Science.gov

Sample records for acute febrile encephalopathy

  1. Serum and CSF levels of cytokines in acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Takashi; Suenaga, Naoko; Kajimoto, Madoka; Tohyama, Jun; Isumi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Masaya; Mori, Masato; Furukawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that an acute encephalopathy occasionally follows prolonged febrile seizures. We measured the concentrations of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1) in serum and CSF during the acute stage in 13 children with acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures (AEPFS) and 23 with prolonged febrile seizures without encephalopathy (PFS) to investigate the pathogenesis of AEPFS. Serum IL-6, IL-10, sTNFR1, and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher in AEPFS and PFS compared with control subjects. CSF IL-6 levels in AEPFS were significantly higher than those in PFS, but not serum IL-6, IL-10, or sTNFR1. The CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher than the serum levels in AEPFS, but not PFS. The serum levels of sTNFR1 and IL-10 were significantly higher than those in the CSF in AEPFS and PFS. The serum IL-10 and sTNFR1 levels in patients who did not experience a second seizure were significantly higher than those in patients who experienced a second seizure, which was characterized by clusters of complex partial seizures several days after the initial prolonged febrile seizure. Our results suggest that serum IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and CSF IL-6 are part of the regulatory system of cytokines in AEPFS.

  2. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, HamidReza; Sajjadi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term “geriatric syndrome” is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed. PMID:26989409

  3. Gray matter heterotopia and acute necrotizing encephalopathy in trichothiodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wetzburger, C L; Van Regemorter, N; Szliwowski, H B; Abramowicz, M J; Van Bogaert, P

    1998-11-01

    Trichothiodystrophy was diagnosed in a 3-year-old male presenting with speech delay, brittle hair, chronic neutropenia, and a history of febrile convulsions. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a focal subcortical and periventricular gray matter heterotopia. An acute encephalopathy with status epilepticus and coma occurred when he was 4 years of age during an upper respiratory tract infection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multifocal T2-weighted hypersignal lesions involving mainly the thalami, hippocampi, midbrain, and pons. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid revealed hyperproteinorachia without pleocytosis. Results of an extensive metabolic evaluation of this acute brain injury, resembling the syndrome of acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood described in Japan, were negative. Focal neuronal migration disorder and acute encephalopathy with symmetric thalamic involvement are newly described neurologic manifestations of syndromes with trichothiodystrophy, which suggests that these conditions may have a common genetic background.

  4. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: An Underrecognized Clinicoradiologic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Wu, Limin; Liu, Kangding; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare but distinctive type of acute encephalopathy with global distribution. Occurrence of ANE is usually preceded by a virus-associated febrile illness and ensued by rapid deterioration. However, the causal relationship between viral infections and ANE and the exact pathogenesis of ANE remain unclear; both environmental and host factors might be involved. Most cases of ANE are sporadic and nonrecurrent, namely, isolated or sporadic ANE; however, few cases are recurrent and with familial episodes. The recurrent and familial forms of ANE were found to be incompletely autosomal-dominant. Further the missense mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2) were identified. Although the clinical course and the prognosis of ANE are diverse, the hallmark of neuroradiologic manifestation of ANE is multifocal symmetric brain lesions which are demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The treatment of ANE is still under investigation. We summarize the up-to-date knowledge on ANE, with emphasis on prompt diagnosis and better treatment of this rare but fatal disease. PMID:25873770

  5. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  6. Defining encephalopathy in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, S E; Alper, Gulay

    2014-06-01

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group requires the presence of encephalopathy to diagnose acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Clinical characteristics of encephalopathy are inadequately delineated in the pediatric demyelinating literature. The authors' purpose was to better define encephalopathy in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis by describing the details of the mental status change. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 25 children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis according to the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group guidelines. Frequency of encephalopathy-defining features was determined. Clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid findings, and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were compared between patients with different stages of encephalopathy. The authors found irritability (36%), sleepiness (52%), confusion (8%), obtundation (20%), and coma (16%) as encephalopathy-defining features in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Twenty-eight percent had seizures, and 65% demonstrated generalized slowing on EEG. Approximately half of the patients in this study were diagnosed with encephalopathy based on the presence of irritability and/or sleepiness only. Such features in young children are often subtle and transient and thus difficult to objectively determine.

  7. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man who developed acute onset of cognitive decline and convulsion due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  8. Mayaro Virus in Child with Acute Febrile Illness, Haiti, 2015.

    PubMed

    Lednicky, John; De Rochars, Valery Madsen Beau; Elbadry, Maha; Loeb, Julia; Telisma, Taina; Chavannes, Sonese; Anilis, Gina; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massinno; Okech, Bernard; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-11-01

    Mayaro virus has been associated with small outbreaks in northern South America. We isolated this virus from a child with acute febrile illness in rural Haiti, confirming its role as a cause of mosquitoborne illness in the Caribbean region. The clinical presentation can mimic that of chikungunya, dengue, and Zika virus infections.

  9. Mayaro Virus in Child with Acute Febrile Illness, Haiti, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lednicky, John; De Rochars, Valery Madsen Beau; Elbadry, Maha; Loeb, Julia; Telisma, Taina; Chavannes, Sonese; Anilis, Gina; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massinno; Okech, Bernard; Salemi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Mayaro virus has been associated with small outbreaks in northern South America. We isolated this virus from a child with acute febrile illness in rural Haiti, confirming its role as a cause of mosquitoborne illness in the Caribbean region. The clinical presentation can mimic that of chikungunya, dengue, and Zika virus infections. PMID:27767924

  10. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management

    PubMed Central

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; Kerouiti, Zakaria El; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought PMID:26328000

  11. Undiagnosed acute viral febrile illnesses, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, Randal J; Rossi, Cynthia A; Khan, Sheik H; Goba, Augustine; Fair, Joseph N

    2014-07-01

    Sierra Leone in West Africa is in a Lassa fever-hyperendemic region that also includes Guinea and Liberia. Each year, suspected Lassa fever cases result in submission of ≈500-700 samples to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Diagnostic Laboratory in eastern Sierra Leone. Generally only 30%-40% of samples tested are positive for Lassa virus (LASV) antigen and/or LASV-specific IgM; thus, 60%-70% of these patients have acute diseases of unknown origin. To investigate what other arthropod-borne and hemorrhagic fever viral diseases might cause serious illness in this region and mimic Lassa fever, we tested patient serum samples that were negative for malaria parasites and LASV. Using IgM-capture ELISAs, we evaluated samples for antibodies to arthropod-borne and other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Approximately 25% of LASV-negative patients had IgM to dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, chikungunya, Ebola, and Marburg viruses but not to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

  12. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  13. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HASSANZADEH RAD, Afagh; AMINZADEH, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a specific type of encephalopathy. After viral infection, it can be diagnosed by bilateral symmetrical lesions predominantly observed in thalami & brainstem of infants & children. Although, it is commonly occurred in Japanese and Taiwanese population. The goal of this article is to report a rare case of ANEC in a 15 months old girl infant from Thaleghani Hospital, Ramian, Gorgan, northern Iran. PMID:28277560

  14. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  15. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  16. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  17. A Clinical Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Tropical Acute Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ajay; Prabhu, Mangalore Venkatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tropical Acute Febrile Illness (TAFI) is one of the most common causes of morbidity within the community. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) due to infective and non infective causes is a major complication. Presence of AKI is a major cause of mortality among patients with TAFI. Aim To study the spectrum of tropical acute febrile illness; the proportion, spectrum and staging of acute kidney injury; Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) initiation and in-hospital mortality. Materials and Methods A total of 600 TAFI patients were prospectively studied at a tertiary care centre in coastal Karnataka between September 2012 and September 2014 for the aetiology of TAFI; the development and staging of AKI based on Kidney disease: Improving global outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines; the initiation of RRT and in-hospital mortality. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0 with statistical significance calculated using chi-square and Fisher’s exact t-test for which p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results The spectrum of TAFI, in decreasing order, was vivax malaria, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria, mixed malaria, enteric fever, scrub typhus and the most common aetiology was malaria. The proportion of AKI was 54%. The most common cause of AKI, its stages 2 and 3, RRT initiation and in-hospital mortality was leptospirosis; and AKI stage 1 was dengue fever. KDIGO AKI stage 1, 2 and 3 was seen in 46.9%, 31.2% and 21.9% of AKI patients, respectively. RRT initiation was required in 10.2% of AKI patients and in-hospital mortality was 3% among all patients. AKI, RRT initiationand in-hospital mortality were significantly associated with older age, fever duration and other presenting complaints, examination findings, renal function and other parameters, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria. Conclusion The aetiology in about half of TAFI patients in coastal Karnataka was malaria. More than 50% develop AKI with greater than one

  18. Acute Wernicke encephalopathy and sensorineural hearing loss complicating bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Jethava, Ashif; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2012-01-01

    Health-care professionals must be aware of the mandatory vitamin supplementation in patients status post bariatric surgery. A recent increase in the number of gastric bypass surgeries in US has been associated with a proportional increase in Wernicke encephalopathy reports. Subtle or atypical neurologic features are not uncommon. Our report is of a female patient with acute Wernicke encephalopathy accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss six weeks after bariatric surgery. The patient had only a partial recovery of her neurologic symptoms eightweeks after vigorous therapy for this condition. Symptomatic thiamine (vitamin B1) and vitamin B12 deficiencies are particularly concerning effects of bariatric procedures, as neurologic and cognitive deficits may be long lasting or even permanent despite aggressive replacement therapy.

  19. Unsuspected rickettsioses among patients with acute febrile illness, Sri Lanka, 2007.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Bodinayake, Champica; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J; Flom, Judith E; Østbye, Truls; Woods, Christopher W; Dumler, J Stephen

    2012-05-01

    We studied rickettsioses in southern Sri Lanka. Of 883 febrile patients with paired serum samples, 156 (17.7%) had acute rickettsioses; rickettsioses were unsuspected at presentation. Additionally, 342 (38.7%) had exposure to spotted fever and/or typhus group rickettsioses and 121 (13.7%) scrub typhus. Increased awareness of rickettsioses and better tests are needed.

  20. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia Among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Naulikha, Jaqueline M; John-Stewart, Grace C; Onchiri, Frankline M; Okumu, Albert O; Sitati, Ruth R; Cranmer, Lisa M; Lokken, Erica M; Singa, Benson O; Walson, Judd L

    2015-11-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8-4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < -2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < -2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0-2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Pavlinac, Patricia B.; Naulikha, Jaqueline M.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Onchiri, Frankline M.; Okumu, Albert O.; Sitati, Ruth R.; Cranmer, Lisa M.; Lokken, Erica M.; Singa, Benson O.; Walson, Judd L.

    2015-01-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8–4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < −2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < −2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0–2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies. PMID:26324730

  3. Acute headache as a presenting symptom of tacrolimus encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, I M; de Leeuw, F-E; Ramos, L M P; van Gijn, J

    2003-08-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with a sudden excruciating headache mimicking an acute vascular event. She had undergone a lung transplantation because of cystic fibrosis and was receiving maintenance treatment with tacrolimus and prednisone. Ancillary investigation excluded vascular causes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated hyperintense lesions in the infratentorial and parieto-occipital regions consistent with posterior leucencephalopathy syndrome. Both her clinical condition improved and the lesions disappeared completely after withdrawal of tacrolimus, suggesting that her condition could be explained by a tacrolimus encephalopathy.

  4. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in rural Cambodia: a 3-year prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Tara C; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects.

  5. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  6. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment.

  7. Immunoblot studies to analyze antibody to the Rickettsia typhi group antigen in sera from patients with acute febrile cerebrovasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hechemy, K E; Fox, J A; Gröschel, D H; Hayden, F G; Wenzel, R P

    1991-01-01

    In 1986, an unusual syndrome of acute febrile cerebrovasculitis in the Piedmont Region of Virginia was reported. All patients had encephalopathy and prior exposure to both a sylvan environment and flea-infested animals. The initial serological studies suggested a rickettsial origin, corroborating clinical, epidemiological, and histopathological findings. Sera from four of five patients were subsequently studied by immunoblotting. Unabsorbed and absorbed sera were tested with electrophoresed and electroblotted Rickettsia typhi, Legionella bozemanii, and Proteus vulgaris OX19 antigens. The unabsorbed sera reacted with all three antigens. The P. vulgaris- and L. bozemanii-absorbed sera reacted with R. typhi only and without significantly less intensity. In contrast, the reactivity of R. typhi-absorbed sera was significantly lower with all three antigens. These results indicate that these patients had specific antibodies to a typhus group antigen. Although our findings suggest that a rickettsia of the typhus group may have caused this syndrome, no definitive diagnosis could be achieved because a rickettsial organism was not isolated. Images PMID:1723073

  8. Predictive score for early diagnosis of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD).

    PubMed

    Tada, Hiroko; Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Okuno, Hideo; Kubota, Masaya; Yamagata, Takanori; Kawano, Gou; Shiihara, Takashi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirose, Shinichi; Hayashi, Takuya; Osaka, Hitoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2015-11-15

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) at onset manifests an early seizure (ES) usually lasting more than 30 min. Following ES, some patients exhibit almost clear consciousness with no neurological symptoms, and no MRI abnormality for a few days, which may lead to an initial misdiagnosis of prolonged febrile seizures (PFS). To allow an early diagnosis of AESD, we retrospectively analyzed clinical manifestations, laboratory data, and radiologic and EEG findings in patients with AESD (n=62) having ES of over 30 min, and ones with PFS (n=54), using logistic regression analyses. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an age below 1.5 years and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or less than 14 (Japan Coma Scale score of 1 or higher) were high risk factors of developing AESD. We proposed an AESD prediction score system consisting of consciousness level, age, duration of convulsions, enforcement of mechanical intubation, and aspartate aminotransferase, blood glucose and creatinine levels (full score: 9), the mean scores in AESD and PFS being 5.9 and 1.8, which were significantly different (p<0.001). We herein propose a scoring system for differentiating patients with AESD and PFS around the time of ES (score of 4 or more than 4 suggesting AESD), which may contribute to early therapeutic intervention and an improved neurologic outcome.

  9. Acute cortical blindness due to posterior reversible encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Lam, Jenny; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-10-01

    An acutely hypertensive 55 year-old male experienced seizures and cortical blindness post-operatively. CT scans demonstrated hypointensities in the occipital lobes bilaterally. MRI revealed symmetrical bilateral hyperintense signals in the same region, involving both grey and white matter. Thromboembolic screening investigations including vertebral artery doppler studies were normal and echocardiography demonstrated borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. A diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was reached and there was complete resolution of blindness with antihypertensive therapy. This case supports the vasogenic theory of PRES which suggests that sustained high grade fluctuations in blood pressure lead to a reduction in cerebral vascular autoregulatory function. The resultant failure of compensatory vasoconstriction to prevent hyperperfusion causes fluid to extravasate into the occipital lobes, which in the present case resulted in cortical blindness.

  10. Novel Human Reovirus Isolated from Children with Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Louise A.; Barin, Francis; Barthez, Marie Anne; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Roingeard, Philippe; Goudeau, Alain; Castelnau, Pierre; Vernet, Guy; Komurian-Pradel, Florence

    2011-01-01

    For many encephalitis cases, the cause remains unidentified. After 2 children (from the same family) received a diagnosis of acute necrotizing encephalopathy at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (Tours, France), we attempted to identify the etiologic agent. Because clinical samples from the 2 patients were negative for all pathogens tested, urine and throat swab specimens were added to epithelial cells, and virus isolates detected were characterized by molecular analysis and electron microscopy. We identified a novel reovirus strain (serotype 2), MRV2Tou05, which seems to be closely related to porcine and human strains. A specific antibody response directed against this new reovirus strain was observed in convalescent-phase serum specimens from the patients, whereas no response was observed in 38 serum specimens from 38 healthy adults. This novel reovirus is a new etiologic agent of encephalitis. PMID:21801621

  11. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Forshey, Brett M.; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Cespedes, Manuel; Vargas, Jorge; Gianella, Alberto; Vallejo, Efrain; Madrid, César; Aguayo, Nicolas; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Suarez, Victor; Morales, Ana Maria; Beingolea, Luis; Reyes, Nora; Perez, Juan; Negrete, Monica; Rocha, Claudio; Morrison, Amy C.; Russell, Kevin L.; J. Blair, Patrick; Olson, James G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are among the most common agents of human febrile illness worldwide and the most important emerging pathogens, causing multiple notable epidemics of human disease over recent decades. Despite the public health relevance, little is know about the geographic distribution, relative impact, and risk factors for arbovirus infection in many regions of the world. Our objectives were to describe the arboviruses associated with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in participating clinics in four countries in South America and to provide detailed epidemiological analysis of arbovirus infection in Iquitos, Peru, where more extensive monitoring was conducted. Methodology/Findings A clinic-based syndromic surveillance system was implemented in 13 locations in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Serum samples and demographic information were collected from febrile participants reporting to local health clinics or hospitals. Acute-phase sera were tested for viral infection by immunofluorescence assay or RT-PCR, while acute- and convalescent-phase sera were tested for pathogen-specific IgM by ELISA. Between May 2000 and December 2007, 20,880 participants were included in the study, with evidence for recent arbovirus infection detected for 6,793 (32.5%). Dengue viruses (Flavivirus) were the most common arbovirus infections, totaling 26.0% of febrile episodes, with DENV-3 as the most common serotype. Alphavirus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV] and Mayaro virus [MAYV]) and Orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus [OROV], Group C viruses, and Guaroa virus) infections were both observed in approximately 3% of febrile episodes. In Iquitos, risk factors for VEEV and MAYV infection included being male and reporting to a rural (vs urban) clinic. In contrast, OROV infection was similar between sexes and type of clinic. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide a better understanding of the geographic range of arboviruses in South

  12. Serological Evidence of Chikungunya Virus among Acute Febrile Patients in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Pinto, Gabriela; Vene, Sirkka; Mandlaze, Arcildo; Muianga, Argentina Felisbela; Cliff, Julie; Falk, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Background In the last two decades, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has rapidly expanded to several geographical areas, causing frequent outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, South East Asia, South America, and Europe. Therefore, the disease remains heavily neglected in Mozambique, and no recent study has been conducted. Methods Between January and September 2013, acute febrile patients with no other evident cause of fever and attending a health center in a suburban area of Maputo city, Mozambique, were consecutively invited to participate. Paired acute and convalescent serum samples were requested from each participant. Convalescent samples were initially screened for anti-CHIKV IgG using a commercial indirect immunofluorescence test, and if positive, the corresponding acute sample was screened using the same test. Results Four hundred patients were enrolled. The median age of study participants was 26 years (IQR: 21–33 years) and 57.5% (224/391) were female. Paired blood samples were obtained from 209 patients, of which 26.4% (55/208) were presented anti-CHIKV IgG antibodies in the convalescent sample. Seroconversion or a four-fold titer rise was confirmed in 9 (4.3%) patients. Conclusion The results of this study strongly suggest that CHIKV is circulating in southern Mozambique. We recommend that CHIKV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute febrile illness in Mozambique and that systematic surveillance for CHIKV should be implemented. PMID:26473605

  13. Unsuspected Dengue as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Children and Adults in Western Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Jadi, Ramesh S.; Broadwater, Anne; Walker, Katie; Woods, Christopher; Mayorga, Orlando; Matute, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Suspected dengue, especially in children in Nicaragua’s heavily-urbanized capital of Managua, has been well documented, but unsuspected dengue among children and adults with undifferentitated fever has not. Methodology/Principal Findings To prospectively study dengue in semi-urban and rural western Nicaragua, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data as well as acute and convalescent sera (2 to 4 weeks after onset of illness) from a convenience sample (enrollment Monday to Saturday daytime to early evening) of consecutively enrolled patients (n = 740) aged ≥ 1 years presenting with acute febrile illness. We tested paired sera for dengue IgG and IgM and serotyped dengue virus using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Among 740 febrile patients enrolled, 90% had paired sera. We found 470 (63.5%) were seropositive for dengue at enrollment. The dengue seroprevalance increased with age and reached >90% in people over the age of 20 years. We identified acute dengue (serotypes 1 and 2) in 38 (5.1%) patients. Only 8.1% (3/37) of confirmed cases were suspected clinically. Conclusions/Significance Dengue is an important and largely unrecognized cause of fever in rural western Nicaragua. Since Zika virus is transmitted by the same vector and has been associated with severe congenital infections, the population we studied is at particular risk for being devastated by the Zika epidemic that has now reached Central America. PMID:27792777

  14. MRI gadolinium enhancement precedes neuroradiological findings in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Tamura, Takuya; Nagai, Yuhki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Shibata, Minoru; Kato, Takeo; Heike, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a 2-year-old Japanese boy with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) triggered by human herpes virus-6, who presented insightful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. He was admitted due to impaired consciousness and a convulsion, 2 days after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. At admission, cranial MRI showed marked gadolinium enhancement at the bilateral thalami, brainstem and periventricular white matter without abnormal findings in noncontrast MRI sequences. On the following day, noncontrast computed tomography demonstrated homogeneous low-density lesions in the bilateral thalami and severe diffuse brain edema. The patient progressively deteriorated and died on the 18th day of admission. The pathogenesis of ANE remains mostly unknown, but it has been suggested that hypercytokinemia may play a major role. Overproduced cytokines cause vascular endothelial damage and alter the permeability of the vessel wall in the multiple organs, including the brain. The MRI findings in our case demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeability was altered prior to the appearance of typical neuroradiological findings. This suggests that alteration of blood-brain barrier permeability is the first step in the development of the brain lesions in ANE, and supports the proposed mechanism whereby hypercytokinemia causes necrotic brain lesions. This is the first report demonstrating MRI gadolinium enhancement antecedent to typical neuroradiological findings in ANE.

  15. Enhanced Surveillance for Fatal Dengue-Like Acute Febrile Illness in Puerto Rico, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Aidsa; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge L.; Sharp, Tyler M.; Rivera, Irma; Sanabria, Dario; Blau, Dianna M.; Galloway, Renee; Torres, Jose; Rodriguez, Rosa; Serrano, Javier; Chávez, Carlos; Dávila, Francisco; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Ellis, Esther M.; Caballero, Gladys; Wright, Laura; Zaki, Sherif R.; Deseda, Carmen; Rodriguez, Edda; Margolis, Harold S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a leading cause of morbidity throughout the tropics; however, accurate population-based estimates of mortality rates are not available. Methods/Principal Findings We established the Enhanced Fatal Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance System (EFASS) to estimate dengue mortality rates in Puerto Rico. Healthcare professionals submitted serum and tissue specimens from patients who died from a dengue-like acute febrile illness, and death certificates were reviewed to identify additional cases. Specimens were tested for markers of dengue virus (DENV) infection by molecular, immunologic, and immunohistochemical methods, and were also tested for West Nile virus, Leptospira spp., and other pathogens based on histopathologic findings. Medical records were reviewed and clinical data abstracted. A total of 311 deaths were identified, of which 58 (19%) were DENV laboratory-positive. Dengue mortality rates were 1.05 per 100,000 population in 2010, 0.16 in 2011 and 0.36 in 2012. Dengue mortality was highest among adults 19–64 years and seniors ≥65 years (1.17 and 1.66 deaths per 100,000, respectively). Other pathogens identified included 34 Leptospira spp. cases and one case of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Neisseria meningitidis. Conclusions/Significance EFASS showed that dengue mortality rates among adults were higher than reported for influenza, and identified a leptospirosis outbreak and index cases of melioidosis and meningitis. PMID:27727271

  16. Viral hemorrhagic fever cases in the country of Georgia: Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance Study results.

    PubMed

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Clark, Danielle V; Bautista, Christian T; Abdel Fadeel, Moustafa; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J; Wölfel, Silke; Wölfel, Roman; Rivard, Robert G

    2014-08-01

    Minimal information is available on the incidence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus and hantavirus infections in Georgia. From 2008 to 2011, 537 patients with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours without a diagnosis were enrolled into a sentinel surveillance study to investigate the incidence of nine pathogens, including CCHF virus and hantavirus. Of 14 patients with a hemorrhagic fever syndrome, 3 patients tested positive for CCHF virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Two of the patients enrolled in the study had acute renal failure. These 2 of 537 enrolled patients were the only patients in the study positive for hantavirus IgM antibodies. These results suggest that CCHF virus and hantavirus are contributing causes of acute febrile syndromes of infectious origin in Georgia. These findings support introduction of critical diagnostic approaches and confirm the need for additional surveillance in Georgia.

  17. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  18. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  19. Etiology of acute undifferentiated febrile illness in the Amazon basin of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Manock, Stephen R; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; de Bravo, Narcisa Brito; Russell, Kevin L; Negrete, Monica; Olson, James G; Sanchez, José L; Blair, Patrick J; Smalligan, Roger D; Quist, Brad K; Espín, Juan Freire; Espinoza, Willan R; MacCormick, Fiona; Fleming, Lila C; Kochel, Tadeusz

    2009-07-01

    We conducted a longitudinal observational study of 533 patients presenting to two hospitals in the Ecuadorean Amazon basin with acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) from 2001 through 2004. Viral isolation, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), IgM seroconversion, and malaria smears identified pathogens responsible for fever in 122 (40.1%) of 304 patients who provided both acute and convalescent blood samples. Leptospirosis was found in 40 (13.2%), malaria in 38 (12.5%), rickettsioses in 18 (5.9%), dengue fever in 16 (5.3%), Q fever in 15 (4.9%), brucellosis in 4 (1.3%), Ilhéus infection in 3 (1.0%), and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE), Oropouche, and St. Louis encephalitis virus infections in less than 1% of these patients. Viral isolation and RT-PCR on another 229 participants who provided only acute samples identified 3 cases of dengue fever, 2 of VEE, and 1 of Ilhéus. None of these pathogens, except for malaria, had previously been detected in the study area.

  20. Arthrogryposis and multicystic encephalopathy after acute fetal distress in the end stage of gestation.

    PubMed

    Charollais, A; Lacroix, C; Nouyrigat, V; Devictor, D; Landrieu, P

    2001-02-01

    The natural history of the rare association "multicystic encephalopathy-arthrogryposis" was traced in a fetus carefully followed after artificial insemination. The fetus exhibited normal viability and brain morphology up to the 32nd week. At 36 weeks, active movements diminished and at 37 weeks, hydramnios and signs of fetal distress led to cesarean section. The infant presented with severe arthrogryposis of the limbs and spine, but not with the other elements of a long-lasting akinesia. US showed multicystic encephalopathy. Both the clinical and the neuropathological findings established that multicystic encephalopathy was neither the cause nor the sequential consequence of the fetal akinesia, but the result of a recent diffuse, acute malacic process that also involved the anterior horn cells. Acute fetal distress, responsible for major ischemic damage to CNS but compatible with fetal survival, remains an obscure condition which allows for the development of severe arthrogryposis in a few weeks.

  1. Frequency of Epstein - Barr Virus in Patients Presenting with Acute Febrile Illness in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masakhwe, Clement; Ochanda, Horace; Nyakoe, Nancy; Ochiel, Daniel; Waitumbi, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Most acute febrile illnesses (AFI) are usually not associated with a specific diagnosis because of limitations of available diagnostics. This study reports on the frequency of EBV viremia and viral load in children and adults presenting with febrile illness in hospitals in Kenya. Methodology/Principal Findings A pathogen surveillance study was conducted on patients presenting with AFI (N = 796) at outpatient departments in 8 hospitals located in diverse regions of Kenya. Enrollment criterion to the study was fever without a readily diagnosable infection. All the patients had AFI not attributable to the common causes of fever in Kenyan hospitals, such as malaria or rickettsiae, leptospira, brucella and salmonella and they were hence categorized as having AFI of unknown etiology. EBV was detected in blood using quantitative TaqMan-based qPCR targeting a highly conserved BALF5 gene. The overall frequency of EBV viremia in this population was 29.2%, with significantly higher proportion in younger children of <5years (33.8%, p = 0.039) compared to patients aged ≥5 years (26.3% for 5–15 years or 18.8% for >15 years). With respect to geographical localities, the frequency of EBV viremia was higher in the Lake Victoria region (36.4%), compared to Kisii highland (24.6%), Coastal region (22.2%) and Semi-Arid region (25%). Furthermore, patients from the malaria endemic coastal region and the Lake Victoria region presented with significantly higher viremia than individuals from other regions of Kenya. Conclusions/Significance This study provides profiles of EBV in patients with AFI from diverse eco-regions of Kenya. Of significant interest is the high frequency of EBV viremia in younger children. The observed high frequencies of EBV viremia and elevated viral loads in residents of high malaria transmission areas are probably related to malaria induced immune activation and resultant expansion of EBV infected B-cells. PMID:27163791

  2. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products.

  3. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  4. Ocular involvement in acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet syndrome): new cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Chloe C; Mishra, Aditya; Belliveau, Dan; Green, Peter; Heathcote, J Godfrey

    2008-01-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a dermatologic disorder with accompanying features of systemic inflammation. It is commonly associated with conjunctivitis, but a variety of types of ocular inflammation have been reported. The ocular manifestations of Sweet syndrome include periorbital and orbital inflammation, dacryoadenitis, conjunctivitis, episcleritis, scleritis, limbal nodules, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, iritis, glaucoma, and choroiditis. The ocular inflammation appears concurrently with skin lesions. An overview of Sweet syndrome is presented with a review of cases in the literature describing ocular involvement. We report two additional cases of ocular involvement, one with conjunctivitis and a second with iritis, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, and episcleritis. Of the 20 cases, half were bilateral. Thirteen cases occurred in the setting of classical or idiopathic Sweet syndrome and seven in association with malignancy. Biopsies of ocular tissue were infrequent, but, in the seven cases where ocular tissue was analyzed, the histopathology was similar to that of the cutaneous lesions. The ocular complications of Sweet syndrome resolved with systemic administration of corticosteroid or cyclosporine. Topical ocular steroid treatment was frequently used in conjunction with oral steroid but may not have been valuable.

  5. Identification of Viruses in Cases of Pediatric Acute Encephalitis and Encephalopathy Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Jun-ichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Torii, Yuka; Okada, Ryo; Hayano, Satoshi; Ando, Shotaro; Kamiya, Yasuko; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Acute encephalitis/encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome that is occasionally associated with viral infection. Comprehensive virus detection assays are desirable because viral pathogens have not been identified in many cases. We evaluated the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for detecting viruses in clinical samples of encephalitis/encephalopathy patients. We first determined the sensitivity and quantitative performance of NGS by comparing the NGS-determined number of sequences of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) in clinical serum samples with the HHV-6 load measured using real-time PCR. HHV-6 was measured as it occasionally causes neurologic disorders in children. The sensitivity of NGS for detection of HHV-6 sequences was equivalent to that of real-time PCR, and the number of HHV-6 reads was significantly correlated with HHV-6 load. Next, we investigated the ability of NGS to detect viral sequences in 18 pediatric patients with acute encephalitis/encephalopathy of unknown etiology. A large number of Coxsackievirus A9 and mumps viral sequences were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of 2 and 1 patients, respectively. In addition, Torque teno virus and Pepper mild mottle viral sequences were detected in the sera of one patient each. These data indicate that NGS is useful for detection of causative viruses in patients with pediatric encephalitis/encephalopathy. PMID:27625312

  6. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever as causes of acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Christova, Iva; Younan, Rasha; Taseva, Evgenia; Gladnishka, Teodora; Trifonova, Iva; Ivanova, Vladislava; Spik, Kristin; Schmaljohn, Connie; Mohareb, Emad

    2013-03-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) are the 2 widespread viral hemorrhagic fevers occurring in Europe. HFRS is distributed throughout Europe, and CCHF has been reported mainly on the Balkan Peninsula and Russia. Both hemorrhagic fevers are endemic in Bulgaria. We investigated to what extent acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria could be due to hantaviruses or to CCHF virus. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), we tested serum samples from 527 patients with acute febrile illness for antibodies against hantaviruses and CCHF virus. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against hantaviruses were detected in 15 (2.8%) of the patients. Of the 15 hantavirus-positive patients, 8 (1.5%) were positive for Dobrava virus (DOBV), 5 (0.9%) were positive for Puumala virus (PUUV), and the remaining 2 were positive for both hantaviruses. A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) confirmed 4 of the 10 DOBV-positive samples. PRNT was negative for all PUUV-positive samples. Serologic evidence of recent CCHF virus infection was found in 13 (2.5%) of the patients. Interestingly, HFRS and CCHF were not only detected in well-known endemic areas of Bulgaria but also in nonendemic regions. Our results suggested that in endemic countries, CCHF and/or HFRS might appear as a nonspecific febrile illness in a certain proportion of patients. Physicians must be aware of possible viral hemorrhagic fever cases, even if hemorrhages or renal impairment are not manifested.

  7. Influenza Virus-Associated Fatal Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: Role of Nonpermissive Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mungaomklang, Anek; Chomcheoy, Jiraruj; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Joyjinda, Yutthana; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Rodpan, Apaporn; Ghai, Siriporn; Saraya, Abhinbhen; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, two unusual peaks of H1N1 influenza outbreak occurred in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, in Thailand. Among 2,406 cases, one of the 22 deaths in the province included a 6-year-old boy, who initially presented with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. On the other hand, his sibling was mildly affected by the same influenza virus strain, confirmed by whole-genome sequencing, with one silent mutation. Absence of acute necrotizing encephalopathy and other neurological illnesses in the family and the whole province, with near identical whole viral genomic sequences from the two siblings, and an absence of concomitant severe lung infection (cytokine storm) at onset suggest nonpermissive infection as an alternative pathogenetic mechanism of influenza virus. PMID:27812294

  8. Acute Pancreatitis and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Magno Pereira, Vítor; Marote Correia, Luís; Rodrigues, Tiago; Serrão Faria, Gorete

    2016-09-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a neurological syndrome characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures associated with identifiable areas of cerebral edema on imaging studies. The authors report the case of a man, 33 years-old, leukodermic with a history of chronic alcohol and tobacco consumption, who is admitted to the emergency department for epigastric pain radiating to the back and vomiting with about six hours of evolution and an intense holocranial headache for two hours. His physical examination was remarkable for a blood pressure of 190/100 mmHg and tenderness in epigastrium. His analytical results revealed emphasis on amylase 193 U/L and lipase 934 U/L. During the observation in the emergency department,he presented a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed and suggestive of pancreatitis withoutgallstones signals. Head computed tomography showed subarachnoid haemorrhage and a small right frontal cortical haemorrhage. The brain magnetic resonance imaging done one week after admission showed areas of a bilateral and symmetrical T2 / FLAIR hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter of the parietal and superior frontal regions, suggesting a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography (10 days after admission) demonstrated a thickened pancreas in connection with inflammation and two small hypodense foci in the anterior part of the pancreas body, translating small foci of necrosis. The investigation of a thrombophilic defect revealed a heterozygous G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The patient was discharged without neurological sequelae and asymptomatic. The follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the reversal of the lesions, confirming the diagnosis.

  9. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  10. Sweet's syndrome – a comprehensive review of an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2007-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome (the eponym for acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms, physical features, and pathologic findings which include fever, neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions (papules, nodules, and plaques), and a diffuse infiltrate consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils that are typically located in the upper dermis. Several hundreds cases of Sweet's syndrome have been published. Sweet's syndrome presents in three clinical settings: classical (or idiopathic), malignancy-associated, and drug-induced. Classical Sweet's syndrome (CSS) usually presents in women between the age of 30 to 50 years, it is often preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection and may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy. Approximately one-third of patients with CSS experience recurrence of the dermatosis. The malignancy-associated Sweet's syndrome (MASS) can occur as a paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with an established cancer or individuals whose Sweet's syndrome-related hematologic dyscrasia or solid tumor was previously undiscovered; MASS is most commonly related to acute myelogenous leukemia. The dermatosis can precede, follow, or appear concurrent with the diagnosis of the patient's cancer. Hence, MASS can be the cutaneous harbinger of either an undiagnosed visceral malignancy in a previously cancer-free individual or an unsuspected cancer recurrence in an oncology patient. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome (DISS) most commonly occurs in patients who have been treated with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, however, other medications may also be associated with DISS. The pathogenesis of Sweet's syndrome may be multifactorial and still remains to be definitively established. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that cytokines have an etiologic role. Systemic corticosteroids are the therapeutic gold standard for Sweet's syndrome. After initiation of treatment with systemic

  11. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Steven T.; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Gandy, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression—has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE. PMID:23558985

  12. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven T; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Gandy, Sam

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)--which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression--has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE.

  13. Acute multiple focal neuropathies and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Che; Yang, Hsiu-Chun; Chen, Yao-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Acute-onset alcohol-associated neuropathy is only occasionally reported, and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy is rare. Here, we report a male who developed acute multiple focal neuropathies and later delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication. He had hypoxia and rhabdomyolysis, presenting with acute renal failure initially, and cardiopulmonary support, including mechanical ventilation, led to improvement of the patient at the acute stage. He suffered from bilateral hand numbness and mild weakness of the right lower limb thereafter. Nerve-conduction study revealed no pickup of compound muscle action potential or sensory nerve action potential in the bilateral ulnar nerve, but showed attenuated amplitude of compound muscle action potential in the right femoral nerve. Multiple focal neuropathies were suspected, and he received outpatient rehabilitation after being discharged. However, the patient developed gradual onset of weakness in four limbs and cognitive impairment 23 days after the hypoxia event. Brain computed tomography showed low attenuation over bilateral globus pallidus, and brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed diffuse increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in bilateral white matter. He was admitted again under the impression of delayed postanoxic brain injury. Supportive treatment and active rehabilitation were given. He had gradual improvement in motor and functional status after rehabilitation. He could walk with festinating gait under supervision, and needed only minimal assistance in performing activities of daily living approximately 1 year later. PMID:26229472

  14. Possible Role of Rickettsia felis in Acute Febrile Illness among Children in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mourembou, Gaël; Lekana-Douki, Jean Bernard; Mediannikov, Oleg; Nzondo, Sydney Maghendji; Kouna, Lady Charlene; Essone, Jean Claude Biteghe Bi; Fenollar, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsia felis has been reported to be a cause of fever in sub-Saharan Africa, but this association has been poorly evaluated in Gabon. We assessed the prevalence of this bacterium among children <15 years of age in 4 areas of Gabon; the locations were in urban, semiurban, and rural areas. DNA samples from 410 febrile children and 60 afebrile children were analyzed by quantitative PCR. Overall, the prevalence of R. felis among febrile and afebrile children was 10.2% (42/410 children) and 3.3% (2/60 children), respectively. Prevalence differed among febrile children living in areas that are urban (Franceville, 1.3% [1/77]), semiurban (Koulamoutou, 2.1% [3/141]), and rural (Lastourville, 11.2% [15/134]; Fougamou, 39.7% [23/58]). Furthermore, in a rural area (Fougamou), R. felis was significantly more prevalent in febrile (39.7% [23/58]) than afebrile children (5.0% [1/20]). Additional studies are needed to better understand the pathogenic role of R. felis in this part of the world. PMID:26402580

  15. The impact of therapeutic delay time on acute scintigraphic lesion and ultimate scar formation in children with first febrile UTI.

    PubMed

    Oh, Mi Mi; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Min Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Moon, Du Geon

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the role of therapeutic delay time (TDT) in acute renal cortical scintigraphic lesion (ASL) and ultimate scar formation (USF) in children with first febrile UTI and whether it is affected by the presence of vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR). 230 children, 90 girls and 140 boys with first febrile UTI were included. Radiologic (USG, DMSA, and VCUG), clinical (age, gender, peak fever, therapeutic delay time) and laboratory (CBC with differential count, ANC (absolute neutrophil count), BUN, Creatinine, urine analysis, gram stain, culture, CRP and ESR) variables were analysed. DMSA was performed within 5 days and after six months. VCUG was performed after acute phase of UTI. The differences in TDT according to the presence of ASL, USF and VUR were assessed. And the correlation between ASL or USF with the duration of TDT was assessed. Of 230 patients enrolled, 142 patients had refluxing UTI and 88 patients had non-refluxing UTI. TDT was the risk factor associated with ASL and USF along with presence of VUR. TDT was longer in ASL positive group compared with the ASL negative group. Also USF group showed longer TDT compared with those without USF in both refluxing UTI and non refluxing UTI. The TDT was significantly shorter in USF group with the presence of VUR. Positive linear association was noted between prevalence of ASL and USF and duration of TDT. In conclusion, the impact of UTI on formation of USF may be enhanced by the presence of VUR with shorter duration of TDT.

  16. First Identification and Description of Rickettsioses and Q Fever as Causes of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Chikeka, Ijeuru; Miles, Jeremy J.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Woods, Christopher W.; Mayorga, Orlando; Matute, Armando J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rickettsial infections and Q fever present similarly to other acute febrile illnesses, but are infrequently diagnosed because of limited diagnostic tools. Despite sporadic reports, rickettsial infections and Q fever have not been prospectively studied in Central America. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled consecutive patients presenting with undifferentiated fever in western Nicaragua and collected epidemiologic and clinical data and acute and convalescent sera. We used ELISA for screening and paired sera to confirm acute (≥4-fold rise in titer) spotted fever and typhus group rickettsial infections and Q fever as well as past (stable titer) infections. Characteristics associated with both acute and past infection were assessed. Conclusions/Significance We enrolled 825 patients and identified acute rickettsial infections and acute Q fever in 0.9% and 1.3%, respectively. Clinical features were non-specific and neither rickettsial infections nor Q fever were considered or treated. Further study is warranted to define the burden of these infections in Central America. PMID:28036394

  17. Hearing loss during osteosarcoma chemotherapy: when acute ifosfamide toxicity revealed unnoticed methotrexate encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Guillaume; Chappé, Céline; Taque, Sophie; Bruneau, Bertrand; Gandemer, Virginie

    2014-03-01

    Ifosfamide and methotrexate are widely used for the treatment of pediatric osteosarcoma. However, both these chemotherapeutic drugs can cause encephalopathy. A 17-year-old girl presented with profound hearing loss and dizziness during a postoperative course of ifosfamide, 20 days after a course of methotrexate. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral white matter hypersignal in Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery sequences. The clinical evolution was rapidly favorable after methylene blue infusion. This is the second reported case of acute deafness, possibly associated with ifosfamide, whereas MRI data revealed unnoticed chronic methotrexate toxicity. Systematic MRI screening and hearing evaluation may be useful in such cases.

  18. Tranilast reduces serum IL-6 and IL-13 and protects against thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Rania R; Elkashef, Wagdi F; Said, Eman

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder usually affecting either acute or chronic hepatic failure patients. Hepatic encephalopathy was replicated in a validated rat model to assess the potential protective efficacy of tranilast against experimentally induced hepatic encephalopathy. Thioacetamide injection significantly impaired hepatic synthetic, metabolic and excretory functions with significant increase in serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels and negative shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Most importantly, there was a significant increase in serum ammonia levels with significant astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization; hallmarks of hepatic encephalopathy. Tranilast administration (300 mg/kg, orally) for 15 days significantly improved hepatic functions, restored oxidant/antioxidant balance, reduced serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels. Meanwhile, serum ammonia significantly declined with significant reduction in astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization. Several mechanisms can be implicated in the observed hepato- and neuroprotective potentials of tranilast, such as its anti-inflammatory potential, its antioxidant potential as well as its immunomodulatory properties.

  19. Dengue and Chikungunya Virus Infections among Young Febrile Adults Evaluated for Acute HIV-1 Infection in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngoi, Carolyne N.; Price, Matt A.; Fields, Barry; Bonventure, Juma; Ochieng, Caroline; Mwashigadi, Grace; Hassan, Amin S.; Thiong’o, Alexander N.; Micheni, Murugi; Mugo, Peter; Graham, Susan; Sanders, Eduard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is common among patients seeking care in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA), but causes other than malaria are rarely diagnosed. We assessed dengue and chikungunya virus infections among young febrile adults evaluated for acute HIV infection (AHI) and malaria in coastal Kenya. Methods We tested plasma samples obtained in a cross-sectional study from febrile adult patients aged 18–35 years evaluated for AHI and malaria at urgent care seeking at seven health facilities in coastal Kenya in 2014–2015. Dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) were amplified using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. We conducted logistic regression analyses to determine independent predictors of dengue virus infection. Results 489 samples that were negative for both AHI and malaria were tested, of which 43 (8.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.4–11.7) were positive for DENV infection. No participant was positive for CHIKV infection. DENV infections were associated with clinic visits in the rainy season (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.3–6.5) and evaluation at a private health facility (AOR 5.2, 95% CI: 2.0–13.1) or research health facility (AOR = 25.6, 95% CI: 8.9–73.2) instead of a public health facility. Conclusion A high prevalence of DENV infections was found in febrile young adult patients evaluated for AHI. Our data suggests that DENV, along with AHI and malaria, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the adult patient seeking care for fever in coastal Kenya. PMID:27942016

  20. [Wernicke encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Djelantik, M; Bloemkolk, D; Tijdink, J

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric disease with heterogeneous symptoms, including changes in mental status, ataxia and ocular abnormalities; if left untreated, these symptoms can lead to morbidity and even to mortality. The treatment is thiamine suppletion. Because of the heterogeneity of the symptoms and the high risk of morbidity and mortality if the symptoms are not treated, it is vitally important that on observing a patient's early symptoms the clinician immediately suspects that the symptoms could point to Wernicke encephalopathy.

  1. Hospital-Based Surveillance for Infectious Etiologies among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness in Georgia, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Gatserelia, Lana; Makhviladze, Manana; Kanashvili, Marine; Mikautadze, Teona; Nanuashvili, Alexander; Kiknavelidze, Khatuni; Kokaia, Nora; Makharadze, Manana; Clark, Danielle V.; Bautista, Christian T.; Farrell, Margaret; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Maksoud, Mohamed Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Rivard, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Information on the infectious causes of undifferentiated acute febrile illness (AFI) in Georgia is essential for effective treatment and prevention. In May 2008, a hospital-based AFI surveillance was initiated at six hospitals in Georgia. Patients aged ≥ 4 years with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours were eligible for surveillance. Blood culture and serologic testing were conducted for Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., West Nile virus (WNV), Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Coxiella burnetii, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), hantavirus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), and Rickettsia typhi. Of 537 subjects enrolled, 70% were outpatients, 54% were males, and the mean age was 37 years. Patients reported having fatigue (89%), rigors (87%), sweating (83%), pain in joints (49%), and sleep disturbances (42%). Thirty-nine (7%) patients were seropositive for R. typhi, 37 (7%) for Brucella spp., 36 (7%) for TBEV, 12 (2%) for Leptospira spp., 10 (2%) for C. burnetii, and three (0.6%) for S. Typhi. None of the febrile patients tested positive for WNV antibodies. Of the patients, 73% were negative for all pathogens. Our results indicate that most of the targeted pathogens are present in Georgia, and highlight the importance of enhancing laboratory capacity for these infectious diseases. PMID:26438032

  2. Update: outbreak of acute febrile illness among athletes participating in Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000--Borneo, Malaysia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-01-19

    During September 7-11, 2000, CDC was notified by the Idaho Department of Health, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, and the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network of at least 20 cases of acute febrile illness in three countries; all ill patients had participated in the Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000 multisport expedition race in Borneo, Malaysia, during August 21-September 3, 2000. Participants included athletes from 29 U.S. states and 26 countries. This report updates the ongoing investigation of this outbreak through December 2, which suggests that Leptospira were the cause of illness and that water from the Segama River was the primary source of infection. Participants in adventure sports and exotic tourism should be aware of potential exposure to unusual and emerging infectious agents.

  3. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  4. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  5. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  6. Prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infections among acute febrile patients in Nong Khai Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lertanekawattana, Sujet; Anantapreecha, Surapee; Jiraphongsa, Chuleeporn; Duan-ngern, Pawinee; Potjalongsin, Sathit; Wiittayabamrung, Wisanu; Daroon, Pamol; Techolarn, Meta

    2013-09-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study at three hospitals of Nong Khai Province, Thailand to determine the prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infection among patients who sought care. The study population was acute febrile patients who visited these hospitals during 1 August -31 October, 2010 who were aged 2-60 years and had clinical symptoms compatible with the case definition. Dengue and chikungunya cases were confirmed by an ELISA IgM titer or RT-PCR. We also reviewed surveillance data of dengue and chikungunya infections from 2003-2009. Of the 200 participants recruited into the study, 103 patients (51.5%) were confirmed to have acute dengue infection; dengue serotype 2 was the most prevalence serotype. The ages of confirmed dengue cases ranged from 2-37 years old. The distribution of cases showed that dengue morbidity tended to be clustered in adjacent areas, particularly in Mueang District. Only a small proportion of the patients uses mosquito repellant and had screens on their windows. One patient (0.5%) had laboratory confirmed chikungunya infection. She was from Rattanawapi District, an area where no chikungunya had been reported before. Since the disease varies by age and geographic location, increased awareness of health care workers and public health officers about the diseases in the area is needed for early detection of cases and to promote early prevention and control measures.

  7. Dengue fever as an acute febrile disease after overseas travel: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tarumoto, Norihito; Abe, Yoshinobu; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is a relatively common infection in travelers, with about 100 cases being reported annually in Japan, and this number is increasing. We herein describe two patients who developed a fever after returning to Japan from Southeast Asia and who were serologically diagnosed with DF. Patient 1 was a 19-year-old man who spent 6 days in Thailand and developed diarrhea and a fever after returning to Japan. Virological studies showed dengue virus (DV) serotype 3 by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), and anti-DV IgM and IgG antibodies were both positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patient 2 was a 43-year-old man who spent time in various Asian countries and developed a fever and arthralgia after returning to Japan. Virological studies showed DV serotype 2 by RT-PCR, and anti-DV IgM and IgG antibodies were both positive by ELISA. DF and other febrile diseases, including Chikungunya fever, should be strongly suspected in patients who develop fever after returning to Japan from other Asian countries, irrespective of whether patients remember being bitten by mosquitoes.

  8. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuville, Marie; Hustinx, Roland; Jacques, Jessica; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI) and hemorrhage (CyH), there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic. Design ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT). CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Results Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172) and/or fever (n = 33). 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11) or probable (n = 12) CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%. Conclusions This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical–fever–and biological–CRP–parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations

  9. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - fever induced; Febrile convulsions ... an illness. It may not occur when the fever is highest. A cold or viral illness may ... other than symptoms of the illness causing the fever. Often, the child will not need a full ...

  10. Leptospirosis as frequent cause of acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J; Flom, Judith E; Dumler, J Stephen; Woods, Christopher W

    2011-09-01

    To determine the proportion of fevers caused by leptospirosis, we obtained serum specimens and epidemiologic and clinical data from patients in Galle, Sri Lanka, March-October 2007. Immunoglobulin M ELISA was performed on paired serum specimens to diagnose acute (seroconversion or 4-fold titer rise) or past (titer without rise) leptospirosis and seroprevalence (acute). We compared (individually) the diagnostic yield of acute-phase specimens and clinical impression with paired specimens for acute leptospirosis. Of 889 patients with paired specimens, 120 had acute leptosoirosis and 241 had past leptospirosis. The sensitivity and specificity of acute-phase serum specimens were 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2%-25.5%) and 69.2% (95% CI 65.5%-72.7%), respectively, and of clinical impression 22.9% (95% CI 15.4%-32.0%) and 91.7% (95% CI 89.2%-93.8%), respectively. For identifying acute leptospirosis, clinical impression is insensitive, and immunoglobulin M results are more insensitive and costly. Rapid, pathogen-based tests for early diagnosis are needed.

  11. Leptospirosis as Frequent Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Flom, Judith E.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Woods, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the proportion of fevers caused by leptospirosis, we obtained serum specimens and epidemiologic and clinical data from patients in Galle, Sri Lanka, March–October 2007. Immunoglobulin M ELISA was performed on paired serum specimens to diagnose acute (seroconversion or 4-fold titer rise) or past (titer without rise) leptospirosis and seroprevalence (acute). We compared (individually) the diagnostic yield of acute-phase specimens and clinical impression with paired specimens for acute leptospirosis. Of 889 patients with paired specimens, 120 had acute leptosoirosis and 241 had past leptospirosis. The sensitivity and specificity of acute-phase serum specimens were 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2%–25.5%) and 69.2% (95% CI 65.5%–72.7%), respectively, and of clinical impression 22.9% (95% CI 15.4%–32.0%) and 91.7% (95% CI 89.2%–93.8%), respectively. For identifying acute leptospirosis, clinical impression is insensitive, and immunoglobulin M results are more insensitive and costly. Rapid, pathogen-based tests for early diagnosis are needed. PMID:21888794

  12. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient's serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness. PMID:27980872

  13. [Methods for the prevention and treatment of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy in patients with acute severe poisoning].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The study included 147 patients with toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy resulting from acute poisoning. It was shown that intensive therapy with cytoflavin (20 ml in 400 ml of 5% glucose solution twice daily for 7 days) reduced severity of hypoxic brain lesions and suppression of CNS as apparent from the improvement of its bioelectric activity. The recovery of CNS regulatory action on the life-sustaining systems of the body promoted normalization of the respiratory component of oxygen transport. The improvement of the patients' conditions in the acute phase contributed to accelerated recovery of cognitive-amnestic functions and social adaptation. Cytoflavin therapy improved the clinical picture of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy due to the reduction in the duration of the comatose state from 45.3 +/- 8.2 to 27.7 +/- 6.9 hr and the decrease in the frequency of secondary pulmonary complications from 72.7 to 35.9%.

  14. Melphalan Culprit or Confounder in Acute Encephalopathy during Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Alayón-Laguer, Diógenes; Alsina, Melissa; Ochoa-Bayona, Jose L.; Ayala, Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient with Durie-Salmon stage 3A/ISS stage I IgG kappa multiple myeloma (MM) who developed encephalopathy after high-dose melphalan and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). The most common etiologies for encephalopathy such as infection, narcotic medications, metabolic-electrolyte disturbance, stroke, and central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhages were ruled out. The patient recovered from the altered mental status spontaneously. The possibilities of melphalan-induced encephalopathy versus critical-state delirium versus hypercytokinemia induce encephalopathy were contemplated. PMID:23259145

  15. West Nile Virus Documented in Indonesia from Acute Febrile Illness Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Khin Saw Aye; Kosasih, Herman; Artika, I. Made; Perkasa, Aditya; Puspita, Mita; Ma'roef, Chairin Nisa; Antonjaya, Ungke; Ledermann, Jeremy P.; Powers, Ann M.; Alisjahbana, Bachti

    2014-01-01

    We report the presence of West Nile virus in a cryopreserved, dengue-negative serum specimen collected from an acute fever case on Java in 2004–2005. The strain belongs to genotype lineage 2, which has recently been implicated in human outbreaks in Europe. PMID:24420775

  16. Acute influenza virus-associated encephalitis and encephalopathy in adults: a challenging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Francisca H. H.; Wensing, Anne M. J.; Leavis, Helen L.; van Riel, Debby; GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Murk, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute influenza-associated encephalopathy/encephalitis (IAE) in adults is a rare but well-known complication of influenza virus infection. The diagnosis is difficult to make due to the absence of distinctive clinical symptoms and validated diagnostic criteria. We present an illustrative case and a case review on acute IAE in adults. Methods: We performed a Medline search of the English literature using the terms influenz*, encephal* and adult, and constructed a database of detailed descriptions of patients with influenza virus infection with influenza-like symptoms at the onset of neurological symptoms. Results: A total of 44 patients were included. Confusion and seizures were the most prevalent neurological symptoms, present in 12 (27 %) and 10 (23 %) patients, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 21 patients and anomalies were found in 13 (62 %), with lesions located throughout the brain. Influenza virus RNA was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 5 (16 %) of 32 patients. Eight (18 %) of the forty-four patients died. The benefits of antiviral and immunomodulatory therapy have not been well studied. Discussion: Our results show that many different neurological symptoms can be present in patients with acute onset IAE. Therefore, the diagnosis should be considered in patients with fever and neurological symptoms, especially during the influenza season. Laboratory diagnosis consists of demonstration of influenza virus RNA in brain tissue, CSF or respiratory samples, and demonstration of intrathecal antibody production against influenza virus. The presence of brain lesions in MRI and influenza virus in CSF appear to be of prognostic value. PMID:28348797

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy with reversible focal neurologic signs resembling acute stroke: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Yamazaki, Mineo; Katayama, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    A 64-year-old female with a history of primary biliary cirrhosis and esophageal varices starting at age 39 was brought to our Stroke Care Unit by ambulance with right-side weakness and speech difficulty. Physical examination revealed right hemiparesis (including the face), sensory disturbances, pathological reflexes, and slightly decreased consciousness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale rating of E3V4M6. Flapping tremors and speech disturbance, as well as anarithmia, construction apraxia, and ideomotor apraxia, were noted, and her National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 13. Initially, the patient was diagnosed with acute stroke and treated accordingly; however, subsequent findings from clinical images and electroencephalography led to a diagnosis of focal neurologic signs due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The patient had significantly reduced cerebral blood flow in the left side of the brain, probably due to microsurgical repair of an aneurysm done 2 years earlier. HE with exaggerated chronic liver damage might have made the previously silent ischemia clinically apparent. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the patient's neurologic deficits resolved once HE was adequately controlled. This case illustrates the need for careful assessment of background pathophysiology when diagnosing patients with stroke-like symptoms.

  18. Complete recovery from acute encephalopathy of late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in a 3-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Mak, C M; Siu, T-S; Lam, C-W; Chan, G C-F; Poon, G W-K; Wong, K-Y; Low, L C-K; Tang, N L; Li, S K; Lau, K-Y; Kwong, N-S; Tam, S

    2007-11-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the commonest urea cycle disorder which is transmitted in X-linked inheritance. It is mainly characterized in males by acute encephalopathy and hyperammonaemia with fatal outcomes in both classical neonatal and late-onset types. We report a 3-year-old healthy Hong Kong Chinese boy who presented with acute encephalopathy and coma after three days of gastroenteritis. He had no focal neurological deficit and brain CT imaging was normal. His plasma ammonia (54 micromol/L) and glutamine (747 micromol/L) concentrations were normal. The only biochemical abnormalities detected were marked orotic aciduria (700 micromol/mmol creatinine) and elevated urinary uracil. He regained consciousness spontaneously after three days under intensive care with parenteral fluid therapy. He recovered completely without any neurological deficits. Five months after discharge, urinary uracil concentration remained elevated despite normalized orotic acid concentration. Finally, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency was diagnosed by DNA analysis. A missense mutation of arginine-to-glutamine substitution on amino acid 277 (p.R277Q) was revealed to be a late-onset mutant. Our case strengthens the argument that in any child with coma or acute encephalopathy of undetermined cause, genetic analysis of the OTC gene and the measurement of urinary uracil concentration remain the most reliable indicators of late-onset OTCD during acute and even quiescent phases. Existing neonatal screening programmes for inheritable metabolic disorders fail to detect late-onset variants. Therefore, a high clinical suspicion is a key to correct and timely diagnosis, especially in those patients with atypical presentations.

  19. Ornicetil on encephalopathy. Effect of ornicetil (ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate) on encephalopathy in patients with acute and chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chainuvati, T; Plengvanit, U; Viranuvatti, V

    1977-12-01

    Di-L (+)-ornithine, alpha ketogluterate infusions were compared with infusions of dextrose water in 27 comatosed patients with acute and chronic liver disease. Of 7 patients with acute liver disease no improvement of conciousness was found in any of these patients. Of 20 patients with chronic liver disease, lowering of blood ammonia level during ornicetil therapy occurred in 8, during the control infusion in 6, and no effect was seen in 4. Improvement of conciousness during ornicetil occurred in 11, during the control infusion in 6 and 3 had no improvement. Among those who improved, 4 in the ornicetil group and 2 in the control group improved after the precipitating causes were controlled or corrected. This study indicated that ornicetil has no beneficial effect on the treatment of coma in various forms of hepatic disease.

  20. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion associated with staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by burns.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, Takaoki; Sakanishi, Shinpei; Ishidou, Yuuki; Kawano, Go; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Akita, Yukihiro; Obu, Keizo

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) associated with toxic shock syndrome caused by burns. A one-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital for treatment of severe burns. On day 3, she exhibited a fever, generalized rash and multiple organ failure. She was diagnosed with toxic shock syndrome after burns. She had seizures with fever twice on the same day, followed by secondary seizures on day 8 and transient deterioration of the gross motor functions involved in sitting alone and rolling over. On day 9, MRI diffusion-weighted images showed bright tree appearance (BTA). We conclude that she developed AESD.

  1. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Patients Presenting to a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India: Clinical Spectrum and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar; Jeevan, Jonathan Arul; Mitra, Shubhanker; Paul, Nirvin; Murugan, Thimiri Palani; Rangaraj, Ajay; David, Sandeep; Hansdak, Samuel George; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Abraham, Asha Mary; Ramasami, Prakash; Sathyendra, Sowmya; Sudarsanam, Thambu David; Varghese, George M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) may have similar clinical presentation, and the etiology is varied and region specific. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary hospital in South India. All adult patients presenting with AUFI of 3–14 days duration were evaluated for etiology, and the differences in presentation and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 1258 patients. A microbiological cause was identified in 82.5% of our patients. Scrub typhus was the most common cause of AUFI (35.9%) followed by dengue (30.6%), malaria (10.4%), enteric fever (3.7%), and leptospirosis (0.6%). Both scrub typhus and dengue fever peaked during the monsoon season and the cooler months, whereas no seasonality was observed with enteric fever and malaria. The mean time to presentation was longer in enteric fever (9.9 [4.7] days) and scrub typhus (8.2 [3.2] days). Bleeding manifestations were seen in 7.7% of patients, mostly associated with dengue (14%), scrub typhus (4.2%), and malaria (4.6%). The requirement of supplemental oxygen, invasive ventilation, and inotropes was higher in scrub typhus, leptospirosis, and malaria. The overall mortality rate was 3.3% and was highest with scrub typhus (4.6%) followed by dengue fever (2.3%). Significant clinical predictors of scrub typhus were breathlessness (odds ratio [OR]: 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.38–7.3), total whole blood cell count >10,000 cells/mm3 (OR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.64–3.24), serum albumin <3.5 g % (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.68–3.2). Overt bleeding manifestations (OR: 2.98; 95% CI: 1.84–4.84), and a platelet count of <150,000 cells/mm3 (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.47–2.98) were independent predictors of dengue fever. Conclusion: The similarity in clinical presentation and diversity of etiological agents demonstrates the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of AUFI in South India. The etiological profile will be of use in the development

  2. Outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B P14H11F14 in a military training camp in Shandong China.

    PubMed

    Dongliu, Yuan; Guoliang, Yang; Haocheng, Xu; Shuaijia, Qing; Li, Bing; Yanglei, Jia

    2016-09-01

    This study reports an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B [P14H11F14] in a military training center in China between May and June 2014. In total, 164 military personnel were affected, and two patients were admitted into the intensive care unit of the military regional central hospital. A HAdV-B [P14H11F14] virus was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of this acute outbreak of febrile respiratory illness based on clinical manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, specific molecular detection results, phylogenetic analysis, and serological assays. The virus was isolated by the rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture method, and the complete sequences of the E1A, penton base, hexon, and fiber genes were determined and deposited in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic and sequence homology analyses indicated that the isolated strain is most closely related to some HAdV-55 strains from mainland China. However, this strain appeared to be less virulent than former HAdV-55 strains. According to the chest X-ray results of 31 affected patients, there was no radiological evidence of pneumonia. The most frequent symptoms in these patients were sore throat (95.12 %, 156/164) and tonsillitis (93.29 %, 153/164). During the course of the outbreak, incorrect response measures and some potential risk factors, such as fire training and marching training, may have exacerbated the spread of the infection. This outbreak illustrates the urgent need to improve the epidemiological and etiological surveillance of HAdV infections and to improve the ability of doctors and health officials in basic units of the Chinese army to respond effectively to febrile respiratory illness.

  3. [Acute febrile state].

    PubMed

    Frigg, C; Stepanek, J; Suter, J

    1999-11-18

    A 34 year old airline pilot, who had spent nine days in Cameroon (Westafrica) presented for his yearly physical examination two weeks later. The physical examination and routine laboratory tests were within normal limits. The patient complained about mild pain of joints and extremities and about not feeling quite well. The same evening (a few hours after the physical examination) he experienced chills and fever (up to 39.5 degrees Celsius). He was seen subsequently by a tropical medicine specialist, who diagnosed Plasmodium falciparum on blood smears. The patient was immediately placed on Riamet, fever and symptoms disappeared completely within a few days.

  4. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses.

  5. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  6. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Marsharani, U

    2000-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a subacute condition associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Its presentation varies from focal neurologic deficits to global confusion. Unlike encephalopathy associated with hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's encephalopathy responds to steroid therapy and not thyroxine replacement.

  7. Antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin on alternate days reduces rate of viridans sepsis and febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Boztug, Heidrun; Mühlegger, Nora; Pötschger, Ulrike; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Peters, Christina; Mann, Georg; Dworzak, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Intensive chemotherapy directed against acute myeloid leukemia of childhood is followed by profound neutropenia and high risk for bacterial and fungal infections, including viridans group streptococci as a common cause for gram-positive septicemia. Few retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of various antibiotic prophylactic regimens in children. We retrospectively studied 50 pediatric patients treated on the AML-BFM 2004 protocol between 2005 and 2015 at St. Anna Children's Hospital and assessed the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the frequency of febrile neutropenia and bacterial sepsis. Fifty pediatric patients underwent 199 evaluable chemotherapy cycles. Viridans sepsis occurred after none of 98 cycles with prophylactic administration of teicoplanin/vancomycin in comparison to 12 cases of viridans sepsis among 79 cycles without systemic antibacterial prophylaxis (0 vs. 15 %, p < 0.0001). In addition, there were significantly fewer episodes of febrile neutropenia in the teicoplanin/vancomycin group (44 % vs. no prophylaxis 82 %, p < 0.0001). Severity of infection seemed to be worse when no antibiotic prophylaxis had been administered with a higher rate of intensive care unit treatment (0/98, 0 %, vs. 4/79, 5 %, p = 0.038). So far, no increase of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus isolates in surveillance cultures was noticed. Antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin (or vancomycin) appears safe and feasible and resulted in eradication of viridans sepsis and decreased incidence of febrile neutropenia in pediatric AML patients. The possibility to administer teicoplanin on alternate days on an outpatient basis or at home could contribute to patient's quality of life and decrease health care costs.

  8. The Role of Human Coronaviruses in Children Hospitalized for Acute Bronchiolitis, Acute Gastroenteritis, and Febrile Seizures: A 2-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jevšnik, Monika; Steyer, Andrej; Pokorn, Marko; Mrvič, Tatjana; Grosek, Štefan; Strle, Franc; Lusa, Lara; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are associated with a variety of clinical presentations in children, but their role in disease remains uncertain. The objective of our prospective study was to investigate HCoVs associations with various clinical presentations in hospitalized children up to 6 years of age. Children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis (AB), acute gastroenteritis (AGE), or febrile seizures (FS), and children admitted for elective surgical procedures (healthy controls) were included in the study. In patients with AB, AGE, and FS, a nasopharyngeal (NP) swab and blood sample were obtained upon admission and the follow-up visit 14 days later, whereas in children with AGE a stool sample was also acquired upon admission; in healthy controls a NP swab and stool sample were taken upon admission. Amplification of polymerase 1b gene was used to detect HCoVs in the specimens. HCoVs-positive specimens were also examined for the presence of several other viruses. HCoVs were most often detected in children with FS (19/192, 9.9%, 95% CI: 6–15%), followed by children with AGE (19/218, 8.7%, 95% CI: 5.3–13.3%) and AB (20/308, 6.5%, 95% CI: 4.0–9.8%). The presence of other viruses was a common finding, most frequent in the group of children with AB (19/20, 95%, 95% CI: 75.1–99.8%), followed by FS (10/19, 52.6%, 95% CI: 28.9–75.6%) and AGE (7/19, 36.8%, 95% CI: 16.3–61.6%). In healthy control children HCoVs were detected in 3/156 (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.4–5.5%) NP swabs and 1/150 (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.02–3.3%) stool samples. It seems that an etiological role of HCoVs is most likely in children with FS, considering that they had a higher proportion of positive HCoVs results than patients with AB and those with AGE, and had the highest viral load; however, the co-detection of other viruses was 52.6%. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00987519 PMID:27171141

  9. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea.

  10. Elaboration of a clinical and paraclinical score to estimate the probability of herpes simplex virus encephalitis in patients with febrile, acute neurologic impairment.

    PubMed

    Gennai, S; Rallo, A; Keil, D; Seigneurin, A; Germi, R; Epaulard, O

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis is associated with a high risk of mortality and sequelae, and early diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department are necessary. However, most patients present with non-specific febrile, acute neurologic impairment; this may lead clinicians to overlook the diagnosis of HSV encephalitis. We aimed to identify which data collected in the first hours in a medical setting were associated with the diagnosis of HSV encephalitis. We conducted a multicenter retrospective case-control study in four French public hospitals from 2007 to 2013. The cases were the adult patients who received a confirmed diagnosis of HSV encephalitis. The controls were all the patients who attended the emergency department of Grenoble hospital with a febrile acute neurologic impairment, without HSV detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in 2012 and 2013. A multivariable logistic model was elaborated to estimate factors significantly associated with HSV encephalitis. Finally, an HSV probability score was derived from the logistic model. We identified 36 cases and 103 controls. Factors independently associated with HSV encephalitis were the absence of past neurological history (odds ratio [OR] 6.25 [95 % confidence interval (CI): 2.22-16.7]), the occurrence of seizure (OR 8.09 [95 % CI: 2.73-23.94]), a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg (OR 5.11 [95 % CI: 1.77-14.77]), and a C-reactive protein <10 mg/L (OR 9.27 [95 % CI: 2.98-28.88]). An HSV probability score was calculated summing the value attributed to each independent factor. HSV encephalitis diagnosis may benefit from the use of this score based upon some easily accessible data. However, diagnostic evocation and probabilistic treatment must remain the rule.

  11. Dengue: etiology of acute febrile illness in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, in 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    L'Azou, Maïna; Succo, Tiphanie; Kamagaté, Mamadou; Ouattara, Abdoulaye; Gilbernair, Elia; Adjogoua, Edgar; Luxemburger, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of dengue in Africa is not well understood. A prospective study was conducted in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire from December 2011 to December 2012 to estimate the proportion of dengue and malaria cases among febrile patients during a period when dengue was not known to be circulating in the region, and to describe the clinical and virological characteristics of laboratory-diagnosed dengue cases. Methods Blood samples were taken from febrile patients (body temperature ≥38°C) at two study sites. Patients with fever lasting more than 7 days, with fever of known origin and with jaundice were excluded. Thick blood film tests, ELISA for anti-dengue IgM and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were performed. Results A total of 812 patients were enrolled (51.7% male [48.3% female]; 46.4% aged <10 years) of whom 796 (98.0%) provided IgM ELISA and RT-PCR data, and 807 (99.4%) had thick blood film results. Three (0.4%) patients had laboratory-diagnosed dengue (one with DENV-3 serotype), none of whom were diagnosed clinically, and 234 (28.8%) had confirmed malaria. Conclusions This study suggests that dengue virus circulates in Abidjan outside an epidemic and that there should be an increase in awareness of dengue as a possible diagnosis in cases of undifferentiated fever. These results stress the importance of implementing laboratory capacity to assess dengue burden in Africa. PMID:26385938

  12. Prevalence of malaria among acute febrile patients clinically suspected of having malaria in the Zeway Health Center, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Sendeaw M; Animut, Abebe; Belay, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    Malaria diagnosis is a common challenge in developing countries with limited diagnostic services. Common febrile illnesses were assessed in 280 malaria-suspected patients, and each case was subjected to clinical and laboratory examinations for malaria, relapsing fever, typhoid fever, typhus, and brucellosis. Data were entered and analyzed using Epi Info version 3.1 software. Malaria accounted for 17% (CI, 12.6-21.4%) of febrile illnesses. The remaining cases were associated with typhoid fever (18.5%; CI, 13.95-23.05%), typhus (17.8%; CI, 13.32-22.28%), brucellosis (1%; CI, -0.17-2.17%), relapsing fever (2%; CI, 0.36-3.64%), and unknown causes (44%). Approximately 7% of patients had coinfections, and 2% of patients treated as monoinfections. Approximately 1.4% of the nonmalarial patients received antimalarial treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of the CareStart Pf/pan rapid diagnostic tests in comparison with those of microscopy were 100% and 91%, respectively, with positive- and negative-predictive values of 94% and 100%, respectively. Compared with microscopy, the positive-predictive value of each malaria symptom was much lower than that of the symptoms combined: fever, 17%; sweating, 30%; headache, 18%; general body ache, 22%; loss of appetite, 21%. The study findings revealed a high proportion of nonmalarial illnesses were clinically categorized as malaria. Parasite-based diagnosis is recommended for the management of malarial and nonmalarial cases.

  13. MR Imaging Findings in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Cozzolino, Attilio; Serino, Antonietta; Fenza, Giacomo; Manto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area) and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex), is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease. PMID:25050351

  14. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p < 0.0001). Cirrhotic patients with ACLF have decreased CSF-SG as compared to cirrhotic patients without ACLF (-0.2 %, p = 0.0030) that remained higher than in healthy controls. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy did not modify CSF-SG (-0.09 %, p = 0.1757). Specific gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to

  15. Clinically mild infantile encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Nozomi; Yoshimaru, Daisuke; Moriyama, Yoko; Honda, Takafumi; Yasukawa, Kumi; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi

    2017-02-15

    Acute infectious encephalopathy is very frequently observed in children in East Asia including Japan. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype in Japan; however, more than 40% of the patients remain unclassified into specific syndromes. To investigate the underlying pathomechanism in those with unclassified acute encephalopathy, we evaluated brain metabolism by MR spectroscopy. Among 20 patients with acute encephalopathy admitted to our hospital during January 2015 to May 2016, 12 could not be classified into specific syndromes. MR spectroscopy was performed in 8 of these 12 patients with unclassified encephalopathy. MR spectroscopy showed an increase of glutamine with a normal N-acetyl aspartate level on days 3 to 8 in three of the 8 patients, which had normalized by follow-up studies. The three patients clinically recovered completely. This study suggests that excitotoxicity may be the underlying pathomechanism in some patients with unclassified mild encephalopathy.

  16. Retrospective survey and evaluation of first-line antibiotics for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mukoyama, Naoki; Nakashima, Marie; Miyamura, Koichi; Yoshimi, Akira; Noda, Yukihiro; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients with acute leukemia are susceptible to chemotherapy-induced severe myelosuppression, and therefore are at a high risk for febrile neutropenia (FN). In such cases, the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics such as fourth-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems is recommended as first-line antimicrobial treatment; however, the effectiveness of these agents in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been investigated in detail. We retrospectively examined and evaluated the effectiveness of first-line antibiotic treatment regimens for chemotherapy-induced FN in patients with AML in Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital. The evaluated first-line treatment regimens were as follows: cefozopran (CZOP) + amikacin (AMK) in 38 cases, cefepime (CFPM) alone in 2 cases, CFPM + AMK in 2 cases, piperacillin (PIPC) + AMK in 2 cases, and CZOP alone in 1 case. Additionally, prophylactic antifungal agents were administered in all cases. Markedly effective, effective, moderately effective, and ineffective responses occurred in 31.1%, 8.9%, 8.9%, and 51.1%, respectively, of the treated cases. The response rate, defined as the combination of markedly effective and effective outcomes, was 40.0%. In 11 cases, impairment of renal functions were observed, and they were associated with combination treatments including AMK; nine of these were associated with a glycopeptide. The combination of CZOP with AMK (84.4%) was the most commonly used first-line treatment for FN in patients with AML; carbapenem or tazobactam/PIPC has never been used for treatment of such cases. Our findings demonstrate that fourth-generation cephems will be an effective first-line treatment for FN in patients with AML in our hospital. PMID:28303057

  17. [Induced hypothermia/normothermia with general anesthesia prevents neurological damage in children with febrile refractory status epilepticus].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Taku; Fujita, Kyoko; Saji, Yohsuke; Maruyama, Azusa; Nagase, Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is defined as persistence of seizure activity despite appropriate medical and antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy. Febrile RSE is often caused by presumed encephalitis and has a high morbidity rate. In addition, it is believed that hyperthermia aggravates epileptic brain damage. The efficacy of hypothermia/normothermia (H/N) therapy against brain damage has been proposed, but there have been limited studies reporting on the efficacy of this treatment against febrile RSE. To study the efficacy of induced H/N with general anesthesia therapy in children with febrile RSE, a retrospective review of RSE cases was conducted in 28 children hospitalized in the tertiary pediatric intensive care center of Kobe Children's Hospital, Japan, between October 2002 and August 2009. Clinical outcomes and neurological sequelae using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) score were compared after one month of treatment with either H/N (34 degrees C-36 degrees C) with general anesthesia therapy or with other conventional therapies. Cases were categorized as those with good recovery (PCPC=1) or poor outcome (PCPC=2-6). Twelve children underwent H/N with general anesthesia therapy, while 16 children were treated by conventional therapy using intravenous diazepam and/or midazolam. Treatment with H/N significantly improved outcome compared to conventional therapies (p=0.024; Fisher's exact test). Five of 6 patients with poor outcome had a final diagnosis of acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE). Treatment with H/N therapy may reduce neurological damage in the development of AEFCSE caused by febrile RSE in children.

  18. Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome: Clinical Review and Hypotheses of Epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    van Baalen, Andreas; Vezzani, Annamaria; Häusler, Martin; Kluger, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES, AERRPS, or DESC) is one of the most severe, mostly irreversible, and presumably immune-mediated epileptic encephalopathies affecting healthy children. Refractory status epilepticus or a cluster of seizures start a few days after the onset of an acute febrile illness; however, encephalitis cannot be proved. Sequelae of FIRES are drug-resistant epilepsy and neuropsychological impairments occurring without latency. Clinical knowledge is limited because FIRES is sporadic and extremely rare. Therefore, based on literature and our data, this review includes clinical features, terminology, epidemiology, diagnostic criteria and procedures, differential diagnoses, acute and chronic therapeutic options, and outcome data. Particular attention is paid to the epileptogenesis. We hypothesize that FIRES is an immune but not an autoimmune disease and discuss GABAergic therapy at high doses, avoidance of burst-suppression coma, and early introduction of enteral or even parenteral ketogenic diet as the most promising treatment. The lack of evidence requires both a network and a multinational web-based clinical registry to define the clinical spectrum for improving diagnosis and treatment and at the very least, to clarify the cause of FIRES. We conclude that the term "fulminant inflammatory response epilepsy syndrome" may be more appropriate.

  19. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  20. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  1. Recognition and management of febrile convulsion in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Kirkham, Emily Natasha; Shirt, Bethany

    2015-08-26

    Febrile convulsion is characterised by convulsion associated with fever in an infant or child aged between six months and six years. The febrile illness causing the convulsion should not be secondary to an intracranial infection (meningitis or encephalitis) or acute electrolyte imbalance. Most cases of febrile convulsion are short lived and self-terminating. However, a few cases of prolonged febrile convulsion may need anticonvulsant medication to stop the seizure. Management is mainly symptomatic, although anticonvulsants may have a role in a small number of children with complex or recurrent febrile convulsion. Referral to paediatric neurologists may be necessary in cases of complex or recurrent febrile convulsion, or in those where a pre-existing neurological disorder exists. One third of children will develop a further febrile convulsion during subsequent febrile illness. Nurses have a vital role in managing children with febrile convulsion, educating parents about the condition and dispelling myths. This article outlines the presentation, management, investigations and prognosis for febrile convulsion, indicating how nurses working in different clinical areas can help to manage this common childhood condition.

  2. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Acute-Febrile-Illness Outbreak Investigation and Surveillance of Emerging Pathogens, Including Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ochieng, Caroline; Wiersma, Steve; Ströher, Ute; Towner, Jonathan S.; Whitmer, Shannon; Nichol, Stuart T.; Moore, Christopher C.; Kersh, Gilbert J.; Kato, Cecilia; Sexton, Christopher; Petersen, Jeannine; Massung, Robert; Hercik, Christine; Crump, John A.; Kibiki, Gibson; Maro, Athanasia; Mujaga, Buliga; Gratz, Jean; Jacob, Shevin T.; Banura, Patrick; Scheld, W. Michael; Juma, Bonventure; Onyango, Clayton O.; Montgomery, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile illness (AFI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet an etiologic agent is often not identified. Convalescent-phase serology is impractical, blood culture is slow, and many pathogens are fastidious or impossible to cultivate. We developed a real-time PCR-based TaqMan array card (TAC) that can test six to eight samples within 2.5 h from sample to results and can simultaneously detect 26 AFI-associated organisms, including 15 viruses (chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever [CCHF] virus, dengue, Ebola virus, Bundibugyo virus, Sudan virus, hantaviruses [Hantaan and Seoul], hepatitis E, Marburg, Nipah virus, o'nyong-nyong virus, Rift Valley fever virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus), 8 bacteria (Bartonella spp., Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira spp., Rickettsia spp., Salmonella enterica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Yersinia pestis), and 3 protozoa (Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., and Trypanosoma brucei). Two extrinsic controls (phocine herpesvirus 1 and bacteriophage MS2) were included to ensure extraction and amplification efficiency. Analytical validation was performed on spiked specimens for linearity, intra-assay precision, interassay precision, limit of detection, and specificity. The performance of the card on clinical specimens was evaluated with 1,050 blood samples by comparison to the individual real-time PCR assays, and the TAC exhibited an overall 88% (278/315; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84% to 92%) sensitivity and a 99% (5,261/5,326, 98% to 99%) specificity. This TaqMan array card can be used in field settings as a rapid screen for outbreak investigation or for the surveillance of pathogens, including Ebola virus. PMID:26491176

  3. Eosinophilic Fasciitis and Acute Encephalopathy Toxicity from Pembrolizumab Treatment of a Patient with Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Maurice, Catherine; Chappell, MaryAnne; MacMillan, Leslie; Al-Habeeb, Ayman S; Al-Faraidy, Nada; Butler, Marcus O; Rogalla, Patrik; Mason, Warren; Joshua, Anthony M; Hogg, David

    2016-03-01

    Anti-PD-1 inhibitors have significant activity in metastatic melanoma. Responses often occur early and may be sustained. The optimal duration of treatment with these agents is unknown. Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old woman treated with pembrolizumab, as part of the Keynote-001 trial, as first-line treatment for metastatic disease. She experienced a complete response after 13.8 months of treatment with no adverse events. One month after the last drug infusion and 18 months from starting treatment, the patient presented with eosinophilic fasciitis. She then developed acute confusion and weakness, thought to be due to intracranial vasculitis. High-dose steroids were initiated with resolution of the fasciitis. Aspirin was commenced for presumed vasculitis with resolution of the neurologic symptoms. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports of eosinophilic fasciitis or cerebral vasculitis due to anti-PD-1 agents. This case demonstrates that toxicity may occur in association with pembrolizumab treatment after a prolonged period of treatment without toxicity. Future trials should explore the optimal duration of treatment with pembrolizumab.

  4. Aquaporin-4 Deletion in Mice Reduces Encephalopathy and Brain Edema in Experimental Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.; Verkman, A. S.; Curtis, Kevin M.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema and associated astrocyte swelling leading to increased intracranial pressure are hallmarks of acute liver failure (ALF). Elevated blood and brain levels of ammonia have been implicated in the development of brain edema in ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with ammonia have been shown to undergo cell swelling and such swelling was associated with an increase in the plasma membrane expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) protein. Further, silencing the AQP4 gene in cultured astrocytes was shown to prevent the ammonia-induced cell swelling. Here, we examined the evolution of brain edema in AQP4-null mice and their wild type counterparts (WT-mice) in different models of ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA) or acetaminophen (APAP). Induction of ALF with TAA or APAP significantly increased brain water content in WT mice (by 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.3 ± 0.4 %, respectively). AQP4 protein was significantly increased in brain plasma membranes of WT mice with ALF induced by either TAA or APAP. In contrast to WT-mice, brain water content did not increase in AQP4-null mice. Additionally, AQP4-null mice treated with either TAA or APAP showed a remarkably lesser degree of neurological deficits as compared to WT mice; the latter displayed an inability to maintain proper gait, and demonstrated a markedly reduced exploratory behavior, with the mice remaining in one corner of the cage with its head tilted downwards. These results support a central role of AQP4 in the brain edema associated with ALF. PMID:24321433

  5. Increased toll-like receptor 4 in cerebral endothelial cells contributes to the astrocyte swelling and brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Tong, Xiao Y; Curtis, Kevin M; Ruiz-Cordero, Roberto; Abreu, Maria T; Norenberg, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Astrocyte swelling and the subsequent increase in intracranial pressure and brain herniation are major clinical consequences in patients with acute hepatic encephalopathy. We recently reported that conditioned media from brain endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to ammonia, a mixture of cytokines (CKs) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), when added to astrocytes caused cell swelling. In this study, we investigated the possibility that ammonia and inflammatory agents activate the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in ECs, resulting in the release of factors that ultimately cause astrocyte swelling. We found a significant increase in TLR4 protein expression when ECs were exposed to ammonia, CKs or LPS alone, while exposure of ECs to a combination of these agents potentiate such effects. In addition, astrocytes exposed to conditioned media from TLR4-silenced ECs that were treated with ammonia, CKs or LPS, resulted in a significant reduction in astrocyte swelling. TLR4 protein up-regulation was also detected in rat brain ECs after treatment with the liver toxin thioacetamide, and that thioacetamide-treated TLR4 knock-out mice exhibited a reduction in brain edema. These studies strongly suggest that ECs significantly contribute to the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy, likely as a consequence of increased TLR4 protein expression by blood-borne noxious agents.

  6. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  7. Molecular Characterisation of Chikungunya Virus Infections in Trinidad and Comparison of Clinical and Laboratory Features with Dengue and Other Acute Febrile Cases.

    PubMed

    Sahadeo, Nikita; Mohammed, Hamish; Allicock, Orchid M; Auguste, Albert J; Widen, Steven G; Badal, Kimberly; Pulchan, Krishna; Foster, Jerome E; Weaver, Scott C; Carrington, Christine V F

    2015-11-01

    Local transmission of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was first documented in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) in July 2014 preceding a large epidemic. At initial presentation, it is difficult to distinguish chikungunya fever (CHIKF) from other acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs), including life-threatening dengue disease. We characterised and compared dengue virus (DENV) and CHIKV infections in 158 patients presenting with suspected dengue fever (DF) and CHIKF at a major hospital in T&T, and performed phylogenetic analyses on CHIKV genomic sequences recovered from 8 individuals. The characteristics of patients with and without PCR-confirmed CHIKV were compared using Pearson's χ2 and student's t-tests, and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using logistic regression. We then compared signs and symptoms of people with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV and DENV infections using the Mann-Whitney U, Pearson's χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. Among the 158 persons there were 8 (6%) RT-qPCR-confirmed DENV and 30 (22%) RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV infections. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the CHIKV strains belonged to the Asian genotype and were most closely related to a British Virgin Islands strain isolated at the beginning of the 2013/14 outbreak in the Americas. Compared to persons who were RT-qPCR-negative for CHIKV, RT-qPCR-positive individuals were significantly more likely to have joint pain (aOR: 4.52 [95% CI: 1.28-16.00]), less likely to be interviewed at a later stage of illness (days post onset of fever--aOR: 0.56 [0.40-0.78]) and had a lower white blood cell count (aOR: 0.83 [0.71-0.96]). Among the 38 patients with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV or DENV, there were no significant differences in symptomatic presentation. However when individuals with serological evidence of recent DENV or CHIKV infection were included in the analyses, there were key differences in clinical presentation between CHIKF and other AUFIs including DF, which

  8. Molecular Characterisation of Chikungunya Virus Infections in Trinidad and Comparison of Clinical and Laboratory Features with Dengue and Other Acute Febrile Cases

    PubMed Central

    Sahadeo, Nikita; Mohammed, Hamish; Allicock, Orchid M.; Auguste, Albert J.; Widen, Steven G.; Badal, Kimberly; Pulchan, Krishna; Foster, Jerome E.; Weaver, Scott C.; Carrington, Christine V. F.

    2015-01-01

    Local transmission of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was first documented in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) in July 2014 preceding a large epidemic. At initial presentation, it is difficult to distinguish chikungunya fever (CHIKF) from other acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs), including life-threatening dengue disease. We characterised and compared dengue virus (DENV) and CHIKV infections in 158 patients presenting with suspected dengue fever (DF) and CHIKF at a major hospital in T&T, and performed phylogenetic analyses on CHIKV genomic sequences recovered from 8 individuals. The characteristics of patients with and without PCR-confirmed CHIKV were compared using Pearson’s χ2 and student’s t-tests, and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using logistic regression. We then compared signs and symptoms of people with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV and DENV infections using the Mann-Whitney U, Pearson’s χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. Among the 158 persons there were 8 (6%) RT-qPCR-confirmed DENV and 30 (22%) RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV infections. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the CHIKV strains belonged to the Asian genotype and were most closely related to a British Virgin Islands strain isolated at the beginning of the 2013/14 outbreak in the Americas. Compared to persons who were RT-qPCR-negative for CHIKV, RT-qPCR-positive individuals were significantly more likely to have joint pain (aOR: 4.52 [95% CI: 1.28–16.00]), less likely to be interviewed at a later stage of illness (days post onset of fever—aOR: 0.56 [0.40–0.78]) and had a lower white blood cell count (aOR: 0.83 [0.71–0.96]). Among the 38 patients with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV or DENV, there were no significant differences in symptomatic presentation. However when individuals with serological evidence of recent DENV or CHIKV infection were included in the analyses, there were key differences in clinical presentation between CHIKF and other AUFIs

  9. Total corpus callosotomy for epileptic spasms after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) in a case with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Okanishi, Tohru; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Motoi, Hirotaka; Kanai, Sotaro; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Takagi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takamichi; Enoki, Hideo

    2016-12-03

    Corpus callosotomy is a palliative therapy for refractory epilepsy, including West syndrome, without a resectable epileptic focus. The surgical outcome of corpus callosotomy is relatively favorable in cryptogenic (non-lesional) West syndrome. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a disorder that frequently leads to the development of refractory seizures by multiple cortical tubers. The multiple cortical tubers cause multiple or wide epileptic networks in these cases. Most of West syndrome cases in TSC with multiple tubers need additional resective surgery after corpus callosotomy. We describe a case of TSC in a boy aged 4years and 8months. He had multiple cortical tubers on his brain and developed epileptic spasms. The seizures were controlled with valproate. At the age of 1year and 4months, he presented with acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), and had relapsed epileptic spasms one month after the onset of the encephalopathy. The seizures were refractory to multiple antiepileptic drugs. A total corpus callosotomy was performed at the age of 3years and 8months. The patient did not show any seizures after the surgery. During 12months of the follow-up, the patient was free from any seizures. Even in cases of symptomatic WS with multiple lesions, total corpus callosotomy may be a good strategy if the patients have secondary diffuse brain insults.

  10. Infection-Triggered Familial or Recurrent Cases of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Caused by Mutations in a Component of the Nuclear Pore, RANBP2

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M.D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a susceptibility locus (ANE1) in a family segregating recurrent ANE as an incompletely penetrant, autosomal-dominant trait. We now report that all affected individuals and obligate carriers in this family are heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.1880C→T, p.Thr585Met) in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). To determine whether this mutation is the susceptibility allele, we screened controls and other patients with ANE who are unrelated to the index family. Patients from 9 of 15 additional kindreds with familial or recurrent ANE had the identical mutation. It arose de novo in two families and independently in several other families. Two other patients with familial ANE had different RANBP2 missense mutations that altered conserved residues. None of the three RANBP2 missense mutations were found in 19 patients with isolated ANE or in unaffected controls. We conclude that missense mutations in RANBP2 are susceptibility alleles for familial and recurrent cases of ANE. PMID:19118815

  11. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  12. Wernicke encephalopathy and ethanol-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Eun; Lee, Eun Ja; Young, Jeong Bo; Shin, Dong Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Ethanol causes diverse neurologic conditions caused by acute and chronic brain damage. This review provides an overview of Wernicke encephalopathy and other ethanol-related brain changes, such as chronic brain atrophy, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, osmotic demyelination syndrome, chronic hepatic encephalopathy, and acute alcohol withdrawal. As clinical symptoms of this spectrum of diseases have nonspecific neurologic alterations, radiologists should have current radiologic information and understand the imaging findings pertaining to the pathophysiology to support diagnosis.

  13. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Prete, Anna Del; Cesaro, Claudia; Gaeta, Laura; Zulli, Claudio; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed. PMID:24367227

  14. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  15. Influenza virus-induced encephalopathy in mice: interferon production and natural killer cell activity during acute infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wabuke-Bunoti, M A; Bennink, J R; Plotkin, S A

    1986-01-01

    Mice injected intracerebrally with infectious influenza virus (60 hemagglutinin units) developed lethargy, seizures, comas, and died 2 to 5 days postinfection. As early as 6 h after infection, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in these animals was infiltrated with polymorphonuclear cells, mononuclear leukocytes, and large granular lymphocytes. Potent natural killer (NK) cell activity was observed for both CSF and spleen cell populations over the same period. This NK cell activity correlated with interferon (IFN) levels in the CSF and serum. Treatment of lethally infected mice with either anti-IFN alpha-IFN beta or anti-ganglio-n-tetraoglyceramide antiserum ameliorated the disease, reduced mortality, and effected changes in the relative proportions of inflammatory cell populations infiltrating the CSF. The possible significance of IFN and NK cell activity in the development of this influenza virus-induced encephalopathy is discussed. PMID:2431159

  16. Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000223.htm Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor To use the ... enable JavaScript. Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within ...

  17. Acute amnestic encephalopathy in amyloid-β oligomer-injected mice is due to their widespread diffusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Epelbaum, Stéphane; Youssef, Ihsen; Lacor, Pascale N; Chaurand, Pierre; Duplus, Eric; Brugg, Bernard; Duyckaerts, Charles; Delatour, Benoît

    2015-06-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are the suspected culprit as initiators of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, their diffusion in the brain remains unknown. Here, we studied Aβ oligomers' dissemination and evaluated their in vivo toxicity. Wild-type mice were injected with 50 pmol of synthetic Aβ oligomers (of different size) in the hippocampus. Oligomers diffused largely in the brain as soon as 1 hour and up to 7 days after injection. A transient encephalopathy with memory impairment was induced by this unique injection. The immunoreactivity of the postsynaptic marker PSD95 was diffusely decreased. Similar results (both on memory and PSD95 immunoreactivity) were obtained with delipidated and high molecular weight oligomers (>50 kDa) but not with smaller assemblies. Tau hyperphosphorylation was observed in the oligomer-injected brains. Finally, fos immunostaining was increased in Aβ-derived diffusible ligands-injected mice, suggesting neuronal hyperactivity. Rapid and widespread diffusion of Aβ oligomers was demonstrated in vivo and associated with decreased synaptic markers and memory deficits which gives new insight to the pathogenicity of Aβ.

  18. Elevated VGKC-Complex Antibodies in a Boy with Fever-Induced Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy in School-Age Children (FIRES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Marjorie A.; Hanrahan, Donncha; Anderson, Claire E.; O'Kane, Kathryn; Anderson, Jennifer; Casey, Maureen; de Sousa, Carlos; Cross, J. Helen; Wright, Sukvhir; Dale, Russell C.; Vincent, Angela; Kurian, Manju A.

    2011-01-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES) is a clinically recognized epileptic encephalopathy of unknown aetiology. Presentation in previously healthy children is characterized by febrile status epilepticus. A pharmacoresistant epilepsy ensues, occurring in parallel with dramatic cognitive decline and…

  19. Rapid encephalopathy associated with anti-D immune globulin treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Golla, Sunitha; Horkan, Clare; Dogaru, Grigore; Teske, Thomas E; Christopher, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Rho (D) immune globulin intravenous (IV RhIG, WinRho SDF) has been shown to be a safe treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Common side effects of IV RhIG include mild hemolysis, febrile reaction and headache. Significant hemolysis with renal impairment is infrequently noted. A single case of irreversible encephalopathy following IV RhIG has been reported. We report a second case of encephalopathy following an infusion of IV RhIG for treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  20. Carnitine, acylcarnitine and amino acid profiles analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M G; Crocker, J F S; O'Regan, P; Lee, S H S; Geldenhuys, L; Dooley, K; Al-Khalidi, M; Acott, P D

    2007-08-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to analyze multiple serum metabolites for the first time in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy (AHE). AHE is characterized by acute liver failure that can lead to potentially lethal increases in intracranial pressure. We have reproduced AHE in young CD-1 mice exposed from postnatal day (P) 2-13 to the industrial surfactant, Toximul 3409F (Tox), and then infected intranasally on P14 with sublethal doses (LD(10-30)) of mouse-adapted human influenza B (Lee) virus (FluB). The sera analyzed by MS/MS were from mice exhibiting typical markers of Tox-mediated potentiation of viral illness, including reduced weights and blood glucose levels. Most metabolite abnormalities were not evident until five days after viral infection (P19), the time corresponding to the onset of weight loss and mortality. Values for fatty acylcarnitines and amino acids in the Tox+FluB-treated mice were either additive or supra-additive relative to the effects of either treatment alone. Amino acid profiles were consistent with those reported for human AHE. None of the treated mice exhibited signs of carnitine deficiency, and propionylcarnitine levels were normal. On P19, mice given combined Tox+FluB treatment had significant increases in levels of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (C6:0-C12:0 and C14:0-C20:0, respectively), including their monounsaturated metabolites. Levels of medium-chain dicarboxylic and long-chain hydroxy-acylcarnitines were also elevated in the combined treatment group. The results of this study indicate a diffuse mitochondrial dysfunction in Tox+FluB-treated mice that results in a serum metabolite profile unique from those observed in classic inherited metabolic disorders.

  1. Combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen therapy yields better efficacy for patients with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wenping; Xue, Hui; Wang, Baojun; Li, Yuechun; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Changchun; Liang, Furu; Pang, Jiangxia; Yu, Lehua

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (DEACMP) commonly occurs after recovering from acute CO poisoning. This study was performed to assess the efficacy of the combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in patients with DEACMP. Patients and methods A total of 120 patients with DEACMP were recruited and randomly assigned into the experimental group (receiving dexamethasone 5 mg/day or 10 mg/day plus HBO therapy) and control group (HBO therapy as monotherapy). Meanwhile, the conventional treatments were provided for all the patients. We used the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale to assess the cognitive function, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) to assess the neurological function and the remission rate (RR) to assess the clinical efficacy. Myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was also measured. Results After 4 weeks of treatment, compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly higher remission rate (P=0.032), a significantly higher average MMSE score (P=0.037) and a significantly lower average NIHSS score (P=0.002). Meanwhile, there was a trend toward better improvement with dexamethasone 10 mg/day, and the level of MBP in the CSF of patients was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.0001). The addition of dexamethasone did not significantly increase the incidence of adverse events. Conclusion These results indicate that the combined application of dexamethasone and HBO therapy could yield better efficacy for patients with DEACMP and should be viewed as a potential new therapy. PMID:28260864

  2. Contribution of dengue fever to the burden of acute febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea: an age-specific prospective study.

    PubMed

    Senn, Nicolas; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Manong, Doris; Siba, Peter Max; McBride, William John Hannan

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is a major contributor to the burden of febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Dengue fever (DF) is likely to contribute; however, its epidemiology in PNG is poorly understood. We performed a prospective age-stratified study in outpatient clinics investigating the prevalence of DF; 578 patients were enrolled, and 317 patients with a negative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for malaria were tested for dengue. Malaria was confirmed in 52% (301/578, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48-56%), DF was diagnosed in 8% (46/578, 95% CI = 6-10%), and 40% (95% CI = 36-44%) had neither diagnosis. Among the 317 malaria RDT-negative patients, 14% (45/317, 95% CI = 10-18%) had DF. The seroprevalence of dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG) was 83% (204/247, 95% CI = 78-87%), and no dengue hemorrhagic fever was seen. This study provides good evidence for the first time that DF is common in PNG and is responsible for 8% of fever episodes. The common occurrence of DF in a population with presumed previous exposure to dengue is an important observation.

  3. Challenges in diagnosing hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, K

    2015-02-01

    The term "hepatic encephalopathy" (HE) covers the neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic liver disease (CLD). This paper deals with clinical features and diagnosis of HE in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension or porto-systemic shunts. The possible impact of concomitant disorders and the cirrhosis underlying liver disease upon brain function is described emphasizing the need of a detailed diagnostic work up of every individual case before diagnosing HE. Currently used methods for diagnosing minimal or covert hepatic encephalopathy are compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing HE against the background of a multitude of concomitant disorders and diseases that could contribute to brain dysfunction.

  4. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials.

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Omalu, Bennet

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome, which is caused by single, episodic, or repetitive blunt force impacts to the head and transfer of acceleration-deceleration forces to the brain. CTE presents clinically as a composite syndrome of mood disorders and behavioral and cognitive impairment, with or without sensorimotor impairment. Symptoms of CTE may begin with persistent symptoms of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a documented episode of brain trauma or after a latent period that may range from days to weeks to months and years, up to 40 years following a documented episode of brain trauma or cessation of repetitive TBI. Posttraumatic encephalopathy is distinct from CTE, can be comorbid with CTE, and is a clinicopathologic syndrome induced by focal and/or diffuse, gross and/or microscopic destruction of brain tissue following brain trauma. The brain of a CTE sufferer may appear grossly unremarkable, but shows microscopic evidence of primary and secondary proteinopathies. The primary proteinopathy of CTE is tauopathy, while secondary proteinopathies may include, but are not limited to, amyloidopathy and TDP proteinopathy. Reported prevalence rates of CTE in cohorts exposed to TBI ranges from 3 to 80% across age groups.

  6. Efficacy of N-Butylphthalide and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients with Delayed Encephalopathy After Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wenping; Xue, Hui; Wang, Baojun; Li, Yuechun; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Changchun; Pang, Jiangxia

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (DEACMP) is one of the most serious complications after CO poisoning. This study was conducted to explore the efficacy of the combined application of N-Butylphthalide and hyperbaric oxygenation therapy (HBO) on cognitive dysfunction in patients with DEACMP. Material/Methods A total of 184 patients with DEACMP were randomly assigned to either receive HBO or N-Butylphthalide and HBO. Meanwhile, all patients received conventional treatment. The total remission rate (RR) was used to assess the clinical efficacy. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess the cognitive function, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess the neurological function. Results Finally, there were 90 and 94 patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively. After eight weeks of treatment, the total RR in the experimental group (47.9%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (33.3%). Compared to the control group, significantly more patients in the experimental group had MMSE scores of 24–30. The lower NIHSS score in the experimental group showed that N-Butylphthalide had the effect of preservation and restoration of neurological function. No obvious drug toxicity or liver and kidney dysfunction was observed, and there was no significant change in the level of blood glucose and blood lipids. Conclusions These results indicated that the combined application of N-Butylphthalide and HBO could significantly improve the cognitive dysfunction of patients with DEACMP and have great clinical efficacy, which should be further studied. PMID:28352069

  7. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  8. Treatment of portal systemic encephalopathy: standard and new treatments.

    PubMed

    Marín, E; Uribe, M

    1990-07-01

    The management of hepatic encephalopathy should be considered accordingly with the precipitating factor and the type of encephalopathy. Ideally the therapeutic approach must be useful for both acute and chronic forms of encephalopathy. Current treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of certain well-established measures attempting to identify and treat the precipitating factors, and to reduce the intestinal nitrogenous compounds formation and absorption by dietary restriction or bowel-cleansing with catartics or antibiotics such as neomycin, metronidazol, etc. This review describes briefly several therapeutic modalities.

  9. Early use of noninvasive techniques for clearing respiratory secretions during noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinrong; Cui, Zhaobo; Liu, Shuhong; Gao, Xiuling; Gao, Pan; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shufen; Li, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) might be superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPDs). Inefficient clearance of respiratory secretions provokes NPPV failure in patients with hypercapnic encephalopathy (HE). This study compared CMV and NPPV combined with a noninvasive strategy for clearing secretions in HE and AECOPD patients. The present study is a prospective cohort study of AECOPD and HE patients enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 in a critical care unit of a major university teaching hospital in China. A total of 74 patients received NPPV and 90 patients received CMV. Inclusion criteria included the following: physician-diagnosed AECOPD, spontaneous airway clearance of excessive secretions, arterial blood gas analysis requiring intensive care, moderate-to-severe dyspnea, and a Kelly–Matthay scale score of 3 to 5. Exclusion criteria included the following: preexisting psychiatric/neurological disorders unrelated to HE, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, upper airway obstruction, acute coronary syndromes, preadmission tracheostomy or endotracheal intubation, and urgent endotracheal intubation for cardiovascular, psychomotor agitation, or severe hemodynamic conditions. Intensive care unit participants were managed by NPPV. Participants received standard treatment consisting of controlled oxygen therapy during NPPV-free periods; antibiotics, intravenous doxofylline, corticosteroids (e.g., salbutamol and ambroxol), and subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin; and therapy for comorbidities if necessary. Nasogastric tubes were inserted only in participants who developed gastric distension. No pharmacological sedation was administered. The primary and secondary outcome measures included comparative complication rates, durations of ventilation and hospitalization, number of invasive devices/patient, and in-hospital and 1-year mortality

  10. Human Febrile Illness Caused by Encephalomyocarditis Virus Infection, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Blair, Patrick; Nix, W. Allan; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Comer, James A.; Rollin, Pierre; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Olson, James; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Etiologic studies of acute febrile disease were conducted in sites across South America, including Cusco and Iquitos, Peru. Patients’ clinical signs and symptoms were recorded, and acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples were obtained for serologic examination and virus isolation in Vero E6 and C6/36 cells. Virus isolated in Vero E6 cells was identified as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) by electron microscopy and by subsequent molecular diagnostic testing of samples from 2 febrile patients with nausea, headache, and dyspnea. The virus was recovered from acute-phase serum samples from both case-patients and identified with cardiovirus-specific reverse transcription–PCR and sequencing. Serum samples from case-patient 1 showed cardiovirus antibody by immunoglobulin M ELISA (acute phase <8, convalescent phase >1,024) and by neutralization assay (acute phase <10, convalescent phase >1,280). Serum samples from case-patient 2 did not contain antibodies detectable by either assay. Detection of virus in serum strongly supports a role for EMCV in human infection and febrile illness. PMID:19331761

  11. Undiagnosed Acute Viral Febrile Illnesses, Sierra Leone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    illness in this region and mimic Lassa fever, we tested patient serum samples that were negative for malaria parasites and LASV. Using IgM-capture...hyperendemic region and initially are screened for malaria by thick blood smear and, if negative, are tested for LASV. LASV infection is determined by the...display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 07 JUL 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND

  12. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain. PMID:27570396

  13. Noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Laish, Ido; Ben Ari, Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Adult hyperammonaemia is associated with severe liver disease in 90% of cases. In the remainder, noncirrhotic causes should be considered. Measurements of serum ammonia level must be part of the basic work-up in all patients presenting with encephalopathy of unknown origin, even when liver function is normal. Clinician awareness of noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy can contribute to early diagnosis and the initiation of sometimes life-saving treatment. This review focuses on the physiology, aetiology and underlying mechanisms of noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy and discusses the available treatment modalities.

  14. Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome without detectable autoantibodies and response to immunotherapy: a case series and discussion of epileptogenesis in FIRES.

    PubMed

    van Baalen, Andreas; Häusler, Martin; Plecko-Startinig, Barbara; Strautmanis, Jurgis; Vlaho, Stefan; Gebhardt, Boris; Rohr, Axel; Abicht, Angela; Kluger, Gerhard; Stephani, Ulrich; Probst, Christian; Vincent, Angela; Bien, Christian G

    2012-08-01

    Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) is a severe postinfectious epileptic encephalopathy in previously healthy children and has three phases: the initial phase with a simple febrile infection, a few days later the acute phase characterized by a peracute onset of highly recurrent seizures or refractory status epilepticus often with no more fever and generally without additional neurological features (the classical pure seizure phenotype), and last, the chronic phase with a drug-resistant epilepsy and neuropsychological impairments. FIRES seems to be sporadic and very rare: we estimated the annual incidence in children and adolescents by a prospective hospital-based German-wide surveillance as 1 in 1,000,000. Because of the preceding infection and lacking evidence of infectious encephalitis, an immune-mediated pathomechanism and, therefore, a response to immunotherapies may be involved. To test the hypothesis that antibodies against neuronal structures cause FIRES, we analyzed sera of 12 patients aged 2 to 12 years (median 6 years) and cerebral spinal fluids (CSFs) of 3 of these 12 patients with acute or chronic FIRES. We studied six patients (two including CSF) 1 to 14 weeks (median 3 weeks) and six patients 1 to 6 years (median 3.5 years) after seizure onset. All samples were analyzed for antibodies against glutamate receptors of type N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and type α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B-receptors, voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-associated proteins leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein like 2 (CASPR2), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) by a multiparametric recombinant immunofluorescence assay employing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with cDNAs for the antigens. In addition, indirect immunohistochemistry using rat whole-brain sections was done in three patients. Finally, sera of 10 patients were tested for VGKC

  15. Value of plasmapheresis in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Riviello, J J; Halligan, G E; Dunn, S P; Widzer, S J; Foley, C M; Breningstall, G N; Grover, W D

    1990-01-01

    Plasmapheresis is used for treating the complications of liver failure. We performed plasmapheresis on 6 children with hepatic encephalopathy resulting from acute hepatic failure and prospectively assessed its effects on neurologic and electrophysiologic (electroencephalography and evoked potentials) function. Clinical improvement was observed in 3 of 6 patients; changes in the serum ammonia value or the results of initial electrophysiologic tests did not predict the patient response. Two patients underwent transplantation after neurologic improvement was produced by plasmapheresis; however, despite plasmapheresis, 4 patients progressed to brain death. Our data demonstrate that plasmapheresis may transiently improve the encephalopathy of acute hepatic failure but is not curative alone. Therefore, plasmapheresis may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of liver failure, potentially improving the pretransplantation status of the patient.

  16. Role of apolipoprotein E in febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Giray, Ozlem; Ulgenalp, Ayfer; Bora, Elçin; Uran, Nedret; Yilmaz, Ebru; Unalp, Aycan; Erçal, Derya

    2008-10-01

    Apolipoprotein E is consistently associated with the progression of some common human neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., epilepsy. We hypothesized that genetic variations in the apolipoprotein E gene have implications for susceptibility to, and prognoses in, febrile convulsion, which plays an apparent role in the development of epilepsy. We used the polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion to characterize variations of the apolipoprotein E gene. Sixty-nine patients with febrile convulsion (simple/complex) and a corresponding cohort of healthy patients (n = 75) were used. There was no significant difference in genotypic distribution and allelic frequencies of the apolipoprotein E gene between the febrile convulsion and control groups. Comparing subpopulations of the febrile convulsion group (patients with simple and complex febrile convulsion), we noted that no patients with the epsilon3/epsilon4 genotype had complex febrile convulsions. The apolipoprotein E epsilon3/epsilon4 genotype was more frequently seen in the simple febrile than in the complicated febrile convulsion group (9 versus 0 patients, respectively). The data indicate an association with the epsilon3/epsilon4 genotype of the apolipoprotein E gene with a milder phenotype. Although apolipoprotein E4 is not a vulnerability factor regarding febrile convulsions, it seems effective in regard to prognoses.

  17. Super-refractory status epilepticus and febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome treated with anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Kenney-Jung, Daniel L.; Kahoud, Robert J.; Vezzani, Annamaria; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Ho, Mai-Lan; Muskardin, Theresa Wampler; Gleich, Stephen J.; Wirrell, Elaine C.; Howe, Charles L.; Payne, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) is a devastating epileptic encephalopathy with limited treatment options and an unclear etiology. Anakinra is a recombinant version of the human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist used to treat autoinflammatory disorders. This is the first report of anakinra for treatment of a child with super-refractory status epilepticus secondary to FIRES. Anakinra was well-tolerated and effective. Cerebral spinal fluid analysis revealed elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines before treatment that normalized on anakinra, suggesting a potential pathogenic role for neuroinflammation in FIRES. Further studies are required to assess anakinra efficacy and dosing, and to further delineate disease etiology. PMID:27770579

  18. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy - rare encephalopathy with good prognosis].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Patalong-Ogiewa, M; Krzystanek, E

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with increased level of antithyroid antibodies. Two types of clinical manifestation can be described: a vasculitic type with stroke like episodes and diffuse progressive type with deterioration of mental function. Neurologic symptoms are present in euthyreosis as well as in thyroid dysfunction. Because of good response to immunosuppressive therapy, the prompt diagnosis and management of HE are crucial. In this study we present the review of current literature and discuss two representative cases.

  19. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Epilepsy (PACE) practice guideline for the long-term management of the http://www.paceusa.org child with ... on Quality Improvement and tensen J. The long-term risk of epilepsy after febrile seizures in Management SboFSAAoP. Febrile seizures: clinical susceptible subgroups. Am J ...

  20. Wernicke's Encephalopathy following Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, V.K.; De Souza, A.

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children. PMID:23859165

  1. Management of febrile convulsion in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Rogers, Eleanor; Wilkinson, Rachel; Paul, Biswajit

    2015-05-01

    The causes of febrile convulsions are usually benign. Such convulsions are common in children and their long-term consequences are rare. However, other causes of seizures, such as intracranial infections, must be excluded before diagnosis, especially in infants and younger children. Diagnosis is based mainly on history taking, and further investigations into the condition are not generally needed in fully immunised children presenting with simple febrile convulsions. Treatment involves symptom control and treating the cause of the fever. Nevertheless, febrile convulsions in children can be distressing for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced emergency department (ED) nurses. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with febrile convulsion, and best practice for care in EDs. It also includes a reflective case study to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals who manage children who present with febrile convulsion.

  2. Febrile Illness with Skin Rashes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Skin rashes that appear during febrile illnesses are in fact caused by various infectious diseases. Since infectious exanthematous diseases range from mild infections that disappear naturally to severe infectious diseases, focus on and basic knowledge of these diseases is very important. But, these include non-infectious diseases, so that comprehensive knowledge of these other diseases is required. Usually, early diagnostic testing for a febrile illness with a rash is inefficient. For clinical diagnosis of diseases accompanied by skin rash and fever, a complete history must be taken, including recent travel, contact with animals, medications, and exposure to forests and other natural environments. In addition, time of onset of symptoms and the characteristics of the rash itself (morphology, location, distribution) could be helpful in the clinical diagnosis. It is also critical to understand the patient's history of specific underlying diseases. However, diagnostic basic tests could be helpful in diagnosis if they are repeated and the clinical course is monitored. Generally, skin rashes are nonspecific and self-limited. Therefore, it could be clinically meaningful as a characteristic diagnostic finding in a very small subset of specific diseases. PMID:26483989

  3. Febrile urinary tract infections: clinical and laboratory diagnosis, imaging, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Edefonti, Alberto; Tel, Francesca; Testa, Sara; De Palma, Diego

    2014-03-01

    According to the literature, febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common severe bacterial infections occurring in childhood, with potential serious long-term consequences. In recent years, there have been significant developments in our understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical and laboratory issues of febrile UTIs. Studies are focusing on the role of predisposing host factors related to genes regulating immune response, inflammation and fibrosis in the development of acute renal damage and subsequent processes leading to renal scars. All the available guidelines underline the importance of a correct diagnosis of febrile UTI to allow a more rational use of antibiotics and imaging. As a consequence, a shift from aggressive imaging studies to a more restrictive and targeted approach has been recently observed. Regarding the prognosis of febrile UTI, the introduction of prenatal ultrasound studies revealed that a great portion of the alterations at imaging (and thus of the clinical complications), previously attributed to postinfection scarring, were because of congenital kidney and urinary tract abnormalities. Although the long-term consequences of febrile UTIs are difficult to ascertain, it seems that children with febrile UTI, normal renal function and normal kidneys at start present a very low risk of developing decreased renal function or hypertension during follow-up. However, high body temperature and high procalcitonin levels during the acute phase of disease, which are indicative of severe inflammation, and the finding of renal scarring on imaging with DMSA scintigraphy 6 months after febrile UTI, together with the detection of congenital kidney and urinary tract abnormalities, indicate "kidney at risk" in UTI.

  4. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Latt, N; Dore, G

    2014-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute, reversible neuropsychiatric emergency due to thiamine deficiency. Urgent and adequate thiamine replacement is necessary to avoid death or progression to Korsakoff syndrome with largely irreversible brain damage. Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome refers to a condition where features of Wernicke encephalopathy are mixed with those of Korsakoff syndrome. Although thiamine is the cornerstone of treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy, there are no universally accepted guidelines with regard to its optimal dose, mode of administration, frequency of administration or duration of treatment. Currently, different dose recommendations are being made. We present recommendations for the assessment and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy based on literature review and our clinical experience.

  5. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zamora Nava, Luis Eduardo; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Physician does generally not perceive cirrhosis complications, and neuropsychological tests and another especial measurement like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography can only make diagnosis. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  6. Burn encephalopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mohnot, D; Snead, O C; Benton, J W

    1982-07-01

    Among 287 children with burns treated over a recent two-year period, 13 (5%) showed evidence of encephalopathy. The major clinical symptoms were an altered sensorium and seizures. The majority of symptoms began later than 48 hours after the burn and were accompanied by multiple metabolic aberrations including hypocalcemia. Three children had a relapsing course, and 1 had temporarily enlarged cerebral ventricles. Eleven children improved to normal. In the majority of instances, burn encephalopathy probably reflects central nervous system dysfunction resulting from complex metabolic, hematological, and hemodynamic abnormalities rather than from a single metabolic abnormality.

  7. Management of covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Waghray, Nisheet; Mullen, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible progressive neuropsychiatric disorder that encompasses a wide clinical spectrum. Covert hepatic encephalopathy is defined as patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I encephalopathy by West-Haven Criteria. Terminology such as "sub-clinical", "latent", and "minimal" appear to trivialize the disease and have been replaced by the term covert. The lack of clinical signs means that covert hepatic encephalopathy is rarely recognized or treated outside of clinical trials with options for therapy based on patients with episodic hepatic encephalopathy. This review discusses the current available options for therapy in covert hepatic encephalopathy and focuses on non-absorbable disacharides (lactulose or lactitol), antibiotics (rifaximin), probiotics/synbiotics and l-ornithine-l-aspartate.

  8. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy after chemotherapy. Survival after treatment with sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, M; Werlin, S L; Lauer, S J

    1997-12-01

    A 16-year-old boy had hyperammonemia and encephalopathy develop after high-dose chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He was treated successfully with the ammonia-trapping agents sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

  9. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  10. Dengue and Scrub Typhus Coinfection in a Patient Presenting with Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever and scrub typhus are common causes of acute febrile illness of unclear origin in Asia. Though coinfections of many vector-borne diseases have been described, articles on dengue and scrub typhus coinfection are distinctly limited. In case of coinfection with dengue and scrub typhus, vigilant monitoring of vitals, platelets transfusion, and timely treatment with doxycycline are necessary. High degree of suspicion has to be made for coinfection in a patient presenting with febrile illness with thrombocytopenia and deranged laboratory parameters in postmonsoon season in endemic regions in Asia. PMID:28386493

  11. KCNQ2 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millichap, John J.; Park, Kristen L.; Tsuchida, Tammy; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Carmant, Lionel; Flamini, Robert; Joshi, Nishtha; Levisohn, Paul M.; Marsh, Eric; Nangia, Srishti; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Patterson, Marc C.; Pearl, Phillip L.; Porter, Brenda; Ramsey, Keri; McGinnis, Emily L.; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Tracy, Molly; Tran, Baouyen; Venkatesan, Charu; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To advance the understanding of KCNQ2 encephalopathy genotype–phenotype relationships and to begin to assess the potential of selective KCNQ channel openers as targeted treatments. Methods: We retrospectively studied 23 patients with KCNQ2 encephalopathy, including 11 treated with ezogabine (EZO). We analyzed the genotype–phenotype relationships in these and 70 previously described patients. Results: The mean seizure onset age was 1.8 ± 1.6 (SD) days. Of the 20 EEGs obtained within a week of birth, 11 showed burst suppression. When new seizure types appeared in infancy (15 patients), the most common were epileptic spasms (n = 8). At last follow-up, seizures persisted in 9 patients. Development was delayed in all, severely in 14. The KCNQ2 variants identified introduced amino acid missense changes or, in one instance, a single residue deletion. They were clustered in 4 protein subdomains predicted to poison tetrameric channel functions. EZO use (assessed by the treating physicians and parents) was associated with improvement in seizures and/or development in 3 of the 4 treated before 6 months of age, and 2 of the 7 treated later; no serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: KCNQ2 variants cause neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy of widely varying severity. Pathogenic variants in epileptic encephalopathy are clustered in “hot spots” known to be critical for channel activity. For variants causing KCNQ2 channel loss of function, EZO appeared well tolerated and potentially beneficial against refractory seizures when started early. Larger, prospective studies are needed to enable better definition of prognostic categories and more robust testing of novel interventions. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that EZO is effective for refractory seizures in patients with epilepsy due to KCNQ2 encephalopathy. PMID:27602407

  12. Febrile illnesses of different etiology among outpatients in four health centers in Northwestern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Animut, Abebe; Mekonnen, Yalemtsehay; Shimelis, Damte; Ephraim, Eden

    2009-03-01

    Fever of different etiology is common in tropical and subtropical countries of the world. Etiological agents of febrile illnesses were assessed in 653 acute febrile patients aged 3 to 17 years who attended the outpatient departments of Dembecha Health Center, Jiga Health Center, Quarit Health Center, and Finoteselam Hospital in western Gojjam zone, northwestern Ethiopia. Malaria was the most prevalent illness, infecting 62% of all cases. Its prevalence varied significantly from 52% (Dembecha) to 72.7% (Quarit) (chi(2)=15.02, P=0.000). Plasmodium falciparum was the first cause of malaria (47.3%) followed by P. vivax (23%). Mixed infection of both P. falciparum and P. vivax was found in 7.2% of the cases. The other febrile infections were pneumonia (7%), typhoid (5.8%), typhus (5.1%), and brucellosis (2.6%). The availability of diagnostic facilities and the awareness of the community regarding the prevalence of non-malaria febrile illnesses are very low, and these illnesses are diagnosed clinically. As these illnesses are nonspecific, especially during the early stages of onset, misdiagnosis and mistreatment can occur. Therefore, it is recommended that the necessary diagnostic materials and awareness should be in place for prompt treatment of febrile cases in these districts.

  13. [Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Signaté, A; Olindo, S; Chausson, N; Cassinoto, C; Edimo Nana, M; Saint Vil, M; Cabre, P; Smadja, D

    2009-03-01

    Ingestion of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) can induce severe intoxication in subjects with chronic renal failure. Oxalate plays a key role in the neurotoxicity of star fruit. We report the cases of two patients with unknown chronic renal insufficiency who developed severe encephalopathy after ingestion of star fruit. The two patients developed intractable hiccups, vomiting, impaired consciousness and status epilepticus. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging showed cortical and thalamic hyperintense lesions related to epileptic status. They improved after being submitted to continuous hemofiltration which constitutes the most effective treatment during the acute phase.

  14. Fatal rhinocerebral mucormycosis under the shade of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ataseven, Hilmi; Yüksel, Ilhami; Gültuna, Selcan; Köklü, Seyfettin; Uysal, Serkan; Basar, Omer; Sasmaz, Nurgül

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an acutely fatal infection that occurs in immuncompromised patients. Cirrhosis is an acquired immune deficiency state and those patients are more prone to develop opportunistic infections. A 42-years-old cirrhotic man was admitted to our gastroenterology clinic with hepatic encephalopathy. Although he recovered from encephalopathy with supportive measurements, he developed paresthesia on the face. He was diagnosed with rhinocerebral mucormycosis and antifungal therapy was administered. Surgical treatment couldn.t be performed because of his bleeding diathesis and poor general condition. He succumbed on the 12th day of his admission.

  15. Galactosaemia: an unusual cause of chronic bilirubin encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Tanushree; Thukral, Anu; Agarwal, Ramesh; Sankar, Mari Jeeva

    2015-01-23

    Galactosaemia is a disorder of galactose metabolism in which raised levels of galactose and galactose-1-phosphate damage various organs. Although galactosaemia is a common metabolic liver disease in childhood, it is a rare cause of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring intervention. We report an unusual case of neonatal galactosaemia that at presentation had features of acute bilirubin encephalopathy requiring exchange transfusion and at discharge had features of chronic bilirubin encephalopathy. This case report emphasises the need for timely suspicion and diagnosis of this disease for prevention of chronic morbidity.

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in children: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Emeksiz, Serhat; Kutlu, Nurettin Onur; Çaksen, Hüseyin; Alkan, Gülsüm; Yıkmaz, Hülya Şeker; Tokgöz, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is characterized by hypertension, seizure, headache, clouding of consciousness, and visual disturbance, and is diagnosed in the presence of typical lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. We retrospectively evaluated five patients who were diagnosed as having posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and followed up in Meram Medical Faculty, Pediatric Intensive Care and Hematology wards, between January 2010 and January 2014. We reviewed the demographic and clinical data, and neuroimaging findings. The primary diseases of the subjects included acute lymphocytic leukemia (n=2), Henoch-Schönlein purpura (n=1), systemic lupus erythematous (n=1), and acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (n=1). The mean age was 10±4.58 years (range, 5–14 years). Acute elevation of blood pressure was found in all patients (n=5). Initial neurologic manifestations included seizure, clouding of consciousness, headache, and visual disturbance. After the diagnosis was made through clinical evaluations and magnetic resonance imaging, complete clinical recovery was obtained in all patients with the appropriate therapeutic approach. In conclusion, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with encephalopathy and underlying diseases such as nephritis, vasculitis, malignancy accompanied by hypertension, and a history of use of medication. PMID:28123335

  17. Prevalence of Bacterial Febrile Illnesses in Children in Kilosa District, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Chipwaza, Beatrice; Mhamphi, Ginethon G.; Ngatunga, Steve D.; Selemani, Majige; Amuri, Mbaraka; Mugasa, Joseph P.; Gwakisa, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial etiologies of non-malaria febrile illnesses have significantly become important due to high mortality and morbidity, particularly in children. Despite their importance, there are few reports on the epidemiology of these diseases in Tanzania, and the true burden of such illnesses remains unknown. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of leptospirosis, brucellosis, typhoid fever and urinary tract infections and their rate of co-infections with malaria. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Kilosa district hospital in Tanzania for 6 months. Febrile children aged from 2–13 years were recruited from the outpatient department. Patients were screened by serological tests such as IgM and IgG ELISA, and microscopic agglutination test. Results A total of 370 patients were enrolled; of these 85 (23.0%) had malaria parasites, 43 (11.6%) had presumptive acute leptospirosis and 26/200 (13%) had confirmed leptospirosis. Presumptive acute brucellosis due to B. abortus was identified among 26 (7.0%) of patients while B. melitensis was detected in 57 (15.4%) of the enrolled patients. Presumptive typhoid fever due to S. Typhi was identified in thirty eight (10.3%) of the participants and 69 (18.6%) had urinary tract infections. Patients presented with similar symptoms; therefore, the identification of these diseases could not be done based on clinical ground alone. Co-infections between malaria and bacterial febrile illnesses were observed in 146 patients (39.5%). Although antibacterials and/or anti-malarials were prescribed in most patients, some patients did not receive the appropriate treatment. Conclusion The study has underscored the importance of febrile bacterial diseases including zoonoses such as leptospirosis and brucellosis in febrile children, and thus such illnesses should be considered by clinicians in the differential diagnoses of febrile diseases. However, access to diagnostic tests for discrimination of febrile illnesses is

  18. [Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis: clinical-pathophysiological correlation, diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Sivolap, Iu P; Damulin, I V

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis are severe unfavorable forms of alcoholic brain damage with poor prognosis. Thiamine deficiency represents a common cause of both diseases. In many cases, Korsakoff's psychosis develops in the outcome of Wernicke's encephalopathy, which, along with the general etiology, lets talk about a single disease - Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, acute (usually reversible) stage of which is Wernicke's encephalopathy and a chronic one (often irreversible) is Korsakoff psychosis. The dramatic paradox of Wernicke's encephalopathy is that in most cases it is difficult to detect, but early diagnosed cases are quite easy to cure. Unrecognized and therefore go untreated Wernicke's encephalopathy is a serious threat to the health and lives of patients, worsens the processes of brain aging and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. The basic approach to the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is long-term parenteral administration of thiamine, often in high doses. As an adjuvant means of therapy memantine is considered.

  19. GABAergic transmission in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE)(1) is a neuropsychiatric disorder caused by chronic or acute liver failure. Nearly thirty years ago a hypothesis was formulated explaining the neuropathology of HE by increased GABAergic tone. Recent progress in the GABAA-receptor (GABAAR) molecular pharmacology and biochemistry as well as the physiology of GABAergic transmission provided better understanding of GABA's role in health and disease. A detailed analysis of neuronal populations and their GABAergic afferents affected in HE is still missing. The slow progress in understanding the pathology of GABAergic transmission in HE is due to the high complexity of brain circuitries controlled by multiple types of GABAergic interneurons and the large variety of GABAAR, which are differently affected by pathological conditions and not yet fully identified. The mechanisms of action of the GABAAR agonist taurine, allosteric positive modulators (inhibitory neurosteroids, anaesthetics, benzodiazepines and histamine) and inhibitors of the GABAAR (excitatory neurosteroids, Ro15-4513) are discussed with respect to HE pathophysiology. Perspectives for GABAergic drugs in the symptomatic treatment of HE are suggested.

  20. Pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Lado, Fred A; Rubboli, Guido; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Capovilla, Pippo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Moshé, Solomon L

    2013-11-01

    The application of metabolic imaging and genetic analysis, and now the development of appropriate animal models, has generated critical insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathies. In this article we present ideas intended to move from the lesions associated with epileptic encephalopathies toward understanding the effects of these lesions on the functioning of the brain, specifically of the cortex. We argue that the effects of focal lesions may be magnified through the interaction between cortical and subcortical structures, and that disruption of subcortical arousal centers that regulate cortex early in life may lead to alterations of intracortical synapses that affect a critical period of cognitive development. Impairment of interneuronal function globally through the action of a genetic lesion similarly causes widespread cortical dysfunction manifesting as increased delta slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and as developmental delay or arrest clinically. Finally, prolonged focal epileptic activity during sleep (as occurring in the syndrome of continuous spike-wave in slow sleep, or CSWSS) might interfere with local slow wave activity at the site of the epileptic focus, thereby impairing the neural processes and, possibly, the local plastic changes associated with learning and other cognitive functions. Seizures may certainly add to these pathologic processes, but they are likely not necessary for the development of the cognitive pathology. Nevertheless, although seizures may be either a consequence or symptom of the underlying lesion, their effective treatment can improve outcomes as both clinical and experimental studies may suggest. Understanding their substrates may lead to novel, effective treatments for all aspects of the epileptic encephalopathy phenotype.

  1. SCN2A encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Katherine B.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Tambunan, Dimira; Mackay, Mark T.; Rodriguez-Casero, Victoria; Webster, Richard; Clark, Damian; Freeman, Jeremy L.; Calvert, Sophie; Olson, Heather E.; Mandelstam, Simone; Poduri, Annapurna; Mefford, Heather C.; Harvey, A. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: De novo SCN2A mutations have recently been associated with severe infantile-onset epilepsies. Herein, we define the phenotypic spectrum of SCN2A encephalopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with an SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy underwent electroclinical phenotyping. Results: Patients were aged 0.7 to 22 years; 3 were deceased. Seizures commenced on day 1–4 in 8, week 2–6 in 2, and after 1 year in 2. Characteristic features included clusters of brief focal seizures with multiple hourly (9 patients), multiple daily (2), or multiple weekly (1) seizures, peaking at maximal frequency within 3 months of onset. Multifocal interictal epileptiform discharges were seen in all. Three of 12 patients had infantile spasms. The epileptic syndrome at presentation was epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) in 7 and Ohtahara syndrome in 2. Nine patients had improved seizure control with sodium channel blockers including supratherapeutic or high therapeutic phenytoin levels in 5. Eight had severe to profound developmental impairment. Other features included movement disorders (10), axial hypotonia (11) with intermittent or persistent appendicular spasticity, early handedness, and severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Mutations arose de novo in 11 patients; paternal DNA was unavailable in one. Conclusions: Review of our 12 and 34 other reported cases of SCN2A encephalopathy suggests 3 phenotypes: neonatal-infantile–onset groups with severe and intermediate outcomes, and a childhood-onset group. Here, we show that SCN2A is the second most common cause of EIMFS and, importantly, does not always have a poor developmental outcome. Sodium channel blockers, particularly phenytoin, may improve seizure control. PMID:26291284

  2. Scrub typhus presenting as an acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Kundavaram, Abhilash Pp; Das, Sohini; George, Varghese M

    2014-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a mite-borne infectious disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, which presents as an acute febrile illness with headache, myalgia, breathlessness, and an eschar, a pathognomonic sign, in a varying proportion of patients. However, this illness can present unusually with fever and severe abdominal pain mimicking acute abdomen. A careful search for an eschar in all patients with an acute febrile illness would provide a valuable diagnostic clue and avoid unnecessary investigations and surgical exploration.

  3. Wernicke encephalopathy with atypical magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kuang-Chung; Kuo, Shu-Fan; Chen, Lu-An

    2012-11-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Typical clinical manifestations are mental change, ataxia, and ocular abnormalities. Wernicke encephalopathy is an important differential diagnosis in all patients with acute mental change. However, the disorder is greatly underdiagnosed. Clinical suspicion, detailed history taking, and neurologic evaluations are important for early diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently considered the diagnostic method of choice. Typical MRI findings of WE are symmetrical involvement of medial thalamus, mammillary body, and periaqueductal gray matter. Prompt thiamine supplement is important in avoiding unfavorable outcomes. Here, we report a case of alcoholic WE with typical clinical presentation but with atypical MRI. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showing symmetrical hyperintensity lesions in dentate nuclei of cerebellum, olivary bodies, and dorsal pons. Although atypical MRI findings are more common in nonalcoholic WE, it can also occur in alcoholic WE. This article is aimed to highlight the potential pitfalls in diagnosing acute mental change, the importance of clinical suspicion, and early treatment in WE.

  4. Febrile Convulsions: Their Significance for Later Intellectual Development and Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that intellectual and behavioral outcomes in children who have had febrile convulsions are dependent on preseizure status, unilaterality of the initial fit, recurrent febrile seizures, continued neurological abnormalities, the advent of fits when afebrile, and socioeconomic status. Suggests that a febrile convulsion should be followed up…

  5. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  6. A Rare Complication Developing After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Wernicke’s Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Tan, Meliha; Demir, Şenay; Yeral, Mahmut; Korur, Aslı; Boğa, Can; Özdoğu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin. Thiamine deficiency can present as a central nervous system disorder known as Wernicke’s encephalopathy, which classically manifests as confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke’s encephalopathy has rarely been reported following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, we report Wernicke’s encephalopathy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who had been receiving prolonged total parenteral nutrition after haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported from Turkey in the literature. PMID:25912759

  7. Rodent-associated Bartonella Febrile Illness, Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Iralu, Jonathan; Bai, Ying; Crook, Larry; Tempest, Bruce; Simpson, Gary; McKenzie, Taylor

    2006-01-01

    Serum specimens from 114 patients hospitalized with a febrile illness were tested with an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using Bartonella antigens prepared from 6 species of sigmodontine rodents and 3 known human Bartonella pathogens: B. henselae, B. quintana, and B. elizabethae. Acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from 5 of these patients showed seroconversion with an IFA titer >512 to rodent-associated Bartonella antigens. The highest titer was against antigen derived from the white-throated woodrat (Neotoma albigula), although this rodent is not necessarily implicated as the source of infection. Three of the 5 who seroconverted showed no cross-reaction to the 3 Bartonella human pathogens. Common clinical characteristics were fever, chills, myalgias, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and transaminasemia. Although antibodies to Bartonella are cross-reactive, high-titer seroconversions to rodent-associated Bartonella antigens in adults with common clinical characteristics should stimulate the search for additional Bartonella human pathogens. PMID:16836824

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and interleukin-6 levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of children with viral infection-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Morichi, Shinichiro; Yamanaka, Gaku; Ishida, Yu; Oana, Shingo; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Kawashima, Hisashi

    2014-11-01

    We investigated changes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 levels in pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) infections, particularly viral infection-induced encephalopathy. Over a 5-year study period, 24 children hospitalized with encephalopathy were grouped based on their acute encephalopathy type (the excitotoxicity, cytokine storm, and metabolic error types). Children without CNS infections served as controls. In serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, BDNF and IL-6 levels were increased in all encephalopathy groups, and significant increases were noted in the influenza-associated and cytokine storm encephalopathy groups. Children with sequelae showed higher BDNF and IL-6 levels than those without sequelae. In pediatric patients, changes in serum and CSF BDNF and IL-6 levels may serve as a prognostic index of CNS infections, particularly for the diagnosis of encephalopathy and differentiation of encephalopathy types.

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not associated with mutations in aquaporin-4.

    PubMed

    Matiello, Marcelo; Muralidharan, Rajanandini; Sun, David; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by acute reversible subcortical vasogenic edema that is typically bilateral and self-limiting. It preferentially affects posterior regions of the brain. Clinical manifestations include encephalopathy, seizures, headache, and cortical blindness. PRES may be precipitated by hypertensive crises such as eclampsia and by immunosuppressive agents. The pathophysiology of PRES is incompletely understood. Disordered cerebral autoregulation leading to protein and fluid extravasation is thought to be important.(1) Other theories implicate endothelial dysfunction or vasospasm.(2).

  10. Hashimoto Encephalopathy in Case of Progressive Cognitive Impairment; a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tafakhori, Abbas; Siroos, Bahaadin; Ghabaii, Mojdeh; Harirchain, Mohammad Hossein; Tajdini, Masih; Garg, Sushil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare condition characterized by atypical psychiatric and heterogeneous neurological manifestations such as acute cerebral ischemia, seizure, tremors, myoclonus, psychosis, depression, cognitive disorders, and fluctuating loss of consciousness. Here, a case of 28 year-old man was reported who referred to the emergency department (ED) with different acute neurologic disorders and final diagnose of HE. PMID:26495368

  11. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior “watershed” areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis. PMID:26515750

  12. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  13. Inheritance of Febrile Seizures in Sudden Unexplained Death in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Ingrid A.; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Krous, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians. PMID:22490769

  14. Comparative Neuroprotective Effects of Dexamethasone and Minocycline during Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Maha; Abdel Wahab, Zainab; Eshra, Mohamed; Rashed, Laila; Sharawy, Nivin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Encephalopathy and brain edema are serious complications of acute liver injury and may lead to rapid death of patients. The present study was designed to investigate the role of the inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the cytotoxic brain oedema and the neuroprotective effects of both minocycline and dexamethasone. Methods. 48 male albino rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, acute liver injury (ALI) group, minocycline pretreated ALI group, and dexamethasone pretreated ALI group. 24 hours after acute liver injury serum ammonia, liver enzymes, brain levels of heme oxygenase-1 gene, iNOS gene expression, nitrite/nitrate, and cytokines were measured. In addition, the grades of encephalopathy and brain water content were assessed. Results. ALI was associated with significant increases in all measured inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, iNOS gene expression, and nitrite/nitrate. Both minocycline and dexamethasone significantly modulated the inflammatory changes and the oxidative/nitrosative stress associated with ALI. However, only minocycline but not dexamethasone significantly reduced the cytotoxic brain oedema. Conclusion. Both minocycline and dexamethasone could modulate inflammatory and oxidative changes observed in brain after ALI and could be novel preventative therapy for hepatic encephalopathy episodes.

  15. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  16. Urinary tract infection in febrile convulsions.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P; Verrier Jones, K

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective review of the casenotes of 403 children admitted to hospital with febrile convulsions was performed to estimate the frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection and examine medical practice in making this diagnosis. A total of 228 (56%) children had urine cultured: 150 bag specimens, 76 clean voided samples, and two suprapubic aspirates. There were 13 'probable' and six 'possible' infected urine samples together representing 5% of the whole study population (n = 403), 8% of those having urine cultured (n = 228), and 12% of those providing uncontaminated urine samples (n = 155). Those with first febrile convulsions and those aged under 18 months were more likely to have urine examined. Practices varied significantly between different hospitals. These results suggest that there has indeed been a need for practice guidelines, and that further audit of practice is required to assess their impact. PMID:1755639

  17. [Epidemiological surveillance of febrile rash illness].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Gabriela Fidela; Rojas-Mendoza, Teresita; Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; Maldonado-Burgos, Martha Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: en 2011 se detectaron tres casos importados de sarampión, por lo que se intensificó la vigilancia epidemiológica con emisión de alertas epidemiológicas. El objetivo de este estudio es describir el fenómeno de la intensificación de la vigilancia epidemiológica de enfermedad febril exantemática ante la importación de casos confirmados de sarampión en el territorio nacional en el Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Métodos: se obtuvieron los casos del sistema especial de vigilancia epidemiológica de 2011, se compararon con el año previo. Se determinó t de Student para diferencia de medias, prueba de Wilson para proporciones; ambas con un valor alfa del 0.05. Resultados: en 2011 se notificaron 2786 casos de enfermedad febril exantemática, 51.2 % más casos que el año anterior; el número de casos reportados con relación a los esperados aumentó en 29 de las 35 Delegaciones del IMSS con un incremento en el promedio de casos notificados a partir de la semana 26. El 67.4 % de los casos notificados se concentró en los menores de 5 años de edad. Conclusiones: se apreció un incremento importante de casos notificados de enfermedad febril exantemática en comparación con el año previo. El Instituto cuenta con un sistema de vigilancia epidemiológica de enfermedad febril exantemática robusto y flexible, que ha permitido identificar riesgos a la población.

  18. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  19. A case of Wernicke encephalopathy combined with disulfiram intoxication.

    PubMed

    Tartara, Elena; Fanucchi, Simona; D'Errico, Ignazio; Farina, Lisa M; Casoni, Francesca; Sinforiani, Elena; Micieli, Giuseppe; Costa, Alfredo

    2013-06-01

    There have been several reports of disulfiram intoxication, but little evidence of neurologic conditions resulting from disulfiram-induced brain damage combined with Wernicke encephalopathy-associated lesions. We report a rare patient with both Wernicke encephalopathy and disulfiram intoxication. This 50-year-old woman, who was taking disulfiram for chronic alcohol abuse, presented with an acute confusional state, dysarthria, nystagmus, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and paraparesis. Biochemical serum and cerebrospinal fluid analyses were normal. An electromyogram detected a motor polyneuropathy. Cognitive assessment revealed severe impairment of memory, attention, and logical and executive abilities. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement showed brain lesions consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy, but also symmetric hyperintensities on T2-weighted images in the globus pallidus. Stopping the disulfiram and treating with hydration, high-dose thiamine supplements, and benzodiazepines significantly improved the patient's consciousness and oculomotor function. A magnetic resonance imaging scan after 1 month of treatment showed complete disappearance of the brain lesions and the hyperintensities in the globus pallidus. After a further month of intensive neurorehabilitation, the patient was able to interact with the medical staff, and her neuropsychological tests showed only mild memory impairment. Patients with alcoholism who present at emergency departments are at high risk for misdiagnosis, especially because there is no specific routine laboratory test for detecting asymptomatic disulfiram intoxication. Although uncommon, the combination of Wernicke encephalopathy and disulfiram intoxication should be suspected in patients with alcoholism. The disorder can be detected through a careful history and prompt clinical evaluation, together with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  20. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a child with high dose thiamine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Won; Yi, Yoon Young; Han, Jung Woo; Kim, Heung Dong; Lee, Joon Soo

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neurological disorder characterized by mental confusion, oculomotor dysfunction, and ataxia. It has been reported in individuals with alcohol dependence, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral nutrition without vitamin supplementation. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old male patient with neuroblastoma and a history of poor oral intake and nausea for 3 months. After admission, he showed gait disturbances, nystagmus, and excessive dizziness; his mental state, however, indicated he was alert, which did not fit the classical triad of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was made only after brain magnetic resonance imaging and serum thiamine level analyses were performed. The patient's symptoms remained after 5 days of treatment with 100-mg thiamine once daily; thus, we increased the dosage to 500 mg 3 times daily, 1,500 mg per day. His symptoms then improved after 20 days of replacement therapy. This case report describes a pediatric patient who was promptly diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy, despite only 2 suspicious symptoms, and who completely recovered after high doses of thiamine were given intravenously. PMID:25550705

  1. Intermittent treatment of febrile convulsions with nitrazepam.

    PubMed

    Vanasse, M; Masson, P; Geoffroy, G; Larbrisseau, A; David, P C

    1984-08-01

    Intermittent oral or rectal administration of diazepam for the prophylactic treatment of febrile convulsions has given results comparable to the continuous use of phenobarbital while limiting side effects and risks of toxicity. Since we believe that nitrazepam is a better anticonvulsant than diazepam, we performed a study to evaluate the effectiveness of this medication in the prophylactic treatment of febrile convulsions. Nitrazepam was given only when the children had fever and almost exclusively in children with a high risk of recurrence (less than 12 months of age at first convulsion; atypical convulsion; one or several previous convulsions). Thirty one children with a high risk of recurrence received nitrazepam. The rate of recurrence in this group was 19.3% after a follow-up of 16 months, compared to 45.8% in 24 children who also had a high risk of recurrence but in whom the parents refused the medication or gave it inadequately (p less than 0.05). Fifty one children with a low risk of recurrence also were evaluated and followed for at least 12 months (mean 15.4 months). Six were treated with nitrazepam, mostly because of parental anxiety, and none had a recurrence; of the 45 untreated children in this group, 6 (13.6%) had another convulsion. These results show the efficiency of nitrazepam in the prophylactic treatment of febrile convulsions.

  2. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  3. Chikungunya and dengue fever among hospitalized febrile patients in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Julian T; Munishi, O Michael; Ooi, Eng Eong; Howe, Shiqin; Lim, Wen Yan; Chow, Angelia; Morrissey, Anne B; Bartlett, John A; Onyango, Jecinta J; Maro, Venance P; Kinabo, Grace D; Saganda, Wilbrod; Gubler, Duane J; Crump, John A

    2012-01-01

    Consecutive febrile admissions were enrolled at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed acute Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Dengue virus (DENV), and flavivirus infection were defined as a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result. Presumptive acute DENV infection was defined as a positive anti-DENV immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunsorbent assay (ELISA) result, and prior flavivirus exposure was defined as a positive anti-DENV IgG ELISA result. Among 870 participants, PCR testing was performed on 700 (80.5%). Of these, 55 (7.9%) had confirmed acute CHIKV infection, whereas no participants had confirmed acute DENV or flavivirus infection. Anti-DENV IgM serologic testing was performed for 747 (85.9%) participants, and of these 71 (9.5%) had presumptive acute DENV infection. Anti-DENV IgG serologic testing was performed for 751 (86.3%) participants, and of these 80 (10.7%) had prior flavivirus exposure. CHIKV infection was more common among infants and children than adults and adolescents (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, P = 0.026) and among HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression (OR 10.5, P = 0.007). CHIKV infection is an important but unrecognized cause of febrile illness in northern Tanzania. DENV or other closely related flaviviruses are likely also circulating.

  4. [Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by the use of diet pills and unbalanced diet].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Adrián; Aradi, Gabriella; Várallyay, György; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Bereczki, Dániel; Vastagh, Ildikó

    2014-03-23

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially life-threatening, neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed and, without prompt treatment, the condition can lead to the chronic form of the disease, Korsakoff's syndrome or even death. In developed countries Wernicke's encephalopathy has been associated with alcoholism, but in recent years there has been an increasing number of non-alcoholic cases. Authors report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed oculomotor dysfunction, encephalopathy and ataxia as a result of an extreme diet and use of diet pills. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was supported by the resolution of neurological signs after parenteral thiamine replacement. This case is presented because of the rare etiology and diagnostic difficulty, and the latest diagnostic and therapic guidelines are also highlighted.

  5. Simple febrile convulsions in children: explain and reassure the parents.

    PubMed

    2002-02-01

    (1) Simple febrile convulsions (brief and generalised) in children carry a high risk of recurrence during new febrile episodes (30-50%), especially while the child is under the age of 3 years. These relapses are rarely severe and only occur during a minority of febrile episodes. Later onset of epilepsy is rare. (2) Long term treatment with phenobarbital and valproic acid reduce the risk of relapse but carry a risk of bothersome or severe adverse effects. These treatments are rarely warranted in this setting. (3) Oral diazepam administration to a febrile child has moderate preventive efficacy, which is further limited by the difficulty of timing the treatment correctly. Oral diazepam has frequent but generally mild adverse effects. (4) Antipyretics are not very effective at preventing febrile convulsions but can make the child more comfortable. (5) Parents are often upset when they first see their child have a febrile convulsion. It is important to take the time to reassure them.

  6. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  7. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole.

  8. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  9. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Abdulhadi; Aldarmahi, Ahmad; Hmoud, Mohammed; Marzuk, Yousef; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological syndrome characterized by headache, altered mental status, seizures, or loss of vision. In this study, we report the largest series of PRES coming from Saudi Arabia and explore the etiology, clinical presentation, and outcome. We also report new imaging findings associated with this condition. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of all cases of PRES admitted to King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between the years 2005 and 2015. A neurologist reviewed all charts and analyzed the clinical presentations, etiological factors, and outcomes, and a neuroradiologist reviewed the imaging studies. Only patients with clinical and imaging features consistent with PRES were included in the study. Results: We collected 31 patients who had clinical and radiological features consistent with PRES. Females were more affected than males (18 females and 13 males), and patients’ age ranged from 6 to 95 years, with a mean of 38.3 years. Patients were treated by removing the precipitating causes and treating the underlying conditions. Resolution of neurologic signs occurred within 2 to 3 weeks in all patients. Conclusion: In our opinion, PRES itself is usually a benign condition with complete recovery if the condition is recognized early and managed appropriately. Although clinical signs are nonspecific, the constellation of symptoms including headache, visual problems, seizures, and altered level of consciousness should suggest the possibility of PRES, especially in high-risk group. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging are often characteristic and may be the first clue to the diagnosis. PMID:28042366

  10. Canine congenital portosystemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Maddison, J E

    1988-08-01

    The case records of 21 dogs with congenital portosystemic encephalopathy are reviewed. The disorder was most common in Australian cattledogs (blue heelers; 8 cases), Old English sheepdogs (3 cases) and Maltese terriers (3 cases). Extra-hepatic shunts occurred in small breeds, with the exception of 1 cattledog, while intra-hepatic shunts occurred in the medium to large breeds. The most common clinical pathology abnormalities were abnormal ammonia tolerance, mild to moderate increases in plasma alanine aminotransferase or alkaline phosphatase concentrations, decreased total serum protein concentrations, increased fasting ammonia concentrations and ammonium biurate crystalluria. Radiological examination revealed that all the dogs had a small liver. The kidneys were enlarged in 5 of 10 dogs in which kidney size could be estimated. Surgical ligation of an extra-hepatic shunt was successful in 2 of 4 dogs in which it was attempted. Medical management resulted in alleviation of clinical signs in 5 of 8 dogs. The period of successful treatment ranged from a few months to over a year.

  11. Approach to clinical syndrome of jaundice and encephalopathy in tropics.

    PubMed

    Anand, Anil C; Garg, Hitendra K

    2015-03-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture.

  12. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  13. Susceptibility to febrile seizures: more than just a faulty thermostat!

    PubMed

    Prasad, Asuri N; Seshia, Shashi S

    2009-05-01

    Febrile seizures, always a hot topic, continue to fire up the interest of a wide spectrum of clinical and basic neuroscientists. Several clinical investigators, amongst them the Halifax group (spearheaded by the Camfields to whom we owe a great debt of gratitude for their contributions in this field), have provided us with a sound foundation for clinical management. We now need to explore febrile seizures in new ways to clarify factors and identify mechanisms that contribute to the intriguing age-dependent susceptibility. The complex processes involved in thermoregulation and the febrile response are important pieces of the puzzle. The contributory factors are likely different for isolated simple febrile, recurrent febrile and complex febrile seizures. A 'systems biology approach' is needed to investigate the intricate genome-proteome-metabolome interaction in determining susceptibility. Population studies that incorporate current clinical, experimental, infectious and molecular genetic knowledge in their concept and design will help to 'conquer' the final frontiers of febrile seizures. In 2006, Engel suggested that febrile seizures could 'encompass many different entities', an increasingly plausible opinion. A higher profile for febrile seizures and related syndromes in the ILAE classification scheme will further catalyze progress in the field. The resultant knowledge can only improve management.

  14. Parent Experience of Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Monica E; Donohue, Pamela K; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Northington, Frances J; Boss, Renee D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to characterize the parent experience of caring for an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. In this mixed-methods study, we performed semistructured interviews with parents whose infants were enrolled in an existing longitudinal cohort study of therapeutic hypothermia between 2011 and 2014. Thematic saturation was achieved after 20 interviews. Parent experience of caring for a child with neonatal encephalopathy was characterized by 3 principal themes. Theme 1: Many families described cumulative loss and grief throughout the perinatal crisis, critical neonatal course, and subsequent missed developmental milestones. Theme 2: Families experienced entangled infant and broader family interests. Theme 3: Parents evolved into and found meaning in their role as an advocate. These data offer insight into the lived experience of parenting an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. Primary data from parents can serve as a useful framework to guide the development and interpretation of parent-centered outcomes.

  15. Electroencephalography of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    There is an increasing recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy with the hope for earlier diagnosis and expedited and improved treatment. Although antibody testing remains the definitive clinical diagnostic feature, the presentation of a rapid dementia, behavioral changes, and seizures leads to investigation using cerebral imaging, electroencephalography, and cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the diagnosis and also to exclude similar disorders. The electroencephalographer may be asked to comment on the types of electroencephalography abnormality and provide input toward the diagnosis of limbic encephalopathy. This article reviews the literature on limbic paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic encephalopathies, providing descriptions and examples of the electroencephalography findings. Typically, there are patterns of slow theta and delta activity and different patterns of temporal and frontal epileptic activity.

  16. Cortical blindness in a child with acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaarthigeyan, K; Vijayalakshmi, A M

    2012-01-01

    The association between hypertensive encephalopathy and cortical blindness in children with acute glomerulonephritis is extremely rare. We report the case of a 9-year old girl who presented with headache, seizures, altered sensorium, hematuria, and transient cortical blindness as a complication of hypertensive encephalopathy which showed complete reversal following normalization of blood pressure and an underlying post-infectious acute glomerulonephritis was revealed.

  17. GNAO1 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Danti, Federica Rachele; Galosi, Serena; Romani, Marta; Montomoli, Martino; Carss, Keren J.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Parrini, Elena; Bianchini, Claudia; McShane, Tony; Dale, Russell C.; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Shah, Ubaid; Mahant, Neil; Ng, Joanne; McTague, Amy; Samanta, Rajib; Vadlamani, Gayatri; Valente, Enza Maria; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Kurian, Manju A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe better the motor phenotype, molecular genetic features, and clinical course of GNAO1-related disease. Methods: We reviewed clinical information, video recordings, and neuroimaging of a newly identified cohort of 7 patients with de novo missense and splice site GNAO1 mutations, detected by next-generation sequencing techniques. Results: Patients first presented in early childhood (median age of presentation 10 months, range 0–48 months), with a wide range of clinical symptoms ranging from severe motor and cognitive impairment with marked choreoathetosis, self-injurious behavior, and epileptic encephalopathy to a milder phenotype, featuring moderate developmental delay associated with complex stereotypies, mainly facial dyskinesia and mild epilepsy. Hyperkinetic movements were often exacerbated by specific triggers, such as voluntary movement, intercurrent illnesses, emotion, and high ambient temperature, leading to hospital admissions. Most patients were resistant to drug intervention, although tetrabenazine was effective in partially controlling dyskinesia for 2/7 patients. Emergency deep brain stimulation (DBS) was life saving in 1 patient, resulting in immediate clinical benefit with complete cessation of violent hyperkinetic movements. Five patients had well-controlled epilepsy and 1 had drug-resistant seizures. Structural brain abnormalities, including mild cerebral atrophy and corpus callosum dysgenesis, were evident in 5 patients. One patient had a diffuse astrocytoma (WHO grade II), surgically removed at age 16. Conclusions: Our findings support the causative role of GNAO1 mutations in an expanded spectrum of early-onset epilepsy and movement disorders, frequently exacerbated by specific triggers and at times associated with self-injurious behavior. Tetrabenazine and DBS were the most useful treatments for dyskinesia. PMID:28357411

  18. The burden of hepatic encephalopathy in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Bustios Sanchez, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior, and personality, as well as by transient neurological symptoms and electroencephalographic changes, which occur in the context of acute or chronic liver failure. Cirrhosis is the main disease associated to HE, and it is known that its incidence is increasing worldwide. As a cause of mortality, cirrhosis is ranked 14 worldwide, but 10 in developed countries. It has been demonstrated that the incidence of liver disease is increasing, in part because of the ascending prevalence of NAFLD, HCV, HCC, as well of alcohol consumption. The real incidence of cirrhosis in Latin America is unknown, although in some Latin American countries that provided national data, cirrhosis death rates were between 5 and 17/100,000 for men and 3 and 5/100,000 for women. Disability, quality of life, and social aspects should be considered when assessing the impact of a disease. In this context, preliminary estimates of the global burden of disease attributable to chronic liver disease seem to be substantial. Hepatic encephalopathy, a main complication of liver failure, occurs in 30-45% of patients as overt encephalopathy, but when subclinical or minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is considered, estimates of the incidence of encephalopathy vary from 20 to 60%. In USA, the 2009 NIH Report on the Costs of Digestive Diseases stated that liver disease was the second most costly disease in direct and indirect costs (13.1 billion dollars). Although the economic cost of HE has not been assessed, it is obvious that the economic impact of HE on daily activities of living is extremely high, as the costs of diminished work performance and lost wages are substantial.

  19. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    PubMed Central

    ESMAILI GOURABI, Hamed; BIDABADI, Elham; CHERAGHALIPOUR, Fatemeh; AARABI, Yasaman; SALAMAT, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Because of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16. Results Of the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months), 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3%) occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls). Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%). All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever. Conclusion Most of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection. PMID:24665278

  20. Glyphosate-surfactant herbicide-induced reversible encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, R C; Ghia, D K; Cordato, D J; Beran, R G

    2010-11-01

    Glyphosate-surfactant (GlySH) is a commonly used herbicide that has been used in attempted suicide. Most reports of GlySH toxicity in patients have followed ingestion of the commercial product "Round-up" (Monsanto Ltd; Melbourne, Victoria, Australia), which consists of a mixture of glyphosate (as a isopropylanine salt) and a surfactant (polyoxyethyleneamine). Ingestion of Round-up is reported to cause significant toxicity including nausea, vomiting, oral and abdominal pain. Renal and hepatic impairment and pulmonary oedema may also occur. Impaired consciousness and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae but there are limited data on the central nervous system (CNS) effects of Round-up toxicity. We report a 71-year-old male who attempted suicide with GlySH and developed a prolonged but reversible encephalopathy suggestive of acute CNS toxicity.

  1. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease. PMID:23921686

  2. Contributions of microdialysis to new alternative therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-08-05

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  3. [Role of rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, Jordi; Miquel, Mireia

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent and serious complication of liver cirrhosis. In addition to correction of the precipitating factors, the most commonly used treatments are non-absorbable disaccharides and rifaximin. Many of the recommendations are based on current clinical practice and there are few randomized controlled trials. Currently, rifaximin should be initiated during an episode of EH if, after 24-48 hours of non-absorbable disaccharide therapy, there is no clinical improvement. In recurrent EH, it is advisable to add rifaximin in patients under non-absorbable disaccharide therapy who develop a new episode. Currently, standard treatment with rifaximin for minimal EH is not recommended. Rifaximin is effective in the acute treatment of overt encephalopathy and in preventing recurrence.

  4. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis misdiagnosed as Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli-Badenier, M; Biancheri, R; Morana, G; Fornarino, S; Siri, L; Celle, M E; Veneselli, E; Vincent, A; Gaggero, R; Mancardi, M M

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a well-defined autoimmune disorder. Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a still controversial entity, lacking definite diagnostic criteria. We described a 14-year-old-girl presenting with a clinical picture consistent with the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis, confirmed by NMDAR antibody testing. Four years earlier, she had presented a similar episode of acute encephalopathy diagnosed as HE. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis and HE share similar clinical features so that the differential diagnosis can be difficult if specific antibodies are not tested. The correct diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is crucial to plan the appropriate management and follow-up, namely in term of oncological screening, since it can be paraneoplastic in origin. We suggest to re-evaluate the clinical history of all subjects with previous HE diagnosis in order to evaluate the possible diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis and plan the appropriate management of these patients.

  5. Long-term consequences of a prolonged febrile seizure in a dual pathology model.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Steve; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Desgent, Sébastien; Awad, Patricia N; Clerk-Lamalice, Olivier; Levesque, Maxime; Vianna, Rose-Mari; Rébillard, Rose-Marie; Delsemme, Andrée-Anne; Hébert, David; Tremblay, Luc; Lepage, Martin; Descarries, Laurent; Di Cristo, Graziella; Carmant, Lionel

    2011-08-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that febrile status epilepticus (SE) in children can lead to acute hippocampal injury and subsequent temporal lobe epilepsy. The contribution of febrile SE to the mechanisms underlying temporal lobe epilepsy are however poorly understood. A rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy following hyperthermic SE was previously established in our laboratory, wherein a focal cortical lesion induced at postnatal day 1 (P1), followed by a hyperthermic SE (more than 30 min) at P10, leads to hippocampal atrophy at P22 (dual pathology model) and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) with mild visuospatial memory deficits in adult rats. The goal of this study was to identify the long term electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular changes in this model. Following hyperthermic SE, all cortically lesioned pups developed progressive SRS as adults, characterized by the onset of highly rhythmic activity in the hippocampus. A reduction of hippocampal volume on the side of the lesion preceded the SRS and was associated with a loss of hippocampal neurons, a marked decrease in pyramidal cell spine density, an increase in the hippocampal levels of NMDA receptor NR2A subunit, but no significant change in GABA receptors. These findings suggest that febrile SE in the abnormal brain leads to hippocampal injury that is followed by progressive network reorganization and molecular changes that contribute to the epileptogenesis as well as the observed memory deficits.

  6. Outpatient management of febrile neutropenia: time to revise the present treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Mads; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    We reviewed medical literature on the efficacy and safety of outpatient versus hospital-based therapy of low-risk febrile neutropenia in adult cancer patients. A PubMed search for all studies evaluating the outpatient treatment of adults diagnosed with solid tumors who suffered from low-risk febrile neutropenia was completed; reference lists from identified articles also were used. In all, 10 trials were included in the analysis, which showed no significant difference in clinical failure rates and mortality for ambulatory regimens and standard hospital-based therapy. Subgroup analysis according to the type of fever episode showed no significant differences in clinical failure rates for fever of unknown origin and fever due to documented infections. Subgroup analyses in two independent trials identified an absolute neutrophil count < 100 cells/ mm3 as being predictive of outpatient treatment failure (P < 0.04). These findings need to be confirmed by further trials. Thus, outpatient management of adult cancer patients with low-risk febrile neutropenia is safe, effective, and comparable to standard hospital-based therapy. Patients at low risk are outpatients and are hemodynamically stable; they have no organ failure, they are able to take oral medications, and they do not suffer from acute leukemia. Low-risk prediction also may be based on the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer risk index.

  7. Pedigree analysis in families with febrile seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.G.; Kugler, S.L.; Stenroos, E.S.; Meulener, M.C.

    1996-02-02

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures, occurring in an estimated 2-5% of North American children. We carried out a systematic pedigree study of febrile seizure probands. Forty of 52 probands (77%) in a referral population selected for increased severity had more than one case per family: one family had 10 cases, one family had 7, 3 families had 6, 2 had 5, 3 had 4, 13 had 3, and 17 had 2 cases. Mode of inheritance in the multicase families best fit the hypothesis of autosomal dominance with reduced penetrance. Polygenic inheritance could not be excluded for some of the smaller families. There was no support for X-linked or mitochondrial inheritance. Penetrance was calculated to be 0.64. Because the cases were selected for increased severity, this represents a useful estimate of the upper limit of penetrance and is in agreement with twin studies. Simulated lod scores showed adequate power for a linkage study in the absence of heterogeneity. Individual families had simulated average lod scores as high as 2.1. However, with potential heterogeneity, assuming only 70% of families share the same disease locus, average lod scores were marginal, and a high density map of marker loci and additional families would be required to document linkage. 41 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Pedigree analysis in families with febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W G; Kugler, S L; Stenroos, E S; Meulener, M C; Rangwalla, I; Johnson, T W; Mandelbaum, D E

    1996-02-02

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures, occurring in an estimated 2-5% of North American children. We carried out a systematic pedigree study of febrile seizure probands. Forty of 52 probands (77%) in a referral population selected for increased severity had more than one case per family: one family had 10 cases, one family had 7, 3 families had 6, 2 had 5, 3 had 4, 13 had 3, and 17 had 2 cases. Mode of inheritance in the multicase families best fit the hypothesis of autosomal dominance with reduced penetrance. Polygenic inheritance could not be excluded for some of the smaller families. There was no support for X-linked or mitochondrial inheritance. Penetrance was calculated to be 0.64. Because the cases were selected for increased severity, this represents a useful estimate of the upper limit of penetrance and is in agreement with twin studies. Simulated lod scores showed adequate power for a linkage study in the absence of heterogeneity. Individual families had simulated average lod scores as high as 2.1. However, with potential heterogeneity, assuming only 70% of families share the same disease locus, average lod scores were marginal, and a high density map of marker loci and additional families would be required to document linkage.

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and hypomagnesemia: A frequent association?

    PubMed

    Chardain, A; Mesnage, V; Alamowitch, S; Bourdain, F; Crozier, S; Lenglet, T; Psimaras, D; Demeret, S; Graveleau, P; Hoang-Xuan, K; Levy, R

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a serious neurological condition encountered in various medical fields. Pathophysiological factor(s) common to PRES cases of apparently unrelated etiologies are yet to be found. Based on the hypothesis that hypomagnesemia might participate in the cascade leading to PRES, our study sought to verify whether hypomagnesemia is frequently associated with PRES regardless of etiology. From a retrospective study of a cohort of 57 patients presenting with PRES of different etiologies, presented here are the findings of 19 patients with available serum magnesium levels (SMLs) during PRES. In the acute phase of PRES, hypomagnesemia was present in all 19 patients in spite of differences in etiology (including immunosuppressive drugs, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematosus, iatrogenic etiology and unknown). SMLs were within normal ranges prior to PRES and below normal ranges during the first 48h of PRES, with a significant decrease in SMLs during the acute phase. In this retrospective study, constant hypomagnesemia was observed during the acute phase of PRES regardless of its etiology. These results now require larger studies to assess the particular importance of acute hypomagnesemia in PRES and especially the possible need to treat PRES with magnesium sulfate.

  10. De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Syrbe, Steffen; Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Riesch, Erik; Djémié, Tania; Müller, Stephan; Møller, Rikke S; Maher, Bridget; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Synofzik, Matthis; Caglayan, Hande S; Arslan, Mutluay; Serratosa, José M; Nothnagel, Michael; May, Patrick; Krause, Roland; Löffler, Heidrun; Detert, Katja; Dorn, Thomas; Vogt, Heinrich; Krämer, Günter; Schöls, Ludger; Mullis, Primus E; Linnankivi, Tarja; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Sterbova, Katalin; Craiu, Dana C; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Korff, Christian M; Weber, Yvonne G; Steinlin, Maja; Gallati, Sabina; Bertsche, Astrid; Bernhard, Matthias K; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Kiess, Wieland; Gonzalez, Michael; Züchner, Stephan; Palotie, Aarno; Suls, Arvid; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Biskup, Saskia; Wolff, Markus; Maljevic, Snezana; Schüle, Rebecca; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R

    2015-04-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six isolated patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild to moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype showed almost complete loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a new gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders through two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons.

  11. De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stephan; Møller, Rikke S.; Maher, Bridget; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Synofzik, Matthis; Caglayan, Hande S.; Arslan, Mutluay; Serratosa, José M.; Nothnagel, Michael; May, Patrick; Krause, Roland; Löffler, Heidrun; Detert, Katja; Dorn, Thomas; Vogt, Heinrich; Krämer, Günter; Schöls, Ludger; Mullis, Primus E.; Linnankivi, Tarja; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Sterbova, Katalin; Craiu, Dana C.; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Korff, Christian M.; Weber, Yvonne G.; Steinlin, Maja; Gallati, Sabina; Bertsche, Astrid; Bernhard, Matthias K.; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Kiess, Wieland; Gonzalez, Michael; Züchner, Stephan; Palotie, Aarno; Suls, Arvid; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Biskup, Saskia; Wolff, Markus; Maljevic, Snezana; Schüle, Rebecca; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R.

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features1-6. Using next generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild-moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype revealed an almost complete loss-of-function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a novel gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders by two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons. PMID:25751627

  12. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Rita; Simón-Talero, Macarena; Córdoba, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver failure that is associated with poor prognosis. However, the prognosis is not uniform and depends on the underlying liver disease. Acute liver failure is an uncommon cause of HE that carries bad prognosis but is potentially reversible. There are several prognostic systems that have been specifically developed for selecting patients for liver transplantation. In patients with cirrhosis the prognosis of the episode of HE is usually dictated by the underlying precipitating factor. Acute-on-chronic liver failure is the most severe form of decompensation of cirrhosis, the prognosis depends on the number of associated organ failures. Patients with cirrhosis that have experienced an episode of HE should be considered candidates for liver transplant. The selection depends on the underlying liver function assessed by the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) index. There is a subgroup that exhibits low MELD and recurrent HE, usually due to the coexistence of large portosystemic shunts. The recurrence of HE is more common in patients that develop progressive deterioration of liver function and hyponatremia. The bouts of HE may cause sequels that have been shown to persist after liver transplant. PMID:22045403

  13. High dengue NS1 antigenemia in febrile patients in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyero, Olufunmilayo G; Ayukekbong, James A

    2014-10-13

    We conducted a dengue seroprevalence survey among febrile patients positive or negative for malaria in Ibadan, Nigeria. Dengue IgG and NS1 seroprevalence of 73% and 35%, respectively, was observed, and 43% of those with malaria had acute dengue infection (NS1 determination). On the other hand, all participants with malaria were IgG dengue seropositive consistent with the endemicity of both arthropod-borne infections in the region. These data indicate that dengue is emerging as a major and neglected cause of fever in Nigeria.

  14. Feasible Relation between Glutathione Peroxidase and Febrile Seizure

    PubMed Central

    MAHYAR, Abolfazl; AYAZI, Parviz; DALIRANI, Reza; MOHAMMAD HOSEINI, Behzad; SAROOKHANI, Mohammad Reza; JAVADI, Amir; ESMAEILY, Shiva

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase and febrile seizure. Materials & Methods In this case-control study, 43 children with simple febrile seizure (case group) were compared with 43 febrile children without seizure (control group) in terms of serum glutathione peroxidase level, measured by ELISA method. This study was conducted in Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences in Qazvin, Iran in 2012-2013. The results were analyzed and compared in two groups. Results From 43 children 24 (53%) were male and 19 (47%) were female in children with simple febrile seizure, and 26 (60%) were male and 17 (40%) were female in febrile children without seizure (control group) (P=0.827). Serum glutathione peroxidase level was 166 U/ml (SD=107) in the case group and 141 U/ml (SD=90.5) in the control group of no significant difference. Conclusion There was no significant relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase and simple febrile seizure. Thus, it seems that glutathione peroxidase, an essential component of antioxidant system, does not play any role in the pathogenesis of simple febrile seizure. PMID:28277558

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Gulay

    2012-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an immune-mediated inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, commonly preceded by an infection. It principally involves the white matter tracts of the cerebral hemispheres, brainstem, optic nerves, and spinal cord. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mainly affects children. Clinically, patients present with multifocal neurologic abnormalities reflecting the widespread involvement in central nervous system. Cerebrospinal fluid may be normal or may show a mild pleocytosis with or without elevated protein levels. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) shows multiple demyelinating lesions. The diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy by consensus criteria. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis typically has a monophasic course with a favorable prognosis. Multiphasic forms have been reported, resulting in diagnostic difficulties in distinguishing these cases from multiple sclerosis. In addition, many inflammatory disorders may have a similar presentation with frequent occurrence of encephalopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  16. Preterm Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gopagondanahalli, Krishna Revanna; Li, Jingang; Fahey, Michael C.; Hunt, Rod W.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic–ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic–ischemic injury (HII), its clinical course, monitoring, and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic–ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia–ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools, and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27812521

  17. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-05

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease.

  18. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  19. Neuropathology of a fatal case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kheir, John N; Lawlor, Michael W; Ahn, Edward S; Lehmann, Leslie; Riviello, James J; Silvera, V Michelle; McManus, Michael; Folkerth, Rebecca D

    2010-01-01

    The pathology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is undefined, since it is rarely fatal and is biopsied in only exceptional circumstances. We describe rapidly progressive PRES following stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After development of altered mental status, this 8-year-old girl had T2 prolongation of the white matter in a posterior-dominant distribution, eventually developing cerebellar edema, hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and herniation. Despite surgical and medical management, she died 36 hours later. At autopsy, the occipital and cerebellar white matter and focal occipital cortical gray matter showed a spectrum of microvascular changes, including dilated perivascular spaces containing proteinaceous exudates and macrophages, as well as fibrinoid necrosis and acute hemorrhage, in a distribution corresponding to the neuroimaging abnormalities and reminiscent of those seen in patients with acute hypertensive encephalopathy. Of note, similar microvascular changes were not seen in the kidney or other systemic sites. Thus, the findings indicate a brain-specific microvascular compromise as the substrate of PRES, at least in the rare instance of cases progressing to fatal outcome.

  20. Current Concepts in the Pathophysiology and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) represents a broad continuum of neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with acute or chronic liver disease and/or portosystemic shunting of blood flow. The pathophysiology of this disease is quite complex, as it involves overproduction and reduced metabolism of various neurotoxins, particularly ammonia. Recent hypotheses implicate low-grade cerebral edema as a final common pathway for the pathophysiology of HE. Management of this condition is multifaceted and requires several steps: elimination of precipitating factors; removal of toxins, both by reducing them at their source and by augmenting scavenging pathways; modulation of resident fecal flora; proper nutritional support; and downregulation of systemic and gut-derived inflammation. PMID:21857820

  1. Dengue and Chikungunya Fever among Viral Diseases in Outpatient Febrile Children in Kilosa District Hospital, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Chipwaza, Beatrice; Mugasa, Joseph P.; Selemani, Majige; Amuri, Mbaraka; Mosha, Fausta; Ngatunga, Steve D.; Gwakisa, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Viral etiologies of fever, including dengue, Chikungunya, influenza, rota and adeno viruses, cause major disease burden in tropical and subtropical countries. The lack of diagnostic facilities in developing countries leads to failure to estimate the true burden of such illnesses, and generally the diseases are underreported. These diseases may have similar symptoms with other causes of acute febrile illnesses including malaria and hence clinical diagnosis without laboratory tests can be difficult. This study aimed to identify viral etiologies as a cause of fever in children and their co-infections with malaria. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for 6 months at Kilosa district hospital, Tanzania. The participants were febrile children aged 2–13 years presented at the outpatient department. Diagnostic tests such as IgM and IgG ELISA, and PCR were used. Results A total of 364 patients were enrolled, of these 83(22.8%) had malaria parasites, 76 (20.9%) had presumptive acute dengue infection and among those, 29(38.2%) were confirmed cases. Dengue was more likely to occur in children ≥ 5 years than in <5 years (OR 2.28, 95% CI: 1.35–3.86). Presumptive acute Chikungunya infection was identified in 17(4.7%) of patients. We observed no presenting symptoms that distinguished patients with Chikungunya infection from those with dengue infection or malaria. Co-infections between malaria and Chikungunya, malaria and dengue fever as well as Chikungunya and dengue were detected. Most patients with Chikungunya and dengue infections were treated with antibacterials. Furthermore, our results revealed that 5(5.2%) of patients had influenza virus while 5(12.8%) had rotavirus and 2(5.1%) had adenovirus. Conclusion Our results suggest that even though viral diseases are a major public health concern, they are not given due recognition as a cause of fever in febrile patients. Emphasis on laboratory diagnostic tests for proper diagnosis and management of

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome complicating diabetic ketoacidosis; an important treatable complication.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel; Redler, Kasey; Witherick, Jonathan; Fuller, Geraint; Mahajan, Tripti; Wakerley, Benjamin R

    2017-03-01

    Development of acute neurological symptoms secondary to cerebral oedema is well described in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and often has a poor prognosis. We present the clinical and radiological data of a 17-yr-old girl who developed cortical blindness, progressive encephalopathy, and seizures caused by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed after her DKA had resolved. Vasogenic oedema in PRES resolves if the underlying trigger is identified and eliminated. In this case, hypertension was identified as the likely precipitating factor and following treatment her vision and neurological symptoms rapidly improved. We suggest how recent DKA may have contributed to the development of PRES in this patient.

  3. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy in a child with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency due to a novel combined heterozygous mutations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiandi; Gao, Feng; Hong, Fang; Yu, Huimin; Jiang, Peifang

    2015-03-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is an X-linked disorder of metabolism of the urea cycle. It usually causes hyperammonemic encephalopathy in males during the neonatal to-infantile period, whereas female carriers present with variable manifestations depending on their pattern of random chromosome X inactivation in the liver. Early clinical manifestations of hyperammonemiaare nonspecific often leading to a delay in the diagnosis of OTCD.Unfortunately, delays in initiating treatment often lead to poor neurologic outcomes and overall survival. Presentation of hyperammonemic encephalopathy in children with OTCD is rare, and the mortality and morbidity rates are high. The diagnosis of OTCD and aggressive management of hyperammonemia were of paramount importance for appropriate treatment and successful recovery. Here, we report theclinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a child with OTCD who presented with acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy: new clinical settings and recent advances in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sechi, Gianpietro; Serra, Alessandro

    2007-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency, which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. According to autopsy-based studies, the disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed in both adults and children. In this review, we provide an update on the factors and clinical settings that predispose to Wernicke's encephalopathy, and discuss the most recent insights into epidemiology, pathophysiology, genetics, diagnosis, and treatment. To facilitate the diagnosis, we classify the common and rare symptoms at presentation and the late-stage symptoms. We emphasise the optimum dose of parenteral thiamine required for prophylaxis and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy and prevention of Korsakoff's syndrome associated with alcohol misuse. A systematic approach helps to ensure that patients receive a prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  5. Susceptibility of European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) to alimentary challenge with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dagleish, Mark P; Martin, Stuart; Steele, Philip; Finlayson, Jeanie; Eaton, Samantha L; Sisó, Sílvia; Stewart, Paula; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Hamilton, Scott; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Reid, Hugh W; Goldmann, Wilfred; González, Lorenzo; Castilla, Joaquín; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) are susceptible to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, when challenged intracerebrally but their susceptibility to alimentary challenge, the presumed natural route of transmission, is unknown. To determine this, eighteen deer were challenged via stomach tube with a large dose of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent and clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, presence and distribution of abnormal prion protein and the attack rate recorded. Only a single animal developed clinical disease, and this was acute with both neurological and respiratory signs, at 1726 days post challenge although there was significant (27.6%) weight loss in the preceding 141 days. The clinically affected animal had histological lesions of vacuolation in the neuronal perikaryon and neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Abnormal prion protein, the diagnostic marker of transmissible encephalopathies, was primarily restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems although a very small amount was present in tingible body macrophages in the lymphoid patches of the caecum and colon. Serial protein misfolding cyclical amplification, an in vitro ultra-sensitive diagnostic technique, was positive for neurological tissue from the single clinically diseased deer. All other alimentary challenged deer failed to develop clinical disease and were negative for all other investigations. These findings show that transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to European red deer via the alimentary route is possible but the transmission rate is low. Additionally, when deer carcases are subjected to the same regulations that ruminants in Europe with respect to the removal of specified offal from the human food chain, the zoonotic risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, from consumption of venison is probably

  6. Susceptibility of European Red Deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) to Alimentary Challenge with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dagleish, Mark P.; Martin, Stuart; Steele, Philip; Finlayson, Jeanie; Eaton, Samantha L.; Sisó, Sílvia; Stewart, Paula; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Hamilton, Scott; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Reid, Hugh W.; Goldmann, Wilfred; González, Lorenzo; Castilla, Joaquín; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) are susceptible to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, when challenged intracerebrally but their susceptibility to alimentary challenge, the presumed natural route of transmission, is unknown. To determine this, eighteen deer were challenged via stomach tube with a large dose of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent and clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, presence and distribution of abnormal prion protein and the attack rate recorded. Only a single animal developed clinical disease, and this was acute with both neurological and respiratory signs, at 1726 days post challenge although there was significant (27.6%) weight loss in the preceding 141 days. The clinically affected animal had histological lesions of vacuolation in the neuronal perikaryon and neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Abnormal prion protein, the diagnostic marker of transmissible encephalopathies, was primarily restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems although a very small amount was present in tingible body macrophages in the lymphoid patches of the caecum and colon. Serial protein misfolding cyclical amplification, an in vitro ultra-sensitive diagnostic technique, was positive for neurological tissue from the single clinically diseased deer. All other alimentary challenged deer failed to develop clinical disease and were negative for all other investigations. These findings show that transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to European red deer via the alimentary route is possible but the transmission rate is low. Additionally, when deer carcases are subjected to the same regulations that ruminants in Europe with respect to the removal of specified offal from the human food chain, the zoonotic risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, from consumption of venison is probably

  7. The mechanisms and treatment of asphyxial encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wassink, Guido; Gunn, Eleanor R.; Drury, Paul P.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2013-01-01

    Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy occurring around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The recent seminal insight that allows active neuroprotective treatment is that even after profound asphyxia (the “primary” phase), many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short “latent” phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a “secondary” deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Although many of these secondary processes are potentially injurious, they appear to be primarily epiphenomena of the “execution” phase of cell death. Animal and human studies designed around this conceptual framework have shown that moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated as early as possible but before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, has been associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. Recent clinical trials show that while therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, many babies still die or survive with disabilities. The challenge for the future is to find ways of improving the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, we will dissect the known mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in relation to the known effects of hypothermic neuroprotection. PMID:24578682

  8. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vijay PB; Tognarelli, Joshua M; Massie, Nicolas; Crossey, Mary ME; Cook, Nicola A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that “those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief ”. He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. PMID:26719720

  9. Antibiotics for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is complex and therapeutic regimens vary according to the acuity of presentation and the goals of therapy. Most treatments for HE rely on manipulating the intestinal milieu and therefore antibiotics that act on the gut form a key treatment strategy. Prominent antibiotics studied in HE are neomycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and rifaximin. For the management of the acute episode, all antibiotics have been tested. However the limited numbers studied, adverse effects (neomycin oto- and nephrotoxicity, metronidazole neurotoxicity) and potential for resistance emergence (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus) has limited the use of most antibiotics, apart from rifaximin which has the greatest evidence base. Rifaximin has also demonstrated, in conjunction with lactulose, to prevent overt HE recurrence in a multi-center, randomized trial. Despite its cost in the US, rifaximin may prove cost-saving by preventing hospitalizations for overt HE. In minimal/covert HE, rifaximin is the only systematically studied antibiotic. Rifaximin showed improvement in cognition, inflammation, quality-of-life and driving simulator performance but cost-analysis does not favor its use at the current time. Antibiotics, especially rifaximin, have a definite role in the management across the spectrum of HE.

  10. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  11. Hashimoto's encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an underdiagnosed, steroid-responsive, progressive or relapsing encephalopathy associated with high titers of serum antithyroid antibodies. Although Hashimoto's encephalopathy is well documented in adults, it is rarely observed or studied in children and adolescents. We describe the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 9-15 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of two patients at presentation included epileptic seizures and confusion. The other presenting signs included breath-holding spells, behavioral problems, psychosis, and ataxia (one patient each). During their presentation, three patients were euthyroid, and one was hyperthyroid. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies, and all improved with steroid treatment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rarely suspected at presentation. Therefore, greater awareness of its signs by clinicians is necessary for proper diagnoses.

  12. Antecedents of Neonatal Encephalopathy in the Vermont Oxford Network Encephalopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Peter; Edwards, Erika M.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.; Kenny, Michael J.; Inder, Terrie; Pfister, Robert H.; Raju, Tonse; Soll, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major predictor of death and long-term neurologic disability, but there are few studies of antecedents of NE. OBJECTIVES: To identify antecedents in a large registry of infants who had NE. METHODS: This was a maternal and infant record review of 4165 singleton neonates, gestational age of ≥36 weeks, meeting criteria for inclusion in the Vermont Oxford Network Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry. RESULTS: Clinically recognized seizures were the most prevalent condition (60%); 49% had a 5-minute Apgar score of ≤3 and 18% had a reduced level of consciousness. An abnormal maternal or fetal condition predated labor in 46%; maternal hypertension (16%) or small for gestational age (16%) were the most frequent risk factors. In 8%, birth defects were identified. The most prevalent birth complication was elevated maternal temperature in labor of ≥37.5°C in 27% of mothers with documented temperatures compared with 2% to 3.2% in controls in population-based studies. Clinical chorioamnionitis, prolonged membrane rupture, and maternal hypothyroidism exceeded rates in published controls. Acute asphyxial indicators were reported in 15% (in 35% if fetal bradycardia included) and inflammatory indicators in 24%. Almost one-half had neither asphyxial nor inflammatory indicators. Although most infants with NE were observably ill since the first minutes of life, only 54% of placentas were submitted for examination. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically recognized asphyxial birth events, indicators of intrauterine exposure to inflammation, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects were each observed in term infants with NE, but much of NE in this large registry remained unexplained. PMID:23071210

  13. The EEG of tropical encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Mallewa, Macpherson; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-10-01

    In addition to encountering most of the conditions treated by clinicians in the West, clinicians in the tropics are faced with unique tropical encephalopathies. These are largely but not entirely infectious in nature. Despite the relatively low cost of EEG technology, it remains unavailable in many low-income tropical settings even at the tertiary care level. Where available, the EEG recordings and interpretation are often of unacceptable quality. Nonetheless, there are existing data on the EEG patterns seen in malaria and a number of tropical viral, bacterial, and parasitic infestations.

  14. [Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholic patients].

    PubMed

    Chamorro Fernández, A J; Marcos Martín, M; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2011-10-01

    A 67-year old male was brought to the hospital by his family because he had been suffering from somnolence, bradypsychia and gait disturbance for one week. He lived alone, reported an ethanol intake higher than 100-120 g/day. His diet was limited in quality and amount. The physical examination showed stigmata of chronic liver disease. The neurological exam revealed right-side cerebellar tremor, bilateral dysmetria and gait ataxia as well as hyporeflexia in the lower limbs. He was diagnosed of Wernicke encephalopathy. How should this patient be evaluated and treated?

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following a scorpion sting.

    PubMed

    Porcello Marrone, Luiz Carlos; Marrone, Bianca Fontana; Neto, Felipe Kalil; Costa, Francisco Cosme; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Aramburu, Martin Brandolt; Schilling, Lucas Porcello; Pascoal, Tharick Ali; Gadonski, Giovani; Huf Marrone, Antônio Carlos; da Costa, Jaderson Costa

    2013-10-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic entity not yet understood, that is present with transient neurologic symptoms and particular radiological findings. The most common imaging pattern in PRES is the presence of edema in the white matter of the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres. The cause of PRES is unclear. We report a case of 13-year-old male who was stung by a scorpion and developed a severe headache, visual disturbance, and seizures and had the diagnosis of PRES with a good outcome. Numerous factors can trigger this syndrome, most commonly: acute elevation of blood pressure, abnormal renal function, and immunosuppressive therapy. There are many cases described showing the relationship between PRES and eclampsia, transplantation, neoplasia and chemotherapy treatment, systemic infections, renal disease acute, or chronic. However, this is the first case of PRES following a scorpion sting.

  16. Nutritional support in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mizock, B A

    1999-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a syndrome of global cerebral dysfunction resulting from underlying liver disease or portal-systemic shunting. HE can present as one of four syndromes, depending on the rapidity of onset of hepatic failure and the presence or absence of preexisting liver disease. The precise pathogenesis is unknown but likely involves impaired hepatic detoxification of ammonia as well as alterations in brain transport and metabolism of amino acids and amines. The etiology of malnutrition in hepatic failure is multifactorial. Nutritional deficits may be clinically manifest as marasmus or kwashiorkor, or both. Nutritional support in HE is directed toward reducing morbidity related to underlying malnutrition and concurrent disease. However, reaching nutritional goals is often complicated by protein and carbohydrate intolerance. The use of protein restriction in HE is controversial. Modified formulas that are supplemented in branched chain amino acids may be of value in patients who exhibit protein intolerance with standard feeding solutions or in patients who present with advanced degrees of encephalopathy.

  17. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: A review.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Taylor, Alexandra C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, but obvious clinical manifestation are lacking. MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis can be achieved through neuropsychological testing, recently developed computerized psychometric tests, such as the critical flicker frequency and the inhibitory control tests, as well as neurophysiological procedures. Event related potentials can reveal subtle changes in patients with normal neuropsychological performances. Spectral analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative analysis of sleep EEG provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE. Neuroimaging, in particular MRI, also increasingly reveals diffuse abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. Medical treatment for MHE to date has been focused on reducing serum ammonia levels and includes non-absorbable disaccharides, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not reverse the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. We performed here an updated review on epidemiology, burden and quality of life, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, neurophysiology and therapy in subjects with MHE.

  18. Febrile illness experience among Nigerian nomads

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An understanding of the febrile illness experience of Nigerian nomadic Fulani is necessary for developing an appropriate strategy for extending malaria intervention services to them. An exploratory study of their malaria illness experience was carried out in Northern Nigeria preparatory to promoting malaria intervention among them. Methods Ethnographic tools including interviews, group discussions, informal conversations and living-in-camp observations were used for collecting information on local knowledge, perceived cause, severity and health seeking behaviour of nomadic Fulani in their dry season camps at the Gongola-Benue valley in Northeastern Nigeria. Results Nomadic Fulani regarded pabboje (a type of "fever" that is distinct from other fevers because it "comes today, goes tomorrow, returns the next") as their commonest health problem. Pabboje is associated with early rains, ripening corn and brightly coloured flora. Pabboje is inherent in all nomadic Fulani for which treatment is therefore unnecessary despite its interference with performance of duty such as herding. Traditional medicines are used to reduce the severity, and rituals carried out to make it permanently inactive or to divert its recurrence. Although modern antimalaria may make the severity of subsequent pabboje episodes worse, nomads seek treatment in private health facilities against fevers that are persistent using antimalarial medicines. The consent of the household head was essential for a sick child to be treated outside the camp. The most important issues in health service utilization among nomads are the belief that fever is a Fulani illness that needs no cure until a particular period, preference for private medicine vendors and the avoidance of health facilities. Conclusions Understanding nomadic Fulani beliefs about pabboje is useful for planning an acceptable community participatory fever management among them. PMID:22292982

  19. Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholics with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Antonio J; Marcos-Martin, Miguel; Martin-Polo, Jorge; Garcia-Diez, Luis Carlos; Luna, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine deficiency in the central nervous system, and is defined by the triad of confusional symptoms, ocular alterations and ataxia. Some other factors may also predispose alcoholic patients to this deficiency. We report two patients with hyperglicaemia and ketoacidosis due to diabetes mellitus decompensation and chronic alcoholism who developed Wernicke encephalopathy before their hospital admission. The outcome was successful after intravenous thiamine administration and insulinotherapy. The presence of Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholics with diabetic ketoacidosis, suggests that metabolic decompensation is essential in the onset of the disease.

  20. Paroxysmal Amnesia Attacks due to Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nar Senol, Pelin; Bican Demir, Aylin; Bora, Ibrahim; Bakar, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare disease which is thought to be autoimmune and steroid responsive. The syndrome is characterized by cognitive impairment, encephalopathy, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures associated with increased level of anti-thyroid antibodies. The exact pathophysiology underlying cerebral involvement is still lesser known. Although symptoms suggest a nonlesional encephalopathy in most of the cases, sometimes the clinical appearance can be subtle and may not respond to immunosuppressants or immunomodulatory agents. Here we report a case who presented with drowsiness and amnestic complaints associated with paroxysmal electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities which could be treated only with an antiepileptic drug. PMID:27034679

  1. Asymmetric dimethylarginine in the assessment of febrile neutropenia in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Marika; Hämäläinen, Sari; Juutilainen, Auni; Koivula, Irma; Pulkki, Kari; Jantunen, Esa

    2017-04-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) has been recognized as an independent prognostic factor for sepsis mortality in intensive care units. No data are available on kinetics or prognostic value of ADMA in hematological patients. We evaluated the ability of ADMA to act as a predictor for complicated course of febrile neutropenia, defined as bacteremia and/or septic shock in adult hematological patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. This prospective study included 87 adult hematological patients with febrile neutropenia after an intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or after an autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Plasma ADMA and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured from the onset of fever (d0) and for 2 days (d1-d2) thereafter. The levels of ADMA were stable or had only minimal changes during the study period. There was no difference between the levels at any time-point in patients having complicated course compared to those without it. On the other hand, CRP levels were significantly higher on d1 (p = 0.016) in patients with bacteremia and/or septic shock than in those without. ADMA was not able to differentiate hematological patients with a complicated course from those without complications. Elevated ADMA levels are probably associated with organ dysfunction, which is rare in this group of patients, of whom about 95% can be successfully managed at the hematology ward.

  2. Prediction of Cortical Defect Using C-Reactive Protein and Urine Sodium to Potassium Ratio in Infants with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, urine protein-creatinine ratio (uProt/Cr), and urine electrolytes can be useful for discriminating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from other febrile illnesses or the presence of a cortical defect on 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scanning (true APN) from its absence in infants with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Materials and Methods We examined 150 infants experiencing their first febrile UTI and 100 controls with other febrile illnesses consecutively admitted to our hospital from January 2010 to December 2012. Blood (CRP, electrolytes, Cr) and urine tests [uProt/Cr, electrolytes, and sodium-potassium ratio (uNa/K)] were performed upon admission. All infants with UTI underwent DMSA scans during admission. All data were compared between infants with UTI and controls and between infants with or without a cortical defect on DMSA scans. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the ability of the parameters to predict true APN was analyzed. Results CRP levels and uProt/Cr were significantly higher in infants with true APN than in controls. uNa levels and uNa/K were significantly lower in infants with true APN than in controls. CRP levels and uNa/K were relevant factors for predicting true APN. The method using CRP levels, u-Prot/Cr, u-Na levels, and uNa/K had a sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 65%, positive predictive value of 60%, and negative predictive value of 95% for predicting true APN. Conclusion We conclude that these parameters are useful for discriminating APN from other febrile illnesses or discriminating true APN in infants with febrile UTI. PMID:26632389

  3. [Special features of febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Olivé-Oliveras, M Teresa; Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2005-12-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a common complication in pediatric oncohematological patients. It is defined by fever > or = 38.3 degrees C or > or = 38 for more than one hour together with a neutrophil count of < or = 500/microl(3). These children are usually admitted to hospital and receive empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Recent studies support the possibility of early discharge or outpatient management in selected cases of febrile neutropenia. This translates into a lower risk of nosocomial infections and a reduction in the discriminate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, with a consequent reduction in resistance, toxicity and costs. All of these factors would improve the patient's quality of life. The estimated incidence of bacteremia in children with febrile neutropenia is 10-36%. However, the experience of multiple centers suggests that not all children have the same risk of complications or death due to infection and that the risk is much lower than that in adults.

  4. Tick-borne febrile illnesses lacking specific symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stoecker, William V; Calcara, David A; Malters, Joseph M; Clonts, Monica; Everett, E Dale

    2009-01-01

    We report here one case of tularemia, one case of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, and one case of febrile illness most consistent with tularemia with titers suggestive of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in residents of three south-central Missouri counties. All three cases had with nonspecific symptoms of a febrile illness. All three patients had a history of a tick bite, common in south-central Missouri, but only two patients reported the tick bite when first seen. In these three cases, the severity of the illness provided a clue that led to a diagnosis of tick-borne febrile illnesses by confirmatory serology in two cases. It is very important that physicians be aware of these diseases in the spring and summer months.

  5. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms.

  7. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2014-11-01

    Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  8. Metabolic encephalopathy in Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Hindawy, A; Gouda, A; El-Ayyadi, A; Megahed, H; Bazaraa, H

    2007-01-01

    Fatty Acid Oxidation disorders represent an expanding group of inborn errors of metabolism. Clinical manifestations include episodic encephalopathy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye like episodes, hepatic, muscular, cardiac affection and sudden death. Analysis of urinary organic acids and plasma fatty acids of 44 clinically suspected patients by Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry revealed 4 cases of Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), 3 cases of Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 9 cases of multiple defects of acyl-CoA dehydrogenation in addition to 3 patients with other metabolic disorders. Timely detection of these disorders including screening for MCADD can have a favorable impact on the outcome of these patients (Tab. 11, Fig. 3, Ref. 24) Full Text (Free, PDF).

  9. [Cortexin effectiveness in circulatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Morozov, V G; Rybnikov, V Iu; Zakutskiĭ, N G

    1999-01-01

    A clinical trial of cortexin, a new peptide bioregulator of cerebral functions, in combined therapy of dyscirculatory encephalopathy (DE) stage I-II was made in 76 patients. They were divided into two groups: a control group of 31 patients on standard therapy and the study group of 45 patients on standard therapy with adjuvant cortexin delivered via nasal electrophoresis (NE). The effect was estimated by clinical symptoms, psychophysiological tests, computed EEG, quantitative parameters of rehabilitation. Cortexin NE produced a positive effect on psychoemotional state, neurological status, intellectual-mnestic and CNS functions. Adjuvant cortexin aroused efficiency of rehabilitation in DE stage I and II by 22.7%. The response of intellectual-mnestic and CNS functions was the highest. Cortexin improves attention, perception, memory, thinking, cortical neurodynamic processes. It is well tolerated and has no side effects. Cortexin is recommended as a drug of choice in combined treatment of patients with DE stage I-II.

  10. Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle or group of muscles), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movement), tremor, muscle atrophy and weakness, dementia, seizures, and ... muscle or group of muscles), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movement), tremor, muscle atrophy and weakness, dementia, seizures, and ...

  11. Cognitive Outcomes After Neonatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A.; Vohr, Betty R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. METHODS: The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development–II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment–Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. RESULTS: Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, −49.3 to −35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:25713280

  12. Panitumumab-Associated Encephalopathy after Accidental Intra-arterial Application through Dislocated Central Venous Access Device

    PubMed Central

    Pikija, Slaven; Pilz, Georg; Gschwandtner, Gerald; Rösler, Cornelia; Schlick, Konstantin; Greil, Richard; Sellner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Acute central nervous system (CNS) toxicity and immune-related side effects are increasingly recognized with the use of monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy. Here, we report a patient who developed of acute-onset encephalopathy and coma, which began shortly after administration of panitumumab for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Echocardiography revealed that the drug had been infused into the left cardiac ventricle via a dislocated central venous line. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging disclosed multiple cortical hyperintensities, which were preferentially located in the frontal lobes. While the neurological condition improved within a few days, the patient died 4 weeks later. It seems likely that the administration of the antibody via the intra-arterial route contributed to the development of this condition. Toxic encephalopathy may be a hitherto unrecognized complication of panitumumab treatment and should be taken into consideration in patients developing CNS symptoms undergoing this therapy. PMID:27872609

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy: An approach to its multiple pathophysiological features

    PubMed Central

    Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Tallis, Silvina; Delfante, Amalia; Souto, Pablo Andrés; Lemberg, Abraham; Eizayaga, Francisco Xavier; Romay, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complex syndrome, ranging from subtle behavioral abnormalities to deep coma and death. Hepatic encephalopathy emerges as the major complication of acute or chronic liver failure. Multiplicity of factors are involved in its pathophysiology, such as central and neuromuscular neurotransmission disorder, alterations in sleep patterns and cognition, changes in energy metabolism leading to cell injury, an oxidative/nitrosative state and a neuroinflammatory condition. Moreover, in acute HE, a condition of imminent threat of death is present due to a deleterious astrocyte swelling. In chronic HE, changes in calcium signaling, mitochondrial membrane potential and long term potential expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate-cGMP and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors alterations, and changes in the mRNA and protein expression and redistribution in the cerebral blood flow can be observed. The main molecule indicated as responsible for all these changes in HE is ammonia. There is no doubt that ammonia, a neurotoxic molecule, triggers or at least facilitates most of these changes. Ammonia plasma levels are increased two- to three-fold in patients with mild to moderate cirrhotic HE and up to ten-fold in patients with acute liver failure. Hepatic and inter-organ trafficking of ammonia and its metabolite, glutamine (GLN), lead to hyperammonemic conditions. Removal of hepatic ammonia is a differentiated work that includes the hepatocyte, through the urea cycle, converting ammonia into GLN via glutamine synthetase. Under pathological conditions, such as liver damage or liver blood by-pass, the ammonia plasma level starts to rise and the risk of HE developing is high. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of HE is rapidly expanding and identification of focally localized triggers has led the development of new possibilities for HE to be considered. This editorial will focus on issues where, to the best of our knowledge, more research is needed in

  14. Recurrent contrast-induced encephalopathy following coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Spina, Roberto; Simon, Neil; Markus, Romesh; Muller, David W M; Kathir, Krishna

    2017-02-01

    Contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) is an acute and reversible neurological disturbance associated with the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium during cardiac catheterisation. It may manifest with encephalopathy, motor and sensory disturbances; vision disturbances, including cortical blindness, ophthalmoplegia, aphasia; and seizures. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier and direct neuronal toxicity are believed to be implicated in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Symptoms appear soon after contrast administration and resolve completely within 24-48 h. Risk factors may include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, the administration of large volumes of iodinated contrast, percutaneous coronary intervention or selective angiography of internal mammary grafts and previous adverse reaction to iodinated contrast. On cerebral imaging, CIE may mimic subarachnoid haemorrhage or cerebral ischaemia, but imaging may be normal. Prognosis is excellent with supportive management alone. CIE may recur, but re-challenge with iodinated contrast without adverse effects has been documented. CIE is a diagnosis of exclusion and is an important clinical entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of stroke following cardiac catheterisation. Physicians should be aware of it and consider it prior to initiating thrombolysis.

  15. Etiology of the 1965 epidemic of febrile illness in Nagpur City, Maharashtra State, India

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, F. M.; Patankar, M. R.; Banerjee, K.; Bhatt, P. N.; Goverdhan, M. K.; Pavri, K. M.; Vittal, M.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of an extensive outbreak of febrile illness during the months of April, May, and June 1965, in the city of Nagpur, Maharashtra State, showed that the main etiological agent was chikungunya virus. Dengue type 4 and Chandipura viruses were also active during this period. In all, 26 strains of virus were isolated from 60 acute phase human sera, and of these strains, 23 were identified as chikungunya virus, 2 as Chandipura, and 1 as dengue type 4. Five strains of chikungunya virus and 9 strains of dengue type 4 virus were isolated from 34 pools of Aedes aegypti collected from the affected areas. Results of complement fixation tests with acute—convalescent paired serum samples and single convalescent sera confirmed that chikungunya virus was the main etiological agent. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:4537481

  16. Evidence on the use of paracetamol in febrile children.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Fiona M.; Shann, Frank; Curtis, Nigel; Mulholland, Kim

    2003-01-01

    Antipyretics, including acetaminophen (paracetamol), are prescribed commonly in children with pyrexia, despite minimal evidence of a clinical benefit. A literature review was performed by searching Medline and the Cochrane databases for research papers on the efficacy of paracetamol in febrile illnesses in children and adverse outcomes related to the use of paracetamol. No studies showed any clear benefit for the use of paracetamol in therapeutic doses in febrile children with viral or bacterial infections or with malaria. Some studies suggested that fever may have a beneficial role in infection, although no definitive prospective studies in children have been done to prove this. The use of paracetamol in therapeutic doses generally is safe, although hepatotoxicity has occurred with recommended dosages in children. In developing countries where malnutrition is common, data on the safety of paracetamol are lacking. The cost of paracetamol for poor families is substantial. No evidence shows that it is beneficial to treat febrile children with paracetamol. Treatment should be given only to children who are in obvious discomfort and those with conditions known to be painful. The role of paracetamol in children with severe malaria or sepsis and in malnourished, febrile children needs to be clarified. PMID:12856055

  17. New guidelines for management of febrile seizures in Japan.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Jun; Hamano, Shin-Ichiro; Iyoda, Kuniaki; Kanemura, Hideaki; Kubota, Masaya; Mimaki, Masakazu; Niijima, Shinichi; Tanabe, Takuya; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Kojimahara, Noriko; Komaki, Hirohumi; Sugai, Kenji; Fukuda, Tokiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Sugie, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the Japanese Society of Child Neurology released new guidelines for the management of febrile seizures, the first update of such guidelines since 1996. In 1988, the Conference on Febrile Convulsions in Japan published "Guidelines for the Treatment of Febrile Seizures." The Task Committee of the Conference proposed a revised version of the guidelines in 1996; that version released in 1996 was used for the next 19years in Japan for the clinical management of children with febrile seizures. Although the guidelines were very helpful for many clinicians, new guidelines were needed to reflect changes in public health and the dissemination of new medical evidence. The Japanese Society of Child Neurology formed a working group in 2012, and published the new guidelines in March 2015. The guidelines include emergency care, application of electroencephalography, neuroimaging, prophylactic diazepam, antipyretics, drugs needing special attention, and vaccines. While the new guidelines contain updated clinical recommendations, many unsolved questions remain. These questions should be clarified by future clinical research.

  18. Prevalence of recent immunisation in children with febrile convulsions

    PubMed Central

    Motala, Leya; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children under 7 years of age presenting for febrile convulsions. METHODS This is a retrospective study of all children under the age of seven presenting with febrile convulsions to a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. A total of 78 cases occurred in the period January 2011 to July 2012 and were included in the study. Data was extracted from medical records to provide a retrospective review of the convulsions. RESULTS Of the 78 total cases, there were five medical records which contained information on whether or not immunisation had been administered in the preceding 48 h to presentation to the emergency department. Of these five patients only one patient (1.28% of the study population) was confirmed to have received a vaccination with Infanrix, Prevnar and Rotavirus. The majority of cases reported a current infection as a likely precipitant to the febrile convulsion. CONCLUSION This study found a very low prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children with febrile convulsions presenting to an emergency department at a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. This finding, however, may have been distorted by underreporting of vaccination history. PMID:27610346

  19. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  20. The role of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of childhood febrile urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    İlarslan, Nisa Eda Çullas; Fitöz, Ömer Suat; Öztuna, Derya Gökmen; Küçük, Nuriye Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Fatma Fatoş

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study assessed the ability of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of childhood febrile urinary tract infections in comparison with the gold standard reference method: Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinicacid renal cortical scintigraphy. Material and Methods: This prospective study included 60 patients who were hospitalized with a first episode of febrile urinary tract infections. All children were examined with dimercaptosuccinicacid scan and tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound within the first 3 days of admission. Results: Signs indicative of acute infection were observed in 29 patients according to the results of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound while dimercaptosuccinicacid scan revealed abnormal findings in 33 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tissue harmonic imaging combined with power Doppler ultrasound using dimercaptosuccinicacid scintigraphy as the reference method in patients diagnosed with first episode febrile urinary tract infections were calculated as 57.58% (95% confidence interval: 40.81%–72.76%); 62.96% (95% confidence interval: 44.23%–78.47%); 65.52% (95% confidence interval: 52.04%–77%); 54.84% (95% confidence interval: 41.54%–67.52%); respectively. Conclusions: Although current results exhibit inadequate success of power Doppler ultrasound, this practical and radiation-free method may soon be comprise a part of the routine ultrasonographic evaluation of febrile urinary tract infections of childhood if patients are evaluated early and under appropriate sedation. PMID:26265892

  1. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: Javascript is ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of cattle that ...

  2. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    PubMed Central

    Janati, A. Bruce; ALGhasab, Naif Saad; ALGhassab, Fahad Saad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen). Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:24455317

  3. Contemporary Understanding and Management of Overt and Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    NeSmith, Meghan; Ahn, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of liver disease that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Caring for hospitalized patients with HE is becoming more complex, and the economic burden of HE continues to rise. Defining and diagnosing HE, particularly covert HE (CHE), remain challenging. In this article, we review new tools and those currently under development for the diagnosis of CHE and the latest advances in the acute and long-term management of overt HE (OHE) and CHE. In particular, we review the latest data on the use of lactulose and rifaximin for treatment of OHE and summarize the data on adjunctive agents such as sodium benzoate and probiotics. PMID:27182210

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy following Hyperemesis gravidarum. A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kotha, V K; De Souza, A

    2013-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children.

  5. Neuropsychological characteristics of encephalopathy in Susac's Syndrome - Case report.

    PubMed

    Roessler-Górecka, Magdalena; Mendel, Tadeusz; Wiśniowska, Justyna; Seniów, Joanna

    Susac's Syndrome (SS) is a rare, autoimmune angiopathy characterized by hearing loss, retinal artery occlusions and encephalopathy, which is usually expressed in multifocal neurological signs and symptoms, confusion state and cognitive impairment. There have been few descriptions of neuropsychological assessment of SS. We present a case study of 29-year-old woman who developed full SS. During the post-acute stage of disease, she was admitted to neurorehabilitation ward to improve her cognitive-behavioral and motor functioning. The initial assessment revealed attention, memory and executive dysfunctions, as well as behavioral changes including impulsivity, affective dysregulation and reduced self-awareness of disease deficits. After five weeks recovery process supported by rehabilitation program, improvement was observed, although some cognitive-behavioral deficits were still present in the follow-up assessment.

  6. [Wernicke encephalopathy after subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity].

    PubMed

    Gabaudan, C; La-Folie, T; Sagui, E; Soulier, B; Dion, A-M; Richez, P; Brosset, C

    2008-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is one of the potential complications of obesity surgery. It is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency often associated with repeated vomiting. The classic triad is frequently reported in these patients (optic neuropathy, ataxia and confusion), associated with uncommon features. Cerebral impairment affects the dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus and the periaqueductal grey area, appearing on MRI, as hyperintense signals on T2, Flair and Diffusion weighted imaging. Early diagnosis and parenteral thiamine are required to decrease morbidity and mortality. We report a case of WE and Korsakoff's syndrome in a young obese patient after subtotal gastrectomy, who still has substantial sequelae. The contribution of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging is illustrated. The interest of nutritional supervision in the first weeks and preventive thiamine supplementation in case of repeated vomiting are of particular importance in these risky situations.

  7. Hashimoto's encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Ramon; Walterfang, Mark; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus. Thyroid function is usually clinically and biochemically normal.Hashimoto's encephalopathy appears to be a rare disorder, but, as it is responsive to treatment with corticosteroids, it must be considered in cases of 'investigation negative encephalopathies'. Diagnosis is made in the first instance by excluding other toxic, metabolic and infectious causes of encephalopathy with neuroimaging and CSF examination. Neuroimaging findings are often not helpful in clarifying the diagnosis. Common differential diagnoses when these conditions are excluded are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, rapidly progressive dementias, and paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. In the context of the typical clinical picture, high titres of antithyroid antibodies, in particular antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, are diagnostic. These antibodies, however, can be detected in elevated titres in the healthy general population. Treatment with corticosteroids is almost always successful, although relapse may occur if this treatment is ceased abruptly. Other forms of immunomodulation, such as intravenous immune-globulin and plasma exchange, may also be effective. Despite the link to autoimmune thyroid disease, the aetiology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is unknown. It is likely that antithyroid antibodies are not pathogenic, but titres can be a marker of treatment response. Pathological findings can suggest an inflammatory process, but features

  8. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. PMID:26253448

  9. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    PubMed

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations.

  10. Hepatic encephalopathy therapy: An overview.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Ridola, Lorenzo; Pasquale, Chiara

    2010-04-06

    Type-C hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe complication of cirrhosis, which seriously affects quality of life and is strongly related to patient survival. Treatment based on a classical pharmacological approach that is aimed at reducing the production of gut-derived toxins, such as ammonia, is still under debate. Currently, results obtained from clinical trials do not support any specific treatment for HE and our competence in testing old and new treatment modalities by randomized controlled trials with appropriate clinically relevant end-points urgently needs to be improved. On the other hand, patients who are at risk for HE are now identifiable, based on studies on the natural history of the disease. Today, very few studies that are specifically aimed at establishing whether HE may be prevented are available or in progress. Recent studies have looked at non absorbable disaccharides or antibiotics and other treatment modalities, such as the modulation of intestinal flora. In the treatment of severe stage HE, artificial liver supports have been tested with initial positive results but more studies are needed.

  11. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  12. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  13. Opsoclonus as a manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Salazar, R; Mehta, C; Zaher, N; Miller, D

    2012-10-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with early manifestation of opsoclonus associated with gait ataxia as a rare clinical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Empiric use of intravenous immunoglobulin followed by intravenous high dose methylprednisolone was initiated with subsequent remittance of opsoclonus, encephalopathy, ataxia, and tremor. Extensive workup for infectious, autoimmune, and paraneoplastic etiologies were undertaken and all studies were negative. Thyroglobulin antibodies (312 U/mL) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (457 U/mL) were elevated (normal <60 U/mL) with a euthyroid state (thyroid stimulating hormone 3.13 μIU/mL). Three months after intravenous steroid therapy, the concentrations of thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase antibodies were retested and found to have decreased considerably. Thus, with steroid therapy, the patient's opsoclonus and encephalopathy improved. We have presented a patient with a rare case of opsoclonus as the principal presenting feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy that was incompletely responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin and resolved with corticosteroids. This report underscores the importance for clinical practitioners to maintain a high index of suspicion for Hashimoto's encephalopathy in cases of opsoclonus, especially when accompanied by an atypical presentation.

  14. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  15. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fridley, J.; Reddy, G.; Curry, D.; Agadi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies are a group of neurologically devastating disorders related to uncontrolled ictal and interictal epileptic activity, with a poor prognosis. Despite the number of pharmacological options for treatment of epilepsy, many of these patients are drug resistant. For these patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, motor and/or neuropsychological deterioration is common. To prevent these secondary consequences, surgery is often considered as either a curative or a palliative option. Magnetic resonance imaging to look for epileptic lesions that may be surgically treated is an essential part of the workup for these patients. Many surgical procedures for the treatment of epileptiform encephalopathies have been reported in the literature. In this paper the evidence for these procedures for the treatment of pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies is reviewed. PMID:24288601

  16. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  17. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  18. Experimental Interspecies Transmission Studies of the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies to Cattle: Comparison to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Since the emergence of BSE and its pr...

  19. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  20. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE.

  1. Cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Béranger, F; Mangé, A; Solassol, J; Lehmann, S

    2001-11-30

    In this review, we describe the generation and use of cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, also known as prion diseases. These models include chronically prion-infected cell lines, as well as cultures expressing variable amounts of wild-type, mutated, or chimeric prion proteins. These cell lines have been widely used to investigate the biology of both the normal and the pathological isoform of the prion protein. They have also contributed to the comprehension of the pathogenic processes occurring in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and in the development of new therapeutic approaches of these diseases.

  2. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy Impairs Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  3. Epileptic Encephalopathies in Adults and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kural, Zekiye; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are motor-mental retardations or cognitive disorders secondary to epileptic seizures or epileptiform activities. Encephalopaties due to brain damage, medications, or systemic diseases are generally not in the scope of this definition, but they may rarely accompany the condition. Appropriate differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures as well as subclinical electroencephalographic discharges are crucial for management of seizures and epileptiform discharges and relative regression of cognitive deterioration in long-term followup. Proper antiepileptic drug, hormonal treatment, or i.v. immunoglobulin choice play major role in prognosis. In this paper, we evaluated the current treatment approaches by reviewing clinical electrophysiological characteristics of epileptic encephalopathies. PMID:23056934

  4. Hyperammonemia Is Associated with Increasing Severity of Both Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Maimoona; Khan, Wazir Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hyperammonemia resulting from chronic liver disease (CLD) can potentially challenge and damage any organ system of the body, particularly the brain. However, there is still some controversy regarding the diagnostic or prognostic values of serum ammonia in patients with over hepatic encephalopathy, especially in the setting of acute-on-chronic or chronic liver failure. Moreover, the association of serum ammonia with worsening Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis has not been studied. Objective. This study was conducted to solve the controversy regarding the association between hyperammonemia and cirrhosis, especially hepatic encephalopathy in chronically failed liver. Material and Methods. In this study, 171 cirrhotic patients had their serum ammonia measured and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-squared test and one-way ANOVA were applied. Results. The study had 110 male and 61 female participants. The mean age of all the participants in years was 42.33 ± 7.60. The mean duration (years) of CLD was 10.15 ± 3.53 while the mean Child-Pugh (CP) score was 8.84 ± 3.30. Chronic viral hepatitis alone was responsible for 71.3% of the cases. Moreover, 86.5% of participants had hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The frequency of hyperammonemia was 67.3%, more frequent in males (N = 81, z-score = 2.4, and P < 0.05) than in females (N = 34, z-score = 2.4, and P < 0.05), and had a statistically significant relationship with increasing CP grade of cirrhosis (χ2(2) = 27.46, P < 0.001, Phi = 0.40, and P < 0.001). Furthermore, serum ammonia level was higher in patients with hepatic encephalopathy than in those without it; P < 0.001. Conclusion. Hyperammonemia is associated with both increasing Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27847646

  5. Resistive index in febrile urinary tract infections: predictive value of renal outcome.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, Gül; Polat, Tuğçin Bora; Aktaş, Seniha; Cetinkaya, Feyzullah; Fetinkaya, Feyzullah

    2004-02-01

    In the absence of specific symptomatology in children, the early diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis is a challenge, particularly during infancy. In an attempt to differentiate acute pyelonephritis from lower urinary tract infection (UTI), we measured intrarenal resistive index (RI). We evaluated its ability to predict renal involvement as assessed by dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy. In total 157 patients admitted to the pediatric department of the Sişli Etfal Hospital with clinical signs of febrile UTI were included in the study. The children were divided into groups according to their age at the time of ultrasonography (US). RI was measured from the renal arteries with Doppler US in the first 72 h in all 157 children. Renal involvement was assessed by (99m)Tc-DMSA scintigraphy in the first 7 days after admission. The examination was repeated at least 6 months later if the first result was abnormal. All available patients with an abnormal scintigraphy underwent voiding cystourethrography 4-6 weeks after the acute infection. All patients with vesicoureteral reflux and scarred kidneys were excluded from the study. DMSA scintigraphy demonstrated abnormal changes in 114 of 157 children and was normal in the remaining 43 children. Of these 114 children, 104 underwent repeat scintigraphy, of whom 77 showed partially or totally reversible lesion(s). Of these 77 children, 17 children (22%) with vesicoureteral reflux were excluded. Thus, we compared the 43 children with lower UTI with the 60 children with definite acute pyelonephritis at admission. Kidneys with changes of acute pyelonephritis had a mean RI of 0.744+/-0.06 in infants, 0.745+/-0.03 in preschool children, and 0.733+/-0.09 in patients of school age with upper UTI. However, the mean RI was 0.703+/-0.06 in infants, 0.696+/-0.1 in preschool children, and 0.671+/-0.09 in school-aged patients with lower UTI. The mean RI values were significantly higher in patients with upper UTI ( P<0.001). There was a

  6. Febrile seizure recurrence reduced by intermittent oral levetiracetam

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lin-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping; Zhong, Jian-Min; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Jian-Bo; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Meng; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Liu, Yu-Jie; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Wei-Na; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Kwan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common form of childhood seizure disorders. FS is perhaps one of the most frequent causes of admittance to pediatric emergency wards worldwide. We aimed to identify a new, safe, and effective therapy for preventing FS recurrence. Methods A total of 115 children with a history of two or more episodes of FS were randomly assigned to levetiracetam (LEV) and control (LEV/control ratio = 2:1) groups. At the onset of fever, LEV group was orally administered with a dose of 15–30 mg/kg per day twice daily for 1 week. Thereafter, the dosage was gradually reduced until totally discontinued in the second week. The primary efficacy variable was seizure frequency associated with febrile events and FS recurrence rate (RR) during 48-week follow-up. The second outcome was the cost effectiveness of the two groups. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed that 78 children in LEV group experienced 148 febrile episodes. Among these 78 children, 11 experienced 15 FS recurrences. In control group, 37 children experienced 64 febrile episodes; among these 37 children, 19 experienced 32 FS recurrences. A significant difference was observed between two groups in FS RR and FS recurrence/fever episode. The cost of LEV group for the prevention of FS recurrence is lower than control group. During 48-week follow-up period, one patient in LEV group exhibited severe drowsiness. No other side effects were observed in the same patient and in other children. Interpretation Intermittent oral LEV can effectively prevent FS recurrence and reduce wastage of medical resources. PMID:25356397

  7. [Complex febrile crises: should we change the way we act?].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cayuelas, E; Herraiz-Martinez, M; Villacieros-Hernandez, L; Cean-Cabrera, L; Martinez-Salcedo, E; Alarcon-Martinez, H; Domingo-Jimenez, R; Perez-Fernandez, V

    2014-11-16

    Introduccion. Las convulsiones febriles son una de las causas mas frecuentes de consulta. Hasta ahora, los pacientes con convulsiones febriles complejas (CFC) deben ingresar, dado el mayor porcentaje de epilepsia y complicaciones agudas descrito clasicamente. En la actualidad hay estudios que apoyan ser menos invasivos en el abordaje de estos pacientes. Objetivo. Describir las caracteristicas de los pacientes ingresados por CFC y proponer un nuevo protocolo de actuacion. Pacientes y metodos. Analisis retrospectivo de historias clinicas de ingresados por CFC (enero de 2010-diciembre de 2013). Se ofrecen datos epidemiologicos, clinicos, pruebas complementarias y evolucion. Resultados. Las CFC suponian un 4,2% de los ingresos de neuropediatria (n = 67). Edad media al evento: 25 meses. El 47% tenia antecedentes familiares patologicos, y el 31%, antecedentes personales de convulsion febril previa. En el 54% de los pacientes, la CFC duro menos de cinco minutos; hubo recurrencia, la mayoria con un total de dos crisis y durante el primer dia (las CFC por recurrencia son las mas frecuentes). De las pruebas complementarias realizadas, ninguna de ellas sirvio como apoyo diagnostico en el momento agudo. Durante su seguimiento, cinco pacientes presentaron complicaciones. Los pacientes con antecedentes familiares de convulsiones febriles presentan mayor riesgo de epilepsia o recurrencia (p = 0,02), sin diferencias significativas respecto a la edad, numero de crisis, intervalo de fiebre, estado epileptico o tipo de CFC. Conclusiones. Las CFC no asocian mayores complicaciones agudas; las exploraciones complementarias no permiten discriminar precozmente a los pacientes de riesgo. Su ingreso podria evitarse en ausencia de otros signos clinicos y limitarse a casos seleccionados.

  8. Recurarization in a successfully managed case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) for emergency caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Suchita; Tavri, Snehlata; Mohite, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome of headache, visual changes, altered mental status and seizures with radiologic findings of posterior cerebral white matter edema. It is seen in hypertensive encephalopathy, renal failure, and autoimmune disorders or in patients on immunosuppressants. We report a case of 24-year-old primigravida who presented at term with sudden onset hypertension, neurological deficits, and an episode of the visual blackout. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features suggestive of PRES. She was posted for emergency lower segment cesarean section. General anesthesia was administered and blood pressure managed with antihypertensives. Postoperatively, she developed acute respiratory depression after prophylactic administration of injection magnesium sulfate. This case highlights that good clinical acumen along with early neuroimaging helps in prompt diagnosis, treatment and prevention of long-term neurological sequelae in PRES and the anesthetic implications of administering magnesium sulfate in the immediate post neuromuscular block reversal phase. PMID:27212776

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Incedayi, Mehmet; Mutlu, Hakan; Meral, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that affects the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and the kidneys. The disease primarily affects children, but may occur in elderly children with allergic purpura and also in adults. Central nervous system involvement may be the first sign; however, it is rarely encountered. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome of encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbance and seizures. Its radiological signs can be observed in grey and white matter at the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. HSP should be considered in children with PRES in the presence of rash, joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. We reported a 5-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure and PRES by reason of HSP. PMID:23946524

  10. Evaluation of new American Academy of Pediatrics guideline for febrile urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Da Min; Heo, Tae Hoon; Yoo, Kee Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the practical applications of the diagnosis algorithms recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics urinary tract infection (UTI) guideline. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of febrile UTI patients aged between 2 and 24 months. The patients were divided into 3 groups: group I (patients with positive urine culture and urinalysis findings), group II (those with positive urine culture but negative urinalysis findings), and group III (those with negative urine culture but positive urinalysis findings). Clinical, laboratory, and imaging results were analyzed and compared between the groups. Results A total of 300 children were enrolled. The serum C-reactive protein level was lower in children in group II than in those in groups I and III (P<0.05). Children in group I showed a higher frequency of hydronephrosis than those in groups II and III (P<0.05). However, the frequencies of acute pyelonephritis (APN), vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), renal scar, and UTI recurrence were not different between the groups. In group I, recurrence of UTI and presence of APN were associated with the incidence of VUR (recurrence vs. no recurrence: 40% vs.11.4%; APN vs. no APN: 23.3% vs. 9.2%; P<0.05). The incidence of VUR and APN was not related to the presence of hydronephrosis. Conclusion UTI in febrile children cannot be ruled out solely on the basis of positive urinalysis or urine culture findings. Recurrence of UTI and presence of APN may be reasonable indicators of the presence of VUR. PMID:26512260

  11. Urinary Colorimetric Sensor Array and Algorithm to Distinguish Kawasaki Disease from Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo; Deng, Xiaohong; Hu, Guang; Liu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jie; Jin, Hua; Huang, Min; Kanegaye, John T.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Burns, Jane C.; Wu, Jianmin; Cohen, Harvey J.; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute pediatric vasculitis of infants and young children with unknown etiology and no specific laboratory-based test to identify. A specific molecular diagnostic test is urgently needed to support the clinical decision of proper medical intervention, preventing subsequent complications of coronary artery aneurysms. We used a simple and low-cost colorimetric sensor array to address the lack of a specific diagnostic test to differentiate KD from febrile control (FC) patients with similar rash/fever illnesses. Study Design Demographic and clinical data were prospectively collected for subjects with KD and FCs under standard protocol. After screening using a genetic algorithm, eleven compounds including metalloporphyrins, pH indicators, redox indicators and solvatochromic dye categories, were selected from our chromatic compound library (n = 190) to construct a colorimetric sensor array for diagnosing KD. Quantitative color difference analysis led to a decision-tree-based KD diagnostic algorithm. Results This KD sensing array allowed the identification of 94% of KD subjects (receiver operating characteristic [ROC] area under the curve [AUC] 0.981) in the training set (33 KD, 33 FC) and 94% of KD subjects (ROC AUC: 0.873) in the testing set (16 KD, 17 FC). Color difference maps reconstructed from the digital images of the sensing compounds demonstrated distinctive patterns differentiating KD from FC patients. Conclusions The colorimetric sensor array, composed of common used chemical compounds, is an easily accessible, low-cost method to realize the discrimination of subjects with KD from other febrile illness. PMID:26859297

  12. Long term outcome of prophylaxis for febrile convulsions.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, F U; Paerregaard, A; Andersen, R; Andresen, J

    1996-01-01

    A cohort of 289 children with febrile convulsions who had been randomised in early childhood to either intermittent prophylaxis (diazepam at fever) or no prophylaxis (diazepam at seizures) was followed up 12 years later. The study focused on the occurrence of epilepsy and on neurological, motor, intellectual, cognitive, and scholastic achievements in the cohort. At follow up the two groups were of almost identical age (14.0 v 14.1 years), body weight (58.2 v 57.2 kg), height (168.2 v 167.7 cm), and head circumference (55.9 v 56.2 cm). The occurrence of epilepsy (0.7% v 0.8%), neurological examination, fine and gross motor development on the Stott motor test, intellectual performance on the Wechsler intelligence scale for children verbal IQ (105 v 105), performance IQ (114 v 111), and full scale IQ (110 v 108), cognitive abilities on a neuropsychological test battery, including short and long term, auditory and visual memory, visuomotor tempo, computer reaction time, reading test, and scholastic achievement were also very similar. Children with simple and complex febrile convulsions had the same benign outcome. The long term prognosis in terms of subsequent epilepsy, neurological, motor, intellectual, cognitive, and scholastic ability was not influenced by the type of treatment applied in early childhood. Preventing new febrile convulsions appears no better in the long run than abbreviating them. PMID:8660037

  13. Understanding Genotypes and Phenotypes in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Tayoun, Abou Ahmad N.

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are severe often intractable seizure disorders where epileptiform abnormalities contribute to a progressive disturbance in brain function. Often, epileptic encephalopathies start in childhood and are accompanied by developmental delay and various neurological and non-neurological comorbidities. In recent years, this concept has become virtually synonymous with a group of severe childhood epilepsies including West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and several other severe childhood epilepsies for which genetic factors are increasingly recognized. In the last 5 years, the field has seen a virtual explosion of gene discovery, raising the number of bona fide genes and possible candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathies to more than 70 genes, explaining 20-25% of all cases with severe early-onset epilepsies that had otherwise no identifiable causes. This review will focus on the phenotypic variability as a characteristic aspect of genetic epilepsies. For many genetic epilepsies, the phenotypic presentation can be broad, even in patients with identical genetic alterations. Furthermore, patients with different genetic etiologies can have seemingly similar clinical presentations, such as in Dravet syndrome. While most patients carry mutations in SCN1A, similar phenotypes can be seen in patients with mutations in PCDH19, CHD2, SCN8A, or in rare cases GABRA1 and STXBP1. In addition to the genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, both benign phenotypes and severe encephalopathies have been recognized in an increasing number of genetic epilepsies, raising the question whether these conditions represent a fluid continuum or distinct entities. PMID:27781027

  14. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  15. Encephalopathy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Baluarte, H J; Gruskin, A B; Hiner, L B; Foley, C M; Grover, W D

    1977-01-01

    The progressive encephalopathy observed in 5 children with chronic renal failure was clinically similar to the so-called dialysis encephalopathy of adults, except that it was not related to dialysis therapy. Renal osteodystrophy is more prevalent in children than in adults and often more severe. The attempt to control the crippling deformities of renal osteodystrophy in growing children with renal insufficiency has led to the use of large quantities of aluminum containing antacids. The encephalopathy observed in children with chronic renal failure may be related to the oral ingestion of aluminum containing compounds in the presence of persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism. We suggest that alternative methods for the adequate control of serum phosphorus levels should be sought and indications for parathyroidectomy in children reevaluated. During the past 18 mos we have lowered the dose of aluminum containing compounds to 50 to 100 mg/Kg/day in our patients with progressive renal failure and recommend parathyroidectomy. No new cases of the encephalopathy have occurred.

  16. Methanethiol metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; Chamuleau, R A; Rothuizen, J; Deutz, N E; Tangerman, A

    1990-04-01

    The metabolism of methanethiol was studied in rats. Administration of a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through inspired air or injection into the upper colon resulted in an elevation of the concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides in serum (protein--S--S--CH3 and X--S--S--CH3, X yet unknown) and in urine (X--S--S--CH3). The concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides proved to be a relative measure of exposure to methanethiol. The levels of volatile sulfur compounds methanethiol, dimethylsulfide and dimethyldisulfide in the air expired by rats exposed to a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through the colon were also elevated. Rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia also showed elevation of methanethiol mixed disulfide levels on challenge of methanethiol through the colon or inspired air, but to a significantly smaller extent than did the corresponding sham-operated rats. This suggests that the liver is at least partly responsible for formation of methanethiol mixed disulfides. No additional toxic effects were observed in the rats with ischemic livers on methanethiol exposition when compared with normal rats, suggesting that the liver does not play an essential role in methanethiol detoxification. Metabolism of methanethiol by blood to sulfate, for example, might be more important. In rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia and in dogs suffering from hepatic encephalopathy resulting from chronic liver disease, large and significant increases in ammonia levels were measured. However, the mean levels of methanethiol mixed disulfides in rats and dogs with hepatic encephalopathy were not different from the mean normal levels in these animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke's encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Sushree Sangita; Swain, Sarada Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Context: Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion), oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia). Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration) as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning), which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs (global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings), the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases. Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but the severity

  18. Zinc supplementation prolongs the latency of hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Aydın, L; Erdem, S R; Yazıcı, C

    2016-03-01

    Some studies have shown a relationship between febrile seizures and zinc levels. The lowest dose zinc supplementation in pentylenetetrazole seizure model has a protective effect. But, zinc pretreatment has no effect in maximal electroshock model. However, it is unclear how zinc supplementation affects hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc supplementation on febrile seizures in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Zinc supplementation was commenced 5 days prior to febrile seizure induction by placing the animals in a water bath at 45°C. We measured the rectal temperature and determined the febrile seizure latency, duration, and stage. In the zinc-supplemented group, both the seizure latency and the rectal temperature triggering seizure initiation were significantly higher than in the other groups. We suggest that zinc supplementation can positively modulate febrile seizure pathogenesis in rats.

  19. Advances in cirrhosis: Optimizing the management of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Kumari, Radhika; Younossi, Zobair M; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of cirrhosis resulting in significant socioeconomic burden, morbidity, and mortality. HE can be further subdivided into covert HE (CHE) and overt HE (OHE). CHE is a subclinical, less severe manifestation of HE and requires psychometric testing for diagnosis. Due to the time consuming screening process and lack of standardized diagnostic criteria, CHE is frequently underdiagnosed despite its recognized role as a precursor to OHE. Screening for CHE with the availability of the Stroop test has provided a pragmatic method to promptly diagnose CHE. Management of acute OHE involves institution of lactulose, the preferred first-line therapy. In addition, prompt recognition and treatment of precipitating factors is critical as it may result in complete resolution of acute episodes of OHE. Treatment goals include improvement of daily functioning, evaluation for liver transplantation, and prevention of OHE recurrence. For secondary prophylaxis, intolerance to indefinite lactulose therapy may lead to non-adherence and has been identified as a precipitating factor for recurrent OHE. Rifaximin is an effective add-on therapy to lactulose for treatment and prevention of recurrent OHE. Recent studies have demonstrated comparable efficacy of probiotic therapy to lactulose use in both primary prophylaxis and secondary prophylaxis. PMID:26692331

  20. Acute presentations of renal artery stenosis in three patients with a solitary functioning kidney.

    PubMed

    Pun, E; Dowling, R J; Mitchell, P J

    2004-12-01

    Renal artery stenosis can present uncommonly in the acute state as flash pulmonary oedema and hypertensive encephalopathy. We present three such cases in patients with a solitary functioning kidney, with successful management via renal artery angioplasty and stent insertion.

  1. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A; Jackson, Clive D; Kircheis, Gerald; Lauridsen, Mette M; Montagnese, Sara; Schiff, Sami; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-12-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of this syndrome. As these patients have, by definition, no recognizable clinical features of brain dysfunction, the primary prerequisite for the diagnosis is careful exclusion of clinical symptoms and signs. A large number of psychometric tests/test systems have been evaluated in this patient group. Of these the best known and validated is the Portal Systemic Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) derived from a test battery of five paper and pencil tests; normative reference data are available in several countries. The electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy since the 1950s but, once popular, the technology is not as accessible now as it once was. The performance characteristics of the EEG are critically dependent on the type of analysis undertaken; spectral analysis has better performance characteristics than visual analysis; evolving analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test together with one of the validated alternative techniques or the EEG. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy has a detrimental effect on the well-being of patients and their care

  2. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John...encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  3. Plasma concentrations of endogenous benzodiazepine-receptor ligands in patients with hepatic encephalopathy: a comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Avila, C A; Shoemaker, W J; Ortega-Soto, H A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder secondary to acute or chronic liver failure. Although the exact causes of HE have not been clarified, enhanced central nervous system inhibition at the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, mediated by increased levels of endogenous benzodiazepine-receptor ligands (BZRL), has been proposed. Research exploring this hypothesis has yielded contradictory findings. This study evaluated the presence and levels of BZRL in plasma from patients with HE and 3 comparison groups. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PATIENTS: Twenty-four patients with HE, 10 patients with liver cirrhosis without encephalopathy (LC), 4 patients with uremic encephalopathy (UE), and 9 healthy subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Radio-receptor assay of plasma samples from patients and controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Plasma levels of BZRL. RESULTS: The patients in the HE group had significantly higher plasma BZRL levels than the patients with UE and the healthy subjects, but not than those with LC, in whom these compounds were also detected in significant concentrations. When patients were classified according to the severity of HE, plasma of BZRL showed a modest correlation with stage of severity (r = 0.37). Interestingly, approximately one-third of the patients with HE did not have detectable levels of BZRL. CONCLUSION: Endogenous BZRL may play a role in the pathogenesis of HE, although neuropsychiatric symptoms in HE are difficult to explain in terms of these compounds alone. Images Fig. 1 PMID:9785700

  4. Pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy - an unsolved puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of sepsis-induced encephalopathy remain elusive. The breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered a focal point in the development of sepsis-induced brain damage. Contributing factors for the compromise of the BBB include cytokines and chemokines, activation of the complement cascade, phagocyte-derived toxic mediators, and bacterial products. To date, we are far from fully understanding the neuropathology that develops as a secondary remote organ injury as a consequence of sepsis. However, recent studies suggest that bacterial proteins may readily cross the functional BBB and trigger an inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space, in absence of a bacterial invasion. A better understanding of the pathophysiological events leading to septic encephalopathy appears crucial to advance the clinical care for this vulnerable patient population. PMID:20565858

  5. Head stereotypies in STXBP1 encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Korff, Christian M; Villaluz, Mel Michel G; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-08-01

    STXBP1 encephalopathy is associated with a range of movement disorders. We observed head stereotypies in three patients. These comprised a slow (<1Hz), high-amplitude, horizontal, 'figure-of-eight' pattern, beginning at age 4-6 years and resulting in neck muscle hypertrophy, in two males; a faster (2-3Hz), side-to-side, 'no' movement, starting at the age of 9 years 6 months was observed in one female. Upper limb and truncal stereotypies and vocalization occurred intermittently with the head movements. The stereotypies increased with excitement but settled with concentration and sleep. Head and upper limb stereotypies are valuable clinical clues to the diagnosis of STXBP1 encephalopathy in patients with profound impairments.

  6. [Metabolic encephalopathy secondary to vitamin D intoxication].

    PubMed

    Herrera Martínez, Aura; Viñals Torràs, Montserrat; Muñoz Jiménez, Ma Concepción; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio Pablo; Molina Puerta, Ma José; Manzano García, Gregorio; Gálvez Moreno, Ma Ángeles; Calañas-Continente, Alfonso

    2014-10-25

    The association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of, among others, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases has lead in the last years to an enhanced interest in the usage of supplements to achieve the normalization of plasmatic values at 25(OH) D. Apparently this search for normalization is resulting in an higher incidence on vitamin D intoxication. We present the case of an 81 years old woman with metabolic encephalopathy and renal failure secondary to iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication. Calcium and vitamin D oral supplements were prescribed after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture. The patient improved clinically as well as analytically after receiving treatment with diuretics and hydration. We emphasize the importance of discarding hypercalcemia as a cause of metabolic encephalopathy; moreover we highly recommend keeping vitamin D intoxication in mind as an uncommon although always possible etiology of reversible hypercalcemia and renal failure.

  7. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A rare proteiform disorder.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela; D'Aurizio, Federica; Tozzoli, Renato; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Giovanella, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians. The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism, demonstrating an excellent response to high dose steroids is presented together with a systematic review of the literature.

  8. Medium chain triglycerides and hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M. Hilary; Bolton, C. H.; Morris, J. S.; Read, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    The oral administration of short (C6) and medium (C8 and (C10) chain triglycerides produced no clinical or electroencephalographic changes in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Arterial ammonia levels were also monitored in these patients and showed no significant change after medium chain triglycerides. It was concluded that medium chain triglycerides, known to be of potential value in the treatment of malabsorption in patients with cirrhosis, are not clinically contraindicated, even in patients with evidence of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:4841275

  9. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in the Term Infant

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Ali; Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia-ischemia in the perinatal period is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated disabilities in children. There has been significant research progress in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy over the last two decades and many new molecular mechanisms have been identified. Despite all these advances, therapeutic interventions are still limited. In this review paper, we discuss a number of molecular pathways involved in hypoxia-ischemia, and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:19944838

  10. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  11. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Agadi, Satish; Quach, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditions that are responsive to vitamin or vitamin derivatives. PMID:23984056

  12. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  13. Extending the KCNQ2 encephalopathy spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Weckhuysen, Sarah; Ivanovic, Vanja; Hendrickx, Rik; Van Coster, Rudy; Hjalgrim, Helle; Møller, Rikke S.; Grønborg, Sabine; Schoonjans, An-Sofie; Ceulemans, Berten; Heavin, Sinead B.; Eltze, Christin; Horvath, Rita; Casara, Gianluca; Pisano, Tiziana; Giordano, Lucio; Rostasy, Kevin; Haberlandt, Edda; Albrecht, Beate; Bevot, Andrea; Benkel, Ira; Syrbe, Steffan; Sheidley, Beth; Guerrini, Renzo; Poduri, Annapurna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Mandelstam, Simone; Scheffer, Ingrid; Angriman, Marco; Striano, Pasquale; Marini, Carla; Suls, Arvid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of KCNQ2 mutations in patients with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (NEE), and to expand the phenotypic spectrum of KCNQ2 epileptic encephalopathy. Methods: Eighty-four patients with unexplained NEE were screened for KCNQ2 mutations using classic Sanger sequencing. Clinical data of 6 additional patients with KCNQ2 mutations detected by gene panel were collected. Detailed phenotyping was performed with particular attention to seizure frequency, cognitive outcome, and video-EEG. Results: In the cohort, we identified 9 different heterozygous de novo KCNQ2 missense mutations in 11 of 84 patients (13%). Two of 6 missense mutations detected by gene panel were recurrent and present in patients of the cohort. Seizures at onset typically consisted of tonic posturing often associated with focal clonic jerking, and were accompanied by apnea with desaturation. One patient diagnosed by gene panel had seizure onset at the age of 5 months. Based on seizure frequency at onset and cognitive outcome, we delineated 3 clinical subgroups, expanding the spectrum of KCNQ2 encephalopathy to patients with moderate intellectual disability and/or infrequent seizures at onset. Recurrent mutations lead to relatively homogenous phenotypes. One patient responded favorably to retigabine; 5 patients had a good response to carbamazepine. In 6 patients, seizures with bradycardia were recorded. One patient died of probable sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Conclusion: KCNQ2 mutations cause approximately 13% of unexplained NEE. Patients present with a wide spectrum of severity and, although rare, infantile epilepsy onset is possible. PMID:24107868

  14. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  15. Treatment of febrile neutropenia and prophylaxis in hematologic malignancies: a critical review and update.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte-Gutierrez, Paola; Villalon, Lucia; Losa, Juan E; Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is one of the most serious complications in patients with haematological malignancies and chemotherapy. A prompt identification of infection and empirical antibiotic therapy can prolong survival. This paper reviews the guidelines about febrile neutropenia in the setting of hematologic malignancies, providing an overview of the definition of fever and neutropenia, and categories of risk assessment, management of infections, and prophylaxis.

  16. Treatment of Febrile Neutropenia and Prophylaxis in Hematologic Malignancies: A Critical Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Villafuerte-Gutierrez, Paola; Villalon, Lucia; Losa, Juan E.; Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is one of the most serious complications in patients with haematological malignancies and chemotherapy. A prompt identification of infection and empirical antibiotic therapy can prolong survival. This paper reviews the guidelines about febrile neutropenia in the setting of hematologic malignancies, providing an overview of the definition of fever and neutropenia, and categories of risk assessment, management of infections, and prophylaxis. PMID:25525436

  17. Febrile Seizures and Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Preschool Children: An Old Issue Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deonna, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The possible deleterious role of febrile seizures on development is an old issue. It took a long time to realize that impaired development or occurrence of chronic epilepsy affected a very small minority of children with febrile seizures. These children either had pre-existing brain damage, specific genetic epileptic conditions, or seizure-induced…

  18. Genetics Home Reference: acute necrotizing encephalopathy type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... interacts with a protein complex known as the nuclear pore. The nuclear pore is a channel that allows transport of ... transport of proteins and other molecules through the nuclear pore and helps modify proteins coming into or ...

  19. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  20. Determining Prevalence of Acute Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Developing Countries

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-11

    Demonstrate BIND II Score of >=5, is Valid for Detecting Moderate to Severe ABE in Neonates <14 Days Old.; Demonstrate Community-BIND Instrument, a Modified BIND II, is a Valid and Reliable Tool for Detecting ABE.; Demonstrate That Community-BIND Can be Used for Acquiring Population-based Prevalence of ABE in the Community.

  1. Wernicke Encephalopathy and Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin

    As the number of obese patients increases, as will the number of bariatric procedures. Malabsorptive bariatric procedures have emerged as one of common causes of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE), an acute neuropsychiatric disorder due to thiamine deficiency. However, restrictive procedures such as sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are less prone to cause nutrient deficiencies. WE occurred after SG is an uncommon complication because the main absorptive sites for thiamine are intact after SG. Here, we report a case of WE after SG. With rapid increase in the use of SG for morbid obesity, this case deserves particular attention from clinicians.

  2. MR Imaging of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunjiu; Jin, Lirong; Fei, Guoqiang

    2005-10-01

    We investigated the correlation of MR imaging features with the pathological evolution and prognosis of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy. A retrospective review and analysis was conducted of 6 cases of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy, consisting of MR imaging features, clinical characteristics, and outcomes after thiamine administration. One patient died, 1 patient entered a persistent vegetative state, and the others recovered fully from Wernicke encephalopathy within 2 weeks to 1 year after thiamine administration. Typical MR imaging showed areas of increased T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signals symmetrically surrounding the aqueduct and the third ventricle, at the floor of fourth ventricle, in the medial thalami, and in the capita of caudate nuclei. Two patients presenting without coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals of the periaqueductal area only. All 4 patients presenting with coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals symmetrically in the medial thalami and in the capita of caudate nuclei. Of the 4 patients with coma, 2 patients with deep coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals in the medial thalami and caudate nuclei as well as in the frontal and parietal cortices. According to the follow-up results, increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals in the 4 patients without cortical damage decreased in intensity, consistent with clinical recovery within 2 weeks to 1 year. The patient in a persistent vegetative state exhibited progressive atrophy of the whole brain during the 2 years of the follow-up study. MR imaging is helpful not only to diagnose acute nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy but also to evaluate the pathologic evolution and prognosis of the disorder.

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme.

    PubMed

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-14

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome.

  4. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme

    PubMed Central

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome. PMID:28127211

  5. Management of febrile neutropenia in the era of bacterial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Sehnaz

    2013-01-01

    Managing cancer patients with fever and neutropenia must be considered as a medical emergency since any delay in initiating appropriate empirical antibacterial therapy may result in high rates of mortality and morbidity. Emerging antibacterial resistance in bacterial pathogens infecting febrile neutropenic patients complicates management, and choosing the type of empirical antimicrobial therapy has become a challenge. To further complicate the decision process, not all neutropenic patients are in same category of susceptibility to develop severe infection. While low-risk patients may be treated with oral antibiotics in the outpatient setting, high-risk patients usually need to be admitted to hospital and receive parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics until the neutrophil levels recover. These strategies have recently been addressed in two international guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL). This review gives a brief overview of current antimicrobial resistance problems and their effects in febrile neutropenic cancer patients by summarizing the suggestions from the IDSA and ECIL guidelines. PMID:25165543

  6. Increased Nasopharyngeal Density and Concurrent Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis Are Associated with Pneumonia in Febrile Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage of five pathogens in febrile children with and without acute respiratory infection (ARI) of the upper (URTI) or lower tract, attending health facilities in Tanzania. Methods NP swabs collected from children (N = 960) aged 2 months to 10 years, and with a temperature ≥38°C, were utilized to quantify bacterial density of S. pneumoniae (Sp), H. influenzae (Hi), M. catarrhalis (Mc), S. aureus (Sa), and N. meningitidis (Nm). We determined associations between presence of individual species, densities, or concurrent carriage of all species combination with respiratory diseases including clinical pneumonia, pneumonia with normal chest radiography (CXR) and endpoint pneumonia. Results Individual carriage, and NP density, of Sp, Hi, or Mc, but not Sa, or Nm, was significantly associated with febrile ARI and clinical pneumonia when compared to febrile non-ARI episodes. Density was also significantly increased in severe pneumonia when compared to mild URTI (Sp, p<0.002; Hi p<0.001; Mc, p = 0.014). Accordingly, concurrent carriage of Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+, in the absence of Sa- and Nm-, was significantly more prevalent in children with ARI (p = 0.03), or clinical pneumonia (p<0.001) than non-ARI, and in children with clinical pneumonia (p = 0.0007) than URTI. Furthermore, Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+ differentiated children with pneumonia with normal CXR, or endpoint pneumonia, from those with URTI, and non-ARI cases. Conclusions Concurrent NP carriage of Sp, Hi, and Mc was a predictor of clinical pneumonia and identified children with pneumonia with normal CXR and endpoint pneumonia from those with febrile URTI, or non-ARI episodes. PMID:27907156

  7. Prognostic evaluation of febrile neutropenia in apparently stable adult cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Bayonas, A; Gómez, J; González-Billalabeitia, E; Canteras, M; Navarrete, A; Gonzálvez, M L; Vicente, V; Ayala de la Peña, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Predictive models to identify low-risk febrile neutropenia (FN) have been developed with heterogeneous samples, which included stable and unstable patients, solid tumours, acute leukaemia and bone marrow transplantation. These models fail to recognise 5–15% of cases with unexpected complications, and literature specifically addressing apparently stable patients (ASPs) is scarce. Methods: We reviewed 861 episodes of FN in outpatients with solid tumours, including 692 (80%) episodes with apparent clinical stability. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of this latter group and explore the possibility of stratifying it according to the presenting features. A case–control study was performed and the MASCC index was evaluated. Results: The rates of complications and bacteraemia in ASPs were 7.3% and 6.2%, respectively. The MASCC index yielded a low sensitivity to detect complications (36%). Prognostic factors were identified: ECOG performance status ⩾2, chronic bronchitis, chronic heart failure, stomatitis NCI grade ⩾2, monocytes <200 mm−3 and stress hyperglycaemia. Conclusion: A very simple assessment is useful to classify the patients with FN according to the risk of complications. A few additional variables may predict the clinical course of the patients. We additionally show that the MASCC index applied to this specific group has a low sensitivity to predict complications. PMID:21811253

  8. Evaluation of six risk factors for the development of bacteremia in children with cancer and febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Asturias, E.J.; Corral, J.E.; Quezada, J.

    2010-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a well-known entity in children with cancer, being responsible for the high risk for infection that characterizes this population. For this reason, cancer patients are hospitalized so that they can receive prophylactic care. Risk factors have been used to classify patients at a high risk for developing bacteremia. The present study evaluates whether those risk factors (C-reactive protein, hypotension, leukemia as the cancer type, thrombocytopenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute malnutrition) apply to patients at the Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica. We evaluated 102 episodes in 88 patients, in whom risk factors and blood cultures were tested. We observed no statistical relationship between the six risk factors and bacteremia. There was also no relationship between bacteremia and the simultaneous presence of two, three, or more risk factors. A significant relationship of C-reactive protein and platelet count with other outcome factors was observed. PMID:20404980

  9. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  10. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  11. Comparison of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy Isolates in Raccoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to its susceptibility to various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and relatively short incubation times, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has been suggested as a model for TSE strain differentiation. Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of undetermined origin in...

  12. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  13. Imaging in sepsis-associated encephalopathy--insights and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Daniel J; Yamamoto, Adam K; Menon, David K

    2013-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) refers to a clinical spectrum of acute neurological dysfunction that arises in the context of sepsis. Although the pathophysiology of SAE is incompletely understood, it is thought to involve endothelial activation, blood-brain barrier leakage, inflammatory cell migration, and neuronal loss with neurotransmitter imbalance. SAE is associated with a high risk of mortality. Imaging studies using MRI and CT have demonstrated changes in the brains of patients with SAE that are also seen in disorders such as stroke. Next-generation imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and PET, as well as experimental imaging modalities, provide options for early identification of patients with SAE, and could aid in identification of pathophysiological processes that represent possible therapeutic targets. In this Review, we explore the recent literature on imaging in SAE, relating the findings of these studies to pathological data and experimental studies to obtain insights into the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated neurological dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest how novel imaging technologies can be used for early-stage proof-of-concept and proof-of-mechanism translational studies, which may help to improve diagnosis in SAE.

  14. Modeling Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Way Forward for Future Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ryan C.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Robson, Matthew J.; Lee, John M.; Bailes, Julian E.; Dashnaw, Matthew L.; Huber, Jason D.; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Rosen, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive media coverage associated with the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), our fundamental understanding of the disease pathophysiology remains in its infancy. Only recently have scientific laboratories and personnel begun to explore CTE pathophysiology through the use of preclinical models of neurotrauma. Some studies have shown the ability to recapitulate some aspects of CTE in rodent models, through the use of various neuropathological, biochemical, and/or behavioral assays. Many questions related to CTE development, however, remain unanswered. These include the role of impact severity, the time interval between impacts, the age at which impacts occur, and the total number of impacts sustained. Other important variables such as the location of impacts, character of impacts, and effect of environment/lifestyle and genetics also warrant further study. In this work, we attempt to address some of these questions by exploring work previously completed using single- and repetitive-injury paradigms. Despite some models producing some deficits similar to CTE symptoms, it is clear that further studies are required to understand the development of neuropathological and neurobehavioral features consistent with CTE-like features in rodents. Specifically, acute and chronic studies are needed that characterize the development of tau-based pathology. PMID:26579067

  15. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A rare cause of recurrent encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Raashda Ainuddin; Shaheen, Marwan Yassin; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Bakshi, Nasir Ahmed; Kaya, Namik; Aldosary, Mazhor; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report an unusual case of recurrent encephalopathy due to acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in a patient with propionic acidemia (PA). PA is an inherited metabolic disorder in which patients often present with encephalopathy and pancytopenia during metabolic decompensation. However, these patients may rarely develop HLH with similar presentation. This case illustrates the need to distinguish HLH induced encephalopathy from the one secondary to metabolic decompensation in these patients, as early diagnosis and treatment of HLH improves prognosis. This case also highlights the importance of considering HLH in patients presenting with unexplained encephalopathy, as early diagnosis and treatment is lifesaving in this otherwise lethal condition. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acquired HLH presenting as recurrent encephalopathy followed by complete recovery, in a metabolically stable patient with PA. PMID:27672548

  16. Clinical and imaging correlates of EEG patterns in hospitalized patients with encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Stevens, Robert D; Kaplan, Peter W

    2013-04-01

    To identify the relationship between pathologic electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns, clinical and neuroradiological abnormalities, and outcome in hospitalized patients with acute encephalopathy. This 5-year cohort study was performed at an academic tertiary care center. EEGs in 154 patients with altered mental status were classified according to five predefined patterns: Isolated continuous slowing of background activity (theta, theta/delta, and delta activity) and patterns with slowing background activity with episodic transients [i.e., triphasic waves (TWs) or frontal intermittent delta activity (FIRDA)]. Clinical characteristics, blood tests and neuroimaging were compared among groups. Associations between EEG patterns and structural and non-structural abnormalities were calculated. Glasgow Outcome Score >3 at discharge was defined as favorable and 1-3 as unfavorable outcome. In multivariable analyses, theta was associated with brain atrophy (OR 2.6, p = 0.020), theta/delta with intracerebral hemorrhages (OR 6.8, p = 0.005), FIRDA with past cerebrovascular accidents (OR 2.7, p = 0.004), TWs with liver or multi-organ failure (OR 6, p = 0.004; OR 4, p = 0.039), and delta activity with alcohol/drug abuse with or without intoxication, and HIV infection (OR 3.8, p = 0.003; OR 9, p = 0.004). TWs were associated with death (OR 4.5, p = 0.005); theta/delta with unfavorable outcomes (OR 2.5, p = 0.033), while patients with FIRDA had favorable outcomes (OR 4.8, p = 0.004). In encephalopathic patients, well-defined EEG patterns are associated with specific pathological conditions and outcomes, suggesting that mechanistic hypotheses underlie these abnormal EEG patterns. To clarify the respective contributions of non-structural and structural abnormalities to encephalopathy reflected in specific EEG patterns, prospective studies using continuous EEG monitoring during the acute onset of encephalopathy are needed.

  17. Three-dimensional brain metabolic imaging in patients with toxic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, T.J.; Duhon, D.; Ristovv, M. ); Morrow, L. ); Subramanian, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Thirty-three workers, ages 24 to 63, developed clinical toxic encephalopathy after exposure to neurotoxins and were studied by SPECT brain scans. Five were exposed to pesticides, 13 were acutely exposed to mixtures of solvents, 8 were chronically exposed to mixtures of hazardous wastes that contained organic solvents, 2 were acutely exposed to phosgene and other toxins, and 5 had exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Twenty-nine had neuropsychological testing and all had a medical history and physical. Of the workers who had a clinical diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy, 31 (93.9%) had abnormal SPECT brain scans with the most frequent areas of abnormality being temporal lobes (67.7%), frontal lobes (61.3%), basal ganglia (45.2%), thalamus (29.0%), parietal lobes (12.9%), motorstrip (9.68%), cerebral hemisphere (6.45%), occipital lobes (3.23%), and caudate nucleus (3.23%). Twenty-three out of 29 (79.3%) neuropsychological evaluations were abnormal. Other modalities when performed included the following percentages of abnormals: NCV, 33.3%; CPT sensory nerve testing, 91.3%, vestibular function testing, 71.4%; olfactory testing, 89.2%; sleep EEG analysis, 85.7%; EEG, 8.33%; CT, 7.14%; and MRI brain scans, 28.6%. The complex of symptoms seen in toxic encephalopathy implies dysfunction involving several CNS regions. This series of patients adds to the previous experience of brain metabolic imaging and demonstrates that certain areas of the brain are typically affected despite differences in toxin structure, that these lesions can be globally defined by SPECT/PET brain scans, that these lesions correlate well with clinical and neuropsychological testing, and that such testing is a useful adjunct to previous methods. EEG and structural brain imaging such as CT and MRI are observed to have poor sensitivity in this type of patient. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  18. The Relationship between Iron Deficiency and Febrile Convulsion: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Kheirkhah, Davood; Madani, Mahla; Kashani, Hamed Haddad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Febrile seizure is among the most common convulsion disorders in children, which strikes 2% to 5% of children between 3 to 60 months of age. Some studies have reported that iron deficiency could be a risk factor for febrile seizure. The present study was conducted to compare the rate of iron deficiency anemia in febrile children with and without seizure. Materials and Methods: This case-control study evaluated 200 children aged 6-60 month in two 100 person groups (febrile seizure and febrile without convulsion) in Kashan. The CBC diff, serum iron and TIBC were done for all of participants. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia based on mentioned tests. Results: No significant differences were found in two groups regarding to the age, gender, and the disease causing the fever. The presence of iron deficiency anemia was 45% in the convulsion group and 22% in the group with fever without convulsion. The Chi Square test indicated a significant difference between two groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a considerable percentage of children having febrile seizure suffer from iron-deficiency anemia and low serum iron. This means the low serum iron and presence of anemia can serve as a reinforcing factor for the febrile seizure in children. PMID:26383191

  19. PRRT2 Mutations Are Related to Febrile Seizures in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng-Wen; Qu, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Mao, Chen-Xue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Deng, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Yin, Ji-Ye; Long, Hong-Yu; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene was identified to be related to paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), infantile convulsions with PKD, PKD with migraine and benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). The present study explores whether the PRRT2 mutation is a potential cause of febrile seizures, including febrile seizures plus (FS+), generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and Dravet syndrome (DS); thus, it may provide a new drug target for personalized medicine for febrile seizure patients. We screened PRRT2 exons in a cohort of 136 epileptic patients with febrile seizures, including FS+, GEFS+ and DS. PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 25 out of 136 (18.4%) febrile seizures in epileptic patients. Five loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified: c.649delC (p.R217Efs*12), c.649_650insC (p.R217Pfs*8), c.412C>G (p.Pro138Ala), c.439G>C (p.Asp147His) and c.623C>A (p.Ser208Tyr). PRRT2 variants were probably involved in the etiology of febrile seizures in epileptic patients. PMID:25522171

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Transplant-associated Encephalopathy in Children

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to analyze characteristics of encephalopathy after both hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ pediatric transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 662 pediatric transplant recipients (201 with liver transplantation [LT], 55 with heart transplantation [HT], and 67 with kidney transplantation [KT], 339 with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT]) who received their graft organs at Asan Medical Center between January 2000 and July 2014. Of the 662 patients, 50 (7.6%) experienced encephalopathy after transplantation. The incidence of encephalopathy was significantly different according to the type of organ transplant: LT, 16/201 (8.0%), HT, 13/55 (23.6%), KT, 5/67 (7.5%), and HSCT, 16/339 (4.7%) (P < 0.001). Drug-induced encephalopathy (n = 14) was the most common encephalopathy for all transplant types, but particularly after HSCT. Hypertensive encephalopathy was the most common after KT and HT, whereas metabolic encephalopathy was the most common after LT. The median time to encephalopathy onset also differed according to the transplant type: 5 days after KT (range 0–491 days), 10 days after HT (1–296 days), 49.5 days after HSCT (9–1,405 days), and 39 days after LT (1–1,092 days) (P = 0.018). The mortality rate among patients with encephalopathy was 42.0% (n = 21/50). Only 5 patients died of neurologic complications. Transplant-associated encephalopathy presented different characteristics according to the type of transplant. Specialized diagnostic approach for neurologic complications specific to the type of transplant may improve survival and quality of life in children after transplantation. PMID:28145649

  1. Ifosfamide associated myoclonus-encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Savica, Rodolfo; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Josephs, Keith A

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of movement disorders associated with ifosfamide toxicity. One of the most common adverse events of ifosfamide treatment is central nervous system toxicity. However, little is known about the occurrence of movement disorders associated with ifosfamide toxicity. We performed a retrospective computer search of the electronic medical records database of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN from 1 January 1997-30 June 2010, using a series of search terms to identify all patients that had been treated with ifosfamide for systemic cancer. Among 400 patients that have ever used ifosfamide, we selected those patients that had any neurological complication in their medical records after the use of ifosfamide. Fifty-two had a neurological complication after ifosfamide administration. The most common neurological complication was encephalopathy that was present in 11 cases (21%). The presence of a movement disorder time locked to the administration of ifosfamide was reported in seven cases (13%). Generalized myoclonus was most common, occurring in four patients while postural tremor was documented in the other three. All patients with myoclonus had asterixis. Four of the patients also had encephalopathy. In six patients the movement disorders resolved within 48 h, spontaneously, after the discontinuation of ifosfamide, while in one case resolved in 24 h after the treatment with methylene blue. Our study demonstrates that although encephalopathy is the most common adverse neurological event associated with ifosfamide toxicity, movement disorders, including generalized myoclonus, asterixis, and postural tremors may also occur. Treatment with methylene blue may be further considered as useful to ameliorate the movement disorders.

  2. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  3. Variation in Rates of Diagnosis of Acute Otitis Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berwick, Donald M.; Thibodeau, Lawrence A.

    1980-01-01

    Over 13 weeks during two periods in 1978 the diagnostic rate for acute otitis media was monitored among febrile children in the emergency room of a large children's hospital. Temporal variation in diagnostic rates by physicians was largely attributable to differences among individual providers and independent of level of training. (Author/MLW)

  4. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the availability cascade.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen

    2014-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in sports has been known for > 85 years, and has experienced a resurgence of interest over the past decade, both in the media and in the scientific community. However, there appears to be a disconnection between the public's perception of CTE and the currently available scientific data. The cognitive bias known as the "availability cascade" has been suggested as a reason to explain this rift in knowledge. This review summarizes and updates the history of CTE in sports, discusses recent epidemiological and autopsy studies, summarizes the evidence base related to CTE in sports, and offers recommendations for future directions.

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy and Sleepiness: An Interesting Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Montagnese, Sara; Turco, Matteo; Amodio, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-wake abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis have been traditionally associated with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In recent years, a certain amount of work has been devoted to the study of this relationship. This has lead to a modified picture, with weakening of the association between HE and poor night sleep, and the emergence of stronger links between HE and excessive daytime sleepiness. This brief review focuses on the evidence in favor of the interpretation of HE as a sleepiness syndrome, and on the diagnostic, therapeutic and social implications of such an interpretation. PMID:26041958

  7. Hashimoto's encephalopathy mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Baehring, Joachim M

    2017-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare, imprecisely defined autoimmune neurologic syndrome associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis that normally responds to corticosteroids. Here, we describe the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with subacute cognitive decline and ataxia. Neoplastic, paraneoplastic, infectious, and metabolic etiologies were ruled out. Anti-TPO antibody level was markedly elevated at 966U/mL. After one month of 60mg/day of oral prednisone, she felt back to baseline and her Montreal Cognitive Assessment dramatically improved. Physicians should strongly consider this uncommon diagnosis in patients with rapid cognitive decline and no other clear etiology.

  8. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern.

  9. [Exanthema as a main symptom in the febrile child].

    PubMed

    Aebi, C

    2005-08-01

    Distinguishing in febrile children between harmless rashes and those, which require specific action, is a common problem in pediatric primary care. Major exanthematous diseases necessitating emergency hospitalization include invasive meningococcal disease and rarely gram-negative septicaemia caused by other pathogens, staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, endocarditis, fever and rash in travellers returning from tropical countries and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. Therapeutic intervention is also necessary in patients with scarlet fever, rheumatic fever, varicella in postpuberal and immunocompromised individuals, in Kawasaki's disease, in Still's disease and in other non-infectious, inflammatory diseases (e.g., familial mediterranean fever). Finally, various specific measures need to be taken in reportable diseases, erythema infectiosum (parvovirus B19), primary HIV infection and in Henoch-Schölein purpura.

  10. Two USA Ehrlichia spp. cause febrile illness in goats.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Amanda D; Levin, Michael L; Spurlock, J Paul

    2008-08-25

    Ehrlichia spp. are not currently recognized as a cause of illness in goats in the USA, but three Ehrlichia are enzootic in lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) in the eastern USA, and related bacteria in other countries cause illness in goats. We exposed naïve goats to Ehrlichia-infected Amblyomma and demonstrated that infection and clinical illness can be caused by two USA species, E. ewingii and the recently discovered Panola Mountain Ehrlichia sp. Clinical features in all five goats are described; ehrlichioses were associated with pyrexia, serous nasal discharge, inappetance, lethargy, decreased alkaline phosphatase, and, in most cases, neutropenia. Goats remained chronically infected for several months following exposure to ehrlichiae and transmitted the pathogens to uninfected ticks. In the eastern USA, undifferentiated febrile illness in goats might be caused by previously unrecognized ehrlichial infections, and pastures housing-infected goats could become infested with a large number of infected ticks.

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karanbir; Gupta, Rajesh; Kamal, Haris; Silvestri, Nicholas J; Wolfe, Gil I

    2015-03-01

    The appearance of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after blood transfusion is rare and has only been reported in three patients to our knowledge. We report a fourth patient with PRES secondary to blood transfusion. A 36-year-old woman with a history of menorrhagia presented to the emergency department with severe fatigue. She had a hemoglobin of 1.7 g/dl and received four units of red blood cells over 15 hours. On day 6 post-transfusion she returned with confusion, headache and a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The MRI of her brain was consistent with PRES. The following day her confusion worsened, repeat MRI of the brain showed new T2-weighted lesions. Over next 10 days her mental status gradually improved close to her baseline. A repeat MRI of the brain showed resolution of the T2-weighted lesions. The clinical presentation, radiological findings and disease progression in our patient was consistent with PRES. Other than the blood transfusions, there were no apparent risk factors for PRES. The prior three patients with post-transfusion PRES have been reported in middle-aged women with uterine fibroids. It is suspected that these patients have a subacute to chronic anemic state due to ongoing menorrhagia. It is interesting to note that no cases of PRES post-transfusion have been reported in the setting of acute blood loss, such as from trauma. It is postulated that an abrupt increase in hemoglobin causes a rapid rise in blood viscosity and loss of hypoxic vasodilation. Subsequent endothelial damage and brain capillary leakage results in PRES. This constellation of changes may not occur after transfusion in patients with more acute blood loss.

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome--Insight into pathogenesis, clinical variants and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Granata, Guido; Greco, Antonio; Iannella, Giannicola; Granata, Massimo; Manno, Alessandra; Savastano, Ersilia; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a rare clinicoradiological entity characterized by typical MRI findings located in the occipital and parietal lobes, caused by subcortical vasogenic edema. It was first described as a distinctive syndrome by Hinchey in 1996. Etiopathogenesis is not clear, although it is known that it is an endotheliopathy of the posterior cerebral vasculature leading to failed cerebral autoregulation, posterior edema and encephalopathy. A possible pathological activation of the immune system has been recently hypothesized in its pathogenesis. At clinical onset, the most common manifestations are seizures, headache and visual changes. Besides, tinnitus and acute vertigo have been frequently reported. Symptoms can be reversible but cerebral hemorrhage or ischemia may occur. Diagnosis is based on magnetic resonance imaging, in the presence of acute development of clinical neurologic symptoms and signs and arterial hypertension and/or toxic associated conditions with possible endotheliotoxic effects. Mainstay on the treatment is removal of the underlying cause. Further investigation and developments in endothelial cell function and in neuroimaging of cerebral blood flow are needed and will help to increase our understanding of pathophysiology, possibly suggesting novel therapies.

  13. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning – A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  14. [Significance of the antimicrobial drug used to prevent febrile infection following prostate needle biopsy].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Maki, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Hamaguchi, Masumitsu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Naotaka; Iguchi, Atushi

    2014-05-01

    The rate of incidence of febrile infection and the antimicrobial drug used at the time of prostate needle biopsy was examined retrospectively. SPFX (sparfloxacin) 400 mg (January 2007 to March 2010) and LVFX (levofloxacin) 500 mg (April 2010, onward) were administered prophylactically in 1,034 patients undergoing transrectal or transperineal prostate biopsy. One febrile infection occurred and resolved in each group. A single dose of LVFX 500 mg before the procedure effectively prevented febrile infection in both transrectal and transperineal prostate needle biopsy.

  15. [Diagnostic significance of electrocortical responses to rhythmic and solitary photic stimuli in patients with hepato-portal encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Erokhina, L G; Ershov, Iu A; Puchinskaia, L M; Gubskiĭ, L V; Lisina, G I

    1976-01-01

    In order to clarify some diagnostical criteria of latent hepato-portal encephalopathy in 57 patients with intrahepatic forms of portal hypertension the authors studied the character of driving response in photorhythmical stimulation. In 9 patients the development of evoked potentials depending upon the significance of the stimula was studied as well. The studies confirmed the prognostical significance of a slowing down the mean frequency of rhythms in the EEG in relation to the development of acute encephalopathy and a certain tendency to the shift in the spectrum of driving responses to low frequency and a worsening of driving responses in slowing down the medium rhythm frequency of EEG. In patients with changed resting activity in the Background EEG there was a drop in the amplitude of late components of evoked potentials.

  16. Endotoxemia, encephalopathy, and mortality in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Bigatello, L M; Broitman, S A; Fattori, L; Di Paoli, M; Pontello, M; Bevilacqua, G; Nespoli, A

    1987-01-01

    Endotoxemia without sepsis was detected with a chromogenic Limulus assay in 36 of 39 (92.3%) cirrhotic patients and was absent in seven healthy volunteers. In 11 patients who underwent elective portasystemic shunt, portal vein endotoxemia was higher than inferior vena caval: p less than 0.05, systemic endotoxin levels did not change, compared to preoperative levels, on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd postoperative days, attendant to an uneventful recovery. In 21 patients in hepatic encephalopathy after esophagogastric hemorrhage, systemic endotoxemia was higher than in well-compensated cirrhotics: p less than 0.001; it was higher in deep than in light coma: p less than 0.05; it was higher in those who died than in those who survived: p less than 0.001. Endotoxin levels showed a positive correlation with serum bilirubin: r = 0.59, p less than 0.001, and a negative correlation with prothrombin activity: r = -0.59, p less than 0.001. These data show endotoxemia without sepsis is a constant finding in cirrhosis and increasing levels of endotoxemia are associated with hepatic failure, encephalopathy, and death.

  17. Neuronal cell death in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2007-12-01

    It is generally assumed that neuronal cell death is minimal in liver failure and is insufficient to account for the neuropsychiatric symptoms characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy. However, contrary to this assumption, neuronal cell damage and death are well documented in liver failure patients, taking the form of several distinct clinical entities namely acquired (non-Wilsonian) hepatocerebral degeneration, cirrhosis-related Parkinsonism, post-shunt myelopathy and cerebellar degeneration. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that liver failure contributes to the severity of neuronal loss in Wernicke's encephalopathy. The long-standing nature of the thalamic and cerebellar lesions, over 80% of which are missed by routine clinical evaluation, together with the probability that they are nutritional in origin, underscores the need for careful nutritional management (adequate dietary protein, Vitamin B(1)) in liver failure patients. Mechanisms identified with the potential to cause neuronal cell death in liver failure include NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity, lactic acidosis, oxidative/nitrosative stress and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The extent of neuronal damage in liver failure may be attenuated by compensatory mechanisms that include down-regulation of NMDA receptors, hypothermia and the presence of neuroprotective steroids such as allopregnanolone. These findings suggest that some of the purported "sequelae" of liver transplantation (gait ataxia, memory loss, confusion) could reflect preexisting neuropathology.

  18. Hyponatremia in hepatic encephalopathy: an accomplice or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung Cheol; Kim, W Ray

    2009-06-01

    Hyponatremia, a common complication inpatients with advanced liver disease and impaired free water clearance, has been shown to be an important predictor of short-term mortality. Hepatic encephalopathy, also a late complication of end-stage liver disease, has been associated with low-grade cerebral edema as a result of swelling of astrocytes. Guevara et al. hypothesized that hyponatremia and the resultant depletion of organic osmolytes (e.g.,myo-inositol) from brain cells contribute to brain edema, playing an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Using a multivariable analysis, they demonstrated that hyponatremia increased the risk of hepatic encephalopathy more than eightfold, after adjustment for serum bilirubin and creatinine concentrations and previous history of encephalopathy. Their magnetic resonance spectroscopy data correlated low brain concentrations of myoinositol with hepatic encephalopathy. As both hyponatremia and encephalopathy occur in patients with advanced liver disease, it has been difficult to implicate hyponatremia independently in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Guevara's data do suggest that hyponatremia is more likely an accomplice than an innocent bystander.

  19. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians’ awareness of its possible onset. PMID:27399058

  20. [Clinical importance and diagnostic methods of minimal hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Stawicka, Agnieszka; Zbrzeźniak, Justyna; Świderska, Aleksandra; Kilisińska, Natalia; Świderska, Magdalena; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) encompasses a number of neuropsychological and neurophysiological disorders in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis, who do not display abnormalities during a medical interview or physical examination. A negative influence of MHE on the quality of life of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis was confirmed, which include retardation of ability of operating motor vehicles and disruption of multiple health-related areas, as well as functioning in the society. The data on frequency of traffic offences and accidents amongst patients diagnosed with MHE in comparison to patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis without MHE, as well as healthy persons is alarming. Those patients are unaware of their disorder and retardation of their ability to operate vehicles, therefore it is of utmost importance to define this group. The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (formerly "subclinical" encephalopathy) erroneously suggested the unnecessity of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with liver cirrhosis. Diagnosing MHE is an important predictive factor for occurrence of overt encephalopathy - more than 50% of patients with this diagnosis develop overt encephalopathy during a period of 30 months after. Early diagnosing MHE gives a chance to implement proper treatment which can be a prevention of overt encephalopathy. Due to continuing lack of clinical research there exist no commonly agreed-upon standards for definition, diagnostics, classification and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. This article introduces the newest findings regarding the importance of MHE, scientific recommendations and provides detailed descriptions of the most valuable diagnostic methods.

  1. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  2. The role of methanethiol in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; Ferenci, P; Grimm, G; Yap, S H; Tangerman, A

    1991-03-01

    Mixed disulfides of methanethiol represent a relative estimate for an exposure to methanethiol. The concentrations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides, methionine, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and ammonia were measured in patients with different stages of hepatic encephalopathy, in patients with chronic kidney failure and in healthy subjects. In patients with hepatic encephalopathy, the mean serum concentrations of all these compounds were elevated. However, the elevations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides were small and partly caused by decreased renal function. In addition, the levels of methanethiol-mixed disulfides did not differ significantly between the different grades of hepatic encephalopathy. The concentrations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides were substantially lower than those previously observed in healthy subjects after an oral methionine load or in a patient with a deficiency in methionine adenosyltransferase, the latter without causing encephalopathy. We concluded that the role of methanethiol in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is probably minor, if not insignificant. In the patients with hepatic encephalopathy, a significant correlation was found between the concentrations of methionine and 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and between 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and methanethiol-mixed disulfides, supporting the theory that methanethiol is formed by way of the methionine transamination pathway. Evidence is provided that, besides the methionine transsulfuration pathway, the transamination pathway is also impaired in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

  3. Legal Responsibilities of Physicians When They Diagnose Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Vierling, John M

    2015-08-01

    Both covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) impair the ability to operate machinery. The legal responsibilities of US physicians who diagnose and treat patients with hepatic encephalopathy vary among states. It is imperative that physicians know the laws regarding reporting in their state. OHE represents a neuropsychiatric impairment that meets general reporting criteria. The medical advisory boards of the states have not identified OHE as a reportable condition. In the absence of validated diagnostic guidelines, physicians are not obligated to perform tests for CHE. There is a need for explicit guidance from professional associations regarding this issue.

  4. Use of Peptide-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay followed by Immunofluorescence Assay To Document Ehrlichia chaffeensis as a Cause of Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Matute, Armando J.; Woods, Christopher W.; Mayorga, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), has been extensively studied as a cause of acute febrile illness and an emerging tick-borne zoonosis in the United States. Limited data suggest its presence in other regions, including Central and South America but not Nicaragua to date. Diagnosis of E. chaffeensis infection by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) is the reference standard due to its presumed high sensitivity and specificity, but IFA is impractical, variably reproducible, and cumbersome for large epidemiologic studies and for clinical diagnosis in resource-poor regions. We evaluated a high-throughput, objective peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for use alone or in combination with IFA. We found that it performed best as a screening test (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 84%) to reduce the proportion of serum samples that were required by the more cumbersome and subjective IFA testing to <20%. Using a two-step diagnostic approach (IFA is performed if the ELISA is positive), we identified E. chaffeensis or a serologically and antigenically similar organism as a heretofore unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in humans in Nicaragua and demonstrated the utility of the peptide ELISA as a screening tool for large-scale clinical studies. PMID:27053675

  5. Towards Improving Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Non-malaria Febrile Illness: A Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Decuypere, Saskia; Maltha, Jessica; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Issa, Guiraud; Bérenger, Kaboré; Lompo, Palpouguini; Tahita, Marc C.; Ruspasinghe, Thusitha; McConville, Malcolm; Goodacre, Royston; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-malaria febrile illnesses such as bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) are a leading cause of disease and mortality in the tropics. However, there are no reliable, simple diagnostic tests for identifying BSI or other severe non-malaria febrile illnesses. We hypothesized that different infectious agents responsible for severe febrile illness would impact on the host metabololome in different ways, and investigated the potential of plasma metabolites for diagnosis of non-malaria febrile illness. Methodology We conducted a comprehensive mass-spectrometry based metabolomics analysis of the plasma of 61 children with severe febrile illness from a malaria-endemic rural African setting. Metabolite features characteristic for non-malaria febrile illness, BSI, severe anemia and poor clinical outcome were identified by receiver operating curve analysis. Principal Findings The plasma metabolome profile of malaria and non-malaria patients revealed fundamental differences in host response, including a differential activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. A simple corticosteroid signature was a good classifier of severe malaria and non-malaria febrile patients (AUC 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70–0.93). Patients with BSI were characterized by upregulated plasma bile metabolites; a signature of two bile metabolites was estimated to have a sensitivity of 98.1% (95% CI: 80.2–100) and a specificity of 82.9% (95% CI: 54.7–99.9) to detect BSI in children younger than 5 years. This BSI signature demonstrates that host metabolites can have a superior diagnostic sensitivity compared to pathogen-detecting tests to identify infections characterized by low pathogen load such as BSI. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential use of plasma metabolites to identify causality in children with severe febrile illness in malaria-endemic settings. PMID:26943791

  6. TRPV1 promotes repetitive febrile seizures by pro-inflammatory cytokines in immature brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Xian; Yu, Fang; Sanchez, Russell M; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder in children, and children with FS are regarded as a high risk for the eventual development of epilepsy. Brain inflammation may be implicated in the mechanism of FS. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is believed to act as a monitor and regulator of body temperature. The role of inflammation in synaptic plasticity mediation indicates that TRPV1 is relevant to several nervous system diseases, such as epilepsy. Here, we report a critical role for TRPV1 in a febrile seizure mouse model and reveal increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the immature brain. Animals were subjected to hyperthermia for 30 min, which generates seizures lasting approximately 20 min, and then were used for experiments. To invoke frequently repetitive febrile seizures, mice are exposed to hyperthermia for three times daily at an interval of 4h between every time induced seizure, and a total of 4 days to induce. Behavioral testing for febrile seizures revealed that a TRPV1 knock-out mouse model demonstrated a prolonged onset latency and a shortened duration and seizure grade of febrile seizure when compared with wild type (WT) mice. The expression levels of both TRPV1 mRNA and protein increased after a hyperthermia-induced febrile seizure in WT mice. Notably, TRPV1 activation resulted in a significant elevation in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and HMGB1) in the hippocampus and cortex. These data indicate that the reduction of TRPV1 expression parallels a decreased susceptibility to febrile seizures. Thus, preventative strategies might be developed for use during febrile seizures.

  7. Clinical and Neurologic Manifestation of Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Basu, P Patrick; Shah, Niraj James

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) shows a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric manifestations. A combined effort with neuropsychological and psychometric evaluation has to be performed to recognize the syndrome, whereas minimal HE (MHE) is largely under-recognized. Subtle symptoms of MHE can only be diagnosed through specialized neuropsychiatric testing. Early diagnosis and treatment may drastically improve the quality of life for many cirrhotic patients. Further research to gain better insight into the pathophysiology and diagnostic accuracy of HE will help determine future management strategies.

  8. Management of hepatic encephalopathy in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Leise, Michael D; Poterucha, John J; Kamath, Patrick S; Kim, W Ray

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in up to 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is a feature of decompensated cirrhosis. With the goal of reviewing the evidence for treatment and prevention of overt hepatic encephalopathy, pubmed was searched using search terms hepatic encephalopathy AND treatment, limited to human studies from January 1, 2003, through December 1, 2013, and supplemented by key references. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000 annually, and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails 2 phases: induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant HE are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications, or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE, and treatment should be initiated with a nonabsorbable disaccharide (ie, lactulose) in most patients. Rifaximin (off label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferred alternative to rifaximin owing to its adverse effect profile. Other therapies, including zinc, L-ornithine-L-aspartate, and branched-chain amino acids, can be considered for patients not responding to disaccharides and nonabsorbable antibiotics. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well-compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe HE who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant HE continue maintenance therapy at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a first-time episode of HE can be administered lactulose, and careful instructions should be provided to patients and caregivers about dose titration to achieve 3 bowel movements daily. Patients with recurrent HE episodes

  9. Extremely elevated IL-18 levels may help distinguish systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis from other febrile diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Y.; Cui, P.; Li, Q.; Liang, F.; Li, C.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore whether IL-18 can be a serological marker for the diagnosis of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). A total of 23 sJIA patients (13 males, median age 8.2), 20 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 18 patients with severe infections (SIF), 26 Kawasaki disease (KD) patients, 18 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, and 25 healthy control patients were selected for this study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to determine the serum concentrations of the S100A8, S100A9, and IL-6 proteins. The serum IL-18 levels were detected by a cytometric bead array (CBA). The serum IL-6 concentrations in various disease groups were significantly higher than that in the healthy control group. The IL-6 concentrations exhibited no significant difference between disease groups. The S100A8 level in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those of the ALL, JIA, and healthy control groups but showed no significant difference compared to the SIF and KD groups. The S100A9 serum concentration in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those in the ALL and healthy control groups and exhibited no significant difference from the SIF, KD, and JIA groups. The IL-18 level of the sJIA group was significantly higher than that of the other febrile disease groups. The IL-18 serum concentration may be used as a biological serum marker to distinguish sJIA from other febrile diseases. PMID:28225869

  10. Estimating the Burden of Leptospirosis among Febrile Subjects Aged below 20 Years in Kampong Cham Communities, Cambodia, 2007-2009

    PubMed Central

    Hem, Sopheak; Ly, Sowath; Votsi, Irene; Vogt, Florian; Asgari, Nima; Buchy, Philippe; Heng, Seiha; Picardeau, Mathieu; Sok, Touch; Ly, Sovann; Huy, Rekol; Guillard, Bertrand; Cauchemez, Simon; Tarantola, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an emerging but neglected public health challenge in the Asia/Pacific Region with an annual incidence estimated at 10–100 per 100,000 population. No accurate data, however, are available for at-risk rural Cambodian communities. Method We conducted anonymous, unlinked testing for IgM antibodies to Leptospira spp. on paired sera of Cambodian patients <20 years of age between 2007–2009 collected through active, community-based surveillance for febrile illnesses in a convenience sample of 27 rural and semi-rural villages in four districts of Kampong Cham province, Cambodia. Leptospirosis testing was done on paired serological samples negative for Dengue, Japanese encephalitis and Chikungunya viruses after random selection. Convalescent samples found positive while initial samples were negative were considered as proof of acute infection. We then applied a mathematical model to estimate the risk of fever caused by leptospirosis, dengue or other causes in rural Cambodia. Results A total of 630 samples are coming from a randomly selected subset of 2358 samples. IgM positive were found on the convalescent serum sample, among which 100 (15.8%) samples were IgM negative on an earlier sample. Seventeen of these 100 seroconversions were confirmed using a Microagglutination Test. We estimated the probability of having a fever due to leptospirosis at 1. 03% (95% Credible Interval CI: 0. 95%–1. 22%) per semester. In comparison, this probability was 2. 61% (95% CI: 2. 55%, 2. 83%) for dengue and 17. 65% (95% CI: 17. 49%, 18. 08%) for other causes. Conclusion Our data from febrile cases aged below 20 years suggest that the burden of leptospirosis is high in rural Cambodian communities. This is especially true during the rainy season, even in the absence of identified epidemics. PMID:27043016

  11. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  12. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: a case of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2012-05-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed with Angelman syndrome in her fifth decade, in whom the intellectual disability and epilepsy had been assumed to be caused by a vaccine encephalopathy following smallpox vaccination. Clinical features of Angelman syndrome had faded away. The history of the present patient suggests that genetic conditions other than Dravet syndrome can be associated with an alleged vaccine encephalopathy. A history of vaccine encephalopathy is rare among patients with learning disability and refractory epilepsy (1.4% in our cohort), but it should lead to consideration of a comprehensive genetic work-up if Dravet syndrome is excluded. The early history of the patient, when available, should guide the investigations. Medico-legal aspects are also discussed.

  13. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed.

  14. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Rebecca A; Vu, Trung; Hunter, Alan J

    2006-01-01

    Clinically, we most often associate Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) with an alcohol abusing population. However, it is important to consider other causes of malnutrition and vitamin deficiency as risk factors for the development of this disorder. We present a case of a 51-year-old man with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium, ophthalmoplegia, and seizures. He responded rapidly to the administration of IV thiamine. Because of the high rate of mortality and morbidity, WE should be high on the differential of any patient at risk for malnutrition or with ophthalmoplegia, regardless of alcohol history. This is particularly important in psychiatric patients where the syndrome may be masked and thus treatment delayed. PMID:16925799

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE. PMID:27088064

  16. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-08-08

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE.

  17. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  18. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheasgreen, Christopher; Lu, Lucy; Patel, Ameen

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis of the liver. It is also extremely debilitating, with an untreated 3-year survival of only 23 %. While the exact pathophysiology of HE has yet to be elucidated, a number of contributing factors have been described. Abnormal levels and altered metabolism of ammonia play a central role. Recently, inflammation has also been identified as a contributor to HE. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of HE is crucial, as current therapy centers on reduction of the body's ammonia load. Lactulose is the first-line therapy for HE, with some antibiotics recently showing promise for improved outcomes in patients with HE. The role of anti-inflammatory therapies has yet to be evaluated.

  19. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Dileep K; Prakash, Ravi; Mullen, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder seen in patients with advanced liver disease or porto-systemic shunts. Based on etiology and severity of HE, the World Congress of Gastroenterology has divided HE into categories and sub-categories. Many user-friendly computer-based neuropsychiatric tests are being validated for diagnosing covert HE. Currently, emphasis is being given to view HE deficits as a continuous spectrum rather than distinct stages. Ammonia is believed to play crucial role in pathogenesis of HE via astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, evidence has been building up which supports the synergistic role of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurosteroids in pathogenesis of HE. At present, treatment of HE aims at decreasing the production and intestinal absorption of ammonia. But as the role of new pathogenetic mechanisms becomes clear, many potential new treatment strategies may become available for clinician. PMID:25755319

  20. Rifaximin, Microbiota Biology, and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Peleman, Cedric; Camilleri, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rifaximin is beneficial in the treatment of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Kang et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e187; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.44) investigated the effects of rifaximin in a mouse model of MHE-associated microbiota without concomitant liver disease. In addition to some impact on the composition of microbiota, rifaximin altered bacterial functions, ameliorated local and systemic inflammation, and reduced enterocyte glutaminase activity. We discuss these effects as well as the interpretation of the permeability studies, given the potential interaction of dysbiosis with dysfunctional intestinal barrier, leading to systemic inflammation and increased uptake of bacterial metabolites that contribute to MHE in the presence of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27711069

  1. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  2. Wernicke encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Brandel, J P; Grignon, Y; Sazdovitch, V; Seilhean, D; Faucheux, B; Privat, N; Brault, J L; Vital, A; Uro-Coste, E; Pluot, M; Chapon, F; Maurage, C A; Letournel, F; Vespignani, H; Place, G; Degos, C F; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Hauw, J J

    2009-06-01

    We assessed the prevalence of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) in all 657 cases suspected of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) referred from 2001 to 2006 to the French Neuropathology Network of CJD. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed when the diagnosis of WE was made at autopsy. No CJD was found in five cases suspected of sporadic CJD. In these five cases, myoclonus had been observed in four, CSF 14-3-3 protein in two. In 14 other cases, WE was combined with CJD, 13 of which were sporadic. These belonged mainly to the molecular variants of sporadic CJD associated with a long duration of disease. This stresses the necessity of remaining alert to the diagnosis of WE when CJD is suspected.

  3. National Childhood Encephalopathy Study: an interim report.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D L; Ross, E M

    1978-01-01

    Data from the first year of the National Childhood Encephalopathy Study were reviewed to see whether any relation was apparent between pertussis vaccination and brain disease. Three hundred and eighty-seven cases of encephalitis and other specified neurological conditions in which the children were admitted to hospital were reported, of which 267 satisfied the study criteria. Control children were matched for age with the index cases, and medical and immunisation histories were reviewed. Few of the index cases had been vaccinated within 28 days before admission to hospital, so that no close association between vaccination and brain disease existed in most cases. The number of children who had recently been immunised was too small for any statistically useful conclusion to be reached about the risk associated with pertussis vaccine. The study is continuing. PMID:709204

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy: expanding the diagnostic toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lough, Mary E

    2012-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a life threatening neurological disorder that results from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Clinical signs include mental status changes, ataxia, occulomotor changes and nutritional deficiency. The conundrum is that the clinical presentation is highly variable. WE clinical signs, brain imaging, and thiamine blood levels, are reviewed in 53 published case reports from 2001 to 2011; 81 % (43/53) were non-alcohol related. Korsakoff Syndrome or long-term cognitive neurological changes occurred in 28 % (15/53). Seven WE cases (13 %) had a normal magnetic resonance image (MRI). Four WE cases (8 %) had normal or high thiamine blood levels. Neither diagnostic tool can be relied upon exclusively to confirm a diagnosis of WE.

  5. Refining the ammonia hypothesis: a physiology-driven approach to the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Jiang, Z Gordon; Patwardhan, Vilas R

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the most important complications of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Although the etiology is incompletely understood, it has been linked to ammonia directly and indirectly. Our goal is to review for the clinician the mechanisms behind hyperammonemia and the pathogenesis of HE to explain the rationale for its therapy. We reviewed articles collected through a search of MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar between October 1, 1948, and December 8, 2014, and by a manual search of citations within retrieved articles. Search terms included hepatic encephalopathy, ammonia hypothesis, brain and ammonia, liver failure and ammonia, acute-on-chronic liver failure and ammonia, cirrhosis and ammonia, portosytemic shunt, ammonia and lactulose, rifaximin, zinc, and nutrition. Ammonia homeostatsis is a multiorgan process involving the liver, brain, kidneys, and muscle as well as the gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, hyperammonemia may be the first clue to poor functional reserves, malnutrition, and impending multiorgan dysfunction. Furthermore, the neuropathology of ammonia is critically linked to states of systemic inflammation and endotoxemia. Given the complex interplay among ammonia, inflammation, and other factors, ammonia levels have questionable utility in the staging of HE. The use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics, and probiotics reduces gut ammoniagenesis and, in the case of antibiotics and probiotics, systemic inflammation. Nutritional support preserves urea cycle function and prevents wasting of skeletal muscle, a significant site of ammonia metabolism. Correction of hypokalemia, hypovolemia, and acidosis further assists in the reduction of ammonia production in the kidney. Finally, early and aggressive treatment of infection, avoidance of sedatives, and modification of portosystemic shunts are also helpful in reducing the neurocognitive effects of hyperammonemia. Refining the

  6. Ifosfamide-induced Encephalopathy Precipitated by Aprepitant: A Rarely Manifested Side Effect of Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Pritam Sureshchandra; Kendre, Pradip Piraji; Patel, Apurva A.

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) toxicity has been reported in approximately 10%–30% of patients receiving intravenous infusions of ifosfamide. Encephalopathy is a rare but serious CNS adverse reaction in these patients, and although usually transient and reversible, may cause persistent neurological dysfunction or death. Clinical features range from fatigue and confusion to coma and death. Ifosfamide forms backbone of various treatment regimens including curative treatment and palliative chemotherapy regimen. Precipitation of ifosfamide-induced encephalopathy (IIE) by aprepitant has been reported in the literature rarely. Ifosfamide is moderately emetogenic; hence, aprepitant is used to prevent emesis induced by ifosfamide. We here report a case where a patient of recurrent B-cell Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic lymphoma was given aprepitant to prevent ifosfamide-induced emesis. After 24 h of ifosfamide infusion, the patient developed symptoms of encephalopathy, i.e., headache, vomiting, and one episode of seizure which was followed by disoriented behavior. After doing all routine investigations and neuroimaging, the diagnosis of IIE was kept on clinical grounds, and after looking for the various factors, we came across injection fosaprepitant as the precipitating factor. On the clinical grounds, the patient was treated with hydration and injection methylene blue for above complaints, and the patient recovered without any residual deficit within 48–72 h. Hence, in the presence of causative agent, i.e., ifosfamide and precipitating agent injection fosaprepitant with negative imaging and normal laboratory parameters as well as the early and good response to methylene blue, the diagnosis of IIE precipitated by aprepitant was confirmed.

  7. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  8. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Puneet; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies refer to a group of disorders in which the unremitting epileptic activity contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and these can worsen over time leading to progressive cerebral dysfunction. Several syndromes have been described based on their electroclinical features (age of onset, seizure type, and EEG pattern). This review briefly describes the clinical evaluation and management of commonly encountered epileptic encephalopathies in children. PMID:23970964

  10. [Efficacy of Levofloxacin Hydrate in Febrile Neutropenia for Outpatient Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Manato; Sato, Junya; Nihei, Satoru; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-05-01

    Management of febrile neutropenia (FN) is important for the safety of patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy. Oral antimicrobials are usually prescribed as the initial treatment for FN, and outpatients are instructed to begin medication prior to chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness and safety of the use of these oral antibiotics have not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin hydrate (LVFX) for breast cancer patients with FN, and the factors associated with the onset of FN in 134 breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy including the anticancer drug anthracycline (total, 513 courses), in an outpatient chemotherapy department. The effectiveness and safety of LVFX were defined respectively as defervescence within 5 days, and the appearance of side effects such as diarrhea and rashes. Fever was observed in 89 (66%) of the 134 patients, and during 164 (32%) of 513 courses. Defervescence was observed with the LVFX medication in 149 (93%) of 160 courses. The primary side effect was the development of rashes, and only 2 (1%) of the 160 courses were discontinued. Onset of stomatitis during chemotherapy was observed as a factor of FN (odds ratio: 1.36, p<0.05). Our results suggest that the use of LVFX according to the patients' discretion might be an effective and safe option for the management of FN during outpatient chemotherapy.

  11. Unsuspected extralymphocutaneous dissemination in febrile cat scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Fretzayas, A; Papadopoulos, N G; Moustaki, M; Bossios, A; Koukoutsakis, P; Karpathios, T

    2001-01-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) commonly manifests as regional self-limited lymphadenitis. However, dissemination of the infection to distant multiple sites may occur even in immunocompetent patients. We report a series of 11 children with fever and extralymphocutaneous manifestations of CSD, in order to highlight potential multiorgan involvement in patients with febrile CSD. To be eligible for enrollment, patients had to present with involvement of sites other than regional lymph nodes. The diagnosis was based on suggestive clinical criteria, histological findings and positive serology. The utilization of ultrasound imaging revealed hepatic lesions in 3 children and splenic lesions in 8 children, whereas osteolytic lesions were observed in 4 children by bone scan. Hepatic or splenic involvement was not suggested by clinical signs or biochemical investigation in 2/3 and 6/8 children, respectively. Bone involvement was supported either by relative symptoms or signs. Our findings indicate that, in the presence of fever, extralymphocutaneous manifestations have to be anticipated in patients with clinically suspected CSD. The systematic use of imaging modalities in patients with serologically documented Bartonella henselae infection could contribute to a better understanding of the clinical spectrum of CSD.

  12. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  13. Rifaximin therapy and hepatic encephalopathy: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Campo, Salvatore MA; Riggio, Oliviero

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is the second most common major complication in cirrhotics and it significantly impacts quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for HE treatment and prevention mainly continue to rely on ammonia-lowering strategies and non-absorbable disaccharides are currently considered the cornerstone therapy. Non-absorbable antibiotics, such as neomycin and paramomycin, are effective in treatment of acute HE episodes but their prolonged use for recurrence prevention is hampered by possible side-effects. To overcome these limitations, rifaximin use has been proposed. Rifaximin has been shown to be not superior to non-absorbable disaccharides for either HE treatment or prevention, with a similar incidence of side-effects. Cirrhosis significantly increases rifaximin absorption and this could be a cause for concern. Following long-term rifaximin therapy, Clostridium difficile colitis has been observed and Candida albicans has been isolated from 20% of patients. In addition, selection of resistant mutants of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract cannot be definitely ruled out. Electrolyte alterations (sodium and potassium) have been reported during rifaximin therapy, a warning for its long-term use in cirrhotics. Moreover, a potential interference with vitamin K production should be considered which could further impair the already altered clotting status of these patients. The therapeutic cost of rifaximin is markedly higher than non-absorbable disaccharides. While waiting for further safety data, caution should be used to limit the use of rifaximin therapy for a very short-term period in selected HE cirrhotics not responding to non-absorbable disaccharides. PMID:22966484

  14. Rifaximin therapy and hepatic encephalopathy: Pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Campo, Salvatore Ma; Riggio, Oliviero

    2012-08-06

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is the second most common major complication in cirrhotics and it significantly impacts quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for HE treatment and prevention mainly continue to rely on ammonia-lowering strategies and non-absorbable disaccharides are currently considered the cornerstone therapy. Non-absorbable antibiotics, such as neomycin and paramomycin, are effective in treatment of acute HE episodes but their prolonged use for recurrence prevention is hampered by possible side-effects. To overcome these limitations, rifaximin use has been proposed. Rifaximin has been shown to be not superior to non-absorbable disaccharides for either HE treatment or prevention, with a similar incidence of side-effects. Cirrhosis significantly increases rifaximin absorption and this could be a cause for concern. Following long-term rifaximin therapy, Clostridium difficile colitis has been observed and Candida albicans has been isolated from 20% of patients. In addition, selection of resistant mutants of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract cannot be definitely ruled out. Electrolyte alterations (sodium and potassium) have been reported during rifaximin therapy, a warning for its long-term use in cirrhotics. Moreover, a potential interference with vitamin K production should be considered which could further impair the already altered clotting status of these patients. The therapeutic cost of rifaximin is markedly higher than non-absorbable disaccharides. While waiting for further safety data, caution should be used to limit the use of rifaximin therapy for a very short-term period in selected HE cirrhotics not responding to non-absorbable disaccharides.

  15. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic.

  16. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  17. Iron-deficiency Anemia in Children with Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    GHASEMI, Fateme; VALIZADEH, Fateme; TAEE, Nadere

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the recurrence of febrile seizure and costs for families, many studies have attempted to identify its risk factors. Some recent studies have reported that anemia is more common in children with febrile convulsion, whereas others have reported that iron deficiency raises the seizure threshold. This study was done to compare iron-deficiency anemia in children with first FS with children having febrile illness alone and with healthy children. Materials & Methods This case-control study evaluated 300 children in three groups (first FS, febrile without convulsion, and healthy) in Khoramabad Madani Hospital from September 2009 to September 2010. Body temperature on admission was measured using the tympanic method. CBC diff, MCV, MCH, MCHC, serum iron, plasma ferritin and TIBC tests were performed for all participants. Data were analyzed by frequency, mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, and chi-square statistical tests. Odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression at a confidence level of 95%. Results Forty percent of the cases with FS had iron-deficiency anemia, compared to 26% of children with febrile illness without seizure and 12% of healthy children. The Odds ratio for iron-deficiency anemia in the patients with FS was 1.89 (95% CI, 1.04-5.17) compared to the febrile children without convulsion and 2.21 (95% CI, 1.54-3.46) compared to the healthy group. Conclusion Children with FS are more likely to be iron-deficient than those with febrile illness alone and healthy children. Thus, iron-deficiency anemia could be a risk factor for FS. PMID:24949050

  18. Prospective cohort study of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy: CSPOR-BC FN study.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Narui, Kazutaka; Kaise, Hiroshi; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Mukai, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing use of adjuvant chemotherapy for treating early breast cancer, febrile neutropenia management has become crucial. Guidelines for febrile neutropenia management are mostly based on a Caucasian population survey although ethnic differences are reported in terms of adverse events. We survey the current status of febrile neutropenia and risk factors in Japanese female breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens potential for febrile neutropenia. Subsequently, we plan to conduct a multicenter prospective cohort study involving 1000 patients with operable breast cancer. With the current state of oral antibiotics being routinely prescribed without hematology tests, we survey febrile neutropenia based on two different definitions, namely, true febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and Grade 4 neutropenia, and surrogate febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and oral antibiotic and antipyretic intake. The comparison of true febrile neutropenia and surrogate febrile neutropenia incidences is anticipated to provide information on the safety and feasibility of chemotherapy management without performing blood tests.

  19. Reversible Encephalopathy due to Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Patient with Bipolar I Disorder: A Cautionary Report

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neel; Landry, Katherine B.; Fargason, Rachel E.; Birur, Badari

    2017-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an FDA-approved medication widely prescribed for seizures, migraines, and mixed or manic episodes in bipolar disorder. Hyperammonemia is a rare complication of VPA use, which can result in high morbidity and occasionally fatal encephalopathy. The scant literature on Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy (VIHE) is characterized by acute onset of decreasing level of consciousness, drowsiness, lethargy which in rare instances can lead to seizures, stupor, coma, and persistent morbidity and cortical damage. Below we describe a case report of a patient with Bipolar I Disorder with no primary evidence of hepatic dysfunction that was initiated on VPA and olanzapine to address manic and psychotic symptoms. This patient subsequently developed elevated ammonia (NH4) levels that led to a reversible encephalopathy. This cautionary case report highlights the potential for a rare but serious complication from VPA, a medication increasingly used in both neurologic and neuropsychiatric settings. It is imperative that clinicians perform a thorough physical, neurological and diagnostic evaluation, routinely check NH4 and VPA levels when prescribing these agents and exercise caution when VPA is concomitantly prescribed with antipsychotics and cytochrome P450 inducing antiepileptic medications. PMID:28138203

  20. Ammonia and amino acid profiles in liver cirrhosis: effects of variables leading to hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperammonemia and severe amino acid imbalances play central role in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the article is demonstrated that the main source of ammonia in cirrhotic subjects is activated breakdown of glutamine (GLN) in enterocytes and the kidneys and the main source of GLN is ammonia detoxification to GLN in the brain and skeletal muscle. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) decrease due to activated GLN synthesis in muscle. Aromatic amino acids (AAA; phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and methionine increase due to portosystemic shunts and reduced ability of diseased liver. The effects on aminoacidemia of the following variables that may affect the course of liver disease are discussed: nutritional status, starvation, protein intake, inflammation, acute hepatocellular damage, bleeding from varices, portosystemic shunts, hepatic cancer, and renal failure. It is concluded that (1) neither ammonia nor amino acid concentrations correlate closely with the severity of liver disease; (2) BCAA/AAA ratio could be used as a good index of liver impairment and for early detection of derangements in amino acid metabolism; (3) variables potentially leading to overt encephalopathy exert substantial but uneven effects; and (4) careful monitoring of ammonia and aminoacidemia may discover important break points in the course of liver disease and indicate appropriate therapeutic approach. Of special importance might be isoleucine deficiency in bleeding from varices, arginine deficiency in sepsis, and a marked rise of GLN and ammonia levels that may appear in all events leading to HE.

  1. THE BICARBONATE RESERVE AND THE DISSOCIATION CURVE OF OXYHEMOGLOBIN IN FEBRILE CONDITIONS.

    PubMed

    White, A C

    1925-02-28

    From Fig. 1 it may be seen that the effect of elevated temperature during the pyrexial period upon 1/K and therefore on the dissociation curve of oxyhemoglobin was, on the average, greater than would have been expected from experiments on normal blood in vitro, and greater than would be expected in view of the alkalosis occurring See PDF for Structure during fever. Temperature rise, and excess hydroxyl ion acting in vitro in the opposite directions, seemed to indicate a more stable state of affairs than was found. Apparently other factors have come into play, as, for example, alterations in the proportions and concentrations of the various electrolytes. In pneumonia, for instance, there is a retention of chloride during the febrile period with excessive loss of phosphates. The variations were not due to variations in the hemoglobin molecule itself since from the work of Adair, Barcroft, and Bock (18) hemoglobin must apparently be reckoned as having identical properties in normal individuals of the same species. If Barcroft's (19) hypothesis be right, namely that the C(H) within the corpuscle is higher than that of the plasma, the observed variations of 1/K may not be so surprising. In view of the fact that the hemoglobin inside the corpuscle is enclosed within a semipermeable membrane, the possibility arises of the setting up of membrane equilibria which will protect the respiratory pigment from excessive changes of reaction that may occur in the plasma, and thus the optimum conditions for the carriage of oxygen to the tissues may be maintained. Krogh and Leitch (10) in 1919 also drew attention to the protected situation of hemoglobin inside the corpuscle. In Case 6 it seems as if the alkalosis consequent on the febrile state had gained the upper hand and had extinguished the normal temperature reaction. This is rather confirmed by the fact that clinically the case showed one of the earlier signs of an alkalosis; namely, twitching of the facial muscles. Case 10

  2. Higher Grades and Repeated Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy May Be Related to High Serum Manganese Levels.

    PubMed

    Kobtan, Abdelrahman A; El-Kalla, Ferial S; Soliman, Hanan H; Zakaria, Soha S; Goda, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious complication of liver failure. Until now, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms are not fully determined. It has been demonstrated that manganese plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, we studied manganese levels in serum of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy in relation to grading and recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy. One hundred persons were enrolled in the study, 80 cirrhotic patients with or without encephalopathy and 20 healthy controls. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed clinically and by laboratory findings. Serum manganese levels were measured in all participants. The grading of hepatic encephalopathy was significantly correlated to the severity of liver dysfunction. The mean serum manganese level was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls and in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without encephalopathy. It was also significantly higher in patients with advanced grading of hepatic encephalopathy. Serum manganese level was positively correlated to number of recurrences of encephalopathy during a 6-month follow-up period. Serum manganese levels were able to predict recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy within 6 months following the episode. Serum manganese levels are positively correlated to the modified Child-Pugh score of cirrhosis as well as grading and number of recurrences of hepatic encephalopathy. Higher manganese levels seem to be related to worsening of the condition, and its measurement may be used as a predictor of repeated recurrences.

  3. Epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis and febrile seizures linked by common genetic variation around SCN1A

    PubMed Central

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B.; Matarin, Mar; Leu, Costin; Novy, Jan; Tostevin, Anna; Leal, Bárbara; Hessel, Ellen V. S.; Hallmann, Kerstin; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Alhusaini, Saud; Doherty, Colin P.; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.; Zumsteg, Dominik; Duncan, Susan; Kälviäinen, Reetta K.; Eriksson, Kai J.; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Pandolfo, Massimo; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Schlachter, Kurt; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Zimprich, Fritz; Théâtre, Emilie; Smith, Colin; O’Brien, Terence J.; Meng Tan, K.; Petrovski, Slave; Robbiano, Angela; Paravidino, Roberta; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Sperling, Michael R.; Buono, Russell J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chaves, João; Costa, Paulo P.; Silva, Berta M.; da Silva, António M.; de Graan, Pierre N. E.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Becker, Albert; Schoch, Susanne; von Lehe, Marec; Reif, Philipp S.; Rosenow, Felix; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Rössler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Hamer, Hajo M.; Kobow, Katja; Coras, Roland; Blumcke, Ingmar; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Weale, Michael E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Kunz, Wolfram S.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy comprises several syndromes, amongst the most common being mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis are typically drug-resistant, and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is frequently associated with important co-morbidities, mandating the search for better understanding and treatment. The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is unknown, but there is an association with childhood febrile seizures. Several rarer epilepsies featuring febrile seizures are caused by mutations in SCN1A, which encodes a brain-expressed sodium channel subunit targeted by many anti-epileptic drugs. We undertook a genome-wide association study in 1018 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 7552 control subjects, with validation in an independent sample set comprising 959 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 3591 control subjects. To dissect out variants related to a history of febrile seizures, we tested cases with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with (overall n = 757) and without (overall n = 803) a history of febrile seizures. Meta-analysis revealed a genome-wide significant association for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures at the sodium channel gene cluster on chromosome 2q24.3 [rs7587026, within an intron of the SCN1A gene, P = 3.36 × 10−9, odds ratio (A) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.26–1.59]. In a cohort of 172 individuals with febrile seizures, who did not develop epilepsy during prospective follow-up to age 13 years, and 6456 controls, no association was found for rs7587026 and febrile seizures. These findings suggest SCN1A involvement in a common epilepsy syndrome, give new direction to biological understanding of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures

  4. Microbial Translocation Contribute to Febrile Episodes in Adults with Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Barqasho, Babilonia; Öhrmalm, Lars; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Nowak, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    In this study we sought to determine the contribution of microbial translocation to febrile episodes with no attributable microbiological cause (Fever of Unknown Origin, FUO) in an adult febrile neutropaenic cohort. Endotoxin concentrations were measured with the chromogenic Limulus Amoebocyte Assay and used as a direct measure of bacterial products whilst soluble CD14 (sCD14), measured with ELISA was selected as an indicator of the early host response to endotoxins. Endotoxin concentrations in this cohort were generally elevated but did not differ with the presentation of fever. Further stratification of the febrile episodes based on the microbiological findings revealed significantly (p = 0.0077) elevated endotoxin concentrations in FUO episodes compared with episodes with documented bacterial and viral findings. sCD14 concentrations were however, elevated in febrile episodes (p = 0.0066) and no association was observed between sCD14 concentration and microbiological findings. However, FUO episodes and episodes with Gram-negative bacteraemia were associated with higher median sCD14 concentrations than episodes with Gram-positive bacteraemia (p = 0.030). In conclusion, our findings suggest that in the absence of microbiological findings, microbial translocation could contribute to febrile episodes in an adult neutropaenic cohort. We further observed an association between prophylactic antibiotic use and increased plasma endotoxin concentrations (p = 0.0212). PMID:23874493

  5. Estimating risk factors and causes for postpartum febrile morbidity in teenage mothers.

    PubMed

    Haeri, S; Baker, A M

    2013-02-01

    In this cohort study, our objective was to identify potentially modifiable risk factors and causes for febrile morbidity in teenage mothers. We identified all cases of febrile morbidity using the United States Joint Commission on Maternal Welfare definition in a cohort of teenage deliveries over a 4-year period at one institution. Of the 730 included teenage deliveries, 49 (7%) women suffered postpartum febrile morbidity. Higher maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI: 34.0 ± 8.6 vs 30.3 ± 6.0 kg/m(2), p = 0.0001), caesarean delivery (RR 21.3, 95% CU 8.9-54.9) and postpartum haemorrhage (RR 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-6.7) were associated with postpartum febrile morbidity. Risk factors for febrile morbidity in the teenage parturient include obesity, caesarean delivery and postpartum haemorrhage. Considering the increasing rates of teenage obesity and overall caesarean delivery rates, attention must be focused on these modifiable risk factors to avoid this complication during a tenuous time for the teenage parent.

  6. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image. PMID:27322924

  7. Is it time to target gut dysbiosis and immune dysfunction in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Shawcross, Debbie L

    2015-05-01

    The development of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in a patient with cirrhosis confers a damning prognosis with a 1-year mortality approaching 64%. This complex neuropsychiatric syndrome arises as a consequence of a dysfunctional gut-liver-brain axis. HE has been largely neglected over the past 30 years, with the reliance on therapies aimed at lowering ammonia production or increasing metabolism following the seminal observation that the hepatic urea cycle is the major mammalian ammonia detoxification pathway and is key in the pathogenesis of HE. The relationship with ammonia is more clear-cut in acute liver failure; but in cirrhosis, it has become apparent that inflammation is a key driver and that a disrupted microbiome resulting in gut dysbiosis, bacterial overgrowth and translocation, systemic endotoxemia and immune dysfunction may be more important drivers. Therefore, it is important to re-focus our efforts into developing therapies that modulate the disrupted microbiome or alleviating its downstream consequences.

  8. Outcome After Therapeutic Hypothermia in Term Neonates with Encephalopathy and a Syndromic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Shimotake, Thomas K.; Glass, Hannah C.

    2015-01-01

    The large randomized, controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) excluded neonates with congenital disorders. The objective of this study was to report our experience using hypothermia in neonates with signs of HIE and a syndromic disorder or brain anomaly. Subjects were identified from a database of neonates admitted to the Neuro-Intensive Care Nursery at University of California, San Francisco. Of 169 patients fulfilling criteria for hypothermia, eight (5%) had a syndromic disorder, and were cooled as per guidelines for non-syndromic neonates. Perinatal characteristics of infants with and without syndromic disorder were not significantly different. Overall outcome was poor: 38% had evidence of acute HI injury, 3 subjects died, two survivors had low developmental quotient (DQ 25). The risk versus benefit of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE among neonates with congenital brain malformations or syndromic diagnoses is uncertain. PMID:25762585

  9. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  10. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE) is a serious neurological disorder characterized by a classical triad of acute mental confusion, ataxia, and opthalmoplegia due to thiamine deficiency. It was initially described in chronic alcoholics; however, any condition resulting in poor nutritional status places the patient at risk of WE. Bariatric surgery is now considered as an emergent cause of WE. The number of bariatric surgery is increasing for morbid obesity. We present a case of a 40-year-old male who presented with confusion and difficulty in maintaining the balance while walking 3 months after Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery. Diagnosis of WE was made on clinical ground and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, which showed bilateral hyperintense signals in paramedian thalami. Parenteral thiamine replacement was started, and patient showed complete recovery. PMID:26620994

  11. Concise review of current concepts on nomenclature and pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Savlan, Ilona; Liakina, Valentina; Valantinas, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric complication of liver cirrhosis the symptoms of which may vary from imperceptible to severe, invaliding, and even lethal. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is also important because of its tendency to impair patients' cognitive functions and quality of life. The polyetiological pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is intensively studied. A general consensus exists that not only excess of ammonia but also inflammatory, oxidative, and other processes are significant in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. The Neuropathology of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Kiernan, Patrick T.; Alvarez, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. PMID:25904048

  13. The neuropathology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Stein, Thor D; Kiernan, Patrick T; Alvarez, Victor E

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE.

  14. TLR4/CD14 Variants-Related Serologic and Immunologic Dys-Regulations Predict Severe Sepsis in Febrile De-Compensated Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chih-Wei; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Huang, Chia-Chang; Li, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Yang, Ying-Ying; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants and dysfunctional monocyte had been reported to be associated with infection susceptibility in advanced cirrhotic patients. This study aims to explore genetic predictive markers and relevant immune dysfunction that contributed to severe sepsis in febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patents. Polymorphism analysis of candidate genes was undergone in 108 febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients and 121 healthy volunteers. Various plasma inflammatory/regulatory cytokines, proportion of classical (CD 16-, phagocytic) and non-classical (CD16+, inflammatory) monocytes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and intracellular/extracellular cytokines on cultured non-classical monocytes, mCD14/HLA-DR expression and phagocytosis of classical monocytes were measured. For TLR4+896A/G variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, high plasma endotoxin/IL-10 inhibits HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis were noted in their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset, enhanced LPS-stimulated TLR4 expression and TNFα/nitrite production, and systemic inflammation [high plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14) and total nitric oxide (NOx) levels] were noted. For CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, persist endotoxemia inhibited mCD14/HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis of their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset up-regulated TLR4-NFκB-iNOS and p38MAPK pathway, stimulated TNFα/nitrite production and elicited systemic inflammation. In febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients, TLR4+896A/G and CD14-159C/T polymorphisms-related non-classical and classical monocytes dysfunction resulted in increased severe sepsis risk. Malnutrition, high plasma endotoxin and sCD14 levels, single TLR4+896A/G or CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers and double variant allele carriers are significant predictive factors for the development of severe

  15. Neurogenic pulmonary edema combined with febrile seizures in early childhood-A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Keiji; Matsubara, Kousaku; Hori, Masayuki; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Aya; Isome, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Yu; Nagai, Sadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical entity that can occur following central nervous system disorders. However, NPE occurs quite rarely in early childhood, and there has only been one report about pediatric NPE associated with febrile seizures. Two cases are reported here. One case involved a 2-year-old girl who presented with febrile seizures, which rapidly progressed to severe NPE. Since the NPE occurred in the emergency department room, the patient was able to be resuscitated via immediate endotracheal intubation. The other case involved an 11-month-old boy who developed respiratory distress following a 50-min episode of febrile status epilepticus. Both patients required respiratory management in the intensive care unit. However their conditions were dramatically improved within several days and fully recovered without any sequelae.

  16. Calcineurin Inhibitors Associated Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Turun; Rao, Zhengsheng; Tan, Qiling; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Jinpeng; Huang, Zhongli; Wang, Xianding; Lin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare neurologic side effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) with poorly understood clinical features. We report cases of 2 patients with PRES developing after kidney transplantation and summarize PRES clinical features through a literature review. The 1st case was a 28-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a deceased donor. Initial immunosuppressive therapy consisted of tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. He developed headache and blurred vision with visual field loss15 days after transplantation and generalized seizures 4 days later. The 2nd case was a 34-year-old man who received a living kidney transplant. His initial immunosuppressive therapy comprised tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. Two months after transplantation, he developed seizures. Both patients were diagnosed with PRES based on neurological symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings; they recovered after switching from tacrolimus to either a cyclosporine or a lower tacrolimus dose. CNI-associated PRES is an acute neurological syndrome with seizures, encephalopathy, visual abnormalities, headache, focal neurological deficits, and nausea/vomiting. It is always accompanied by hypertension. A fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal MRI scan typically shows reversible subcortical white matter changes in the posterior cerebral hemisphere that usually occur within the 1st month after transplantation. CNI-associated PRES has a generally favorable prognosis with early diagnosis and prompt treatment including alternating or discontinuing CNIs and blood pressure control. CNI-associated PRES should be considered in patients exhibiting acute neurological symptoms after transplantation. Early diagnosis and immediate treatment are critical for a favorable prognosis. PMID:27057842

  17. Electroencephalogram of Age-Dependent Epileptic Encephalopathies in Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Nickels, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are disorders in which the epileptiform abnormalities are thought to contribute to a progressive cerebral dysfunction. Characteristic electroencephalogram findings have an important diagnostic value in classification of epileptic encephalopathy syndromes. In this paper, we focus on electroencephalogram findings of childhood epileptic encephalopathy syndromes and provide sample illustrations. PMID:24024028

  18. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This... with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Comments on the proposed rule were required to......

  19. Novel Paramyxovirus Associated with Severe Acute Febrile Disease, South Sudan and Uganda, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Albariño, César G.; Foltzer, Michael; Towner, Jonathan S.; Rowe, Lory A.; Campbell, Shelley; Jaramillo, Carlos M.; Bird, Brian H.; Reeder, DeeAnn M.; Vodzak, Megan E.; Rota, Paul; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Knust, Barbara; Vincent, Joel P.; Frace, Michael A.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a female wildlife biologist experienced fever, malaise, headache, generalized myalgia and arthralgia, neck stiffness, and a sore throat shortly after returning to the United States from a 6-week field expedition to South Sudan and Uganda. She was hospitalized, after which a maculopapular rash developed and became confluent. When the patient was discharged from the hospital on day 14, arthralgia and myalgia had improved, oropharynx ulcerations had healed, the rash had resolved without desquamation, and blood counts and hepatic enzyme levels were returning to reference levels. After several known suspect pathogens were ruled out as the cause of her illness, deep sequencing and metagenomics analysis revealed a novel paramyxovirus related to rubula-like viruses isolated from fruit bats. PMID:24447466

  20. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000-2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Ecuador, 6 Asociación Rayos del Sol, Asunción, Paraguay, 7 Instituto de Medicina Tropical ‘‘Alexander von Humboldt’’, Universidad Peruana Cayetano...Bienestar Social and Comité de Ética de Asociación de Rayos de Sol). Written consent was obtained from patients 18 years of age and older. For patients...Villa Tunari) Paraguay. Alma Barboza (ONG ‘‘ Rayos de Sol’’, Asunción), Liliana Giménez de Sosa (ONG ‘‘ Rayos de Sol’’, Asunción), Maria Eugenia

  1. Bacteremia and malaria in Tanzanian children hospitalized for acute febrile illness.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Ingrid S; Heltshe, Sonya L; Smith, Arnold L; Chibwana, Jerome; Fried, Michal W; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-04-01

    We recorded the reason for presentation to a rural hospital in an area endemic for malaria in 909 children between January 2006 and March 2009. Blood smears were examined for Plasmodium falciparum parasites, and blood spots dried on filter paper were prepared for 464 children. A PCR assay utilizing the stored blood spots was developed for Streptococcus pneumoniae (lytA) and Haemophilus influenzae (pal). Malaria was present in 299 children whose blood was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); 19 had lytA and 15 had pal. The overall prevalence of lytA was 25 of the 464 children, while that of pal was 18 children. Fever was present in 369 children of whom 19 had lytA DNA while 11 had pal DNA detected. Of the 95 afebrile children, six had lytA and seven pal. We conclude that there are no clinical features that distinguish malaria alone from bacteremia alone or the presence of both infections.

  2. Etiology of Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Quito, Ecuador; Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital General de las Fuerzas Armadas, Quito, Ecuador; Policlínico Militar San Jorge, Sangolqui...593-2-226-9234, E-mail: bquist@hcjb.org.ec. Juan Freire Espín, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital General de las Fuerzas Armadas, Queseras

  3. Etiology of Acute, Non-Malaria, Febrile Illnesses in Jayapura, Northeastern Papua, Indonesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    31) of 87 rats harbored Xenopsylla cheopis (Oriental rat flea) and 9 (11%) of 82 were positive for antibodies against Rickettsia typhi . Thus...paired serologic samples analysis for dengue, Japanese encephalitis, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, murine typhus, and spotted fever group rickettsia ...against R. typhi , O. tsutsugamushi , and spotted fever group rickettsia (PanBio, Windsor, Queensland, Australia); 20 2) an in-house, endpoint

  4. [Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM): its diagnostic criteria and therapy].

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated central nervous system disorder in an individual with genetic susceptibility. It is characterized by acute or subacute onset of multifocal neurologic deficits with encephalopathy, often following a viral illness or vaccination. Since ADEM is diverse in its clinical features, the diagnostic criteria of ADEM require the exclusion of other etiologies. In this review, I will explain the diagnostic algorism and criteria, and therapy of ADEM.

  5. Retrospective Analysis of Demographic and Clinical Factors Associated with Etiology of Febrile Respiratory Illness Among US Military Basic Trainees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-05

    Naval Health Research Center Retrospective Analysis of Demographic and Clinical Factors Associated with Etiology of Febrile Respiratory Illness...1471-2334/14/576RESEARCH ARTICLE Open AccessRetrospective analysis of demographic and clinical factors associated with etiology of febrile respiratory ...Patrick Blair1Abstract Background: Basic trainees in the US military have historically been vulnerable to respiratory infections. Adenovirus and

  6. Is the addition of aminoglycosides to beta-lactams in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia needed?

    PubMed

    Contreras, Valeria; Sepúlveda, Sebastián; Heredia, Ana

    2016-02-24

    It is still controversial if the combined use of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides has advantages over broad-spectrum beta-lactam monotherapy for the empirical treatment of cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including 14 pertinent randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the combination of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides probably does not lead to a reduced mortality in febrile neutropenic cancer patients and it might increase nephrotoxicity.

  7. Accuracy and precision of temporal artery thermometers in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Margaret; Granstrom, Patsy; Pomarico, Bernie; Reimanis, Cathryn

    2013-01-01

    The noninvasive temporal artery thermometer offers a way to measure temperature when oral assessment is contraindicated, uncomfortable, or difficult to obtain. In this study, the accuracy and precision of the temporal artery thermometer exceeded levels recommended by experts for use in acute care clinical practice.

  8. Fundamental immunological problems associated with "transmissible spongiform encephalopathies".

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde

    2015-02-01

    "Bovine spongiform encephalopathy", "scrapie", as well as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru belong to a group of related neurological conditions termed "transmissible spongiform encephalopathies". These diseases are based on the LD50 measurement whereby saline brain homogenates are injected into experimental animals and when 50% of them develop symptoms, this is considered as transmission of the disease, but the gold standard for diagnosis is autopsy examination. However, an untenable assumption is being made in that saline brain homogenates do not cause tissue damage but it is known since the time of Pasteur, that they give rise to "post-rabies vaccination allergic encephalomyelitis". This is the fundamental flaw in the diagnosis of these diseases. A way forward, however, is to examine infectious agents, such as Acinetobacter which show molecular mimicry with myelin and elevated levels of antibodies to this microbe are found in multiple sclerosis patients and animals affected by "bovine spongiform encephalopathy".

  9. Covert and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-11-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is part of a spectrum of neurocognitive changes in cirrhosis. HE is divided into 2 broad categories based on severity: covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE). CHE has a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, driving performance, and recently has been associated with increased hospitalizations and death. Likewise, OHE is associated with increased rates of hospitalizations and mortality, and poor quality of life. Given its significant burden on patients, care takers, and the health care system, early diagnosis and management are imperative. In addition, focus also should be directed on patient and family member education on the disease progression and adherence to medications. Treatment strategies include the use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics (ie, rifaximin), and, potentially, probiotics. Other therapies currently under further investigation include L-ornithine-L-aspartate, ornithine phenylacetate, glycerol phenylbutyrate, molecular adsorbent recirculating system, and albumin infusion.

  10. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: four cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gul Mert, Gülen; Horoz, Ozden Ozgur; Herguner, M Ozlem; Incecik, Faruk; Yildizdas, R Dincer; Onenli Mungan, Neslihan; Yuksel, Bilgin; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2014-04-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare clinically heterogenous condition consisting of encephalopathy, seizures and variable neurological and psychiatric manifestations, accompanied by high titres of serum antithyroid antibodies. We described the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 8-17 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of three patients at presentation included refractory epilepsy, and confusion, and one patient presented with behavioral and cognitive changes. During their presentation, two of them were in euthyroid, and the others were in hypothyroid status. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies. Two patients improved with steroid treatment. The others responded to plasmapheresis instead of corticosteroid treatment. Physicians' awareness of this complication is of great importance because most patients respond dramatically to the treatment.

  11. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Eleven children with epileptic encephalopathy were administered one cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone (15–30 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days, once a month for four months) in addition to constant dosages of their regular antiepileptic drugs. The treatment resulted in statistically significant reductions of generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges (p<0.0028) and seizure frequency (p<0.013), which persisted even after methylprednisolone pulse therapy was stopped. A globally positive outcome was noted in 9/11 patients (81.8%). This methylprednisolone treatment regimen did not cause significant or persistent adverse effects. We suggest that children with epileptic encephalopathy without an underlying structural lesion could be the best candidates for intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy. PMID:26910177

  12. [Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: characteristics, diagnosis and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Guerrero-Hernández, Ignacio; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. This cirrhosis complication is generally not perceived by physician, and diagnosis can only be made by neuropsychological tests and other especial measurements like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  13. Valproate-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy with normal liver function.

    PubMed

    Rath, Amitav; Naryanan, T Jaishree; Chowdhary, G V S; Murthy, J M K

    2005-06-01

    Hyperammonemic encephalopathy with normal liver function is an uncommon serious adverse effect of valproate therapy. We retrospectively analyzed the case records of 5 patients of epilepsy on valproate with hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Of the 5 patients, 3 were on monotherapy. The mean valproate dose was 1250 mg/day and the duration of therapy ranged between 4 and 90 days. Alteration in the sensorium was the presenting clinical feature. The risk factors included high initial dose (2), long-term valproate therapy (1), and long-term valproate therapy with concomitant topiramate (1). There was good correlation between the fall in serum ammonia levels and clinical improvement. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy should be suspected in patients on valproate with altered sensorium. Response to treatment is rewarding.

  14. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Cong; Ju, Wei-na; Jin, Hang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In this review, we

  15. Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rahul; Saraswat, Vivek A.; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia, a key factor in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), is predominantly derived from urea breakdown by urease producing large intestinal bacteria and from small intestine and kidneys, where the enzyme glutaminases releases ammonia from circulating glutamine. Non-culture techniques like pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid are used to characterize fecal microbiota. Fecal microbiota in patients with cirrhosis have been shown to alter with increasing Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) and Model for End stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores, and with development of covert or overt HE. Cirrhosis dysbiosis ratio (CDR), the ratio of autochthonous/good bacteria (e.g. Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae and Clostridiales) to non-autochthonous/pathogenic bacteria (e.g. Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae), is significantly higher in controls and patients with compensated cirrhosis than patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Although their stool microbiota do not differ, sigmoid colonic mucosal microbiota in liver cirrhosis patients with and without HE, are different. Linkage of pathogenic colonic mucosal bacteria with poor cognition and inflammation suggests that important processes at the mucosal interface, such as bacterial translocation and immune dysfunction, are involved in the pathogenesis of HE. Fecal microbiome composition does not change significantly when HE is treated with lactulose or when HE recurs after lactulose withdrawal. Despite improving cognition and endotoxemia as well as shifting positive correlation of pathogenic bacteria with metabolites, linked to ammonia, aromatic amino acids and oxidative stress, to a negative correlation, rifaximin changes gut microbiome composition only modestly. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of lactulose and rifaximin could be associated with a change in microbial metabolic function as well as an improvement in dysbiosis. PMID:26041954

  16. Wernicke encephalopathy complicating lymphoma therapy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boniol, Scott; Boyd, Molly; Koreth, Rachel; Burton, Gary V

    2007-07-01

    Thiamine deficiency can occur in any disease that results in inadequate intake or excessive loss of vitamin B1. In addition to increased thiamine consumption secondary to high cell turnover, cancer patients frequently have reduced oral intake as a direct result of their cancer or from cancer treatments. However, Wernicke encephalopathy (cerebral Beriberi), a clinical manifestation of thiamine deficiency, has rarely been associated with cancer patients. We report a case of Wernicke encephalopathy in a nonalcoholic patient with lymphoma. Although thiamine deficiency rarely potentiates clinical sequelae in cancer patients, it is important to recognize the risk and the clinical signs and manifestations so that prompt therapy can be initiated to reverse morbidity.

  17. Reversible encephalopathy associated with tacrolimus in pediatric renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Parvex, P; Pinsk, M; Bell, L E; O'Gorman, A M; Patenaude, Y G; Gupta, I R

    2001-07-01

    Neurological complications post transplant have been described with the use of calcineurin inhibitors. Although tacrolimus may be a better immunosuppressant than cyclosporine, its neurological side effects may be worse. Two children, living-related kidney transplant recipients, were treated with antibody induction, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone, and tacrolimus. Soon after transplant, they each developed an encephalopathy, which when visualized by magnetic resonance imaging showed that it affected both white and grey matter of the brain. Although the encephalopathy was associated with the use of tacrolimus, there was a complete neurological recovery without cessation of the drug.

  18. [Value of MRI findings in Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Lenz, V; Vargas, M I; Bin, J F; Bogorin, A; Grebici-Guessoum, M; Jacques, C; Marin, H; Zöllner, G; Dietemann, J L

    2002-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is related to thiamine deficiency. We report the MRI findings in four patients with visualization of bilateral and symmetrical hyperintense foci on T2W and FLAIR images involving the periaqueductal gray matter, the mamillary bodies and around the third ventricle. Diffusion weighted images obtained in two patients demonstrated mild hypersignal in the same areas. Contrast enhancement within the mamillary bodies was noted in one patient. Follow-up MRI obtained in three patients showed rapid regression of signal abnormalities without correlation with good clinical outcome.

  19. Should We Treat Minimal/Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy, and with What?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Phillip K; Herrera, Jorge L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy exists along a continuum from abnormal neuropsychiatric testing in the absence of clinical findings to varying degrees of detectable clinical findings. The International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism has endorsed the term "covert" to encompass minimal hepatic encephalopathy and grade I overt hepatic encephalopathy. Covert hepatic encephalopathy has been associated with poor quality of life, decreased employment, increased falls, and increased traffic accidents that significantly impact quality of life and health care expenditures. Probiotics, nonabsorbable dissacharides, rifaximin, and l-ornithine-l-aspartate have been evaluated with varying levels of success. Because of the lack of universally accepted diagnostic tools, optimal timing of testing and treatment remains controversial.

  20. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-07-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27377741

  2. Bridging therapies and liver transplantation in acute liver failure, 10 years of MARS experience from Finland.

    PubMed

    Kantola, T; Ilmakunnas, M; Koivusalo, A-M; Isoniemi, H

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a life-threatening condition in the absence of liver transplantation option. The aetiology of liver failure is the most important factor determining the probability of native liver recovery and prognosis of the patient. Extracorporeal liver assist devices like MARS (Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System) may buy time for native liver recovery or serve as bridging therapy to liver transplantation, with reduced risk of cerebral complications. MARS treatment may alleviate hepatic encephalopathy even in patients with a completely necrotic liver. Taking this into account, better prognostic markers than hepatic encephalopathy should be used to assess the need for liver transplantation in acute liver failure.

  3. Protein restriction in hepatic encephalopathy is appropriate for selected patients: a point of view.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Morgan, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, protein restriction has been shown to improve hepatic encephalopathy. However, malnutrition has been described in up to 60 % of cirrhotic patients and is associated with increased mortality. Furthermore, emerging clinical evidence has revealed that a large proportion of cirrhotic patients may tolerate normal protein intake. However, approximately one third of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy may need a short course of protein restriction, in addition to maximum medical therapy, to ameliorate the clinical course of their hepatic encephalopathy. For patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy who are protein-sensitive, modifying their sources of nitrogen by using more vegetable protein, less animal protein, and branched-chain amino acids may improve their encephalopathy without further loss of lean body mass. In conclusion, among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy, modulation of normal protein intake must take into account the patient's hepatic reserve, severity of hepatic encephalopathy, and current nutritional status.

  4. [Frequency of recurrent convulsions after a first febrile seizure: two-year observation results].

    PubMed

    Mustafić, Nevzeta; Tahirović, Husref; Trnovcević, Jasmina

    2010-01-01

    Febrile convulsions are the most frequent neurological disorder of early childhood. One third of children with febrile convulsions will have a recurrence, and only a small number will develop afebrile convulsions with epilepsy variation. The aim of the work was to establish the frequency of convulsion recurrence through the retrospective study with regard to age, type of recurrence, and applied prophylaxis in children in Tuzla Canton in a two-year period after the first febrile convulsion. Amongst 716 patients, 21.9% had a recurrence. Recurrence of simple febrile convulsions occurred in 124 (78.9%), complex in 18 (11.5%), and 14 (9.8%) patients had afebrile convulsions. There was no statistically significant difference in recurrence appearance between patients who received continuous and intermittent prophylaxis or different type of continuous prophylaxis. Knowledge of recurrence frequency according to age groups opens the possibility of recurrence prevention with adequate therapeutic measures, especially in home care conditions. Good parent education would represent the first step in recurrence prevention.

  5. Iron Status and Febrile Seizure- A Case Control Study in Children Less Than 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    SADEGHZADEH, Mansour; KHOSHNEVIS ASL, Parisa; MAHBOUBI, Esrafil

    2012-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizure is one of the most common neurological conditions of childhood. Several theories, such as iron deficiency anemia have been proposed as the pathogenesis of this condition. The aim of this study was to find the association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile seizures in children aged 6 months to 3 years admitted in Valie Asr hospital in Zanjan. Materials &Methods Hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and SI/TIBC ratio were assessed in one hundred children with febrile seizures and compared to the values of one hundred healthy children presenting in a heath care center in the same period as the control group. Results A total of 6% of cases had iron deficiency anemia which was similar to the control group. In the case group SI/TIBC ratio below 12% was seen in 58% of children which was significantly higher than that of the control group (29%). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that although anemia was not common among febrile seizure patients, iron deficiency was more frequent in these patients. PMID:24665277

  6. Prenatal Stress and Risk of Febrile Seizures in Children: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study in Denmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jorn; Obel, Carsten; Christensen, Jakob; Precht, Dorthe Hansen; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether exposure to prenatal stress following maternal bereavement is associated with an increased risk of febrile seizures. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study, we followed 1,431,175 children born in Denmark. A total of 34,777 children were born to women who lost a close relative during pregnancy or within 1 year…

  7. Parental perspectives on inpatient versus outpatient management of pediatric febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Martino, Julia; Boydell, Katherine Mary; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Mayo, Chris; Wing, Richard; Teuffel, Oliver; Sung, Lillian; Tomlinson, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    To describe parent preference for treatment of febrile neutropenia and the key drivers of parental decision making, structured face-to-face interviews were used to elicit parent preferences for inpatient versus outpatient management of pediatric febrile neutropenia. Parents were presented with 4 different scenarios and asked to indicate which treatment option they preferred and to describe reasons for this preference during the face-to-face interview. Comments were recorded in writing by research assistants. A consensus approach to thematic analysis was used to identify themes from the written comments of the research assistants. A total of 155 parents participated in the study. Of these, 80 (51.6%) parents identified hospital-based intravenous treatment as the most preferred treatment scenario for febrile neutropenia. The major themes identified included convenience/disruptiveness, physical health, emotional well-being, and modifiers of parental decision making. Most parents preferred hospital-based treatment for febrile neutropenia. An understanding of issues that influence parental decision making may assist health care workers in planning program implementation and further support families in their decision-making process.

  8. Chikungunya Virus in Febrile Humans and Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes, Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cigarroa-Toledo, Nohemi; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa C.; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G.; Baak-Baak, Carlos M.; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo M.; Hamid, Md-Nafiz; Friedberg, Iddo; González-Martinez, Pedro; Alonzo-Salomon, Gabriela; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P.; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe C.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was isolated from 12 febrile humans in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2015. One patient was co-infected with dengue virus type 1. Two additional CHIKV isolates were obtained from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes collected in the homes of patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the CHIKV isolates belong to the Asian lineage. PMID:27347760

  9. Upregulated H-Current in Hyperexcitable CA1 Dendrites after Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen, Jonas; Morgan, Robert J.; Földy, Csaba; Soltesz, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Somatic recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells indicated a persistent upregulation of the h-current (Ih) after experimental febrile seizures. Here, we examined febrile seizure-induced long-term changes in Ih and neuronal excitability in CA1 dendrites. Cell-attached recordings showed that dendritic Ih was significantly upregulated, with a depolarized half-activation potential and increased maximal current. Although enhanced Ih is typically thought to be associated with decreased dendritic excitability, whole-cell dendritic recordings revealed a robust increase in action potential firing after febrile seizures. We turned to computational simulations to understand how the experimentally observed changes in Ih influence dendritic excitability. Unexpectedly, the simulations, performed in three previously published CA1 pyramidal cell models, showed that the experimentally observed increases in Ih resulted in a general enhancement of dendritic excitability, primarily due to the increased Ih-induced depolarization of the resting membrane potential overcoming the excitability-depressing effects of decreased dendritic input resistance. Taken together, these experimental and modeling results reveal that, contrary to the exclusively anti-convulsive role often attributed to increased Ih in epilepsy, the enhanced Ih can co-exist with, and possibly even contribute to, persistent dendritic hyperexcitability following febrile seizures in the developing hippocampus. PMID:18946517

  10. Home intravenous antibiotic treatment for febrile episodes in immune-compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, E; Yaniv, I; Drucker, M; Hadad, S; Goshen, Y; Stein, J; Ash, S; Fisher, S; Zaizov, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of home intravenous antibiotic treatment (HIAT) for febrile episodes in immune-compromised (neutropenic, splenectomized), low-risk pediatric patients. Thirty hematology-oncology patients who presented to our emergency room from January 1993 to January 1995 and who suffered from a febrile episode and were considered at low risk for septic complications were immediately discharged on HIAT. Patients were followed for at least 3 weeks after recovery. Patients and parents were retrospectively questioned about adverse effects and about their degree of satisfaction with home treatment. Patients who required hospitalization during this period were considered unresponsive to HIAT and were analyzed for causes and adverse effects. Thirteen out of 60 (22%) febrile episodes, or eight out of 42 (19%) episodes of fever and neutropenia eventually led to hospitalization. Pseudomonas species infections were associated with the highest rate of unresponsiveness (88%). A central venous catheter infection developed in two cases following HIAT (two cases out of 640 days of therapy). No other complications were identified. No infection-related morbidity was observed. Patients and parents were highly satisfied with HIAT and wanted to use it again, if necessary. Immediate discharge on HIAT for low-risk pediatric immune-compromised patients suffering from a febrile episode is feasible, safe, and well accepted by patients and families. Patients who are found to have Pseudomonas infections should probably be hospitalized. Our results are preliminary and must be confirmed by a prospective, randomized trial before definite recommendations can be made.

  11. Surveillance of transcriptomes in basic military trainees with normal, febrile respiratory illness, and convalescent phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Thach, D C; Agan, B K; Olsen, C; Diao, J; Lin, B; Gomez, J; Jesse, M; Jenkins, M; Rowley, R; Hanson, E; Tibbetts, C; Stenger, D A; Walter, E

    2005-10-01

    Gene expression profiles permit analysis of host immune response at the transcriptome level. We used the Pax gene Blood RNA (PAX) System and Affymetrix microarrays (HG-U133A&B) to survey profiles in basic military trainees and to classify them as healthy, febrile respiratory illness (FRI) without adenovirus, FRI with adenovirus, and convalescent from FRI with adenovirus. We assessed quality metrics of RNA processing for microarrays. Class prediction analysis discovered nested sets of transcripts that could categorize the phenotypes with optimized accuracy of 99% (nonfebrile vs febrile, P<0.0005), 87% (healthy vs convalescent, P=0.001), and 91% (febrile without vs with adenovirus, P<0.0005). The discovered set for classification of nonfebrile vs febrile patients consisted of 40 transcripts with functions related to interferon induced genes, complement cascades, and TNF and IL1 signaling. The set of seven transcripts for distinguishing healthy vs convalescent individuals included those associated with ribosomal structure, humoral immunity, and cell adhesion. The set of 10 transcripts for distinguishing FRI without vs with adenovirus had functions related to interferon induced genes, IL1 receptor accessory protein, and cell interactions. These results are the first in vivo demonstration of classification of infectious diseases via host signature transcripts and move us towards using the transcriptome in bio-surveillance.

  12. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Márquez, S; Carrera, J; Pullan, S T; Lewandowski, K; Paz, V; Loman, N; Quick, J; Bonsall, D; Powell, R; Thézé, J; Pybus, O G; Klenerman, P; Eisenberg, J; Coloma, J; Carroll, M W; Trueba, G; Logue, C H

    2017-02-23

    Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador.

  13. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, S.; Carrera, J.; Pullan, S. T.; Lewandowski, K.; Paz, V.; Loman, N.; Quick, J.; Bonsall, D.; Powell, R.; Thézé, J.; Pybus, O. G.; Klenerman, P.; Eisenberg, J.; Coloma, J.; Carroll, M. W.; Trueba, G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador. PMID:28232448

  14. Expression Profiling after Prolonged Experimental Febrile Seizures in Mice Suggests Structural Remodeling in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jongbloets, Bart C.; van Gassen, Koen L. I.; Kan, Anne A.; Olde Engberink, Anneke H. O.; de Wit, Marina; Wolterink-Donselaar, Inge G.; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Holstege, Frank C. P.; de Graan, Pierre N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most prevalent type of seizures among children up to 5 years of age (2–4% of Western-European children). Complex febrile seizures are associated with an increased risk to develop temporal lobe epilepsy. To investigate short- and long-term effects of experimental febrile seizures (eFS), we induced eFS in highly febrile convulsion-susceptible C57BL/6J mice at post-natal day 10 by exposure to hyperthermia (HT) and compared them to normotherm-exposed (NT) mice. We detected structural re-organization in the hippocampus 14 days after eFS. To identify molecular candidates, which entrain this structural re-organization, we investigated temporal changes in mRNA expression profiles eFS 1 hour to 56 days after eFS. We identified 931 regulated genes and profiled several candidates using in situ hybridization and histology at 3 and 14 days after eFS. This is the first study to report genome-wide transcriptome analysis after eFS in mice. We identify temporal regulation of multiple processes, such as stress-, immune- and inflammatory responses, glia activation, glutamate-glutamine cycle and myelination. Identification of the short- and long-term changes after eFS is important to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to epileptogenesis. PMID:26684451

  15. First case of human "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" infection in a febrile patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Kjellin, Eva; Vaht, Krista; Jacobsson, Stefan; Wennerås, Christine

    2010-05-01

    An immunocompromised patient presented with febrile episodes, an erysipelas-like rash, and thromboembolic complications. Amplification of 16S rRNA gene sequences from blood and sequence analysis revealed "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis." We report the first case of human disease caused by "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis."

  16. Prenatal undernutrition increases the febrile response to lipopolysaccharides in adulthood in male rats.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Kuwahara, Akira; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru

    2015-08-01

    It has been reported that prenatal undernutrition affects the development of the peripheral immune system. In this study, the effects of prenatal undernutrition on the febrile response and hypothalamic innate immune system were evaluated in male rats. Pregnant rats were divided into normally nourished (NN) and undernourished groups (UN). The febrile and anorectic responses to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were evaluated in the offspring of NN and UN dams. The hypothalamic expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were also evaluated. The UN rats exhibited significantly lighter body weights than the NN rats at birth; however, their mean body weight was the same as that of the NN rats by postnatal day 10. In adulthood, the UN rats exhibited significantly stronger febrile responses than the NN rats, and the anorectic responses of the UN rats also tended to be stronger than those of the NN rats. On the other hand, no differences in hypothalamic interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, TLR4, or NPY mRNA expression were detected between the NN and UN rats. These results suggest that prenatal undernutrition has long-lasting effects on the febrile response to LPS. However, the precise mechanism underlying these effects and their pathophysiological significance remain unclear.

  17. Albumin dialysis with molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kobashi-Margáin, Ramón A; Gavilanes-Espinar, Juan G; Gutiérrez-Grobe, Ylse; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Angel A; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez Sánchez, Nahum

    2011-06-01

    Acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver diseases are major health issues worldwide, and most cases end with the need for liver transplantation. Up to 90% of the patients die waiting for an organ to be transplanted. Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome that usually accompanies liver failure and impacts greatly on the quality of life. The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is a recently developed form of artificial liver support that functions on a base of albumin dialysis. It facilitates the dialysis of albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins, allowing the patient to survive and even improving some clinical features of liver failure. The following manuscript reviews the technical features of MARS operation and some of the clinical trials that analyze the efficacy of the system in the therapy of liver diseases.

  18. Association of RNA Biosignatures With Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants Aged 60 Days or Younger

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Prashant; Kuppermann, Nathan; Mejias, Asuncion; Suarez, Nicolas; Chaussabel, Damien; Casper, T. Charles; Smith, Bennett; Alpern, Elizabeth R.; Anders, Jennifer; Atabaki, Shireen M.; Bennett, Jonathan E.; Blumberg, Stephen; Bonsu, Bema; Borgialli, Dominic; Brayer, Anne; Browne, Lorin; Cohen, Daniel M.; Crain, Ellen F.; Cruz, Andrea T.; Dayan, Peter S.; Gattu, Rajender; Greenberg, Richard; Hoyle, John D.; Jaffe, David M.; Levine, Deborah A.; Lillis, Kathleen; Linakis, James G.; Muenzer, Jared; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Powell, Elizabeth C.; Rogers, Alexander J.; Roosevelt, Genie; Ruddy, Richard M.; Saunders, Mary; Tunik, Michael G.; Tzimenatos, Leah; Vitale, Melissa; Dean, J. Michael; Ramilo, Octavio

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Young febrile infants are at substantial risk of serious bacterial infections; however, the current culture-based diagnosis has limitations. Analysis of host expression patterns (“RNA biosignatures”) in response to infections may provide an alternative diagnostic approach. OBJECTIVE To assess whether RNA biosignatures can distinguish febrile infants aged 60 days or younger with and without serious bacterial infections. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational study involving a convenience sample of febrile infants 60 days or younger evaluated for fever (temperature >38° C) in 22 emergency departments from December 2008 to December 2010 who underwent laboratory evaluations including blood cultures. A random sample of infants with and without bacterial infections was selected for RNA biosignature analysis. Afebrile healthy infants served as controls. Blood samples were collected for cultures and RNA biosignatures. Bioinformatics tools were applied to define RNA biosignatures to classify febrile infants by infection type. EXPOSURE RNA biosignatures compared with cultures for discriminating febrile infants with and without bacterial infections and infants with bacteremia from those without bacterial infections. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Bacterial infection confirmed by culture. Performance of RNA biosignatures was compared with routine laboratory screening tests and Yale Observation Scale (YOS) scores. RESULTS Of 1883 febrile infants (median age, 37 days; 55.7%boys), RNA biosignatures were measured in 279 randomly selected infants (89 with bacterial infections—including 32 with bacteremia and 15 with urinary tract infections—and 190 without bacterial infections), and 19 afebrile healthy infants. Sixty-six classifier genes were identified that distinguished infants with and without bacterial infections in the test set with 87%(95%CI, 73%-95%) sensitivity and 89% (95%CI, 81%-93%) specificity. Ten classifier genes distinguished

  19. Febrile neutropenia in chemotherapy treated small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kukec, Renata Rezonja; Grabnar, Iztok; Vovk, Tomaz; Mrhar, Ales; Kovac, Viljem; Cufer, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background. Chemotherapy with platinum agent and etoposide for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is supposed to be associated with intermediate risk (10–20%) of febrile neutropenia. Primary prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is not routinely recommended by the treatment guidelines. However, in clinical practice febrile neutropenia is often observed with standard etoposide/platinum regimen. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in advanced SCLC patients in the first cycle of standard chemotherapy. Furthermore, we explored the association between severe neutropenia and etoposide peak plasma levels in the same patients. Methods. The case series based analysis of 17 patients with advanced SCLC treated with standard platinum/etoposide chemotherapy, already included in the pharmacokinetics study with etoposide, was performed. Grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia, observed after the first cycle are reported. The neutrophil counts were determined on day one of the second cycle unless symptoms potentially related to neutropenia occurred. Adverse events were classified according to Common Toxicity Criteria 4.0. Additionally, association between severe neutropenia and etoposide peak plasma concentrations, which were measured in the scope of pharmacokinetic study, was explored. Results. Two out of 17 patients received primary GCS-F prophylaxis. In 15 patient who did not receive primary prophylaxis the rates of both grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were high (8/15 (53.3%) and 2/15 (13.3%), respectively), already in the first cycle of chemotherapy. One patient died due to febrile neutropenia related pneumonia. Neutropenic events are assumed to be related to increased etoposide plasma concentrations after a standard etoposide and cisplatin dose. While the mean etoposide peak plasma concentration in the first cycle of chemotherapy was 17.6 mg/l, the highest levels of 27.07 and

  20. Febrile morbidity in severe and critical ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Y; Elchalal, U; Schenker, J G

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this study was to define the incidence of febrile morbidity and its causes in severe and critical ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). For this purpose, we reviewed the medical records of all OHSS patients hospitalized in 16 out of 19 tertiary medical centres in Israel between January 1987 and December 1996. Febrile morbidity was defined as at least one episode of temperature rise above 38 degrees C lasting > or =24 h. A total of 2902 patients (3305 hospitalizations) with OHSS was identified, of whom 196 had severe, and 13 critical, OHSS. Among the 209 patients investigated the incidence of febrile morbidity was 82.3%, of which 20.5% was attributed to urinary tract infection, 3.8% to pneumonia, 3.3% to upper respiratory tract infection, 2.0% to intravenous line phlebitis, 1.0% to cellulitis at an abdominal puncture site, 1.0% to postoperative wound infections and 0.5 % to gluteal abscess at the site of progesterone injection. Non-typical organisms were frequently isolated, such as Pseudomonas, Proteus, Klebsiella and Enterobacter species. No infectious aetiology was found in 105 patients (50.2%). Hypoglobulinaemia was recorded in most patients, while ascitic and pleural fluids aspirated from these patients contained high globulin concentrations. We conclude that infection-related febrile morbidity in severe and critical OHSS is high, and may be attributed to some degree of immunodeficiency associated with loss of plasma globulins to the third space. However, non-infection-related febrile morbidity is even higher and may be attributed to endogenous pyrogenic mechanisms.

  1. Emergency department evaluation of febrile children after the introduction of Prevnar.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, John P; Craig, Allen S; Chu, Patricia S; Schaffner, William

    2005-04-01

    The Emergency Department work-up of febrile children is largely driven by the risk of occult bacteremia. This study was designed to determine if emergency medicine doctors had changed their work-up of febrile children after introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in 2000. We surveyed 411 licensed emergency doctors in Tennessee in 2001. Participants were presented with a hypothetical eight-month-old, well-appearing child with a temperature of 102.2 degrees F with no source of infection. They were asked about practice setting, years in practice, laboratory evaluation and whether their work-up of febrile children had changed in the past year. Of those surveyed, 238 (58%) of 411 completed a survey. Of these, 39 were excluded, leaving a study group of 199. Thirty-two (16%) of 196 respondents to the practice-setting question worked in university-affiliated hospitals, and 164 (84%) worked in community hospitals. Twenty-seven (14%) of 196 respondents had been in practice for five years or less, and 169 (86%) respondents had been in practice for greater than five years. One-hundred-and-thirty-eight (69%) of 199 respondents chose to order a complete blood count and 92 (46%) respondents ordered blood cultures. Overall, 22 (11%) respondents stated that they had changed their work-up in the past year. This survey of emergency doctors demonstrates that changes in the work-up of the febrile child were beginning to occur in the year after the introduction of PCV. Because of the dramatic decrease in invasive pneumococcal disease since introduction of the vaccine, future surveys will be needed to determine if the evaluation of febrile children has changed since this survey was conducted.

  2. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations.

  3. Costs and Infant Outcomes After Implementation of a Care Process Model for Febrile Infants

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Carolyn C.; Korgenski, Kent; Sheng, Xiaoming; Valentine, Karen J.; Nelson, Richard E.; Daly, Judy A.; Osguthorpe, Russell J.; James, Brent; Savitz, Lucy; Pavia, Andrew T.; Clark, Edward B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Febrile infants in the first 90 days may have life-threatening serious bacterial infection (SBI). Well-appearing febrile infants with SBI cannot be distinguished from those without by examination alone. Variation in care resulting in both undertreatment and overtreatment is common. METHODS: We developed and implemented an evidence-based care process model (EB-CPM) for the management of well-appearing febrile infants in the Intermountain Healthcare System. We report an observational study describing changes in (1) care delivery, (2) outcomes of febrile infants, and (3) costs before and after implementation of the EB-CPM in a children’s hospital and in regional medical centers. RESULTS: From 2004 through 2009, 8044 infants had 8431 febrile episodes, resulting in medical evaluation. After implementation of the EB-CPM in 2008, infants in all facilities were more likely to receive evidence-based care including appropriate diagnostic testing, determination of risk for SBI, antibiotic selection, decreased antibiotic duration, and shorter hospital stays (P < .001 for all). In addition, more infants had a definitive diagnosis of urinary tract infection or viral illness (P < .001 for both). Infant outcomes improved with more admitted infants positive for SBI (P = .011), and infants at low risk for SBI were more often managed without antibiotics (P < .001). Although hospital admissions were shortened by 27%, there were no cases of missed SBI. Health Care costs were also reduced, with the mean cost per admitted infant decreasing from $7178 in 2007 to $5979 in 2009 (−17%, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The EB-CPM increased evidence-based care in all facilities. Infant outcomes improved and costs were reduced, substantially improving value. PMID:22732178

  4. Hypothalamic neuronal histamine modulates febrile response but not anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Seiichi; Itateyama, Emi; Oka, Kyoko; Masaki, Takayuki; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2005-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of hypothalamic neuronal histamine (HA) to the anorectic and febrile responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an exogenous pyrogen, and the endogenous pyrogens interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of LPS, IL-1beta, or TNF-alpha suppressed 24-hr cumulative food intake and increased rectal temperature in rats. To analyze the histaminergic contribution, rats were pretreated with intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of 2.44 mmol/kg or ip injection of 244 mmol/kg of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), to deplete neural HA. The depletion of neural HA augmented the febrile response to ip injection of LPS and IL-1beta and alleviated the anorectic response to ip injection of IL-1beta. However, the depletion of neural HA did not modify the LPS-induced anorectic response or TNF-alpha-induced febrile and anorectic responses. Consistent with these results, the rate of hypothalamic HA turnover, assessed by the accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), was elevated with ip injections of LPS and IL-1beta, but unaffected by TNF-alpha at equivalent doses. This suggests that (i) LPS and IL-1beta activate hypothalamic neural HA turnover; (ii) hypothalamic neural HA suppresses the LPS- and IL-1beta-induced febrile responses and accelerates the IL-1beta-induced anorectic response; and (iii) TNF-alpha modulates the febrile and anorectic responses via a neural HA-independent pathway. Therefore, hypothalamic neural HA is involved in the IL-1beta-dominant pathway, rather than the TNF-alpha-dominant pathway, preceding the systemic inflammatory response induced by exogenous pyrogens, such as LPS. Further research on this is needed.

  5. Etiology of Severe Febrile Illness in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Namrata; Murdoch, David R.; Reyburn, Hugh; Crump, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background With apparent declines in malaria worldwide during the last decade and more widespread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests, healthcare workers in low-resource areas face a growing proportion of febrile patients without malaria. We sought to describe current knowledge and identify information gaps of the etiology severe febrile illness in low-and middle-income countries. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review of studies conducted in low-and-middle income countries 1980–2013 that prospectively assessed consecutive febrile patients admitted to hospital using rigorous laboratory-based case definitions. We found 45 eligible studies describing 54,578 patients; 9,771 (17.9%) had a positive result for ≥1 pathogen meeting diagnostic criteria. There were no eligible studies identified from Southern and Middle Africa, Eastern Asia, Oceania, Latin American and Caribbean regions, and the European region. The median (range) number of diagnostic tests meeting our confirmed laboratory case definitions was 2 (1 to 11) per study. Of diagnostic tests, 5,052 (10.3%) of 49,143 had confirmed bacterial or fungal bloodstream infection; 709 (3.8%) of 18,142 had bacterial zoonosis; 3,488 (28.5%) of 12,245 had malaria; and 1,804 (17.4%) of 10,389 had a viral infection. Conclusions We demonstrate a wide range of pathogens associated with severe febrile illness and highlight the substantial information gaps regarding the geographic distribution and role of common pathogens. High quality severe febrile illness etiology research that is comprehensive with respect to pathogens and geographically representative is needed. PMID:26126200

  6. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Sweden: an H-type variant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) had never been detected in Sweden until 2006, when the active surveillance identified a case in a 12-year-old cow. The case was an unusual form since several molecular features of the protease-resistant prion protein (PrP**res) were different from classical BSE...

  7. The role of astrocytes in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, M; Yamamoto, T; Gemba, H

    1999-09-01

    Thioacetamide (TAA), a hepatotoxin used to ascertain the role of astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, was administered to prepare four experimental groups of rats. (The TAA1D, TAA1.5D, TAA2D, and TAA2.5D group rats were perfusion fixated with formalin at 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 days, respectively, after initial administration of TAA. In addition, TAA was readministered to the TAA2D and TAA2.5D rats 24 h after the first dose.) Abnormalities of higher brain function and equilibrium that progressed with time were apparent in the rats receiving TAA. On the other hand, innate reflexes (e.g. pupillary reflex) were similar to those in the normal control group. Astrocyte cell areas in the hippocampus, neocortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and basal ganglia (striatum) from the TAA rats were significantly larger than in corresponding sites from the normal rats (maximum in TAA1D and TAA1.5D groups). However, there were no differences with respect to the midbrain. Any morphological difference was not observed in neurons between the hepatic encephalopathy and normal rats. Administration of TAA caused hepatic tissue injury that progressed over time. Surprisingly, encephalopathy was apparent even when hepatic injury was mild. These findings suggest that abnormalities in astrocytes, which precede any abnormal change in neurons, play a role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  8. Neuropsychiatric Manifestation of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy in an Adolescent and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ransing, Ramdas Sarjerao; Mishra, Kshirod Kumar; Sarkar, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is usually underdiagnosed and untreated because of complex neuropsychiatric manifestation. We report a case of an adolescent female with Hashimoto's encephalopathy who responded well to a combination of aspirin and levothyroxine. A 16-year-old girl presented at psychiatric emergency services with a depressive episode, menstrual irregularities, and a 5-month past history of thyroid swelling. On clinical examination, she was in a euthyroid state with insignificant neurological history. However, her previous investigation revealed a hypothyroid state. Her magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated infarcts in the bilateral gangliocapsular region and left frontal periventricular deep white matter lesion. Ultrasonography of the thyroid and fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed lymphocytic thyroiditis. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (289 IU/ml) antibody titer was elevated (289 IU/mL). Her depressive symptoms responded well to antidepressants, mood stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levothyroxine. She remained in the euthyroid state and then in the euthymic state for 3 years. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Most researchers have observed a dramatic response to steroids with or without levothyroxine. A clinician may consider aspirin as an alternative to a steroid in long-term management to avoid steroid-related side effects and contraindications. PMID:27570351

  9. Pediatric Hashimoto's encephalopathy with peripheral nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Mankad, Kshitij; Polizzi, Agata; Sugawara, Yuji; Granata, Francesca; David, Emanuele; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Tortorella, Gaetano; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-06-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a syndrome of encephalopathy associated with elevated concentration of circulating serum anti-thyroid antibodies usually responsive to steroid therapy. We report a 13-year-old girl with Hashimoto encephalopathy and peripheral nervous system involvement. The child had experienced high-grade pyrexia, global headache and sleeplessness. After admission she had an ileus with a distended urinary bladder, hallucinations and cognitive impairment. She had reduced deep tendon reflexes and distal sensory deficiency. Anti-thyroglobulin antibodies were raised at 2121 IU/mL (normal, 0-40) and the anti-thyroperoxidase was high at 886 IU/mL (normal, 0-50). Progressive neurological and psychiatric remission was noted after i.v. methylprednisolone. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed complete resolution of the foci of signal abnormality previously yielded. This case report is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to describe peripheral nervous system involvement in a child with a diagnosis of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  10. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to suture line breakdown after bladder operation.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, W; Zoetmulder, F A; Moffie, D

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with a severe encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in absence of liver dysfunction, attributed to urine absorption into the systemic circulation due to suture line breakdown after bladder dome resection. At autopsy characteristic Alzheimer type II astrocytes were found in the basal ganglia.

  11. Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies, France, 2001-2007.

    PubMed

    Biacabe, Anne-Gaëlle; Morignat, Eric; Vulin, Johann; Calavas, Didier; Baron, Thierry G M

    2008-02-01

    In France, through exhaustive active surveillance, approximately 17.1 million adult cattle were tested for bovine spongiform encephalopathy from July 2001 through July 2007; approximately 3.6 million were >8 years of age. Our retrospective Western blot study of all 645 confirmed cases found that 7 were H-type and 6 were L-type.

  12. Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy through FDDNP PET Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    cumulative head trauma. All operational aspects of this study have been accomplished including local IRB approval, identification of potential... head injuries sustained in battle have been associated with the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Pathological series have...will examine whether FDDNP PET imaging correlates with, and/or can predict, decline in cognitive function in those exposed to cumulative head trauma

  13. Neuropsychiatric Manifestation of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy in an Adolescent and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ransing, Ramdas Sarjerao; Mishra, Kshirod Kumar; Sarkar, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is usually underdiagnosed and untreated because of complex neuropsychiatric manifestation. We report a case of an adolescent female with Hashimoto's encephalopathy who responded well to a combination of aspirin and levothyroxine. A 16-year-old girl presented at psychiatric emergency services with a depressive episode, menstrual irregularities, and a 5-month past history of thyroid swelling. On clinical examination, she was in a euthyroid state with insignificant neurological history. However, her previous investigation revealed a hypothyroid state. Her magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated infarcts in the bilateral gangliocapsular region and left frontal periventricular deep white matter lesion. Ultrasonography of the thyroid and fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed lymphocytic thyroiditis. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (289 IU/ml) antibody titer was elevated (289 IU/mL). Her depressive symptoms responded well to antidepressants, mood stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levothyroxine. She remained in the euthyroid state and then in the euthymic state for 3 years. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Most researchers have observed a dramatic response to steroids with or without levothyroxine. A clinician may consider aspirin as an alternative to a steroid in long-term management to avoid steroid-related side effects and contraindications.

  14. Wernicke's encephalopathy: a preventable cause of maternal death.

    PubMed

    Wedisinghe, Lilantha; Jayakody, Kaushadh; Arambage, Kirana

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare cause of maternal death. It is a difficult diagnosis to make but prevention and treatment is straightforward. Severe thiamine deficiency causes Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Correct diagnosis and treatment with thiamine will decrease the case fatality rate.

  15. Acute schistosomiasis in travelers: 14 years' experience at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London.

    PubMed

    Logan, Sarah; Armstrong, Margaret; Moore, Elinor; Nebbia, Gaia; Jarvis, Joseph; Suvari, Muhiddin; Bligh, John; Chiodini, Peter L; Brown, Michael; Doherty, Tom

    2013-06-01

    We report 79 cases of acute schistosomiasis. Most of these cases were young, male travelers who acquired their infection in Lake Malawi. Twelve had a normal eosinophil count at presentation and 11 had negative serology, although two had neither eosinophilia nor positive serology when first seen. Acute schistosomiasis should be considered in any febrile traveler with a history of fresh water exposure in an endemic area once malaria has been excluded.

  16. Unexpected Death of a Child with Complex Febrile Seizures—Pathophysiology Similar to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Dlouhy, Brian J.; Ciliberto, Michael A.; Cifra, Christina L.; Kirby, Patricia A.; Shrock, Devin L.; Nashelsky, Marcus; Richerson, George B.

    2017-01-01

    Febrile seizures are usually considered relatively benign. Although some cases of sudden unexplained death in childhood have a history of febrile seizures, no documented case of febrile seizure-induced death has been reported. Here, we describe a child with complex febrile seizures who died suddenly and unexpectedly after a suspected seizure while in bed at night during the beginning phases of sleep. She was resuscitated and pronounced brain dead 2 days later at our regional medical center. Autopsy revealed multiorgan effects of hypoperfusion and did not reveal an underlying (precipitating) disease, injury, or toxicological cause of death. Although a seizure was not witnessed, it was suspected as the underlying cause of death based on the medical examiner and forensic pathologist (author Marcus Nashelsky) investigation, the post-resuscitation clinical findings, and multiple aspects of the clinical history. The child had a history of complex febrile seizures that had previously caused apnea and oxygen desaturation. She had two febrile seizures earlier on the same day of the fatal event. Interestingly, her mother also experienced a febrile seizure as a child, which led to respiratory arrest requiring cardiorespiratory resuscitation. This case suggests that in a child with complex febrile seizures, a seizure can induce death in a manner that is consistent with the majority of cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Further work is needed to better understand how and why certain individuals, with a history of epilepsy or not, die suddenly and unexpectedly from seizures. This will only occur through better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying epileptic and febrile seizures and death from seizures including SUDEP. PMID:28203222

  17. CADASIL: Migraine, Encephalopathy, Stroke and Their Inter-Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine is common in Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) but its treatment responses are not well described, and its relationship to stroke risk unknown. Encephalopathy is a less common presentation; it has been suggested it is related to migraine. We characterised migraine patterns and treatment responses in CADASIL, and examined associations between migraine and both stroke risk and encephalopathy. Methods 300 symptomatic CADASIL patients were prospectively recruited from a national referral clinic over a nineteen year period, from 1996 to 2015. Data was collected using a standardised questionnaire. Migraine was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). A cross-sectional analysis was carried out on the data collected. Results Migraine was present in 226 (75.3%), and the presenting feature in 203 (67.7%). It was usually accompanied by aura (89.8%). Patients showed variable responses to a variety of drugs for migraine. Of 24 given triptans, 45.5% had consistent or partial responses. None had complications following triptans. Thirty-three (11.0%) patients experienced encephalopathy lasting on average 8.1 ± 3.4 days. Patients with migraine with aura had higher odds of encephalopathy (OR = 5.4; 95%CI 1.6–28.4; p = 0.002). Patients with confusional aura had higher odds of encephalopathy than those with other aura types (OR = 2.5, 95%CI = 1.0–5.8, p = 0.04). There was also no increase in risk of encephalopathy with sex or age at onset of migraine. Migraineurs had a lower stroke risk than non-migraineurs (HR = 0.46, 95%CI 0.3–0.6, p = 2.1x10-6). Conclusions Migraine with aura is a prominent feature of CADASIL. Treatment responses are similar to those seen in the general migraine population and no complications were observed with triptans. Migraine with aura was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy suggesting

  18. SCN8A encephalopathy: Research progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Meisler, Miriam H; Helman, Guy; Hammer, Michael F; Fureman, Brandy E; Gaillard, William D; Goldin, Alan L; Hirose, Shinichi; Ishii, Atsushi; Kroner, Barbara L; Lossin, Christoph; Mefford, Heather C; Parent, Jack M; Patel, Manoj; Schreiber, John; Stewart, Randall; Whittemore, Vicky; Wilcox, Karen; Wagnon, Jacy L; Pearl, Phillip L; Vanderver, Adeline; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2016-07-01

    On April 21, 2015, the first SCN8A Encephalopathy Research Group convened in Washington, DC, to assess current research into clinical and pathogenic features of the disorder and prepare an agenda for future research collaborations. The group comprised clinical and basic scientists and representatives of patient advocacy groups. SCN8A encephalopathy is a rare disorder caused by de novo missense mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN8A, which encodes the neuronal sodium channel Nav 1.6. Since the initial description in 2012, approximately 140 affected individuals have been reported in publications or by SCN8A family groups. As a result, an understanding of the severe impact of SCN8A mutations is beginning to emerge. Defining a genetic epilepsy syndrome goes beyond identification of molecular etiology. Topics discussed at this meeting included (1) comparison between mutations of SCN8A and the SCN1A mutations in Dravet syndrome, (2) biophysical properties of the Nav 1.6 channel, (3) electrophysiologic effects of patient mutations on channel properties, (4) cell and animal models of SCN8A encephalopathy, (5) drug screening strategies, (6) the phenotypic spectrum of SCN8A encephalopathy, and (7) efforts to develop a bioregistry. A panel discussion of gaps in bioregistry, biobanking, and clinical outcomes data was followed by a planning session for improved integration of clinical and basic science research. Although SCN8A encephalopathy was identified only recently, there has been rapid progress in functional analysis and phenotypic classification. The focus is now shifting from identification of the underlying molecular cause to the development of strategies for drug screening and prioritized patient care.

  19. Matrix-metalloproteinases and proinflammatory cytokines in children with febrile convulsions and epilepsy--cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Haberlandt, Edda; Rauchenzauner, Markus; Morass, Maike; Wondrak, Petra; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Rostásy, Kevin; Karall, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    This is the first investigation of MMPs in children with febrile seizures. In a prospective, cross sectional study, serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP8/9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP1/2), of children with FS (n=13), children with febrile infection (FI, n=13) and children with unprovoked generalized seizures (US, n=11) were compared. Neither provoked nor unprovoked seizures in FS and US seem to elevate levels of MMPs or TIMPs, whereas in case of febrile infection blood level of MMP8 was significant elevated. Seizures in general might have no influence on this distinctive inflammatory process or even might have suppressive impact.

  20. Systemic primary carnitine deficiency with hypoglycemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jae Sung; Lee, Eun Joo; Park, Hyung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Acute hypoglycemia in children is not an uncommon disease that can be encountered in the Emergency Department. Most cases of childhood hypoglycemia are caused by ketotic hypoglycemia due to missed meals. Often, hypoketotic hypoglycemia can also occur, which suggests hyperinsulinemia or a defect in fatty acid oxidation. Carnitine is essential for long chain fatty acids transfer into mitochondria for oxidation. We present a case of systemic primary carnitine deficiency who presented with seizures due to hypoketotic hypoglycemia. PMID:28164076

  1. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  2. Various Imaging Manifestations of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajesh; Devaramane, Radhika; Jagadish, Geetha Mukunda; Chowdaiah, Sanjana

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), also called the acute hypertensive encephalopathy and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), is a neurotoxic syndrome of cerebral vasoregulation classically characterized by bilaterally symmetrical parieto-occipital edema. However, the imaging findings are variable and may occur in other locations such as the frontal lobes, thalami, basal ganglia and brainstem. Most commonly, PRES presents with hyperintense signals on T2 and FLAIR sequences. Restricted diffusion and hemorrhage are rare. This study presents the typical and atypical manifestations of PRES on 3T MR images. Material/Methods It is a retrospective study analyzing a radiology report database and MR images of 92 patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of PRES. The brain MRI images of these patients were evaluated. The regions involved and the signal intensity of the affected areas on T1, T2, FLAIR and DW sequences were recorded. The location of the abnormal signal intensity as well as the presence or absence of atypical features such as diffusion restriction and hemorrhage were also recorded. Results The most commonly affected region was the parieto-occipital lobes (100%), however, other atypical regions involved were the frontal lobes (30.4%), temporal lobes (8.69%), basal ganglia (22%), cerebellum(17.39%), brainstem(9%) and thalamus(4%). Some of the cases showed restricted diffusion (43%) and hemorrhage (9%). Conclusions The involvement of the parieto-occipital, frontal and temporal lobes is common in PRES. Occasionally, there may be an involvement of the basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem, with or without hemorrhage and restricted diffusion. Radiologists should be aware of the typical and atypical imaging manifestations of PRES in order to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:28243339

  3. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation with average volume assured pressure support (AVAPS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) in patients with acute respiratory failure has been traditionally determined based on clinical assessment and changes in blood gases, with NIV support pressures manually adjusted by an operator. Bilevel positive airway pressure-spontaneous/timed (BiPAP S/T) with average volume assured pressure support (AVAPS) uses a fixed tidal volume that automatically adjusts to a patient’s needs. Our study assessed the use of BiPAP S/T with AVAPS in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hypercapnic encephalopathy as compared to BiPAP S/T alone, upon immediate arrival in the Emergency-ICU. Methods We carried out a prospective interventional match-controlled study in Guayaquil, Ecuador. A total of 22 patients were analyzed. Eleven with COPD exacerbations and hypercapnic encephalopathy with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) <10 and a pH of 7.25-7.35 were assigned to receive NIV via BiPAP S/T with AVAPS. Eleven patients were selected as paired controls for the initial group by physicians who were unfamiliar with our study, and these patients were administered BiPAP S/T. Arterial blood gases, GCS, vital signs, and ventilatory parameters were then measured and compared between the two groups. Results We observed statistically significant differences in favor of the BiPAP S/T + AVAPS group in GCS (P = .00001), pCO2 (P = .03) and maximum inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) (P = .005), among others. However, no significant differences in terms of length of stay or days on NIV were observed. Conclusions BiPAP S/T with AVAPS facilitates rapid recovery of consciousness when compared to traditional BiPAP S/T in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials application ref is ISRCTN05135218 PMID:23497021

  4. Community Knowledge and Attitudes and Health Workers' Practices regarding Non-malaria Febrile Illnesses in Eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Chipwaza, Beatrice; Mugasa, Joseph P.; Mayumana, Iddy; Amuri, Mbaraka; Makungu, Christina; Gwakisa, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although malaria has been the leading cause of fever for many years, with improved control regimes malaria transmission, morbidity and mortality have decreased. Recent studies have increasingly demonstrated the importance of non-malaria fevers, which have significantly improved our understanding of etiologies of febrile illnesses. A number of non-malaria febrile illnesses including Rift Valley Fever, dengue fever, Chikungunya virus infection, leptospirosis, tick-borne relapsing fever and Q-fever have been reported in Tanzania. This study aimed at assessing the awareness of communities and practices of health workers on non-malaria febrile illnesses. Methods Twelve focus group discussions with members of communities and 14 in-depth interviews with health workers were conducted in Kilosa district, Tanzania. Transcripts were coded into different groups using MaxQDA software and analyzed through thematic content analysis. Results The study revealed that the awareness of the study participants on non-malaria febrile illnesses was low and many community members believed that most instances of fever are due to malaria. In addition, the majority had inappropriate beliefs about the possible causes of fever. In most cases, non-malaria febrile illnesses were considered following a negative Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test (mRDT) result or persistent fevers after completion of anti-malaria dosage. Therefore, in the absence of mRDTs, there is over diagnosis of malaria and under diagnosis of non-malaria illnesses. Shortages of diagnostic facilities for febrile illnesses including mRDTs were repeatedly reported as a major barrier to proper diagnosis and treatment of febrile patients. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for creating community awareness on other causes of fever apart from malaria. Based on our study, appropriate treatment of febrile patients will require inputs geared towards strengthening of diagnostic facilities, drugs availability and optimal

  5. Surgical attenuation of spontaneous congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs resolves hepatic encephalopathy but not hypermanganesemia.

    PubMed

    Gow, Adam G; Frowde, Polly E; Elwood, Clive M; Burton, Carolyn A; Powell, Roger M; Tappin, Simon W; Foale, Rob D; Duncan, Andrew; Mellanby, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Hypermanganesemia is commonly recognized in human patients with hepatic insufficiency and portosystemic shunting. Since manganese is neurotoxic, increases in brain manganese concentrations have been implicated in the development of hepatic encephalopathy although a direct causative role has yet to be demonstrated. Evaluate manganese concentrations in dogs with a naturally occurring congenital shunt before and after attenuation as well as longitudinally following the changes in hepatic encephalopathy grade. Our study demonstrated that attenuation of the shunt resolved encephalopathy, significantly reduced postprandial bile acids, yet a hypermanganasemic state persisted. This study demonstrates that resolution of hepatic encephalopathy can occur without the correction of hypermanganesemia, indicating that increased manganese concentrations alone do not play a causative role in encephalopathy. Our study further demonstrates the value of the canine congenital portosystemic shunt as a naturally occurring spontaneous model of human hepatic encephalopathy.

  6. Out-of-Pocket Costs and Other Determinants of Access to Healthcare for Children with Febrile Illnesses: A Case-Control Study in Rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Joëlle; Mihaylova, Borislava; Evers, Silvia M. A. A.; Paulus, Aggie T. G.; Mrango, Zakayo E.; Kimbute, Omari; Shishira, Joseph P.; Mulokozi, Francis; Petzold, Max; Singlovic, Jan; Gomes, Melba

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study private costs and other determinants of access to healthcare for childhood fevers in rural Tanzania. Methods A case-control study was conducted in Tanzania to establish factors that determine access to a health facility in acute febrile illnesses in children less than 5 years of age. Carers of eligible children were interviewed in the community; cases were represented by patients who went to a facility and controls by those who did not. A Household Wealth Index was estimated using principal components analysis. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to understand the factors which influenced attendance of healthcare facility including severity of the illness and household wealth/socio-demographic indicators. To complement the data on costs from community interviews, a hospital-based study obtained details of private expenditures for hospitalised children under the age of 5. Results Severe febrile illness is strongly associated with health facility attendance (OR: 35.76, 95%CI: 3.68-347.43, p = 0.002 compared with less severe febrile illness). Overall, the private costs of an illness for patients who went to a hospital were six times larger than private costs of controls ($5.68 vs. $0.90, p<0.0001). Household wealth was not significantly correlated with total costs incurred. The separate hospital based cost study indicated that private costs were three times greater for admissions at the mission versus public hospital: $13.68 mission vs. $4.47 public hospital (difference $ 9.21 (95% CI: 7.89 -10.52), p<0.0001). In both locations, approximately 50% of the cost was determined by the duration of admission, with each day in hospital increasing private costs by about 12% (95% CI: 5% - 21%). Conclusion The more severely ill a child, the higher the probability of attending hospital. We did not find association between household wealth and attending a health facility; nor was there an association between household wealth and private

  7. Itaya virus, a Novel Orthobunyavirus Associated with Human Febrile Illness, Peru.

    PubMed

    Hontz, Robert D; Guevara, Carolina; Halsey, Eric S; Silvas, Jesus; Santiago, Felix W; Widen, Steven G; Wood, Thomas G; Casanova, Wilma; Vasilakis, Nikos; Watts, Douglas M; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Ebihara, Hideki; Aguilar, Patricia V

    2015-05-01

    Our genetic analyses of uncharacterized bunyaviruses isolated in Peru identified a possible reassortant virus containing small and large gene segment sequences closely related to the Caraparu virus and a medium gene segment sequence potentially derived from an unidentified group C orthobunyavirus. Neutralization tests confirmed serologic distinction among the newly identified virus and the prototype and Caraparu strains. This virus, named Itaya, was isolated in 1999 and 2006 from febrile patients in the cities of Iquitos and Yurimaguas in Peru. The geographic distance between the 2 cases suggests that the Itaya virus could be widely distributed throughout the Amazon basin in northeastern Peru. Identification of a new Orthobunyavirus species that causes febrile disease in humans reinforces the need to expand viral disease surveillance in tropical regions of South America.

  8. High Prevalence of Intermediate Leptospira spp. DNA in Febrile Humans from Urban and Rural Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Chiriboga, Jorge; Barragan, Verónica; Arroyo, Gabriela; Sosa, Andrea; Birdsell, Dawn N; España, Karool; Mora, Ana; Espín, Emilia; Mejía, María Eugenia; Morales, Melba; Pinargote, Carmina; Gonzalez, Manuel; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Keim, Paul; Bretas, Gustavo; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Trueba, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    Leptospira spp., which comprise 3 clusters (pathogenic, saprophytic, and intermediate) that vary in pathogenicity, infect >1 million persons worldwide each year. The disease burden of the intermediate leptospires is unclear. To increase knowledge of this cluster, we used new molecular approaches to characterize Leptospira spp. in 464 samples from febrile patients in rural, semiurban, and urban communities in Ecuador; in 20 samples from nonfebrile persons in the rural community; and in 206 samples from animals in the semiurban community. We observed a higher percentage of leptospiral DNA-positive samples from febrile persons in rural (64%) versus urban (21%) and semiurban (25%) communities; no leptospires were detected in nonfebrile persons. The percentage of intermediate cluster strains in humans (96%) was higher than that of pathogenic cluster strains (4%); strains in animal samples belonged to intermediate (49%) and pathogenic (51%) clusters. Intermediate cluster strains may be causing a substantial amount of fever in coastal Ecuador.

  9. High Prevalence of Intermediate Leptospira spp. DNA in Febrile Humans from Urban and Rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Chiriboga, Jorge; Barragan, Verónica; Arroyo, Gabriela; Sosa, Andrea; Birdsell, Dawn N.; España, Karool; Mora, Ana; Espín, Emilia; Mejía, María Eugenia; Morales, Melba; Pinargote, Carmina; Gonzalez, Manuel; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Keim, Paul; Bretas, Gustavo; Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospira spp., which comprise 3 clusters (pathogenic, saprophytic, and intermediate) that vary in pathogenicity, infect >1 million persons worldwide each year. The disease burden of the intermediate leptospires is unclear. To increase knowledge of this cluster, we used new molecular approaches to characterize Leptospira spp. in 464 samples from febrile patients in rural, semiurban, and urban communities in Ecuador; in 20 samples from nonfebrile persons in the rural community; and in 206 samples from animals in the semiurban community. We observed a higher percentage of leptospiral DNA–positive samples from febrile persons in rural (64%) versus urban (21%) and semiurban (25%) communities; no leptospires were detected in nonfebrile persons. The percentage of intermediate cluster strains in humans (96%) was higher than that of pathogenic cluster strains (4%); strains in animal samples belonged to intermediate (49%) and pathogenic (51%) clusters. Intermediate cluster strains may be causing a substantial amount of fever in coastal Ecuador. PMID:26583534

  10. Itaya virus, a Novel Orthobunyavirus Associated with Human Febrile Illness, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Hontz, Robert D.; Guevara, Carolina; Halsey, Eric S.; Silvas, Jesus; Santiago, Felix W.; Widen, Steven G.; Wood, Thomas G.; Casanova, Wilma; Vasilakis, Nikos; Watts, Douglas M.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ebihara, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic analyses of uncharacterized bunyaviruses isolated in Peru identified a possible reassortant virus containing small and large gene segment sequences closely related to the Caraparu virus and a medium gene segment sequence potentially derived from an unidentified group C orthobunyavirus. Neutralization tests confirmed serologic distinction among the newly identified virus and the prototype and Caraparu strains. This virus, named Itaya, was isolated in 1999 and 2006 from febrile patients in the cities of Iquitos and Yurimaguas in Peru. The geographic distance between the 2 cases suggests that the Itaya virus could be widely distributed throughout the Amazon basin in northeastern Peru. Identification of a new Orthobunyavirus species that causes febrile disease in humans reinforces the need to expand viral disease surveillance in tropical regions of South America. PMID:25898901

  11. Is preemptive antifungal therapy a good alternative to empirical treatment in prolonged febrile neutropenia?

    PubMed

    Koch, Erica; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-09

    Patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia are at high risk of invasive fungal infection, so it has been standard practice to initiate empirical antifungal therapy in these cases. However, this strategy is associated with important toxicity, so diagnostic test-guided preemptive antifungal therapy has been proposed as an alternative. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including twelve studies overall. Four randomized controlled trials addressed the question of this article. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether preemptive strategy affects mortality because the certainty of the evidence is very low, but it might slightly decrease the use of antifungal agents in patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia.

  12. Once daily ceftriaxone and gentamicin for the treatment of febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, R.; Ronghe, M.; Goodbourne, C.; Price, C.; Lilleyman, J.; Das, S.; Saha, V.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of once daily (OD) gentamicin and its effectiveness as part of an OD regimen for the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia in children with cancer.
SUBJECTS—59 children aged 6 months to 16 years (mean (SD) 5.7 (4) years) with febrile neutropenia (neutrophil count < 0.5 × 109/l) after chemotherapy.
METHODS—Over one year, 113 febrile neutropenic episodes were treated empirically with an OD antibiotic regimen of ceftriaxone (80 mg/kg; maximum 4 g) and gentamicin (7 mg/kg; infused over 60 minutes, no maximum). The patients were assessed after 48hours.
RESULTS—86 of the 113 episodes settled with the first line antibiotic regimen. In 29 episodes, blood cultures identified a causative bacterial pathogen; for 17 of these, the first line antibiotic regimen was adequate; in four episodes, although the episode settled, ceftriaxone was replaced by a more appropriate antibiotic and OD gentamicin was continued; in the remaining eight episodes, a glycopeptide antibiotic was deemed necessary. There was no failure of treatment in organisms sensitive to gentamicin, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 27 episodes (24%), resolution was obtained by the empirical introduction of a second line regimen of ceftazidime and a glycopeptide antibiotic, and/or amphotericin. Gentamicin concentrations were measured in 110 episodes and they were all below the 24 hour line indicating that there was no need to change the dosing interval. In two episodes (2%), serum creatinine rose transiently by more than 50% of the baseline concentration. Although there was no vestibular toxicity, three of 30 children who underwent pure tone audiometry reported high frequency hearing loss in one ear.
CONCLUSION—OD gentamicin can be used safely and effectively to treat febrile neutropenia in children with cancer. When used for a short period (< 5 days), in children not receiving other nephrotoxic drugs and who have normal serum creatinine, serum

  13. Frequent Respiratory Viral Infections in Children with Febrile Neutropenia - A Prospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Söderman, Martina; Rhedin, Samuel; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Rotzén-Östlund, Maria; Albert, Jan; Broliden, Kristina; Lindblom, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective Febrile neutropenia is common in children undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of malignancies. In the majority of cases, the cause of the fever is unknown. Although respiratory viruses are commonly associated with this condition, the etiologic significance of this finding remains unclear and is therefore the subject of this study. Study design Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected during 87 episodes of febrile neutropenia in children age 0–18 years, being treated at a children’s oncology unit between January 2013 and June 2014. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the presence of 16 respiratory viruses. Follow-up samples were collected from children who tested positive for one or more respiratory viruses. Rhinoviruses were genotyped by VP4/VP2 sequencing. Fisher’s exact test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for group comparisons. Results At least one respiratory virus was detected in samples from 39 of 87 episodes of febrile neutropenia (45%), with rhinoviruses the most frequently detected. Follow-up samples were collected after a median of 28 days (range, 9–74 days) in 32 of the 39 virus-positive episodes. The respiratory viral infection had resolved in 25 episodes (78%). The same virus was detected at follow-up in one coronavirus and six rhinovirus episodes. Genotyping revealed a different rhinovirus species in two of the six rhinovirus infections. Conclusion The frequency of respiratory viral infections in this group of patients suggests an etiologic role in febrile neutropenia. However, these findings must be confirmed in larger patient cohorts. PMID:27309354

  14. Colonization with Escherichia coli Strains among Female Sex Partners of Men with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Torsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Clabots, Connie; Johnston, Brian D.; Thuras, Paul; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Of 23 unique Escherichia coli strains from 10 men with febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) and their female sex partners, 6 strains (all UTI causing) were shared between partners. Molecularly, the 6 shared strains appeared more virulent than the 17 nonshared strains, being associated with phylogenetic group B2, sequence types ST73 and ST127, and multiple specific virulence genes. This indicates that UTIs are sometimes sexually transmitted. PMID:25832302

  15. Imaging in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Teena; Raince, Avtar; Manning, Erin; Tsiouris, Apostolos John

    2016-01-01

    Context: The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be made pathologically, and there is no concordance of defined clinical criteria for premorbid diagnosis. The absence of established criteria and the insufficient imaging findings to detect this disease in a living athlete are of growing concern. Evidence Acquisition: The article is a review of the current literature on CTE. Databases searched include Medline, PubMed, JAMA evidence, and evidence-based medicine guidelines Cochrane Library, Hospital for Special Surgery, and Cornell Library databases. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be diagnosed on imaging. Examples of imaging findings in common types of head trauma are discussed. Conclusion: Further study is necessary to correlate the clinical and imaging findings of repetitive head injuries with the pathologic diagnosis of CTE. PMID:26733590

  16. Hepatic encephalopathy associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Pillitteri, C A; Craig, L E

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy has been listed as a differential for llamas displaying neurologic signs, but it has not been histopathologically described. This report details the neurologic histopathologic findings associated with 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis with concurrent neurologic signs and compares them to 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis in the absence of neurologic signs and 3 cases without hepatic lipidosis. Brain from all 3 llamas displaying neurologic signs contained Alzheimer type II cells, which were not detected in either subset of llamas without neurologic signs. Astrocytic immunohistochemical staining intensity for glial fibrillary acid protein was decreased in llamas with neurologic signs as compared to 2 of 3 llamas with hepatic lipidosis and without neurologic signs and to 2 of 3 llamas without hepatic lipidosis. Immunohistochemical staining for S100 did not vary between groups. These findings suggest that hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas.

  17. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome presenting with encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Alireza E.; Daneshmand, Dana; Khorvash, Farzin; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) is a rare syndrome affecting tissues containing melanocytes. The possibility of its autoimmune pathogenesis is supported by high frequent HLA-DR4 presentation, commonly associated with other autoimmune diseases. Eyes are the main affected organs, resulting in blindness. Brain disease is a late-onset event, and is extremely rare. Here, we are reporting a 57-year-old woman, a known case of VKH syndrome, presenting with brain encephalopathy several decades after the initial presentation. We think this long period between initial presentation and presentation of encephalopathy due to VKH syndrome has not been described before. She was treated with corticosteroids and discharged home with a good general condition. PMID:24753681

  18. Unusually Prolonged Presentation of Designer Drug Encephalopathy Responsive to Steroids.

    PubMed

    Albadareen, Rawan; Thornton, Stephen; Heshmati, Arezou; Gerona, Roy; Lowry, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    The availability and use of novel psychoactive substances has risen dramatically over the last decade. The unpredictability of their toxicity constitutes a real challenge. We report a case of an adolescent who developed prolonged encephalopathy after ingesting "Hot Molly," which was found to contain the novel psychoactive substance, methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine when analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry assay. This is the first case of human toxicity from methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine ingestion in the medical literature confirmed by body fluid analysis presenting with significant and prolonged encephalopathy. The prolonged course may be due to CYP2D6 inhibition from a combination of the methylenedioxyphenyl moiety and the patient's ultrarapid metabolizer pharmacokinetics. The response to high dose corticosteroids suggests a possible inflammatory effect that warrants further investigation.

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy: From the Pathogenesis to the New Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cordoba, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and serious complication of liver cirrhosis; the pathophysiology of this complication is not fully understood although great efforts have been made during the last years. There are few prospective studies on the epidemiology of this complication; however, it is known that it confers with high short-term mortality. Hepatic encephalopathy has been classified into different groups depending on the degree of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of portal-systemic shunts, and the number of episodes. Due to the large clinical spectra of overt EH and the complexity of cirrhotic patients, it is very difficult to perform quality clinical trials for assessing the efficacy of the treatments proposed. The physiopathology, clinical manifestation, and the treatment of HE is a challenge because of the multiple factors that converge and coexist in an episode of overt HE. PMID:27335836

  20. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during slow sleep: "the Penelope syndrome".

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Carlo A; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Rios-Pohl, Loreto; Giustina, Elvio Della; Rubboli, Guido

    2009-08-01

    ESES (encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep) is an epileptic encephalopathy with heterogeneous clinical manifestations (cognitive, motor, and behavioral disturbances in different associations, and various seizure types) related to a peculiar electroencephalography (EEG) pattern characterized by paroxysmal activity significantly activated during slow sleep-that is, a condition of continuous spikes and waves, or status epilepticus, during sleep. The pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this condition are still incompletely understood; recent data suggest that the abnormal epileptic EEG activity occurring during sleep might cause the typical clinical symptoms by interfering with sleep-related physiologic functions, and possibly neuroplasticity processes mediating higher cortical functions such as learning and memory consolidation. As in the myth of Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, what is weaved during the day will be unraveled during the night.