinical outcomes data was followed by a planning session for improved integration of clinical and basic science research. Although SCN8A encephalopathy was identified only recently, there has been rapid progress in functional analysis and phenotypic classification. The focus is now shifting from identification of the underlying molecular cause to the development of strategies for drug screening and prioritized patient care. PMID:27270488

  6. THE BICARBONATE RESERVE AND THE DISSOCIATION CURVE OF OXYHEMOGLOBIN IN FEBRILE CONDITIONS.

    PubMed

    White, A C

    1925-02-28

    From Fig. 1 it may be seen that the effect of elevated temperature during the pyrexial period upon 1/K and therefore on the dissociation curve of oxyhemoglobin was, on the average, greater than would have been expected from experiments on normal blood in vitro, and greater than would be expected in view of the alkalosis occurring See PDF for Structure during fever. Temperature rise, and excess hydroxyl ion acting in vitro in the opposite directions, seemed to indicate a more stable state of affairs than was found. Apparently other factors have come into play, as, for example, alterations in the proportions and concentrations of the various electrolytes. In pneumonia, for instance, there is a retention of chloride during the febrile period with excessive loss of phosphates. The variations were not due to variations in the hemoglobin molecule itself since from the work of Adair, Barcroft, and Bock (18) hemoglobin must apparently be reckoned as having identical properties in normal individuals of the same species. If Barcroft's (19) hypothesis be right, namely that the C(H) within the corpuscle is higher than that of the plasma, the observed variations of 1/K may not be so surprising. In view of the fact that the hemoglobin inside the corpuscle is enclosed within a semipermeable membrane, the possibility arises of the setting up of membrane equilibria which will protect the respiratory pigment from excessive changes of reaction that may occur in the plasma, and thus the optimum conditions for the carriage of oxygen to the tissues may be maintained. Krogh and Leitch (10) in 1919 also drew attention to the protected situation of hemoglobin inside the corpuscle. In Case 6 it seems as if the alkalosis consequent on the febrile state had gained the upper hand and had extinguished the normal temperature reaction. This is rather confirmed by the fact that clinically the case showed one of the earlier signs of an alkalosis; namely, twitching of the facial muscles. Case 10

  7. Therapy of acute gastroenteritis: role of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zollner-Schwetz, I; Krause, R

    2015-08-01

    Acute infectious diarrhoea remains a very common health problem, even in the industrialized world. One of the dilemmas in assessing patients with acute diarrhoea is deciding when to test for aetiological agents and when to initiate antimicrobial therapy. The management and therapy of acute gastroenteritis is discussed in two epidemiological settings: community-acquired diarrhoea and travellers' diarrhoea. Antibiotic therapy is not required in most patients with acute gastroenteritis, because the illness is usually self-limiting. Antimicrobial therapy can also lead to adverse events, and unnecessary treatments add to resistance development. Nevertheless, empirical antimicrobial therapy can be necessary in certain situations, such as patients with febrile diarrhoeal illness, with fever and bloody diarrhoea, symptoms persisting for >1 week, or immunocompromised status.

  8. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) due to acute hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Younis, Bilal Bin; Arshad, Rozina; Khurhsid, Saima; Masood, Junaid; Nazir, Farhan; Tahira, Maham

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis C (HCV) infection has been identified as an important cause of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), characterized by rapid deterioration of liver function from massive hepatic necrosis leading to encephalopathy and multi-organ failure. We admitted a female patient at Shalamar Hospital with jaundice, fever, encephalopathy and coagulopathy of short duration with no history of any comorbidity. Her hepatitis viral screen revealed positive anti HCV. Her viral loads were also high. A diagnosis of FHF due to acute HCV infection was made. Patient was treated conservatively and improved gradually. In summary, acute HCV can cause FHF and should be ruled out in patients with FHF of unknown cause in an endemic country for HCV like Pakistan.

  9. Outpatient management without initial assessment for febrile patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kosei; Tanaka, Satoru; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Fujioka, Hiroya; Sato, Nayuko; Terasawa, Risa; Kawaguchi, Kanako; Matsuda, Junna; Umezaki, Nodoka; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the feasibility of outpatient management without initial assessment for febrile patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. A total of 131 consecutive patients with breast cancer treated with adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy from 2011 to 2013 at Osaka Medical College Hospital (Osaka, Japan) were retrospectively reviewed. In the case of developing a fever (body temperature, ≥38°C), the outpatients had been instructed to take previously prescribed oral antibiotics for 3 days without any initial assessment, and if no improvement had occurred by then, they were required to visit the hospital for examination and to undergo treatment based on the results of a risk assessment for complications. The primary aim of the present study was to assess the outcome of febrile episodes, while the secondary aim was to assess the incidence of febrile episodes, hospitalizations, and the type of chemotherapy. The 131 patients received 840 chemotherapy administrations. Fifty-five patients (42.0%) had a total of 75 febrile episodes after 840 chemotherapy administrations (8.9%). Treatment failure occurred in 12 of the 75 episodes (16.0%) in 11 of the 55 patients (20.0%). Only four episodes required hospitalization. Treatment success was achieved in 63 episodes (84.0%). In conclusion, the feasibility of outpatient management without initial assessment was evaluated in the present study for febrile patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, and the outpatient strategy regimen may be safe and convenient for these patients. PMID:27699031

  10. Assessment of Febrile Neonates According to Low Risk Criteria for Serious Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zarkesh, Marjaneh; Hashemian, Houman; Momtazbakhsh, Mohammad; Rostami, Tahereh

    2011-01-01

    Objective It is propounded that febrile neonates with low risk criteria (LRC) can be carefully observed without parenteral antimicrobial therapy; but yet, reliability of LRC to exclude serious bacterial infection (SBI) is uncertain. Methods The records of all febrile term neonates, seen in the emergency room and admitted in neonatal ward of 17 Shahrivar children's hospital of Rasht, Iran from January 2004 to January 2009 were reviewed. All of them underwent full sepsis workup. The prevalence of SBI in total population and LRC positive and negative neonates were calculated Findings A total of 202 records of previously healthy febrile neonates were evaluated. SBI was shown in 38 (18.8%). The most common type of SBI was urinary tract infection (UTI). Sixty-two (31%) neonates had LRC, and only one (1.6%) had SBI (UTI with E. coli). SBI was significantly more common in neonates without LRC (26.6% versus 1.6%, P<0.001). The negative predictive value (NPV) of LRC to exclude SBI was 98.4% (95%confidence interval: 96.7% to 100%). Conclusion These findings suggest that LRC may be relied upon to exclude SBI in febrile neonates. We propose that all febrile neonates be admitted, ill or LRC negative neonates should undergo a full sepsis work up and be administered systemic antibiotics immediately. LRC positive neonates should be under close observation. PMID:23056828

  11. Outpatient management without initial assessment for febrile patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kosei; Tanaka, Satoru; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Fujioka, Hiroya; Sato, Nayuko; Terasawa, Risa; Kawaguchi, Kanako; Matsuda, Junna; Umezaki, Nodoka; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the feasibility of outpatient management without initial assessment for febrile patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. A total of 131 consecutive patients with breast cancer treated with adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy from 2011 to 2013 at Osaka Medical College Hospital (Osaka, Japan) were retrospectively reviewed. In the case of developing a fever (body temperature, ≥38°C), the outpatients had been instructed to take previously prescribed oral antibiotics for 3 days without any initial assessment, and if no improvement had occurred by then, they were required to visit the hospital for examination and to undergo treatment based on the results of a risk assessment for complications. The primary aim of the present study was to assess the outcome of febrile episodes, while the secondary aim was to assess the incidence of febrile episodes, hospitalizations, and the type of chemotherapy. The 131 patients received 840 chemotherapy administrations. Fifty-five patients (42.0%) had a total of 75 febrile episodes after 840 chemotherapy administrations (8.9%). Treatment failure occurred in 12 of the 75 episodes (16.0%) in 11 of the 55 patients (20.0%). Only four episodes required hospitalization. Treatment success was achieved in 63 episodes (84.0%). In conclusion, the feasibility of outpatient management without initial assessment was evaluated in the present study for febrile patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, and the outpatient strategy regimen may be safe and convenient for these patients.

  12. Effects of hydration on febrile temperature patterns in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Richmond, C A

    2001-04-01

    Patients with fever have a predisposition to experience dehydration, which may alter their thermoregulatory responses to elevated body temperature. In view of the recent discovery of the antipyretic activity of arginine vasopressin (AVP), it is possible that dehydration has a beneficial role during fever. Dehydration may enhance endogenous antipyresis by stimulating AVP release, making aggressive fluid replacement, which may inhibit AVP release, undesirable during fever. This study addressed the effects of manipulation of hydration status on temperature and cardiovascular responses in endotoxin-injected rabbits. Eight unanesthetized chronically instrumented rabbits were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while in euhydrated state, after furosemide (5 mg/kg) and 24 hours of water deprivation (dehydrated), after infusion of saline (30 mL/kg) while in euhydrated state (hyperhydrated), and after saline (mL/per overnight body weight loss in grams) while in dehydrated state (rehydrated). Dehydrated rabbits display higher fevers that are biphasic in nature and are accompanied by increased vasoconstriction and duration of mean arterial pressure increases, indicating that activation of antipyretic mechanisms in dehydrated rabbits was not sufficient to reduce body core temperature. In addition, fluid supplementation in euhydrated rabbits did not alter the febrile response; however, a marked decrease in heart rate was noted. Furthermore, fluid supplementation in dehydrated rabbits significantly attenuates the rectal temperature and heart rate response to LPS injection, indicating the possibility that activation of antipyretic mechanisms of AVP in rehydrated rabbits was sufficient to reduce body core temperature. The results suggest that fluid supplementation has a beneficial role in keeping body temperature lower .

  13. Elevated VGKC-complex antibodies in a boy with fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES).

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Marjorie A; Hanrahan, Donncha; Anderson, Claire E; O'Kane, Kathryn; Anderson, Jennifer; Casey, Maureen; de Sousa, Carlos; Cross, J Helen; Wright, Sukvhir; Dale, Russell C; Vincent, Angela; Kurian, Manju A

    2011-11-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES) is a clinically recognized epileptic encephalopathy of unknown aetiology. Presentation in previously healthy children is characterized by febrile status epilepticus. A pharmacoresistant epilepsy ensues, occurring in parallel with dramatic cognitive decline and behavioural difficulties. We describe a case of FIRES in a 4-year-old boy that was associated with elevated voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies and a significant clinical and immunological response to immunomodulation. This case, therefore, potentially expands the clinical phenotype of VGKC antibody-associated disease to include that of FIRES. Prior to immunomodulation, neuropsychology assessment highlighted significant attention, memory, and word-finding difficulties. The UK version of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence assessment indicated particular difficulties with verbal skills (9th centile). Immunomodulation was initially administered as intravenous methylprednisolone (followed by maintenance oral prednisolone) and later in the disease course as regular monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusions and low-dose azathioprine. Now aged 6 years, the seizure burden in this child is much reduced, although increased seizure frequency is observed in the few days before his monthly immunoglobulin infusions. Formal IQ assessment has not been repeated but there is no clinical suggestion of further cognitive regression. VGKC complex antibodies have been reported in a range of central and peripheral neurological disorders (predominantly presenting in adulthood), and the identification of elevated VGKC complex antibodies, combined with the response to immunotherapies in this child, supports an autoimmune pathogenesis in FIRES with potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  14. Sight-threatening ocular manifestations of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome).

    PubMed

    Baartman, Brandon; Kosari, Payman; Warren, Clinton C; Ali, Saba; Jorizzo, Joseph L; Sato, Masaki; Kurup, Shree K

    2014-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is a primarily dermatologic disorder with many features of systemic inflammation. It is generally characterized by a neutrophilic dermatosis in the setting of fever and an elevated white blood cell count. Inflammation has been described to occur in many organ systems including the lung, bone, liver, spleen, brain and eye. Ocular inflammation is a well-known comorbidity that may occur in the setting of Sweet's syndrome, including conjunctivitis, episcleritis, scleritis, iritis and choroiditis, among other forms. In the current article, we have compiled a series of cases that describe three separate patients who demonstrated a rare form of ocular involvement in Sweet's syndrome, retinal vasculitis. The evidence from these three cases and other reports in recent ophthalmologic literature suggest overlapping of ocular manifestations of Sweet's syndrome and the closely related Behçet's disease. It is important to be aware of the sometimes challenging differential between these two disorders and their sight-threatening complications.

  15. Bacteremia and malaria in Tanzanian children hospitalized for acute febrile illness.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Ingrid S; Heltshe, Sonya L; Smith, Arnold L; Chibwana, Jerome; Fried, Michal W; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-04-01

    We recorded the reason for presentation to a rural hospital in an area endemic for malaria in 909 children between January 2006 and March 2009. Blood smears were examined for Plasmodium falciparum parasites, and blood spots dried on filter paper were prepared for 464 children. A PCR assay utilizing the stored blood spots was developed for Streptococcus pneumoniae (lytA) and Haemophilus influenzae (pal). Malaria was present in 299 children whose blood was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); 19 had lytA and 15 had pal. The overall prevalence of lytA was 25 of the 464 children, while that of pal was 18 children. Fever was present in 369 children of whom 19 had lytA DNA while 11 had pal DNA detected. Of the 95 afebrile children, six had lytA and seven pal. We conclude that there are no clinical features that distinguish malaria alone from bacteremia alone or the presence of both infections.

  16. Etiology of acute, non-malaria, febrile illnesses in Jayapura, northeastern Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Punjabi, Narain H; Taylor, Walter R J; Murphy, Gerald S; Purwaningsih, Sri; Picarima, Helena; Sisson, John; Olson, James G; Baso, Samuel; Wangsasaputra, Ferry; Lesmana, Murad; Oyofo, Buhari A; Simanjuntak, Cyrus H; Subekti, Decy; Corwin, Andrew L; Richie, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, inpatient fever study in malaria-endemic Papua, Indonesia to determine non-malaria fever etiologies. Investigations included malaria blood films, blood culture, paired serologic samples analysis for dengue, Japanese encephalitis, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, murine typhus, and spotted fever group rickettsia. During 1997-2000, 226 patients (127 males and 99 females) 1-80 years of age (median age = 25 years) were enrolled. Positive blood cultures (n = 34, 15%) were obtained for Salmonella Typhi (n = 13), Escherichia coli (n = 8), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 6), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 5), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 1), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1). Twenty (8.8%) patients were positive for leptospirosis by polymerase chain reaction. Eighty (35.4%) of 226 patients had ≥ 1 positive serology, diagnostic for 15 rickettsial and 9 dengue cases. Acid-fast bacilli-positive sputum was obtained from three patients. Most common confirmed (81 of 226, 35.8%)/suspected diagnoses were typhoid fever (n = 41), pneumonia (n = 29), leptospirosis (n = 28), urinary tract infections (n = 20), rickettsioses (n = 19), dengue (n = 17), and meningitis/encephalitis (n = 15). There were 17 deaths, 7 (46.7%) were caused by meningitis/encephalitis. Multiple positive serologic results and few confirmed diagnoses indicate the need for improved diagnostics.

  17. Novel Paramyxovirus Associated with Severe Acute Febrile Disease, South Sudan and Uganda, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Albariño, César G.; Foltzer, Michael; Towner, Jonathan S.; Rowe, Lory A.; Campbell, Shelley; Jaramillo, Carlos M.; Bird, Brian H.; Reeder, DeeAnn M.; Vodzak, Megan E.; Rota, Paul; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Knust, Barbara; Vincent, Joel P.; Frace, Michael A.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a female wildlife biologist experienced fever, malaise, headache, generalized myalgia and arthralgia, neck stiffness, and a sore throat shortly after returning to the United States from a 6-week field expedition to South Sudan and Uganda. She was hospitalized, after which a maculopapular rash developed and became confluent. When the patient was discharged from the hospital on day 14, arthralgia and myalgia had improved, oropharynx ulcerations had healed, the rash had resolved without desquamation, and blood counts and hepatic enzyme levels were returning to reference levels. After several known suspect pathogens were ruled out as the cause of her illness, deep sequencing and metagenomics analysis revealed a novel paramyxovirus related to rubula-like viruses isolated from fruit bats. PMID:24447466

  18. Prenatal stress and risk of febrile seizures in children: a nationwide longitudinal study in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Obel, Carsten; Christensen, Jakob; Precht, Dorthe Hansen; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2009-07-01

    We aimed to examine whether exposure to prenatal stress following maternal bereavement is associated with an increased risk of febrile seizures. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study, we followed 1,431,175 children born in Denmark. A total of 34,777 children were born to women who lost a close relative during pregnancy or within 1 year before the pregnancy and they were included in the exposed group. The exposed children had a risk of febrile seizures similar to that of the unexposed children (hazard ratio (HR) 1.00, 95% CI 0.94-1.06). The HRs did not differ according to the nature or timing of bereavement. Our data do not suggest any causal link between exposure to prenatal stress and febrile seizures in childhood.

  19. Hospital-based prevalence of malaria and dengue in febrile patients in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Labib I; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Alamgir, A S M; Gurley, Emily S; Haque, Rashidul; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a nationwide study at six tertiary hospitals from December 2008 through November 2009 to investigate etiologies of febrile illnesses in Bangladesh. Febrile patients meeting a clinical case definition were enrolled from inpatient and outpatient medicine and pediatric units. We assessed 720 febrile patients over 12 months; 69 (9.6%) were positive for IgM antibodies against dengue virus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and four malaria patients (0.56%) were confirmed with immuno-chromatography and microscopic slide tests. We identified dengue cases throughout the year from rural (49%) and urban areas (51%). We followed-up 55 accessible dengue-infected patients two months after their initial enrollment: 45 (82%) patients had fully recovered, 9 (16%) reported ongoing jaundice, fever and/or joint pain, and one died. Dengue infection is widespread across Bangladesh, but malaria is sufficiently uncommon that it should not be assumed as the cause of fever without laboratory confirmation.

  20. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  1. Normoammonemic encephalopathy: solely valproate induced or multiple mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Budhdeo, Sanjay; Marquette, Malcolm; Singh, Deepwant; Rajagopal, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman presented with subacute onset progressive confusion, aggression, auditory hallucinations and delusions. In the preceding months, the patient had a number of admissions with transient unilateral hemiparesis with facial droop, and had been started on valproate for presumed hemiplegic migraine. Valproate was withdrawn soon after admission and her cognitive abilities have gradually improved over 3 months of follow-up. Valproate levels taken prior to withdrawal were subtherapeutic and the patient was normoammonaemic. EEG undertaken during inpatient stay showed changes consistent with encephalopathy, and low titre N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibodies were present in this patient. The possible aetiologies of valproate-induced encephalopathy and NMDA receptor-associated encephalitis present a diagnostic dilemma. We present a putative combinatorial hypothesis to explain this patient's symptoms. PMID:24614773

  2. Pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy--an unsolved puzzle.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Michael A; Rittirsch, Daniel; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Stahel, Philip F

    2010-01-01

    The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of sepsis-induced encephalopathy remain elusive. The breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered a focal point in the development of sepsis-induced brain damage. Contributing factors for the compromise of the BBB include cytokines and chemokines, activation of the complement cascade, phagocyte-derived toxic mediators, and bacterial products. To date, we are far from fully understanding the neuropathology that develops as a secondary remote organ injury as a consequence of sepsis. However, recent studies suggest that bacterial proteins may readily cross the functional BBB and trigger an inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space, in absence of a bacterial invasion. A better understanding of the pathophysiological events leading to septic encephalopathy appears crucial to advance the clinical care for this vulnerable patient population.

  3. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  4. Nutritional support in the treatment of chronic hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Milke García, María del Pilar

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of under nutrition in cirrhotic patients is 61% and it usually progresses as the disease becomes more advanced. The deterioration in the nutritional status and its associated metabolic derangements has raised doubts about the benefits of severe and prolonged protein restriction as a treatment for hepatic encephalopathy. However, the practice of dietary protein restriction for patients with liver cirrhosis is deeply embedded among medical practitioners and dietitians. To date, no solid conclusions may be drawn about the benefit of protein restriction. However, the negative effects of protein restriction are clear, that is, increased protein catabolism, the release of amino acids from the muscle, and possible worsening of hepatic encephalopathy. In conclusion, chronic protein restriction causes progressive and harmful protein depletion and must be avoided. PMID:22228881

  5. [Diabetic encephalopathy: an underexposed complication of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Brands, A M A; Henselmans, J M L; de Haan, E H F; Biessels, G J

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus seems to be associated with gradually developing end-organ damage to the central nervous system. This relatively unknown complication of both diabetes type 1 and type 2 can be referred to as 'diabetic encephalopathy'. Measurable manifestations are electrophysiological and structural changes and limitations in the cognitive functioning. The mechanisms responsible for this diabetic encephalopathy are only partially known. Chronic metabolic and vascular changes seem to play an important role. The effects of diabetes on the brain are most distinct in the elderly. This may be the consequence of interactions between the mechanisms that underlie the ageing of the brain, dementia and the origin of diabetic complications. At present there are few leads for the targeted diagnostics and treatment of individual patients.

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy: From the Pathogenesis to the New Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cordoba, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and serious complication of liver cirrhosis; the pathophysiology of this complication is not fully understood although great efforts have been made during the last years. There are few prospective studies on the epidemiology of this complication; however, it is known that it confers with high short-term mortality. Hepatic encephalopathy has been classified into different groups depending on the degree of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of portal-systemic shunts, and the number of episodes. Due to the large clinical spectra of overt EH and the complexity of cirrhotic patients, it is very difficult to perform quality clinical trials for assessing the efficacy of the treatments proposed. The physiopathology, clinical manifestation, and the treatment of HE is a challenge because of the multiple factors that converge and coexist in an episode of overt HE. PMID:27335836

  7. [RENDU-OSLER DISEASE: A RARE CAUSE OF AMMONIA ENCEPHALOPATHY].

    PubMed

    Dumont, R; Loly, J-P; Delwaide, J; Louis, E

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) also known as Rendu-Osler disease is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as the brain, lungs, and liver. The prevalence of liver involvement is clinically estimated between 8 and 31 percent. It can be revealed by the following clinical signs : ascites, edema of the lower extremities, abdominal pain, dyspnea, and, rarely, hepatic encephalopathy and gastrointestinal bleeding associated with portal hypertension. This case illustrates the highlight of liver damage revealed by an ammonia encephalopathy associated with iconographic anomalies on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance liver as part of Rendu-Osler disease. PMID:27141651

  8. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  9. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome presenting with encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Alireza E.; Daneshmand, Dana; Khorvash, Farzin; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) is a rare syndrome affecting tissues containing melanocytes. The possibility of its autoimmune pathogenesis is supported by high frequent HLA-DR4 presentation, commonly associated with other autoimmune diseases. Eyes are the main affected organs, resulting in blindness. Brain disease is a late-onset event, and is extremely rare. Here, we are reporting a 57-year-old woman, a known case of VKH syndrome, presenting with brain encephalopathy several decades after the initial presentation. We think this long period between initial presentation and presentation of encephalopathy due to VKH syndrome has not been described before. She was treated with corticosteroids and discharged home with a good general condition. PMID:24753681

  10. Guest Editorial: Managing Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Risk in the United States.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Rick

    2002-01-01

    The United States has built a triple firewall system to prevent the introduction or emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. The firewalls are preventing bovine spongiform encephalopathy's introduction through bans on imports of animals and animal products, actively looking for bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the US cattle herd, and banning ruminant animal feed supplements found to carry the infectious agent and spread the disease in England. PMID:11984425

  11. Trends in the patterns of IgM and IgG antibodies in febrile persons with suspected dengue in Barbados, an English-speaking Caribbean country, 2006-2013.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Nielsen, Anders L

    2015-01-01

    Long-term seroprevalence studies of dengue have provided a measure of the degree of endemicity and future trends in disease prevalence and severity. In this study, we describe the seroprevalence of dengue antibodies in febrile persons with suspected acute dengue in Barbados. It is a retrospective population-based study of all febrile persons with suspected dengue from 2006 to 2013. All of the cases had IgM and IgG antibodies in the blood sample drawn between days 3 and 5 of their illness. Among the 8296 cases that were tested for IgM antibodies, 3037 (36.6%) had recent dengue infection. In the age groups <5 years, 5-20 years and >20 years, 23.3%, 39.6% and 35.5% had acute infection, respectively. Of the 7227 cases with documented IgG results, 5473 (75.7%) were positive and had a past infection. In the age groups <5 years, 5-20 years and >20 years, 31.2%, 65.2% and 86.6%, respectively, had a past infection (IgG positive). During the first 5 years of life, 10-20% of febrile persons investigated for dengue had a positive IgM and a negative IgG titer, between 5 and 10% had a positive IgM and IgG titer, 5% had a positive IgG and a negative IgM titer, and between 45% and 65% had a negative IgM and a negative IgG titer. Throughout the study period, between 12% and 20% of febrile persons failed to show any evidence of current or previous dengue. In the age groups <5 years, 5-20 years and >20 years, 45.0%, 18.8% and 7.2%, respectively, had no evidence of recent or past dengue (both IgM and IgG negative). Between 37% and 59% of the febrile persons had serological evidence of past dengue in the absence of any current dengue. In conclusion, the pattern of IgG antibodies in this study was comparable to those in countries known to be hyperendemic for dengue. The age of infection is likely to shift to younger adults and children who are more likely to have severe dengue in the future.

  12. Is the addition of aminoglycosides to beta-lactams in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia needed?

    PubMed

    Contreras, Valeria; Sepúlveda, Sebastián; Heredia, Ana

    2016-02-24

    It is still controversial if the combined use of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides has advantages over broad-spectrum beta-lactam monotherapy for the empirical treatment of cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including 14 pertinent randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the combination of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides probably does not lead to a reduced mortality in febrile neutropenic cancer patients and it might increase nephrotoxicity.

  13. Is the addition of aminoglycosides to beta-lactams in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia needed?

    PubMed

    Contreras, Valeria; Sepúlveda, Sebastián; Heredia, Ana

    2016-01-01

    It is still controversial if the combined use of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides has advantages over broad-spectrum beta-lactam monotherapy for the empirical treatment of cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including 14 pertinent randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the combination of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides probably does not lead to a reduced mortality in febrile neutropenic cancer patients and it might increase nephrotoxicity. PMID:26938974

  14. Epileptic encephalopathies: Optimizing seizure control and developmental outcome.

    PubMed

    Jehi, Lara; Wyllie, Elaine; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive and developmental outcomes in patients with epileptic encephalopathy are hypothesized to result from an interplay between the underlying epileptic pathologic substrate and the acquired consequences of frequent and repetitive seizures and epileptiform discharges that often straddle the interictal and ictal boundaries. This article briefly reviews the evidence related to this assumption, presents critical questions that need to be answered to clarify this relationship, and advances a set of concrete steps that may help improve developmental patient outcomes. PMID:26293588

  15. [Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: neuroinfections with unconventional immune reactions].

    PubMed

    Mitrová, E

    1997-04-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) as well as the properties of the major component of the infectious agent-prion, and the most important human and animal prion diseases are characterized. Considering the recent biochemical and molecular biological data, possible explanations of natural resistance, species barrier and lack of the immune response to the unconventional infectious particles are presented. Finally the importance of immunoblotting and immunostaining as the most specific confirmation of TSE diagnosis is underlined. (Ref. 11.)

  16. Hypothermia for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Infants ≥ 36 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting infants which can result in death and disability. This is a summary of pathogenesis of HIE, animal studies of cooling for hypoxic and ischemic models, human hypothermia trials, and the American Academy of Pediatrics publication on hypothermia for HIE. Hypothermia for neonatal HIE is continuing to evolve as a therapy. Studies, gaps in knowledge and opportunities for research are presented herein. PMID:19762176

  17. Non-typhoidal Salmonella encephalopathy involving lipopolysaccharide in cattle.

    PubMed

    Xiong, N; Brewer, M T; Anderson, K L; Carlson, S A

    2013-02-22

    This study assessed the involvement of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the non-typhoidal Salmonella encephalopathy (NTSE) caused by a unique isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Saint-paul (SstpNPG). NTSE was prevented by genetic (deletion of murE) or pharmacologic (polymyxin) disruption of LPS on SstpNPG although the disruption of LPS did not deter brain penetration of the strain. This is the first study to demonstrate that LPS is involved in the manifestations of NTSE. PMID:22939987

  18. Persistent portosystemic shunts after deceased donor liver transplant causing episodic hepatic encephalopathy despite good graft function

    PubMed Central

    Barritt, A. Sidney; Fried, Michael W.; Hayashi, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe two cases of post liver transplant encephalopathy caused by persistent portosystemic shunts despite good graft function. Such recurrence of encephalopathy due to persistent shunting has not been reported in the deceased donor liver transplant literature. Our patients had episodic hepatic encephalopathy concordant with elevated serum ammonia levels due to well documented persistent portosystemic shunts. In one of our cases, the shunt was obliterated via coil embolization. This patient's encephalopathy resolved completely and has not recurred over seven months of follow up. The second patient has declined an intervention, but has remained symptom free on maintenance lactulose and rifaximin. PMID:19655248

  19. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with masticator and parapharyngeal space abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a fatal neurological disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Many reports indicate that Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by malnutrition. We report the case of a 79-year-old female patient who had a left masticator space and parapharyngeal space abscess who was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy. She reported problems while eating due to the presence of the abscess, but the true quantities of food she was ingesting were never assessed. Clinicians have a responsibility to provide adequate nutritional support by ensuring that patients receive adequate nutrition. Clinicians should also keep in mind that Wernicke's encephalopathy may occur in patients who experienced prolonged periods of malnutrition. PMID:27162754

  20. A neurotoxic alcohol exposure paradigm does not induce hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Joel G; Wiren, Kristine M; Wilhelm, Clare J

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with neurological dysfunction, brain morphological deficits and frank neurotoxicity. Although these disruptions may be a secondary effect due to hepatic encephalopathy, no clear evidence of causality is available. This study examined whether a 72h period of alcohol intoxication known to induce physical dependence, followed by a single withdrawal, was sufficient to induce signs of hepatic encephalopathy in male and female mice. Animals were continuously intoxicated via alcohol vapor inhalation, a procedure previously shown to induce significant neurotoxicity in female mice. At peak synchronized withdrawal (8h following the end of alcohol exposure), blood samples were taken and levels of several liver-regulated markers and brain swelling were characterized. Glutathione levels were also determined in the medial frontal cortex (mFC) and hippocampus. Results revealed elevated levels of cholesterol, albumin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and decreased levels of blood urea nitrogen and total bilirubin in alcohol-exposed male and female groups compared to controls. Brain water weight was not affected by alcohol exposure, though males tended to have slightly more water weight overall. Alcohol exposure led to reductions in tissue levels of glutathione in both the hippocampus and mFC which may indicate increased oxidative stress. Combined, these results suggest that hepatic encephalopathy does not appear to play a significant role in the neurotoxicity observed following alcohol exposure in this model. PMID:27268733

  1. The Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy in the Cirrhotic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.; Mullen, Kevin D.; Bass, Nathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Cirrhosis of the liver is a rising epidemic in the United States, affecting 2 out of every 1,000 adults. It is responsible for the deaths of more than 27,000 people each year. The primary diseases that underlie cirrhosis include viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Monitoring the extent of fibrosis and aggressively treating the underlying disease is essential for maintaining quality of life and preventing the complications of cirrhosis. As patients progress toward end-stage liver disease, the most common complications include portal hypertension, the development of esophageal varices, and hepatic encephalopathy. Esophageal varices can lead to hemorrhaging, a dangerous complication that is fatal in 30–50% of patients during the first occurrence. Hepatic encephalopathy is another serious complication of end-stage liver disease, as it significantly reduces patient quality of life and places heavy economic and caregiving burdens upon the patient's family. In this clinical roundtable monograph, the latest advances in the monitoring of liver disease and the management of portal hypertension and hepatic encephalopathy are discussed. PMID:20567582

  2. Dexamethasone therapy for preventing delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Song, J J; Zhang, H Y; Fu, K; Lan, H B; Deng, Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated dexamethasone therapy for preventing delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Eighty healthy male rats were exposed to CO and randomly divided into four groups: hyperbaric oxygen treatment (H), treatment (D), combined hyperbaric and dexamethasone treatment (C), and a control (M) group in which the rats inhaled CO to coma in the hyperbaric oxygen chamber, then were removed without further treatment. Twelve rats were put into the hyperbaric oxygen chamber and treated with air for 60 min (N) group. An eight arm maze was used to evaluate cognitive and memory abilities of these mice. Serum myelin basic protein (MBP) levels were evaluated using ELISA, and magnetic resonance imaging was used to observe brain demyelination and morbidity associated with delayed encephalopathy. A sample of the hippocampus from each group was examined by light microscopy. Cognitive and memory functions decreased in the control group M. Three days after CO poisoning, the serum MBP level of each group increased significantly. On Day 10 after CO poisoning, the MBP levels in groups C and D decreased significantly, but returned to normal on Day 18. MBP levels in the M and H groups were elevated at all time points. Brain MRIs showed significant differences among C, D, H and control M groups. Hematoxylin & eosin staining of the hippocampus showed greater damage in the control M and H groups. Early dexamethasone treatment may be useful for preventing delayed encephalopathy after CO poisoning and may reduce serum MBP levels.

  3. Accuracy and precision of temporal artery thermometers in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Margaret; Granstrom, Patsy; Pomarico, Bernie; Reimanis, Cathryn

    2013-01-01

    The noninvasive temporal artery thermometer offers a way to measure temperature when oral assessment is contraindicated, uncomfortable, or difficult to obtain. In this study, the accuracy and precision of the temporal artery thermometer exceeded levels recommended by experts for use in acute care clinical practice.

  4. Clinical and laboratory features that differentiate dengue from other febrile illnesses in an endemic area--Puerto Rico, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher J; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Argüello, D Fermin; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Tomashek, Kay M

    2010-05-01

    Dengue infection can be challenging to diagnose early in the course of infection before severe manifestations develop, but early diagnosis can improve patient outcomes and promote timely public health interventions. We developed age-based predictive models generated from 2 years of data from an enhanced dengue surveillance system in Puerto Rico. These models were internally validated and were able to differentiate dengue infection from other acute febrile illnesses with moderate accuracy. The accuracy of the models was greater than either the current World Health Organization case definition for dengue fever or a proposed modification to this definition, while requiring the collection of fewer data. In young children, thrombocytopenia and the absence of cough were associated with dengue infection; for adults, rash, leucopenia, and the absence of sore throat were associated with dengue infection; in all age groups, retro-orbital pain was associated with dengue infection.

  5. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome of the midbrain and hypothalamus - a case report of uremic encephalopathy presenting with hypersomnia].

    PubMed

    Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting with hypersomnia and loss of appetite. She suffered from diabetic nephropathy without receiving dialysis, in addition to hypertension, which was well controlled without marked fluctuation. There were no objective neurological findings. Her laboratory findings showed renal failure with 3.7 mg/dl of serum creatinine and decreased serum sodium and potassium. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) with vasogenic edema, which was distributed in the dorsal midbrain, medial thalamus, and hypothalamus. After we addressed the electrolyte imbalance and dehydration, her symptoms and MRI findings gradually improved, but faint high signals on MRI were still present 3 months later. Orexin in the cerebrospinal fluid was decreased on admission, but improved 6 months later. We diagnosed uremic encephalopathy with atypical form PRES showing functional disturbance of the hypothalamus. PMID:26640128

  6. Hypoglycemic encephalopathy: a case series and literature review on outcome determination.

    PubMed

    Witsch, Jens; Neugebauer, Hermann; Flechsenhar, Julia; Jüttler, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Data on clinical long-term outcome after the acute phase of hypoglycemic encephalopathy (HE) using validated outcome scales is currently unavailable. Here we report the results of a systematic literature search for studies on HE and data on long-term outcome in patients with HE admitted to three Charité hospitals between January 2005 and July 2010. HE was defined as coma/stupor and blood glucose levels <50 mg/dl on admission, persistence of coma/stupor for ≥24 h despite normalization of blood glucose levels, and exclusion of any other cause of coma/stupor. Outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin scale (mRS), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), and Barthel index (BI). Fifteen patients were included, with a mean age of 60 years (range 29-79). Two were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining 13 patients, six had died (46 %). In the seven survivors, the median mRS score was 0 (range 0-5), median GOS score was 5 (range 2-5), and median BI was 100 (range 0-100). MRIs made in the acute phase were available for three patients and revealed no obvious relation between lesion size or pattern and clinical outcome. To our knowledge, this is the first case series using validated clinical scoring systems to determine clinical long-term outcome after HE. The results suggest that mortality is high, but long-term survival with little or no disability is possible and can be observed in the majority of survivors. Risk of death or poor outcome does not seem to be related to MRI features in the acute phase but rather to other presumably medical factors.

  7. Experimental interspecies transmission studies of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies to cattle: comparison to bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hamir, Amir N; Kehrli, Marcus E; Kunkle, Robert A; Greenlee, Justin J; Nicholson, Eric M; Richt, Jürgen A; Miller, Janice M; Cutlip, Randall C

    2011-05-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. The emergence of BSE and its spread to human beings in the form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) resulted in interest in susceptibility of cattle to CWD, TME and scrapie. Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for potential host ranges of known TSEs. Some interspecies transmission studies have been conducted by inoculating disease-causing prions intracerebrally (IC) rather than orally; the latter is generally effective in intraspecies transmission studies and is considered a natural route by which animals acquire TSEs. The "species barrier" concept for TSEs resulted from unsuccessful interspecies oral transmission attempts. Oral inoculation of prions mimics the natural disease pathogenesis route whereas IC inoculation is rather artificial; however, it is very efficient since it requires smaller dosage of inoculum, and typically results in higher attack rates and reduces incubation time compared to oral transmission. A species resistant to a TSE by IC inoculation would have negligible potential for successful oral transmission. To date, results indicate that cattle are susceptible to IC inoculation of scrapie, TME, and CWD but it is only when inoculated with TME do they develop spongiform lesions or clinical disease similar to BSE. Importantly, cattle are resistant to oral transmission of scrapie or CWD; susceptibility of cattle to oral transmission of TME is not yet determined.

  8. False-positive rapid plasma reagin testing in patients with acute Plasmodium vivax malaria: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Dean, Katherine; Gadea, Nilda; Halsey, Eric S; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2014-01-01

    Non-treponemal tests such as the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assay are mainstays of syphilis diagnosis, but false-positive tests are common. We identified false-positive RPR titers in 8.2% of patients with malaria due to Plasmodium vivax in northern Peru. Similar rates were not detected in patients with other acute febrile illnesses.

  9. Chikungunya Virus in Febrile Humans and Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes, Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cigarroa-Toledo, Nohemi; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa C.; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G.; Baak-Baak, Carlos M.; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo M.; Hamid, Md-Nafiz; Friedberg, Iddo; González-Martinez, Pedro; Alonzo-Salomon, Gabriela; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P.; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe C.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was isolated from 12 febrile humans in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2015. One patient was co-infected with dengue virus type 1. Two additional CHIKV isolates were obtained from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes collected in the homes of patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the CHIKV isolates belong to the Asian lineage. PMID:27347760

  10. Chikungunya Virus as Cause of Febrile Illness Outbreak, Chiapas, Mexico, 2014.

    PubMed

    Kautz, Tiffany F; Díaz-González, Esteban E; Erasmus, Jesse H; Malo-García, Iliana R; Langsjoen, Rose M; Patterson, Edward I; Auguste, Dawn I; Forrester, Naomi L; Sanchez-Casas, Rosa Maria; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Weaver, Scott C; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso

    2015-11-01

    Since chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was introduced into the Americas in 2013, its geographic distribution has rapidly expanded. Of 119 serum samples collected in 2014 from febrile patients in southern Mexico, 79% were positive for CHIKV or IgM against CHIKV. Sequencing results confirmed CHIKV strains closely related to Caribbean isolates.

  11. Prenatal Stress and Risk of Febrile Seizures in Children: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study in Denmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jorn; Obel, Carsten; Christensen, Jakob; Precht, Dorthe Hansen; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether exposure to prenatal stress following maternal bereavement is associated with an increased risk of febrile seizures. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study, we followed 1,431,175 children born in Denmark. A total of 34,777 children were born to women who lost a close relative during pregnancy or within 1 year…

  12. Expression Profiling after Prolonged Experimental Febrile Seizures in Mice Suggests Structural Remodeling in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jongbloets, Bart C.; van Gassen, Koen L. I.; Kan, Anne A.; Olde Engberink, Anneke H. O.; de Wit, Marina; Wolterink-Donselaar, Inge G.; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Holstege, Frank C. P.; de Graan, Pierre N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most prevalent type of seizures among children up to 5 years of age (2–4% of Western-European children). Complex febrile seizures are associated with an increased risk to develop temporal lobe epilepsy. To investigate short- and long-term effects of experimental febrile seizures (eFS), we induced eFS in highly febrile convulsion-susceptible C57BL/6J mice at post-natal day 10 by exposure to hyperthermia (HT) and compared them to normotherm-exposed (NT) mice. We detected structural re-organization in the hippocampus 14 days after eFS. To identify molecular candidates, which entrain this structural re-organization, we investigated temporal changes in mRNA expression profiles eFS 1 hour to 56 days after eFS. We identified 931 regulated genes and profiled several candidates using in situ hybridization and histology at 3 and 14 days after eFS. This is the first study to report genome-wide transcriptome analysis after eFS in mice. We identify temporal regulation of multiple processes, such as stress-, immune- and inflammatory responses, glia activation, glutamate-glutamine cycle and myelination. Identification of the short- and long-term changes after eFS is important to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to epileptogenesis. PMID:26684451

  13. Chikungunya Virus as Cause of Febrile Illness Outbreak, Chiapas, Mexico, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kautz, Tiffany F.; Díaz-González, Esteban E.; Erasmus, Jesse H.; Malo-García, Iliana R.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Patterson, Edward I.; Auguste, Dawn I.; Forrester, Naomi L.; Sanchez-Casas, Rosa Maria; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso

    2015-01-01

    Since chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was introduced into the Americas in 2013, its geographic distribution has rapidly expanded. Of 119 serum samples collected in 2014 from febrile patients in southern Mexico, 79% were positive for CHIKV or IgM against CHIKV. Sequencing results confirmed CHIKV strains closely related to Caribbean isolates. PMID:26488312

  14. Chikungunya Virus in Febrile Humans and Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes, Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cigarroa-Toledo, Nohemi; Blitvich, Bradley J; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa C; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G; Baak-Baak, Carlos M; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo M; Hamid, Md-Nafiz; Friedberg, Iddo; González-Martinez, Pedro; Alonzo-Salomon, Gabriela; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe C; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Machain-Williams, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was isolated from 12 febrile humans in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2015. One patient was co-infected with dengue virus type 1. Two additional CHIKV isolates were obtained from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes collected in the homes of patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the CHIKV isolates belong to the Asian lineage. PMID:27347760

  15. Molecular Detection of Fastidious and Common Bacteria as Well as Plasmodium spp. in Febrile and Afebrile Children in Franceville, Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mourembou, Gaël; Fenollar, Florence; Socolovschi, Cristina; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nzoughe, Hermann; Kouna, Lady Charlene; Toure-Ndouo, Fousseyni; Million, Matthieu; Mbiguino, Angelique Ndjoyi; Lekana-Douki, Jean Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Malaria was considered as the main cause of fever in Africa. However, with the roll back malaria initiative, the causes of fever in Africa may change. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of bacteria and Plasmodium spp. in febrile and afebrile (controls) children from Franceville, Gabon. About 793 blood samples from febrile children and 100 from controls were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with sequencing. Plasmodium spp. was the microorganism most detected in febrile (74.5%, 591/793) and controls (13%, 13/100), P < 0.0001. Its coinfection with bacteria was found only in febrile children (P = 0.0001). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent bacterium in febrile children (2.8%, 22/793) and controls (3%, 3/100). Eight cases of Salmonella spp. (including two Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi) and two of Streptococcus pneumoniae were found only among febrile children. Borrelia spp. was found in 2 controls while Rickettsia felis was detected in 10 children (in 8 febriles and 2 afebriles). No DNA of other targeted microorganisms was detected. Plasmodium spp. remains prevalent while Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were common bacteria in Gabon. Two fastidious bacteria, Rickettsia felis and Borrelia spp., were found. Inclusion of controls should improve the understanding of the causes of fever in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Molecular Detection of Fastidious and Common Bacteria as well as Plasmodium spp. in Febrile and Afebrile Children in Franceville, Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mourembou, Gaël; Fenollar, Florence; Socolovschi, Cristina; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nzoughe, Hermann; Kouna, Lady Charlene; Toure-Ndouo, Fousseyni; Million, Matthieu; Mbiguino, Angelique Ndjoyi; Lekana-Douki, Jean Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Malaria was considered as the main cause of fever in Africa. However, with the roll back malaria initiative, the causes of fever in Africa may change. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of bacteria and Plasmodium spp. in febrile and afebrile (controls) children from Franceville, Gabon. About 793 blood samples from febrile children and 100 from controls were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with sequencing. Plasmodium spp. was the microorganism most detected in febrile (74.5%, 591/793) and controls (13%, 13/100), P < 0.0001. Its coinfection with bacteria was found only in febrile children (P = 0.0001). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent bacterium in febrile children (2.8%, 22/793) and controls (3%, 3/100). Eight cases of Salmonella spp. (including two Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi) and two of Streptococcus pneumoniae were found only among febrile children. Borrelia spp. was found in 2 controls while Rickettsia felis was detected in 10 children (in 8 febriles and 2 afebriles). No DNA of other targeted microorganisms was detected. Plasmodium spp. remains prevalent while Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were common bacteria in Gabon. Two fastidious bacteria, Rickettsia felis and Borrelia spp., were found. Inclusion of controls should improve the understanding of the causes of fever in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25802432

  17. Walking unsteadily: a case of acute cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Simonetta, Federico; Christou, Fotini; Vandoni, Riccardo E; Nierle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia is an infrequent neurological syndrome in adults especially if complicated by additional neurological deficits. We report the case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with sudden onset of left facial droop, dizziness, slurred speech and impaired balance. Her medical history included paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and a sigmoid diverticular abscess treated with ciprofloxacin and metronidazole. Cranial computed tomographic angiography and MRI showed no signs of acute ischaemia or haemorrhage but demonstrated symmetrically distributed lesions in the cerebellar dentate nuclei. A diagnosis of metronidazole-induced encephalopathy was suspected. Metronidazole was stopped and the patient completely recovered. Metronidazole is a commonly prescribed medication. Clinicians should be aware of the clinical and radiological presentation of metronidazole-induced encephalopathy so that this serious but completely reversible condition can be promptly diagnosed. PMID:23283615

  18. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  19. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Yasunori; Kasai, Mari; Fukuda, Takeshi; Ichimura, Tomoyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a common complication in cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated chemotherapy-induced neutropenia that was recently detected in all patients with gynecologic malignancy. Between January 2009 and December 2011, we examined cases of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia reported in our hospital. We analyzed the incidence and clinical features of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with gynecologic malignancy. During the study period, we administered over 1614 infusions (29 regimens) to 291 patients. The median age of the patients was 60 years (range 24-84 years). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia occurred in 147 (50.5%) patients over 378 (23.4%) chemotherapy cycles. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 20 (6.9%) patients over 25 (1.5%) cycles. The mean duration of neutropenia and fever was 3.6 days (range 1-12 days) and 3.4 days (range 1-9 days), respectively. The source of fever was unexplained by examination or cultures in 14 (56.0%) cycles. There were two cases of neutropenia-related death. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia was associated with older age (over 70 years) (P<0.0001), less than five previous chemotherapy cycles (P=0.02), disseminated disease (P=0.03), platinum-based regimens (P<0.0001), taxane-containing regimens (P<0.0001), and combined therapy (P<0.0001). Febrile neutropenia was associated with poor performance status (P<0.0001), no previous chemotherapy (P<0.05), disseminated disease (P<0.0001), and distant metastatic disease (P=0.03). Neither chemotherapy-induced neutropenia nor febrile neutropenia was associated with bone marrow metastases or previous radiotherapy. By identifying risk factors for febrile neutropenia, such as performance status, no previous chemotherapy, disseminated disease, and distant metastatic disease, the safe management of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia may be possible in patients with gynecologic malignancy.

  20. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations. PMID:26875662