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Sample records for acute febrile respiratory

  1. Outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B P14H11F14 in a military training camp in Shandong China.

    PubMed

    Dongliu, Yuan; Guoliang, Yang; Haocheng, Xu; Shuaijia, Qing; Li, Bing; Yanglei, Jia

    2016-09-01

    This study reports an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B [P14H11F14] in a military training center in China between May and June 2014. In total, 164 military personnel were affected, and two patients were admitted into the intensive care unit of the military regional central hospital. A HAdV-B [P14H11F14] virus was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of this acute outbreak of febrile respiratory illness based on clinical manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, specific molecular detection results, phylogenetic analysis, and serological assays. The virus was isolated by the rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture method, and the complete sequences of the E1A, penton base, hexon, and fiber genes were determined and deposited in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic and sequence homology analyses indicated that the isolated strain is most closely related to some HAdV-55 strains from mainland China. However, this strain appeared to be less virulent than former HAdV-55 strains. According to the chest X-ray results of 31 affected patients, there was no radiological evidence of pneumonia. The most frequent symptoms in these patients were sore throat (95.12 %, 156/164) and tonsillitis (93.29 %, 153/164). During the course of the outbreak, incorrect response measures and some potential risk factors, such as fire training and marching training, may have exacerbated the spread of the infection. This outbreak illustrates the urgent need to improve the epidemiological and etiological surveillance of HAdV infections and to improve the ability of doctors and health officials in basic units of the Chinese army to respond effectively to febrile respiratory illness. PMID:27352268

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  3. Infectious Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illness among Patients Seeking Health Care in South-Central Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Matthew R.; Blair, Patrick J.; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Putnam, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations. PMID:22302857

  4. A case of recurrent acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus with carnitine palmitoyltransferase II variation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Eiko; Yamanaka, Gaku; Kawashima, Hisashi; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Ishida, Yu; Oana, Shingo; Miyajima, Tasuku; Shinohara, Mayu; Saitoh, Makiko; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    Acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE) is the most common type of acute encephalopathy in childhood in Japan, which develops with prolonged febrile convulsion, followed by mild unconsciousness. It is generally sporadic and nonrecurrent. In this report, a 1-year-old girl showed signs of AEFCSE triggered by respiratory syncytial virus infection. Two years later, she presented with AEFCSE triggered by influenza virus infection, resulting in severe neurologic sequelae. The patient had a thermolabile genotype of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) variations consisting of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in exons 4 [1055T > G/F352C and 1102G > A/V368I] and 5 [1939A > G/M647V]. The polymorphism has been identified as a genetic predisposition for acute encephalopathy. This report presents the first case of recurrent encephalopathy with CPT II variations that may partially associate with pathogenesis of recurrent AEFCSE. PMID:23450341

  5. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management.

    PubMed

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; El Kerouiti, Zakaria; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought. PMID:26328000

  6. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management

    PubMed Central

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; Kerouiti, Zakaria El; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought PMID:26328000

  7. Undiagnosed Acute Viral Febrile Illnesses, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Cynthia A.; Khan, Sheik H.; Goba, Augustine; Fair, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Sierra Leone in West Africa is in a Lassa fever–hyperendemic region that also includes Guinea and Liberia. Each year, suspected Lassa fever cases result in submission of ≈500–700 samples to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Diagnostic Laboratory in eastern Sierra Leone. Generally only 30%–40% of samples tested are positive for Lassa virus (LASV) antigen and/or LASV-specific IgM; thus, 60%–70% of these patients have acute diseases of unknown origin. To investigate what other arthropod-borne and hemorrhagic fever viral diseases might cause serious illness in this region and mimic Lassa fever, we tested patient serum samples that were negative for malaria parasites and LASV. Using IgM-capture ELISAs, we evaluated samples for antibodies to arthropod-borne and other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Approximately 25% of LASV-negative patients had IgM to dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, chikungunya, Ebola, and Marburg viruses but not to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. PMID:24959946

  8. Epidemiological and clinical features of dengue versus other acute febrile illnesses amongst patients seen at government polyclinics.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, B; Hani, A W Asmah; Chem, Y K; Mariam, M; Khairul, A H; Abdul Rasid, K; Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    Classical dengue fever is characterized by the clinical features of fever, headache, severe myalgia and occasionally rash, which can also be caused by a number of other viral and bacterial infections. Five hundred and fifty eight patients who fulfilled the criteria of clinical diagnosis of acute dengue from 4 government outpatient polyclinics were recruited in this prospective field study. Of the 558 patients, 190 patients were categorized as acute dengue fever, 86 as recent dengue and 282 as non-dengue febrile illnesses based on the results of a number of laboratory tests. Epidemiological features of febrile patients showed that the mean age of patients in the dengue fever group was significantly younger in comparison with patients in the non-dengue group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to gender but there was significant ethnic difference with foreign workers representing a higher proportion in the dengue fever group. Patients with acute dengue fever were more likely to have patient-reported rash and a history of dengue in family or neighbourhood but less likely to have respiratory symptoms, sore-throat and jaundice in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. As with patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have history of patient-reported rash and a history of dengue contact and less likely to have respiratory symptoms in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. In contrast to patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have abdominal pain and jaundice in comparison to non-dengue febrile patients. The finding strongly suggests that a proportion of patients in the recent dengue group may actually represent a subset of patients with acute dengue fever at the late stage of illness. PMID:21901948

  9. Cortical gray matter lesions in acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Mimaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Kan; Jimi, Hanako; Oka, Akira; Igarashi, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    In acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE), subcortical white matter lesions on diffusion-weighted images are sometimes encountered on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), such as in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD). We report here a severe case of AEFCSE following respiratory syncytial virus infection, with emphasis on the cranial MRI findings. MRI in this patient showed widespread T2-hyperintensity along the cerebral cortical gray matter from day 3 to day 22. Lesions with reduced diffusion were noted on day 3 in the deep zone of gray matter of the left occipito-temporo-parietal cortex, but on day 7 they shifted to the subcortical white matter of both the cerebral hemispheres. These MRI findings provide radiologic evidence for damage to the cortical gray matter in AEFCSE. The serial change of diffusion-weighted images suggests that the cortical gray matter may be injured prior to the involvement of the subcortical white matter. PMID:18848752

  10. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  11. Febrile neutropenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal; Tüysüz, Gülen; Çelik, Nigar; Yantri, Leman; Erginöz, Ethem; Apak, Hilmi; Özkan, Alp; Yıldız, İnci; Celkan, Tiraje

    2016-01-01

    Aim: An important life-threatening complication of intensive chemotherapy administered in children with leukemia is febrile neutropenia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and consequences of febrile neutropenia attacks in children who were treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Material and Methods: Nighty-six children who received chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in our center between January 1995 and December 2010 were included in the study. The data related to demographic characteristics, treatment features, relapse and febrile neutropenia incidences, risk factors, culture results and prognosis were retrospectively evaluated from the patients’ files. Results: A total of two hundred-ninety nine febrile neutropenia attacks observed in the patients during initial treatment and relapse treatment were evaluated. When the incidence of febrile neutropenia was evaluated by years, it was observed that the patients treated after year 2000 had statistically significantly more febrile neutopenia attacks compared to the patients treated before year 2000. When the incidences of febrile neutropenia during initial treatment and during relapse treatment were compared, it was observed that more febrile neutropenia attacks occured during relapse treatment. Fifty-nine percent of all febrile neutropenia attacks were fever of unknown origin. Eighty microorganisms grew in cultures during febrile neutropenia throughout treatment in 75 patients; 86% were bacterial infections (50% gram positive and 50% gram negative), 8% were viral infections and 6% were fungal infections. Coagulase negative staphylococcus (n=17) was the most frequent gram positive pathogen; E. Coli (n=17) was the most commonly grown gram negative pathogen. Conclusions: In this study, it was found that an increase in the incidence of febrile neutropenia occured in years. Increments in treatment intensities increase the incidence of febrile neutropenia while improving

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  13. Frequent Respiratory Viral Infections in Children with Febrile Neutropenia - A Prospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Söderman, Martina; Rhedin, Samuel; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Rotzén-Östlund, Maria; Albert, Jan; Broliden, Kristina; Lindblom, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective Febrile neutropenia is common in children undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of malignancies. In the majority of cases, the cause of the fever is unknown. Although respiratory viruses are commonly associated with this condition, the etiologic significance of this finding remains unclear and is therefore the subject of this study. Study design Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected during 87 episodes of febrile neutropenia in children age 0–18 years, being treated at a children’s oncology unit between January 2013 and June 2014. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the presence of 16 respiratory viruses. Follow-up samples were collected from children who tested positive for one or more respiratory viruses. Rhinoviruses were genotyped by VP4/VP2 sequencing. Fisher’s exact test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for group comparisons. Results At least one respiratory virus was detected in samples from 39 of 87 episodes of febrile neutropenia (45%), with rhinoviruses the most frequently detected. Follow-up samples were collected after a median of 28 days (range, 9–74 days) in 32 of the 39 virus-positive episodes. The respiratory viral infection had resolved in 25 episodes (78%). The same virus was detected at follow-up in one coronavirus and six rhinovirus episodes. Genotyping revealed a different rhinovirus species in two of the six rhinovirus infections. Conclusion The frequency of respiratory viral infections in this group of patients suggests an etiologic role in febrile neutropenia. However, these findings must be confirmed in larger patient cohorts. PMID:27309354

  14. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  15. Aetiology of Acute Febrile Episodes in Children Attending Korogwe District Hospital in North-Eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mahende, Coline; Ngasala, Billy; Lusingu, John; Butichi, Allvan; Lushino, Paminus; Lemnge, Martha; Premji, Zul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the burden of malaria in many parts of Tanzania has declined, the proportion of children with fever has not changed. This situation underscores the need to explore the possible causes of febrile episodes in patients presenting with symptoms at the Korogwe District Hospital (KDH). Methods A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted at KDH, north-eastern Tanzania. Patients aged 2 to 59 months presenting at the outpatient department with an acute medical condition and fever (measured axillary temperature ≥37.5°C) were enrolled. Blood samples were examined for malaria parasites, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and bacterial infections. A urine culture was performed in selected cases to test for bacterial infection and a chest radiograph was requested if pneumonia was suspected. Diagnosis was based on both clinical and laboratory investigations. Results A total of 867 patients with a median age of 15.1 months (Interquartile range 8.6–29.9) were enrolled from January 2013 to October 2013. Respiratory tract infections were the leading clinical diagnosis with 406/867 (46.8%) of patients diagnosed with upper respiratory tract infection and 130/867 (15.0%) with pneumonia. Gastroenteritis was diagnosed in 184/867 (21.2%) of patients. Malaria infection was confirmed in 72/867 (8.3%) of patients. Bacterial infection in blood and urine accounted for 26/808 (3.2%) infections in the former, and 66/373 (17.7%) infections in the latter. HIV infection was confirmed in 10/824 (1.2%) of patients. Respiratory tract infections and gastroenteritis were frequent in patients under 36 months of age (87.3% and 91.3% respectively). Co-infections were seen in 221/867 (25.5%) of patients. The cause of fever was not identified in 65/867 (7.5%) of these patients. Conclusions The different proportions of infections found among febrile children reflect the causes of fever in the study area. These findings indicate the need to optimise patient management by

  16. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  17. Chikungunya as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Akoroda, Ufuoma; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikaarachchi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Chua, Robert; Hou, Yan'an; Chow, Angelia; Sessions, October M.; Østbye, Truls; Gubler, Duane J.; Woods, Christopher W.; Bodinayake, Champica

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) re-emerged in Sri Lanka in late 2006 after a 40-year hiatus. We sought to identify and characterize acute chikungunya infection (CHIK) in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in unstudied rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka in 2007. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled febrile patients ≥ 2 years of age, collected uniform epidemiologic and clinical data, and obtained serum samples for serology, virus isolation, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Serology on paired acute and convalescent samples identified acute chikungunya infection in 3.5% (28/797) patients without acute dengue virus (DENV) infection, 64.3% (18/28) of which were confirmed by viral isolation and/or real-time RT-PCR. No CHIKV/DENV co-infections were detected among 54 patients with confirmed acute DENV. Sequencing of the E1 coding region of six temporally distinct CHIKV isolates (April through October 2007) showed that all isolates posessed the E1-226A residue and were most closely related to Sri Lankan and Indian isolates from the same time period. Except for more frequent and persistent musculoskeletal symptoms, acute chikungunya infections mimicked DENV and other acute febrile illnesses. Only 12/797 (1.5%) patients had serological evidence of past chikungunya infection. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest CHIKV is a prominent cause of non-specific acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka. PMID:24312651

  18. [Acute respiratory distress revealing severe pulmonary leptospirosis].

    PubMed

    Sekkach, Y; Qaçif, H; Jira, M; El Qatni, M; El omri, N; Ghafir, D

    2007-01-01

    We return a clinical case of leptospirose revelated by a complicated febrile harp pneumopathie of a sharp respiratory distress syndrome having required a transfer in resuscitation. The goal of our article is to recall that it is necessary to think systematically about a pulmonary shape of leptospirose facing an atypical pneumopahie. PMID:17141924

  19. [Acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Damak, H; Décosterd, D

    2015-09-30

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect all respiratory muscles, leading to acute respiratory failure, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in those patients. Two situations must be distinguished. 1) Acute respiratory failure as part of a neuromuscular disorder of acute onset and possibly reversible (Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenic crisis...). 2) Acute respiratory failure occurring in a patient with an already advanced neuromuscular disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy...). This article describes the neuromuscular acute respiratory failure in these different aspects, discusses its initial management in the emergency department and identifies the parameters that have to be monitored. PMID:26619704

  20. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-07-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is known to enhance neuronal excitability. Here we show that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis in the immature brain, with a threshold of 0.2-0.3 pH units for seizure induction. Suppressing alkalosis with 5% ambient CO2 abolished seizures within 20 s. CO2 also prevented two long-term effects of hyperthermic seizures in the hippocampus: the upregulation of the I(h) current and the upregulation of CB1 receptor expression. The effects of hyperthermia were closely mimicked by intraperitoneal injection of bicarbonate. Our work indicates a mechanism for triggering hyperthermic seizures and suggests new strategies in the research and therapy of fever-related epileptic syndromes. PMID:16819552

  1. Challenges in the Etiology and Diagnosis of Acute Febrile Illness in Children in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Obaro, Stephen K; Storch, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    Acute febrile illness is a common cause of hospital admission, and its associated infectious causes contribute to substantial morbidity and death among children worldwide, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Declining transmission of malaria in many regions, combined with the increasing use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, has led to the increasing recognition of leptospirosis, rickettsioses, respiratory viruses, and arboviruses as etiologic agents of fevers. However, clinical discrimination between these etiologies can be difficult. Overtreatment with antimalarial drugs is common, even in the setting of a negative test result, as is overtreatment with empiric antibacterial drugs. Viral etiologies remain underrecognized and poorly investigated. More-sensitive diagnostics have led to additional dilemmas in discriminating whether a positive test result reflects a causative pathogen. Here, we review and summarize the current epidemiology and focus particularly on children and the challenges for future research. PMID:27059657

  2. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  3. [Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) and erythema nodosum in Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Schlegel Gómez, R; Kiesewetter, F; von den Driesch, P; Hornstein, O P

    1990-07-01

    We report on 2 patients who developed an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) and erythema nodosum in association with Crohn's disease. The first patient showed symmetrical painful erythemas on her cheeks after hemicolectomy. Additionally, red painful nodules appeared on her lower legs. The second patient disclosed typical Sweet's syndrome-like lesions with pustules and plaques on her face, scalp and extremities after activation of Crohn's disease. Simultaneously, erythema nodosum-like lesions appeared on her lower legs. PMID:2144848

  4. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)].

    PubMed

    Gillissen, Adrian; Ruf, Bernhard R

    2003-06-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral disease, observed primarily in Southern China in November 2002, with variable flu-like symptoms and pneumonia, in approx. 5% leading to death from respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The disease was spread over more than 30 states all over the globe by SARS-virus-infected travelers. WHO and CDC received first information about a new syndrome by the end of February 2003, after the first cases outside the Republic of China had been observed. A case in Hanoi, Vietnam, led to the first precise information about the new disease entity to WHO, by Dr. Carlo Urbani, a co-worker of WHO/Doctors without Borders, who had been called by local colleagues to assist in the management of a patient with an unknown severe disease by the end of February 2003. Dr. Urbani died from SARS, as did many other health care workers. In the meantime, more than 7,000 cases have been observed worldwide, predominantly in China and Hong Kong, but also in Taiwan, Canada, Singapore, and the USA, and many other countries, and more than 600 of these patients died from RDS. Since the beginning of March 2003, when WHO and CDC started their activities, in close collaboration with a group of international experts, including the Bernhard-Nocht-Institute in Hamburg and the Department of Virology in Frankfurt/Main, a previously impossible success in the disclosure of the disease was achieved. Within only 8 weeks of research it was possible to describe the infectious agent, a genetically modified coronavirus, including the genetic sequence, to establish specific diagnostic PCR methods and to find possible mechanisms for promising therapeutic approaches. In addition, intensifying classical quarantine and hospital hygiene measures, it was possible to limit SARS in many countries to sporadic cases, and to reduce the disease in countries such as Canada and Vietnam. This review article summarizes important information about many issues of SARS (May 15th, 2003

  5. Sweet's syndrome – a comprehensive review of an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2007-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome (the eponym for acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms, physical features, and pathologic findings which include fever, neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions (papules, nodules, and plaques), and a diffuse infiltrate consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils that are typically located in the upper dermis. Several hundreds cases of Sweet's syndrome have been published. Sweet's syndrome presents in three clinical settings: classical (or idiopathic), malignancy-associated, and drug-induced. Classical Sweet's syndrome (CSS) usually presents in women between the age of 30 to 50 years, it is often preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection and may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy. Approximately one-third of patients with CSS experience recurrence of the dermatosis. The malignancy-associated Sweet's syndrome (MASS) can occur as a paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with an established cancer or individuals whose Sweet's syndrome-related hematologic dyscrasia or solid tumor was previously undiscovered; MASS is most commonly related to acute myelogenous leukemia. The dermatosis can precede, follow, or appear concurrent with the diagnosis of the patient's cancer. Hence, MASS can be the cutaneous harbinger of either an undiagnosed visceral malignancy in a previously cancer-free individual or an unsuspected cancer recurrence in an oncology patient. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome (DISS) most commonly occurs in patients who have been treated with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, however, other medications may also be associated with DISS. The pathogenesis of Sweet's syndrome may be multifactorial and still remains to be definitively established. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that cytokines have an etiologic role. Systemic corticosteroids are the therapeutic gold standard for Sweet's syndrome. After initiation of treatment with systemic

  6. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Forshey, Brett M.; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Cespedes, Manuel; Vargas, Jorge; Gianella, Alberto; Vallejo, Efrain; Madrid, César; Aguayo, Nicolas; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Suarez, Victor; Morales, Ana Maria; Beingolea, Luis; Reyes, Nora; Perez, Juan; Negrete, Monica; Rocha, Claudio; Morrison, Amy C.; Russell, Kevin L.; J. Blair, Patrick; Olson, James G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are among the most common agents of human febrile illness worldwide and the most important emerging pathogens, causing multiple notable epidemics of human disease over recent decades. Despite the public health relevance, little is know about the geographic distribution, relative impact, and risk factors for arbovirus infection in many regions of the world. Our objectives were to describe the arboviruses associated with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in participating clinics in four countries in South America and to provide detailed epidemiological analysis of arbovirus infection in Iquitos, Peru, where more extensive monitoring was conducted. Methodology/Findings A clinic-based syndromic surveillance system was implemented in 13 locations in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Serum samples and demographic information were collected from febrile participants reporting to local health clinics or hospitals. Acute-phase sera were tested for viral infection by immunofluorescence assay or RT-PCR, while acute- and convalescent-phase sera were tested for pathogen-specific IgM by ELISA. Between May 2000 and December 2007, 20,880 participants were included in the study, with evidence for recent arbovirus infection detected for 6,793 (32.5%). Dengue viruses (Flavivirus) were the most common arbovirus infections, totaling 26.0% of febrile episodes, with DENV-3 as the most common serotype. Alphavirus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV] and Mayaro virus [MAYV]) and Orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus [OROV], Group C viruses, and Guaroa virus) infections were both observed in approximately 3% of febrile episodes. In Iquitos, risk factors for VEEV and MAYV infection included being male and reporting to a rural (vs urban) clinic. In contrast, OROV infection was similar between sexes and type of clinic. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide a better understanding of the geographic range of arboviruses in South

  7. Serological Evidence of Chikungunya Virus among Acute Febrile Patients in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Pinto, Gabriela; Vene, Sirkka; Mandlaze, Arcildo; Muianga, Argentina Felisbela; Cliff, Julie; Falk, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Background In the last two decades, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has rapidly expanded to several geographical areas, causing frequent outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, South East Asia, South America, and Europe. Therefore, the disease remains heavily neglected in Mozambique, and no recent study has been conducted. Methods Between January and September 2013, acute febrile patients with no other evident cause of fever and attending a health center in a suburban area of Maputo city, Mozambique, were consecutively invited to participate. Paired acute and convalescent serum samples were requested from each participant. Convalescent samples were initially screened for anti-CHIKV IgG using a commercial indirect immunofluorescence test, and if positive, the corresponding acute sample was screened using the same test. Results Four hundred patients were enrolled. The median age of study participants was 26 years (IQR: 21–33 years) and 57.5% (224/391) were female. Paired blood samples were obtained from 209 patients, of which 26.4% (55/208) were presented anti-CHIKV IgG antibodies in the convalescent sample. Seroconversion or a four-fold titer rise was confirmed in 9 (4.3%) patients. Conclusion The results of this study strongly suggest that CHIKV is circulating in southern Mozambique. We recommend that CHIKV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute febrile illness in Mozambique and that systematic surveillance for CHIKV should be implemented. PMID:26473605

  8. [Etiology and pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors influencing acute respiratory failure and pathogenesis according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either the normal delivery of oxygen to tissues and release or the normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and lung contusion, acute respiratory distress syndrome, long-term mechanical ventilation of the lungs, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: the transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, the transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and the removal of carbon dioxide from blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the course of disease or cause higher mortality. It is important to determine the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute respiratory failure, estimate the main parameters and their interrelations and prescribe proper treatment. PMID:15064552

  9. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Laxdal, O. E.; Evans, G. E.; Braaten, V.; Robertson, H. E.

    1964-01-01

    A new polyvalent respiratory virus vaccine has been evaluated in a double-blind trial involving infants and children. Five hundred and sixteen healthy infants and children were given either nine-strain polyvalent respiratory virus vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained four Influenza strains, three Adenovirus strains and two Parainfluenza strains. Serologic studies revealed that persistent protective antibody levels were achieved with only the Asian Influenza component. The children were followed up clinically for a one-year period and each respiratory illness was recorded. No protection appeared to have been conferred by the vaccine, and indeed a significantly greater number of respiratory illnesses occurred among the vaccinated group. PMID:14105010

  10. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  11. Acute respiratory failure in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2015-09-01

    Respiratory failure affects up to 0.2% of pregnancies, more commonly in the postpartum period. Altered maternal respiratory physiology affects the assessment and management of these patients. Respiratory failure may result from pregnancy-specific conditions such as preeclampsia, amniotic fluid embolism or peripartum cardiomyopathy. Pregnancy may increase the risk or severity of other conditions, including thromboembolism, asthma, viral pneumonitis, and gastric acid aspiration. Management during pregnancy is similar to the nonpregnant patient. Endotracheal intubation in pregnancy carries an increased risk, due to airway edema and rapid oxygen desaturation following apnea. Few data are available to direct prolonged mechanical ventilation in pregnancy. Chest wall compliance is reduced, perhaps permitting slightly higher airway pressures. Optimizing oxygenation is important, but data on the use of permissive hypercapnia are limited. Delivery of the fetus does not always improve maternal respiratory function, but should be considered if benefit to the fetus is anticipated. PMID:27512467

  12. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  13. Swaddling and acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Yurdakok, K; Yavuz, T; Taylor, C E

    1990-07-01

    In Turkey and China the ancient practice of swaddling is still commonly practiced. Both countries have extremely high rates of pneumonia, especially during the neonatal period. Preliminary evidence on the possibility that swaddling may interfere with normal respiratory function and thereby predispose to pneumonia was gathered in a teaching health center in Ankara. Babies who had been swaddled for at least three months were four times more likely to have developed pneumonia (confirmed radiologically) and upper respiratory infections than babies who were unswaddled. These preliminary findings were highly significant and are being followed up by further studies. PMID:2356917

  14. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  15. Acute Uncomplicated Febrile Illness in Children Aged 2-59 months in Zanzibar – Aetiologies, Antibiotic Treatment and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Elfving, Kristina; Shakely, Deler; Andersson, Maria; Baltzell, Kimberly; Ali, Abdullah S.; Bachelard, Marc; Falk, Kerstin I.; Ljung, Annika; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Omar, Rahila S.; Parola, Philippe; Xu, Weiping; Petzold, Max; Trollfors, Birger; Björkman, Anders; Lindh, Magnus; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that a large proportion of children with fever in Africa present at primary health care facilities, few studies have been designed to specifically study the causes of uncomplicated childhood febrile illness at this level of care, especially in areas like Zanzibar that has recently undergone a dramatic change from high to low malaria transmission. Methods We prospectively studied the aetiology of febrile illness in 677 children aged 2–59 months with acute uncomplicated fever managed by IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) guidelines in Zanzibar, using point-of-care tests, urine culture, blood-PCR, chest X-ray (CXR) of IMCI-pneumonia classified patients, and multiple quantitative (q)PCR investigations of nasopharyngeal (NPH) (all patients) and rectal (GE) swabs (diarrhoea patients). For comparison, we also performed NPH and GE qPCR analyses in 167 healthy community controls. Final fever diagnoses were retrospectively established based on all clinical and laboratory data. Clinical outcome was assessed during a 14-day follow-up. The utility of IMCI for identifying infections presumed to require antibiotics was evaluated. Findings NPH-qPCR and GE-qPCR detected ≥1 pathogen in 657/672 (98%) and 153/164 (93%) of patients and 158/166 (95%) and 144/165 (87%) of controls, respectively. Overall, 57% (387/677) had IMCI-pneumonia, but only 12% (42/342) had CXR-confirmed pneumonia. Two patients were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Respiratory syncytial virus (24.5%), influenza A/B (22.3%), rhinovirus (10.5%) and group-A streptococci (6.4%), CXR-confirmed pneumonia (6.2%), Shigella (4.3%) were the most common viral and bacterial fever diagnoses, respectively. Blood-PCR conducted in a sub-group of patients (n = 83) without defined fever diagnosis was negative for rickettsiae, chikungunya, dengue, Rift Valley fever and West Nile viruses. Antibiotics were prescribed to 500 (74%) patients, but only 152 (22%) had an infection

  16. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Cases in the Country of Georgia: Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Clark, Danielle V.; Bautista, Christian T.; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Wölfel, Silke; Wölfel, Roman; Rivard, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal information is available on the incidence of Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus and hantavirus infections in Georgia. From 2008 to 2011, 537 patients with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours without a diagnosis were enrolled into a sentinel surveillance study to investigate the incidence of nine pathogens, including CCHF virus and hantavirus. Of 14 patients with a hemorrhagic fever syndrome, 3 patients tested positive for CCHF virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Two of the patients enrolled in the study had acute renal failure. These 2 of 537 enrolled patients were the only patients in the study positive for hantavirus IgM antibodies. These results suggest that CCHF virus and hantavirus are contributing causes of acute febrile syndromes of infectious origin in Georgia. These findings support introduction of critical diagnostic approaches and confirm the need for additional surveillance in Georgia. PMID:24891463

  17. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  18. Distinguishing Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion from Prolonged Febrile Seizures by Acute Phase EEG Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Fukuda, Chisako; Kishi, Kazuko; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Lee, Sooyoung; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Toyoshima, Mitsuo; Sejima, Hitoshi; Kaji, Shunsaku; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Okanishi, Toru; Tomita, Yutaka; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background To differentiate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) after status epileptics in febrile children with final diagnosis of either febrile seizure (FS) or acute encephalopathy for an early diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively collected data from 68 children who had status epilepticus and for whom EEGs were recorded within 120 h. These included subjects with a final diagnosis of FS (n = 20), epileptic status (ES; n = 11), acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD; n = 18), mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS; n = 7), other febrile encephalopathies (n = 10), hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (n = 1), and intracranial bleeding (n = 1). Initially, all EEGs were visually assessed and graded, and correlation with outcome was explored. Representative EEG epochs were then selected for quantitative analyses. Furthermore, data from AESD (n = 7) and FS (n = 16) patients for whom EEG was recorded within 24 h were also compared. Results Although milder and most severe grades of EEG correlated with neurological outcome, the outcome of moderate EEG severity group was variable and was not predictable from usual inspection. Frequency band analysis revealed that solid delta power was not significantly different among the five groups (AESD, MERS, FS, ES and control), and that MERS group showed the highest theta band power. The ratios of delta/alpha and (delta + theta)/(alpha + beta) band powers were significantly higher in the AESD group than in other groups. The alpha and beta band powers in EEGs within 24 h from onset were significantly lower in the AESD group. The band powers and their ratios showed earlier improvement towards 24 h in FS than in AESD. Conclusion Sequential EEG recording up to 24 h from onset appeared to be helpful for distinction of AESD from FS before emergence of the second phase of AESD. PMID:27046946

  19. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributed to Neosartorya infection. The mold grew rapidly in culture of both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman with ARDS, which developed as the culmination of a...

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress in Children: Croup and Acute Asthma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, B S; Shekhawat, Dhananjay S; Sharma, Prity; Meena, Chetan; Mohan, Hari

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress is one of the most common reason for emergency visits in children under 5 y of age. An accurate understanding of the epidemiology of these diseases, identification of risk factors and etiology is critical for successful treatment and prevention of related mortality. The cause of acute respiratory distress varies in etiology, and hence is amenable to different treatment modalities. Depending on the predominant symptoms and signs, a child presenting to the clinician can be divided into six groups, viz., stridor; cough, fever and difficulty in breathing or fast breathing; wheezing; mediastinal shift with severe respiratory distress; slow or irregular breathing in absence of any pulmonary sign; and respiratory distress with cardiac findings. A detailed history followed by a thorough clinical examination and laboratory evaluation assisted by imaging modalities if indicated, helps to establish the exact cause of respiratory distress in the child. Early recognition and prompt institution of appropriate management or referral can significantly improve the outcome of this illness. This article offers clinicians a brief update on the general management guidelines of respiratory distress in pediatric patients. Specific treatment depends on the exact cause, however croup and acute severe asthma have been discussed in this article. PMID:25257964

  1. Gene Expression Profiling during Early Acute Febrile Stage of Dengue Infection Can Predict the Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Calzavara-Silva, Carlos E.; Gomes, Ana L. V.; Brito, Carlos A. A.; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Silva, Ana M.; Magalhães, Cecilia; Andrade, Raoni; Gil, Laura H. V. G.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background We report the detailed development of biomarkers to predict the clinical outcome under dengue infection. Transcriptional signatures from purified peripheral blood mononuclear cells were derived from whole-genome gene-expression microarray data, validated by quantitative PCR and tested in independent samples. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was performed on patients of a well-characterized dengue cohort from Recife, Brazil. The samples analyzed were collected prospectively from acute febrile dengue patients who evolved with different degrees of disease severity: classic dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) samples were compared with similar samples from other non-dengue febrile illnesses. The DHF samples were collected 2–3 days before the presentation of the plasma leakage symptoms. Differentially-expressed genes were selected by univariate statistical tests as well as multivariate classification techniques. The results showed that at early stages of dengue infection, the genes involved in effector mechanisms of innate immune response presented a weaker activation on patients who later developed hemorrhagic fever, whereas the genes involved in apoptosis were expressed in higher levels. Conclusions/Significance Some of the gene expression signatures displayed estimated accuracy rates of more than 95%, indicating that expression profiling with these signatures may provide a useful means of DHF prognosis at early stages of infection. PMID:19936257

  2. Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis associated with JAK-2 positive myeloproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Dean; Selwyn, Jey

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 77-year-old man with a history of myeloproliferative disorder. He was admitted with a 2-week history of erythaema, swelling and significant pain of the right forearm following a mechanical fall at home, which had caused a skin laceration. During his admission, he developed ongoing intermittent fever and persistently elevated C reactive protein, and total white cell count. Initially, he was treated with antibiotics for suspected cellulitis. However, symptoms continued to progress, making a suitable management plan challenging. Wound swabs, blood cultures and viral PCR did not confirm infection. A punch biopsy of a skin lesion on the forearm was performed. The histology demonstrated a dense infiltrate of neutrophils and neutrophilic debris in keeping with acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome). He was treated with oral steroids and after that he had a complete resolution of symptoms. However, he required a period of rehabilitation before returning home. PMID:27118753

  3. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  5. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  6. Frequency of Epstein - Barr Virus in Patients Presenting with Acute Febrile Illness in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masakhwe, Clement; Ochanda, Horace; Nyakoe, Nancy; Ochiel, Daniel; Waitumbi, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Most acute febrile illnesses (AFI) are usually not associated with a specific diagnosis because of limitations of available diagnostics. This study reports on the frequency of EBV viremia and viral load in children and adults presenting with febrile illness in hospitals in Kenya. Methodology/Principal Findings A pathogen surveillance study was conducted on patients presenting with AFI (N = 796) at outpatient departments in 8 hospitals located in diverse regions of Kenya. Enrollment criterion to the study was fever without a readily diagnosable infection. All the patients had AFI not attributable to the common causes of fever in Kenyan hospitals, such as malaria or rickettsiae, leptospira, brucella and salmonella and they were hence categorized as having AFI of unknown etiology. EBV was detected in blood using quantitative TaqMan-based qPCR targeting a highly conserved BALF5 gene. The overall frequency of EBV viremia in this population was 29.2%, with significantly higher proportion in younger children of <5years (33.8%, p = 0.039) compared to patients aged ≥5 years (26.3% for 5–15 years or 18.8% for >15 years). With respect to geographical localities, the frequency of EBV viremia was higher in the Lake Victoria region (36.4%), compared to Kisii highland (24.6%), Coastal region (22.2%) and Semi-Arid region (25%). Furthermore, patients from the malaria endemic coastal region and the Lake Victoria region presented with significantly higher viremia than individuals from other regions of Kenya. Conclusions/Significance This study provides profiles of EBV in patients with AFI from diverse eco-regions of Kenya. Of significant interest is the high frequency of EBV viremia in younger children. The observed high frequencies of EBV viremia and elevated viral loads in residents of high malaria transmission areas are probably related to malaria induced immune activation and resultant expansion of EBV infected B-cells. PMID:27163791

  7. Eosinophil-Rich Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis in a Patient With Enteropathy-Associated T-cell Lymphoma, Type 1.

    PubMed

    Soon, Christopher W; Kirsch, Ilan R; Connolly, Andrew J; Kwong, Bernice Y; Kim, Jinah

    2016-09-01

    The presence of eosinophils within the neutrophilic infiltrates of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet syndrome) is documented in the literature. Here, the authors describe a case of eosinophil-rich acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in the setting of new onset enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), type 1. Histopathologic evaluation of the skin biopsies demonstrated a mixed superficial perivascular and inflammatory infiltrate composed of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and abundant eosinophils. EATL, type 1 is an aggressive although rare primary intestinal lymphoma that may be associated with celiac disease. This lymphoma is associated with a poor prognosis due to treatment resistance or bowel perforation. To the authors' knowledge, Sweet syndrome has not been reported in a patient with EATL. PMID:27097333

  8. Oxygen derived variables in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Covelli, H D; Nessan, V J; Tuttle, W K

    1983-08-01

    The clinical course of 33 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was monitored by noninvasive oxygen derived variables and compared to data obtained by invasive monitoring. A total of 350 data points were used to compare the physiologic shunt fraction (Qsp/Qt) with the ratio of arterial oxygen to inspired oxygen concentration (PaO2/FIO2), the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference [P(A-a)O2], the respiratory index (RI)-[P(A-a)O2/PaO2], and the ratio of arterial oxygen to alveolar oxygen (a/A). The PaO2/FIO2 ratio, the RI and the aA ratio correlated well with Qsp/Qt (r = 0.87 to 0.94). The P(A-a)O2 correlated less well (r = 0.68). Changes in the cardiac index (CI) and the arteriovenous oxygen content difference C(a-v)O2 had only a minimal effect on the correlation of the oxygen derived variables with Qsp/Qt, although a higher correlation resulted when these extrapulmonary factors were within normal range. We conclude that a number of oxygen derived variables may accurately reflect the degree of Qsp/Qt. The PaO2/FIO2 ratio is the easiest of these variables to calculate, yet accurately predicts the degree of Qsp/Qt throughout a course of acute respiratory failure. PMID:6409506

  9. Effects of timing of vaccination (day 0 versus day 14 of a receiving period) with a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine on performance, feed intake, and febrile response of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of timing of the administration of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine on day 0 or on day 14 of a receiving period on performance, feed intake, and febrile response in beef heifers. Our hypothesis was vaccine timing will alter febrile res...

  10. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Sajjadi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term "geriatric syndrome" is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed. PMID:26989409

  11. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, HamidReza; Sajjadi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term “geriatric syndrome” is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed. PMID:26989409

  12. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... febrile seizure does not mean a child has epilepsy, since that disorder is characterized by reoccurring seizures ... outcome but carry an increased risk of developing epilepsy. How common are febrile seizures? Febrile seizures are ...

  13. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Pediatrics, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management, Subcommittee on Febrile Seizures. Febrile seizures: clinical practice guideline for the long-term management of the child with simple febrile seizures. Pediatrics . 2008; ...

  14. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  15. Late-onset epilepsy in children with acute febrile encephalopathy with prolonged convulsions: A clinical and encephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sugai, Kenji; Nakagawa, Eiji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Ishido, Yusaku; Kaneko, Yuu; Kaido, Takanobu; Takahashi, Akio; Ohtsuki, Taisuke; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of epilepsies as the sequelae of acute febrile encephalopathy with prolonged convulsions during childhood. Sixteen patients (M:F=9:7) aged 2-13years (mean 6.1years) with history of febrile acute encephalopathy were retrospectively reviewed. These patients experienced febrile encephalopathy at the age of 11months to 4years, with 11 individuals presenting with findings of a biphasic clinical course (n=5), frontal predominant (n=8) lesions, and/or reduced diffusivity in the cerebral white matter on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n=3). The remaining 5 patients had unilateral lesions that manifested the phenotype of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome (HHES). Epilepsy emerged with a latent period of 2months to 2years after the acute phase of febrile encephalopathy. Head nodding or spasm with subsequent motion arrest and brief tonic seizures were the main seizure phenotypes. Ictal records of epileptic seizures were available in 9 patients. Epileptiform discharges with a focal or uneven distribution appeared at the seizure onset and lasted less than 1s in all patients; these were followed by either generalized attenuation or fast activity in 8 patients with head nodding, spasm, or brief tonic seizures, and by localized fast activity in 1 patient with versive tonic seizures. Notably, the seizure onset area was often located outside the severe lesions on MRI, i.e., in the parietal areas in patients with frontal predominant lesions, and in the spared hemisphere of HHES. Although phenobarbital, zonisamide, carbamazepine, clobazam, clonazepam, and clorazepate were partially effective in some patients, daily seizures persisted in 11 patients. Callosotomy was performed in 2 patients, and beneficial effects were observed in both. These characteristics suggested a broad distribution of augmented excitability in these patients, resulting in the rapid propagation of epileptic activity in the initial phase of ictal

  16. Initial assessment of impact of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine on febrile respiratory illness and virus transmission in military basic trainees, March 2012.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Charles H; Hawksworth, Anthony; Snyder, Clifford E

    2012-03-01

    After a 12-year hiatus, military recruit training centers resumed administration of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine, live, oral (adenovirus vaccine) to trainees beginning in October of 2011. Subsequently, rates of febrile respiratory illnesses (FRI) and adenovirus isolations markedly declined. These findings are consistent with those of a placebo-controlled efficacy trial conducted prior to the vaccine's licensure by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Continued surveillance will clarify the longer term impact of vaccine use. PMID:22452712

  17. Acute and long term respiratory damage following inhalation of ammonia.

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, D; Gris, P; Lheureux, P; Gevenois, P A; De Vuyst, P; Yernault, J C

    1992-01-01

    A lifelong non-smoker who was the victim of a massive accidental exposure to anhydrous ammonia gas was followed up for 10 years. In the acute phase the patient presented with severe tracheobronchitis and respiratory failure, caused by very severe burns of the respiratory mucosa. After some improvement he was left with severe and fixed airways obstruction. Isotope studies of mucociliary clearance, computed tomography, and bronchography showed mild bronchiectasis. It is concluded that acute exposure to high concentrations of ammonia may lead to acute respiratory injury but also to long term impairment of respiratory function. Images PMID:1440475

  18. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  19. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp) and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp) with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure monitoring using the AVEA ventilator to tailor the ventilatory strategy. PMID:27076736

  1. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. Purpose: This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46–60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6–10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6–10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. Conclusion: IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness. PMID:27365916

  2. [Positioning of patients with acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Bein, T

    2012-11-01

    The collapse of lung tissue, edema and intrapulmonary shunt are the main symptoms in patients with acute respiratory insufficiency. The techniques of ventilation in a prone position and continuous lateral rotational therapy (CLRT) are based on these pathophysiological changes. Ventilation in a prone position was found to improve ventilation and perfusion relationships and reduction in the pleural pressure gradient. In hypoxemic lung failure (PaO(2)/FIO(2) <100) a prone position was found to improve oxygenation as a rescue measure and to improve survival. In contrast CLRT is considered to be an early therapeutic or prophylactic measure aimed at prevention of ventilation-associated complications. In trauma patients these beneficial effects were demonstrated in several studies. Positioning therapy can be accompanied by potentially serious complications (e.g. face and skin ulceration, accidental loss of tubes and catheters and cardiac arrhythmias) and its use requires routine management and exact knowledge of indications and risks. PMID:23086293

  3. An Analysis of Hematological Parameters as a Diagnostic test for Malaria in Patients with Acute Febrile Illness: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jairajpuri, Zeeba Shamim; Rana, Safia; Hassan, Mohd Jaseem; Nabi, Farhat; Jetley, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hematological changes are among the most common complications encountered in malaria. This study analyzes and statistically evaluates the hematological changes as a diagnostic test for malaria in patients with acute febrile illness and whether these could guide the physician to institute specific antimalarial treatment. Methods The present study was an observational study, conducted from January to December 2012. A total of 723 patients presenting with acute febrile illness at our hospital were evaluated. A complete blood count and malarial parasite microscopy were performed for each patient. Results The findings showed that 172 out of 723 patients (24%) were diagnosed to have malaria by positive smear report. There were 121 males and 51 females with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. Maximum number of cases were seen in the 20-30 years age group. There was a statistically significant reduction in hemoglobin (p<0.005), platelet count (p<0.001) and total leukocyte count (p<0.001) levels in patients with malaria compared to those without the disease. Likelihood ratios for a positive result of platelets (6.2) and total leukocyte count (3.4) was relevant as compared to hemoglobin (1.61) and Red cell distribution width (1.79). The negative predictive values for hemoglobin (79%), total leukocyte count (86%), platelets (94%) and Red cell distribution width (93%) were significant. Red cell distribution width values were found to be higher in patients with malaria than in patients without malaria (p<0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that routinely used laboratory findings such as hemoglobin, leukocytes, platelet counts and even red cell distribution width values can provide a diagnostic clue in a patient with acute febrile illness in endemic areas, thus increasing the probability of malaria and enhancing prompt initiation of treatment. PMID:24498476

  4. Possible Role of Rickettsia felis in Acute Febrile Illness among Children in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mourembou, Gaël; Lekana-Douki, Jean Bernard; Mediannikov, Oleg; Nzondo, Sydney Maghendji; Kouna, Lady Charlene; Essone, Jean Claude Biteghe Bi; Fenollar, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsia felis has been reported to be a cause of fever in sub-Saharan Africa, but this association has been poorly evaluated in Gabon. We assessed the prevalence of this bacterium among children <15 years of age in 4 areas of Gabon; the locations were in urban, semiurban, and rural areas. DNA samples from 410 febrile children and 60 afebrile children were analyzed by quantitative PCR. Overall, the prevalence of R. felis among febrile and afebrile children was 10.2% (42/410 children) and 3.3% (2/60 children), respectively. Prevalence differed among febrile children living in areas that are urban (Franceville, 1.3% [1/77]), semiurban (Koulamoutou, 2.1% [3/141]), and rural (Lastourville, 11.2% [15/134]; Fougamou, 39.7% [23/58]). Furthermore, in a rural area (Fougamou), R. felis was significantly more prevalent in febrile (39.7% [23/58]) than afebrile children (5.0% [1/20]). Additional studies are needed to better understand the pathogenic role of R. felis in this part of the world. PMID:26402580

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex disorder of heterogeneous etiologies characterized by a consistent, recognizable pattern of lung injury. Extensive epidemiologic studies and clinical intervention trials have been conducted to address the high mortality of this disorder and have provided significant insight into the complexity of studying new therapies for this condition. The existing clinical investigations in ARDS will be highlighted in this review. The limitations to current definitions, patient selection, and outcome assessment will be considered. While significant attention has been focused on the parenchymal injury that characterizes this disorder and the clinical support of gas exchange function, relatively limited focus has been directed to hemodynamic and pulmonary vascular dysfunction equally prominent in the disease. The limited available clinical information in this area will also be reviewed. The current standards for cardiopulmonary management of the condition will be outlined. Current gaps in our understanding of the clinical condition will be highlighted with the expectation that continued progress will contribute to a decline in disease mortality. PMID:22034606

  6. Meditation or Exercise May Help Acute Respiratory Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z Meditation or Exercise May Help Acute Respiratory Infections, Study Finds Share: © ... of three groups: a mindfulness meditation group, an exercise group, or a wait-list control group. Participants ...

  7. Incidence of respiratory viruses in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Weilg, Pablo; Verne, Eduardo; Nazario-Fuertes, Ronald; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J; Pumarola, Tomás

    2015-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections are responsible for high morbi-mortality in Peruvian children. However, the etiological agents are poorly identified. This study, conducted during the pandemic outbreak of H1N1 influenza in 2009, aims to determine the main etiological agents responsible for acute respiratory infections in children from Lima, Peru. Nasopharyngeal swabs collected from 717 children with acute respiratory infections between January 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed by multiplex RT-PCR for 13 respiratory viruses: influenza A, B, and C virus; parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4; and human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A and B, among others. Samples were also tested with direct fluorescent-antibodies (DFA) for six respiratory viruses. RT-PCR and DFA detected respiratory viruses in 240 (33.5%) and 85 (11.9%) cases, respectively. The most common etiological agents were RSV-A (15.3%), followed by influenza A (4.6%), PIV-1 (3.6%), and PIV-2 (1.8%). The viruses identified by DFA corresponded to RSV (5.9%) and influenza A (1.8%). Therefore, respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV) were found to be the most common etiology of acute respiratory infections. The authors suggest that active surveillance be conducted to identify the causative agents and improve clinical management, especially in the context of possible circulation of pandemic viruses. PMID:25784285

  8. Febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder of childhood, and occurs in an age-related manner. FS are classified into simple and complex. FS has a multifactorial inheritance, suggesting that both genetic and environmental factors are causative. Various animal models have elucidated the pathophysiological mechanisms of FS. Risk factors for a first FS are a family history of the disorder and a developmental delay. Risk factors for recurrent FS are a family history, age below 18 months at seizure onset, maximum temperature, and duration of fever. Risk factors for subsequent development of epilepsy are neurodevelopmental abnormality and complex FS. Clinicians evaluating children after a simple FS should concentrate on identifying the cause of the child's fever. Meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any febrile child. A simple FS does not usually require further evaluation such as ordering electroencephalography, neuroimaging, or other studies. Treatment is acute rescue therapy for prolonged FS. Antipyretics are not proven to reduce the recurrence risk for FS. Some evidence shows that both intermittent therapy with oral/rectal diazepam and continuous prophylaxis with oral phenobarbital or valproate are effective in reducing the risk of recurrence, but there is no evidence that these medications reduce the risk of subsequent epilepsy. Vaccine-induced FS is a rare event that does not lead to deleterious outcomes, but could affect patient and physician attitudes toward the safety of vaccination. PMID:25324864

  9. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  10. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prolonged seizures are a risk factor for epilepsy but most children who experience febrile seizures do ... develop the reoccurring seizures that re characteristic of epilepsy. Certain children who have febrile seizures face an ...

  11. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000980.htm Febrile seizures To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A febrile seizure is a convulsion in a child triggered by ...

  12. Respiratory Viral Testing and Influenza Antiviral Prescriptions During Hospitalization for Acute Respiratory Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly M.; Meek, James I.; Fry, Alicia M.; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined respiratory viral testing and influenza antiviral prescriptions at a US tertiary care hospital. During the 2010–11 to 2012–13 influenza seasons, antiviral prescriptions among acute respiratory illness (ARI) hospitalizations were associated with viral testing (rate ratio = 15.0), and empiric prescriptions were rare (<1% of ARI hospitalizations). PMID:26885545

  13. Hospital-Based Surveillance for Infectious Etiologies Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness in Georgia, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Gatserelia, Lana; Makhviladze, Manana; Kanashvili, Marine; Mikautadze, Teona; Nanuashvili, Alexander; Kiknavelidze, Khatuni; Kokaia, Nora; Makharadze, Manana; Clark, Danielle V; Bautista, Christian T; Farrell, Margaret; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Maksoud, Mohamed Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J; Rivard, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Information on the infectious causes of undifferentiated acute febrile illness (AFI) in Georgia is essential for effective treatment and prevention. In May 2008, a hospital-based AFI surveillance was initiated at six hospitals in Georgia. Patients aged ≥ 4 years with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours were eligible for surveillance. Blood culture and serologic testing were conducted for Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., West Nile virus (WNV), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Coxiella burnetii, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), hantavirus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), and Rickettsia typhi. Of 537 subjects enrolled, 70% were outpatients, 54% were males, and the mean age was 37 years. Patients reported having fatigue (89%), rigors (87%), sweating (83%), pain in joints (49%), and sleep disturbances (42%). Thirty-nine (7%) patients were seropositive for R. typhi, 37 (7%) for Brucella spp., 36 (7%) for TBEV, 12 (2%) for Leptospira spp., 10 (2%) for C. burnetii, and three (0.6%) for S. Typhi. None of the febrile patients tested positive for WNV antibodies. Of the patients, 73% were negative for all pathogens. Our results indicate that most of the targeted pathogens are present in Georgia, and highlight the importance of enhancing laboratory capacity for these infectious diseases. PMID:26438032

  14. Aetiologies of Acute Undifferentiated Febrile illness in Adult Patients – an Experience from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sohaib; Agarwal, R K; Dhar, Minakshi; Mittal, Manish; Sharma, Shiwani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) is a common clinical entity in most of the hospitals. The fever can be potentially fatal if the aetiology is not recognized and appropriately treated early. Aim To describe the aetiology of fever among patients in a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Materials and Methods A one-year retro-prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age>18years) presenting with undifferentiated febrile illness (of duration 5-14 days). Diagnosis was confirmed by suitable laboratory tests after exhaustive clinical examination. Results A total of 2547 patients with AUFI were evaluated. Of these, 1663 (65.3%) were males and 884 (34.7%) were females. Dengue (37.54%); enteric fever (16.5%); scrub typhus (14.42%); bacterial sepsis (10.3%); malaria (6.8%); hepatitis A (1.9%); hepatitis E (1.4%); leptospirosis (0.14%); were the main infections while no specific diagnosis could be delineated in 11%. Mixed infections were noted in 48 (1.9%) patients. Conclusion A good clinical acumen supported by the basic investigations can help diagnose the cause of fever with reasonable certainty. PMID:26816892

  15. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes. PMID:20038672

  16. Anxiety and depression on an acute respiratory ward

    PubMed Central

    Thew, Graham R; MacCallam, Jackie; Salkovskis, Paul M; Suntharalingam, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Psychological difficulties are a common complication among patients with respiratory disease, and are associated with poorer health outcomes and increased use of healthcare. As prevalence studies typically sample patients from community settings, this study aimed to explore the extent and nature of psychological difficulties during acute hospital admission. Methods: A case example of an acute respiratory ward is presented. In total, 41 acute respiratory inpatients completed standardised measures of depression, anxiety, and health anxiety. Results: Rates of clinically significant depression, anxiety, and health anxiety were 71%, 40%, and 21%, respectively, with 76% of participants showing clinically significant scores on at least one measure. Comparison to existing literature suggests depression rates may be elevated in the acute inpatient context. The difficulties experienced encompassed both contextual factors related to being in hospital and broader health concerns. Conclusion: We suggest that psychological distress may be particularly prevalent in inpatient settings and that larger-scale studies are warranted. PMID:27508081

  17. Febrile seizures in Kaduna, north western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eseigbe, E. E.; Adama, S. J.; Eseigbe, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Febrile seizure is the most common seizure of childhood and has a good prognosis. However its presentation is fraught with poor management, with grave consequences, in our environment. Thus a review of its current status is important. Objective: To review the status of febrile seizures in Kaduna metropolis. Materials and Methods: A review of cases seen in the Department of Paediatrics, 44 Nigeria Army Reference Hospital, Kaduna between June 2008 and June 2010. Results: Out of the 635 cases admitted in the department 17 (2.7%) fulfilled the criteria for febrile seizures. There were 11 Males and 6 Females (M: F, 1.8:1). Age range was from 9 months to 5 years with a mean of 2.2 years ± 1.1 and peak age of 3 years. Twelve (70.6%) were in the upper social classes (I-III). Fever, convulsion, catarrh and cough were major presenting symptoms. Incidence of convulsion was least on the 1st day of complaint. Fourteen (82.4%) of the cases were simple febrile seizures while 3 were complex. There was a positive family history in 5 (29.4%) of the cases. Eleven (64.7%) had orthodox medication at home, before presentation, 5 (29.4%) consulted patient medicine sellers and 7 (41.7%) received traditional medication as part of home management. Malaria and acute respiratory infections were the identifiable causes. Standard anti-malaria and anti-biotic therapy were instituted, where indicated. All recovered and were discharged. Conclusion: There was a low prevalence of febrile seizures among the hospitalized children and a poor pre-hospitalization management of cases. It highlighted the need for improved community awareness on the prevention and management of febrile seizures. PMID:23293414

  18. Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance in a Tertiary Hospital Emergency Department: Comparison of Influenza and Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Olga D.; Gregory, Christopher J.; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M.; Oberste, M. Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2–7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs. PMID:23382160

  19. Update: outbreak of acute febrile illness among athletes participating in Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000--Borneo, Malaysia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-01-19

    During September 7-11, 2000, CDC was notified by the Idaho Department of Health, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, and the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network of at least 20 cases of acute febrile illness in three countries; all ill patients had participated in the Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000 multisport expedition race in Borneo, Malaysia, during August 21-September 3, 2000. Participants included athletes from 29 U.S. states and 26 countries. This report updates the ongoing investigation of this outbreak through December 2, which suggests that Leptospira were the cause of illness and that water from the Segama River was the primary source of infection. Participants in adventure sports and exotic tourism should be aware of potential exposure to unusual and emerging infectious agents. PMID:11215718

  20. Acute febrile illness surveillance in a tertiary hospital emergency department: comparison of influenza and dengue virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Olga D; Gregory, Christopher J; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M; Oberste, M Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M

    2013-03-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2-7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs. PMID:23382160

  1. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection. PMID:22490115

  2. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  3. Toluene inducing acute respiratory failure in a spray paint sniffer

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Diego P.; Chang, Aymara Y.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Toluene, formerly known as toluol, is an aromatic hydrocarbon that is widely used as an industrial feedstock and as a solvent. Like other solvents, toluene is sometimes also used as an inhalant drug for its intoxicating properties. It has potential to cause multiple effects in the body including death. Case Report: I report a case of a 27-year-old male, chronic spray paint sniffer, who presented with severe generalized muscle weakness and developed acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. Toluene toxicity was confirmed with measurement of hippuric acid of 8.0 g/L (normal <5.0 g/L). Conclusions: Acute respiratory failure is a rare complication of chronic toluene exposure that may be lethal if it is not recognized immediately. To our knowledge, this is the second case of acute respiratory failure due to toluene exposure. PMID:23569498

  4. Febrile convulsion--an overview.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arabinda; Mukherjee, Asha

    2002-05-01

    Febrile convulsion is the most frequently occurring epilepsy syndrome, experienced in infants/children between 6 months and 5 years of age associated with fever >38 degrees C. Children having first or second degree relative with history of febrile convulsion, neonatal nursery stay of more than 30 days, developmental delay or attendance at day care centre are at increased risk of developing febrile convulsion. Single febrile convulsion does not increase the risk of epilepsy and there is no causal relationship between febrile convulsion and subsequent epilepsy. It has been recognised that there is significant genetic component for susceptibility to febrile seizures. To make the diagnosis of febrile convulsion, meningitis, encephalitis, serious electrolyte imbalance and other acute neurologic illnesses are to be excluded. While managing acute attack the steps to be taken are--airway management, a semi-prone position to avoid aspiration, monitoring vital signs and other supportive care. Diazepam or lorazepam is the drug to be used. There is no reason to expect phenobarbitone administered at the time of fever to be effective in prevention of febrile convulsion. The parents should be counselled about the benign nature of the convulsion. Although the febrile convulsion a frightening event, still it is a benign condition. PMID:12418634

  5. [Diagnosis of acute respiratory failure and nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Reingardiene, Dagmara; Tereseviciūte, Neringa; Slavinskas, Ricardas

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine diagnosis and factors influencing acute respiratory failure and nosocomial pneumonia according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either normal delivery of oxygen to tissues or normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and contusion of the lungs, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and removal of carbon dioxide from the blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the outcome of disease or can cause higher mortality. PMID:15547315

  6. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  7. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  8. Effects of timing on vaccination (day 0 versus day 14 of a receiving period) with a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine on performance, feed intake, and febrile response of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of timing of administration of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine (IBR-PI3-BRSV-BVD) on d 0 or on d 14 of a receiving period on performance, feed intake, and febrile response in beef heifers. Our hypothesis was vaccine timing will alter ...

  9. Effects of timing of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccination (day 0 versus day 14 of a receiving period) on performance, feed intake, and febrile response of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of timing associated with the administration of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine (IBR-PI3-BRSV-BVD) on day 0 or on day 14 of a receiving period on performance, feed intake, and the febrile response in beef heifers. Our hypothesis was t...

  10. Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--worldwide, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-03-21

    Since late February 2003, CDC has been supporting the World Health Organization (WHO) in the investigation of a multicountry outbreak of atypical pneumonia of unknown etiology. The illness is being referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This report describes the scope of the outbreak, preliminary case definition, and interim infection control guidance for the United States. PMID:12665115

  11. Ventilators for noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The application of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat acute respiratory failure has increased tremendously both inside and outside the intensive care unit. The choice of ventilator is crucial for success of NIV in the acute setting, because poor tolerance and excessive air leaks are significantly correlated with NIV failure. Patient-ventilator asynchrony and discomfort can occur if the physician or respiratory therapist fails to adequately set NIV to respond to the patient's ventilatory demand, so clinicians need to fully understood the ventilator's technical peculiarities (eg, efficiency of trigger and cycle systems, speed of pressurization, air-leak compensation, CO(2) rebreathing, reliability of fraction of inspired oxygen reading, monitoring accuracy). A wide range of ventilators of different complexity have been introduced into clinical practice to noninvasively support patients in acute respiratory failure, but the numerous commercially available ventilators (bi-level, intermediate, and intensive care unit ventilators) have substantial differences that can influence patient comfort, patient-ventilator interaction, and, thus, the chance of NIV clinical success. This report examines the most relevant aspects of the historical evolution, the equipment, and the acute-respiratory-failure clinical application of NIV ventilators. PMID:18655744

  12. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  13. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuville, Marie; Hustinx, Roland; Jacques, Jessica; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI) and hemorrhage (CyH), there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic. Design ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT). CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Results Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172) and/or fever (n = 33). 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11) or probable (n = 12) CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%. Conclusions This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical–fever–and biological–CRP–parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations

  14. Human herpesviruses respiratory infections in patients with acute respiratory distress (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Bonizzoli, Manuela; Arvia, Rosaria; di Valvasone, Simona; Liotta, Francesco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Azzi, Alberta; Peris, Adriano

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is today a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU). ARDS and pneumonia are closely related to critically ill patients; however, the etiologic agent is not always identified. The presence of human herpes simplex virus 1, human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in respiratory samples of critically ill patients is increasingly reported even without canonical immunosuppression. The main aim of this study was to better understand the significance of herpesviruses finding in lower respiratory tract of ARDS patients hospitalized in ICU. The presence of this group of herpesviruses, in addition to the research of influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, was investigated in respiratory samples from 54 patients hospitalized in ICU, without a known microbiological causative agent. Moreover, the immunophenotype of each patient was analyzed. Herpesviruses DNA presence in the lower respiratory tract seemed not attributable to an impaired immunophenotype, whereas a significant correlation was observed between herpesviruses positivity and influenza virus infection. A higher ICU mortality was significantly related to the presence of herpesvirus infection in the lower respiratory tract as well as to impaired immunophenotype, as patients with poor outcome showed severe lymphopenia, affecting in particular T (CD3+) cells, since the first days of ICU hospitalization. In conclusion, these results indicate that herpesviruses lower respiratory tract infection, which occurs more frequently following influenza virus infection, can be a negative prognostic marker. An independent risk factor for ICU patients with ARDS is an impaired immunophenotype. PMID:27138606

  15. Leptospirosis as Frequent Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Flom, Judith E.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Woods, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the proportion of fevers caused by leptospirosis, we obtained serum specimens and epidemiologic and clinical data from patients in Galle, Sri Lanka, March–October 2007. Immunoglobulin M ELISA was performed on paired serum specimens to diagnose acute (seroconversion or 4-fold titer rise) or past (titer without rise) leptospirosis and seroprevalence (acute). We compared (individually) the diagnostic yield of acute-phase specimens and clinical impression with paired specimens for acute leptospirosis. Of 889 patients with paired specimens, 120 had acute leptosoirosis and 241 had past leptospirosis. The sensitivity and specificity of acute-phase serum specimens were 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2%–25.5%) and 69.2% (95% CI 65.5%–72.7%), respectively, and of clinical impression 22.9% (95% CI 15.4%–32.0%) and 91.7% (95% CI 89.2%–93.8%), respectively. For identifying acute leptospirosis, clinical impression is insensitive, and immunoglobulin M results are more insensitive and costly. Rapid, pathogen-based tests for early diagnosis are needed. PMID:21888794

  16. Pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arondi, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Alberto; Borghesi, Andrea; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common disease that involve almost constantly the lung. Usually the onset is insidious, and symptoms are slowly ingravescent. Very rarely, as in the case here reported, sarcoidosis can cause an acute respiratory failure with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A 20-year-old girl from Pakistan presented for acute fatigue, fever, and cough with a chest X-ray displayed the micronodular interstitial disease. Despite of anti-tuberculosis therapy, ARDS developed in a few days requiring continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Examinations on transbronchial specimens obtained by bronchoscopy permitted to reach the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and steroid therapy improved rapidly clinical conditions. This is the first case report reported in Europe that confirms the rare onset of sarcoidosis as ARDS. Steroid therapy allows to cure rapidly this severe complication. PMID:26933462

  17. An Outbreak of Acute Febrile Illness Caused by Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus in the Afar Region of Ethiopia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Woyessa, Abyot Bekele; Omballa, Victor; Wang, David; Lambert, Amy; Waiboci, Lilian; Ayele, Workenesh; Ahmed, Abdi; Abera, Negga Asamene; Cao, Song; Ochieng, Melvin; Montgomery, Joel M.; Jima, Daddi; Fields, Barry

    2014-01-01

    In malaria-endemic regions, many medical facilities have limited capacity to diagnose non-malarial etiologies of acute febrile illness (AFI). As a result, the etiology of AFI is seldom determined, although AFI remains a major cause of morbidity in developing countries. An outbreak of AFI was reported in the Afar region of Ethiopia in August of 2011. Retrospectively, 12,816 suspected AFI cases were identified by review of medical records. Symptoms were mild and self-limiting within 3 days after the date of onset; no fatalities were identified. All initial test results of AFI patient specimens were negative for selected pathogens using standard microbiological and molecular techniques. High-throughput sequencing of nucleic acid extracts of serum specimens from 29 AFI cases identified 17 (59%) of 29 samples as positive for Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus (SFSV). These results were further confirmed by specific reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. This is the first study implicating SFSV as an etiological agent for AFI in Ethiopia. PMID:25266349

  18. Human bocavirus in children with acute respiratory infections in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Nguyen, Tran Quynh Nhu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Human bocavirus (HBoV), a novel virus, is recognized to increasingly associate with previously unknown etiology respiratory infections in young children. In this study, the epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics of HBoV infections were described in hospitalized Vietnamese pediatric patients. From April 2010 to May 2011, 1,082 nasopharyngeal swab samples were obtained from patients with acute respiratory infections at the Children's Hospital 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Samples were screened for HBoV by PCR and further molecularly characterized by sequencing. HBoV was found in 78 (7.2%) children. Co-infection with other viruses was observed in 66.7% of patients infected with HBoV. Children 12-24 months old were the most affected age group. Infections with HBoV were found year-round, though most cases occurred in the dry season (December-April). HBoV was possible to cause severe diseases as determined by higher rates of hypoxia, pneumonia, and longer hospitalization duration in patients with HBoV infection than in those without (P-value <0.05). Co-infection with HBoV did not affect the disease severity. The phylogenetic analysis of partial VP1 gene showed minor variations and all HBoV sequences belonged to species 1 (HBoV1). In conclusion, HBoV1 was circulating in Vietnam and detected frequently in young children during dry season. Acute respiratory infections caused by HBoV1 were severe enough for hospitalization, which implied that HBoV1 may have an important role in acute respiratory infections among children. PMID:24123072

  19. Personalizing mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berngard, S Clark; Beitler, Jeremy R; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-03-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes remains the cornerstone for treating patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Personalizing such an approach to each patient's unique physiology may improve outcomes further. Many factors should be considered when mechanically ventilating a critically ill patient with ARDS. Estimations of transpulmonary pressures as well as individual's hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics should influence PEEP decisions as well as response to therapy (recruitability). This summary will emphasize the potential role of personalized therapy in mechanical ventilation. PMID:27076966

  20. Personalizing mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beitler, Jeremy R.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes remains the cornerstone for treating patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Personalizing such an approach to each patient’s unique physiology may improve outcomes further. Many factors should be considered when mechanically ventilating a critically ill patient with ARDS. Estimations of transpulmonary pressures as well as individual’s hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics should influence PEEP decisions as well as response to therapy (recruitability). This summary will emphasize the potential role of personalized therapy in mechanical ventilation. PMID:27076966

  1. West Nile Virus Documented in Indonesia from Acute Febrile Illness Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Khin Saw Aye; Kosasih, Herman; Artika, I. Made; Perkasa, Aditya; Puspita, Mita; Ma'roef, Chairin Nisa; Antonjaya, Ungke; Ledermann, Jeremy P.; Powers, Ann M.; Alisjahbana, Bachti

    2014-01-01

    We report the presence of West Nile virus in a cryopreserved, dengue-negative serum specimen collected from an acute fever case on Java in 2004–2005. The strain belongs to genotype lineage 2, which has recently been implicated in human outbreaks in Europe. PMID:24420775

  2. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers. PMID:26614238

  3. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: definitions, mechanisms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Urso, Domenico Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a secondary acute respiratory insufficiency caused by an inflammatory syndrome which is characterized by an increased of permeability pulmonary edema, associated with many other clinic anomalies, radiological and pathophysiological not directly caused by, but with which it could coexist, a left atrial hypertension. The illness, characterized by refractory hypoxemia, recognizes several causes, which have direct or indirect harm on the cells of the membrane alveolus-capillary. In spite of the improvements in the therapeutic approach, during these last 40 years, represented by the aid of the mechanical ventilation and the use of selective pulmonary vasodilators, this condition is life threatening and often lethal: 90% of mortality rate amongst those older than 65 years. PMID:16913178

  4. Host-microbiome interactions in acute and chronic respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven L; Wesselingh, Steve; Rogers, Geraint B

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory infection is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Understanding the factors that influence risk and outcome of these infections is essential to improving care. We increasingly understand that interactions between the microbial residents of our mucosal surfaces and host regulatory systems is fundamental to shaping local and systemic immunity. These mechanisms are most well defined in the gastrointestinal tract, however analogous systems also occur in the airways. Moreover, we now appreciate that the host-microbiota interactions at a given mucosal surface influence systemic host processes, in turn, affecting the course of infection at other anatomical sites. This review discusses the mechanisms by which the respiratory microbiome influences acute and chronic airway disease and examines the contribution of cross-talk between the gastrointestinal and respiratory compartments to microbe-mucosa interactions. PMID:26972325

  5. Efficacy of noninvasive CPAP in COPD with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P; Reissmann, H; Maltais, F; Ranieri, M; Gottfried, S B

    1995-11-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation and the development of intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) are commonly observed in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in acute respiratory failure. Previous studies have shown that externally applied PEEP reduces PEEPi and its adverse effects in mechanically-ventilated COPD patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of graded amounts of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the degree of inspiratory effort, pattern of breathing, gas exchange, and level of dyspnoea in a group of spontaneously breathing, nonintubated COPD patients in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Ten COPD patients admitted to the intensive care unit in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure were studied. Inspiratory effort was measured by the tidal excursions of oesophageal (Poes) and transdiaphragmatic (Pdi) pressure. Inspiratory effort and both the pressure-time product for the diaphragm (integral of Pdi-dt) and for the inspiratory muscles (integral of Poes.dt) were measured during the application of 5, 7.5, and 10 cmH2O of CPAP. Dyspnoea, gas exchange and pattern of breathing were also assessed. Inspiratory effort and the pressure-time product both for the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles fell significantly with CPAP in a dose-dependent fashion. Both the pattern of breathing and level of dyspnoea improved with CPAP. End-expiratory lung volume remained stable at the lower levels of CPAP, with only modest increases at the higher levels. Arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) either improved or remained stable with CPAP. We conclude that the noninvasive application of CPAP to spontaneously breathing patients with severe COPD in acute respiratory failure decreases inspiratory effort and dyspnoea whilst improving breathing pattern. It is conceivable that the early institution of CPAP in this setting may obviate the need for intubation and conventional

  6. [Serological studies of the role of the respiratory syncytial virus in acute respiratory diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Vancea, D; Saşcă, C; Matinca, D; Ivanof, A

    1975-01-01

    The presence of the syncytial respiratory virus was determined by CF in 281 children admitted with acute respiratory diseases between 15 Sept. 1971 and 30 Dec. 1973, using the Long antigen prepared in the "St. Nicolau" Institute of Virology, Bucharest. In 38 children (13.5%) a serologic diagnosis of infection with the syncytial virus was established; in the other cases of respiratory infection of different etiology, antibodies to the syncytial virus were found in low but constant titers in both serum samples. The presence of these antibodies in a high proportion of the children points to the wide circulation of the syncytial virus in the infantile population, with all its clinico-epidemiologic implications. PMID:173009

  7. Asthmatics with exacerbation during acute respiratory illness exhibit unique transcriptional signatures within the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory illness is the leading cause of asthma exacerbations yet the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. To address the deficiencies in our understanding of the molecular events characterizing acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations, we undertook a transcriptional profiling study of the nasal mucosa over the course of acute respiratory illness amongst individuals with a history of asthma, allergic rhinitis and no underlying respiratory disease. Methods Transcriptional profiling experiments were performed using the Agilent Whole Human Genome 4X44K array platform. Time point-based microarray and principal component analyses were conducted to identify and distinguish acute respiratory illness-associated transcriptional profiles over the course of our study. Gene enrichment analysis was conducted to identify biological processes over-represented within each acute respiratory illness-associated profile, and gene expression was subsequently confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results We found that acute respiratory illness is characterized by dynamic, time-specific transcriptional profiles whose magnitudes of expression are influenced by underlying respiratory disease and the mucosal repair signature evoked during acute respiratory illness. Most strikingly, we report that people with asthma who experience acute respiratory illness-induced exacerbations are characterized by a reduced but prolonged inflammatory immune response, inadequate activation of mucosal repair, and the expression of a newly described exacerbation-specific transcriptional signature. Conclusion Findings from our study represent a significant contribution towards clarifying the complex molecular interactions that typify acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:24433494

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  9. Oronasal mask versus helmet in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Lara; Mega, Chiara; Vaschetto, Rosanna; Bellone, Andrea; Scala, Raffaele; Cosentini, Roberto; Musti, Muriel; Del Forno, Manuela; Grassi, Mario; Fasano, Luca; Navalesi, Paolo; Nava, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    The choice of the interface for noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a key factor in NIV success. We hypothesised that a new helmet specifically design to improve performance in hypercapnic patients would be clinically equivalent to a standard oronasal mask. In a multicentre, short-term, physiological, randomised trial in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients facing an acute hypercapnic respiratory failure episode, we compared the changes in arterial blood gases (ABGs) and tolerance score obtained using the helmet or mask, and, as secondary end-points, dyspnoea, vital signs, early NIV discontinuation and rate of intubation. 80 patients were randomly assigned to receive NIV either with the helmet (n=39) or mask (n=41), using an intensive care unit ventilator. Compared with baseline, in the first 6 h, NIV improved ABGs, dyspnoea and respiratory rate (p<0.05) in both groups. Changes in ABGs and discomfort were similar with the two groups, while dyspnoea decreased more (p<0.005) using the mask. The rate of intubation and the need for interface change during the whole period of NIV were very low and not different between groups. The new helmet may be a valid alternative to a mask in improving ABGs and achieving a good tolerance during an episode of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. PMID:25504992

  10. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    PubMed

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  11. Update: Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--worldwide, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-03-28

    CDC continues to support the World Health Organization (WHO) in the investigation of a multicountry outbreak of unexplained atypical pneumonia referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This report includes summaries of the epidemiologic investigations and public health responses in several affected locations where CDC is collaborating with international and national health authorities. This report also describes an unusual cluster of cases associated with a hotel in Hong Kong and identifies the potential etiologic agent of SARS. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of SAPS are ongoing. PMID:12680518

  12. Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Recent Update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Young

    2016-01-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is characterized by an excessive inflammatory response to infectious pathogens. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication of severe sepsis, from which patients have high mortality. Advances in treatment modalities including lung protective ventilation, prone positioning, use of neuromuscular blockade, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have improved the outcome over recent decades, nevertheless, the mortality rate still remains high. Timely treatment of underlying sepsis and early identification of patients at risk of ARDS can help to decrease its development. In addition, further studies are needed regarding pathogenesis and novel therapies in order to show promising future treatments of sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:27066082

  13. Pulmonary hypertension during acute respiratory diseases in infants

    PubMed Central

    Bardi-Peti, Luiza; Ciofu, Eugen Pascal

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives:The study was undertaken to assess whether previously healthy infants with acute respiratory diseases develop elevated pulmonary artery pressures and to identify which type of disease is associated with pulmonary hypertension. Material and Methods:We performed 2D and Doppler echocardiography in 137 infants, aged between 1 and 12 month, from November 2007 to December 2009. 75 infants had acute respiratory diseases (49 bronchiolitis, 16 interstitial pneumonia, 3 bronchopneumonia, 6 episodic wheezing, 1 lobar pneumonia) and 62 were in the control group. We excluded children with congenital heart diseases and other conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension. The method of time to peak velocity corrected for heart rate was used to estimate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We analysed 2 age-subgroups: 1-2 months and 2-12 months. A Student’s t-test for independent samples was used to compare the mean values of variables. Outcomes:Increased mean pulmonary pressures (>25mmHg) were measured in 18 infants with respiratory diseases, with the next distribution: 14 bronchiolitis, 2 bronchopneumonia, 1 episodic wheezing, 1 interstitial pneumonia. The values were categorized as mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. Mean PAP were significantly increased in subjects with clinically bronchoobstructive disease (bronchiolitis, episodic wheezing, bronchopneumonia) vs. control (p=0.05 in first age-subgroup and<0.001 in second age-subgroup). In infants with bronchoobstructive disease hospitalization was significantly longer in patients with pulmonary hypertension vs. normal PAP (p= 0.04 in first age-subgroup and 0.005 in second age-subgroup). In patients with bronchoobstructive diseases, mean PAPm and PAPs were significantly increased in subjects with a moderate/severe episode of wheezing at admission vs. a mild episode (p=0.02). Mean PAPm and PAPs were increased in subjects with interstitial pneumonia vs. control, but without statistic significance

  14. Transmission Dynamics and Control of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsitch, Marc; Cohen, Ted; Cooper, Ben; Robins, James M.; Ma, Stefan; James, Lyn; Gopalakrishna, Gowri; Chew, Suok Kai; Tan, Chorh Chuan; Samore, Matthew H.; Fisman, David; Murray, Megan

    2003-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently described illness of humans that has spread widely over the past 6 months. With the use of detailed epidemiologic data from Singapore and epidemic curves from other settings, we estimated the reproductive number for SARS in the absence of interventions and in the presence of control efforts. We estimate that a single infectious case of SARS will infect about three secondary cases in a population that has not yet instituted control measures. Public-health efforts to reduce transmission are expected to have a substantial impact on reducing the size of the epidemic.

  15. Respiratory autoresuscitation following severe acute hypoxemia in anesthetized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Nowak, Z; Srbu, R; Bell, H J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the pattern and efficacy of respiratory autoresuscitation in spontaneously breathing adult male rats across three separate anesthetic backgrounds. Each animal was administered one of three injectable anesthetics to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia: ketamine-xylazine (KET, n=10), pentobarbital (PEN, n=10), or urethane (URE, n=10). Animals were tracheostomized and equipped with a femoral artery catheter to record airflow and arterial pressures. In response to a bout of breathing anoxic air, none of the 10 URE animals were able to mount a successful autoresuscitation response. In contrast, all KET and PEN animals survived all four consecutive anoxic exposures, restoring eupneic breathing in all cases. Moreover, only 4/10 URE animals expressed gasping breaths following the onset of respiratory arrest, and these were temporally delayed (p<0.001) and much smaller in volume (P≤0.012) compared to KET and PEN animals. URE animals showed no clear aberrations in their cardiovascular responses to anoxia, with the exception of lower arterial pulse pressures compared to either KET or PEN animals at specific points following RA. Ketamine-xylazine and pentobarbital anesthesia can be reliably and effectively used to create models for the study of autoresuscitation in adult rats. In contrast, urethane causes catastrophic failure of respiratory autoresuscitation, by delaying or outright preventing the elaboration of gasping breaths following anoxia-induced respiratory arrest. The neuronal and synaptic alterations accompanying urethane anesthesia may therefore provide a means of understanding potential pathological alterations in rhythm generation that can predispose the respiratory control system to failed autoresuscitation following an episode of acute severe hypoxemia. PMID:27378495

  16. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    PubMed

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice. PMID:24780650

  17. Recurrent Postpartum Eosinophilic Pneumonia Presenting as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Elif Yilmazel; Araz, Omer; Yilmaz, Nafiye; Akgun, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) is a rare disease of the lung. We aimed to present atypical course of two EP cases. They were admitted to our hospital because of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in postpartum period. Eosinophilia was detected in bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage and laboratory examination. In these cases, no spesific cause for eosinophilic pneumonia was determined and steroid treatment was started. After the treatment, the patients were in full recovery which were confirmed by clinical and radiological investigations, readmitted to our clinic with relapses of ARDS. The patients have received regular treatment for 1 year. Our cases were neither fitting the classic definitions of acute eosinophilic pneumonia nor chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Therefore, we wanted to contribute additional data in the literature by sharing these interesting cases. PMID:25610194

  18. Relevant Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite distinct epidemiology and outcomes, pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) is often managed based on evidence extrapolated from treatment of adults. The impact of non-pulmonary processes on mortality as well as the lower mortality rate compared to adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) renders the utilization of short-term mortality as a primary outcome measure for interventional studies problematic. However, data regarding alternatives to mortality are profoundly understudied, and proposed alternatives, such as ventilator-free days, may be themselves subject to hidden biases. Given the neuropsychiatric and functional impairment in adult survivors of ARDS, characterization of these morbidities in children with PARDS is of paramount importance. The purpose of this review is to frame these challenges in the context of the existing pediatric literature, and using adult ARDS as a guide, suggest potential clinically relevant outcomes that deserve further investigation. The goal is to identify important areas of study in order to better define clinical practice and facilitate future interventional trials in PARDS. PMID:27242980

  19. [Acute febrile state].

    PubMed

    Frigg, C; Stepanek, J; Suter, J

    1999-11-18

    A 34 year old airline pilot, who had spent nine days in Cameroon (Westafrica) presented for his yearly physical examination two weeks later. The physical examination and routine laboratory tests were within normal limits. The patient complained about mild pain of joints and extremities and about not feeling quite well. The same evening (a few hours after the physical examination) he experienced chills and fever (up to 39.5 degrees Celsius). He was seen subsequently by a tropical medicine specialist, who diagnosed Plasmodium falciparum on blood smears. The patient was immediately placed on Riamet, fever and symptoms disappeared completely within a few days. PMID:10605329

  20. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair

    PubMed Central

    Im, Daniel; Shi, Wei; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI), including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within 7 days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9 to 9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation, and surfactant regulation have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long-term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long-term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute, and long-term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis. PMID:27066462

  1. [Current approaches to the treatment of severe hypoxic respiratory insufficiency (acute lung injury; acute respiratory distress syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Kluge, S; Müller, T; Pfeifer, M

    2011-02-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, plateau pressure < 30 cm H(2)O. oxygen saturation > 90% and permissive hypercapnia results in reduction of the mortality rate in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The level of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) must be chosen in relation to oxygen requirement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist are promising methods. However, further studies with firm end-points have to be awaited before a final judgment is possible. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can ensure life-sustaining gas exchange in patients with severe vitally compromised pulmonary failure, to provide time for lung tissue to heal and reduce ventilatory stress. The latest guidelines for analgesia and sedation in intensive care medicine demand consistent monitoring of the level of sedation and the intensity of pain. The sedation should be interrupted daily, with phases of awakenings and, if possible, spontaneous breathing. Methods of supportive treatment: Positional treatment (prone position) and inhalation of vasodilators can improve ventilation/perfusion mismatch and thus oxygenation. However, administration of surfactant is currently not advised in adult respiratory failure. PMID:21271478

  2. A Pathophysiologic Approach to Biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blondonnet, Raiko; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Sapin, Vincent; Jabaudon, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute-onset hypoxic condition with radiographic bilateral lung infiltration. It is characterized by an acute exudative phase combining diffuse alveolar damage and lung edema followed by a later fibroproliferative phase. Despite an improved understanding of ARDS pathobiology, our ability to predict the development of ARDS and risk-stratify patients with the disease remains limited. Biomarkers may help to identify patients at the highest risk of developing ARDS, assess response to therapy, predict outcome, and optimize enrollment in clinical trials. After a short description of ARDS pathobiology, here, we review the scientific evidence that supports the value of various ARDS biomarkers with regard to their major biological roles in ARDS-associated lung injury and/or repair. Ongoing research aims at identifying and characterizing novel biomarkers, in order to highlight relevant mechanistic explorations of lung injury and repair, and to ultimately develop innovative therapeutic approaches for ARDS patients. This review will focus on the pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of biomarkers in ARDS and on their utility to ultimately improve patient care. PMID:26980924

  3. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    PubMed Central

    Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Silvestre, Catarina; Matias, Ester; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI), to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD) treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156). Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%), and pneumonia in 44 (29%) patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05) in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001). In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%). Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05). Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42–71.4) and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33–111.11). There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection. PMID:22802994

  4. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  5. Utility of the Tourniquet Test and the White Blood Cell Count to Differentiate Dengue among Acute Febrile Illnesses in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Christopher J.; Lorenzi, Olga D.; Colón, Lisandra; Sepúlveda García, Arleene; Santiago, Luis M.; Cruz Rivera, Ramón; Cuyar Bermúdez, Liv Jossette; Ortiz Báez, Fernando; Vázquez Aponte, Delanor; Tomashek, Kay M.; Gutierrez, Jorge; Alvarado, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT) and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm3) in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2–7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12%) patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections), and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001), 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001). The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue. PMID:22163057

  6. The Role of Human Coronaviruses in Children Hospitalized for Acute Bronchiolitis, Acute Gastroenteritis, and Febrile Seizures: A 2-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jevšnik, Monika; Steyer, Andrej; Pokorn, Marko; Mrvič, Tatjana; Grosek, Štefan; Strle, Franc; Lusa, Lara; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are associated with a variety of clinical presentations in children, but their role in disease remains uncertain. The objective of our prospective study was to investigate HCoVs associations with various clinical presentations in hospitalized children up to 6 years of age. Children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis (AB), acute gastroenteritis (AGE), or febrile seizures (FS), and children admitted for elective surgical procedures (healthy controls) were included in the study. In patients with AB, AGE, and FS, a nasopharyngeal (NP) swab and blood sample were obtained upon admission and the follow-up visit 14 days later, whereas in children with AGE a stool sample was also acquired upon admission; in healthy controls a NP swab and stool sample were taken upon admission. Amplification of polymerase 1b gene was used to detect HCoVs in the specimens. HCoVs-positive specimens were also examined for the presence of several other viruses. HCoVs were most often detected in children with FS (19/192, 9.9%, 95% CI: 6–15%), followed by children with AGE (19/218, 8.7%, 95% CI: 5.3–13.3%) and AB (20/308, 6.5%, 95% CI: 4.0–9.8%). The presence of other viruses was a common finding, most frequent in the group of children with AB (19/20, 95%, 95% CI: 75.1–99.8%), followed by FS (10/19, 52.6%, 95% CI: 28.9–75.6%) and AGE (7/19, 36.8%, 95% CI: 16.3–61.6%). In healthy control children HCoVs were detected in 3/156 (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.4–5.5%) NP swabs and 1/150 (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.02–3.3%) stool samples. It seems that an etiological role of HCoVs is most likely in children with FS, considering that they had a higher proportion of positive HCoVs results than patients with AB and those with AGE, and had the highest viral load; however, the co-detection of other viruses was 52.6%. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00987519 PMID:27171141

  7. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  8. Febrile Illness in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Natalie A.; Diehl, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Acute febrile illnesses are common in athletes over the course of training and competition seasons. Complete recovery and rapid yet safe return to participation are critical for competitive athletes. Alterations in thermoregulation, metabolism, fluid homeostasis, muscle strength, and endurance, as well as potential complications for the athlete and others, must be considered. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched (1970-2013) for all English-language articles related to febrile illness in sport, using the keywords fever, febrile, body temperature, thermoregulation, infection, illness, disease, exercise, athlete, sport, performance, return to play, metabolism, hydration, and dehydration. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Limited data confirm that febrile illness is correlated with alterations in the body’s thermoregulatory system, with increases in metabolic rate, and with effects in fluid homeostasis. Human and animal studies demonstrate a decrease in muscle strength and endurance secondary to muscle catabolism in febrile illness. However, indirect evidence suggests that regular exercise enhances the immune response. No strong clinical research has been published on return to play during or following acute febrile illness, excluding mononucleosis and myocarditis. Conclusion: Fever is correlated with an increase in insensible fluid losses, dehydration, metabolic demands, and dysregulation of body temperature. Fever can have detrimental effects on the musculoskeletal system, including decreasing strength and endurance, generalized muscle catabolism, and increase in perceived fatigue. Participating in strenuous exercise during febrile illness can worsen the illness and has demonstrated increased lethality in animal models. No consensus recommendations support return to activity before resolution of fever, and training should be resumed gradually once fever and dehydration have resolved. PMID:24790692

  9. Effects of acute oligohydramnios on respiratory system of fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Padbury, J F; Kitterman, J A

    1992-08-01

    Prolonged oligohydramnios, or a lack of amniotic fluid, is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and subsequent perinatal morbidity, but it is unclear whether short-term or acute oligohydramnios has any effect on the fetal respiratory system. To investigate the acute effects of removal of amniotic fluid, we studied nine chronically catheterized fetal sheep at 122-127 days gestation. During a control period, we measured the volume of fluid in the fetal potential airways and air spaces (VL), production rate of that fluid, incidence and amplitude of fetal breathing movements, tracheal pressures, and fetal plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. We then drained the amniotic fluid for a short period of time [24-48 h, 30.0 +/- 4.0 (SE) h] and repeated the above measurements. The volume of fluid drained for the initial studies was 1,004 +/- 236 ml. Acute oligohydramnios decreased VL from 35.4 +/- 2.9 ml/kg during control to 22.0 +/- 1.6 after oligohydramnios (P less than 0.004). Acute oligohydramnios did not affect the fetal lung fluid production rate, fetal breathing movements, or any of the other measured variables. Seven repeat studies were performed in six of the fetuses after reaccumulation of the amniotic fluid at 130-138 days, and in four of these studies the lung volume also decreased, although the overall mean for the repeat studies was not significantly different (27.0 +/- 5.2 ml/kg for control vs. 25.5 +/- 5.5 ml/kg for oligohydramnios). Again, none of the other measured variables were altered by oligohydramnios in the repeat studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1399988

  10. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Mechanisms and Perspective Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, JN; Lucas, R; Verin, AD

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung inflammatory disorder with a 30–50% mortality. Sepsis and pneumonia are the leading causes of ARDS. On the cellular level there is pulmonary capillary endothelial cell permeability and fluid leakage into the pulmonary parenchyma, followed by neutrophils, cytokines and an acute inflammatory response. When fluid increases in the interstitium then the outward movement continues and protein rich fluid floods the alveolar spaces through the tight junctions of the epithelial cells. Neutrophils play an important role in the development of pulmonary edema associated with acute lung injury or ARDS. Animal studies have shown that endothelial injury appears within minutes to hours after Acute Lung Injury (ALI) initiation with resulting intercellular gaps of the endothelial cells. The Endothelial Cell (EC) gaps allow for permeability of fluid, neutrophils and cytokines into the pulmonary parenchymal space. The neutrophils that infiltrate the lungs and migrate into the airways express pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and contribute to both the endothelial and epithelial integrity disruption of the barriers. Pharmacological treatments have been ineffective. The ARDS Network trial identified low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, positive end expiratory pressure and fluid management guidelines that have improved outcomes for patients with ARDS. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in specialized centers for severe cases. Prone positioning has recently proven to have significantly decreased ventilator days and days in the intensive care unit. Current investigation includes administration of mesenchymal stem cell therapy, partial fluid ventilation, TIP peptide nebulized administration and the continued examination of pharmacologic drugs. PMID:26973981

  11. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children. PMID:25961472

  12. The use of vital signs as predictors for serious bacterial infections in children with acute febrile illness in a pediatric emergency setting in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Elmuntasir Taha; Ahmed, Emad; Elhussien, Manal; Salah, Tarig

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing children with serious infections from those with milder, self-limiting febrile illnesses remains a daily challenge in primary care and hospital emergency department. Measurement of vital signs is recommended as part of this assessment. To determine whether vital signs can predict children with serious bacterial infections, we studied the data of children aged 1 month to < 16 years presented who with acute febrile illness to a Pediatric emergency department in Sudan. Sample size was 150 patients. The severity of infection was classified as serious or not serious bacterial infection. Vital signs and oxygen saturation were recorded and compared to the final outcome of these children. Data analyzed bivariably and multivariably using regression analysis. Ten percent of patients were classified as having serious bacterial infection. Tachycardia and tachypnea were the most sensitive and specific in predicting serious bacterial infections with (80%, 86.6 % sensitivity) and (97.4%, 83.7% specificity), respectively. High temperature, severe hypoxemia and hypotension were the least sensitive but highly specific signs of serious bacterial infections. As a conclusion, vital signs can be used to differentiate children with serious bacterial infections from those with non-serious bacterial infections in pediatric emergency departments and has comparable sensitivity to more complicated triage systems.

  13. Incubation periods of acute respiratory viral infections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lessler, Justin; Reich, Nicholas G; Brookmeyer, Ron; Perl, Trish M; Nelson, Kenrad E; Cummings, Derek A T

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the incubation period is essential in the investigation and control of infectious disease, but statements of incubation period are often poorly referenced, inconsistent, or based on limited data. In a systematic review of the literature on nine respiratory viral infections of public-health importance, we identified 436 articles with statements of incubation period and 38 with data for pooled analysis. We fitted a log-normal distribution to pooled data and found the median incubation period to be 5·6 days (95% CI 4·8–6·3) for adenovirus, 3·2 days (95% CI 2·8–3·7) for human coronavirus, 4·0 days (95% CI 3·6–4·4) for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, 1·4 days (95% CI 1·3–1·5) for influenza A, 0·6 days (95% CI 0·5–0·6) for influenza B, 12·5 days (95% CI 11·8–13·3) for measles, 2·6 days (95% CI 2·1–3·1) for parainfluenza, 4·4 days (95% CI 3·9–4·9) for respiratory syncytial virus, and 1·9 days (95% CI 1·4–2·4) for rhinovirus. When using the incubation period, it is important to consider its full distribution: the right tail for quarantine policy, the central regions for likely times and sources of infection, and the full distribution for models used in pandemic planning. Our estimates combine published data to give the detail necessary for these and other applications. PMID:19393959

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome in a naval diver.

    PubMed

    Chim, Harvey; Soo, Kian Hing; Low, Edwin; Chan, Gregory

    2006-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly infectious, rapidly progressive, emerging disease. Early diagnosis and preventive measures are key for treatment and minimization of secondary spread. In the context of the armed forces, aggressive containment measures are essential to prevent an outbreak. In this study, we present the first reported case, to our knowledge, of SARS in a naval diver. The special physical requirements for divers and the potential complications associated with deep sea diving necessitate extensive investigation before certification of fitness for diving after SARS. In the early recovery period, potential problems during diving are caused by inadequate lung ventilation in relation to exercise level and increased breathing resistance attributable to weak respiratory muscles, with corresponding risk of hypoxia and hypercapnia, as well as decreased ability to respond to nonrespiratory problems during diving. Problems in the late recovery period include increased risk of diving complications (such as pulmonary barotrauma) resulting from fibrosis and scarring within the lung parenchyma, which are known complications of SARS. From our experience, we suggest that computed tomographic scans of the thorax, lung function tests, and careful follow-up monitoring should play a vital role in the assessment of patients during the convalescent period, before certification of fitness to dive. PMID:16808126

  15. Epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): adults and children.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan-Shan; Wong, Gary W K

    2004-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly described respiratory infection with pandemic potential. The causative agent is a new strain of coronavirus most likely originating from wild animals. This disease first emerged in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, China. Early in the outbreak the infection had been transmitted primarily via household contacts and healthcare settings. In late February 2003 the infection was transmitted to Hong Kong when an infected doctor from the mainland visited there. During his stay in Hong Kong at least 17 guests and visitors were infected at the hotel at which he stayed. By modern day air travel, the infection was rapidly spread to other countries including Vietnam, Singapore and Canada by these infected guests. With the implementation of effective control strategies including early isolation of suspected cases, strict infection control measures in the hospital setting, meticulous contact tracing and quarantine, the outbreak was finally brought under control by July 2003. In addition, there were another two events of SARS in China between the end of December 2003 and January 2004 and from March to May 2004; both were readily controlled without significant patient spread. PMID:15531250

  16. Detection of respiratory pathogens in aerosols from acutely infected pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents that cause respiratory disease in pigs include porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), swine influenza virus (SIV), porcine respiratory corona virus (PRCV), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The objective of...

  17. Association of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position in acute respiratory disease syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniela Caetano; Rocha, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Tatiane Flores

    2009-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome is the clinical presentation of acute lung injury characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position can be used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this review of literature was to identify possible benefits, indications, complications and care of the associated recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. This national and international scientific literature review was developed according to the established criteria for searching the databases MedLine, LILACS, SciElo, PubMed, Cochrane, from 1994 to 2008 in Portuguese and English, with the key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar recruitment maneuver and prone position. Despite advances in the understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology, mortality is still expressive. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position significantly contribute to treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome patient aiming to improve oxygenation and minimizing complications of refractory hypoxemia and reduction of pulmonary compliance. However,as there are few studies in literature associating alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, additional research and evidences of clinical application are required. PMID:25303351

  18. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  19. Acute respiratory failure induced by bleomycin and hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Goad, M.E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, and oxygen at concentrations greater than 20%, induce acute pulmonary damage separately and when administered together. The interaction of 5 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin and 24 hours of exposure to 80% oxygen in hamsters produces delayed onset acute respiratory distress syndrome three days after treatment. As little as 12 hours of 80% O/sub 2/ exposure, after intratracheal bleomycin, induces severe pulmonary damage. Lung lesions are characterized as diffuse alveolar damage. Significantly pulmonary edema, measured by iodine-125-bovine serum albumin and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, occurs 72 hours after treatment. Lesions progress from focal mild alveolar interstitial and air-space macrophage and granulocyte infiltrates at 24 hours to marked infiltrates and severe interstitial and air space edema with hemorrhages and hyaline membranes at 96 hours. Significant changes measured by electron microscopy morphometry are increases in volume fractions of neutrophils, alveolar tissue and mononuclear leukocytes. Surfactant assay of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid shows a marked decrease in the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio at 72 hours. Proposed mechanisms of bleomycin and hyperoxia synergism include enhanced production of superoxide radicals either directly or indirectly by increasing neutrophil activity or numbers, or by alteration of cell mediators. The pulmonary edema, without evidence of severe morphological changes, may be secondary to alterations of transalveolar transport mechanisms.

  20. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea. PMID:25331803

  1. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to overdose desferrioxamine: report of a child.

    PubMed

    Atas, B; Caksen, H; Tuncer, O; Oner, A F; Kirimi, E; Akbayram, S

    2005-03-01

    In this article, we present an 18-month-old girl with acute iron poisoning who died from acute respiratory distress syndrome due to overdose of desferrioxamine. Our purpose is to emphasize the importance of close follow-up children with acute iron poisoning for desferrioxamine toxicity. PMID:16250288

  3. Mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bankhead, Armand; Jeng, Sophia; Menachery, Vineet D.; Proll, Sean; Belisle, Sarah E.; Matzke, Melissa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Luna, Maria L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ferris, Martin T.; Bolles, Meagan; Chang, Jean; Aicher, Lauri; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Law, G. Lynn; Katze, Michael G.; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systems biology offers considerable promise in uncovering novel pathways by which viruses and other microbial pathogens interact with host signaling and expression networks to mediate disease severity. In this study, we have developed an unbiased modeling approach to identify new pathways and network connections mediating acute lung injury, using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as a model pathogen. We utilized a time course of matched virologic, pathological, and transcriptomic data within a novel methodological framework that can detect pathway enrichment among key highly connected network genes. This unbiased approach produced a high-priority list of 4 genes in one pathway out of over 3,500 genes that were differentially expressed following SARS-CoV infection. With these data, we predicted that the urokinase and other wound repair pathways would regulate lethal versus sublethal disease following SARS-CoV infection in mice. We validated the importance of the urokinase pathway for SARS-CoV disease severity using genetically defined knockout mice, proteomic correlates of pathway activation, and pathological disease severity. The results of these studies demonstrate that a fine balance exists between host coagulation and fibrinolysin pathways regulating pathological disease outcomes, including diffuse alveolar damage and acute lung injury, following infection with highly pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as SARS-CoV. PMID:23919993

  4. Prevalence of malaria among acute febrile patients clinically suspected of having malaria in the Zeway Health Center, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Sendeaw M; Animut, Abebe; Belay, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    Malaria diagnosis is a common challenge in developing countries with limited diagnostic services. Common febrile illnesses were assessed in 280 malaria-suspected patients, and each case was subjected to clinical and laboratory examinations for malaria, relapsing fever, typhoid fever, typhus, and brucellosis. Data were entered and analyzed using Epi Info version 3.1 software. Malaria accounted for 17% (CI, 12.6-21.4%) of febrile illnesses. The remaining cases were associated with typhoid fever (18.5%; CI, 13.95-23.05%), typhus (17.8%; CI, 13.32-22.28%), brucellosis (1%; CI, -0.17-2.17%), relapsing fever (2%; CI, 0.36-3.64%), and unknown causes (44%). Approximately 7% of patients had coinfections, and 2% of patients treated as monoinfections. Approximately 1.4% of the nonmalarial patients received antimalarial treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of the CareStart Pf/pan rapid diagnostic tests in comparison with those of microscopy were 100% and 91%, respectively, with positive- and negative-predictive values of 94% and 100%, respectively. Compared with microscopy, the positive-predictive value of each malaria symptom was much lower than that of the symptoms combined: fever, 17%; sweating, 30%; headache, 18%; general body ache, 22%; loss of appetite, 21%. The study findings revealed a high proportion of nonmalarial illnesses were clinically categorized as malaria. Parasite-based diagnosis is recommended for the management of malarial and nonmalarial cases. PMID:25420658

  5. Detection Of Viral And Bacterial Pathogens In Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Obasi, Chidi N.; Barrett, Bruce; Brown, Roger; Vrtis, Rose; Barlow, Shari; Muller, Daniel; Gern, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The role of bacteria in acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) of adults and interactions with viral infections is incompletely understood. This study tested the hypothesis that bacterial co-infection during ARI adds to airway inflammation and illness severity. Methods Two groups of 97 specimens each were randomly selected from multiplex-PCR identified virus-positive and virus-negative nasal specimens obtained from adults with new onset ARI, and 40 control specimens were collected from healthy adults. All specimens were analyzed for Haemophilus influenza(HI), Moraxella catarrhalis(MC) and Streptococcus pneumonia(SP) by quantitative-PCR. General linear models tested for relationships between respiratory pathogens, biomarkers (nasal wash neutrophils and CXCL8), and ARI-severity. Results Nasal specimens from adults with ARIs were more likely to contain bacteria (37% overall; HI=28%, MC=14%, SP=7%) compared to specimens from healthy adults (5% overall; HI=0%, MC=2.5%, SP=2.5%;p<0.001). Among ARI specimens, bacteria were more likely to be detected among virus-negative specimens compared to virus-positive specimens (46% vs. 27%;p=0.0046). The presence of bacteria was significantly associated with increased CXCL8 and neutrophils, but not increased symptoms. Conclusion Pathogenic bacteria were more often detected in virus-negative ARI, and also associated with increased inflammatory biomarkers. These findings suggest the possibility that bacteria may augment virus-induced ARI and contribute to airway inflammation. Summary We tested whether bacterial pathogens were associated with ARI illness and inflammation. Bacteria were detected more often in nasal secretions during ARI, especially in samples without detectable viruses, and were associated with increased airway inflammation, but not increased symptoms. PMID:24211414

  6. Specialized Respiratory Management for Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury:

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sandra Lynn; Shem, Kazuko; Crew, James

    2012-01-01

    Background: In individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), respiratory complications arise within hours to days of injury. Paralysis of the respiratory muscles predisposes the patient toward respiratory failure. Respiratory complications after cervical SCI include hypoventilation, hypercapnea, reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Ultimately, the patient must use increased work to breathe, which results in respiratory fatigue and may eventually require intubation for mechanical ventilation. Without specialized respiratory management for individuals with tetraplegia, recurrent pneumonias, bronchoscopies, and difficulty in maintaining a stable respiratory status will persist. Objective: This retrospective analysis examined the effectiveness of specialized respiratory management utilized in a regional SCI center. Methods: Individuals with C1-C4 SCI (N = 24) were the focus of this study as these neurological levels present with the most complicated respiratory status. Results: All of the study patients’ respiratory status improved with the specialized respiratory management administered in the SCI specialty unit. For a majority of these patients, respiratory improvements were noted within 1 week of admission to our SCI unit. Conclusion: Utilization of high tidal volume ventilation, high frequency percussive ventilation, and mechanical insufflation– exsufflation have demonstrated efficacy in stabilizing the respiratory status of these individuals. Optimizing respiratory status enables the patients to participate in rehabilitation therapies, allows for the opportunity to vocalize, and results in fewer days on mechanical ventilation for patients who are weanable. PMID:23459555

  7. Prediction of Acute Respiratory Disease in Current and Former Smokers With and Without COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Victor; Regan, Elizabeth; Williams, André A. A.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Make, Barry J.; Lynch, David A.; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George R.; Bercz, Peter; Soler, Xavier; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Criner, Gerard J.; Ramsdell, Joe; Han, MeiLan K.; Demeo, Dawn; Anzueto, Antonio; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark; Wells, J. Michael; Hersh, Craig P.; MacIntyre, Neil; Martinez, Fernando; Nath, Hrudaya P.; Niewoehner, Dennis; Sciurba, Frank; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Silverman, Edwin K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wilson, Carla; Wendt, Christine; Wise, Robert A.; Curtis, Jeffrey; Kazerooni, Ella; Hanania, Nicola; Alapat, Philip; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Guy, Elizabeth; Lunn, William; Mallampalli, Antara; Trinh, Charles; Atik, Mustafa; DeMeo, Dawn; Hersh, Craig; Jacobson, Francine; Graham Barr, R.; Thomashow, Byron; Austin, John; MacIntyre, Neil; Washington, Lacey; Page McAdams, H.; Rosiello, Richard; Bresnahan, Timothy; McEvoy, Charlene; Tashjian, Joseph; Wise, Robert; Hansel, Nadia; Brown, Robert; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Fischer, Hans; Budoff, Matt; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Niewoehner, Dennis; Allen, Tadashi; Rice, Kathryn; Foreman, Marilyn; Westney, Gloria; Berkowitz, Eugene; Bowler, Russell; Friedlander, Adam; Meoni, Eleonora; Criner, Gerard; Kim, Victor; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Satti, Aditi; James Mamary, A.; Steiner, Robert; Dass, Chandra; Bailey, William; Dransfield, Mark; Gerald, Lynn; Nath, Hrudaya; Ramsdell, Joe; Ferguson, Paul; Friedman, Paul; McLennan, Geoffrey; van Beek, Edwin JR; Martinez, Fernando; Han, MeiLan; Thompson, Deborah; Kazerooni, Ella; Wendt, Christine; Allen, Tadashi; Sciurba, Frank; Weissfeld, Joel; Fuhrman, Carl; Bon, Jessica; Anzueto, Antonio; Adams, Sandra; Orozco, Carlos; Santiago Restrepo, C.; Mumbower, Amy; Crapo, James; Silverman, Edwin; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Samet, Jonathan; Willis, Amy; Stinson, Douglas; Beaty, Terri; Klanderman, Barbara; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Ionita, Iuliana; Santorico, Stephanie; Silverman, Edwin; Lynch, David; Schroeder, Joyce; Newell, John; Reilly, John; Coxson, Harvey; Judy, Philip; Hoffman, Eric; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George; Leek, Rebecca; Zach, Jordan; Kluiber, Alex; Rodionova, Anastasia; Mann, Tanya; Crapo, Robert; Jensen, Robert; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Murphy, James; Everett, Douglas; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute episodes of respiratory disease in current and former smokers who do not have COPD are unknown. METHODS: Eight thousand two hundred forty-six non-Hispanic white and black current and former smokers in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cohort had longitudinal follow-up (LFU) every 6 months to determine acute respiratory episodes requiring antibiotics or systemic corticosteroids, an ED visit, or hospitalization. Negative binomial regression was used to determine the factors associated with acute respiratory episodes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for time to first episode and an acute episode of respiratory disease risk score. RESULTS: At enrollment, 4,442 subjects did not have COPD, 658 had mild COPD, and 3,146 had moderate or worse COPD. Nine thousand three hundred three acute episodes of respiratory disease and 2,707 hospitalizations were reported in LFU (3,044 acute episodes of respiratory disease and 827 hospitalizations in those without COPD). Major predictors included acute episodes of respiratory disease in year prior to enrollment (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24 per exacerbation), airflow obstruction (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96 per 10% change in % predicted FEV1), and poor health-related quality of life (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.08 for each 4-unit increase in St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score). Risks were similar for those with and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute episode of respiratory disease rates are higher in subjects with COPD, risk factors are similar, and at a population level, there are more episodes in smokers without COPD. PMID:24945159

  8. Challenges of Establishing the Correct Diagnosis of Outbreaks of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Africa: The Case of a Likely Brucella Outbreak among Nomadic Pastoralists, Northeast Kenya, March–July 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ari, Mary D.; Guracha, Argata; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Njuguna, Charles; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Kalani, Rosalia; Abdi, Hassan; Warfu, Osman; Omballa, Victor; Tetteh, Christopher; Breiman, Robert F.; Pimentel, Guillermo; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of acute febrile illness was reported among Somali pastoralists in remote, arid Northeast Kenya, where drinking raw milk is common. Blood specimens from 12 patients, collected mostly in the late convalescent phase, were tested for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. All were negative for viral and typhoid serology. Nine patients had Brucella antibodies present by at least one of the tests, four of whom had evidence suggestive of acute infection by the reference serologic microscopic agglutination test. Three patients were positive for leptospiral antibody by immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and two were positive for malaria. Although sensitive and specific point-of-care testing methods will improve diagnosis of acute febrile illness in developing countries, challenges of interpretation still remain when the outbreaks are remote, specimens collected too late, and positive results for multiple diseases are obtained. Better diagnostics and tools that can decipher overlapping signs and symptoms in such settings are needed. PMID:22049048

  9. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  10. MicroRNAs: Novel regulatory molecules in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CAO, YONGMEI; LYU, YI; TANG, JIAHUA; LI, YINGCHUAN

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are common and complex inflammatory lung diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a type of non-coding RNA molecule that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, have emerged as a novel class of gene regulators, which have critical roles in a wide range of human disorders and diseases, including ALI. Certain types of miRNAs are abnormally expressed in response to lung injury. miRNAs can regulate inflammation pathways by targeting specific molecules and modulate immune response in the process of lung injury and repair. The regulation of miRNA can relieve injury response and promote the recovery of ALI/ARDS. Therefore, miRNAs may serve as novel therapeutic targets in ALI/ARDS. PMID:27123242

  11. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    PubMed Central

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar–capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  12. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation.

  13. Intention to Receive Influenza Vaccine After an Acute Respiratory Illness

    PubMed Central

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Balasubramani, G. K.; Schaffer, Mallory; Lieberman, Rhett H.; Eng, Heather; Kyle, Shakala; Wisniewski, Stephen; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Middleton, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of symptoms and presence of confirmed influenza on intention to receive an influenza vaccine, specifically in patients recovering from a medically-attended acute (≤ 7 days’ duration) respiratory illness (ARI). Methods During the 2013–2014 influenza season, individuals seeking outpatient care for an ARI that included cough were tested for influenza using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays (PCR) and completed surveys. Children (6 months–18 years) and adults (≥ 18 years) were grouped by their combined current season’s influenza vaccination status (vaccinated/not vaccinated) and their vaccination intentions for next season (intend/do not intend). Results Forty-one percent (323/786) were unvaccinated at enrollment, of whom nearly half (151/323) intended to be vaccinated next season. When adjusting for demographic, health and other factors, unvaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season were approximately 1.5 times more likely to have PCR-confirmed influenza compared with vaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season. Conclusion The combined experience of not being vaccinated against influenza and seeking medical attention for an ARI seemed to influence approximately one-half of unvaccinated participants to consider influenza vaccination for next season. PMID:26018106

  14. An approach to ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Appropriate management of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a challenge for physicians working in the critical care environment. Significant advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of ARDS. There is also an increasing appreciation of the role of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is most likely related to several different aspects of ventilator management: barotrauma due to high peak airway pressures, lung overdistension or volutrauma due to high transpulmonary pressures, alveolar membrane damage due to insufficient positive end-expiratory pressure levels and oxygen-related cell toxicity. Various lung protective strategies have been suggested to minimize the damage caused by conventional modes of ventilation. These include the use of pressure- and volume-limited ventilation, the use of the prone position in the management of ARDS, and extracorporeal methods of oxygen delivery and carbon dioxide removal. Although the death rate resulting from ARDS has been declining over the past 10 years, there is no evidence that any specific treatment or change in approach to ventilation is the cause of this improved survival. PMID:10948686

  15. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU.

    PubMed

    Ingelse, Sarah A; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G; Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  16. Profiling Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children from Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farzana; Sarma, Ratna; Debroy, Arup; Kar, Sumit; Pal, Ranabir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are leading global cause of under-five mortality and morbidity. Objective: To elicit the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among under-five children. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in 21 registered urban slums of Guwahati in Assam to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among 370 under-five children from 184 households and 370 families. Results: The prevalence of ARI was found to be 26.22%; infants and female children were more affected. Majority of the ARI cases were from nuclear families (84.54%), living in kutcha houses (90.72%) with inadequate ventilation (84.54%), overcrowded living condition (81.44%), with kitchen attached to the living room (65.98%) and using biomass fuel for cooking (89.69%). ARI was significantly associated with ventilation, location of kitchen in household; presence of overcrowding, nutritional status, and primary immunization status also had impacts on ARI. Conclusion: The present study had identified a high prevalence of the disease among under-fives. It also pointed out various socio-demographic, nutritional, and environmental modifiable risk factors which can be tackled by effective education of the community. PMID:23599611

  17. Protein Kinase C and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mondrinos, Mark J.; Kennedy, Paul A.; Lyons, Melanie; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Kilpatrick, Laurie E.

    2013-01-01

    The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a major public health problem and a leading source of morbidity in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Lung tissue in patients with ARDS is characterized by inflammation, with exuberant neutrophil infiltration, activation and degranulation that is thought to initiate tissue injury through the release of proteases and oxygen radicals. Treatment of ARDS is supportive primarily because the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. This gap in knowledge must be addressed in order to identify urgently needed therapies. Recent research efforts in anti-inflammatory drug development have focused on identifying common control points in multiple signaling pathways. The protein kinase C (PKC) serine-threonine kinases are master regulators of proinflammatory signaling hubs, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Pharmacological inhibition of broad spectrum PKC activity and, more importantly, of specific PKC isoforms (as well as deletion of PKCs in mice) exerts protective effects in various experimental models of lung injury. Furthermore, PKC isoforms have been implicated in inflammatory processes that may be involved in the pathophysiologic changes that result in ARDS, including activation of innate immune and endothelial cells, neutrophil trafficking to the lung, regulation of alveolar epithelial barrier functions and control of neutrophil pro-inflammatory and pro-survival signaling. This review focuses on the mechanistic involvement of PKC isoforms in the pathogenesis of ARDS and highlights the potential of developing new therapeutic paradigms based on the selective inhibition (or activation) of specific PKC isoforms. PMID:23572089

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a 10-year-old dog.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, T L

    2001-01-01

    A 10-year-old shih tzu was presented with lethargy, anorexia, coughing, and dyspnea of 2 days' duration. Despite treatment with parenteral fluids, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and diuretics, the dog died. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed histologically. PMID:11565374

  19. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Zantah, Massa; Coyle, Timothy B.; Datta, Debapriya

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis. PMID:26989546

  20. Is there a need for emerging drugs for the acute respiratory distress syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and devastating syndrome of acute respiratory failure for which little effective pharmacotherapy exists. The authors describe some interventions that show promise as potential therapies for this condition, with particular reference to clinically relevant human models of ARDS. Aspirin, mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells, keratinocyte growth factor, IFN-β and oncostatin M inhibition are discussed. PMID:25152048

  1. Intravenous colistin-induced acute respiratory failure: A case report and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Amardeep; Soriano, Sheryll Mae; Song, Mingchen; Chihara, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant gram negative bacillary infections has regained popularity of ancient drugs such as polymyxins. We report a case of acute respiratory failure induced by use of intravenous colistimethate, which is one of the forms of polymyxin. The patient is a 31 year old female with paraplegia due to spina bifida who underwent excisional debridement of large lumbosacral decubitus ulcer with osteomyelitis infected with pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA. Six days after initiation of intravenous colistimethate and vancomycin, she developed acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Pan-culture was negative including a chest radiograph. V/Q scan showed low probability for pulmonary embolism. Echocardiogram showed normal right ventricle with no strain or pulmonary hypertension. Colistimethate was discontinued. Within 24 hours, she was extubated. In the early years after introduction of polymyxin, there were several reports of acute respiratory paralysis. The mechanism is thought to be noncompetitive myoneuronal presynaptic blockade of acetylcholine release. Though a direct causal relationship for respiratory failure is often difficult to establish in current era with multiple co morbidities, the timeframe of apnea, acuity of onset as well as rapid recovery in our case clearly point out the causal relationship. In addition, our patient also developed acute renal failure, presumably due to colistimethate induced nephrotoxicity, a possible contributing factor for her acute respiratory failure. In summary, colistimethate can induce acute neurotoxicity including respiratory muscular weakness and acute respiratory failure. Clinicians should consider its toxicity in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure especially in critically ill patients. PMID:25337492

  2. Intravenous colistin-induced acute respiratory failure: A case report and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Amardeep; Soriano, Sheryll Mae; Song, Mingchen; Chihara, Shingo

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant gram negative bacillary infections has regained popularity of ancient drugs such as polymyxins. We report a case of acute respiratory failure induced by use of intravenous colistimethate, which is one of the forms of polymyxin. The patient is a 31 year old female with paraplegia due to spina bifida who underwent excisional debridement of large lumbosacral decubitus ulcer with osteomyelitis infected with pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA. Six days after initiation of intravenous colistimethate and vancomycin, she developed acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Pan-culture was negative including a chest radiograph. V/Q scan showed low probability for pulmonary embolism. Echocardiogram showed normal right ventricle with no strain or pulmonary hypertension. Colistimethate was discontinued. Within 24 hours, she was extubated. In the early years after introduction of polymyxin, there were several reports of acute respiratory paralysis. The mechanism is thought to be noncompetitive myoneuronal presynaptic blockade of acetylcholine release. Though a direct causal relationship for respiratory failure is often difficult to establish in current era with multiple co morbidities, the timeframe of apnea, acuity of onset as well as rapid recovery in our case clearly point out the causal relationship. In addition, our patient also developed acute renal failure, presumably due to colistimethate induced nephrotoxicity, a possible contributing factor for her acute respiratory failure. In summary, colistimethate can induce acute neurotoxicity including respiratory muscular weakness and acute respiratory failure. Clinicians should consider its toxicity in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure especially in critically ill patients. PMID:25337492

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  4. Metagenomic analysis of viral genetic diversity in respiratory samples from children with severe acute respiratory infection in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhu, N; Li, Y; Lu, R; Wang, H; Liu, G; Zou, X; Xie, Z; Tan, W

    2016-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in children is thought to be mainly caused by infection with various viruses, some of which have been well characterized; however, analyses of respiratory tract viromes among children with SARI versus those without are limited. In this study, nasopharyngeal swabs from children with and without SARI (135 versus 15) were collected in China between 2008 and 2010 and subjected to multiplex metagenomic analyses using a next-generation sequencing platform. The results show that members of the Paramyxoviridae, Coronaviridae, Parvoviridae, Orthomyxoviridae, Picornaviridae, Anelloviridae and Adenoviridae families represented the most abundant species identified (>50% genome coverage) in the respiratory tracts of children with SARI. The viral population found in the respiratory tracts of children without SARI was less diverse and mainly dominated by the Anelloviridae family with only a small proportion of common epidemic respiratory viruses. Several almost complete viral genomes were assembled, and the genetic diversity was determined among several samples based on next-generation sequencing. This research provides comprehensive mapping of the viromes of children with SARI and indicates high heterogeneity of known viruses present in the childhood respiratory tract, which may benefit the detection and prevention of respiratory disease. PMID:26802214

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Outcomes after Near-hanging

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Sahar; Afshar, Majid; Barrett, Matthew; Smith, Gordon S.; Barr, Erik A.; Lissauer, Matthew E.; McCurdy, Michael T.; Murthi, Sarah B.; Netzer, Giora

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assess the case rate of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) after near-hanging, and the secondary outcomes of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury, and death. Risk factors for the outcomes were assessed. Method Single-center, state-wide retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients admitted between August, 2002, and September, 2011, with a primary diagnosis of non-judicial "hanging injury". Results Of 56 patients, 73% were male. The median age was 31 (IQR: 16–56). Upon arrival, 9% (5/56) did not have a pulse, and 23% (13/56) patients were intubated. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13 (IQR: 3–15); 14% (8/56) had a GCS=3. ARDS developed in 9% (5/56) of patients. Traumatic anoxic brain injury resulted in 9% (5/56) of patients. The in-hospital case fatality was 5% (3/56). Lower median GCS [3 (IQR: 3–7) vs. 14 (IQR: 3–15), p=0.0003] and intubation in field or in trauma resuscitation unit [100% (5/5) vs. 16% (8/51), p=0.0003] were associated with ARDS development. Risk factors of death were GCS=3 [100% (3/3) vs. 9% (5/53), p=0.002]; pulselessness upon arrival of emergency medical services [100% (3/3) vs. 4% (2/53), p<0.001]; and abnormal neurologic imaging [50% (1/2) vs. zero, p=0.04]. Conclusions The ARDS case rate after near-hanging is similar to the general trauma population. Low GCS and intubation are associated with increased risk of ARDS development. The rate of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury in this population is low. PMID:25596627

  6. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  7. Uneven distribution of ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rylander, Christian; Tylén, Ulf; Rossi-Norrlund, Rauni; Herrmann, Peter; Quintel, Michael; Bake, Björn

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the volume of gas being poorly ventilated or non-ventilated within the lungs of patients treated with mechanical ventilation and suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, descriptive study was performed of 25 sedated and paralysed ARDS patients, mechanically ventilated with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cmH2O in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit of a tertiary university hospital. The volume of poorly ventilated or non-ventilated gas was assumed to correspond to a difference between the ventilated gas volume, determined as the end-expiratory lung volume by rebreathing of sulphur hexafluoride (EELVSF6), and the total gas volume, calculated from computed tomography images in the end-expiratory position (EELVCT). The methods used were validated by similar measurements in 20 healthy subjects in whom no poorly ventilated or non-ventilated gas is expected to be found. Results EELVSF6 was 66% of EELVCT, corresponding to a mean difference of 0.71 litre. EELVSF6 and EELVCT were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.72; P < 0.001). In the healthy subjects, the two methods yielded almost identical results. Conclusion About one-third of the total pulmonary gas volume seems poorly ventilated or non-ventilated in sedated and paralysed ARDS patients when mechanically ventilated with a PEEP of 5 cmH2O. Uneven distribution of ventilation due to airway closure and/or obstruction is likely to be involved. PMID:15774050

  8. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wu-Chun; de Vlas, Sake J.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR) of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteonecrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nationwide internet-based disease reporting system was established. PMID:24470901

  9. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: screening for sensitization potential.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Copeland, Lisa B; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D W

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naïve individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approximately 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods. PMID:20045013

  10. Proton pump inhibitor-induced Sweet’s syndrome: report of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in a woman with recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sweet’s syndrome, also referred to as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, can either occur as an idiopathic disorder or associated with another condition, including cancer, or induced by exposure to a drug. Proton pump inhibitors selectively inhibit gastric parietal cell H+-K+-adenosine triphosphatase and are most commonly used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Purpose: Proton pump inhibitor-associated Sweet’s syndrome is described in a woman with recurrent breast cancer. Methods: PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, breast cancer, malignancy, paraneoplastic, proton pump inhibitor, and Sweet’s syndrome. All papers were reviewed and relevant manuscripts, along with their reference citations, were evaluated. Results: Proton pump inhibitors have previously been associated with cutaneous adverse reactions including maculopapular rash, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus and toxic epidermal necrolysis. However, drug-induced Sweet’s syndrome has not been observed in patients receiving proton pump inhibitors. The reported woman developed Sweet’s syndrome after initial exposure and subsequent repeat challenge to proton pump inhibitors; subsequent studies also observed recurrence of her breast cancer presenting as metastases to her stomach and bone. Conclusions: Drug-induced Sweet’s syndrome has most commonly been associated with granulocyte colony stimulating factor in oncology patients. Malignancy-associated Sweet’s syndrome has been observed in patients with solid tumors, including breast cancer. Confirmation of proton pump inhibitor-induced Sweet’s syndrome, by repeat challenge with another medication in the same class of drug, was observed in a woman with breast cancer; although the subsequent discovery of recurrent breast cancer presenting as gastric mucosa and vertebral metastases also raises the possibility of concurrent

  11. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  12. Seasonal variation of febrile convulsion in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, T; Okada, S

    1984-05-01

    The 6-year incidence rates of febrile convulsions in all 3-year-old children in Fuchu (covering 95% of children, number examined 17,044) was 8.2%. The incidence was higher in boys than in girls (9.0%: 7.5%, P less than 0.001). The incidence rates varied with the month and year of birth, but the variations observed were slight. Two peak appearances of seasonal variation of the first febrile convulsion were found in November-January and in June-August. The former could be interpreted as a tendency to winter virus infection of the upper respiratory tract in children. The other peak in summer could be explained as a tendency to gastrointestinal infection. Liability to febrile convulsion was influenced by the age of children and by the seasonal variations of febrile illness, but not by the season of birth. PMID:6464667

  13. Sleep after critical illness: Study of survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Agrawal, Anshu Kumar; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study aims to evaluate the sleep quality, architecture, sleep-related quality of life, and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors early after discharge. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, observational study, consecutive patients with ARDS discharged from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) underwent evaluation with Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and overnight polysomnography. Patients having one or more of the following characteristics were classified as having abnormal sleep: ESS>10, PSQI>5, FOSQ <17.9, apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5, or AHI during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep ≥5. Results: Twenty patients (median interquartile range [IQR] age of 24 [22–28] years, 11 [55%] females) were included in the study. Acute febrile illness of unknown etiology with multi-organ dysfunction syndrome was the most common underlying etiology for ARDS. The median (IQR) PaO2/FiO2 ratio and APACHE II scores on admission were 176 (151–191.5) and 14 (14–16), respectively. The median (IQR) duration of stay in the ICU was 10 days (7.3–19.5). The overall sleep efficiency (median [IQR], 54% [32.3–65.4%]) was poor. None of the patients had ESS>10, seven (35%) had global PSQI>5 and one had FOSQ <17.9. Ten (50%) patients had at least one characteristic that suggested abnormal sleep (4 insomnia, 2 central sleep apnea, 1 obstructive sleep apnea, 1 REM-SDB, and 2 with a high PSQI, but no specific sleep abnormality). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances are common in ARDS survivors early after discharge from the ICU. PMID:27390455

  14. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael; McArthur, Colin; Roberts, Sally; Williamson, Deborah; Grant, Cameron; Trenholme, Adrian; Wong, Conroy; Taylor, Susan; LeComte, Lyndsay; Mackereth, Graham; Bandaranayake, Don; Wood, Tim; Bissielo, Ange; Se, Ruth; Turner, Nikki; Pierse, Nevil; Thomas, Paul; Webby, Richard; Gross, Diane; Duque, Jazmin; Thompson, Mark; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9) virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control. PMID:25077034

  15. Update on the utility of corticosteroids in acute pediatric respiratory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chipps, Bradley E.; Bacharier, Leonard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Corticosteroids, delivered systemically and by inhalation, are widely used for the treatment of multiple acute respiratory illnesses in children. However, the level of evidence to support the utility of this therapy varies between these different acute respiratory illnesses. Objective: To summarize the evidence regarding the utility of corticosteroids in the management of common acute pediatric respiratory conditions and to highlights the controversies regarding their use. Methods: Literature search of manuscripts describing the evidence regarding the efficacy of corticosteroids (systemic and inhaled) in the management of: acute asthma exacerbation among school age children, acute episodic wheeze among preschool children, viral croup, and acute viral bronchiolitis. Results: Current evidence indicates that systemic corticosteroids provide benefits for the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations in school age children, mainly in the acute care setting. In addition, high dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy administered in the Emergency Department appears to have comparable effect for the prevention of asthma-related hospital admission as systemic corticosteroids in this age group. In contrast, most available studies have not shown benefit for systemic corticosteroids during acute wheezing episodes in preschool children. Systemic corticosteroids decrease symptoms and the rate of hospital admissions in patients with severe croup; however, corticosteroids have no role in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis and their use in this condition should be discouraged. Conclusion: Corticosteroids treatment response varies between the acute respiratory illnesses presented in this review. Future research should aim to fill the current gaps-of-knowledge regarding the utility this intervention such as the identification of specific wheezing phenotypes among preschool children which might benefit from systemic corticosteroids as a treatment for acute viral wheeze. PMID

  16. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  17. Incidence and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Tsai, Ching-Fang; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Shian; Ware, Lorraine B.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most epidemiological studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been conducted in western countries, and studies in Asia are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and 1-year mortality of ARDS in Taiwan. We conducted a nationwide inpatient cohort study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 1997 and 2011. A total of 40,876 ARDS patients (68% male; mean age 66 years) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition coding and further analyzed for clinical characteristics, medical costs, and mortality. The overall crude incidence of ARDS was 15.74 per 100,000 person-years, and increased from 2.53 to 19.26 per 100,000 person-years during the study period. The age-adjusted incidence of ARDS was 15.19 per 100,000 person-years. The overall in-hospital mortality was 57.8%. In-hospital mortality decreased from 59.7% in 1997 to 47.5% in 2011 (P < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was lowest (33.5%) in the youngest patients (age 18–29 years) and highest (68.2%) in the oldest patients (>80 years, P < 0.001). The overall 1-year mortality rate was 72.1%, and decreased from 75.8% to 54.7% during the study period. Patients who died during hospitalization were older (69 ± 17 versus 62 ± 19, P < 0.001) and predominantly male (69.8% versus 65.3%, P < 0.001). In addition, patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher medical costs (6421 versus 5825 US Dollars, P < 0.001) and shorter lengths of stay (13 versus 19 days, P < 0.001) than patients who survived. We provide the first large-scale epidemiological analysis of ARDS incidence and outcomes in Asia. Although the overall incidence was lower than has been reported in a prospective US study, this may reflect underdiagnosis by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code and identification of only patients with more severe ARDS in this

  18. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  19. Cross-shift study of acute respiratory effects in cement production workers.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Omid; Aslani, Maryam; Sadeghniiat Haghighi, Khosro

    2014-01-01

    Cement dust exposure is associated with increased respiratory impairment. As the major occupational hazard in the cement production industry is cement particles, our aim was to more thoroughly examine the acute effects of occupational exposure to cement dust on the respiratory system. A cross-shift study was conducted in a cement factory in Iran. 100 high exposed workers from production and packing sections and 100 low exposed from office workers were included. Environmental total dust was measured in each section. Assessment of lung function was done by pre and post shift spirometry. At the end of the day shift, acute respiratory symptoms were recorded. The means of total dust among high and low exposed workers were 16.55 mg/m3 and 0.9 mg/m3, respectively. The most common acute respiratory symptoms in high exposed workers were stuffy nose (52%) and shortness of breath (49%). A statistically significant post shift reduction in PEF, FEV1, FEF 25-75, FVC and FEV1/ FVC was demonstrated in high exposed group. Multivariate linear regression showed a significant relationship between the percentage of the cross-shift decrease in spirometric indices and exposure to cement dust. We detected significant relationship between exposure to cement dust and acute respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function indices. Effective dust-control measures and preparing a suitable strategy for respiratory protection are highly recommended. PMID:24659073

  20. Association of Interleukin-8 and Neutrophils with Nasal Symptom Severity During Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Kelsey M.; Hayney, Mary S.; Xie, Yaoguo; Zhang, Zhengjun; Barrett, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Using a large data set (n = 811), the relationship between acute respiratory infection illness severity and inflammatory biomarkers was investigated to determine whether certain symptoms are correlated more closely than others with the inflammatory biomarkers, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and nasal neutrophils. Participants with community acquired acute respiratory infection underwent nasal lavage for IL-8 and neutrophil testing, in addition to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection and identification of respiratory viruses. Information about symptoms was obtained throughout the duration of the illness episode using the well-validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Global symptom severity was calculated by the area under the curve (AUC) plotting duration versus WURSS total. Of the specimens tested, 56% were positively identified for one or more of nine different respiratory viruses. During acute respiratory infection illness, both IL-8 and neutrophils positively correlate with AUC (rs = 0.082, P = 0.022; rs = 0.080, P = 0.030). IL-8 and neutrophils correlate with nasal symptom severity: runny nose (r = 0.13, P = <0.00001; r = 0.18, P = <0.003), plugged nose (r = 0.045, P = 0.003; r = 0.14, P = 0.058), and sneezing (r = −0.02, P = <0.0001; r = −0.0055, P = 0.31). Neutrophils correlate with some quality of life measures such as sleeping well (r = 0.15, P = 0.026). Thus, the study demonstrates that IL-8 and neutrophils are correlated with severity of nasal symptoms during acute respiratory infection. Further research is necessary to determine if the concentration of these or other biomarkers can predict the overall duration and severity of acute respiratory infection illness. PMID:25132248

  1. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26790856

  2. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  3. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  4. Acute respiratory failure due to Nicotiana glauca ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, D; Kargakis, M; Topalis, T; Drouzas, A; Potolidis, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of organisms produce potent toxins that impact human health through compromising respiratory function. Case report: We describe a rare case of abrupt respiratory failure afterNicotiana glaucaingestion in a previously healthy sixty years old female patient. She presented complaining for gait instability and malaise after ingestion of cooked leaves of the wild plant and two hours after the onset she developed respiratory failurefor which she was intubated and mechanically ventilated for two days. The patient fully recovered and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusion: Anabasine, the plant’s main active ingredient, can cause severe systemic intoxication due to its nicotinic receptor agonist action with respiratory muscle paralysis being the main effect. PMID:24376330

  5. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals. PMID:18975486

  6. The association between obesity and outpatient visits for acute respiratory infections in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Campitelli, Michael A.; Rosella, Laura C.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent evidence suggests that obesity increases the risk of severe outcomes following respiratory infection. It is less clear whether obesity is associated with the risk of being infected with influenza or other respiratory pathogens. Therefore, we examined the association between obesity and outpatient visits for acute respiratory infections. Design We conducted a retrospective cohort study over 13 years on 104,665 individuals in Ontario, Canada who responded to population health surveys and agreed to linkage with health administrative data. Individuals aged 18–64 years who responded to a survey within 5 years prior to the start of an influenza season were included. Poisson regression, with adjustment for relevant confounders, was used to measure the association between self-reported BMI and outpatient visits coded as acute respiratory infection. We conducted numerous sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of our findings. Results We observed higher rates of outpatient visits for ARI during influenza season periods compared with normal weight individuals for those who were overweight (BMI 25–29.9) (Rate Ratio [RR] 1.10; 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 1.07–1.13), obese class I (BMI 30–34.9) (RR 1.17; 95% CI 1.13–1.22), and obese class II or III (BMI ≥35) (RR 1.19; 95% CI 1.12–1.25) Associations of a similar magnitude were observed during non-influenza season periods. Obesity was a greater risk factor for acute respiratory infections managed in emergency departments than physician offices. Conclusions Obese individuals are at an increased risk of outpatient visits for acute respiratory infection during both influenza and non-influenza season periods, suggesting that the effect of obesity on the risk of respiratory infections is not limited to influenza. Interventions designed to reduce the prevalence of obesity may have the added benefit reducing the population burden of respiratory infections. PMID:23670219

  7. Role of serotonin in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Huval, W V; Lelcuk, S; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1984-08-01

    An early event in the evolution of acute respiratory failure (ARF) is thought to be the activation of platelets, their pulmonary entrapment and subsequent release of the smooth muscle constrictor serotonin (5HT). This study tests the thesis that inhibition of 5HT will improve lung function. The etiology of ARF in the 18 study patients was sepsis (N = 10), aspiration (N = 3), pancreatitis (N = 1), embolism (N = 2), and abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery (N = 2). Patients were divided into two groups determined by whether their period of endotracheal intubation was less than or equal to 4 days (early ARF, N = 12) or greater than 4 days (late ARF, N = 6). Transpulmonary platelet counts in the early group showed entrapment of 26,300 +/- 5900 platelets/mm3 in contrast to the late group where there was no entrapment (p less than 0.05). The platelet 5HT levels in the early group were 55 +/- 5 ng/10(9) platelets, values lower than 95 +/- 15 ng/10(9) platelets in the late ARF group (p less than 0.05), and 290 +/- 70 ng/10(9) platelets in normals. The selective 5HT receptor antagonist, ketanserin was given as an intravenous bolus over 3 minutes in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, followed by a 30-minute infusion of 0.08 mg/kg. During this period mean arterial pressure (MAP) fell from 87 +/- 5 to 74 +/- 6 mmHg (mean +/- SEM) (p less than 0.05). One and one-half hours following the start of therapy, MAP returned to baseline. At this time, patients with early ARF showed decreases in: physiologic shunt (Qs/QT) from 26 +/- 3 to 19 +/- 3 (p less than 0.05); peak inspiratory pressure from 35 +/- 2 to 32 +/- 2 cmH2O (p less than 0.05) and in mean pulmonary arterial pressure from 32 +/- 2 to 29 +/- 1 mmHg (p less than 0.05). At 4 hours all changes returned to baseline levels. In early ARF ketanserin did not alter pretreatment values of: pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, 17 +/- 3 mmHg; cardiac index, 2.8 +/- 0.3 L/min X m2; platelet count, 219,000 +/- 45,000/mm3; platelet 5HT, 55 +/- 5 ng/10

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an adult patient with a myelodysplastic disorder.

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Cini, G; Meola, N; Ferrannini, E

    1983-01-01

    A 58-year-old man was diagnosed to have refractory anaemia with excessive blasts. After 3 1/2 years of relative control on periodic blood transfusions, the patient developed an acute leukaemia. Although the blastic crisis was not extreme (WBC counts less than 100 X 10(9)/l), a severe, intractable respiratory distress syndrome set in and brought the patient to the exitus in a few days. Overt signs of septic shock were absent, as was evidence of any other known cause of adult respiratory distress. Acute pulmonary failure can be the cause of death in leukaemic patients even in the absence of overwhelming sepsis or hyperleucocytosis. PMID:6404107

  9. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Mohammed H; Al-Ansari, Mariam A

    2007-04-01

    A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas. PMID:19727350

  10. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Mohammed H.; Al-Ansari, Mariam A.

    2007-01-01

    A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas. PMID:19727350

  11. Direct costs of acute respiratory infections in a pediatric long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Murray, Meghan T; Heitkemper, Elizabeth; Jackson, Olivia; Neu, Natalie; Stone, Patricia; Cohen, Bevin; Saiman, Lisa; Hutcheon, Gordon; Larson, Elaine L

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) are a major burden in pediatric long-term care. We analyzed the financial impact of ARI in 2012-2013. Costs associated with ARI during the respiratory viral season were ten times greater than during the non-respiratory viral season, $31 224 and $3242 per 1000 patient-days, respectively (P < 0·001). ARI are burdensome for pediatric long-term care facilities not only because of the associated morbidity and mortality, but also due to the great financial costs of prevention. PMID:26425787

  12. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  13. New Pneumococcal Carriage Acquired in Association with Acute Respiratory Infection Is Prone to Cause Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi

    2016-01-01

    For considering vaccine-prevention of pneumococcal acute otitis media (PncAOM), relationships between pneumococcal carriage, respiratory infection and PncAOM need to be understood. We analyzed nasopharyngeal samples collected from 329 unvaccinated Finnish children aged 2–24 months at scheduled visits and at visits during respiratory infection in 1994–97. We assessed temporal associations of respiratory infection with pneumococcal acquisition and whether PncAOM hazard depends on the relative timing of acquisition and the infection onset. The data comprised 607 person-years of risk-time for acquisition, 245 person-months of concurrent respiratory infection and carriage, and 119 episodes of PncAOM. The acquisition hazard was 3-fold in the month preceding respiratory sickness (hazard ratio, HR 3.5, 90% credible interval CI 2.9, 4.1) as compared to acquisition in healthy children. Moreover, the PncAOM hazard was markedly higher (HR 3.7, 90% CI 2.4, 5.3) during the first month of carriage acquired around the acute phase of respiratory infection (between 1 month before and 1 week after the sickness onset), as compared to carriage acquired later during sickness. The high proportion (76%) of PncAOM events occurring within 1 month of acquisition was due to frequent acquisition being associated with respiratory infection as well as the susceptibility of such acquisition to cause otitis media. PMID:27257789

  14. Recognition and management of febrile convulsion in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Kirkham, Emily Natasha; Shirt, Bethany

    2015-08-26

    Febrile convulsion is characterised by convulsion associated with fever in an infant or child aged between six months and six years. The febrile illness causing the convulsion should not be secondary to an intracranial infection (meningitis or encephalitis) or acute electrolyte imbalance. Most cases of febrile convulsion are short lived and self-terminating. However, a few cases of prolonged febrile convulsion may need anticonvulsant medication to stop the seizure. Management is mainly symptomatic, although anticonvulsants may have a role in a small number of children with complex or recurrent febrile convulsion. Referral to paediatric neurologists may be necessary in cases of complex or recurrent febrile convulsion, or in those where a pre-existing neurological disorder exists. One third of children will develop a further febrile convulsion during subsequent febrile illness. Nurses have a vital role in managing children with febrile convulsion, educating parents about the condition and dispelling myths. This article outlines the presentation, management, investigations and prognosis for febrile convulsion, indicating how nurses working in different clinical areas can help to manage this common childhood condition. PMID:26307316

  15. Should Immune-Enhancing Formulations Be Used for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Roosevelt, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    The potential for regulating immune function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through enteral-administered anti-inflammatory lipids has generated much interest over the past 20 years. Yet recommendations remain inconclusive regarding the utilization of ω-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI). Studies are limited in number, with differing methods, small sample sizes, and conflicting results, making recommendations difficult to interpret. PMID:27339156

  16. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Acute-Febrile-Illness Outbreak Investigation and Surveillance of Emerging Pathogens, Including Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ochieng, Caroline; Wiersma, Steve; Ströher, Ute; Towner, Jonathan S; Whitmer, Shannon; Nichol, Stuart T; Moore, Christopher C; Kersh, Gilbert J; Kato, Cecilia; Sexton, Christopher; Petersen, Jeannine; Massung, Robert; Hercik, Christine; Crump, John A; Kibiki, Gibson; Maro, Athanasia; Mujaga, Buliga; Gratz, Jean; Jacob, Shevin T; Banura, Patrick; Scheld, W Michael; Juma, Bonventure; Onyango, Clayton O; Montgomery, Joel M; Houpt, Eric; Fields, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Acute febrile illness (AFI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet an etiologic agent is often not identified. Convalescent-phase serology is impractical, blood culture is slow, and many pathogens are fastidious or impossible to cultivate. We developed a real-time PCR-based TaqMan array card (TAC) that can test six to eight samples within 2.5 h from sample to results and can simultaneously detect 26 AFI-associated organisms, including 15 viruses (chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever [CCHF] virus, dengue, Ebola virus, Bundibugyo virus, Sudan virus, hantaviruses [Hantaan and Seoul], hepatitis E, Marburg, Nipah virus, o'nyong-nyong virus, Rift Valley fever virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus), 8 bacteria (Bartonella spp., Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira spp., Rickettsia spp., Salmonella enterica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Yersinia pestis), and 3 protozoa (Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., and Trypanosoma brucei). Two extrinsic controls (phocine herpesvirus 1 and bacteriophage MS2) were included to ensure extraction and amplification efficiency. Analytical validation was performed on spiked specimens for linearity, intra-assay precision, interassay precision, limit of detection, and specificity. The performance of the card on clinical specimens was evaluated with 1,050 blood samples by comparison to the individual real-time PCR assays, and the TAC exhibited an overall 88% (278/315; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84% to 92%) sensitivity and a 99% (5,261/5,326, 98% to 99%) specificity. This TaqMan array card can be used in field settings as a rapid screen for outbreak investigation or for the surveillance of pathogens, including Ebola virus. PMID:26491176

  17. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Acute-Febrile-Illness Outbreak Investigation and Surveillance of Emerging Pathogens, Including Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ochieng, Caroline; Wiersma, Steve; Ströher, Ute; Towner, Jonathan S.; Whitmer, Shannon; Nichol, Stuart T.; Moore, Christopher C.; Kersh, Gilbert J.; Kato, Cecilia; Sexton, Christopher; Petersen, Jeannine; Massung, Robert; Hercik, Christine; Crump, John A.; Kibiki, Gibson; Maro, Athanasia; Mujaga, Buliga; Gratz, Jean; Jacob, Shevin T.; Banura, Patrick; Scheld, W. Michael; Juma, Bonventure; Onyango, Clayton O.; Montgomery, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile illness (AFI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet an etiologic agent is often not identified. Convalescent-phase serology is impractical, blood culture is slow, and many pathogens are fastidious or impossible to cultivate. We developed a real-time PCR-based TaqMan array card (TAC) that can test six to eight samples within 2.5 h from sample to results and can simultaneously detect 26 AFI-associated organisms, including 15 viruses (chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever [CCHF] virus, dengue, Ebola virus, Bundibugyo virus, Sudan virus, hantaviruses [Hantaan and Seoul], hepatitis E, Marburg, Nipah virus, o'nyong-nyong virus, Rift Valley fever virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus), 8 bacteria (Bartonella spp., Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira spp., Rickettsia spp., Salmonella enterica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Yersinia pestis), and 3 protozoa (Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., and Trypanosoma brucei). Two extrinsic controls (phocine herpesvirus 1 and bacteriophage MS2) were included to ensure extraction and amplification efficiency. Analytical validation was performed on spiked specimens for linearity, intra-assay precision, interassay precision, limit of detection, and specificity. The performance of the card on clinical specimens was evaluated with 1,050 blood samples by comparison to the individual real-time PCR assays, and the TAC exhibited an overall 88% (278/315; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84% to 92%) sensitivity and a 99% (5,261/5,326, 98% to 99%) specificity. This TaqMan array card can be used in field settings as a rapid screen for outbreak investigation or for the surveillance of pathogens, including Ebola virus. PMID:26491176

  18. What has been learnt from P/V curves in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, S M; Richard, J C; Brochard, L

    2003-08-01

    Mechanical impairment of the respiratory system was recognised soon after the description of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The analysis of the pressure/volume (P/V) curve of the respiratory system contributed a lot to the understanding of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury and formed the basis for lung protection. The lower and upper inflection points were regarded as points of interest to avoid cyclic derecruitment and overdistension and to optimise ventilatory settings. However, because of the heterogeneity of lung injury, reducing the mechanical properties of the whole respiratory system to a single curve is a schematic approach, which makes interpretation difficult. New data suggest that alveolar re-inflation occurs along the whole P/V curve that can, therefore, be considered as a recruitment curve. The lower inflection point has no relationship with alveolar opening and closure and does not indicate the positive end-expiratory pressure needed to prevent alveolar collapse. The shape of the P/V curve gives information about the extension and the homogeneity of lung injury, indicating the possibility of lung recruitment. The upper inflection point, classically seen as the beginning of overdistension, may also indicate the end of recruitment. The pressure/volume curve offers the unique opportunity of evaluating alveolar recruitment/derecruitment at the bedside that can be helpful for the identification of optimal ventilatory settings and makes the curve a valuable tool for the ventilatory management of acute lung injury. PMID:12945997

  19. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  20. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome. PMID:27222793

  1. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  2. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  3. Exploring the Roles and Nature of Science: A Case Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2008-01-01

    The roles of science in society and the nature of science are the focus of many science curricula. Current views about these two aspects of science have largely been informed by the history of scientific development. This article uses the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--a recent health scare--as a case study to explore the roles of…

  4. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B. )

    1993-09-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  5. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Epidemic and Change of People's Health Behavior in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xiaodong; Li, Shiyue; Wang, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) has become a new worldwide epidemic whose origin was until recently unknown. It is the unpredictable nature of this epidemic that makes people want answers to some important questions about what they can do to protect themselves. This study presents an inquiry into peoples knowledge and self-reported…

  6. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  7. Acute respiratory distress associated with external jugular vein catheterization in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Fadi F; Obeid, Mounir; Dabbous, Ibrahim; Hayek, Paula; Akel, Samir; Mroueh, Salman

    2003-12-01

    We report on the acute onset of respiratory distress secondary to fluid accumulation in the chest within hours of placement of an external jugular venous line in a newborn. External jugular venous catheterization in the newborn is a procedure with potentially serious complications, and should be avoided unless the patient is monitored closely. PMID:14618649

  8. Acute Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Victor M.; Wong, Emily Y.M.; Tsang, Alan K.L.; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K.; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Drosten, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother–calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk. PMID:25989145

  9. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  10. Ventilator Strategies and Rescue Therapies for Management of Acute Respiratory Failure in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Hypes, Cameron; Joshi, Raj; Whitmore, Sage; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Cairns, Charles B

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure is commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED), and early treatment can have effects on long-term outcome. Noninvasive ventilation is commonly used for patients with respiratory failure and has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive lung disease and congestive heart failure, but should be used carefully, if at all, in the management of asthma, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Lung-protective tidal volumes should be used for all patients receiving mechanical ventilation, and FiO2 should be reduced after intubation to achieve a goal of less than 60%. For refractory hypoxemia, new rescue therapies have emerged to help improve the oxygenation, and in some cases mortality, and should be considered in ED patients when necessary, as deferring until ICU admission may be deleterious. This review article summarizes the pathophysiology of acute respiratory failure, management options, and rescue therapies including airway pressure release ventilation, continuous neuromuscular blockade, inhaled nitric oxide, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26014437

  11. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations. PMID:26429697

  12. Acute respiratory illness: popular health culture and mother's knowledge in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Nichter, M; Nichter, M

    1994-05-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is one of the chief causes of morbidity and mortality in the third world. This ethnographic study of ARI in the Philippines draws attention to local knowledge, sign recognition, perceptions of severity, and cultural factors influencing health care seeking. The mix of research methods used to generate data on these issues is discussed. PMID:8041235

  13. Aetiology of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Hospitalised Children in Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Jan; Panayiotou, Christakis; Tryfonos, Christina; Koptides, Dana; Koliou, Maria; Kalogirou, Nikolas; Georgiou, Eleni; Christodoulou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve clinical management and prevention of viral infections in hospitalised children improved etiological insight is needed. The aim of the present study was to assess the spectrum of respiratory viral pathogens in children admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections in Cyprus. For this purpose nasopharyngeal swab samples from 424 children less than 12 years of age with acute respiratory tract infections were collected over three epidemic seasons and were analysed for the presence of the most common 15 respiratory viruses. A viral pathogen was identified in 86% of the samples, with multiple infections being observed in almost 20% of the samples. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (30.4%) and Rhinovirus (27.4%). RSV exhibited a clear seasonality with marked peaks in January/February, while rhinovirus infections did not exhibit a pronounced seasonality being detected almost throughout the year. While RSV and PIV3 incidence decreased significantly with age, the opposite was observed for influenza A and B as well as adenovirus infections. The data presented expand our understanding of the epidemiology of viral respiratory tract infections in Cypriot children and will be helpful to the clinicians and researchers interested in the treatment and control of viral respiratory tract infections. PMID:26761647

  14. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application. PMID:24485531

  15. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  16. Anesthetic management of parturient with thoracic kyphoscoliosis, malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ravindra Kr; Batra, Meenu M; Darlong, Vanlal; Garg, Rakesh; Punj, Jyotsna; Kumar, Sri

    2015-01-01

    The management of cesarean section in kyphoscoliotic patient is challenging. The respiratory changes and increased metabolic demands due to pregnancy may compromise the limited respiratory reserves in such patients. Presence of other comorbidities like malaria and respiratory tract infection will further compromise the effective oxygenation. We report a case of kyphoscoliosis along with malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section. PMID:26702219

  17. Acute intermittent porphyria associated with respiratory failure: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Kátia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

  18. Acute Intermittent Porphyria Associated with Respiratory Failure: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Kátia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

  19. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation as treatment for acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio

    2000-01-01

    Our current state of knowledge on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and technical aspects are discussed in the present review. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, NPPV can be considered a valid therapeutic option to prevent endotracheal intubation. Evidence suggests that, before eventual endotracheal intubation, NPPV should be considered as first-line intervention in the early phases of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Small randomized and non-randomized studies on the application of NPPV in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure showed promising results, with reduction in complications such as sinusitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and in the duration of intensive care unit stay. The conventional use of NPPV in hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure still remains controversial, however. Large randomized studies are still needed before extensive clinical application in this condition. PMID:11094492

  20. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  1. Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus using Direct Fluorescent Antibody Assay in Paediatric Patients with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boloor, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) pulmonary disease manifesting as bronchiolitis and pneumonia continues to play a major role in the childhood mortality and morbidity. Hence the present study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of RSV among hospitalized children presenting with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection (ARTI) and its correlation with risk factors. Aim To determine the occurrence of RSV related respiratory tract infection in paediatric patients and to access the risk factors and clinical features associated. Materials and Methods RSV antigen detection was performed by Direct Fluorescent Antibody (DFA) staining on 100 nasopharyngeal aspirate collected from hospitalized children below 5 years of age with a diagnosis of ARTI. Results Out of the 100 samples tested for RSV with DFA, 22 (22%) were found RSV positive with a mean age of 12 months and a male to female ratio of (1.75:1). Clinical features significantly associated with RSV were wheezing and breathlessness. Congenital heart disease (CHD) and prematurity were the risk factors significantly associated with RSV infection. Conclusion RSV infection is a significant cause of morbidity among children presenting with ARTI. In resource limited countries DFA can be used as an important tool for rapid detection of RSV and can potentially eliminate prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  2. [Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skalická, Hana; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome manifested by rapidly progressive respiratory distress leading, without therapy, to severe respiratory insufficiency and subsequent multiorgan failure. The pathophysiological causes are: the change in the pressure gradients in the pulmonary capillaries, the impaired membrane permeability of the alveolocapillary in the lungs, and impaired lymphatic drainage. Unlike in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac disease is not a cause, and there is no increase in wedge pressure (< 18 mm Hg). The aetiological base is diverse and includes more clinical pathological factors. The diagnosis and evaluation are usually very difficult due to the rapidly deteriorating clinical condition of the patients. A decisive, quick and comprehensive approach, using all available invasive and non-invasive methods is necessary. The basic steps of treatment are: the use of different types of ventilatory support in order to achieve adequate oxygenation, dealing with possible hemodynamic instability, and, when needed, other specific procedures. It is always important to keep in mind that this is a very serious condition with a high mortality rate. And there is a need for fast and efficient access to the best specialized clinic. PMID:26750623

  3. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  4. Parainfluenza Virus Infection Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Children and Adults Hospitalized for Severe Acute Respiratory Illness in South Africa, 2009–2014

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Adam L.; Sahr, Philip K.; Treurnicht, Florette; Walaza, Sibongile; Groome, Michelle J.; Kahn, Kathleen; Dawood, Halima; Variava, Ebrahim; Tempia, Stefano; Pretorius, Marthi; Moyes, Jocelyn; Olorunju, Steven A. S.; Malope-Kgokong, Babatyi; Kuonza, Lazarus; Wolter, Nicole; von Gottberg, Anne; Madhi, Shabir A.; Venter, Marietjie; Cohen, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parainfluenza virus (PIV) is a common cause of acute respiratory tract infections, but little is known about PIV infection in children and adults in Africa, especially in settings where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence is high. Methods. We conducted active, prospective sentinel surveillance for children and adults hospitalized with severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) from 2009 to 2014 in South Africa. We enrolled controls (outpatients without febrile or respiratory illness) to calculate the attributable fraction for PIV infection. Respiratory specimens were tested by multiplex real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for parainfluenza types 1, 2, and 3. Results. Of 18 282 SARI cases enrolled, 1188 (6.5%) tested positive for any PIV type: 230 (19.4%) were type 1; 168 (14.1%) were type 2; 762 (64.1%) were type 3; and 28 (2.4%) had coinfection with 2 PIV types. After adjusting for age, HIV serostatus, and respiratory viral coinfection, the attributable fraction for PIV was 65.6% (95% CI [confidence interval], 47.1–77.7); PIV contributed to SARI among HIV-infected and -uninfected children <5 years of age and among individuals infected with PIV types 1 and 3. The observed overall incidence of PIV-associated SARI was 38 (95% CI, 36–39) cases per 100 000 population and was highest in children <1 year of age (925 [95% CI, 864–989] cases per 100 000 population). Compared with persons without HIV, persons with HIV had an increased relative risk of PIV hospitalization (9.4; 95% CI, 8.5–10.3). Conclusions. Parainfluenza virus causes substantial severe respiratory disease in South Africa among children <5 years of age, especially those that are infected with HIV. PMID:26566534

  5. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject. PMID:15292826

  6. The usage of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure system in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Wong, D T; Tam, A D; Van Zundert, T C R V

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) devices have been used to treat patients in acute respiratory failure. However they require an electric power source, are relatively large in size, and may be difficult to use in prehospital settings. The recently introduced Boussignac CPAP system is capable of delivering 10 cmH2O of CPAP, is compact, portable and requires only an oxygen source. This paper reviews the efficacy of using Boussignac CPAP as a treatment for acute respiratory failure in both prehospital and hospital settings. All studies mainly focused on patients treated for cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In the prehospital setting, Boussigac CPAP significantly improved respiratory parameters and oxygenation from baseline values. In the emergency department setting, Boussignac CPAP was more effective than standard oxygen delivery and just as effective as BiPAP in improving patient oxygenation and respiration. In one study, implementing Boussignac CPAP reduced intubation rate and hospital stay. Most hospital staff found Boussignac CPAP easy to use and complication rates were low. Boussigac CPAP is a useful device in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure, especially in the prehospital setting. PMID:23419338

  7. Multinodular Goiter Spontaneous Hemorrhage in ESRD Patients Result in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wen-Hui; Shao, Chu-Xiao; Xin, Jun; Li, Jie; Mao, Ming-Feng; Yu, Xue-Ping; Jin, Lie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Euthyroid multinodular goiters may lead to acute respiratory failure caused by airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. Here, we present a case admitted to the nephrologist with multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage along with respiratory failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which required urgent surgical intervention. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with ESRD who presented with a rapidly enlarging nodular goiter resulting in acute respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation and emergency partial thyroidectomy were performed, revealing multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage by postoperative histopathology. Several cases of benign goiters necessitating endotracheal intubation have been reported. Goiters are among the rare diagnoses in patients consulting at our institution's Nephrology. This case illustrates that ESRD patients with benign goiter may lead to acute respiratory failure due to airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. It was found in agreement with previous reports. This case highlights that ESRD patient at risk of this life threatening complication such as multinodular goiter hemorrhage should be managed with elective thyroidectomy to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26871832

  8. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, Guadalupe; Videla, Cristina; Misirlian, Alicia; Requeijo, Paula V; Aguilar, María del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14) and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14). Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24). Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14). Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection. PMID:12184818

  9. Molecular Characterisation of Chikungunya Virus Infections in Trinidad and Comparison of Clinical and Laboratory Features with Dengue and Other Acute Febrile Cases

    PubMed Central

    Sahadeo, Nikita; Mohammed, Hamish; Allicock, Orchid M.; Auguste, Albert J.; Widen, Steven G.; Badal, Kimberly; Pulchan, Krishna; Foster, Jerome E.; Weaver, Scott C.; Carrington, Christine V. F.

    2015-01-01

    Local transmission of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was first documented in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) in July 2014 preceding a large epidemic. At initial presentation, it is difficult to distinguish chikungunya fever (CHIKF) from other acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs), including life-threatening dengue disease. We characterised and compared dengue virus (DENV) and CHIKV infections in 158 patients presenting with suspected dengue fever (DF) and CHIKF at a major hospital in T&T, and performed phylogenetic analyses on CHIKV genomic sequences recovered from 8 individuals. The characteristics of patients with and without PCR-confirmed CHIKV were compared using Pearson’s χ2 and student’s t-tests, and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using logistic regression. We then compared signs and symptoms of people with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV and DENV infections using the Mann-Whitney U, Pearson’s χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. Among the 158 persons there were 8 (6%) RT-qPCR-confirmed DENV and 30 (22%) RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV infections. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the CHIKV strains belonged to the Asian genotype and were most closely related to a British Virgin Islands strain isolated at the beginning of the 2013/14 outbreak in the Americas. Compared to persons who were RT-qPCR-negative for CHIKV, RT-qPCR-positive individuals were significantly more likely to have joint pain (aOR: 4.52 [95% CI: 1.28–16.00]), less likely to be interviewed at a later stage of illness (days post onset of fever—aOR: 0.56 [0.40–0.78]) and had a lower white blood cell count (aOR: 0.83 [0.71–0.96]). Among the 38 patients with RT-qPCR-confirmed CHIKV or DENV, there were no significant differences in symptomatic presentation. However when individuals with serological evidence of recent DENV or CHIKV infection were included in the analyses, there were key differences in clinical presentation between CHIKF and other AUFIs

  10. Acute respiratory failure after endoscopic third ventriculostomy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Elgamal, Essam A; Aqil, Mansoor

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a relatively safe procedure. However, postoperative acute respiratory failure may be fatal. The authors report an 8-month-old patient with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to posterior fossa cyst, and Chiari malformation. After ETV he developed difficulty in breathing, and had to be reintubated and ventilated. The infant recovered fully after craniocervical decompression and insertion of cystoperitoneal shunt. We speculate that respiratory failure is related to relative expansion of the posterior fossa arachnoid cyst, causing significant compression on the brain stem. Supportive care with mechanical ventilation and brain stem decompression were the mainstay of treatment. PMID:23493148

  11. Supine chest compression: alternative to prone ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Soni, Kapil Dev

    2014-05-01

    Prone ventilation is usually used for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. We applied an alternative method to prone position. We described 2 cases of trauma where prone position could not be done. Chest wall compression was performed by 2-kg weight in front of the chest wall bilaterally while the patient was in a supine position. Respiratory mechanics work to improve oxygenation almost as same as the mechanism proposed for prone position without any major adverse effects and serious complications. We suggest a larger randomized study to determine the efficacy and also to find out the optimum weight required to compress the chest. PMID:24332252

  12. Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOJUAN; ZHANG, ZHIDAN; CHEN, SONG; ZHAO, DONGMEI; ZHANG, FANGXIAO; HU, ZIWEI; XIAO, FENG; MA, XIAOCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards are chemical agents that are similar to sulfur mustards, with similar toxicities. The present study describes a case of nitrogen mustard-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression in a 33-year-old man. The patient, who was accidentally exposed to nitrogen mustard hydrochloride in a pharmaceutical factory, exhibited severe inhalation injury and respiratory symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed reduced white blood cell counts and lowered platelet levels during the first 6 days after the skin exposure to nitrogen mustard. Following treatment with mechanical ventilation, immunity-enhancing agents and nutritional supplements for 1 month, the patient successfully recovered and was released from hospital. PMID:26622480

  13. Relationship between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Cui, Meng-Meng; Fan, Da; Zhang, De-Shan; Lian, Hui-Xin; Yin, Zhao-Yin; Li, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon in which dry particulate pollutants obscure the sky. Haze has been associated with chronic diseases, but its relationship with acute diseases is less clear. We aimed to determine the association between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, in order to determine the influence of haze on human health. We compared the number of cases of acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing Emergency Center between 2006 and 2013, with haze data from Beijing Observatory. The relationship between the number of hazy days and the number of cases of the above types of diseases was analyzed using univariate analyses. Both the number of cases and the number of hazy days showed a rising trend. The average number of cases per day for all three diseases was higher on hazy days than on non-hazy days. There was a positive correlation between the number of hazy days and the number of cases, and this correlation showed a hysteretic quality. Haze has an influence on acute cardiovascular (CVDs), cerebrovascular (CBDs), and respiratory system (RSDs) diseases. Haze seems to have an additive effect, since the associations between haze and number of cases were stronger in the following month than in the preceding month. The increasing trend in the number of hazy days might worsen the problem of haze-related diseases. PMID:25292298

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): lessons learnt in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Hui, David S

    2013-08-01

    Many healthcare workers were infected while looking after the SARS patients on the medical wards in 2003. The high infectivity of the SARS coronavirus with peak viral load on day 10 of illness when patients were ill, overcrowding of the old medical wards with low air changes/hr (ACH), and aerosol-generating procedures while resuscitating the patients were the major factors. Procedures reported to present an increased risk of SARS transmission include tracheal intubation, non-invasive ventilation, tracheotomy and manual ventilation before intubation whereas oxygen therapy and bed distance <1 m were also implicated. Studies based on laser visualization technique with smoke particles as smokers in the human patient simulator has shown that oxygen therapy via Hudson mask and nasal cannula could disperse exhaled air of patients to 0.4 and 1 m respectively whereas jet nebulizer could disperse exhaled air >0.8 m from the patient. Bigger isolation rooms with 16 ACH are more effective than smaller isolation rooms with 12 ACH in removing exhaled air and preventing room contamination but at the expense of more noise and electricity consumption. Non-invasive ventilation via face masks and single circuit can disperse exhaled air from 0.4 to 1 m. Both higher inspiratory pressures and use of whisper swivel device (to facilitate carbon dioxide removal) could increase the exhaled air leakage and isolation room contamination during on-invasive ventilation. Addition of a viral-bacterial filter during manual ventilation by bagging may reduce the exhaled air leakage forward and yet increase the sideway leakage. N95 mask was more effective than surgical mask in preventing expelled air leakage during patient's coughing but there was still significant sideway leakage to 15 cm. Clinicians should be aware of air leakage from the various face masks and adopt strict infection control measures during resuscitation of patients with severe respiratory infections. Carefully designed clinical

  15. Efficacy of intraoperative, single-bolus corticosteroid administration to prevent postoperative acute respiratory failure after oesophageal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Yong; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Jang, Hee-Jin; Joo, Jungnam; Zo, Jae Ill

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Respiratory failure from acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia are the major cause of morbidity and mortality following an oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer. This study was performed to investigate whether an intraoperative corticosteroid can attenuate postoperative respiratory failure. METHODS Between November 2005 and December 2008, 234 consecutive patients who underwent an oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer were reviewed. A 125-mg dose of methylprednisolone was administered after performing the anastomosis. ALI, ARDS and pneumonia occurring before postoperative day (POD) 7 were regarded as acute respiratory failure. RESULT The mean age was 64.2 ± 8.7 years. One hundred and fifty-one patients were in the control group and 83 patients in the steroid group. Patients' characteristics were comparable. The incidence of acute respiratory failure was lower in the steroid group (P = 0.037). The incidences of anastomotic leakage and wound dehiscence were not different (P = 0.57 and P = 1.0). The C-reactive protein level on POD 2 was lower in the steroid group (P < 0.005). Multivariate analysis indicates that the intraoperative steroid was a protective factor against acute respiratory failure (P = 0.046, OR = 0.206). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative corticosteroid administration was associated with a decreased risk of acute respiratory failure following an oesophagectomy. The laboratory data suggest that corticosteroids may attenuate the stress-induced inflammatory responses after surgery. PMID:22745302

  16. Air pollution and acute respiratory illness in five German communities

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J. ); Spix, C.; Wichmann, H.E. ); Malin, E. )

    1991-10-01

    To assess the impact of short-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory illness in children, the authors recruited pediatricians and hospitals in five German cities to report daily counts of children's visits for croup symptoms and obstructive bronchitis. Data were collected for at least 2 years in each location. These symptoms are predominantly found in very young children, with the croup reporting peaking at 2 years of age and obstructive bronchitis at 1 year. A total of 6,330 cases of croup and 4,755 cases of obstructive bronchitis were observed during the study. The distributions of these events were quite skewed and were modeled as a Poisson process. To focus the analysis on short-term correlations and avoid seasonal confounding, biannual, annual (seasonal), and six shorter term cycles were controlled for in the regression models. After controlling for short-term weather factors, total suspended particulate matter (TSP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) were associated with croup cases. An increase in TSAP levels from 10 {mu}g/m{sup 3} to 70 {mu}g/m{sup 3} was associated with a 27% increase in cases of croup; the same increase in NO{sub 2} levels resulted in a 28% increase in cases. No pollutant was associated with daily cases of obstructive bronchitis.

  17. The Acute Respiratory Infection Quality Dashboard: a performance measurement reporting tool in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jeffrey A; Jung, Eunice; Housman, Dan; Eskin, Michael S; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2007-01-01

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with electronic health records, can help clinicians understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. The Acute Respiratory Infection Quality Dashboard (ARI QD) for LMR users is a secure web report for performance measurement of an acute condition delivered through a central data warehouse and custom-built reporting tool. Pilot evaluation of the ARI QD indicates that clinicians prefer a quality report that combines not only structured data regarding diagnosis and antibiotic prescribing rates entered into EHRs but one that also shows billing data. The ARI QD has the potential to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. PMID:18694133

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a woman with heroin and methamphetamine misuse.

    PubMed

    Yeh, P S; Yuan, A; Yu, C J; Kuo, S H; Luh, K T; Yang, P C

    2001-08-01

    Methamphetamine, heroin, and cannabis are three of the most commonly misused drugs in Asia. In Taiwan, cases of misuse of methamphetamine have been increasing. In this paper, we report the case of a 23-year-old woman who had a 10-year history of smoking methamphetamine and intermittent use of heroin for 3 to 4 years. She developed pulmonary toxic effects associated with misuse of heroin and methamphetamine. She was brought to the emergency room because of consciousness disturbance and acute respiratory failure. Her symptoms of rapid progression of refractory hypoxemia, ill-defined densities over both lung fields, and normal pulmonary artery wedge pressure were consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Rapid resolution of infiltrations and improvement of oxygenation were observed after mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure support and oxygen therapy. She was discharged on the fifteenth hospital day without any sequela except for mild exertional dyspnea. PMID:11678007

  19. The effect of fibreoptic bronchoscopy in acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental evidence from a lung model.

    PubMed

    Nay, M-A; Mankikian, J; Auvet, A; Dequin, P-F; Guillon, A

    2016-02-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy is essential for appropriate care during mechanical ventilation, but can significantly affect mechanical ventilation of the lungs, particularly for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We aimed to describe the consequences of bronchoscopy during lung-protective ventilation in a bench study, and thereby to determine the optimal diameter of the bronchoscope for avoiding disruption of the protective-ventilation strategy during the procedure. Immediately following the insertion of the bronchoscope into the tracheal tube, either minute ventilation decreased significantly, or positive end-expiratory pressure increased substantially, according to the setting of the inspiratory pressure limit. The increase in end-expiratory pressure led to an equivalent increase in the plateau pressure, and lung-protective ventilation was significantly altered during the procedure. We showed that a bronchoscope with an external diameter of 4 mm (or less) would allow safer bronchoscopic interventions in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:26559154

  20. Management of acute respiratory infections by community health volunteers: experience of Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC).

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Abdullahel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of management practices for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in improving the competency of community health volunteers in diagnosing and treating acute respiratory infections among children. METHODS: Data were collected by a group of research physicians who observed the performance of a sample of 120 health volunteers in 10 sub-districts in Bangladesh in which Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) had run a community-based ARI control programme since mid-1992. Standardized tests were conducted until the 95% interphysician reliability on the observation of clinical examination was achieved. FINDINGS:The sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates in diagnosing and treating ARIs were significantly higher among the health volunteers who had basic training and were supervised routinely than among those who had not. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis and treatment of ARIs at the household level in developing countries are possible if intensive basic training and the close supervision of service providers are ensured. PMID:12764514

  1. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  2. Cross-host evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in palm civet and human

    PubMed Central

    Song, Huai-Dong; Tu, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Guo-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zheng, Kui; Lei, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Qiu-Xia; Gao, Yu-Wei; Zhou, Hui-Qiong; Xiang, Hua; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Chern, Shur-Wern Wang; Cheng, Feng; Pan, Chun-Ming; Xuan, Hua; Chen, Sai-Juan; Luo, Hui-Ming; Zhou, Duan-Hua; Liu, Yu-Fei; He, Jian-Feng; Qin, Peng-Zhe; Li, Ling-Hui; Ren, Yu-Qi; Liang, Wen-Jia; Yu, Ye-Dong; Anderson, Larry; Wang, Ming; Xu, Rui-Heng; Wu, Xin-Wei; Zheng, Huan-Ying; Chen, Jin-Ding; Liang, Guodong; Gao, Yang; Liao, Ming; Fang, Ling; Jiang, Li-Yun; Li, Hui; Chen, Fang; Di, Biao; He, Li-Juan; Lin, Jin-Yan; Tong, Suxiang; Kong, Xiangang; Du, Lin; Hao, Pei; Tang, Hua; Bernini, Andrea; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Spiga, Ottavia; Guo, Zong-Ming; Pan, Hai-Yan; He, Wei-Zhong; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Fontanet, Arnaud; Danchin, Antoine; Niccolai, Neri; Li, Yi-Xue; Wu, Chung-I; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    The genomic sequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses from human and palm civet of the 2003/2004 outbreak in the city of Guangzhou, China, were nearly identical. Phylogenetic analysis suggested an independent viral invasion from animal to human in this new episode. Combining all existing data but excluding singletons, we identified 202 single-nucleotide variations. Among them, 17 are polymorphic in palm civets only. The ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide substitution in palm civets collected 1 yr apart from different geographic locations is very high, suggesting a rapid evolving process of viral proteins in civet as well, much like their adaptation in the human host in the early 2002–2003 epidemic. Major genetic variations in some critical genes, particularly the Spike gene, seemed essential for the transition from animal-to-human transmission to human-to-human transmission, which eventually caused the first severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak of 2002/2003. PMID:15695582

  3. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  4. Association between outdoor ozone and compensated acute respiratory diseases among workers in Quebec (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    ADAM-POUPART, Ariane; LABRÈCHE, France; BUSQUE, Marc-Antoine; BRAND, Allan; DUGUAY, Patrice; FOURNIER, Michel; ZAYED, Joseph; SMARGIASSI, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory effects of ozone in the workplace have not been extensively studied. Our aim was to explore the relationship between daily average ozone levels and compensated acute respiratory problems among workers in Quebec between 2003 and 2010 using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Health data came from the Workers’ Compensation Board. Daily concentrations of ozone were estimated using a spatiotemporal model. Conditional logistic regressions, with and without adjustment for temperature, were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs, per 1 ppb increase of ozone), and lag effects were assessed. Relationships with respiratory compensations in all industrial sectors were essentially null. Positive non-statistically significant associations were observed for outdoor sectors, and decreased after controlling for temperature (ORs of 0.98; 1.01 and 1.05 at Lags 0, 1 and 2 respectively). Considering the predicted increase of air pollutant concentrations in the context of climate change, closer investigation should be carried out on outdoor workers. PMID:25736778

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: use of specialized nutrients in pediatric patients and infants.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Leslie A; Trobaugh, Kimberly A

    2011-02-01

    With a high rate of mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has limited treatments options. Immune-enhanced formulas, containing eicosapentaenoic acid, borage oil, and antioxidants, have shown to be beneficial in adults patients with ARDS, decreasing mortality, length of mechanical ventilation, and new organ dysfunction. There is promising research in pediatric patients with improvement in oxygenation status found, but further trials are needed to realize these benefits in pediatric and infant populations. PMID:21266694

  6. Fatal measles presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Gupta, Anurag; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Fatal measles is known to occur among immunocompromised adults. We report a rare case of an immunocompetent non-pregnant young lady who suffered from fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome due to measles. Physicians must be vigilant to this deadly presentation of measles even in immunocompetent individuals. We emphasise the inadequacies of vaccination programmes in India reflected not only by the existing high measles-related childhood mortalities, but also an emerging rise in deaths among adults. PMID:25139919

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Human WU Polyomavirus Isolate Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dehority, Walter N.; Schwalm, Kurt C.; Young, Jesse M.; Gross, Stephen M.; Schroth, Gary P.; Young, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) isolate, NM040708, collected from a patient with an acute respiratory infection in New Mexico. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of NM040708 is 5,229 bp in length and differs from the WUPyV reference with accession no. NC_009539 by 6 nucleotides and 2 amino acids. PMID:27151782

  8. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named “Melaka virus”) isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms ≈1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house ≈1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans. PMID:17592121

  9. Circulation of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strains Among Hospitalized Children with Acute Lower Respiratory Infection in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Mohammad Reza; Sekawi, Zamberi; Othman, Norlijah; Lye, Munn-Sann; Moghaddam, Faezeh Yazdani

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral pathogen associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs) among hospitalized children. In this study, the genetic diversity of the RSV strains was investigated among nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) taken from children less than 5 years of age hospitalized with ALRTIs in Hospital Serdang, Malaysia. A total of 165 NPA samples were tested for the presence of RSV and other respiratory viruses from June until December 2009. RSV was found positive in 83 (50%) of the samples using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Further classification of 67 RSV strains showed that subgroups A and B comprised 11/67 (16.4%) and 56/67 (83.6%) of the strains, respectively. The second hypervariable region at the carboxyl-terminal of the G gene was amplified and sequenced in order to do phylogenetic study. The phylogenetic relationships of the samples were determined separately for subgroups A and B using neighbor joining (NJ), maximum parsimony (MP), and Bayesian inference (BI). Phylogenetic analysis of the 32 sequenced samples showed that all 9 RSV-A strains were clustered within NA1 genotype while the remaining 23 strains of the RSV-B subgroup could be grouped into a clade consisted of strains with 60-nucleotide duplication region. They were further classified into newly discovered BA10 and BA9 genotypes. The present finding suggests the emergence of RSV genotypes of NA1 and BA. This is the first documentation of the phylogenetic relationship and genetic diversity of RSV strains among hospitalized children diagnosed with ALRTI in Serdang, Malaysia. PMID:23641140

  10. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Phuong, Hoang Lan; Nga, Tran T T; van Doornum, Gerard J; Groen, Jan; Binh, Tran Q; Giao, Phan T; Hung, Le Q; Nams, Nguyen V; Kager, P A; de Vries, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control program. Serum was collected on first presentation (t0) and after 3 weeks (t3) for serology. After exclusion of acute dengue infection, acute and convalescent serum samples from 606 patients were using enzyme-linked immunoassays to detect IgA, as well as IgM and IgG antibodies against common respiratory viruses. Paired sera showed the following infections: human parainfluenza virus (HPIV, 4.7%), influenza B virus (FLUBV, 2.2%), influenza A virus (FLUAV, 1.9%) and human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, 0.6%). There was no association between type of infection and age, sex or seasonality; some inter-annual differences were observed for influenza. Antibody prevalence, indicative of previous infections, was relatively low: HPV, 56.8%, FLUBV, 12.1%; FLUAV, 5.9% and HRSV, 6.8%. PMID:21073032

  11. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2002-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are reactive, partially reduced derivatives of molecular oxygen (O 2 ). Important reactive oxygen species in biologic systems include superoxide radical anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. Closely related species include the hypohalous acids, particularly hypochlorous acid; chloramine and substituted chloramines; and singlet oxygen. Reactive nitrogen species are derived from the simple diatomic gas, nitric oxide. Peroxynitrite and its protonated form, peroxynitrous acid, are the most significant reactive nitrogen species in biologic systems. A variety of enzymatic and nonenzymatic processes can generate reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in mammalian cells. An extensive body of experimental evidence from studies using animal models supports the view that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are important in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. This view is further supported by data from clinical studies that correlate biochemical evidence of reactive oxygen species-mediated or reactive nitrogen species-mediated stress with the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite these data, pharmacologic strategies directed at minimizing reactive oxygen species-mediated or reactive nitrogen species-mediated damage have yet to be successfully introduced into clinical practice. The most extensively studied compound in this regard is N -acetylcysteine; unfortunately, clinical trials with this compound in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome have yielded disappointing results. PMID:12205400

  12. Acute viral infections with combined involvement of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts in children. Therapy with interferon.

    PubMed

    Dondurei, E A; Osidak, L V; Golovacheva, E G; Golovanova, A K; Amosova, I V; Gladchenko, L N

    2009-08-01

    We evaluated the percent of acute respiratory viral infections with gastrointestinal syndrome in the structure of morbidity in babies aging 6 months and elder. Therapeutic efficiency and safety of anaferon (pediatric formuation) as a component of complex therapy of acute respiratory viral infections with involvement of the gastrointestinal tract were proven; more rapid disappearance of all symptoms and improvement of the immune status parameters were demonstrated. PMID:20027348

  13. Interdisciplinary Peripartum Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation – a Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, J.; Bogdanski, R.; Ortiz, J. U.; Kuschel, B.; Schneider, K. T. M.; Lobmaier, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used for the management of acute severe cardiac and respiratory failure. One of the indications is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which, in some severe cases, ECMO represents the only possibility to save lives. We report on the successful long-term use of ECMO in a postpartum patient with recurrent pulmonary decompensation after peripartum uterine rupture with extensive blood loss. PMID:27065489

  14. Geographic Access to High Capability Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Yealy, Donald M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimal care of adults with severe acute respiratory failure requires specific resources and expertise. We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States. We defined high capability centers using two criteria: (1) provision of adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), based on either 2008–2013 Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reporting or provision of ECMO to 2010 Medicare beneficiaries; or (2) high annual hospital mechanical ventilation volume, based 2010 Medicare claims. Setting Nonfederal acute care hospitals in the United States. Measurements and Main Results We defined geographic access as the percentage of the state, region and national population with either direct or hospital-transferred access within one or two hours by air or ground transport. Of 4,822 acute care hospitals, 148 hospitals met our ECMO criteria and 447 hospitals met our mechanical ventilation criteria. Geographic access varied substantially across states and regions in the United States, depending on center criteria. Without interhospital transfer, an estimated 58.5% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 79.0% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. With interhospital transfer and under ideal circumstances, an estimated 96.4% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 98.6% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. However, this degree of geographic access required substantial interhospital transfer of patients, including up to two hours by air. Conclusions Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers varies widely across states and regions in the United States. Adequate

  15. Characterization of acute respiratory infections among 340 infants in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiaoli; Han, Zhijun; Chen, Hongmin; Cheng, Juanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the etiological and epidemiological features of acute respiratory infections among children in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province. Methods Nasopharyngeal swab specimens were collected from 340 pediatric patients from Wuxi Second People’s Hospital from June 2012 to May 2014. Seven respiratory viruses including influenza virus A (FA), influenza virus B (FB), parainfluenza virus I (PIVI), parainfluenza virus II (PIVII), parainfluenza virus III (PIVIII), adenovirus (ADV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were detected using direct immunofluorescence method. Epidemiological analysis was performed in terms of gender, age, and seasonal distribution. Results Among these 340 patients, viral pathogens were detected in 116 cases (34.12%), with the leading three viruses being RSV (16.18%; 55/340), FB (5.29%; 18/340), and FA (5.00%; 17/340). The positive rate was not significantly different between male (36.32%; 73/201) and female (31.65%; 44/139) patients (P>0.05). The positive rate was highest in the 0-1-year-old group (48.48%; 32/66) and in winter (42.72%; 44/103). Conclusions RSV is the most commonly detected respiratory virus in Wuxi. Infants aged 0-1 year should be a priority population during disease prevention and control. Respiratory infections among children are more common in winter. PMID:26605310

  16. Initial respiratory status in hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia: prognostic significance and effect of leukapheresis.

    PubMed

    Van de Louw, Andry; Schneider, Coursen W; Desai, Ruchi J; Claxton, David F

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated whether initial respiratory status in hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML), as defined by oxygen/ventilatory support, is (1) associated with early mortality and overall survival and (2) improved after leukapheresis. A retrospective chart review of 89 patients requiring leukapheresis was performed. White blood cell count (WBC) decreased from 153 (56-475) × 10(9)/L to 60 (17-259) × 10(9)/L after first leukapheresis (p < 0.01). Initial respiratory status was room air (n = 40), low (n = 31) or high flow oxygen therapy (n = 8) or mechanical ventilation (n = 10). As compared to admission, respiratory status significantly deteriorated after both first and second leukapheresis (p < 0.01) and was not different at day 5 for patients still alive (p = 0.131). Both day 28 mortality and overall survival were significantly affected by initial respiratory status (p < 0.01). Despite being effective in reducing WBC, leukapheresis did not improve respiratory status of hyperleukocytic AML patients, a factor strongly associated with survival. PMID:26374497

  17. Estimating the risks of smoking, air pollution, and passive smoke on acute respiratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ostro, B.D. )

    1989-06-01

    Five years of the annual Health Interview Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, are used to estimate the effects of air pollution, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory restrictions in activity for adults, and bed disability for children. After adjusting for several socioeconomic factors, the multiple regression estimates indicate that an independent and statistically significant association exists between these three forms of air pollution and respiratory morbidity. The comparative risks of these exposures are computed and the plausibility of the relative risks is examined by comparing the equivalent doses with actual measurements of exposure taken in the homes of smokers. The results indicate that: (1) smokers will have a 55-75% excess in days with respiratory conditions severe enough to cause reductions in normal activity; (2) a 1 microgram increase in fine particulate matter air pollution is associated with a 3% excess in acute respiratory disease; and (3) a pack-a-day smoker will increase respiratory restricted days for a nonsmoking spouse by 20% and increase the number of bed disability days for young children living in the household by 20%. The results also indicate that the estimates of the effects of secondhand smoking on children are improved when the mother's work status is known and incorporated into the exposure estimate.

  18. Acute Viral Respiratory Illnesses in Andean Children: a Household-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Budge, Philip J.; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Williams, John V.; Verastegui, Hector; Hartinger, Stella M.; Johnson, Monika; Klemenc, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Yuwei; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Few community studies have measured the incidence, severity, and etiology of acute respiratory illness (ARI) among children living at high-altitude in remote rural settings. Methods We conducted active, household-based ARI surveillance among children aged <3 years in rural highland communities of San Marcos, Cajamarca, Peru from May 2009 through September 2011 (RESPIRA-PERU study). ARI (defined by fever or cough) were considered lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) if tachypnea, wheezing, grunting, stridor, or retractions were present. Nasal swabs collected during ARI episodes were tested for respiratory viruses by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. ARI incidence was calculated using Poisson regression. Results During 755.1 child-years of observation among 892 children in 58 communities, 4,475 ARI were observed, yielding an adjusted incidence of 6.2 ARI/child-year (95% CI 5.9 – 6.5). Families sought medical care for 24% of ARI, 4% were classified as LRTI, and 1% led to hospitalization. Two of five deaths among cohort children were attributed to ARI. One or more respiratory virus was detected in 67% of 3957 samples collected. Virus-specific incidence rates per 100 child-years were: rhinovirus, 236; adenovirus, 73; parainfluenza virus, 46; influenza, 37; respiratory syncytial virus, 30; and human metapneumovirus, 17. Respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, and parainfluenza virus 1-3 comprised a disproportionate share of LRTI compared to other etiologies. Conclusions In this high-altitude rural setting with low population density, ARI in young children were common, frequently severe, and associated with a number of different respiratory viruses. Effective strategies for prevention and control of these infections are needed. PMID:24378948

  19. [Exposure to tobacco smoke and type of acute respiratory infections in children].

    PubMed

    Bielska, Dorota; Trofimiuk, Emil; Ołdak, Elzbieta; Cylwik, Bogdan; Chlabicz, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are the most common cause of the child and family practice physicians are one of the main reasons for referral to a specialist clinic and hospital pediatric wards. The severity of respiratory disease in adolescence influenced by various factors, endo- and exogenous. Some of them, especially environmental factors can be eliminated or reduced and thus reduce the risk of developing this disease. The most common source of pollutants in dwellings is tobacco smoke. The aim of this study was to assess exposure to tobacco smoke in three years old children of attending local kindergartens in Białystok and its influence on the type of recovery from acute respiratory infections by the respondents. The study included 313 children from among the 1,200 who attend the local 51-kindergartens in Bialystok. Information on the structure of tobacco use in three-years-old-children's families and respiratory illnesses among random children were obtained, based on anonymous questionnaires completed by their carers. Exposure to tobacco smoke was based on questionnaires and serum cotinine in relation to creatinine in the urine of patients (K/K). In the 150 families surveyed children found 210 smoking people. Every day smoked 37.3% of fathers and 23.6% of mothers. Of the children surveyed--34% of the houses which where there was a prohibition on tobacco use, 35% of the houses which were smoked in enclosed areas, in 31% of homes have not been established no-smoking rules. Children who during the six-month period to attend kindergarten gone lower respiratory tract infection had mean K/K (59.57 ng/mg) higher than the ones that were healthy and underwent upper respiratory tract infection. Used by the parents of the children tested in part to reduce the exposure to tobacco smoke in the home environment was ineffective and did not influence the decrease in the incidence of lower respiratory tract. PMID:21360910

  20. Non-invasive ventilation in immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Jerath, Angela; Dres, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The survival rate of immunocompromised patients has improved over the past decades in light of remarkable progress in diagnostic and therapeutic options. Simultaneously, there has been an increase in the number of immunocompromised patients with life threatening complications requiring intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. ICU admission is necessary in up to 15% of patients with acute leukemia and 20% of bone marrow transplantation recipients, and the main reason for ICU referral in this patient population is acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, which is associated with a high mortality rate, particularly in patients requiring endotracheal intubation. The application of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and thus the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation with its side effects, appears therefore of great importance in this patient population. Early trials supported the benefits of NIV in these settings, and the 2011 Canadian guidelines for the use of NIV in critical care settings suggest the use of NIV in immune-compromised patients with a grade 2B recommendation. However, the very encouraging results from initial seminal trials were not confirmed in subsequent observational and randomized clinical studies, questioning the beneficial effect of NIV in immune-compromised patients. Based on these observations, a French group led by Azoulay decided to assess whether early intermittent respiratory support with NIV had a role in reducing the mortality rate of immune-compromised patients with non-hypercapnic hypoxemic respiratory failure developed in less than 72 h, and hence conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in experienced ICUs in France. This perspective reviews the findings from their RCT in the context of the current critical care landscape, and in light of recent results from other trials focused on the early management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. PMID:27076972

  1. Fluid Management With a Simplified Conservative Protocol for the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Colin K.; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Dickerson, Justin B.; Brown, Samuel M.; Lanspa, Michael J.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Schoenfeld, David; Tidswell, Mark; Hite, R. Duncan; Rock, Peter; Miller, Russell R.; Morris, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network, a conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Conservative) resulted in a lower cumulative fluid balance and better outcomes than a liberal fluid protocol (FACTT Liberal). Subsequent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network studies used a simplified conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Lite). The objective of this study was to compare the performance of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal protocols. Design Retrospective comparison of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal. Primary outcome was cumulative fluid balance over 7 days. Secondary outcomes were 60-day adjusted mortality and ventilator-free days through day 28. Safety outcomes were prevalence of acute kidney injury and new shock. Setting ICUs of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network participating hospitals. Patients Five hundred three subjects managed with FACTT Conservative, 497 subjects managed with FACTT Liberal, and 1,124 subjects managed with FACTT Lite. Interventions Fluid management by protocol. Measurements and Main Results Cumulative fluid balance was 1,918 ± 323 mL in FACTT Lite, −136 ±491 mL in FACTT Conservative, and 6,992 ± 502 mL in FACTT Liberal (p < 0.001). Mortality was not different between groups (24% in FACTT Lite, 25% in FACTT Conservative and Liberal, p = 0.84). Ventilator-free days in FACTT Lite (14.9 ±0.3) were equivalent to FACTT Conservative (14.6±0.5) (p = 0.61) and greater than in FACTT Liberal (12.1 ±0.5, p < 0.001 vs Lite). Acute kidney injury prevalence was 58% in FACTT Lite and 57% in FACTT Conservative (p = 0.72). Prevalence of new shock in FACTT Lite (9%) was lower than in FACTT Conservative (13%) (p = 0.007 vs Lite) and similar to FACTT Liberal (11%) (p = 0.18 vs Lite). Conclusions FACTT Lite had a greater cumulative fluid balance than FACTT Conservative but had equivalent clinical and safety outcomes

  2. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  3. Surveillance of Acute Respiratory Infections Using Community-Submitted Symptoms and Specimens for Molecular Diagnostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Jennifer; Rowe, Aaron; Brownstein, John S.; Chunara, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Participatory systems for surveillance of acute respiratory infection give real-time information about infections circulating in the community, yet to-date are limited to self-reported syndromic information only and lacking methods of linking symptom reports to infection types. We developed the GoViral platform to evaluate whether a cohort of lay volunteers could, and would find it useful to, contribute self-reported symptoms online and to compare specimen types for self-collected diagnostic information of sufficient quality for respiratory infection surveillance. Volunteers were recruited, given a kit (collection materials and customized instructions), instructed to report their symptoms weekly, and when sick with cold or flu-like symptoms, requested to collect specimens (saliva and nasal swab). We compared specimen types for respiratory virus detection sensitivity (via polymerase-chain-reaction) and ease of collection. Participants were surveyed to determine receptivity to participating when sick, to receiving information on the type of pathogen causing their infection and types circulating near them. Between December 1 2013 and March 1 2014, 295 participants enrolled in the study and received a kit. Of those who reported symptoms, half (71) collected and sent specimens for analysis. Participants submitted kits on average 2.30 days (95 CI: 1.65 to 2.96) after symptoms began. We found good concordance between nasal and saliva specimens for multiple pathogens, with few discrepancies. Individuals report that saliva collection is easiest and report that receiving information about what pathogen they, and those near them, have is valued and can shape public health behaviors. Community-submitted specimens can be used for the detection of acute respiratory infection with individuals showing receptivity for participating and interest in a real-time picture of respiratory pathogens near them. PMID:26075141

  4. Clinical indicators of ineffective airway clearance in children with acute respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Livia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Herdman, T Heather; Lira, Ana Luisa Brandão de Carvalho; Teixeira, Iane Ximenes; Costa, Alice Gabrielle de Sousa

    2016-09-01

    The identification of clinical indicators with good predictive ability allows the nurse to minimize the existing variability in clinical situations presented by the patient and to accurately identify the nursing diagnosis, which represents the true clinical condition. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accuracy of NANDA-I clinical indicators of the nursing diagnosis ineffective airway clearance (IAC) in children with acute respiratory infection. This was a prospective cohort study conducted with a group of 136 children and followed for a period of time ranging from 6 to 10 consecutive days. For data analysis, the measures of accuracy were calculated for clinical indicators, which presented statistical significance in a generalized estimated equation model. IAC was present in 91.9% of children in the first assessment. Adventitious breath sounds presented the best measure of accuracy. Ineffective cough presented a high value of sensitivity. Changes in respiratory rate, wide-eyed, diminished breath sounds, and difficulty vocalizing presented high positive predictive values. In conclusion, adventitious breath sounds showed the best predictive ability to diagnose IAC in children with respiratory acute infection. PMID:26311487

  5. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  6. Amoebic liver abscess – a cause of acute respiratory distress in an infant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The usual presentation of amebic liver abscess in children is extremely variable and unpredictable. It presents with a picture of common pediatric illness that is fever, lethargy, and abdominal pain, and can go on to develop into a rare complication of rupture into the pleura to cause acute respiratory distress, which is another common pediatric illness. In our patient, diagnosis was not made or suspected in these two stages. Case presentation This is the report of a 2-year-old male infant who presented with a 2-week history of anorexia, fever, and abdominal pain. A few hours after admission, he suddenly developed acute respiratory distress; chest X-ray demonstrated massive right pleural effusion that failed to response to tube thoracostomy. Limited thoracotomy revealed a ruptured amebic liver abscess through the right cupola of the diaphragm. The content of the abscess was evacuated from the pleural cavity, which was drained with two large chest tubes. Serological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ruptured amebic liver abscess. Postoperative treatment with antibiotics including metronidazole continued until full recovery. Conclusion Diagnosis of such a rare disease requires a high degree of suspicion. In this patient, the diagnosis was only made postoperatively. The delay in presentation and the sudden onset of respiratory distress must be emphasized for all those physicians who care for children. PMID:19192277

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Increases Infant Acute Respiratory Illness Severity, but not Childhood Asthma.

    PubMed

    Valet, Robert S; Carroll, Kecia N; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Minton, Patricia A; Woodward, Kimberly B; Liu, Zhouwen; Hartert, Tina V

    2014-03-01

    It is unknown whether gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) during infancy affects infant bronchiolitis severity or childhood asthma inception. Four hundred thirty-two infants presenting with acute respiratory illness due to bronchiolitis or upper respiratory infection were studied. The primary exposure was the parental report of a previous GERD diagnosis. Outcomes included bronchiolitis severity at initial presentation and childhood asthma diagnosis at age 4. Infants with parentally reported GERD had a higher bronchiolitis severity score (range=0-12, clinically significant difference=0.5), indicating more severe disease, than infants without reported GERD (median 5.5 [interquartile range 3.5-9.0] among those with reported GERD versus 4.0 [1.0-7.0] among those without, P=0.005). This association persisted after adjusting for infant age, race, gender, and secondhand smoke exposure by a propensity score (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-3.46, P=0.02). The parental report of GERD during infancy was not associated with the parental report of asthma diagnosis at age 4. GERD during infancy may contribute to acute respiratory illness severity, but is not associated with asthma diagnosis at age 4. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24669353

  8. Viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases in Rio de Janeiro: first two years of a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Sutmoller, F.; Nascimento, J. P.; Chaves, J. R. S.; Ferreira, V.; Pereira, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    A two-year study was undertaken to establish the incidence and possible viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases among the child population of a shanty town in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results demonstrated that nearly half of all the illnesses seen were respiratory infections, 10% of them affecting the lower respiratory tract. Viruses were isolated from 20% of the throat swabs collected. Of the viruses identified, 47% were adenoviruses, 25% were enteroviruses, 9% were influenza A, 8% herpes simplex, 7% parainfluenza, 3% respiratory syncytial and 1% influenza B viruses. PMID:6606500

  9. Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia increases growth/neurotrophic factor expression in non-respiratory motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Satriotomo, I; Nichols, N L; Dale, E A; Emery, A T; Dahlberg, J M; Mitchell, G S

    2016-05-13

    Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia (rAIH) increases growth/trophic factor expression in respiratory motor neurons, thereby eliciting spinal respiratory motor plasticity and/or neuroprotection. Here we demonstrate that rAIH effects are not unique to respiratory motor neurons, but are also expressed in non-respiratory, spinal alpha motor neurons and upper motor neurons of the motor cortex. In specific, we used immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence to assess growth/trophic factor protein expression in spinal sections from rats exposed to AIH three times per week for 10weeks (3×wAIH). 3×wAIH increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), and phosphorylated TrkB (pTrkB) immunoreactivity in putative alpha motor neurons of spinal cervical 7 (C7) and lumbar 3 (L3) segments, as well as in upper motor neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1). 3×wAIH also increased immunoreactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), the high-affinity VEGFA receptor (VEGFR-2) and an important VEGF gene regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Thus, rAIH effects on growth/trophic factors are characteristic of non-respiratory as well as respiratory motor neurons. rAIH may be a useful tool in the treatment of disorders causing paralysis, such as spinal injury and motor neuron disease, as a pretreatment to enhance motor neuron survival during disease, or as preconditioning for cell-transplant therapies. PMID:26944605

  10. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Derek D.; Lucas, Joseph E.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Woods, Christopher W.; Newby, L. Kristin; Kraus, William E.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1) a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES) was associated with MI and 2) respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES) of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI. Methods A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) (n=20), Human Rhinovirus (HRV) (n=20), Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1) (n=24), Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2) (n=17). We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status. Results In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32) had MI versus 12.2% (69/567) among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04). In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04). Conclusions A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection

  11. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field. PMID:23462428

  12. Bacterial lysate in the prevention of acute exacerbation of COPD and in respiratory recurrent infections

    PubMed Central

    Braido, F; Tarantini, F; Ghiglione, V; Melioli, G; Canonica, G W

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent a serious problem because they are one of the most common cause of human death by infection. The search for the treatment of those diseases has therefore a great importance. In this study we provide an overview of the currently available treatments for RTIs with particular attention to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases exacerbations and recurrent respiratory infections therapy and a description of bacterial lysate action, in particular making reference to the medical literature dealing with its clinical efficacy. Those studies are based on a very large number of clinical trials aimed to evaluate the effects of this drug in maintaining the immune system in a state of alert, and in increasing the defences against microbial infections. From this analysis it comes out that bacterial lysates have a protective effect, which induce a significant reduction of the symptoms related to respiratory infections. Those results could be very interesting also from an economic point of view, because they envisage a reduction in the number of acute exacerbations and a shorter duration of hospitalization. The use of bacterial lysate could therefore represent an important means to achieve an extension of life duration in patients affected by respiratory diseases. PMID:18229572

  13. Computerised Analysis of Telemonitored Respiratory Sounds for Predicting Acute Exacerbations of COPD.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Granero, Miguel Angel; Sanchez-Morillo, Daniel; Leon-Jimenez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the commonest causes of death in the world and poses a substantial burden on healthcare systems and patients' quality of life. The largest component of the related healthcare costs is attributable to admissions due to acute exacerbation (AECOPD). The evidence that might support the effectiveness of the telemonitoring interventions in COPD is limited partially due to the lack of useful predictors for the early detection of AECOPD. Electronic stethoscopes and computerised analyses of respiratory sounds (CARS) techniques provide an opportunity for substantial improvement in the management of respiratory diseases. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using: (a) a respiratory sensor embedded in a self-tailored housing for ageing users; (b) a telehealth framework; (c) CARS and (d) machine learning techniques for the remote early detection of the AECOPD. In a 6-month pilot study, 16 patients with COPD were equipped with a home base-station and a sensor to daily record their respiratory sounds. Principal component analysis (PCA) and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier was designed to predict AECOPD. 75.8% exacerbations were early detected with an average of 5 ± 1.9 days in advance at medical attention. The proposed method could provide support to patients, physicians and healthcare systems. PMID:26512667

  14. Computerised Analysis of Telemonitored Respiratory Sounds for Predicting Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Granero, Miguel Angel; Sanchez-Morillo, Daniel; Leon-Jimenez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the commonest causes of death in the world and poses a substantial burden on healthcare systems and patients’ quality of life. The largest component of the related healthcare costs is attributable to admissions due to acute exacerbation (AECOPD). The evidence that might support the effectiveness of the telemonitoring interventions in COPD is limited partially due to the lack of useful predictors for the early detection of AECOPD. Electronic stethoscopes and computerised analyses of respiratory sounds (CARS) techniques provide an opportunity for substantial improvement in the management of respiratory diseases. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using: (a) a respiratory sensor embedded in a self-tailored housing for ageing users; (b) a telehealth framework; (c) CARS and (d) machine learning techniques for the remote early detection of the AECOPD. In a 6-month pilot study, 16 patients with COPD were equipped with a home base-station and a sensor to daily record their respiratory sounds. Principal component analysis (PCA) and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier was designed to predict AECOPD. 75.8% exacerbations were early detected with an average of 5 ± 1.9 days in advance at medical attention. The proposed method could provide support to patients, physicians and healthcare systems. PMID:26512667

  15. Detection and characterization of respiratory viruses causing acute respiratory illness and asthma exacerbation in children during three different seasons (2011–2014) in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Valencia, Yazmin; Hernandez-Hernandez, Victor A; Romero-Espinoza, Jose A I; Coronel-Tellez, Rodrigo H; Castillejos-Lopez, Manuel; Hernandez, Andres; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Alejandre-Garcia, Alejandro; de la Rosa-Zamboni, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E; Vazquez-Perez, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Viral infections play a significant role in causing acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and exacerbations of chronic diseases. Acute respiratory infections are now the leading cause of mortality in children worldwide, especially in developing countries. Recently, human rhinovirus (HRV) infection has been emerged as an important cause of pneumonia and asthma exacerbation. Objectives To determine the role of several viral agents principally, respiratory syncytial virus, and HRV in children with ARIs and their relationship with asthma exacerbation and pneumonia. Methods Between October 2011 and March 2014, 432 nasopharyngeal samples of children <15 years of age with ARI hospitalized at a referral hospital for respiratory diseases were tested for the presence of respiratory viruses using a multiplex RT-qPCR. Clinical, epidemiological, and demographic data were collected and associated with symptomatology and viral infections. Results Viral infections were detected in at least 59·7% of the enrolled patients, with HRV (26·6%) being the most frequently detected. HRV infections were associated with clinical features of asthma and difficulty in breathing such as wheezing (P = 0·0003), supraesternal (P = 0·046), and xiphoid retraction (P = 0·030). HRV subtype C (HRV-C) infections were associated with asthma (P = 0·02). Conclusions Human rhinovirus was the virus most commonly detected in pediatric patients with ARI. There is also an association of HRV-C infection with asthma exacerbation, emphasizing the relevance of this virus in severe pediatric respiratory disease. PMID:26289993

  16. Respiratory controversies in the critical care setting. Should noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation be used in all forms of acute respiratory failure?

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R; Fessler, Henry E

    2007-05-01

    Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) has been a major advance in the management of acute respiratory failure. Over the past decade alone, NPPV has been the subject of over 1,500 scientific papers, including 14 meta-analyses. NPPV's utility in many clinical settings has been well established, with demonstration in randomized trials of lower intubation rate, mortality, hospital stay, and advantages in other important clinical outcomes. However, it is still used in a minority of patients with acute respiratory failure. While there probably are situations in which NPPV is commonly under-utilized, there are other situations in which it is unlikely to be of benefit or likely to inflict harm. This paper debates the data for and against the more widespread application of NPPV. It will assist the clinician to identify both good and poor candidates for NPPV and thereby devote respiratory care resources where they will be most effective, and optimize patient outcomes. PMID:17484789

  17. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: role of nutritional modulation of inflammation through dietary lipids.

    PubMed

    Mizock, Barry A; DeMichele, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most serious form of acute hypoxic respiratory failure. ARDS represents the expression of an acute, diffuse, inflammatory process in the lungs consequent to a variety of infectious and noninfectious conditions. It is characterized pathologically by damage to pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells, with subsequent alveolar-capillary leak and exudative pulmonary edema. The main clinical features of ARDS include rapid onset of dyspnea, severe defects in gas exchange, and imaging studies demonstrating diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. The role of nutrition in the management of ARDS has traditionally been supportive. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of certain dietary oils (eg, fish oil, borage oil) to modulate pulmonary inflammation, thereby improving lung compliance and oxygenation, and reducing time on mechanical ventilation. This article reviews the alterations in the immune response that underlie ARDS, discusses the physiology of dietary oils as immunonutrients, summarizes animal and human studies that explore the therapeutic effects of dietary oils, and provides clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:16215155

  18. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Injured lungs can be partially protected by optimal settings and ventilation modes, using low tidal volume (VT) values and high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). The benefits in ARDS outcomes caused by these interventions have been confirmed by several prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and are attributed to reduction in volutrauma. The purpose of this article is to present an approach to VILI pathophysiology focused on the effects of volutrauma that lead to lung injury and the ‘mechanotransduction’ mechanism. A more complete understanding about the molecular effects that physical forces could have, is essential for a better assessment of existing strategies as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies to reduce the damage resulting from VILI, and thereby contribute to reducing mortality in ARDS. PMID:26312103

  19. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality. PMID:26312101

  20. Noninvasive ventilation practice patterns for acute respiratory failure in Canadian tertiary care centres: A descriptive analysis

    PubMed Central

    Digby, Geneviève C; Keenan, Sean P; Parker, Christopher M; Sinuff, Tasnim; Burns, Karen E; Mehta, Sangeeta; Ronco, Juan J; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Rose, Louise; Ayas, Najib T; Berthiaume, Luc R; D’Arsigny, Christine L; Stollery, Daniel E; Muscedere, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) use for patients with acute respiratory failure in Canadian hospitals, indications for use and associated outcomes are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To describe NIV practice variation in the acute setting. METHODS: A prospective observational study involving 11 Canadian tertiary care centres was performed. Data regarding NIV indication, mode and outcomes were collected for all adults (>16 years of age) treated with NIV for acute respiratory failure during a four-week period (between February and August 2011). Logistic regression with site as a random effect was used to examine the association between preselected predictors and mortality or intubation. RESULTS: A total of 330 patients (mean [± SD] 30±12 per centre) were included. The most common indications for NIV initiation were pulmonary edema (104 [31.5%]) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (99 [30.0%]). Significant differences in indications for NIV use across sites, specialty of ordering physician and location of NIV initiation were noted. Although intubation rates were not statistically different among sites (range 10.3% to 45.4%), mortality varied significantly (range 6.7% to 54.5%; P=0.006). In multivariate analysis, the most significant independent predictor of avoiding intubation was do-not-resuscitate status (OR 0.11 [95% CI 0.03 to 0.37]). CONCLUSION: Significant variability existed in NIV use and associated outcomes among Canadian tertiary care centres. Assignment of do-not-resuscitate status prevented intubation. PMID:26469155

  1. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Praveen; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Khilnani, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants. PMID:26962356

  2. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. I. Pathophysiology and mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a cardinal sign of both acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Normally, mucus protects respiratory tract, but its overproduction leads to airway obstruction and promotes bacterial colonization. In the first part of our review we outlined the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion and clinical consequences of this process. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Mechanisms of action and indications for use of mucolytics are presented. Mucolytics have been shown to have a role in improving lung functions and patients' quality of life. Undoubtedly they are useful as an adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053600

  3. New coronavirus outbreak. Lessons learned from the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, E; Donado-Campos, J; Morilla, F

    2015-10-01

    System dynamics approach offers great potential for addressing how intervention policies can affect the spread of emerging infectious diseases in complex and highly networked systems. Here, we develop a model that explains the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) epidemic that occurred in Hong Kong in 2003. The dynamic model developed with system dynamics methodology included 23 variables (five states, four flows, eight auxiliary variables, six parameters), five differential equations and 12 algebraic equations. The parameters were optimized following an iterative process of simulation to fit the real data from the epidemics. Univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the reliability of the model. In addition, we discuss how further testing using this model can inform community interventions to reduce the risk in current and future outbreaks, such as the recently Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) epidemic. PMID:25591619

  4. [Acute respiratory distress subordinate to a morphine overdose during a frail elderly patient controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ades, A; Compère, V; Abriou, C; Baert, O; Fourdrinier, V; Dureuil, B

    2009-04-01

    We describe a case-report of an 85-year-male patient with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) after a total hip arthroplasty. Four hours after surgery, acute respiratory distress secondary to a morphine overdose occurred, requiring an antagonisation with naloxone. Morphine overdose during a PCA was always caused by a wrong use of the pump. In this case-report, no mistake of programming or administration's use was found. Too important morphine's doses managed in comparison with the patient's age and his renal failure could explain this morphine's accumulation and the respiratory distress. This observation reminds us the obligation to determine the optimal posology in accordance with the rate of glomerular filtration estimated by Cockcroft and Gault formula for patients using a PCA. PMID:19361945

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody–positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, I-Nae

    2016-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  7. Detection of airborne severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and environmental contamination in SARS outbreak units.

    PubMed

    Booth, Timothy F; Kournikakis, Bill; Bastien, Nathalie; Ho, Jim; Kobasa, Darwyn; Stadnyk, Laurie; Li, Yan; Spence, Mel; Paton, Shirley; Henry, Bonnie; Mederski, Barbara; White, Diane; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison; Simor, Andrew; Vearncombe, Mary; Downey, James; Jamieson, Frances B; Tang, Patrick; Plummer, Frank

    2005-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by a risk of nosocomial transmission; however, the risk of airborne transmission of SARS is unknown. During the Toronto outbreaks of SARS, we investigated environmental contamination in SARS units, by employing novel air sampling and conventional surface swabbing. Two polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive air samples were obtained from a room occupied by a patient with SARS, indicating the presence of the virus in the air of the room. In addition, several PCR-positive swab samples were recovered from frequently touched surfaces in rooms occupied by patients with SARS (a bed table and a television remote control) and in a nurses' station used by staff (a medication refrigerator door). These data provide the first experimental confirmation of viral aerosol generation by a patient with SARS, indicating the possibility of airborne droplet transmission, which emphasizes the need for adequate respiratory protection, as well as for strict surface hygiene practices. PMID:15809906

  8. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Praveen; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Khilnani, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants. PMID:26962356

  9. Noninvasive radiographic assessment of cardiovascular function in acute and chronic respiratory failure

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.J.; Matthay, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    Noninvasive radiographic techniques have provided a means of studying the natural history and pathogenesis of cardiovascular performance in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Chest radiography, radionuclide angiocardiography and thallium-201 imaging, and M mode and cross-sectional echocardiography have been employed. Each of these techniques has specific uses, attributes and limitations. For example, measurement of descending pulmonary arterial diameters on the plain chest radiograph allows determination of the presence or absence of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Right and left ventricular performance can be evaluated at rest and during exercise using radionuclide angiocardiography. The biventricular response to exercise and to therapeutic interventions also can be assessed with this approach. Evaluation of the pulmonary valve echogram and echocardiographic right ventricular dimensions have been shown to reflect right ventricular hemodynamics and size. Each of these noninvasive techniques has been applied to the study of patients with respiratory failure and has provided important physiologic data.

  10. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI. PMID:25983014

  11. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moesker, Fleur M.; van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. Objective The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Study Design Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (<18 year) with or without a medical history, admitted to our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI or to the medium care (MC) with an acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. Results We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Conclusion Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified. PMID:26964038

  12. Identification and Characterization of a New Orthoreovirus from Patients with Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Voon, Kenny; Crameri, Gary; Tan, Hui Siu; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer A.; Suluraju, Sivagami; Yu, Meng; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    First discovered in the early 1950s, reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were not associated with any known disease, and hence named orphan viruses. Recently, our group reported the isolation of the Melaka virus from a patient with acute respiratory disease and provided data suggesting that this new orthoreovirus is capable of human-to-human transmission and is probably of bat origin. Here we report yet another Melaka-like reovirus (named Kampar virus) isolated from the throat swab of a 54 year old male patient in Kampar, Perak, Malaysia who was suffering from high fever, acute respiratory disease and vomiting at the time of virus isolation. Serological studies indicated that Kampar virus was transmitted from the index case to at least one other individual and caused respiratory disease in the contact case. Sequence analysis of the four small class genome segments indicated that Kampar and Melaka viruses are closely related. This was confirmed by virus neutralization assay, showing an effective two-way cross neutralization, i.e., the serum against one virus was able to neutralize the other. Although the exact origin of Kampar virus is unknown, epidemiological tracing revealed that the house of the index case is surrounded by fruit trees frequently visited by fruit bats. There is a high probability that Kampar virus originated from bats and was transmitted to humans via bat droppings or contaminated fruits. The discovery of Kampar virus highlights the increasing trend of emergence of bat zoonotic viruses and the need to expand our understanding of bats as a source of many unknown viruses. PMID:19030226

  13. Evidence of Recombination and Genetic Diversity in Human Rhinoviruses in Children with Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Peijun; Sheng, Jun; Yan, Huajie; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Xin; Wang, Yongjin; Delpeyroux, Francis; Deubel, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are a highly prevalent cause of acute respiratory infection in children. They are classified into at least three species, HRV-A, HRV-B and HRV-C, which are characterized by sequencing the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) or the VP4/VP2 region of the genome. Given the increased interest for novel HRV strain identification and their worldwide distribution, we have carried out clinical and molecular diagnosis of HRV strains in a 2-year study of children with acute respiratory infection visiting one district hospital in Shanghai. Methodology/Findings We cloned and sequenced a 924-nt fragment that covered part of the 5′UTR and the VP4/VP2 capsid genes. Sixty-four HRV-infected outpatients were diagnosed amongst 827 children with acute low respiratory tract infection. Two samples were co-infected with HRV-A and HRV-B or HRV-C. By comparative analysis of the VP4/VP2 sequences of the 66 HRVs, we showed a high diversity of strains in HRV-A and HRV-B species, and a prevalence of 51.5% of strains that belonged to the recently identified HRV-C species. When analyzing a fragment of the 5′ UTR, we characterized at least two subspecies of HRV-C: HRV-Cc, which clustered differently from HRV-A and HRV-B, and HRV-Ca, which resulted from previous recombination in this region with sequences related to HRV-A. The full-length sequence of one strain of each HRV-Ca and HRV-Cc subspecies was obtained for comparative analysis. We confirmed the close relationship of their structural proteins but showed apparent additional recombination events in the 2A gene and 3′UTR of the HRV-Ca strain. Double or triple infections with HRV-C and respiratory syncytial virus and/or bocavirus were diagnosed in 33.3% of the HRV-infected patients, but no correlation with severity of clinical outcome was observed. Conclusion Our study showed a high diversity of HRV strains that cause bronchitis and pneumonia in children. A predominance of HRV-C over HRV-A and HRV-B was

  14. Negative findings concerning Alcaligenes faecalis as an etiologic agent in acute respiratory disease of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Singer, N; Weisman, Y; Aronovici, A

    1981-01-01

    An acute respiratory disease of turkeys in Israel was first reported in November 1978. Alcaligenes faecalis was isolated from sick turkeys and from chickens not affected by the disease. Plate agglutination tests with A. faecalis antigen of 1,067 turkey and 494 chicken serum samples gave variable results: healthy turkeys gave positive reactions and sick turkeys sometimes gave negative ones. All isolated strains were highly sensitive in vitro drug sensitivity tests, but chemotherapy failed in the field. Pathogenicity trials with A. faecalis, given alone or in combination with Yucaipa virus to 8-day-old turkey poults, failed to reproduce the disease. PMID:7259671

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Katrina E; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction. PMID:27275457

  16. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  17. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wardrope, Katrina E.; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D. O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction.

  18. Low risk of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome on airplanes: the Singapore experience.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Paton, Nicholas I; Goh, Kee Tai

    2003-11-01

    The risk of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on airplanes is of major concern to the public and airline industry. We examined data from flights to Singapore with SARS patients on board in order to assess this risk. In-flight transmission occurred only in one of the three flights with symptomatic SARS patients on board. The incidence was estimated to be 1 out of 156 passengers. The risk of in-flight transmission of SARS appears to be far lower than that reported for influenza, but may be increased with superspreaders on board. PMID:14629772

  19. BiPAP in acute respiratory failure due to myasthenic crisis may prevent intubation.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2002-11-26

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation using bilevel positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) has not been studied in acute respiratory failure caused by MG. Eleven episodes in nine patients were initially managed with BiPAP, and endotracheal intubation was avoided in seven of these trials. Presence of hypercapnia (PaCO2 greater than 50 mm Hg) at onset predicted BiPAP failure and subsequent intubation. Results of this preliminary study suggest that a trial of BiPAP may prevent intubation in patients with myasthenic crisis without overt hypercapnia. PMID:12451217

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: new definition, current and future therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Vlachou, Aikaterini; Ghannadian, Shirin; Simonetti, Umberto; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    Since acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was first described in 1967 there has been large number of studies addressing its pathogenesis and therapies. Despite this intense research activity, there are very few effective therapies for ARDS other than the use of lung protection strategies. This lack of therapeutic modalities is not only related to the complex pathogenesis of this syndrome but also the insensitive and nonspecific diagnostic criteria to diagnose ARDS. This review article will summarize the key features of the new definition of ARDS, and provide a brief overview of innovative therapeutic options that are being assessed in the management of ARDS. PMID:23825769

  1. Public Health Lessons from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome a Decade Later

    PubMed Central

    Butler-Jones, David; Tsang, Thomas; Yu, Wang

    2013-01-01

    The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2002–2003 exacted considerable human and economic costs from countries involved. It also exposed major weaknesses in several of these countries in coping with an outbreak of a newly emerged infectious disease. In the 10 years since the outbreak, in addition to the increase in knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of this disease, a major lesson learned is the value of having a national public health institute that is prepared to control disease outbreaks and designed to coordinate a national response and assist localities in their responses. PMID:23739634

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-05-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  4. Managing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) intellectual property rights: the possible role of patent pooling.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, James H. M.; Claassen, Eric; Correa, Carmen E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Patent applications that incorporate the genomic sequence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, have been filed by a number of organizations. This is likely to result in a fragmentation of intellectual property (IP) rights which in turn may adversely affect the development of products, such as vaccines, to combat SARS. Placing these patent rights into a patent pool to be licensed on a non-exclusive basis may circumvent these difficulties and set a key precedent for the use of this form of mechanism in other areas of health care, leading to benefits to public health. PMID:16211163

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to systemic lupus erythematosus with hemophagocytic syndrome: an autopsy report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuma; Matsuda, Masayuki; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Hosoda, Waki; Gono, Takahisa; Hoshi, Kenichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2005-04-01

    This report concerns a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who died of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 1 day after the onset of pulmonary symptoms. Autopsy demonstrated severe hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and histopathology indicating a marked increase in vascular permeability in both lungs and kidneys. In this patient, active SLE and associated hemophagocytic syndrome may have induced an increase in the production of inflammatory cytokines, which immediately induced ARDS. Since fatal ARDS can occur as a life-threatening complication of SLE, careful observation is necessary, particularly when there are clinical findings suggestive of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:15338452

  6. Longitudinal Analysis of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus-Specific Antibody in SARS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shan-Chwen; Wang, Jann-Tay; Huang, Li-Min; Chen, Yee-Chun; Fang, Chi-Tai; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Wang, Jiun-Ling; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2005-01-01

    The serum antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus of 18 SARS patients were checked at 1 month and every 3 months after disease onset. All of them except one, who missed blood sampling at 1 month, tested positive for the immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody at 1 month. Fifteen out of 17 tested positive for the IgM antibody at 1 month. The serum IgM antibody of most patients became undetectable within 6 months after the onset of SARS. The IgG antibody of all 17 patients, whose serum was checked 1 year after disease onset, remained positive. PMID:16339072

  7. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  8. Evaluation of Four Commercial Multiplex Molecular Tests for the Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Salez, Nicolas; Vabret, Astrid; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Andreoletti, Laurent; Carrat, Fabrice; Renois, Fanny; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs) are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Documentation of respiratory specimens can help for an appropriate clinical management with a significant effect on the disease progress in patient, the antimicrobial therapy used and the risk of secondary spread of infection. Here, we compared the performances of four commercial multiplex kits used in French University Hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratories for the detection of ARI pathogens (i.e., the xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel Fast, RespiFinder SMART 22, CLART PneumoVir and Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory Pathogen 33 kits). We used a standardised nucleic acids extraction protocol and a comprehensive comparative approach that mixed reference to well established real-time PCR detection techniques and analysis of convergent positive results. We tested 166 respiratory clinical samples and identified a global high degree of correlation for at least three of the techniques (xTAG, RespiFinder and FTD33). For these techniques, the highest Youden’s index (YI), positive predictive (PPV) and specificity (Sp) values were observed for Core tests (e.g., influenza A [YI:0.86–1.00; PPV:78.95–100.00; Sp:97.32–100.00] & B [YI:0.44–1.00; PPV:100.00; Sp:100.00], hRSV [YI:0.50–0.99; PPV:85.71–100.00; Sp:99.38–100.00], hMPV [YI:0.71–1.00; PPV:83.33–100.00; Sp:99.37–100.00], EV/hRV [YI:0.62–0.82; PPV:93.33–100.00; Sp:94.48–100.00], AdV [YI:1.00; PPV:100.00; Sp:100.00] and hBoV [YI:0.20–0.80; PPV:57.14–100.00; Sp:98.14–100.00]). The present study completed an overview of the multiplex techniques available for the diagnosis of acute respiratory infections. PMID:26107509

  9. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27418297

  10. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26106066

  11. Acute Viral Respiratory Infection Rapidly Induces a CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion-like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Erickson, John J; Lu, Pengcheng; Wen, Sherry; Hastings, Andrew K; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Joyce, Sebastian; Shyr, Yu; Williams, John V

    2015-11-01

    Acute viral infections typically generate functional effector CD8(+) T cells (TCD8) that aid in pathogen clearance. However, during acute viral lower respiratory infection, lung TCD8 are functionally impaired and do not optimally control viral replication. T cells also become unresponsive to Ag during chronic infections and cancer via signaling by inhibitory receptors such as programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). PD-1 also contributes to TCD8 impairment during viral lower respiratory infection, but how it regulates TCD8 impairment and the connection between this state and T cell exhaustion during chronic infections are unknown. In this study, we show that PD-1 operates in a cell-intrinsic manner to impair lung TCD8. In light of this, we compared global gene expression profiles of impaired epitope-specific lung TCD8 to functional spleen TCD8 in the same human metapneumovirus-infected mice. These two populations differentially regulate hundreds of genes, including the upregulation of numerous inhibitory receptors by lung TCD8. We then compared the gene expression of TCD8 during human metapneumovirus infection to those in acute or chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. We find that the immunophenotype of lung TCD8 more closely resembles T cell exhaustion late into chronic infection than do functional effector T cells arising early in acute infection. Finally, we demonstrate that trafficking to the infected lung alone is insufficient for TCD8 impairment or inhibitory receptor upregulation, but that viral Ag-induced TCR signaling is also required. Our results indicate that viral Ag in infected lungs rapidly induces an exhaustion-like state in lung TCD8 characterized by progressive functional impairment and upregulation of numerous inhibitory receptors. PMID:26401005

  12. Cardiac Function in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Bee; Choi, Han Seul; Son, Sejung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Respiratory symptoms are often observed in children with Kawasaki disease (KD) during the acute phase. The association of respiratory viruses in children with KD was investigated using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Subjects and Methods 138 KD patients were included from January 2010 to June 2013. We compared 3 groups (group 1: n=94, KD without respiratory symptoms; group 2: n=44, KD with respiratory symptoms; and group 3: n=50, febrile patients with respiratory symptoms). Laboratory data were obtained from each patient including N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Echocardiographic measurements were compared between group 1 and group 2. RT-PCR was performed using nasopharyngeal secretion to screen for the presence of 14 viruses in groups 2 and 3. Results The incidence of KD with respiratory symptoms was 31.8%. The duration of fever was significantly longer, and coronary artery diameter was larger in group 2 than in group 1. Tei index was significantly higher and coronary artery diameter larger in group 2 than group 1. Coronary artery diameter, C-reactive protein levels, platelet count, alanine aminotransferase levels, and NT-pro BNP levels were significantly higher and albumin levels lower in group 2 compared with group 3. Conclusion NT-pro BNP was a valuable diagnostic tool in differentiating KD from other febrile viral respiratory infections. Some viruses were more frequently observed in KD patients than in febrile controls. Tei index using tissue Doppler imaging was increased in KD patients with respiratory symptoms. PMID:26240586

  13. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  14. Comparative Epidemiology of Human Infections with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronaviruses among Healthcare Personnel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shelan; Chan, Ta-Chien; Chu, Yu-Tseng; Wu, Joseph Tsung-Shu; Geng, Xingyi; Zhao, Na; Cheng, Wei; Chen, Enfu; King, Chwan-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    The largest nosocomial outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) occurred in South Korea in 2015. Health Care Personnel (HCP) are at high risk of acquiring MERS-Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections, similar to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infections first identified in 2003. This study described the similarities and differences in epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 183 confirmed global MERS cases and 98 SARS cases in Taiwan associated with HCP. The epidemiological findings showed that the mean age of MERS-HCP and total MERS cases were 40 (24~74) and 49 (2~90) years, respectively, much older than those in SARS [SARS-HCP: 35 (21~68) years, p = 0.006; total SARS: 42 (0~94) years, p = 0.0002]. The case fatality rates (CFR) was much lower in MERS-HCP [7.03% (9/128)] or SARS-HCP [12.24% (12/98)] than the MERS-non-HCP [36.96% (34/92), p<0.001] or SARS-non-HCP [24.50% (61/249), p<0.001], however, no difference was found between MERS-HCP and SARS-HCP [p = 0.181]. In terms of clinical period, the days from onset to death [13 (4~17) vs 14.5 (0~52), p = 0.045] and to discharge [11 (5~24) vs 24 (0~74), p = 0.010] and be hospitalized days [9.5 (3~22) vs 22 (0~69), p = 0.040] were much shorter in MERS-HCP than SARS-HCP. Similarly, days from onset to confirmation were shorter in MERS-HCP than MERS-non-HCP [6 (1~14) vs 10 (1~21), p = 0.044]. In conclusion, the severity of MERS-HCP and SARS-HCP was lower than that of MERS-non-HCP and SARS-non-HCP due to younger age and early confirmation in HCP groups. However, no statistical difference was found in MERS-HCP and SARS-HCP. Thus, prevention of nosocomial infections involving both novel Coronavirus is crucially important to protect HCP. PMID:26930074

  15. Comparative Epidemiology of Human Infections with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronaviruses among Healthcare Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yu-Tseng; Wu, Joseph Tsung-Shu; Geng, Xingyi; Zhao, Na; Cheng, Wei; Chen, Enfu; King, Chwan-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    The largest nosocomial outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) occurred in South Korea in 2015. Health Care Personnel (HCP) are at high risk of acquiring MERS-Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections, similar to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infections first identified in 2003. This study described the similarities and differences in epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 183 confirmed global MERS cases and 98 SARS cases in Taiwan associated with HCP. The epidemiological findings showed that the mean age of MERS-HCP and total MERS cases were 40 (24~74) and 49 (2~90) years, respectively, much older than those in SARS [SARS-HCP: 35 (21~68) years, p = 0.006; total SARS: 42 (0~94) years, p = 0.0002]. The case fatality rates (CFR) was much lower in MERS-HCP [7.03% (9/128)] or SARS-HCP [12.24% (12/98)] than the MERS-non-HCP [36.96% (34/92), p<0.001] or SARS-non-HCP [24.50% (61/249), p<0.001], however, no difference was found between MERS-HCP and SARS-HCP [p = 0.181]. In terms of clinical period, the days from onset to death [13 (4~17) vs 14.5 (0~52), p = 0.045] and to discharge [11 (5~24) vs 24 (0~74), p = 0.010] and be hospitalized days [9.5 (3~22) vs 22 (0~69), p = 0.040] were much shorter in MERS-HCP than SARS-HCP. Similarly, days from onset to confirmation were shorter in MERS-HCP than MERS-non-HCP [6 (1~14) vs 10 (1~21), p = 0.044]. In conclusion, the severity of MERS-HCP and SARS-HCP was lower than that of MERS-non-HCP and SARS-non-HCP due to younger age and early confirmation in HCP groups. However, no statistical difference was found in MERS-HCP and SARS-HCP. Thus, prevention of nosocomial infections involving both novel Coronavirus is crucially important to protect HCP. PMID:26930074

  16. Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor is preferentially increased in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M; Donnelly, S C; Grant, I S; Robertson, C; Gauldie, J; Haslett, C

    1999-05-01

    Inappropriate release of proteases from inflammatory and stromal cells can lead to destruction of the lung parenchyma. Antiproteinases such as alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-Pi), secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and elastase-specific inhibitor (elafin) control excess production of human neutrophil elastase. In the present study, the concentrations of alpha1-Pi, SLPI and elafin found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from control subjects, patients at risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and patients with established ARDS were determined. Levels of all three inhibitors were raised in patients compared with normal subjects. SLPI was increased in the group of patients who were at risk of ARDS and went on to develop the condition, compared with the "at-risk" group who did not progress to ARDS (p=0.0083). Alpha1-Pi and elafin levels were similar in these two populations. In patients with established ARDS, both alpha1-Pi and SLPI levels were significantly increased, compared to patients at risk of ARDS who did (p=0.0089) or did not (p=0.0003) progress to ARDS. The finding of increased antiproteinases shortly before the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome provide further evidence for enhanced inflammation prior to clinical disease. PMID:10414400

  17. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  18. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. II. Uses for treatment and antioxidant properties].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    In the first part of our editorial we reviewed the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion in acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. The present paper presents the results of studies proving, that mucolytics are useful in adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Current evidence indicate, that these drugs are effective, especially in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and acute bronchitis. They produce a modest improvement in symptom control and lung function. It has been demonstrated that there is a synergism between mucolytics and antibiotics in the treatment of exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. Moreover, they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. Ambroxol is able to inhibit mediator release involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. As mucolytics are cheap and well-tolerated they are beneficial in the therapy of patients suffering from respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053601

  19. Association between size-segregated particles in ambient air and acute respiratory inflammation.

    PubMed

    Han, Yiqun; Zhu, Tong; Guan, Tianjia; Zhu, Yi; Liu, Jun; Ji, Yunfang; Gao, Shuna; Wang, Fei; Lu, Huimin; Huang, Wei

    2016-09-15

    The health effects of particulate matter (PM) in ambient air are well documented. However, whether PM size plays a critical role in these effects is unclear in the population studies. This study investigated the association between the ambient concentrations of PM with varies sizes (5.6-560nm) and a biomarker of acute respiratory inflammation, the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), in a panel of 55 elderly people in Shanghai, China. Linear mixed-effect model was fitted to estimate the association between FENO and moving average concentrations of PM, adjusting for temperature, relative humidity, day of the week, and age. Results showed that among the measured particles size range, Aitken-mode (20-100nm) particles had the strongest positive association with increased FENO when using moving average concentration of PM up to 24h prior to visits. The estimates were robust to the adjustment for gender, condition of chronic disease and use of medication, and to the sensitive analysis using different times of visits. The authors concluded that the association between acute respiratory inflammation and PM concentration of fine particulates depended on particle size, and suggested Aitken-mode particles may be the most responsible for this adverse health association. PMID:27179679

  20. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  1. Prescribing Patterns of Drugs in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute respiratory failure and is associated with wide range of clinical disorders. Controversy prevails over the pharmacological intervention in this disease. The aim of the study was to observe the prescribing pattern of drugs in patients with ARDS managed at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted at tertiary care hospital in India. Data of patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2012 was collected. Patients aged more than 18 years admitted in ICU, who were diagnosed to have ARDS during the study period, were included. A total of 150 patients of ARDS were selected. Data was collected as per the pre designed proforma and it included patients’ age, gender, clinical disorders precipitating ARDS, prescribing pattern of drugs and outcome. The data of the subjects was collected till discharge from hospital or death. Results: Infection was the cause of ARDS in 81.3% (n=122) of subjects. Antibiotics were prescribed in all the subjects and beta-lactams were prescribed in 97.3% (n=146). 41.3% (n=62) were prescribed corticosteroids, 39.3% (n=59) diuretics and 89.3% (n=134) intravenous fluids. Conclusion: The outcome of patients on different pharmacological treatment did not show any statistically significant difference. PMID:25859465

  2. [Severe Japanese Spotted Fever Complicated by Acute Respiratory Failure in Kobe City].

    PubMed

    Takiguchi, Junji; Okimura, Kenjiro; Ishii, Mariko; Okamura, Kayoko; Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Inamoto, Shinya; Ando, Shuji

    2016-03-01

    We report herein on a case of severe Japanese spotted fever complicated by acute respiratory failure in Kobe City. A 70-year-old female presenting with general malaise and systematic erythema was admitted to our hospital in June, 2013. From her history and physical examination, she was found to be suffering from scleroderma and mild interstitial pneumonia. From admission, the patient was noted to have a fever of 39 degrees C accompanied by relative bradycardia. Physical examination revealed a black eschar on her right leg, making us suspect rickettsial infection since Kobe City is not an area predisposed to Japanese spotted fever. Three days after admission, her condition worsened and treatment with minocycline and levofloxacin was initiated in accordance with the treatment protocol for Japanese spotted fever. The following day, the patient developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and was put on a respirator. She gradually recovered with the antibiotic treatment and was discharged from the hospital 23 days after admission. The diagnosis of Japanese spotted fever was confirmed by conducting a polymerase chain reaction test on the eschar. Japanese spotted fever is noted to occur in any place other than Kobe City. Late diagnoses may result in aggravated cases of Japanese spotted fever, with the possibility of developing ARDS as a complication. PMID:27197438

  3. Recent developments in anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Dale L; Kumaki, Yohichi

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in early 2003 to cause a very severe acute respiratory syndrome, which eventually resulted in a 10% case-fatality rate. Owing to excellent public health measures that isolated focus cases and their contacts, and the use of supportive therapies, the epidemic was suppressed to the point that further cases have not appeared since 2005. However, despite intensive research since then (over 3500 publications), it remains an untreatable disease. The potential for re-emergence of the SARS-CoV or a similar virus with unknown but potentially serious consequences remains high. This is due in part to the extreme genetic variability of RNA viruses such as the coronaviruses, the many animal reservoirs that seem to be able host the SARS-CoV in which reassortment or recombination events could occur and the ability coronaviruses have to transmit relatively rapidly from species to species in a short period of time. Thus, it seems prudent to continue to explore and develop antiviral chemotherapies to treat SARS-CoV infections. To this end, the various efficacious anti-SARS-CoV therapies recently published from 2007 to 2010 are reviewed in this article. In addition, compounds that have been tested in various animal models and were found to reduce virus lung titers and/or were protective against death in lethal models of disease, or otherwise have been shown to ameliorate the effects of viral infection, are also reported. PMID:21765859

  4. [Genetic predisposition and Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: New tools for genetic study].

    PubMed

    Erranz, M Benjamín; Wilhelm, B Jan; Riquelme, V Raquel; Cruces, R Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most severe form of respiratory failure. Theoretically, any acute lung condition can lead to ARDS, but only a small percentage of individuals actually develop the disease. On this basis, genetic factors have been implicated in the risk of developing ARDS. Based on the pathophysiology of this disease, many candidate genes have been evaluated as potential modifiers in patient, as well as in animal models, of ARDS. Recent experimental data and clinical studies suggest that variations of genes involved in key processes of tissue, cellular and molecular lung damage may influence susceptibility and prognosis of ARDS. However, the pathogenesis of pediatric ARDS is complex, and therefore, it can be expected that many genes might contribute. Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy-number variations are likely associated with susceptibility to ARDS in children with primary lung injury. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies can objectively examine these variations, and help identify important new genes and pathogenetic pathways for future analysis. This approach might also have diagnostic and therapeutic implications, such as predicting patient risk or developing a personalized therapeutic approach to this serious syndrome. PMID:26235685

  5. Acute Respiratory Failure in Critically Ill Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafrani, Lara; Lemiale, Virginie; Lapidus, Nathanael; Lorillon, Gwenael; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD) may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce. Patients and Methods Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF). Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression. Results Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT) fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR) 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) (1.20–17.33); OR, 7.68; (1.78–33.22) and OR 10.60; (2.25–49.97) respectively). Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005–0.21)). In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality. Conclusion Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival. PMID:25115557

  6. [The usefulness of the Peak Flow Meter for assessing patients with acute respiratory disease].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Torices, J C; Diego Domínguez, F; Franch Nadal, J; Alvarez Guisasola, F; Pablo Pons, M L

    1990-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the utility of the extrahospital use of "Peak Flow Meter" (PFM) in patients with an acute respiratory disease. 70 patients were studied. PFM, arterial gasometry, physical examination and dyspnea evaluation were performed on all of them. The PFM were posteriorly transformed into the rate related to the ideal result, following the Nunn and Gregg equation (1989). We found an association between the PFM rate and the different arterial blood gas test results, and a relation to the degree of dyspnea and the listening of sibilant rales. There was more significance with the rate of PFM than with the PFM transformed in all cases, and only association was found between arterial blood changes and PFM. We concluded that all patients with an acute respiratory disease with a rate of PFM greater than 50% should be evaluated carefully because of the probability of existing hypoxemia, and those with rate of less than 20% must be referred to hospital. PMID:2103210

  7. Applying a low-flow CO2 removal device in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay S; Weerwind, Patrick W; Strauch, Uli; van Belle, Arne; Maessen, Jos G; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2016-03-01

    A novel and portable extracorporeal CO2-removal device was evaluated to provide additional gas transfer, auxiliary to standard therapy in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. A dual-lumen catheter was inserted percutaneously in five subjects (mean age 55 ± 0.4 years) and, subsequently, connected to the CO2-removal device. The median duration on support was 45 hours (interquartile range 26-156), with a blood flow rate of approximately 500 mL/min. The mean PaCO2 decreased from 95.8 ± 21.9 mmHg to 63.9 ± 19.6 mmHg with the pH improving from 7.11 ± 0.1 to 7.26 ± 0.1 in the initial 4 hours of support. Three subjects were directly weaned from the CO2-removal device and mechanical ventilation, one subject was converted to ECMO and one subject died following withdrawal of support. No systemic bleeding or device complications were observed. Low-flow CO2 removal adjuvant to standard therapy was effective in steadily removing CO2, limiting the progression of acidosis in subjects with severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. PMID:26040584

  8. Acute respiratory diseases and carboxyhemoglobin status in school children of Quito, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Bertha; Estrella, Ramiro; Oviedo, Jorge; Narváez, Ximena; Reyes, María T; Gutiérrez, Miguel; Naumova, Elena N

    2005-05-01

    Outdoor carbon monoxide comes mainly from vehicular emissions, and high concentrations occur in areas with heavy traffic congestion. CO binds to hemoglobin, forming carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), and reduces oxygen delivery. We investigated the link between the adverse effects of CO on the respiratory system using COHb as a marker for chronic CO exposure. We examined the relationship between acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and COHb concentrations in school-age children living in urban and suburban areas of Quito, Ecuador. We selected three schools located in areas with different traffic intensities and enrolled 960 children. To adjust for potential confounders we conducted a detailed survey. In a random subsample of 295 children, we determined that average COHb concentrations were significantly higher in children attending schools in areas with high and moderate traffic, compared with the low-traffic area. The percentage of children with COHb concentrations above the safe level of 2.5% were 1, 43, and 92% in low-, moderate-, and high-traffic areas, respectively. Children with COHb above the safe level are 3.25 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.65-6.38] times more likely to have ARI than children with COHb < 2.5%. Furthermore, with each percent increase in COHb above the safety level, children are 1.15 (95% CI, 1.03-1.28) times more likely to have an additional case of ARI. Our findings provide strong evidence of the relation between CO exposure and susceptibility to respiratory infections. PMID:15866771

  9. Acute Respiratory Diseases and Carboxyhemoglobin Status in School Children of Quito, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Bertha; Estrella, Ramiro; Oviedo, Jorge; Narváez, Ximena; Reyes, María T.; Gutiérrez, Miguel; Naumova, Elena N.

    2005-01-01

    Outdoor carbon monoxide comes mainly from vehicular emissions, and high concentrations occur in areas with heavy traffic congestion. CO binds to hemoglobin, forming carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), and reduces oxygen delivery. We investigated the link between the adverse effects of CO on the respiratory system using COHb as a marker for chronic CO exposure. We examined the relationship between acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and COHb concentrations in school-age children living in urban and suburban areas of Quito, Ecuador. We selected three schools located in areas with different traffic intensities and enrolled 960 children. To adjust for potential confounders we conducted a detailed survey. In a random subsample of 295 children, we determined that average COHb concentrations were significantly higher in children attending schools in areas with high and moderate traffic, compared with the low-traffic area. The percentage of children with COHb concentrations above the safe level of 2.5% were 1, 43, and 92% in low-, moderate-, and high-traffic areas, respectively. Children with COHb above the safe level are 3.25 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.65–6.38] times more likely to have ARI than children with COHb < 2.5%. Furthermore, with each percent increase in COHb above the safety level, children are 1.15 (95% CI, 1.03–1.28) times more likely to have an additional case of ARI. Our findings provide strong evidence of the relation between CO exposure and susceptibility to respiratory infections. PMID:15866771

  10. Acute phase proteins in naturally occurring respiratory disease of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Idoate, Ignacio; Vander Ley, Brian; Schultz, Loren; Heller, Meera

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three acute phase proteins (APP) [haptoglobin (HPT), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and transferrin (Tf)] in feedlot cattle with naturally occurring respiratory disease diagnosed by a calf health scoring chart (CHSC). Seventy-seven beef calves were observed for signs of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) during the first 28 days after arrival at the feedlot. Fourteen cases and pen matched controls were selected based on the CHSC. BRD cases were defined as a score of ≥ 5, while controls were defined as a score ≤ 4. The mean CHSC score in cases was 6.9 which was significantly greater than the controls 2.8 (P < 0.01). Mean plasma LBP and HPT concentrations were significantly greater in cases than controls (P < 0.01). Our study results show that measurement of HPT and LBP could be useful in detecting respiratory disease in feedlot conditions. Transferrin concentrations between the two groups were not statistically different. PMID:25599608

  11. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of acute respiratory virus infections in Vietnamese children.

    PubMed

    Tran, D N; Trinh, Q D; Pham, N T K; Vu, M P; Ha, M T; Nguyen, T Q N; Okitsu, S; Hayakawa, S; Mizuguchi, M; Ushijima, H

    2016-02-01

    Information about viral acute respiratory infections (ARIs) is essential for prevention, diagnosis and treatment, but it is limited in tropical developing countries. This study described the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of ARIs in children hospitalized in Vietnam. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected from children with ARIs at Ho Chi Minh City Children's Hospital 2 between April 2010 and May 2011 in order to detect respiratory viruses by polymerase chain reaction. Viruses were found in 64% of 1082 patients, with 12% being co-infections. The leading detected viruses were human rhinovirus (HRV; 30%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; 23·8%), and human bocavirus (HBoV; 7·2%). HRV was detected all year round, while RSV epidemics occurred mainly in the rainy season. Influenza A (FluA) was found in both seasons. The other viruses were predominant in the dry season. HRV was identified in children of all age groups. RSV, parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1, PIV3 and HBoV, and FluA were detected predominantly in children aged 24 months, respectively. Significant associations were found between PIV1 with croup (P < 0·005) and RSV with bronchiolitis (P < 0·005). HBoV and HRV were associated with hypoxia (P < 0·05) and RSV with retraction (P < 0·05). HRV, RSV, and HBoV were detected most frequently and they may increase the severity of ARIs in children. PMID:26145204

  12. [Risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Jaimes, María Belén; Cáceres, Diana C; de la Hoz, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Camilo; Herrera, Diana; Pinilla, Jairo; Porras, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Fabio; Velandia, Martha

    2003-09-01

    Severity of acute respiratory infection is higher in developing countries, especially among the socioeconomically underprivileged. Viral pneumonias are more common, especially among children. A prospective hospital-based case control study was undertaken in Bogota between November 2000 and August 2001, aimed to identify factors related to severe low acute respiratory infection (SLARI). Cases were limited to children aged between 2 months and 5 years who filled WHO criteria for SLARI. Controls were children at the same hospital with ARI in a similar age range, but without symptoms of chest drawing. A total of 638 children (277 cases and 361 controls) were included. The most important risk factors included the following: living in borrowed houses (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-7.07), sharing the bed (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.0-3.7), living with more than 9 people (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.0-3.51), and living with smokers (OR = 1.4, CI: 1.0-2.05). Of the 114 samples collected (from children at third day after beginning of symptoms), 98 had viruses, sincitial respiratory virus was the most frequently identified virus (41.8%), followed by influenza A virus (3.1%) and influenza B virus (1%). All positive isolates for influenza A and B were sent to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, where they were classified as influenza A/PANAMA/2007/99-like and influenza B/SICHUAN/379/99-like, respectively. PMID:14582331

  13. Help-Seeking Behavior for Children with Acute Respiratory Infection in Ethiopia: Results from 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infection is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among children under five years of age in Ethiopia. While facilities have been implemented to address this problem they are underused due to a lack in help-seeking behavior. This study investigates factors related to the help-seeking behavior of mothers for children with acute respiratory infection using data from the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey. Methods Data on 11,030 children aged 0–59 months obtained through interviewing women aged 15–49 years throughout Ethiopia was available. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine which factors are related to help-seeking behavior for acute respiratory infection. Results In the two weeks prior to the survey, 773(7%) of the children were reported to have symptoms of acute respiratory infection while treatment was sought for only 209 (27.2%). The odds ratio for acute respiratory infection was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2–2.0) for rural residence with only 25.2% of these mothers seeking help compared to 46.4% for mothers with an urban residence. Smaller family size, younger mothers’ age and having had prenatal care had a statistically significant odds ratio greater than 1 for both urban and rural residences. Highest wealth index had a statistically significant odds ratio greater than 1 for rural residence only, whereas primary education or higher had a statistically significant odds ratio greater than 1 for urban residence. Conclusions Children from rural areas are more at risk for acute respiratory infection while their mothers are less likely to seek help. Nevertheless, there is also underuse of available services in urban areas. Interventions should target mothers with less education and wealth and older mothers. Expanding prenatal care among these groups would encourage a better use of available facilities and subsequently better care for their children. PMID:26560469

  14. Dual hit lipopolysaccharide & oleic acid combination induced rat model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hagawane, T.N.; Gaikwad, R.V.; Kshirsagar, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Despite advances in therapy and overall medical care, acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) management remains a problem. Hence the objective of this study was to develop a rat model that mimics human ALI/ARDS. Methods: Four groups of Wistar rats, 48 per group were treated with (i) intratracheal (IT) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) dissolved in normal saline (NS), (ii) intravenous (iv) oleic acid (OA) (250 μl/kg) suspension in bovine serum albumin (BSA), (iii) dual hit: IT LPS (2 mg/kg) dissolved in NS and iv OA (100 μl/kg) and (iv) control group: IT NS and iv BSA. From each group at set periods of time various investigations like chest X-rays, respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV), total cell count, differential cell count, total protein count and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung wet/dry weight ratio and histopathological examination were done. Results: It was noted that the respiratory rate, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were significantly higher at 4 h in the dual hit group as compared to LPS, OA and control groups. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were significantly higher in the dual hit group as compared to LPS at 8 and 24 h, OA at 8 h and control (at all time intervals) group. IL-1β levels were significantly higher in LPS and dual hit groups at all time intervals, but not in OA and control groups. The injury induced in dual hit group was earlier and more sustained as compared to LPS and OA alone. Interpretation & conclusions: The lung pathology and changes in respiration functions produced by the dual hit model were closer to the diagnostic criteria of ALI/ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury and the injury persisted longer as compared to LPS and OA single hit model. Therefore, the ARDS model produced by the dual hit method was closer to the diagnostic criteria of ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury. PMID

  15. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: the first transmissible disease of the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Petrosillo, Nicola; Macrì, Giulia; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is the first severe and easily transmissible disease to emerge in the 21st century. It is caused by the infection with a coronavirus, a single strand RNA capsulated virus, recently found in a small mammalian, the masked palm civet. It is likely to represent the source of human infection. The first cases of SARS have been reported in the Chinese province of Guangdong and, since then, probable cases have been reported world wide. The clinical picture is characterized by nonspecific symptoms such as fever, cough or dyspnea in patients affected by air-space opacities (unifocal involvement in the 54.6% of cases) or distress respiratory syndrome and linked to a recent exposure to a SARS case or to a travel/residence in an affected area. The empirical therapy is based on broad-spectrum antibiotics, steroids and ribavirin, but susceptibility testing have failed to demonstrate direct anti-viral activity of ribavirin against SARS-related coronavirus in vitro. The exposure to respiratory droplets and the contact with biologic fluids (respiratory and gastrointestinal secretions) represent the most efficient transmission modality of the SARS-related coronavirus. Hand hygiene is the most simple and cost effective measure of infection control to prevent contagion, and the use of airborne, contact and droplet precaution is strictly recommended to all health care workers taking care of such patients. The spread of SARS, to less developed country with limited resource for public health programs, represent the emerging alarming threat in the new global scenario. PMID:12868234

  16. Epidemiology of acute respiratory infections in children in Guangzhou: a three-year study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen Kuan; Liu, Qian; Chen, De Hui; Liang, Huan Xi; Chen, Xiao Kai; Chen, Mei Xin; Qiu, Shu Yan; Yang, Zi Yeng; Zhou, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) are some of the most common human diseases worldwide. However, they have a complex and diverse etiology, and the characteristics of the pathogens involved in respiratory infections in developing countries are not well understood. In this work, we analyzed the characteristics of 17 common respiratory pathogens in children (≤14 years old) with ARI in Guangzhou, southern China over a 3-year period using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Pathogens were identified in 2361/4242 (55.7%) patients, and the positivity rate varied seasonally. Ten of the 17 pathogens investigated showed positivity rates of more than 5%. The most frequently detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (768/2361, 32.5%), influenza A virus (428/2361, 18.1%), enterovirus (138/2361, 13.3%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (267/2361, 11.3%) and adenovirus (213/2361, 9.0%). Co-pathogens were common and found in 503 of 2361 (21.3%) positive samples. When ranked according to frequency of occurrence, the pattern of co-pathogens was similar to that of the primary pathogens, with the exception of human bocavirus, human coronavirus and human metapneumovirus. Significant differences were found in age prevalence in 10 of the 17 pathogens (p≤0.009): four basic patterns were observed, A: detection rates increased with age, B: detection rates declined with age, C: the detection rate showed distinct peaks or D: numbers of patients were too low to detect a trend or showed no significant difference among age groups (p>0.05). These data will be useful for planning vaccine research and control strategies and for studies predicting pathogen prevalence. PMID:24797911

  17. Computer simulation allows goal-oriented mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uttman, Leif; Ögren, Helena; Niklason, Lisbet; Drefeldt, Björn; Jonson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To prevent further lung damage in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it is important to avoid overdistension and cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli. Previous studies have demonstrated protective effects of using low tidal volume (VT), moderate positive end-expiratory pressure and low airway pressure. Aspiration of dead space (ASPIDS) allows a reduction in VT by eliminating dead space in the tracheal tube and tubing. We hypothesized that, by applying goal-orientated ventilation based on iterative computer simulation, VT can be reduced at high respiratory rate and much further reduced during ASPIDS without compromising gas exchange or causing high airway pressure. Methods ARDS was induced in eight pigs by surfactant perturbation and ventilator-induced lung injury. Ventilator resetting guided by computer simulation was then performed, aiming at minimal VT, plateau pressure 30 cmH2O and isocapnia, first by only increasing respiratory rate and then by using ASPIDS as well. Results VT decreased from 7.2 ± 0.5 ml/kg to 6.6 ± 0.5 ml/kg as respiratory rate increased from 40 to 64 ± 6 breaths/min, and to 4.0 ± 0.4 ml/kg when ASPIDS was used at 80 ± 6 breaths/min. Measured values of arterial carbon dioxide tension were close to predicted values. Without ASPIDS, total positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau pressure were slightly higher than predicted, and with ASPIDS they were lower than predicted. Conclusion In principle, computer simulation may be used in goal-oriented ventilation in ARDS. Further studies are needed to investigate potential benefits and limitations over extended study periods. PMID:17352801

  18. Clinical review: Stem cell therapies for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - hope or hype?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has led to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of stem cells for this devastating disease. Mesenchymal stem cells appear closest to clinical translation, given the evidence that they may favourably modulate the immune response to reduce lung injury, while maintaining host immune-competence and also facilitating lung regeneration and repair. The demonstration that human mesenchymal stem cells exert benefit in the endotoxin-injured human lung is particularly persuasive. Endothelial progenitor cells also demonstrate promise in reducing endothelial damage, which is a key pathophysiological feature of ALI. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are at an earlier stage in the translational process, but offer the hope of directly replacing injured lung tissue. The lung itself also contains endogenous stem cells, which may ultimately offer the greatest hope for lung diseases, given their physiologic role in replacing and regenerating native lung tissues. However, significant deficits remain in our knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action of stem cells, their efficacy in relevant pre-clinical models, and their safety, particularly in critically ill patients. These gaps need to be addressed before the enormous therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALI/ARDS can be realised. PMID:22424108

  19. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  20. Acute In Vivo Testing of a Respiratory Assist Catheter: Implants in Calves Versus Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Eash, Heide J.; Frankowski, Brian J.; Litwak, Kenneth; Wagner, William R.; Hattler, Brack G.; Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01

    A respiratory catheter that is inserted through a peripheral vein and placed within the vena cava is being developed for CO2 removal in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The catheter uses a rapidly pulsating balloon to enhance gas exchange. In this study, the CO2 removal performance of our catheter was assessed in acute sheep implants and compared with calf implants, primarily because sheep have cardiac outputs (CO) that are more comparable with human CO and lower than calves. Respiratory catheters (25 mL balloon, 0.17 m²) were inserted acutely in sheep (n = 2) and calves (n = 6) through the jugular vein and placed within the vena cava in two positions: spanning the right atrium (RA) and within the inferior vena cava (IVC). The postinsertion CO in the sheep ranged from 4.1 to 7.2 L/min compared with 6.2 to 15.5 L/min for the calves. The maximum CO2 removal rates (vCO2) were 297 ml/min/m² (calf) and 282 ml/min/m² (sheep) in the RA position and 240 ml/min/m² (calf) and 248 ml/min/m² (sheep) in the IVC position. The respective removal rates between animal models were not statistically different (p values > 0 .05 for all data sets). The dependence of the vCO2 on balloon pulsation was also not statistically different between the animal models. PMID:12918576

  1. Changes in Clinical Presentation and Epidemiology of Respiratory Pathogens Associated With Acute Respiratory Illness in Military Trainees After Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Heather C.; Young, Adam N.; Caballero, Manuel Y.; Lott, Lisa; Cropper, Thomas L.; Murray, Clinton K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adenovirus (Ad) has long been the predominant cause of acute respiratory illness (ARI) in military trainees. In 2011, live oral Ad vaccines for serotypes 4 and 7 were reintroduced into US basic military training populations. This study evaluated the impact on clinical presentations and other respiratory pathogens. Methods. The Center for Advanced Molecular Detection at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland prospectively collects demographic, clinical, and polymerase chain reaction data from respiratory specimens (throat swab and nasal wash) among Air Force trainees presenting for care of ARI. Results. From June 2008 to August 2013, 2660 trainees enrolled and were tested for selected respiratory pathogens. Post-vaccine introduction (VI), reported systemic symptoms were less frequent, including fever (38% vs 94%) and myalgia (37% vs 67%; P < .01). Median temperature and heart rate decreased (98.4 vs 101.3°F, 81 vs 96 beats per minute; P < .01). Ad detection decreased for all Ad (3% vs 68%), Ad4 (1% vs 70%), 7 (0% vs 8%), 14 (0% vs 5%), and 3 (0.1% vs 2%); P < .01). Rhinovirus and cases with no pathogen identified increased in frequency (35% vs 18%, 51% vs 14%; P < .01). Conclusions. Acute respiratory illness in military trainees post-VI is associated with decreased severity of systemic symptoms and reduced fever and heart rate. Marked reductions in frequency of Ad serotypes are seen, including those in the vaccine, with no serotype shift. However, detection of several other respiratory pathogens, most notably rhinovirus, is observed in increasing proportions, and a majority are now undiagnosed clinical syndromes. PMID:26380351

  2. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1]. PMID:27358909

  3. Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000223.htm Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor To use the ... please enable JavaScript. Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within ...

  4. Taiwan's traffic control bundle and the elimination of nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome among healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Yen, M-Y; Lin, Y-E; Lee, C-H; Ho, M-S; Huang, F-Y; Chang, S-C; Liu, Y-C

    2011-04-01

    The traffic control bundle consists of procedures designed to help prevent epidemic nosocomial infection. We retrospectively studied the serial infection control measures to determine factors most effective in preventing nosocomial infections of healthcare workers (HCWs) during the 2003 Taiwanese severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic. Fever screening stations, triage of fever patients, separating SARS patients from other patients, separation of entrances and passageways between patients and HCWs, and increasing hand-washing facilities all demonstrated a protective effect for HCWs (univariate analysis; P<0.05). By multiple logistic regression: (i) checkpoint alcohol dispensers for glove-on hand rubbing between zones of risk, and (ii) fever screening at the fever screen station outside the emergency department, were the significant methods effectively minimising nosocomial SARS infection of HCWs (P<0.05). The traffic control bundle should be implemented in future epidemics as a tool to achieve strict infection control measures. PMID:21316802

  5. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  6. Argument against the Routine Use of Steroids for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Silvia M.; Hough, Catherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Steroids have a plausible mechanism of action of reducing severity of lung disease in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but have failed to show consistent benefits in patient-centered outcomes. Many studies have confounding from the likely presence of ventilator-induced lung injury and steroids may have shown benefit because administration minimized ongoing inflammation incited by injurious ventilator settings. If steroids have benefit, it is likely for specific populations that fall within the heterogeneous diagnosis of ARDS. Those pediatric patients with concurrent active asthma or reactive airway disease of prematurity, in addition to ARDS, are the most common group likely to derive benefit from steroids, but are poorly studied. With the information currently available, it does not appear that the typical adult or pediatric patient with ARDS derives benefit from steroids and steroids should not be given on a routine basis. PMID:27517035

  7. Spatial dynamics of an epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome in an urban area.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; McMichael, Anthony J.; Meng, Bin; Becker, Niels G.; Han, Weiguo; Glass, Kathryn; Wu, Jilei; Liu, Xuhua; Liu, Jiyuan; Li, Xiaowen; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To map risk of exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in an urban area and assess the ability of traditional interventions to control dispersion of the disease. METHODS: Data on the Beijing SARS epidemic were used to map spatial clusters of identified contacts and to estimate transmission of SARS using a model with a time-dependent transmission rate. RESULTS: The estimated transmission rate decreased dramatically from 20 to 30 April 2003. The total number of cases in the epidemic in Beijing was estimated to be 2521. Hierarchical clustering revealed that risk-exposures were widespread, but clustered in a pattern that is distinctly related to the Beijing urban ring roads. CONCLUSION: Traditional control measures can be very effective at reducing transmission of SARS. Spatial patterns of risk-exposures can inform disease surveillance, prediction and control by identifying spatial target areas on which interventions should be focused. PMID:17242832

  8. Community health worker competency in managing acute respiratory infections of childhood in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, P S; Harrison, L H; López, M; Cornale, G

    1993-01-01

    A competency-based training and evaluation method was developed to improve and assess the management of acute respiratory infections (ARI) in young children by community health workers (CHWs) in Bolivia. This method was used to evaluate three groups of Bolivian CHWs, provide them with a one-day refresher course in ARI management, and assess the effects of the course. The results showed the CHWs capable of acquiring the skills needed to effectively manage ARI cases in accordance with the World Health Organization's ARI case management strategy. It was found important, however, that their training emphasize how to count the respirations of children with tachypnea and how to identify chest indrawing. In general, the competency-based methods appeared to be effective in training and evaluating CHWs in the area of ARI case management; it is expected that these methods will prove useful in other community-based health interventions. PMID:8339109

  9. Prospects for emerging infections in East and southeast Asia 10 years after severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horby, Peter W; Pfeiffer, Dirk; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    It is 10 years since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged, and East and Southeast Asia retain a reputation as a hot spot of emerging infectious diseases. The region is certainly a hot spot of socioeconomic and environmental change, and although some changes (e.g., urbanization and agricultural intensification) may reduce the probability of emerging infectious diseases, the effect of any individual emergence event may be increased by the greater concentration and connectivity of livestock, persons, and products. The region is now better able to detect and respond to emerging infectious diseases than it was a decade ago, but the tools and methods to produce sufficiently refined assessments of the risks of disease emergence are still lacking. Given the continued scale and pace of change in East and Southeast Asia, it is vital that capabilities for predicting, identifying, and controlling biologic threats do not stagnate as the memory of SARS fades. PMID:23738977

  10. Prospects for Emerging Infections in East and Southeast Asia 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Dirk; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    It is 10 years since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged, and East and Southeast Asia retain a reputation as a hot spot of emerging infectious diseases. The region is certainly a hot spot of socioeconomic and environmental change, and although some changes (e.g., urbanization and agricultural intensification) may reduce the probability of emerging infectious diseases, the effect of any individual emergence event may be increased by the greater concentration and connectivity of livestock, persons, and products. The region is now better able to detect and respond to emerging infectious diseases than it was a decade ago, but the tools and methods to produce sufficiently refined assessments of the risks of disease emergence are still lacking. Given the continued scale and pace of change in East and Southeast Asia, it is vital that capabilities for predicting, identifying, and controlling biologic threats do not stagnate as the memory of SARS fades. PMID:23738977

  11. The effect of probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Sæterdal, Ingvil; Underland, Vigdis; Nilsen, Elin Strømme

    2012-05-01

    As part of its efforts to disseminate the results of Cochrane reviews to a wider audience, the Cochrane Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Field develops Summary of Findings (SoF) tables and then uses those tables as a basis for its plain-language summaries. Each SoF table presents the most important outcomes for the review as well as the effect of the intervention and the quality of the evidence for each outcome. The process of developing the SoF table involves deciding which outcomes to present for which time points and evaluating the strength and quality of the evidence for the outcomes. In this article, we present a Cochrane review about the effects of the use of probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections. We contacted the authors of the Cochrane review to request clarification on points that we did not understand and to have them review the SoF table. PMID:24278820

  12. Quantitative assessment of relative roles of drivers of acute respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Prashant; Baruah, Jurismita

    2014-01-01

    Several thousands of people, including children, suffer from acute respiratory disease (ARD) every year worldwide. Pro-active planning and mitigation for these diseases require identification of the major drivers in a location-specific manner. While the importance of air pollutants in ARD has been extensively studied and emphasized, the role of weather variables has been less explored. With Delhi with its large population and pollution as a test case, we examine the relative roles of air pollution and weather (cold days) in ARD. It is shown that both the number of cold days and air pollution play important roles in ARD load; however, the number of cold days emerges as the major driver. These conclusions are consistent with analyses for several other states in India. The robust association between ARD load and cold days provides basis for estimating and predicting ARD load through dynamical model, as well as impact of climate change. PMID:25322687

  13. Quantitative assessment of relative roles of drivers of acute respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Prashant; Baruah, Jurismita

    2014-10-01

    Several thousands of people, including children, suffer from acute respiratory disease (ARD) every year worldwide. Pro-active planning and mitigation for these diseases require identification of the major drivers in a location-specific manner. While the importance of air pollutants in ARD has been extensively studied and emphasized, the role of weather variables has been less explored. With Delhi with its large population and pollution as a test case, we examine the relative roles of air pollution and weather (cold days) in ARD. It is shown that both the number of cold days and air pollution play important roles in ARD load; however, the number of cold days emerges as the major driver. These conclusions are consistent with analyses for several other states in India. The robust association between ARD load and cold days provides basis for estimating and predicting ARD load through dynamical model, as well as impact of climate change.

  14. A Curious Case of Acute Respiratory Failure: Is It Antisynthetase Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Serafin; Iliescu, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase (AS) syndrome is a major subgroup of inflammatory myopathies seen in a minority of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Although it is usually associated with elevated creatine phosphokinase level, some patients may have amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) like presentation with predominant skin involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the main pulmonary manifestation and may be severe thereby determining the prognosis. It may rarely present with a very aggressive course resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of a 43-year-old male who presented with nonresolving pneumonia who was eventually diagnosed to have ADM through a skin biopsy without any muscle weakness. ADM may be associated with rapidly progressive course of interstitial lung disease (ADM-ILD) which is associated with high mortality. Differentiation between ADM-ILD and AS syndrome may be difficult in the absence of positive serology and clinical presentation may help in clinching the diagnosis. PMID:27433359

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Rare Complication in Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Sudhanshu, Siddhnath; Jevalikar, Ganesh; Das, Pravin K; Singh, Pramod K; Bhatia, Eesh; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral edema (CE) and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema (acute respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS) are life-threatening complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In contrast to CE complicating DKA, which is primarily reported in pediatric patients, ARDS is rarely described in this age group. Here, the authors present a child with DKA who developed both cerebral edema and ARDS during the course of her management. It is feasible that severe acidosis, hypotension, azotemia, hypoalbuminemia and the superimposed aggressive intravenous fluid administration were important risk factors for the development of cerebral edema and ARDS in the index patient. The report highlights the importance of early diagnosis and aggressive therapy in the management of ARDS, and summarizes the published literature on this rarely reported complication of pediatric DKA. PMID:26666907

  16. [ASSOCIATED RESPIRATORY AND HEMODYNAMICS RESPONSE TO ACUTE NORMOBARIC PROGRESSIVE HYPOXIA IN ANESTHETIZED RATS].

    PubMed

    Donina, Zh A; Baranova, E V; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-10-01

    The interdependent reactions of the cardiorespiratory system during experimental simulation of progressive acute hypoxia were studied in anesthetized Wistar rats. The results indicate that the extremely low oxygen content in the inhaled gas mixture to less than 6% lead to terminal sedation and apnea. After the cessation of hypoxic exposure were observed spontaneous autoresuscitation. Effects of progressive hypoxia, is an example of a multi-component interdependent reactions of the cardiorespiratory system, which are based on the respiratory and vasomotor center function disturbance and the predominance of parasympathetic influences on the heart. The obtained data can be used as a model of hypoxic apnea to examine the influence of physiologically active substances on the cardiorespiratory system at disease pathology. PMID:26827496

  17. Acute respiratory effects of exposure to diesel emissions in coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.; Attfield, M.D.; Hankinson, J.L.; Hearl, F.J.; Reger, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine if acute respiratory effects, measured in terms of changes in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and maximal expiratory flow rate at 50% of forced vital capacity (Vmax50), were related to exposure to diesel emissions in coal miners. Sixty coal miners exposed to diesel emissions and 90 miners not exposed were tested before and after a work shift for ventilatory function changes. Significant work shift decrements in ventilatory function did occur in miners in both groups who smoked cigarettes, but there were no significant differences in the ventilatory function changes between those miners exposed to diesel emissions and those not exposed either in the aggregate or under control by smoking status.

  18. Five genome sequences of subspecies B1 human adenoviruses associated with acute respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Shoaleh; Liu, Elizabeth B; Seto, Jason; Torres, Sarah F; Hudson, Nolan R; Kajon, Adriana E; Metzgar, David; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James; Jones, Morris S; Seto, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Five genomes of human subspecies B1 adenoviruses isolated from cases of acute respiratory disease have been sequenced and archived for reference. These include representatives of two prevalent genomic variants of HAdV-7, i.e., HAdV-7h and HAdV-7d2. The other three are HAdV-3/16, HAdV-16 strain E26, and HAdV-3+7 strain Takeuchi. All are recombinant genomes. Genomics and bioinformatics provide detailed views into the genetic makeup of these pathogens and insight into their molecular evolution. Retrospective characterization of particularly problematic older pathogens such as HAdV-7h (1987) and intriguing isolates such as HAdV-3+7 strain Takeuchi (1958) may provide clues to their phenotypes and serology and may suggest protocols for prevention and treatment. PMID:22158846

  19. Noninvasive assessment of right and left ventricular function in acute and chronic respiratory failure

    SciTech Connect

    Matthay, R.A.; Berger, H.J.

    1983-05-01

    This review evaluates noninvasive techniques for assessing cardiovascular performance in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Radiographic, radionuclide, and echocardiographic methods for determining ventricular volumes, right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions, and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) are emphasized. These methods include plain chest radiography, radionuclide angiocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial imaging, and M mode and 2-dimensional echocardiography, which have recently been applied in patients to detect pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), right ventricular enlargement, and occult ventricular performance abnormalities at rest or exercise. Moreover, radionuclide angiocardiography has proven useful in combination with hemodynamic measurements, for evaluating the short-and long-term cardiovascular effects of therapeutic agents, such as oxygen, digitalis, theophylline, beta-adrenergic agents, and vasodilators.

  20. Recent advances in mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Brochard, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterised by different degrees of severity and different stages. Understanding these differences can help to better adapt the ventilatory settings to protect the lung from ventilator-induced lung injury by reducing hyperinflation or keeping the lung open when it is possible. The same therapies may be useful and beneficial in certain forms of ARDS, and risky or harmful at other stages: this includes high positive end-expiratory pressure, allowance of spontaneous breathing activity or use of noninvasive ventilation. The severity of the disease is the primary indicator to individualise treatment. Monitoring tools such as oesophageal pressure or lung volume measurements may also help to set the ventilator. At an earlier stage, an adequate lung protective strategy may also help to prevent the development of ARDS. PMID:25726563

  1. Zinc status in well nourished Bangladeshi children suffering from acute lower respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Shakur, Md Salim; Malek, M A; Bano, Nasreen; Islam, Khaleda

    2004-05-01

    This study was done to investigate the association of zinc status of well nourished Bangladeshi children with Acute Lower Respiratory Infection (ALRI). In this case control study, simultaneous estimation of serum and hair zinc was performed in 35 well nourished children, aged 6-60 months suffering from ALRI and 38 normal matched controls. Serum zinc was low in children suffering from ALRI as compared to control (90 +/- 51 pg/dL vs 176 +/- 98 pg/dL, OR: 6, 95% CI: 1.83, 19.66;P <0.05) children. Hair zinc was also found significantly low in children suffering from ALRI as compared to control (158 + 48 1g/g vs 247 154 pg/g, OR: 3, 95% CI: 1.46, 10.04, P < 0.05). We conclude that Bangladeshi children suffering from pneumonia, have decreased levels of serum and hair zinc. PMID:15181298

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practice factors in childhood acute respiratory infections in a peninsular Malaysia health district.

    PubMed

    Vasanthamala, A; Arokiasamy, J T

    1989-01-01

    This study compares the knowledge, attitudes and practice of mothers in two ethnic groups with regard to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in their child. Most had traditional beliefs as to the cause of ARI with only a minority knowing the causes. Most mothers were aware of the effect of frequent attacks of ARI on the health status of their child and of the importance of early treatment. Reasons for their becoming worried during an episode of ARI in their child indicated that problems of distance, transportation and arrangements for care of their other children predominate. A large proportion of the respondents felt that their present knowledge of ARI was inadequate and were thus interested in obtaining more information. PMID:2620023

  3. [Social capital, poverty and self-perception of family support in cases of acute respiratory illness].

    PubMed

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Ponce-Rosas R, E Raúl; Irigoyen-Coria, Arnulfo; Halabe-Cherem, José

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the socio structural variables of the Simplified Index of Family Poverty with the self-perception of resources that conform social capital among patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD). We used a qualitative and quantitative methodology. The sample included 848 cases distributed in seven Rural Medicine Units of Mexico. We considered three pathways described by Kawachi where social capital might have an impact on individual health. The bivariate correlation and discriminant analysis showed that when there is evidence of poverty in the family, the statistically significant differences are mainly observed in self-perception. Moral support of sons and daughters is thereby increased when there is an ARD. We concluded that when there is a higher index of family poverty there is a decreased access to social resources when a family member is diagnosed with an ARD. PMID:20077867

  4. Therapeutic options for acute cough due to upper respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ian M

    2012-02-01

    Cough due to upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) is one of the most frequent complaints encountered by pediatric health-care providers, and one of the most disruptive symptoms for children and families. Despite the frequency of URIs, there is limited evidence to support the few therapeutic agents currently available in the United States (US) to treat acute cough due to URI. Published, well-designed, contemporary research supporting the efficacy of narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved over-the-counter (OTC) oral antitussives and expectorants (dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlophedianol, and guaifenesin) is absent for URI-associated pediatric cough. Alternatively, honey and topically applied vapor rubs may be effective antitussives. PMID:21892785

  5. Isolation and phenotypic characteristics of microparticles in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongxia; Meng, Xiangyu; Gao, Yue; Cai, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the alterations of microparticles in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in rats. Methods: 18 Wistar male rats were randomly divided into three groups: no intervention, sham (saline control) group and ARDS group (LPS induced). Blood was collected from abdominal aorta and microparticles were extracted through multiple rounds of centrifugation. Particles were analyzed by flow cytometry and transmission electron microscope. Results: The circulating concentration of total microparticles of rats with ARDS induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) did not change compared with other two groups. However, ARDS rats expressed higher concentration of leukocyte- and endothelium- derived microparticles in the three groups. Conclusion: Our results indicate that leukocyte and endothelial cell-derived particles may play an important role in ARDS. Thus it is important not only to monitor total microparticle levels but also the phenotypes, which may contribute to the prevention and early treatment of ARDS. PMID:25973049

  6. A RESPIRATORY DISEASE MODEL FOR ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC CROSS-PROTECTION FOLLOWING HETEROLOGOUS ACUTE-TYPE PRRSV CHALLENGE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute-type PRRS outbreaks were first observed in 1996. They are characterized by severe reproductive and respiratory clinical disease losses (including sow mortalities) in PRRSV “immune” herds (regularly vaccinated or systematically exposed). This study was designed to document and validate the inef...

  7. Effects of Acute Exercise on Some Respiratory, Circulatory and Oxidative Stress Parameters of School Boys Aged 15-17 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurkcu, Recep; Gokhan, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute exercise on respiratory functions, heart-beats, blood pressure, total antioxidative capacity (TAC), oxidative stress index (OSI), lipid hydro-peroxide (LOOHs) and Paraoxonase (PON) in school boys. A sample of 18 male amateur wrestlers are selected for this study. The participants…

  8. THE UNIVERSITY OF AKRON STUDY ON AIR POLLUTION AND HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS II. EFFECTS ON ACUTE RESPIRATORY ILLNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of air pollution on acute respiratory illness (ARI). Levels of air pollutants were monitored on a daily 24-hour basis at two schools in Akron, Ohio. The children at each school completed daily diaries which served as a screen...

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  10. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  11. Extracorporeal life support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: report of a Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The influenza H1N1 epidemics in 2009 led a substantial number of people to develop severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory hypoxemia. In these patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was used as rescue oxygenation therapy. Several randomized clinical trials and observational studies suggested that extracorporeal membrane oxygenation associated with protective mechanical ventilation could improve outcome, but its efficacy remains uncertain. Organized by the Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF) in conjunction with the Société Française d’Anesthésie et de Réanimation (SFAR), the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Française (SPLF), the Groupe Francophone de Réanimation et d’Urgences Pédiatriques (GFRUP), the Société Française de Perfusion (SOFRAPERF), the Société Française de Chirurgie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire (SFCTV) et the Sociedad Española de Medecina Intensiva Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC), a Consensus Conference was held in December 2013 and a jury of 13 members wrote 65 recommendations to answer the five following questions regarding the place of extracorporeal life support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: 1) What are the available techniques?; 2) Which patients could benefit from extracorporeal life support?; 3) How to perform extracorporeal life support?; 4) How and when to stop extracorporeal life support?; 5) Which organization should be recommended? To write the recommendations, evidence-based medicine (GRADE method), expert panel opinions, and shared decisions taken by all the thirteen members of the jury of the Consensus Conference were taken into account. PMID:24936342

  12. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  13. Disparities in smoking and acute respiratory illnesses among sexual minority young adults.

    PubMed

    Blosnich, John; Jarrett, Traci; Horn, Kimberly

    2010-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality from cigarette smoking remain major public health issues. Particularly, smoking has been associated with increased risk of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs). Literature indicates that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (i.e., sexual minority) persons smoke more than the general population. Additionally, young adulthood is the second-most prevalent period of smoking uptake. Given this constellation of risk correlates, the authors examined whether sexual minority young adults experience increased odds of ARIs (i.e., strep throat, bronchitis, sinus infection, and asthma). Using cross-sectional data from the Spring 2006 National College Health Assessment, prevalence estimates of smoking were generated among young adult (age range, 18-24 years) lesbian/gay, bisexual, unsure, and heterosexual college students (n = 75,164). Nested logistic regression analyses were used to examine whether smoking status mediated the risk of ARIs among sexual orientation groups. Compared with heterosexual smokers, gay/lesbian smokers were more likely to have had strep throat, and bisexual smokers were more likely to have had sinus infection, asthma, and bronchitis. Whereas smoking mediated the risk of ARI, sexual minorities still showed higher odds of ARIs after adjustment for smoking. Sexual minority young adults may experience respiratory health disparities that may be linked to their higher smoking rates, and their higher rates of smoking lend urgency to the need for cessation interventions. Future studies are needed to explore whether chronic respiratory disease caused by smoking (i.e., lung cancer, COPD, emphysema) disproportionately affect sexual minority populations. PMID:20496074

  14. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A pathophysiology-based review.

    PubMed

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Papathanakos, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, Georgios

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome with heterogeneous underlying pathological processes. It represents a common clinical problem in intensive care unit patients and it is characterized by high mortality. The mainstay of treatment for ARDS is lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure sufficient for alveolar recruitment. Prone positioning is a supplementary strategy available in managing patients with ARDS. It was first described 40 years ago and it proves to be in alignment with two major ARDS pathophysiological lung models; the "sponge lung" - and the "shape matching" -model. Current evidence strongly supports that prone positioning has beneficial effects on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung protection and hemodynamics as it redistributes transpulmonary pressure, stress and strain throughout the lung and unloads the right ventricle. The factors that individually influence the time course of alveolar recruitment and the improvement in oxygenation during prone positioning have not been well characterized. Although patients' response to prone positioning is quite variable and hard to predict, large randomized trials and recent meta-analyses show that prone position in conjunction with a lung-protective strategy, when performed early and in sufficient duration, may improve survival in patients with ARDS. This pathophysiology-based review and recent clinical evidence strongly support the use of prone positioning in the early management of severe ARDS systematically and not as a rescue maneuver or a last-ditch effort. PMID:27152255

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after the Use of Gadolinium Contrast Media

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jihye; Byun, Il Hwan; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Nam, Eun Ji

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a medical emergency that threatens life. To this day, ARDS is very rarely reported by iodine contrast media, and there is no reported case of ARDS induced by gadolinium contrast media. Here, we present a case with ARDS after the use of gadobutrol (Gadovist) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium. A 26 years old female without any medical history, including allergic diseases and without current use of drugs, visited the emergency room for abdominal pain. Her abdominopelvic computed tomography with iodine contrast media showed a right ovarian cyst and possible infective colitis. Eighty-three hours later, she underwent pelvis MRI after injection of 7.5 mL (0.1 mL/kg body weight) of gadobutrol (Gadovist) to evaluate the ovarian cyst. She soon presented respiratory difficulty, edema of the lips, nausea, and vomiting, and we could hear wheezing upon auscultation. She was treated with dexamethasone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Her chest X-ray showed bilateral central bat-wing consolidative appearance. Managed with mechanical ventilation, she was extubated 3 days later and discharged without complications. PMID:26069143

  16. Acute Respiratory Failure Caused by Hepatopulmonary Fistula in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsil; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jee-Min; Kim, Young-Chan

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with acute dyspnea following sudden productive cough and expectoration of a full cup of "blood-tinged" sputum. He had been diagnosed with hepatitis B virus–related hepatocellular carcinoma and had received transarterial chemoembolization 5 years ago for a 20-cm hepatic mass; he denied any history of hematemesis and the last esophagogastroduodenoscopy from a year ago showed absence of varix. Chest computed tomography (CT) with angiography showed new appearance of right basal lung consolidation but no bleeding focus. Despite the use of systemic antibiotics, the patient developed respiratory failure on day 7 of hospitalization. After intubation, a massive amount of brown sputum with anchovy-paste-like consistency was suctioned via the endotracheal tube. Bronchoscopic toileting was performed and the patient was extubated. In the ward, he continued to expectorate the brown sputum. On day 25 of hospitalization, a repeat CT scan showed simultaneous disappearance of the pneumonic consolidation and the necrotic fluid within the hepatic mass, suggesting the presence of a fistula. He has continued to receive systemic antibiotics, sorafenib, and entecavir, and follow up by respiratory and hepato-oncology specialists. PMID:27433178

  17. Maternal knowledge, attitude and practices regarding childhood acute respiratory infections in Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Denno, D M; Bentsi-Enchill, A; Mock, C N; Adelson, J W

    1994-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are a major cause of paediatric mortality and morbidity, particularly when associated with delays in treatment. A study of mothers' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding ARI in their children aged less than 5 years was conducted in an urban Ghanaian population. One hundred and forty-three women traders were interviewed in open air markers in Kumasi, Ghana. Based on Western standards, there was a poor maternal understanding of the aetiology of ARI. A variety of herbal and home care therapies, including some which have potentially harmful effects, were routinely employed for the prophylaxis and treatment of ARI. For example, castor oil and enemas (25.9%) were reported as agents to prevent ARI, and antibiotics were prescribed by the parents in 39.9% for treating coughs. While the mothers exhibited an understanding of symptoms which differentiate between mild and severe ARI, a substantial number indicated that they would delay accessing a health care facility in the presence of the following symptoms which signify severe respiratory distress: dyspnoea (11.2%); tachypnoea (18.9%); chest retraction (21.7%); cough, fever and anorexia (30.0%); and cough, fever and lethargy (57.3%). These findings support the need for an ARI health education programme in Ghana. PMID:7880091

  18. Acute Respiratory Failure Caused by Hepatopulmonary Fistula in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungsil; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jee-Min; Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Sun Mi

    2016-07-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with acute dyspnea following sudden productive cough and expectoration of a full cup of "blood-tinged" sputum. He had been diagnosed with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma and had received transarterial chemoembolization 5 years ago for a 20-cm hepatic mass; he denied any history of hematemesis and the last esophagogastroduodenoscopy from a year ago showed absence of varix. Chest computed tomography (CT) with angiography showed new appearance of right basal lung consolidation but no bleeding focus. Despite the use of systemic antibiotics, the patient developed respiratory failure on day 7 of hospitalization. After intubation, a massive amount of brown sputum with anchovy-paste-like consistency was suctioned via the endotracheal tube. Bronchoscopic toileting was performed and the patient was extubated. In the ward, he continued to expectorate the brown sputum. On day 25 of hospitalization, a repeat CT scan showed simultaneous disappearance of the pneumonic consolidation and the necrotic fluid within the hepatic mass, suggesting the presence of a fistula. He has continued to receive systemic antibiotics, sorafenib, and entecavir, and follow up by respiratory and hepato-oncology specialists. PMID:27433178

  19. Recent insights: mesenchymal stromal/stem cell therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Shahd; Laffey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes respiratory failure, which is associated with severe inflammation and lung damage and has a high mortality and for which there is no therapy. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are adult multi-progenitor cells that can modulate the immune response and enhance repair of damaged tissue and thus may provide a therapeutic option for ARDS. MSCs demonstrate efficacy in diverse in vivo models of ARDS, decreasing bacterial pneumonia and ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury while enhancing repair following ventilator-induced lung injury. MSCs reduce the pro-inflammatory response to injury while augmenting the host response to bacterial infection. MSCs appear to exert their effects via multiple mechanisms—some are cell interaction dependent whereas others are paracrine dependent resulting from both soluble secreted products and microvesicles/exosomes derived from the cells. Strategies to further enhance the efficacy of MSCs, such as by overexpressing anti-inflammatory or pro-repair molecules, are also being investigated. Encouragingly, early phase clinical trials of MSCs in patients with ARDS are under way, and experience with these cells in trials for other diseases suggests that the cells are well tolerated. Although considerable translational challenges, such as concerns regarding cell manufacture scale-up and issues regarding cell potency and batch variability, must be overcome, MSCs constitute a highly promising potential therapy for ARDS. PMID:27408702

  20. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain. PMID:27271739

  1. Venovenous Extracorporeal Life Support in Single-Ventricle Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Alison B.; Oishi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    There is new and growing experience with venovenous extracorporeal life support (VV ECLS) for neonatal and pediatric patients with single-ventricle physiology and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Outcomes in this population have been defined but could be improved; survival rates in single-ventricle patients on VV ECLS for respiratory failure are slightly higher than those in single-ventricle patients on venoarterial ECLS for cardiac failure (48 vs. 32–43%), but are lower than in patients with biventricular anatomy (58–74%). To that end, special consideration is necessary for patients with single-ventricle physiology who require VV ECLS for ARDS. Specifically, ARDS disrupts the balance between pulmonary and systemic blood flow through dynamic alterations in cardiopulmonary mechanics. This complexity impacts how to run the VV ECLS circuit and the transition back to conventional support. Furthermore, these patients have a complicated coagulation profile. Both venous and arterial thrombi carry marked risk in single-ventricle patients due to the vulnerability of the pulmonary, coronary, and cerebral circulations. Finally, single-ventricle palliation requires the preservation of low resistance across the pulmonary circulation, unobstructed venous return, and optimal cardiac performance including valve function. As such, the proper timing as well as the particular conduct of ECLS might differ between this population and patients without single-ventricle physiology. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of VV ECLS in the single-ventricle population in the context of these special considerations. PMID:27446889

  2. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A pathophysiology-based review

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Papathanakos, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome with heterogeneous underlying pathological processes. It represents a common clinical problem in intensive care unit patients and it is characterized by high mortality. The mainstay of treatment for ARDS is lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure sufficient for alveolar recruitment. Prone positioning is a supplementary strategy available in managing patients with ARDS. It was first described 40 years ago and it proves to be in alignment with two major ARDS pathophysiological lung models; the “sponge lung” - and the “shape matching” -model. Current evidence strongly supports that prone positioning has beneficial effects on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung protection and hemodynamics as it redistributes transpulmonary pressure, stress and strain throughout the lung and unloads the right ventricle. The factors that individually influence the time course of alveolar recruitment and the improvement in oxygenation during prone positioning have not been well characterized. Although patients’ response to prone positioning is quite variable and hard to predict, large randomized trials and recent meta-analyses show that prone position in conjunction with a lung-protective strategy, when performed early and in sufficient duration, may improve survival in patients with ARDS. This pathophysiology-based review and recent clinical evidence strongly support the use of prone positioning in the early management of severe ARDS systematically and not as a rescue maneuver or a last-ditch effort. PMID:27152255

  3. Role of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Juliette Lucinda; Bronicki, Ronald A.; Anas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several systematic reviews with meta-analysis that have shown no reduction in mortality with the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Importantly, these reports fail to make a distinction between the pediatric and adult patient. The number of adult patients in these reviews are far greater than the number of pediatric patients, which makes it difficult to interpret the data regarding the role of iNO on the pediatric population. Extrapolating data from the adult population to the pediatric population is complicated as we know that physiology and the body’s response to disease can be different between adult and pediatric patients. iNO has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in term and near-term infants with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. Recently, Bronicki et al. published a prospective randomized control trial investigating the impact of iNO on the pediatric patient population with acute respiratory failure. In this study, a benefit of decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and an increased rate of ECMO-free survival was demonstrated in patients who were randomized to receiving iNO, suggesting that there may be benefit to the use of iNO in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) that has not been demonstrated in adults. iNO has repeatedly been shown to transiently improve oxygenation in all age groups, and yet neonates and pediatric patients have shown improvement in other outcomes that have not been seen in adults. The mechanism that explains improvement with the use of iNO in these patient populations are not well understood but does not appear to be solely a result of sustained improvement in oxygenation. There are physiologic studies that suggest alternative mechanisms for explaining the positive effects of iNO, such as platelet aggregation inhibition and reduction in systemic inflammation. Hence, the role of iNO by various mechanisms and in various

  4. Bordetella pertussis in infants hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms remains a concern

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preliminary results suggest that pertussis infection might be considered in infants during a seasonal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak. Methods In order to analyze clinical features and laboratory findings in infants with pertussis hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms during a seasonal RSV outbreak, we conducted a retrospective single-center study on 19 infants with pertussis (6 boys; median age 72 days) and 19 matched controls (RSV-bronchiolitis), hospitalized from October 2008 to April 2010. B. pertussis and RSV were detected from nasopharyngeal washes with Real Time-PCR. Results Infants with pertussis were less often breastfeed than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (63.2% vs 89.5%; p <0.06). Clinically, significantly fewer infants with pertussis than controls had more episodes of whooping cough (63.2% vs 0.0%; p < 0.001) and also less frequently fever at admission (15.8% vs 68.4%; p <0.01), apnea (52.6% vs 10.5%; p <0.006), and cyanosis (52.6% vs 10.5%; p < 0.006). Infants with pertussis had more often no abnormal chest sounds on auscultation than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (0% vs 42,1%; p < 0.005). The absolute blood lymphocyte and eosinophil counts were higher in infants with B. pertussis than in controls with bronchiolitis (23886 ± 16945 vs 10725 ± 4126 cells/mm3, p < 0.0001 and 13.653 ± 10.430 vs 4.730 ± 2.400 cells/mm3, p < 0.001). The molecular analysis of 2 B. pertussis isolates for ptxA1, ptxP3, and prn2 genes showed the presence of gene variants. Conclusions When infants are hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms, physicians should suspect a pertussis infection, seek for specific clinical symptoms, investigate lymphocyte and eosinophil counts and thus diagnose infection early enough to allow treatment. PMID:24209790

  5. Two long-lasting central respiratory responses following acute hypoxia in glomectomized cats.

    PubMed

    Gallman, E A; Millhorn, D E

    1988-01-01

    1. Central respiratory response to acute (10 min) hypoxia, as measured by phrenic nerve activity, was determined in peripheral chemo-denervated cats. 2. Hypoxia was induced by ventilating cats for 10 min at reduced inspired oxygen levels (inspired O2 fraction, FI,O2 = 0.06-0.15). The degree of hypoxaemia was determined from an arterial blood sample and ranged from 'severe' (arterial O2 pressure, Pa,O2 less than 26 Torr) to 'mild' (Pa,O2 greater than 35 Torr). The respiratory response was monitored for 1 h following return to ventilation with 100% oxygen. 3. The results confirmed the finding of prolonged (greater than 60 min) inhibition of respiration upon return to hyperoxic conditions following severe hypoxia, as reported previously (Millhorn, Eldridge, Kiley & Waldrop, 1984). A new finding was a long-lasting (greater than 60 min) facilitation of respiration following exposure to less severe (Pa,O2 greater than 35 Torr) hypoxia. 4. Medullary extracellular fluid pH was measured in six cats. Changes in pH could not explain either the prolonged inhibition following severe hypoxia or the long-lasting facilitation observed following mild hypoxia. 5. Ablation studies were performed in order to determine the locations of the neuronal substrates for the inhibitory and facilitatory mechanisms. The results of this series of experiments indicate that the mesencephalon is necessary for activation of the inhibitory mechanism, while the facilitatory mechanism requires the presence of higher brain structures, notably the diencephalon. 6. Following removal of the diencephalon, the inhibitory response was seen following even mild hypoxic insults, i.e. those shown to produce facilitation in animals with intact brains. In the absence of the mesencephalon, neither prolonged inhibition nor prolonged facilitation could be produced following hypoxia. 7. It is proposed that there are two centrally mediated long-lasting responses to acute hypoxia. Facilitation is seen following mild

  6. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  7. Recruitment maneuvers in acute respiratory distress syndrome and during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chiumello, Davide; Algieri, Ilaria; Grasso, Salvatore; Terragni, Pierpaolo; Pelosi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The use of low tidal volume ventilation and low to moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels is a widespread strategy to ventilate patients with non-injured lungs during general anesthesia and in intensive care as well with mild to moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Higher PEEP levels have been recommended in severe ARDS. Due to the presence of alveolar collapse, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) by causing a transient elevation in airway pressure (i.e. transpulmonary pressure) have been suggested to improve lung inflation in non-inflated and poorly-inflated lung regions. Various types of RMs such as sustained inflation at high pressure, intermittent sighs and stepwise increases of PEEP and/or airway plateau inspiratory pressure have been proposed. The use of RMs has been associated with mixed results in terms of physiological and clinical outcomes. The optimal method for RMs has not yet been identified. The use of RMs is not standardized and left to the individual physician based on his/her experience. Based on the same grounds, RMs have been proposed to improve lung aeration during general anesthesia. The aim of this review was to present the clinical evidence supporting the use of RMs in patients with ARDS and during general anesthesia and as well their potential biological effects in experimental models of acute lung injury. PMID:25881732

  8. Teacher led school-based surveillance can allow accurate tracking of emerging infectious diseases - evidence from serial cross-sectional surveys of febrile respiratory illness during the H1N1 2009 influenza pandemic in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schools are important foci of influenza transmission and potential targets for surveillance and interventions. We compared several school-based influenza monitoring systems with clinic-based influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance, and assessed the variation in illness rates between and within schools. Methods During the initial wave of pandemic H1N1 (pdmH1N1) infections from June to Sept 2009 in Singapore, we collected data on nation-wide laboratory confirmed cases (Sch-LCC) and daily temperature monitoring (Sch-DTM), and teacher-led febrile respiratory illness reporting in 6 sentinel schools (Sch-FRI). Comparisons were made against age-stratified clinic-based influenza-like illness (ILI) data from 23 primary care clinics (GP-ILI) and proportions of ILI testing positive for pdmH1N1 (Lab-ILI) by computing the fraction of cumulative incidence occurring by epidemiological week 30 (when GP-ILI incidence peaked); and cumulative incidence rates between school-based indicators and sero-epidemiological pdmH1N1 incidence (estimated from changes in prevalence of A/California/7/2009 H1N1 hemagglutination inhibition titers ≥ 40 between pre-epidemic and post-epidemic sera). Variation in Sch-FRI rates in the 6 schools was also investigated through a Bayesian hierarchical model. Results By week 30, for primary and secondary school children respectively, 63% and 79% of incidence for Sch-LCC had occurred, compared with 50% and 52% for GP-ILI data, and 48% and 53% for Sch-FRI. There were 1,187 notified cases and 7,588 episodes in the Sch-LCC and Sch-DTM systems; given school enrollment of 485,723 children, this represented 0.24 cases and 1.6 episodes per 100 children respectively. Mean Sch-FRI rate was 28.8 per 100 children (95% CI: 27.7 to 29.9) in the 6 schools. We estimate from serology that 41.8% (95% CI: 30.2% to 55.9%) of primary and 43.2% (95% CI: 28.2% to 60.8%) of secondary school-aged children were infected. Sch-FRI rates were similar across the 6 schools

  9. Healthcare-seeking behaviors for acute respiratory illness in two communities of Java, Indonesia: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Lafond, Kathryn E; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Storms, Aaron D; Mangiri, Amalya; Iuliano, Angela D; Samaan, Gina; Titaley, Christiana R; Yelda, Fitra; Kreslake, Jennifer; Storey, Douglas; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Understanding healthcare-seeking patterns for respiratory illness can help improve estimations of disease burden and inform public health interventions to control acute respiratory disease in Indonesia. The objectives of this study were to describe healthcare-seeking behaviors for respiratory illnesses in one rural and one urban community in Western Java, and to explore the factors that affect care seeking. From February 8, 2012 to March 1, 2012, a survey was conducted in 2520 households in the East Jakarta and Bogor districts to identify reported recent respiratory illnesses, as well as all hospitalizations from the previous 12-month period. We found that 4% (10% of those less than 5years) of people had respiratory disease resulting in a visit to a healthcare provider in the past 2weeks; these episodes were most commonly treated at government (33%) or private (44%) clinics. Forty-five people (0.4% of those surveyed) had respiratory hospitalizations in the past year, and just over half of these (24/45, 53%) occurred at a public hospital. Public health programs targeting respiratory disease in this region should account for care at private hospitals and clinics, as well as illnesses that are treated at home, in order to capture the true burden of illness in these communities. PMID:26930154

  10. Predictors of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients with Paraquat Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hu, Ching-Chih; Lin, Ja-Liang; Lin-Tan, Dan-Tzu; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Paraquat poisoning is characterized by acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory failure, and multi-organ failure, resulting in a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this study were to identify predictors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cases of paraquat poisoning and determine the association between these parameters. Materials and Methods In total, 187 patients were referred for management of intentional paraquat ingestion between 2000 and 2010. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) scores were collected, and predictors of ARDS were analyzed. Results The overall mortality rate for the entire population was 54% (101/187). Furthermore, the mortality rate was higher in the ARDS patients than in the non-ARDS patients (80% vs. 43.80%, P<0.001). Additionally, the ARDS patients not only had higher AKIN48-h scores (P<0.009), SOFA48-h scores (P<0.001), and time to ARDS/nadir PaO2 (P=0.008) but also suffered from lower nadir PaO2 (P<0.001), nadir AaDO2 (P<0.001), and nadir eGFR (P=0.001) compared to those in the non-ARDS patients. Moreover, pneumomediastinum episodes were more frequent in the ARDS patients than in the non-ARDS patients (P<0.001). A multivariate Cox regression model revealed that blood paraquat concentrations (P<0.001), SOFA48-h scores (P=0.001), and steroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapies (P=0.024) were significant predictors of ARDS. The cumulative survival rates differed significantly (P<0.001) between patients with SOFA48-h scores <3 and SOFA48-h scores ≥3, with a sensitivity of 95.8%, specificity of 58.4%, and overall correctness of 67.6%. Finally, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) analysis showed that SOFA48-h scores (P<0.001) had a better discriminatory power than blood paraquat concentrations (P=0.01) for predicting ARDS. Conclusions The analytical results

  11. Echocardiographic parameters of right ventricular function predict mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Trushil G; Wadia, Subeer K; Kovach, Julie; Fogg, Louis; Tandon, Rajive

    2016-06-01

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) contributes to increased mortality. Our aim is to identify reproducible transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) parameters of RV dysfunction that can be used to predict outcomes in ARDS. We performed a retrospective single-center cohort pilot study measuring tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), Tei index, RV-fractional area change (RV-FAC), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and septal shift, reevaluated by an independent blinded cardiologist (JK). Thirty-eight patients were included. Patients were divided on the basis of 30-day survival. Thirty-day mortality was 47%. Survivors were younger than nonsurvivors. Survivors had a higher pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratio, and TAPSE. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were lower in survivors. TAPSE has the strongest association with increased 30-day mortality from date of TTE. Accordingly, TAPSE has a strong positive correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, and Tei index has a strong negative correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Septal shift was associated with lower PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Decrease in TAPSE, increase in Tei index, and septal shift were seen in the severe ARDS group. In multivariate logistic regression models, TAPSE maintained a significant association with mortality independent of age, pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, positive end expiratory pressure, PCO2, serum bicarbonate, plateau pressures, driving pressures, APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA scores. In conclusion, TAPSE and other TTE parameters should be used as novel predictive indicators for RV dysfunction in ARDS. These parameters can be used as surrogate noninvasive RV hemodynamic measurements to be manipulated to improve mortality in patients with ARDS and contributory RV dysfunction. PMID:27252840

  12. Echocardiographic parameters of right ventricular function predict mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Subeer K.; Kovach, Julie; Fogg, Louis; Tandon, Rajive

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) contributes to increased mortality. Our aim is to identify reproducible transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) parameters of RV dysfunction that can be used to predict outcomes in ARDS. We performed a retrospective single-center cohort pilot study measuring tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), Tei index, RV-fractional area change (RV-FAC), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and septal shift, reevaluated by an independent blinded cardiologist (JK). Thirty-eight patients were included. Patients were divided on the basis of 30-day survival. Thirty-day mortality was 47%. Survivors were younger than nonsurvivors. Survivors had a higher pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratio, and TAPSE. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were lower in survivors. TAPSE has the strongest association with increased 30-day mortality from date of TTE. Accordingly, TAPSE has a strong positive correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, and Tei index has a strong negative correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Septal shift was associated with lower PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Decrease in TAPSE, increase in Tei index, and septal shift were seen in the severe ARDS group. In multivariate logistic regression models, TAPSE maintained a significant association with mortality independent of age, pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, positive end expiratory pressure, PCO2, serum bicarbonate, plateau pressures, driving pressures, APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA scores. In conclusion, TAPSE and other TTE parameters should be used as novel predictive indicators for RV dysfunction in ARDS. These parameters can be used as surrogate noninvasive RV hemodynamic measurements to be manipulated to improve mortality in patients with ARDS and contributory RV dysfunction. PMID:27252840

  13. The potential role and limitations of echocardiography in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Cianchi, Giovanni; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Batacchi, Stefano; Peris, Adriano; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2016-04-01

    Bedside use of Doppler echocardiography is being featured as a promising, clinically useful tool in assessing the pulmonary circulation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present review is aimed at summarizing the available evidence obtained with echocardiography on right ventricle (RV) function and pulmonary circulation in ARDS and to highlight the potential of this technique in clinical practice (only articles in English language were considered). According to the available evidence on echocardiographic findings, the following conclusions can be drawn: (a) echocardiography (transthoracic and transesophageal) has a growing role in the management ARDS patients mainly because of the strict interactions between the lung (and ventilation) and the RV and pulmonary circulation; (b) there may be a continuum of alterations in RV size and function and pulmonary circulation which may end in the development of acute cor pulmonale, probably paralleling ARDS disease severity; and (c) the detection of acute cor pulmonale should prompt intensivists to tailor their ventilatory strategy to the individual patient depending on the echocardiography findings. Bearing in mind the clinical role and growing importance of echocardiography in ARDS and the available evidence on this topic, we present a flow chart including the parameters to be measured and the timing of echo exams in ARDS patients. Despite the important progress that echocardiography has gained in the evaluation of patients with ARDS, several open questions remain and echocardiography still appears to be underused in these patients. A more systematic use of echocardiography (mainly through shared protocols) in ARDS could help intensivists to tailor the optimal treatment in individual patients as well as highlighting the limits and potential of this methodology in patients with ALI. PMID:26660667

  14. Pilot study of participant-collected nasal swabs for acute respiratory infections in a low-income, urban population

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Celibell Y; Wang, Liqun; Castellanos de Belliard, Yaritza; Morban, Maria; Diaz, Hilbania; Larson, Elaine L; LaRussa, Philip; Saiman, Lisa; Stockwell, Melissa S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and validity of unsupervised participant-collected nasal swabs to detect respiratory pathogens in a low-income, urban minority population. Methods This project was conducted as part of an ongoing community-based surveillance study in New York City to identify viral etiologies of acute respiratory infection. In January 2014, following sample collection by trained research assistants, participants with acute respiratory infection from 30 households subsequently collected and returned a self-collected/parent-collected nasal swab via mail. Self/parental swabs corresponding with positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction primary research samples were analyzed. Results Nearly all (96.8%, n=30/31) households agreed to participate; 100% reported returning the sample and 29 were received (median time: 8 days). Most (18; 62.1%) of the primary research samples were positive. For eight influenza-positive research samples, seven (87.5%) self-swabs were also positive. For ten other respiratory pathogen-positive research samples, eight (80.0%) self-swabs were positive. Sensitivity of self-swabs for any respiratory pathogen was 83.3% and 87.5% for influenza, and specificity for both was 100%. There was no relationship between level of education and concordance of results between positive research samples and their matching participant swab. Conclusion In this pilot study, self-swabbing was feasible and valid in a low-income, urban minority population. PMID:26793005

  15. Detection of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Like, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Like Bat Coronaviruses and Group H Rotavirus in Faeces of Korean Bats.

    PubMed

    Kim, H K; Yoon, S-W; Kim, D-J; Koo, B-S; Noh, J Y; Kim, J H; Choi, Y G; Na, W; Chang, K-T; Song, D; Jeong, D G

    2016-08-01

    Bat species around the world have recently been recognized as major reservoirs of several zoonotic viruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), Nipah virus and Hendra virus. In this study, consensus primer-based reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) and high-throughput sequencing were performed to investigate viruses in bat faecal samples collected at 11 natural bat habitat sites from July to December 2015 in Korea. Diverse coronaviruses were first detected in Korean bat faeces, including alphacoronaviruses, SARS-CoV-like and MERS-CoV-like betacoronaviruses. In addition, we identified a novel bat rotavirus belonging to group H rotavirus which has only been described in human and pigs until now. Therefore, our results suggest the need for continuing surveillance and additional virological studies in domestic bat. PMID:27213718

  16. A Critical Care and Transplantation-Based Approach to Acute Respiratory Failure after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    Elbahlawan, Lama; Srinivasan, Ashok; Morrison, R Ray

    2016-04-01

    Acute respiratory failure contributes significantly to nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although there is a trend of improved survival over time, mortality remains unacceptably high. An understanding of the pathophysiology of early respiratory failure, opportunities for targeted therapy, assessment of the patient at risk, optimal use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, strategies to improve alveolar recruitment, appropriate fluid management, care of the patient with chronic lung disease, and importantly, a team approach between critical care and transplantation services may improve outcomes. PMID:26409244

  17. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Agustín; Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  18. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  19. Demographic, etiological, and histological pulmonary analysis of patients with acute respiratory failure: a study of 19 years of autopsies

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Parra, Edwin R; Farhat, Cecília; Capelozzi, Vera L

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory failure has been one of the most important causes of death in intensive care units, and certain aspects of its pulmonary pathology are currently unknown. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to describe the demographic data, etiology, and pulmonary histopathological findings of different diseases in the autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure. METHOD: Autopsies of 4,710 patients with acute respiratory failure from 1990 to 2008 were reviewed, and the following data were obtained: age, sex, and major associated diseases. The pulmonary histopathology was categorized as diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage, and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of the concordance between the major associated diseases and specific autopsy findings was calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 33.9% of the cases and cancer in 28.1%. The pulmonary histopathology showed diffuse alveolar damage in 40.7% (1,917) of the cases. A multivariate analysis showed a significant and powerful association between diffuse alveolar damage and bronchopneumonia, HIV/AIDS, sepsis, and septic shock, between liver cirrhosis and pulmonary embolism, between pulmonary edema and acute myocardial infarction, between dilated cardiomyopathy and cancer, between alveolar hemorrhage and bronchopneumonia and pulmonary embolism, and between lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia and HIV/AIDS and liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchopneumonia was the most common diagnosis in these cases. The most prevalent pulmonary histopathological pattern was diffuse alveolar damage, which was associated with different inflammatory conditions. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the complete pathophysiological mechanisms involved with each disease and the development of acute respiratory failure. PMID:21876973

  20. Titration of tidal volume and induced hypercapnia in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roupie, E; Dambrosio, M; Servillo, G; Mentec, H; el Atrous, S; Beydon, L; Brun-Buisson, C; Lemaire, F; Brochard, L

    1995-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation may promote overdistension-induced pulmonary lesions in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The static pressure-volume (P-V) curve of the respiratory system can be used to determine the lung volume and corresponding static airway pressure at which lung compliance begins to diminish (the upper inflection point, or UIP). This fall in compliance may indicate overdistension of lung units. We prospectively studied 42 patients receiving mechanical ventilation with an FIO2 of 0.5 or more for at least 24 h. According to the Lung Injury Score (LIS), 25 patients were classified as having ARDS (LIS > 2.5), while 17 patients constituted a non-ARDS control group. The P-V curve was obtained every 2 d. Mechanical ventilation initially used standard settings (volume-control mode, a positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] adjusted to the lower inflection point on the P-V curve, and a tidal volume [VT] of 10 ml/kg). The end-inspiratory plateau pressure (Pplat) was compared to the UIP, and VT was lowered when the Pplat was above the UIP. In the range of lung volume studied on the P-V curves (up to 1600 ml), a UIP could be shown in only one control patient (at 23 cm H2O). By contrast, a UIP was present on the P-V curve obtained from all patients with ARDS, corresponding to a mean airway pressure of 26 +/- 6 cm H2O, a lung volume of 850 +/- 200 ml above functional residual capacity and 610 +/- 235 ml above PEEP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599810

  1. Antibiotic Utilization for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in U.S. Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) has decreased in many outpatient settings. For patients presenting to U.S. emergency departments (EDs) with ARTIs, antibiotic utilization patterns are unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of ED patients from 2001 to 2010 using data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). We identified patients presenting to U.S. EDs with ARTIs and calculated rates of antibiotic utilization. Diagnoses were classified as antibiotic appropriate (otitis media, sinusitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, and nonviral pneumonia) or antibiotic inappropriate (nasopharyngitis, unspecified upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis or bronchiolitis, viral pneumonia, and influenza).There were 126 million ED visits with a diagnosis of ARTI, and antibiotics were prescribed in 61%. Between 2001 and 2010, antibiotic utilization decreased for patients aged <5 presenting with antibiotic-inappropriate ARTI (rate ratio [RR], 0.94; confidence interval [CI], 0.88 to 1.00). Utilization also decreased significantly for antibiotic-inappropriate ARTI patients aged 5 to 19 years (RR, 0.89; CI, 0.85 to 0.94). Utilization remained stable for antibiotic-inappropriate ARTI among adult patients aged 20 to 64 years (RR, 0.99; CI, 0.97 to 1.01). Among adults, rates of quinolone use for ARTI increased significantly from 83 per 1,000 visits in 2001 to 2002 to 105 per 1,000 in 2009 to 2010 (RR, 1.08; CI, 1.03 to 1.14). Although significant progress has been made toward reduction of antibiotic utilization for pediatric patients with ARTI, the proportion of adult ARTI patients receiving antibiotics in U.S. EDs is inappropriately high. Institution of measures to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use in the ED setting is warranted. PMID:24342652

  2. Use of Oligonucleotide Microarrays for Rapid Detection and Serotyping of Acute Respiratory Disease-Associated Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J.; Thach, Dzung; Walter, Elizabeth; Metzgar, David; Tibbetts, Clark; Stenger, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The cessation of the adenovirus vaccination program for military trainees has resulted in several recent acute respiratory disease (ARD) outbreaks. In the absence of vaccination, rapid detection methods are necessary for the timely implementation of measures to prevent adenovirus transmission within military training facilities. To this end, we have combined a fluorogenic real-time multiplex PCR assay with four sets of degenerate PCR primers that target the E1A, fiber, and hexon genes with a long oligonucleotide microarray capable of identifying the most common adenovirus serotypes associated with adult respiratory tract infections (serotypes 3, 4, 7, 16, and 21) and a representative member of adenovirus subgroup C (serotype 6) that is a common cause of childhood ARD and that often persists into adulthood. Analyses with prototype strains demonstrated unique hybridization patterns for representative members of adenovirus subgroups B1, B2, C, and E, thus allowing serotype determination. Microarray-based sensitivity assessments revealed lower detection limits (between 1 and 100 genomic copies) for adenovirus serotype 4 (Ad4) and Ad7 cell culture lysates, clinical nasal washes, and throat swabs and purified DNA from clinical samples. When adenovirus was detected from coded clinical samples, the results obtained by this approach demonstrated an excellent concordance with those obtained by the more established method of adenovirus identification as well as by cell culture with fluorescent-antibody staining. Finally, the utility of this method was further supported by its ability to detect adenoviral coinfections, contamination, and, potentially, recombination events. Taken together, the results demonstrate the usefulness of the simple and rapid diagnostic method developed for the unequivocal identification of ARD-associated adenoviral serotypes from laboratory or clinical samples that can be completed in 1.5 to 4.0 h. PMID:15243087

  3. Practical Implementation of a Multiplex PCR for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gruteke, Paul; Glas, Afina S.; Dierdorp, Mirjam; Vreede, Willem B.; Pilon, Jan-Willem; Bruisten, Sylvia M.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular testing for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) has documented value but limited implementation due to questions that typically slow the acceptance of new tests. This study sought to address these questions and achieve implementation. Rhinovirus was added to a nested multiplex PCR (M-PCR), increasing its diagnostic yield. Over one winter, three hospital pediatric departments used the M-PCR to complement their direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Clinicians recorded “pretest probability estimates” (using continuous scales for various pathogen groups) for comparison with test results; treatments and test turnaround times were also recorded. Transnasal and throat swabs, with or without nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), were M-PCR tested. NPA-containing sample sets found to be RSV positive by DFA were not further tested. Single PCR for human metapneumovirus (hMPV) was performed retrospectively. Of 178 ARI episodes representing 172 patients, NPA was included in 97 sample sets; 54 (56%) were determined to be RSV positive. The other NPA-containing sample sets (n = 43) yielded 27 findings (63%), and the swab-only sets (n = 81) yielded 47 findings (58%); rhinovirus was found most often. Testing for hMPV yielded seven positive results. M-PCR median turnaround times were 4 days in swab-only samples and 5 days with NPA. Antibiotics were prescribed in 50 episodes, at rates similar for RSV and rhinovirus. Pretest probability estimates of a viral cause were lower in episodes caused by rhinovirus than in episodes caused by RSV. The hospitals continued to use M-PCR for NPA-containing samples found to be RSV negative by DFA. Test implementation is more likely with higher diagnostic yield and a protocol that reflects day-to-day clinical and laboratory operations. PMID:15583287

  4. Acute respiratory infections prevent improvement of vitamin A status in young infants supplemented with vitamin A.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Mahalanabis, D; Alvarez, J O; Wahed, M A; Islam, M A; Habte, D; Khaled, M A

    1996-03-01

    At immunization contact, 165 infants 2.5 mo old were randomly assigned to receive either 15 mg vitamin A (retinyl palmitate) or placebo. Three doses were given at monthly intervals with each diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus and oral polio (DPT/OPV) immunization dose. The diarrhea and acute respiratory infection (ARI) morbidity was similar in the vitamin A and placebo groups. However, the duration (days per child-year, mean +/- SD) of ARI was less in the vitamin A group compared with placebo group (27.6 +/- 17.1 vs. 40.8 +/- 22.7; P = 0.005). Fasting retinol concentrations were measured at entry and in 61 infants, the relative dose response (RDR) test was done 1 mo after the third dose of vitamin A. Eighty-five percent of the infants had serum retinol concentration < 0.70 mol/L at entry. After 3 mo the serum retinol levels improved significantly in both groups, and in the vitamin A-supplemented group the serum retinol concentration was significantly better than that in the placebo group (P= 0.02). However, 61% of the infants remained deficient despite vitamin A supplementation. Among vitamin A-supplemented infants only, diarrhea and ARI morbidity during the 3-mo period were compared in children with normal versus children with abnormal RDR at the end of the supplementation period. The ARI episodes were more frequent in the supplemented infants who remained vitamin A deficient at the end of the 3 mo (P = 0.027). Also, the cumulative duration (days, mean +/- SD) of fever and cough was 5.0 +/- 2.8 in the normal versus 11.2 +/- 6.0 in the deficient group (P = 0.04). The results of this study suggest that a large proportion of infants remain vitamin A deficient even after large dose vitamin A supplementation because of frequent respiratory infections, particularly those accompanied by fever. PMID:8598547

  5. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  6. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  7. Acute respiratory toxicity following inhalation exposure to soman in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Michael W.; Pierre, Zdenka; Rezk, Peter; Sabnekar, Praveena; Sciuto, Alfred M.; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.

    2010-06-01

    Respiratory toxicity and lung injury following inhalation exposure to chemical warfare nerve agent soman was examined in guinea pigs without therapeutics to improve survival. A microinstillation inhalation exposure technique that aerosolizes the agent in the trachea was used to administer soman to anesthetized age and weight matched male guinea pigs. Animals were exposed to 280, 561, 841, and 1121 mg/m{sup 3} concentrations of soman for 4 min. Survival data showed that all saline controls and animals exposed to 280 and 561 mg/m{sup 3} soman survived, while animals exposed to 841, and 1121 mg/m{sup 3} resulted in 38% and 13% survival, respectively. The microinstillation inhalation exposure LCt{sub 50} for soman determined by probit analysis was 827.2 mg/m{sup 3}. A majority of the animals that died at 1121 mg/m{sup 3} developed seizures and died within 15-30 min post-exposure. There was a dose-dependent decrease in pulse rate and blood oxygen saturation of animals exposed to soman at 5-6.5 min post-exposure. Body weight loss increased with the dose of soman exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and blood acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity was inhibited dose-dependently in soman treated groups at 24 h. BAL cells showed a dose-dependent increase in cell death and total cell counts following soman exposure. Edema by wet/dry weight ratio of the accessory lung lobe and trachea was increased slightly in soman exposed animals. An increase in total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein was observed in soman exposed animals at all doses. Differential cell counts of BAL and blood showed an increase in total lymphocyte counts and percentage of neutrophils. These results indicate that microinstillation inhalation exposure to soman causes respiratory toxicity and acute lung injury in guinea pigs.

  8. Acute respiratory bronchiolitis: an ultrastructural and autoradiographic study of epithelial cell injury and renewal in Rhesus monkeys exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, W.L.; Dungworth, D.L.; Schwartz, L.W.; Tyler, W.S.

    1980-03-01

    The pathogenesis of acute respiratory bronchiolitis was examined in Rhesus monkeys exposed to 0.8 ppM ozone for 4 to 50 hours. Epithelial injury and renewal were qualitatively and quantitatively characterized by correlated techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by light-microscopic autoradiography following labeling with tritiated thymidine. Extensive degeneration and necrosis of Type 1 epithelial cells occurred on the respiratory bronchiolar wall during the initial 4 to 12 hours of exposure. Increased numbers of labeled epithelial cells were present in this region after 18 hours of exposure, and the highest labeling index (18%) was measured after 50 hours of exposure. Most (67 to 80%) of the labeled cells and all the mitotic epithelial cells (22) observed ultrastructurally were cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells. Of the labeled epithelial cells, 20 to 33% were Type 2 epithelial cells. After 50 hours of exposure the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium was hyperplastic. The predominant inflammatory cell in respiratory bronchiolar exudate was the alveolar macrophage. Monkeys that were exposed for 50 hours and allowed to recover in unozonized air for 7 days had incomplete resolution of respiratory bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia. The results indicate that Type 1 epithelial cells lining respiratory bronchioles are the cell types most sensitive to injury and that both cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells and Type 2 epithelial cells function as stem cells in epithelial renewal.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  10. Mortality amongst Patients with Influenza-Associated Severe Acute Respiratory Illness, South Africa, 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; Moyes, Jocelyn; Tempia, Stefano; Groome, Michelle; Walaza, Sibongile; Pretorius, Marthi; Dawood, Halima; Chhagan, Meera; Haffejee, Summaya; Variava, Ebrahim; Kahn, Kathleen; von Gottberg, Anne; Wolter, Nicole; Cohen, Adam L.; Malope-Kgokong, Babatyi; Venter, Marietjie; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Data on the burden and risk groups for influenza-associated mortality from Africa are limited. We aimed to estimate the incidence and risk-factors for in-hospital influenza-associated severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) deaths. Methods Hospitalised patients with SARI were enrolled prospectively in four provinces of South Africa from 2009–2013. Using polymerase chain reaction, respiratory samples were tested for ten respiratory viruses and blood for pneumococcal DNA. The incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths was estimated at one urban hospital with a defined catchment population. Results We enrolled 1376 patients with influenza-associated SARI and 3% (41 of 1358 with available outcome data) died. In patients with available HIV-status, the case-fatality proportion (CFP) was higher in HIV-infected (5%, 22/419) than HIV-uninfected individuals (2%, 13/620; p = 0.006). CFPs varied by age group, and generally increased with increasing age amongst individuals >5 years (p<0.001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were age-group 45–64 years (odds ratio (OR) 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–16.3) and ≥65 years (OR 6.5, 95%CI 1.2–34.3) compared to 1–4 year age-group who had the lowest CFP, HIV-infection (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.1–7.8), underlying medical conditions other than HIV (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.2–7.3) and pneumococcal co-infection (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.5–11.2). The estimated incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths per 100,000 population was highest in children <1 year (20.1, 95%CI 12.1–31.3) and adults aged 45–64 years (10.4, 95%CI 8.4–12.9). Adjusting for age, the rate of death was 20-fold (95%CI 15.0–27.8) higher in HIV-infected individuals than HIV-uninfected individuals. Conclusion Influenza causes substantial mortality in urban South Africa, particularly in infants aged <1 year and HIV-infected individuals. More widespread access to antiretroviral treatment and influenza vaccination may reduce this

  11. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  12. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  13. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus not detected in children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness in Amman, Jordan, March 2010 to September 2012

    PubMed Central

    Khuri-Bulos, N.; Payne, D. C.; Lu, X.; Erdman, D.; Wang, L.; Faouri, S.; Shehabi, A.; Johnson, M.; Becker, M. M.; Denison, M. R.; Williams, J. V.; Halasa, N. B.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalized children < 2 years of age in Amman, Jordan, admitted for fever and/or respiratory symptoms, were tested for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): MERS-CoV by real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). This was a prospective year-round viral surveillance study in children <2 years of age admitted with acute respiratory symptoms and/or fever from March 2010 to September 2012 and enrolled from a government-run hospital, Al-Bashir in Amman, Jordan. Clinical and demographic data, including antibiotic use, were collected. Combined nasal/throat swabs were collected, aliquoted, and frozen at −80°C. Specimen aliquots were shipped to Vanderbilt University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and tested by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the 2433 subjects enrolled from 16 March 2010 to 10 September 2012, 2427 subjects had viral testing and clinical data. Of 1898 specimens prospectively tested for other viruses between 16 March 2010 and 18 March 2012, 474 samples did not have other common respiratory viruses detected. These samples were tested at CDC for MERS-CoV and all were negative by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the remaining 531 samples, collected from 19 March 2012 to 10 September 2012 and tested at Vanderbilt, none were positive for MERS-CoV. Our negative findings from a large sample of young Jordanian children hospitalized with fever and/or respiratory symptoms suggest that MERS-CoV was not widely circulating in Amman, Jordan, during the 30-month period of prospective, active surveillance occurring before and after the first documented MERS-CoV outbreak in the Middle East region. PMID:24313317

  14. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus not detected in children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness in Amman, Jordan, March 2010 to September 2012.

    PubMed

    Khuri-Bulos, N; Payne, D C; Lu, X; Erdman, D; Wang, L; Faouri, S; Shehabi, A; Johnson, M; Becker, M M; Denison, M R; Williams, J V; Halasa, N B

    2014-07-01

    Hospitalized children < 2 years of age in Amman, Jordan, admitted for fever and/or respiratory symptoms, were tested for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): MERS-CoV by real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). This was a prospective year-round viral surveillance study in children <2 years of age admitted with acute respiratory symptoms and/or fever from March 2010 to September 2012 and enrolled from a government-run hospital, Al-Bashir in Amman, Jordan. Clinical and demographic data, including antibiotic use, were collected. Combined nasal/throat swabs were collected, aliquoted, and frozen at -80°C. Specimen aliquots were shipped to Vanderbilt University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and tested by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the 2433 subjects enrolled from 16 March 2010 to 10 September 2012, 2427 subjects had viral testing and clinical data. Of 1898 specimens prospectively tested for other viruses between 16 March 2010 and 18 March 2012, 474 samples did not have other common respiratory viruses detected. These samples were tested at CDC for MERS-CoV and all were negative by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the remaining 531 samples, collected from 19 March 2012 to 10 September 2012 and tested at Vanderbilt, none were positive for MERS-CoV. Our negative findings from a large sample of young Jordanian children hospitalized with fever and/or respiratory symptoms suggest that MERS-CoV was not widely circulating in Amman, Jordan, during the 30-month period of prospective, active surveillance occurring before and after the first documented MERS-CoV outbreak in the Middle East region. PMID:24313317

  15. Sublingual immunotherapy as an alternative to induce protection against acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Rial, Analía; Saavedra, José M; Chabalgoity, José A

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route has been widely used to deliver small molecules into the bloodstream and to modulate the immune response at different sites. It has been shown to effectively induce humoral and cellular responses at systemic and mucosal sites, namely the lungs and urogenital tract. Sublingual vaccination can promote protection against infections at the lower and upper respiratory tract; it can also promote tolerance to allergens and ameliorate asthma symptoms. Modulation of lung's immune response by sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is safer than direct administration of formulations by intranasal route because it does not require delivery of potentially harmful molecules directly into the airways. In contrast to intranasal delivery, side effects involving brain toxicity or facial paralysis are not promoted by SLIT. The immune mechanisms underlying SLIT remain elusive and its use for the treatment of acute lung infections has not yet been explored. Thus, development of appropriate animal models of SLIT is needed to further explore its potential advantages. This work shows how to perform sublingual administration of therapeutic agents in mice to evaluate their ability to protect against acute pneumococcal pneumonia. Technical aspects of mouse handling during sublingual inoculation, precise identification of sublingual mucosa, draining lymph nodes and isolation of tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage and lungs are illustrated. Protocols for single cell suspension preparation for FACS analysis are described in detail. Other downstream applications for the analysis of the immune response are discussed. Technical aspects of the preparation of Streptococcus pneumoniae inoculum and intranasal challenge of mice are also explained. SLIT is a simple technique that allows screening of candidate molecules to modulate lungs' immune response. Parameters affecting the success of SLIT are related to molecular size, susceptibility to degradation and stability of highly concentrated

  16. The role of inhaled prostacyclin in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Searcy, Randi J; Morales, James R; Ferreira, Jason A; Johnson, Donald W

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute lung injury that is characterized by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and severe hypoxemia second to a pathogenic impairment of gas exchange. Despite significant advances in the area, mortality remains high among ARDS patients. High mortality and a limited spectrum of therapeutic options have left clinicians searching for alternatives, spiking interest in selective pulmonary vasodilators (SPVs). Despite the lack of robust evidence, SPVs are commonly employed for their therapeutic role in improving oxygenation in patients who have developed refractory hypoxemia in ARDS. While inhaled epoprostenol (iEPO) also impacts arterial oxygenation by decreasing ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) mismatching and pulmonary shunt flow, this effect is not different from inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). The most effective and safest dose for yielding a clinically significant increase in PaO2 and reduction in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) appears to be 20-30 ng/kg/min in adults and 30 ng/kg/min in pediatric patients. iEPO appears to have a ceiling effect above these doses in which no additional benefit may be derived. iNO and iEPO have shown similar efficacy profiles; however, they differ with respect to cost and ease of therapeutic administration. The most beneficial effects of iEPO have been seen in adult patients with secondary ARDS as compared with primary ARDS, most likely due to the difference in etiology of the two disease states, and in patients suffering from baseline right ventricular heart failure. Although iEPO has demonstrated improvements in hemodynamic parameters and oxygenation in ARDS patients, due to the limited number of randomized clinical trials and the lack of studies investigating mortality, the use of iEPO cannot be recommended as standard of care in ARDS. iEPO should be reserved for those refractory to traditional therapies. PMID:26294418

  17. Bilevel ventilation during exercise in acute on chronic respiratory failure: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Menadue, Collette; Alison, J A; Piper, A J; Flunt, D; Ellis, E R

    2010-02-01

    To determine the immediate effects of bilevel non-invasive ventilation plus oxygen (NIV+O(2)) during exercise compared to exercise with O(2) alone in people recovering from acute on chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (HRF), a randomised crossover study with repeated measures was performed. Eighteen participants performed six minute walk tests (6MWT) and 16 participants performed unsupported arm exercise (UAE) tests with NIV+O(2) and with O(2) alone in random order. Distance walked increased by a mean of 43.4m (95% CI 14.1 to 72.8, p=0.006) with NIV+O(2) compared to exercise with O(2) alone. In addition, isotime oxygen saturation increased by a mean of 5% (95% CI 2-7, p=0.001) and isotime dyspnoea was reduced [median 2 (interquartile range (IQR) 1-4) versus 4 (3-5), p=0.028] with NIV+O(2). A statistically significant increase was also observed in UAE endurance time with NIV+O(2) [median 201s (IQR 93-414) versus 157 (90-342), p=0.033], and isotime perceived exertion (arm muscle fatigue) was reduced by a mean of 1.0 on the Borg scale (95% CI -1.9 to -0.1, p=0.037) compared with O(2) alone. Non-invasive ventilation plus O(2) during walking resulted in an immediate improvement in distance walked and oxygen saturation, and a reduction in dyspnoea compared to exercise with O(2) alone in people recovering from acute on chronic HRF. The reduction of dyspnoea during walking and arm muscle fatigue during UAE observed with NIV+O(2) may allow patients to better tolerate exercise early in the recovery period. PMID:19804963

  18. Uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax malaria in pregnancy associated with mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    McGready, Rose; Wongsaen, Klanarong; Chu, Cindy S; Tun, Nay Win; Chotivanich, Kesinee; White, Nicholas J; Nosten, François

    2014-01-01

    The association between severe malaria and Plasmodium vivax species is contentious. On the Thai-Myanmar border, all pregnant women are followed systematically with active weekly malaria screening. Over a 27-year period of providing antenatal care, 48,983 have been prospectively followed until pregnancy outcome (miscarriage or delivery) and 4,298 women have had P. vivax detected at least once. Reported here is the first known P. vivax-associated death amongst these women. The initial patient presentation was of uncomplicated P. vivax (0.5% parasitaemia) in a term, multigravida woman who responded rapidly to oral artesunate and mefloquine treatment, clearing her blood stage parasites within 48 hours. The patient appeared well, was ambulatory and due to be discharged but became unwell with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring ventilation three days (67 hours) into treatment. Despite induction and delivery of a stillborn foetus, ventilatory requirements increased and the patient died on day 7. The patient had a low body mass index. Sensitive detection with nested PCR confirmed only the presence of P. vivax species and concomitant infections such as tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were also ruled out. The contemporaneous treatment of acute uncomplicated P. vivax and the onset of ARDS on day 3 in this patient implies a possible but unconfirmed association with death in this patient. Assuming this death was caused by P. vivax, the risk of ARDS-related maternal mortality in this setting did not differ significantly between Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax (0.24 per 1,000 (1/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), contrary to the increased risk of maternal mortality from P. falciparum compared to P. vivax, 2.89 per 1,000 (12/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), P = 0.003. PMID:24886559

  19. Uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax malaria in pregnancy associated with mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The association between severe malaria and Plasmodium vivax species is contentious. On the Thai-Myanmar border, all pregnant women are followed systematically with active weekly malaria screening. Over a 27-year period of providing antenatal care, 48,983 have been prospectively followed until pregnancy outcome (miscarriage or delivery) and 4,298 women have had P. vivax detected at least once. Reported here is the first known P. vivax-associated death amongst these women. The initial patient presentation was of uncomplicated P. vivax (0.5% parasitaemia) in a term, multigravida woman who responded rapidly to oral artesunate and mefloquine treatment, clearing her blood stage parasites within 48 hours. The patient appeared well, was ambulatory and due to be discharged but became unwell with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring ventilation three days (67 hours) into treatment. Despite induction and delivery of a stillborn foetus, ventilatory requirements increased and the patient died on day 7. The patient had a low body mass index. Sensitive detection with nested PCR confirmed only the presence of P. vivax species and concomitant infections such as tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were also ruled out. The contemporaneous treatment of acute uncomplicated P. vivax and the onset of ARDS on day 3 in this patient implies a possible but unconfirmed association with death in this patient. Assuming this death was caused by P. vivax, the risk of ARDS-related maternal mortality in this setting did not differ significantly between Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax (0.24 per 1,000 (1/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), contrary to the increased risk of maternal mortality from P. falciparum compared to P. vivax, 2.89 per 1,000 (12/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), P = 0.003. PMID:24886559

  20. Prothrombotic state in senile patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease combined with respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    SONG, YA-JUN; ZHOU, ZHE-HUI; LIU, YAO-KANG; RAO, SHI-MING; HUANG, YING-JUN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the clinical value of prethrombotic state and treatment with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in senile patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) combined with respiratory failure. Hemorheological markers (hematocrit, blood viscosity and plasma viscosity), fibrinogen (FIB), D-dimer and gas analysis were evaluated in 30 senile patients with AECOPD combined with respiratory failure and compared with those in 30 cases without respiratory failure. A total of 30 cases with AECOPD combined with respiratory failure were randomly divided into treatment and control groups. The two groups received conventional treatment. The treatment group also received LMWH injections every 12 h for 6 days and the clinical effect was observed. The levels of FIB, D-dimer, hematocrit, blood viscosity and plasma viscosity were significantly higher in the patients with AECOPD combined with respiratory failure compared with those in the patients without respiratory failure. The plasma D-dimer and FIB levels had significantly positive correlations with the partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) and negative correlations with the partial pressure of O2 (PaO2) in the patients with AECOPD combined with respiratory failure. The curative effect was improved in the treatment group, compared with that in the control group without side-effects. However, no significant changes in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and international normalized ratio (INR) were observed between the treatment and control groups. The senile patients with AECOPD combined with respiratory failure suffered from hypercoagulation. Early detection and diagnosis of the prethrombotic state and timely treatment with LMWH may benefit these patients without side-effects. PMID:23596488

  1. [An unusual cause of febrile neutropenia: brucellosis].

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Soner; Asma, Süheyl; Ozdoğu, Hakan; Yeral, Mahmut; Turunç, Tuba

    2014-10-01

    Febrile neutropenia which is a common complication of cancer treatment, is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Several gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are responsible for infections in neutropenic patients, however the most common microorganisms are Escherichia coli and coagulase-negative staphylococci, in decreasing order. Although Brucella spp. infections are endemic in Turkey, brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia has only rarely been reported. In this report, a case of brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia in a patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was presented. A 56-year-old male patient presenting with fever, petechiae/purpura, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory studies revealed a hemoglobin level of 8.27 g/dl, leukocyte count of 77.100 k/ml, absolute neutrophil count of 200 k/ml, and platelets at 94.200 k/ml. The patient was diagnosed as AML-M1 and piperacillin/tazobactam was started as the first-line antibiotic therapy due to the febrile neutropenia. On admission, blood and urine cultures were negative. Once the fever was controlled, remission/induction chemotherapy was initiated. However, fever developed again on the eight day, and vancomycin was added to the therapy. Since the fever persisted, the antibiotic therapy was gradually replaced with meropenem and linezolid. However, fever continued and the patient's general condition deteriorated. Subsequently performed Brucella tube agglutination test revealed positivity at 1/320 titer and the microorganism grown in blood culture (Bactec 9050; BD, USA) was identified as B.melitensis by conventional methods. Rifampicin and doxycycline therapy was started immediately, however, the patient died due to septic shock. If the tests for brucellosis were performed earlier when response to second step antibiotic therapy lacked in this patient, it was assumed that mortality could be prevented by the prompt initiation of the

  2. [Therapeutic modalities for the management of cough associated with acute respiratory viral infection, effective in an otolaryngologist's practice].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, A I; Paniakina, M A; Korostelev, S A; Mitiuk, A M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness ascoril therapy in comparison with the treatment using the mucoactive agent lasolvan in the adult patients suffering from productive cough associated with acute viral respiratory infection. Patients and methods. The study included 120 patients suffering from productive cough associated with acute viral respiratory infection. They were divided into two groups. The patients comprising group 1 (n=6.) were treated with ascoril, those in group 2 (n=60) were given lasolvan. Results. The effectiveness of the treatment of cough in group 1 was found to be higher compared with that in group 2 (p<0.05); moreover, it was associated with better dynamics of certain indicators of the quality of life, such as the social activity level, vitality, and general health (p<0.05). The safety of the proposed treatment was confirmed by the absence of the adverse events throughout the entire treatment period. PMID:24781181

  3. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fawkner-Corbett, David W; Khoo, Siew Kim; Duarte, Carminha M; Bezerra, Patricia G M; Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E; Le Souef, Peter N; McNamara, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5 years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analyzed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs. 5%; P = 0.04). Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV-A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A. PMID:26100591

  4. Coronavirus Pathogenesis and the Emerging Pathogen Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Susan R.; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a family of enveloped, single-stranded, positive-strand RNA viruses classified within the Nidovirales order. This coronavirus family consists of pathogens of many animal species and of humans, including the recently isolated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). This review is divided into two main parts; the first concerns the animal coronaviruses and their pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the functions of individual viral genes, and the second discusses the newly described human emerging pathogen, SARS-CoV. The coronavirus part covers (i) a description of a group of coronaviruses and the diseases they cause, including the prototype coronavirus, murine hepatitis virus, which is one of the recognized animal models for multiple sclerosis, as well as viruses of veterinary importance that infect the pig, chicken, and cat and a summary of the human viruses; (ii) a short summary of the replication cycle of coronaviruses in cell culture; (iii) the development and application of reverse genetics systems; and (iv) the roles of individual coronavirus proteins in replication and pathogenesis. The SARS-CoV part covers the pathogenesis of SARS, the developing animal models for infection, and the progress in vaccine development and antiviral therapies. The data gathered on the animal coronaviruses continue to be helpful in understanding SARS-CoV. PMID:16339739

  5. Use of OM-85 BV for the prevention of acute respiratory tract infections in occupational medicine.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ramírez, M A; Alvárez-Gómez, V; Berber, A

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of the immunostimulatory agent OM-85 BV in 112 male car-factory workers who were highly susceptible to acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs), each having experienced > or = 4 ARTIs during 1999. From January to March 2000, each worker received one capsule of OM-85 BV (7 mg) per day for 10 consecutive days each month. The patients were followed for a further 9 months. Mean number of ARTIs decreased from 8.2 +/- 2.1 per worker in 1999 to 5.3 +/- 2.9 in 2000; i.e. a difference of -2.9 (95% confidence intervals, -3.5 to -2.4). Similar effects were observed in men who had different job roles, and no adverse events were reported during drug administration. We concluded that OM-85 BV appears to be safe and effective in reducing the incidence of ARTIs in susceptible workers, although further double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are required. PMID:12166352

  6. Conformational States of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Berardi, Marcelo; Li, Wenhui; Farzan, Michael; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2006-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus enters cells through the activities of a spike protein (S) which has receptor-binding (S1) and membrane fusion (S2) regions. We have characterized four sequential states of a purified recombinant S ectodomain (S-e) comprising S1 and the ectodomain of S2. They are S-e monomers, uncleaved S-e trimers, cleaved S-e trimers, and dissociated S1 monomers and S2 trimer rosettes. Lowered pH induces an irreversible transition from flexible, L-shaped S-e monomers to clove-shaped trimers. Protease cleavage of the trimer occurs at the S1-S2 boundary; an ensuing S1 dissociation leads to a major rearrangement of the trimeric S2 and to formation of rosettes likely to represent clusters of elongated, postfusion trimers of S2 associated through their fusion peptides. The states and transitions of S suggest conformational changes that mediate viral entry into cells. PMID:16809285

  7. New therapies for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS):--a review.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V G

    1999-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been associated with high mortality. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology, recognition of precipitating events and improved management has decreased the mortality over the years. Mechanical ventilation is still the corner stone of the management of the disease. It is well recognised that high tidal volumes and airway pressures increase the morbidity, hence the need to use alternative modes of ventilation like pressure control with or without inverse ratio ventilation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is still experimental and not easily available, whereas prone position to improve oxygenation is simple and inexpensive. The concept of pathological oxygen dependency and therapy aimed at supranormal values has failed to improve survival. Restricting the fluids to prevent further oedema formation in an already wet lung has improved the survival rate. Nitric oxide and surfactant have failed to produce desirable effect in large studies. Pharmacological support to inhibit inflammation with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antifungal agents, prostaglandin and corticosteroids have all failed. Interestingly corticosteroid rescue treatment in the late phase of ARDS has shown promise. Antiendotoxin and anticytokine studies which began with much enthusiasm is yet to produce desirable results. PMID:10972019

  8. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus non-structural protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Brucz, Kimberly; Miknis, Zachary J.; Schultz, L. Wayne; Umland, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The coronavirus (CoV) responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), SARS-CoV, encodes two large polyproteins (pp1a and pp1ab) that are processed by two viral proteases to yield mature non-structural proteins (nsps). Many of these nsps have essential roles in viral replication, but several have no assigned function and possess amino acid sequences that are unique to the CoV family. One such protein is SARS-CoV nsp1, which is processed from the N-terminus of both pp1a and pp1ab. The mature SARS-CoV protein is present in cells several hours post-infection and co-localizes to the viral replication complex, but its function in the viral life cycle remains unknown. Furthermore, nsp1 sequences are highly divergent across the CoV family, and it has been suggested that this is due to nsp1 possessing a function specific to viral interactions with its host cell or acting as a host specific virulence factor. In order to initiate structural and biophysical studies of SARS-CoV nsp1, a recombinant expression system and a purification protocol have been developed, yielding milligram quantities of highly purified SARS-CoV nsp1. The purified protein was characterized using circular dichroism, size exclusion chromatography, and multi-angle light scattering. PMID:17187987

  9. Increased extravascular lung water reduces the efficacy of alveolar recruitment maneuver in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smetkin, Alexey A; Kuzkov, Vsevolod V; Suborov, Eugeny V; Bjertnaes, Lars J; Kirov, Mikhail Y

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the recruitment maneuver (RM) is used to reexpand atelectatic areas of the lungs aiming to improve arterial oxygenation. The goal of our paper was to evaluate the response to RM, as assessed by measurements of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) in ARDS patients. Materials and Methods. Seventeen adult ARDS patients were enrolled into a prospective study. Patients received protective ventilation. The RM was performed by applying a continuous positive airway pressure of 40 cm H(2)O for 40 sec. The efficacy of the RM was assessed 5 min later. Patients were identified as responders if PaO(2)/FiO(2) increased by >20% above the baseline. EVLWI was assessed by transpulmonary thermodilution before the RM, and patients were divided into groups of low EVLWI (<10 mL/kg) and high EVLWI (≥10 mL/kg). Results. EVLWI was increased in 12 patients. Following RM, PaO(2)/FiO(2) increased by 33 (4-65) % in the patients with low EVLWI, whereas those in the high EVLWI group experienced a change by only -1((-13)-(+5)) % (P = 0.035). Conclusion. In ARDS, the response to a recruitment maneuver might be related to the severity of pulmonary edema. In patients with incresed EVLWI, the recruitment maneuver is less effective. PMID:22649717

  10. Recovery and outcomes after the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Herridge, Margaret S; Moss, Marc; Hough, Catherine L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Rice, Todd W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are similar to those of other survivors of critical illness and largely affect the nerve, muscle, and central nervous system but also include a constellation of varied physical devastations ranging from contractures and frozen joints to tooth loss and cosmesis. Compromised quality of life is related to a spectrum of impairment of physical, social, emotional, and neurocognitive function and to a much lesser extent discrete pulmonary disability. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is ubiquitous and includes contributions from both critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, and recovery from these lesions may be incomplete at 5 years after ICU discharge. Cognitive impairment in ARDS survivors ranges from 70 to 100 % at hospital discharge, 46 to 80 % at 1 year, and 20 % at 5 years, and mood disorders including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also sustained and prevalent. Robust multidisciplinary and longitudinal interventions that improve these outcomes are still uncertain and data in our literature are conflicting. Studies are needed in family members of ARDS survivors to better understand long-term outcomes of the post-ICU family syndrome and to evaluate how it affects patient recovery. PMID:27025938

  11. Severe acute respiratory syndrome--a new coronavirus from the Chinese dragon's lair.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, T B; Kledal, T N; Andersen, O; Eugen-Olsen, J; Kristiansen, T B

    2003-09-01

    The recent identification of a novel clinical entity, the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the rapid subsequent spread and case fatality rates of 14-15% have prompted a massive international collaborative investigation facilitated by a network of laboratories established by the World Health Organization (WHO). As SARS has the potential of becoming the first pandemic of the new millennium, a global warning by the WHO was issued on 12 March 2003. The disease, which is believed to have its origin in the Chinese Guangdong province, spread from Hong Kong via international airports to its current worldwide distribution. The concerted efforts of a globally united scientific community have led to the independent isolation and identification of a novel coronavirus from SARS patients by several groups. The extraordinarily rapid isolation of a causative agent of this newly emerged infectious disease constitutes an unprecedented scientific achievement. The main scope of the article is to provide the clinician with an overview of the natural history, epidemiology and clinical characteristics of SARS. On the basis of the recently published viral genome and structural features common to the members of the coronavirus family, a model for host cell-virus interaction and possible targets for antiviral drugs are presented. The epidemiological consequences of introducing a novel pathogen in a previously unexposed population and the origin and evolution of a new and more pathogenic strain of coronavirus are discussed. PMID:12950672

  12. The burden of acute respiratory infections in crisis-affected populations: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Crises due to armed conflict, forced displacement and natural disasters result in excess morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases. Historically, acute respiratory infections (ARIs) have received relatively little attention in the humanitarian sector. We performed a systematic review to generate evidence on the burden of ARI in crises, and inform prioritisation of relief interventions. We identified 36 studies published since 1980 reporting data on the burden (incidence, prevalence, proportional morbidity or mortality, case-fatality, attributable mortality rate) of ARI, as defined by the International Classification of Diseases, version 10 and as diagnosed by a clinician, in populations who at the time of the study were affected by natural disasters, armed conflict, forced displacement, and nutritional emergencies. We described studies and stratified data by age group, but did not do pooled analyses due to heterogeneity in case definitions. The published evidence, mainly from refugee camps and surveillance or patient record review studies, suggests very high excess morbidity and mortality (20-35% proportional mortality) and case-fatality (up to 30-35%) due to ARI. However, ARI disease burden comparisons with non-crisis settings are difficult because of non-comparability of data. Better epidemiological studies with clearer case definitions are needed to provide the evidence base for priority setting and programme impact assessments. Humanitarian agencies should include ARI prevention and control among infants, children and adults as priority activities in crises. Improved data collection, case management and vaccine strategies will help to reduce disease burden. PMID:20181220

  13. Pathophysiological Approaches of Acute Respiratory Distress syndrome: Novel Bases for Study of Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, R.L; Carrasco Loza, R; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Experimental approaches have been implemented to research the lung damage related-mechanism. These models show in animals pathophysiological events for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), such as neutrophil activation, reactive oxygen species burst, pulmonary vascular hypertension, exudative edema, and other events associated with organ dysfunction. Moreover, these approaches have not reproduced the clinical features of lung damage. Lung inflammation is a relevant event in the develop of ARDS as component of the host immune response to various stimuli, such as cytokines, antigens and endotoxins. In patients surviving at the local inflammatory states, transition from injury to resolution is an active mechanism regulated by the immuno-inflammatory signaling pathways. Indeed, inflammatory process is regulated by the dynamics of cell populations that migrate to the lung, such as neutrophils and on the other hand, the role of the modulation of transcription factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sources, such as nuclear factor kappaB and NADPH oxidase. These experimental animal models reproduce key components of the injury and resolution phases of human ALI/ARDS and provide a methodology to explore mechanisms and potential new therapies. PMID:26312099

  14. Pre-hospital care seeking behaviour for childhood acute respiratory infections in south-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Talabi, Ademola A; Aina, Olufemi B

    2012-12-01

    WHO/UNICEF currently recommend that childhood malaria and pneumonia be managed together in the community; most African countries are in the process of developing this policy. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine maternal awareness of general danger signs of childhood illnesses and the prevalence, determinants and sources of pre-hospital treatment by mothers during their child's acute respiratory illness in a poor urban community in south-western Nigeria. A total of 226 mothers were interviewed. Only 4.9% of the mothers were aware of the two pneumonia symptoms: difficult breathing and fast breathing. About 75% of the children were given pre-hospital medication at home and only 16.5% of them received the drugs within 24 hour of symptom recognition. Drug shops/patent medicine vendors (PMVs; 70.6%) were the most common source of care. Wishing to try home management first (46.6%); waiting for the child to improve (14.4%) and lack of money (31.6%) delayed care-seeking. Older maternal age (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.2-4.4) and having a child with cough and difficult and/or fast breathing (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.1-5.2) were positive predictors of pre-hospital treatment. Maternal education and adequately equipping PMVs could improve prompt access to integrated community-based child health services in Nigeria. PMID:24029675

  15. Severe Acute Respiratory Illness (SARI) Surveillance in Louisiana, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Hand, Julie P; Serrano, Jose; Johnson, Jenna I; Jespersen, Megan; Ratard, Raoult C

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to describe the severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) surveillance implemented in Louisiana during the 2013-2014 influenza season, present the epidemiology of reported SARI cases, and identify ways to improve this system by incorporating formal SARI surveillance into the influenza surveillance program. Of the 212 SARI cases, 181 (85%) had at least one underlying medical condition, 54 (25.7%) had two conditions, 43 (20.3%) had three conditions, and 25 (11.8%) reported four or more. The most common four underlying conditions were: obesity (43.4%), chronic cardiac conditions (39.6%), diabetes (29.7%), and chronic pulmonary conditions (26.9%). While obesity was the most reported underlying condition, it was three times more likely to be reported in less than 65 years old rather than those >65. Continuation of SARI data collection in future seasons will allow comparisons regarding severity, populations affected, and identify risk factors most commonly associated with severe illness. Reporting of SARI cases also increased influenza-associated adult mortality reporting to the Office of Public Health's Office of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology (ID Epi). Though all influenza-associated mortality is reportable in Louisiana, adult mortality was reported rarely prior to the 2013-2014 season. PMID:27159455

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cardiovascular surgery: current concepts and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hoegl, Sandra; Zwissler, Bernhard; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Vohwinkel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review gives an update on current treatment options and novel concepts on the prevention and treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cardiovascular surgery patients. Recent findings The only proven beneficial therapeutic options in ARDS are those that help to prevent further ventilator-induced lung injury, such as prone position, use of lung-protective ventilation strategies, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In the future also new approaches like mesenchymal cell therapy, activation of hypoxia-elicited transcription factors or targeting of purinergic signaling may be successful outside the experimental setting. Owing to the so far limited treatment options, it is of great importance to determine patients at risk for developing ARDS already perioperatively. In this context, serum biomarkers and lung injury prediction scores could be useful. Summary Preventing ARDS as a severe complication in the cardiovascular surgery setting may help to reduce morbidity and mortality. As cardiovascular surgery patients are of greater risk to develop ARDS, preventive interventions should be implemented early on. Especially, use of low tidal volumes, avoiding of fluid overload and restrictive blood transfusion regimes may help to prevent ARDS. PMID:26598954

  17. Structural and Functional Analyses of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Endoribonuclease Nsp15

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Kanchan; Palaninathan, Satheesh; Alcantara, Joanna Maria Ortiz; Yi, Lillian Li; Guarino, Linda; Sacchettini, James C.; Kao, C. Cheng

    2008-03-31

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus encodes several RNA-processing enzymes that are unusual for RNA viruses, including Nsp15 (nonstructural protein 15), a hexameric endoribonuclease that preferentially cleaves 3' of uridines. We solved the structure of a catalytically inactive mutant version of Nsp15, which was crystallized as a hexamer. The structure contains unreported flexibility in the active site of each subunit. Substitutions in the active site residues serine 293 and proline 343 allowed Nsp15 to cleave at cytidylate, whereas mutation of leucine 345 rendered Nsp15 able to cleave at purines as well as pyrimidines. Mutations that targeted the residues involved in subunit interactions generally resulted in the formation of catalytically inactive monomers. The RNA-binding residues were mapped by a method linking reversible cross-linking, RNA affinity purification, and peptide fingerprinting. Alanine substitution of several residues in the RNA-contacting portion of Nsp15 did not affect hexamer formation but decreased the affinity of RNA binding and reduced endonuclease activity. This suggests a model for Nsp15 hexamer interaction with RNA.

  18. Enterobacter cloacae Sacroiliitis with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Ko, Jeong Hee; Lee, Seunghun; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen, but is rarely a cause of sacroiliitis. Herein, we present the first reported case of Enterobacter cloacae sacroiliitis associated with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A previously healthy 14-year-old boy presented with low-grade fever and pain in the left side of the hip that was aggravated by walking. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) showed normal findings, and the patient received supportive care for transient synovitis with no antibiotics. However, there was no clinical improvement. On the third day of hospitalization, magnetic resonance imaging of the hip revealed findings compatible with sacroiliitis, for which vancomycin and ceftriaxone were administered. The patient suddenly developed high fever with dyspnea. Chest radiography and CT findings and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 mmHg were suggestive of ARDS; the patient subsequently received ventilatory support and low-dose methylprednisolone infusions. Within one week, defervescence occurred, and the patient was able to breathe on his own. Following the timely recognition of, and therapeutic challenge to, ARDS, and after 6 weeks of parenteral antimicrobial therapy, the patient was discharged in good health with no complications. PMID:26157593

  19. Advances in clinical diagnosis and treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Qing-He; Luo, Xin-Dong; Hui, Wu-Li

    2003-01-01

    It has been proved that severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by SARS-associated coronavirus, a novel coronavirus. SARS originated in Guangdong Province, the People's Republic of China at the end of 2002. At present, it has spread to more than 33 countries or regions all over the world and affected 8360 people and killed 764 by May 31, 2003. Identification of the SARS causative agent and development of a diagnostic test are important. Detecting disease in its early stage, understanding its pathways of transmission and implementing specific prevention measures for the disease are dependent upon swift progress. Due to the efforts of the WHO-led network of laboratories testing for SARS, tests for the novel coronavirus have been developed with unprecedented speed. The genome sequence reveals that this coronavirus is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses. WHO established the definitions of suspected and confirmed and probable cases. But the laboratory tests and definitions are limited. Until now, the primary measures included isolation, ribavirin and corticosteroid therapy, mechanical ventilation, etc. Other therapies such as convalescent plasma are being explored. It is necessary to find more effective therapy. There still are many problems to be solved in the course of conquering SARS. PMID:12800213

  20. What is the clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in acute respiratory distress syndrome? A review

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Mita, Carol; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Elevated pulmonary arterial pressures appear to be a prominent feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Current clinical guidelines for the management of ARDS do not specifically address treatment of pulmonary hypertension or associated right ventricular dysfunction because the clinical significance of this entity remains unclear. Interpretation of elevated pulmonary arterial pressures, pulmonary vascular resistance, and transpulmonary gradient as well as signs of right ventricular dysfunction is confounded by the effects of positive pressure ventilation. There does not appear to be a consistent relationship between the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular failure and mortality in patients with ARDS, but it is unclear if right ventricular failure contributes to the mortality risk per se or if the underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension, including intravascular micro and macro thrombosis, are simply markers for systemic dysregulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis that may lead to multiorgan failure in ARDS. While studies of pulmonary vasodilator therapies have not shown a mortality benefit in ARDS, such trials have targeted improved oxygenation rather than improved pulmonary hemodynamics so that the possible contribution of improved right ventricular function to better outcomes has not been directly tested in large trials. Future studies are needed to determine if treatment of pulmonary hypertension and associated right ventricular dysfunction will affect mortality in patients with ARDS. PMID:24193181

  1. Gamma scintigraphic analysis of albumin flux in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sugerman, H.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Burke, T.S.; Strash, A.M.; Glauser, F.L.

    1984-06-01

    Computerized gamma-scintigraphy provides a new method for the analysis of albumin flux in patients with pulmonary permeability edema. In this technique, 10 mCi of /sup 99/mTc -tagged human serum albumin is administered and lung:heart radioactivity ratios are determined. This ratio remains constant unless there is a leak of albumin, when a rising ratio with time, called the ''slope index'' (SI), is seen. Thirty-five scintigraphic studies were obtained in 28 patients by means of a portable computerized gamma-camera. Thirteen of these patients had clinical evidence of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and six had or were recovering from left ventricular induced congestive heart failure (CHF). Five of the patients with CHF and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) below 30 mm Hg had normal scintigraphic studies. The patients with ARDS were found to have significantly higher SIs than patients who did not have, or had recovered from, ARDS. Positive SIs were present from 1 to 8 days following the apparent onset of ARDS in seven studies in five patients. Recovery of gas exchange was associated with a return to a normal SI in four patients. In conclusion, computerized gamma-scintigraphy was a sensitive, noninvasive tool for the detection of a pathologic increase in pulmonary protein flux. Positive scintigraphic findings were associated with significantly impaired gas exchange. The method documented that the leak of albumin in patients with ARDS may last for days but resolves with recovery.

  2. Impaired gas exchange: accuracy of defining characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection1

    PubMed Central

    Pascoal, Lívia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange nursing diagnosis in children with acute respiratory infection. METHOD: open prospective cohort study conducted with 136 children monitored for a consecutive period of at least six days and not more than ten days. An instrument based on the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis and on literature addressing pulmonary assessment was used to collect data. The accuracy means of all the defining characteristics under study were computed. RESULTS: the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis was present in 42.6% of the children in the first assessment. Hypoxemia was the characteristic that presented the best measures of accuracy. Abnormal breathing presented high sensitivity, while restlessness, cyanosis, and abnormal skin color showed high specificity. All the characteristics presented negative predictive values of 70% and cyanosis stood out by its high positive predictive value. CONCLUSION: hypoxemia was the defining characteristic that presented the best predictive ability to determine Impaired gas exchange. Studies of this nature enable nurses to minimize variability in clinical situations presented by the patient and to identify more precisely the nursing diagnosis that represents the patient's true clinical condition. PMID:26155010

  3. Aspirin as a potential treatment in sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toner, Philip; McAuley, Danny Francis; Shyamsundar, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition that is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and health-care cost. Pulmonary and non-pulmonary sepsis are common causes of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mortality from ARDS remains high despite protective lung ventilation, and currently there are no specific pharmacotherapies to treat sepsis or ARDS. Sepsis and ARDS are characterised by activation of the inflammatory cascade. Although there is much focus on the study of the dysregulated inflammation and its suppression, the associated activation of the haemostatic system has been largely ignored until recently. There has been extensive interest in the role that platelet activation can have in the inflammatory response through induction, aggregation and activation of leucocytes and other platelets. Aspirin can modulate multiple pathogenic mechanisms implicated in the development of multiple organ dysfunction in sepsis and ARDS. This review will discuss the role of the platelet, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in sepsis and ARDS, and aspirin as a potential therapy in treating sepsis and ARDS. PMID:26494395

  4. Potential enhancement of osteoclastogenesis by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 3a/X1 protein.

    PubMed

    Obitsu, Saemi; Ahmed, Nursarat; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Hayashi, Takaya; Masuda, Takao; Kannagi, Mari

    2009-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes a lung disease with high mortality. In addition, osteonecrosis and bone abnormalities with reduced bone density have been observed in patients following recovery from SARS, which were partly but not entirely explained by the short-term use of steroids. Here, we demonstrate that human monocytes, potential precursors of osteoclasts, partly express angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a cellular receptor of SARS-CoV, and that expression of an accessory protein of SARS-CoV, 3a/X1, in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells, enhanced NF-kappaB activity and differentiation into osteoclast-like cells in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Furthermore, human epithelial A549 cells expressed ACE2, and expression of 3a/X1 in these cells up-regulated TNF-alpha, which is known to accelerate osteoclastogenesis. 3a/X1 also enhanced RANKL expression in mouse stromal ST2 cells. These findings indicate that SARS-CoV 3a/X1 might promote osteoclastogenesis by direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:19685004

  5. Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome in dynamical small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Konno, Norio; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-03-01

    The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is still threatening the world because of a possible resurgence. In the current situation that effective medical treatments such as antiviral drugs are not discovered yet, dynamical features of the epidemics should be clarified for establishing strategies for tracing, quarantine, isolation, and regulating social behavior of the public at appropriate costs. Here we propose a network model for SARS epidemics and discuss why superspreaders emerged and why SARS spread especially in hospitals, which were key factors of the recent outbreak. We suggest that superspreaders are biologically contagious patients, and they may amplify the spreads by going to potentially contagious places such as hospitals. To avoid mass transmission in hospitals, it may be a good measure to treat suspected cases without hospitalizing them. Finally, we indicate that SARS probably propagates in small-world networks associated with human contacts and that the biological nature of individuals and social group properties are factors more important than the heterogeneous rates of social contacts among individuals. This is in marked contrast with epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases or computer viruses to which scale-free network models often apply.

  6. Using Clinical Vignettes to Assess Quality of Care for Acute Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Gidengil, Courtney A; Linder, Jeffrey A; Beach, Scott; Setodji, Claude M; Hunter, Gerald; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2016-01-01

    Overprescribing of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) is common. Our objective was to develop and validate a vignette-based method to estimate clinician ARI antibiotic prescribing. We surveyed physicians (n = 78) and retail clinic clinicians (n = 109) between January and September 2013. We surveyed clinicians using a set of ARI vignettes and linked the responses to electronic health record data for all ARI visits managed by these clinicians during 2012. We then created a new measure of antibiotic prescribing, the comprehensive ARI management rate. This was defined as not prescribing antibiotics for antibiotic-inappropriate diagnoses and prescribing guideline-concordant antibiotics for antibiotic-appropriate diagnoses (and also included appropriate use of streptococcal testing for the pharyngitis vignettes). We compared the vignette-based and chart-based comprehensive ARI management at the clinician level. We then identified the combination of vignettes that best predicted comprehensive ARI management rates, using a partitioning algorithm. Responses to 3 vignettes partitioned clinicians into 4 groups with chart-based comprehensive ARI management rates of 61% (n = 121), 50% (n = 47), 31% (n = 12), and 22% (n = 7). Responses to 3 clinical vignettes can identify clinicians with relatively poor quality ARI antibiotic prescribing. Vignettes may be a mechanism to target clinicians for quality improvement efforts. PMID:27098876

  7. Distinct Proteasome Subpopulations in the Alveolar Space of Patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sixt, S. U.; Alami, R.; Hakenbeck, J.; Adamzik, M.; Kloß, A.; Costabel, U.; Jungblut, P. R.; Dahlmann, B.; Peters, J.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that proteasomes have a biological role in the extracellular alveolar space, but inflammation could change their composition. We tested whether immunoproteasome protein-containing subpopulations are present in the alveolar space of patients with lung inflammation evoking the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) supernatants and cell pellet lysate from ARDS patients (n = 28) and healthy subjects (n = 10) were analyzed for the presence of immunoproteasome proteins (LMP2 and LMP7) and proteasome subtypes by western blot, chromatographic purification, and 2D-dimensional gelelectrophoresis. In all ARDS patients but not in healthy subjects LMP7 and LMP2 were observed in BAL supernatants. Proteasomes purified from pooled ARDS BAL supernatant showed an altered enzyme activity ratio. Chromatography revealed a distinct pattern with 7 proteasome subtype peaks in BAL supernatant of ARDS patients that differed from healthy subjects. Total proteasome concentration in BAL supernatant was increased in ARDS (971 ng/mL ± 1116 versus 59 ± 25; P < 0.001), and all fluorogenic substrates were hydrolyzed, albeit to a lesser extent, with inhibition by epoxomicin (P = 0.0001). Thus, we identified for the first time immunoproteasome proteins and a distinct proteasomal subtype pattern in the alveolar space of ARDS patients, presumably in response to inflammation. PMID:22363101

  8. Severe Acute Respiratory Failure due to Inhalation of Baby Powder and Successfully Treated with Venous-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Piazza, Marcello; Capitanio, Guido; Vitulo, Patrizio; Gridelli, Bruno; Pilato, Michele; Arcadipane, Antonio

    2015-12-15

    Accidental inhalation of powder is a potential problem for infants. The clinical effects of inhaling powder depend on the powder contents, degree of aspiration, and the child's underlying systemic response. We present a case of accidental inhalation of rice starch powder in a 17-month-old girl, which led to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome responsive to conventional treatment, ultimately requiring venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26657704

  9. Chronic and Acute Exposures to the World Trade Center Disaster and Lower Respiratory Symptoms: Area Residents and Workers

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Stephen M.; Pillai, Parul S.; Reibman, Joan; Berger, Kenneth I.; Goldring, Roberta; Stellman, Steven D.; Farfel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed associations between new-onset (post–September 11, 2001 [9/11]) lower respiratory symptoms reported on 2 surveys, administered 3 years apart, and acute and chronic 9/11-related exposures among New York City World Trade Center–area residents and workers enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. Methods. World Trade Center–area residents and workers were categorized as case participants or control participants on the basis of lower respiratory symptoms reported in surveys administered 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 years after 9/11. We created composite exposure scales after principal components analyses of detailed exposure histories obtained during face-to-face interviews. We used multivariate logistic regression models to determine associations between lower respiratory symptoms and composite exposure scales. Results. Both acute and chronic exposures to the events of 9/11 were independently associated, often in a dose-dependent manner, with lower respiratory symptoms among individuals who lived and worked in the area of the World Trade Center. Conclusions. Study findings argue for detailed assessments of exposure during and after events in the future from which potentially toxic materials may be released and for rapid interventions to minimize exposures and screen for potential adverse health effects. PMID:22515865

  10. Acute respiratory distress induced by repeated saline lavage provides stable experimental conditions for 24 hours in pigs.

    PubMed

    Muellenbach, Ralf M; Kredel, Markus; Zollhoefer, Bernd; Bernd, Zollhoefer; Johannes, Amelie; Kuestermann, Julian; Schuster, Frank; Schwemmer, Ulrich; Wurmb, Thomas; Wunder, Christian; Roewer, Norbert; Brederlau, Jörg

    2009-04-01

    Surfactant depletion is most often used to study acute respiratory failure in animal models. Because model stability is often criticized, the authors tested the following hypotheses: Repeated pulmonary lavage with normal saline provides stable experimental conditions for 24 hours with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 300 mm Hg. Lung injury was induced by bilateral pulmonary lavages in 8 female pigs (51.5 +/- 4.8 kg). The animals were ventilated for 24 hours (PEEP: 5 cm H2O; tidal volume: 6 mL/kg; respiratory rate: 30/min). After 24 hours the animals were euthanized. For histopathology slides from all pulmonary lobes were obtained. Supernatant of the bronchoalveolar fluid collected before induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and after 24 hours was analyzed. A total of 19 +/- 6 lavages were needed to induce ARDS. PaO2/FiO2 ratio and pulmonary shunt fraction remained significantly deteriorated compared to baseline values after 24 hours (P < .01). Slight to moderate histopathologic changes were detected. Significant increases of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6 were observed after 24 hours (P < .01). The presented surfactant depletion-based lung injury model was associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and fulfilled the criteria of acute ling injury (ALI) for 24 hours. PMID:19337905

  11. Additional diagnostic yield of adding serology to PCR in diagnosing viral acute respiratory infections in Kenyan patients 5 years of age and older.

    PubMed

    Feikin, Daniel R; Njenga, M Kariuki; Bigogo, Godfrey; Aura, Barrack; Gikunju, Stella; Balish, Amanda; Katz, Mark A; Erdman, Dean; Breiman, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    The role of serology in the setting of PCR-based diagnosis of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) is unclear. We found that acute- and convalescent-phase paired-sample serologic testing increased the diagnostic yield of naso/oropharyngeal swabs for influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, and parainfluenza viruses beyond PCR by 0.4% to 10.7%. Although still limited for clinical use, serology, along with PCR, can maximize etiologic diagnosis in epidemiologic studies. PMID:23114699

  12. Acute lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in a group of Egyptian children under 5 years of age

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI) in infants and young children. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of ALRTI associated with RSV among children ≤ 5 years old in Egypt. Patients and Methods We enrolled 427 children ≤ 5 years old diagnosed with ALRTI attending the outpatient clinic or Emergency Department (ED) of Children Hospital, Cairo University during a one- year period. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from the patients, kept on ice and processed within 2 hours of collection. Immunoflourescent assay (IFA) for RSV was performed. Results 91 cases (21.3%) had viral etiology with RSV antigens detected in 70 cases (16.4%). The RSV positive cases were significantly younger than other non-RSV cases (mean age 8.2 months versus 14.2 months, p <0.001). RSV cases had significantly higher respiratory rate in the age group between 2-11 months (mean 58.4 versus 52.7/minute, p < 0.001) and no significant difference in the mean respiratory rate in the age group between 12-59 months. More RSV cases required supplemental oxygen (46% versus 23.5%, p < 0.001) with higher rate of hospitalization (37.1% versus 11.2%, p < 0.001) than the non-RSV cases. 97% of RSV cases occurred in winter season (p < 0.001). Conclusion RSV is the most common viral etiology of ALRTI in children below 5 years of age, especially in young infants below 6 months of age. It is more prevalent in winter and tends to cause severe infection. PMID:21466713

  13. Aetiological role of common respiratory viruses in acute lower respiratory infections in children under five years: A systematic review and meta–analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ting; McLean, Kenneth; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) remains a major cause of childhood hospitalization and mortality in young children and the causal attribution of respiratory viruses in the aetiology of ALRI is unclear. We aimed to quantify the absolute effects of these viral exposures. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review (across 7 databases) of case–control studies published from 1990 to 2014 which investigated the viral profile of 18592 children under 5 years with and without ALRI. We then computed a pooled odds ratio and virus–specific attributable fraction among the exposed of 8 common viruses – respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza (IFV), parainfluenza (PIV), human metapneumovirus (MPV), adenovirus (AdV), rhinovirus (RV), bocavirus (BoV), and coronavirus (CoV). Findings From the 23 studies included, there was strong evidence for causal attribution of RSV (OR 9.79; AFE 90%), IFV (OR 5.10; AFE 80%), PIV (OR 3.37; AFE 70%) and MPV (OR 3.76; AFE 73%), and less strong evidence for RV (OR 1.43; AFE 30%) in young children presenting with ALRI compared to those without respiratory symptoms (asymptomatic) or healthy children. However, there was no significant difference in the detection of AdV, BoV, or CoV in cases and controls. Conclusions This review supports RSV, IFV, PIV, MPV and RV as important causes of ALRI in young children, and provides quantitative estimates of the absolute proportion of virus–associated ALRI cases to which a viral cause can be attributed. PMID:26445672

  14. Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Bruce; Hayney, Mary S.; Muller, Daniel; Rakel, David; Ward, Ann; Obasi, Chidi N.; Brown, Roger; Zhang, Zhengjun; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Gern, James; West, Rebecca; Ewers, Tola; Barlow, Shari; Gassman, Michele; Coe, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was designed to evaluate potential preventive effects of meditation or exercise on incidence, duration, and severity of acute respiratory infection (ARI) illness. METHODS Community-recruited adults aged 50 years and older were randomized to 1 of 3 study groups: 8-week training in mindfulness meditation, matched 8-week training in moderate-intensity sustained exercise, or observational control. The primary outcome was area-under-the-curve global illness severity during a single cold and influenza season, using the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-24) to assess severity. Health care visits and days of missed work were counted. Nasal wash collected during ARI illness was assayed for neutrophils, interleukin-8, and viral nucleic acid. RESULTS Of 154 adults randomized into the study, 149 completed the trial (82% female, 94% white, mean age 59.3 ± 6.6 years). There were 27 ARI episodes and 257 days of ARI illness in the meditation group (n = 51), 26 episodes and 241 illness days in the exercise group (n = 47), and 40 episodes and 453 days in the control group (n = 51). Mean global severity was 144 for meditation, 248 for exercise, and 358 for control. Compared with control, global severity was significantly lower for meditation (P = .004). Both global severity and total days of illness (duration) trended toward being lower for the exercise group (P=.16 and P=.032, respectively), as did illness duration for the meditation group (P=.034). Adjusting for covariates using zero-inflated multivariate regression models gave similar results. There were 67 ARI-related days of-work missed in the control group, 32 in the exercise group (P = .041), and 16 in the meditation group (P <.001). Health care visits did not differ significantly. Viruses were identified in 54% of samples from meditation, 42% from exercise, and 54% from control groups. Neutrophil count and interleukin-8 levels were similar among intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS Training in

  15. Spatiotemporal Interplay of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus and Respiratory Mucosal Cells Drives Viral Dissemination in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Wei, Qiang; Nishiura, Kenji; Peng, Jie; Wang, Haibo; Midkiff, Cecily; Alvarez, Xavier; Qin, Chuan; Lackner, Andrew; Chen, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune responses play a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how SARS-CoV evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here, we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387+ and CD163+ monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells (LCs) and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes (LNs) within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages and the dendritic cell network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  16. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenzhou Bao, Qingli Sun, Lixin Huang, Xin Wang, Tao Zhang, Shuang Li, Han Zhang, Luyong

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  17. Viral etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized young children in a children's referral hospital in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mahmoudi, Shima; Movahedi, Zahra; Halimi, Shahnaz; Momeni, Shervin; Hosseinpour-Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are considered major causes of acute respiratory tract infections among children under 5 years old. In this study we investigated the prevalence of three respiratory viruses--respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus (INF) and adenovirus (ADV)--among hospitalized children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under five who had been hospitalized for LRTIs. The clinical data, including demographic data (age and sex), vital symptoms and signs at admission, duration of fever, duration of hospitalization, chest X-ray findings and outcome were considered. All inpatient specimens were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV and the INF-A, INF-B and parainfluenza viruses and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ADV. Out of those from 232 patients, 58 (25%) specimens were positive for either RSV, INF or ADV. The most predominant pathogens were RSV (40 cases, 17.2%), followed by INF (10 cases, 4%; including 8 type A and 2 type B) and ADV (8 cases, 3.4%). A total of 32 (55.1%) viral cases were identified in the spring, followed by 19 (32.7%) in the autumn and 7 (12%) in the winter. There was no significant correlation between clinical symptoms and the individual virus detected. In our study, RSV and INF were the two most common causes of LRTIs. These data are helpful for guiding the development of further vaccines as well as the use of antiviral drugs. Further studies will be needed to investigate other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, human metapneumovirus and rhinovirus. PMID:25818953

  18. Clinical and biological role of secretory phospholipase A2 in acute respiratory distress syndrome infants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Secretory phospholipase A2 is supposed to play a role in acute lung injury but no data are available for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It is not clear which enzyme subtypes are secreted and what the relationships are between enzyme activity, biophysical and biochemical parameters, and clinical outcomes. We aimed to measure the enzyme and identify its subtypes and to study its biochemical and biophysical effect. The secondary aim was to correlate enzyme activity with clinical outcome. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 24 infants with ARDS and 14 controls with no lung disease. Samples were assayed for secretory phospholipase A2 and molecules related to its activity and expression. Western blotting and captive bubble surfactometry were also performed. Clinical data were real time downloaded. Results Tumor necrosis factor-α (814 (506-2,499) vs. 287 (111-1,315) pg/mL; P = 0.04), enzyme activity (430 (253-600) vs. 149 (61-387) IU/mL; P = 0.01), free fatty acids (4.3 (2.8-8.6) vs. 2 (0.8-4.6) mM; P = 0.026), and minimum surface tension (25.6 ± 6.1 vs. 18 ± 1.8 mN/m; P = 0.006) were higher in ARDS than in controls. Phospholipids are lower in ARDS than in controls (76.5 (54-100) vs. 1,094 (536-2,907) μg/mL; P = 0.0001). Three enzyme subtypes were identified (-IIA, -V, -X), although in lower quantities in controls; another subtype (-IB) was mainly detected in ARDS. Significant correlations exist between enzyme activity, free fatty acids (ρ = 0.823; P < 0.001), and surface tension (ρ = 0.55; P < 0.028). Correlations also exist with intensive care stay (ρ = 0.54; P = 0.001), PRISM-III24 (ρ = 0.79; P< 0.001), duration of ventilation (ρ = 0.53; P = 0.002), and oxygen therapy (ρ = 0.54; P = 0.001). Conclusions Secretory phospholipase A2 activity is raised in pediatric ARDS and constituted of four subtypes. Enzyme correlates with some inflammatory mediators, surface tension, and major clinical outcomes. Secretory

  19. Impact on mortality of a community-based programme to control acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Fauveau, V.; Stewart, M. K.; Chakraborty, J.; Khan, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    Acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs) are a major cause of death among young children in developing countries. A targeted programme designed to treat children with ALRI was implemented in 1988 in a primary health care project in rural Bangladesh. In the 2 years preceding the introduction of the programme (1986-87), non-ALRI-specific health services were provided, including promotion of oral rehydration therapy, family planning, immunization of children and mothers, distribution of vitamin A, referral of severely sick children to field clinics, and nutritional rehabilitation of malnourished children. The targeted ALRI programme, which was in place in 1988-89, was based on systematic ALRI case detection and management by community health workers, who were linked to a referral system for medical support. These two levels of intervention have been evaluated by comparing the ALRI-specific mortality in the programme area and a neighbouring control area during the two periods. During the first phase (1986-87), the ALRI mortality among under-5-year-olds was 28% lower in the intervention than in the comparison area (P less than 0.01). During the second phase (1988-89), the ALRI mortality was 32% lower in the intervention area than during the preceding phase, while there was no significant difference for the comparison area. These findings suggest that in the study region the combination of specific and nonspecific interventions can reduce ALRI mortality by as much as 50% and the overall mortality among under-5-year-olds by as much as 30%. PMID:1568275

  20. Identification of Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome by Exome-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, Katherine; Chaudhary, Suman; Grigoryev, Dmitry; Heruth, Daniel P.; Venkitachalam, Lakshmi; Zhang, Li Q.; Ye, Shui Q.

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a lung condition characterized by impaired gas exchange with systemic release of inflammatory mediators, causing pulmonary inflammation, vascular leak and hypoxemia. Existing biomarkers have limited effectiveness as diagnostic and therapeutic targets. To identify disease-associating variants in ARDS patients, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 96 ARDS patients, detecting 1,382,399 SNPs. By comparing these exome data to those of the 1000 Genomes Project, we identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) which are potentially associated with ARDS. 50,190SNPs were found in all case subgroups and controls, of which89 SNPs were associated with susceptibility. We validated three SNPs (rs78142040, rs9605146 and rs3848719) in additional ARDS patients to substantiate their associations with susceptibility, severity and outcome of ARDS. rs78142040 (C>T) occurs within a histone mark (intron 6) of the Arylsulfatase D gene. rs9605146 (G>A) causes a deleterious coding change (proline to leucine) in the XK, Kell blood group complex subunit-related family, member 3 gene. rs3848719 (G>A) is a synonymous SNP in the Zinc-Finger/Leucine-Zipper Co-Transducer NIF1 gene. rs78142040, rs9605146, and rs3848719 are associated significantly with susceptibility to ARDS. rs3848719 is associated with APACHE II score quartile. rs78142040 is associated with 60-day mortality in the overall ARDS patient population. Exome-seq is a powerful tool to identify potential new biomarkers for ARDS. We selectively validated three SNPs which have not been previously associated with ARDS and represent potential new genetic biomarkers for ARDS. Additional validation in larger patient populations and further exploration of underlying molecular mechanisms are warranted. PMID:25372662

  1. IGF1 and IGFBP3 in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahasic, Amy M.; Zhai, Rihong; Su, Li; Zhao, Yang; Aronis, Konstantinos N.; Thompson, B.Taylor; Mantzoros, Christos S.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and its most abundant binding protein, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3), have been implicated in fibrotic lung diseases and persistent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) because of profibrogenic and antiapoptotic activity. Whether levels of circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3 are altered in ARDS, and whether they predict progression of and survival from ARDS remains unknown. This study aims to characterize circulating levels of IGF1 and IGFBP3 in patients at risk for ARDS in relation to (1) development of ARDS, and (2) mortality among ARDS cases. Design In this case-cohort study, consecutive patients with risk factors for ARDS admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were enrolled and followed prospectively for development of ARDS. Cases were followed for all-cause mortality through Day 60. Of 2397 patients enrolled in the parent study, plasma samples were available in 531 (22%) patients (356 controls, 175 cases) from early in presentation. Total plasma IGF1 and IGFBP3 were measured. Results After adjusting for relevant clinical covariates including severity of illness, IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were significantly lower in ARDS cases than controls (odds ratio [OR], 0.58; P =0.006; OR, 0.57; P=0.0015, respectively). Among ARDS cases, IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were significantly lower in the 78 (45%) non-survivors (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P =0.024; HR, 0.69; P=0.021, respectively). Conclusions Lower levels of circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3 were independently associated with ARDS case status. Furthermore, lower levels were associated with mortality among ARDS cases. This data supports a role of the IGF pathway in ARDS. PMID:22004906

  2. Human metapneumovirus in patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Annick; Manoha, Catherine; Bour, Jean-Baptiste; Abbas, Rachid; Fournel, Isabelle; Tiv, Michel; Pothier, Pierre; Astruc, Karine; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig Serge

    2016-08-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the prevalence of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in patients hospitalized for acute respiratory infection (ARI) and to study factors associated with this prevalence. Medline and ScienceDirect databases were searched for prospective observational studies that screened hospitalized patients with ARI for hMPV by RT-PCR, with data available at December 27, 2014. The risk of bias was assessed regarding participation rate, definition of ARI, description of diagnostic technique, method of inclusion identical for all subjects, standardized and identical sampling method for all subjects, analysis performed according to the relevant subgroups, and presentation of data sources. Random-effect meta-analysis with arcsine transformation and meta-regressions was used. In the 75 articles included, the prevalence of hMPV among hospitalized ARI was 6.24% (95% CI 5.25-7.30). An effect of the duration of the inclusion period was observed (p=0.0114), with a higher prevalence of hMPV in studies conducted during periods of 7-11 months (10.56%, 95% CI 5.97-16.27) or complete years (7.55%, 95% CI 5.90-9.38) than in periods of 6 months or less (5.36%, 95% CI 4.29-6.54). A significant increase in the incidence with increasing distance from the equator was observed (p=0.0384). hMPV should be taken into account as a possible etiology in hospitalized ARI. PMID:27337518

  3. Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ilan S.; Embil, John M.; Sharma, Atul; Goulet, Stephen; Light, R. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an uncommon, highly fatal, and poorly understood manifestation of blastomycosis. Optimal management remains unknown, including the roles of adjunctive corticosteroids and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis, managed in intensive care units in Manitoba, Canada, from 1992 to 2014. ARDS was defined using the Berlin definition. Corticosteroid therapy was defined as ≥150 mg cortisol equivalent in 24 hours. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants of a fatal outcome, and bootstrap resampling was used to assess sample size requirements. Forty-three patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis were identified. ARDS was mild, moderate, and severe in 2 (5%), 12 (28%), and 29 (67%) patients, respectively. Management included amphotericin B (n = 42, 98%), vasopressors (n = 36, 84%), corticosteroids (n = 22, 51%), renal replacement (n = 13, 30%), and ECMO (n = 4, 11%). Seventeen patients (40%) died. All patients treated with ECMO survived (P = 0.14). Corticosteroids were not associated with survival benefit in univariate (P = 0.43) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.11–2.34). Bootstrap studies indicated that almost 500 patients would be needed to confirm a significant reduction in mortality from corticosteroids (type I error = 0.05, power = 80%). Blastomycosis is an uncommon, albeit important, cause of ARDS in this geographic area. Given the rarity of disease and the large cohort needed to demonstrate mortality benefit, the role of adjunctive therapies, including corticosteroids and ECMO, may remain unconfirmed, and clinical judgment should guide management decisions. PMID:27149459

  4. Postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with previous exposure to bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Aakre, Benjamin M.; Efem, Richard I.; Wilson, Greg A.; Kor, Daryl J.; Eisenach, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence and risk factors for postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome (PO-ARDS) in a large cohort of bleomycin-exposed patients undergoing surgery with general endotracheal anesthesia. Patients and Methods From a Mayo Clinic cancer registry, we identified patients who had received systemic bleomycin (n=1120) and then underwent a major surgical procedure requiring >1 hour of general anesthesia between January 1, 2000 and August 30, 2012. Heart/lung/liver transplants were excluded. PO-ARDS (within seven days after surgery) was defined according to Berlin criteria. Results We identified 316 patients who underwent 541 major surgical procedures. Only 7 patients met criteria for PO-ARDS; all were Caucasian males, and 6 were current or former smokers. On univariate analysis, we observed an increased risk for PO-ARDS in patients who were current or former smokers. Furthermore, there was significantly greater crystalloid and colloid administration in patients with PO-ARDS. We also observed a trend toward longer surgical duration and red blood cell transfusion in patients with PO-ARDS, though this was not significant. Intraoperative FiO2 was not associated with PO-ARDS. In bleomycin-exposed patients, the incidence of PO-ARDS following major surgery under general anesthesia is approximately 1.3% (C.I. 0.6–2.6%). For first major procedures after bleomycin, the incidence is 1.9% (C.I. 0.9–4.1%). Conclusions The risk for PO-ARDS in patients exposed to systemic bleomycin appears to be lower than expected. Smoking status may be an important factor modifying risk for PO-ARDS in these patients. PMID:24485131

  5. Mechanisms of Host Receptor Adaptation by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Peng, Guiqing; Wilken, Matthew; Geraghty, Robert J.; Li, Fang

    2012-12-10

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) from palm civets has twice evolved the capacity to infect humans by gaining binding affinity for human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Numerous mutations have been identified in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of different SARS-CoV strains isolated from humans or civets. Why these mutations were naturally selected or how SARS-CoV evolved to adapt to different host receptors has been poorly understood, presenting evolutionary and epidemic conundrums. In this study, we investigated the impact of these mutations on receptor recognition, an important determinant of SARS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. Using a combination of biochemical, functional, and crystallographic approaches, we elucidated the molecular and structural mechanisms of each of these naturally selected RBD mutations. These mutations either strengthen favorable interactions or reduce unfavorable interactions with two virus-binding hot spots on ACE2, and by doing so, they enhance viral interactions with either human (hACE2) or civet (cACE2) ACE2. Therefore, these mutations were viral adaptations to either hACE2 or cACE2. To corroborate the above analysis, we designed and characterized two optimized RBDs. The human-optimized RBD contains all of the hACE2-adapted residues (Phe-442, Phe-472, Asn-479, Asp-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for hACE2 but relative low affinity for cACE2. The civet-optimized RBD contains all of the cACE2-adapted residues (Tyr-442, Pro-472, Arg-479, Gly-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for cACE2 and also substantial affinity for hACE2. These results not only illustrate the detailed mechanisms of host receptor adaptation by SARS-CoV but also provide a molecular and structural basis for tracking future SARS-CoV evolution in animals.

  6. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child <5 years of age was assessed with multivariate logistic regression adjusting for socioeconomic status, residence type, mother's age and education, family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children <2 years of age. Maternal caretaking, especially agency, is strongly associated with lower prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in younger children. Interventions specifically designed to promote maternal autonomy and decision-making may lead to improved child health. PMID:25108503

  7. Unnecessary Antibiotics for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections: Association With Care Setting and Patient Demographics

    PubMed Central

    Barlam, Tamar F.; Soria-Saucedo, Rene; Cabral, Howard J.; Kazis, Lewis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Up to 40% of antibiotics are prescribed unnecessarily for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). We sought to define factors associated with antibiotic overprescribing of ARTIs to inform efforts to improve practice. Methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of ARTI visits between 2006 and 2010 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Those surveys provide a representative sample of US visits to community-based physicians and to hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) and outpatient practices. Patient factors (age, sex, race, underlying lung disease, tobacco use, insurance), physician specialty, practice demographics (percentage poverty, median household income, percentage with a Bachelor's Degree, urban-rural status, geographic region), and care setting (ED, hospital, or community-based practice) were evaluated as predictors of antibiotic overprescribing for ARTIs. Results. Hospital and community-practice visits had more antibiotic overprescribing than ED visits (odds ratio [OR] = 1.64 and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27–2.12 and OR = 1.59 and 95% CI, 1.26–2.01, respectively). Care setting had significant interactions with geographic region and urban and rural location. The quartile with the lowest percentage of college-educated residents had significantly greater overprescribing (adjusted OR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07–1.86) than the highest quartile. Current tobacco users were overprescribed more often than nonsmokers (OR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.38–2.12). Patient age, insurance, and provider specialty were other significant predictors. Conclusions. Tobacco use and a lower grouped rate of college education were associated with overprescribing and may reflect poor health literacy. A focus on educating the patient may be an effective approach to stewardship. PMID:27006968

  8. Surviving Critical Illness: The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Experienced by Patients and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christopher E.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Brandon, Debra H.; Whaley, Christie; Attix, Deborah K.; Clay, Alison S.; Dore, Daniel V.; Hough, Catherine L.; White, Douglas B.; Tulsky, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a systemic critical illness, often report poor quality of life based on responses to standardized questionnaires. However, the experiences of ARDS survivors have not been reported. Our objective was to characterize the effects of critical illness in the daily lives and functioning of ARDS survivors. Design, Setting, and Patients We recruited consecutively 31 ARDS survivors and their informal caregivers from medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic medical center and a community hospital. Eight patients died before completing interviews. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 ARDS survivors and 24 caregivers three to nine months after ICU admission, stopping enrollment after thematic saturation was reached. Transcripts were analyzed using Colaizzi’s qualitative methodology to identify significant ways in which survivors’ critical illness experience impacted their lives. Measurements and Main Results Participants related five key elements of experience as survivors of ARDS: pervasive memories of critical care, day to day impact of new disability, critical illness defining the sense of self, relationship strain and change, and ability to cope with disability. Survivors described remarkable disability that persisted for months. Caregivers’ interviews revealed substantial strain from caregiving responsibilities, as well as frequent symptom minimization by patients. Conclusions The diverse and unique experiences of ARDS survivors reflect the global impact of severe critical illness. We have identified symptom domains important to ARDS patients that are not well represented in existing health outcomes measures. These insights may aid the development of targeted interventions to enhance recovery and return of function after ARDS. PMID:19865004

  9. Hyperpolarized Gas Diffusion MRI for the Study of Atelectasis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Kadlecek, Stephen; Hamedani, Hooman; Rajaei, Jennia; Clapp, Justin; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains about the best ventilator strategies for the mitigation of atelectasis and associated airspace stretch in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition to several immediate physiological effects, atelectasis increases the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), which has been shown to significantly worsen ARDS outcomes. A number of lung imaging techniques have made substantial headway in clarifying the mechanisms of atelectasis. This paper reviews the contributions of CT, PET, and conventional MRI to understanding this phenomenon. In doing so, it also reveals several important shortcomings inherent to each of these approaches. Once these shortcomings have been made apparent, we describe how hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (HP MRI)—a technique that is uniquely able to assess responses to mechanical ventilation and lung injury in peripheral airspaces—is poised to fill several of these knowledge gaps. The HP-MRI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantifies the restriction of 3He diffusion by peripheral airspaces, thereby obtaining pulmonary structural information at an extremely small scale. Lastly, this paper reports the results of a series of experiments that measured ADC in mechanically ventilated rats in order to investigate (i) the effect of atelectasis on ventilated airspaces; (ii) the relationship between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), hysteresis, and the dimensions of peripheral airspaces; and (iii) the ability of PEEP and surfactant to reduce airspace dimensions after lung injury. An increase in ADC was found to be a marker of atelectasis-induced overdistension. With recruitment, higher airway pressures were shown to reduce stretch rather than worsen it. Moving forward, HP MRI has significant potential to shed further light on the atelectatic processes that occur during mechanical ventilation. PMID:24920074

  10. Lung ventilation strategies for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chi, Chunjie; Guo, Libo; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Pi, Xin; Sun, Bo; Lian, Ailing; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    To identify the best lung ventilation strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we performed a network meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Web of Science were searched, and 36 eligible articles were included. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP], the hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were 0.624 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.419-0.98) for lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning and 0.572 (0.34-0.968) for pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning had the greatest potential to reduce mortality, and the possibility of receiving the first ranking was 61.6%. Permissive hypercapnia, recruitment maneuver, and low airway pressures were most likely to be the worst in terms of all-cause mortality. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP, pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning ventilation are associated with lower mortality in ARDS patients. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning ventilation and lower tidal volumes with pressure-volume (P-V) static curve-guided individual PEEP are potential optimal strategies for ARDS patients. PMID:26955891

  11. Proteomic profiles in acute respiratory distress syndrome differentiates survivors from non-survivors.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Becker, Trisha L; Viken, Kevin J; Jagtap, Pratik D; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Kumar, Vipin; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Christine H

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days) and late-phase (8 to 35 days) groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1). Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ) with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7), early-phase non-survivors (n = 8), and late-phase survivors (n = 7). Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS. PMID:25290099

  12. Unexpected Role for Adaptive αβTH17 Cells in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome1

    PubMed Central

    Li, John T.; Melton, Andrew C.; Su, George; Hamm, David E.; LaFemina, Michael; Howard, James; Fang, Xiaohui; Bhat, Sudarshan; Huynh, Kieu-My; O’Kane, Cecilia M.; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Muir, Roshell R.; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.; Sheppard, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder characterized by increased alveolar permeability with no effective treatment beyond supportive care. Current mechanisms underlying ARDS focus on alveolar endothelial and epithelial injury caused by products of innate immune cells and platelets. However, the role of adaptive immune cells in ARDS remains largely unknown. Here we report that expansion of antigen-specific αβT helper 17 (αβTH17) cells contribute to ARDS by local secretion of IL-17A, which in turn directly increases alveolar epithelial permeability. Mice with a highly restrictive defect in antigen-specific αβTH17 cells were protected from experimental ARDS induced by a single dose of endotracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Loss of IL-17 receptor C or antibody blockade of IL-17A was similarly protective, further suggesting that IL-17A released by these cells was responsible for this effect. LPS induced a rapid and specific clonal expansion of αβTH17 cells in the lung, as determined by deep sequencing of the hypervariable CD3RβVJ region of the T cell receptor. Our findings could be relevant to ARDS in humans, since we found significant elevation of IL-17A in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ARDS and recombinant IL-17A directly increased permeability across cultured human alveolar epithelial monolayers. These results reveal a previously unexpected role for adaptive immune responses that increase alveolar permeability in ARDS and suggest that αβTH17 cells and IL-17A could be novel therapeutic targets for this currently untreatable disease. PMID:26002979

  13. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-like virus in Chinese horseshoe bats

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Li, Kenneth S. M.; Huang, Yi; Tsoi, Hoi-Wah; Wong, Beatrice H. L.; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Leung, Suet-Yi; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2005-01-01

    Although the finding of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in caged palm civets from live animal markets in China has provided evidence for interspecies transmission in the genesis of the SARS epidemic, subsequent studies suggested that the civet may have served only as an amplification host for SARS-CoV. In a surveillance study for CoV in noncaged animals from the wild areas of the Hong Kong Special Administration Region, we identified a CoV closely related to SARS-CoV (bat-SARS-CoV) from 23 (39%) of 59 anal swabs of wild Chinese horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus sinicus) by using RT-PCR. Sequencing and analysis of three bat-SARS-CoV genomes from samples collected at different dates showed that bat-SARS-CoV is closely related to SARS-CoV from humans and civets. Phylogenetic analysis showed that bat-SARS-CoV formed a distinct cluster with SARS-CoV as group 2b CoV, distantly related to known group 2 CoV. Most differences between the bat-SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV genomes were observed in the spike genes, ORF 3 and ORF 8, which are the regions where most variations also were observed between human and civet SARS-CoV genomes. In addition, the presence of a 29-bp insertion in ORF 8 of bat-SARS-CoV genome, not in most human SARS-CoV genomes, suggests that it has a common ancestor with civet SARS-CoV. Antibody against recombinant bat-SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein was detected in 84% of Chinese horseshoe bats by using an enzyme immunoassay. Neutralizing antibody to human SARS-CoV also was detected in bats with lower viral loads. Precautions should be exercised in the handling of these animals. PMID:16169905

  14. Unexpected Role for Adaptive αβTh17 Cells in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, John T; Melton, Andrew C; Su, George; Hamm, David E; LaFemina, Michael; Howard, James; Fang, Xiaohui; Bhat, Sudarshan; Huynh, Kieu-My; O'Kane, Cecilia M; Ingram, Rebecca J; Muir, Roshell R; McAuley, Daniel F; Matthay, Michael A; Sheppard, Dean

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder characterized by increased alveolar permeability with no effective treatment beyond supportive care. Current mechanisms underlying ARDS focus on alveolar endothelial and epithelial injury caused by products of innate immune cells and platelets. However, the role of adaptive immune cells in ARDS remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that expansion of Ag-specific αβTh17 cells contributes to ARDS by local secretion of IL-17A, which in turn directly increases alveolar epithelial permeability. Mice with a highly restrictive defect in Ag-specific αβTh17 cells were protected from experimental ARDS induced by a single dose of endotracheal LPS. Loss of IL-17 receptor C or Ab blockade of IL-17A was similarly protective, further suggesting that IL-17A released by these cells was responsible for this effect. LPS induced a rapid and specific clonal expansion of αβTh17 cells in the lung, as determined by deep sequencing of the hypervariable CD3RβVJ region of the TCR. Our findings could be relevant to ARDS in humans, because we found significant elevation of IL-17A in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with ARDS, and rIL-17A directly increased permeability across cultured human alveolar epithelial monolayers. These results reveal a previously unexpected role for adaptive immune responses that increase alveolar permeability in ARDS and suggest that αβTh17 cells and IL-17A could be novel therapeutic targets for this currently untreatable disease. PMID:26002979

  15. Novel Inhibitors of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Entry That Act by Three Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, Adeyemi O.; Severson, William; Jonsson, Colleen; Singh, Kamalendra; Weiss, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious and highly contagious disease that is caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and for which there are currently no approved treatments. We report the discovery and characterization of small-molecule inhibitors of SARS-CoV replication that block viral entry by three different mechanisms. The compounds were discovered by screening a chemical library of compounds for blocking of entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped with SARS-CoV surface glycoprotein S (SARS-S) but not that of HIV-1 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus surface glycoprotein G (VSV-G). Studies on their mechanisms of action revealed that the compounds act by three distinct mechanisms: (i) SSAA09E2 {N-[[4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]methyl]-1,2-oxazole-5-carboxamide} acts through a novel mechanism of action, by blocking early interactions of SARS-S with the receptor for SARS-CoV, angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2); (ii) SSAA09E1 {[(Z)-1-thiophen-2-ylethylideneamino]thiourea} acts later, by blocking cathepsin L, a host protease required for processing of SARS-S during viral entry; and (iii) SSAA09E3 [N-(9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracen-2-yl)benzamide] also acts later and does not affect interactions of SARS-S with ACE2 or the enzymatic functions of cathepsin L but prevents fusion of the viral membrane with the host cellular membrane. Our work demonstrates that there are at least three independent strategies for blocking SARS-CoV entry, validates these mechanisms of inhibition, and introduces promising leads for the development of SARS therapeutics. PMID:23678171

  16. Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Blastomycosis: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ilan S; Embil, John M; Sharma, Atul; Goulet, Stephen; Light, R Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an uncommon, highly fatal, and poorly understood manifestation of blastomycosis. Optimal management remains unknown, including the roles of adjunctive corticosteroids and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis, managed in intensive care units in Manitoba, Canada, from 1992 to 2014. ARDS was defined using the Berlin definition. Corticosteroid therapy was defined as ≥150 mg cortisol equivalent in 24 hours. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants of a fatal outcome, and bootstrap resampling was used to assess sample size requirements.Forty-three patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis were identified. ARDS was mild, moderate, and severe in 2 (5%), 12 (28%), and 29 (67%) patients, respectively. Management included amphotericin B (n = 42, 98%), vasopressors (n = 36, 84%), corticosteroids (n = 22, 51%), renal replacement (n = 13, 30%), and ECMO (n = 4, 11%). Seventeen patients (40%) died. All patients treated with ECMO survived (P = 0.14). Corticosteroids were not associated with survival benefit in univariate (P = 0.43) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.11-2.34). Bootstrap studies indicated that almost 500 patients would be needed to confirm a significant reduction in mortality from corticosteroids (type I error = 0.05, power = 80%).Blastomycosis is an uncommon, albeit important, cause of ARDS in this geographic area. Given the rarity of disease and the large cohort needed to demonstrate mortality benefit, the role of adjunctive therapies, including corticosteroids and ECMO, may remain unconfirmed, and clinical judgment should guide management decisions. PMID:27149459

  17. Screening and identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus-specific CTL epitopes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghai; Xu, Dongping; Li, Xiaojuan; Li, Hongtao; Shan, Ming; Tang, Jiaren; Wang, Min; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Zhu, Xiaodong; Tao, Hua; He, Wei; Tien, Po; Gao, George F

    2006-08-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious and life-threatening disease that emerged in China in November 2002. A novel SARS-associated coronavirus was identified as its principal etiologic agent; however, the immunopathogenesis of SARS and the role of special CTLs in virus clearance are still largely uncharacterized. In this study, potential HLA-A*0201-restricted spike (S) and nucleocapsid protein-derived peptides were selected from an online database and screened for potential CTL epitopes by in vitro refolding and T2 cell-stabilization assays. The antigenicity of nine peptides which could refold with HLA-A*0201 molecules was assessed with an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay to determine the capacity to stimulate CTLs from PBMCs of HLA-A2(+) SARS-recovered donors. A novel HLA-A*0201-restricted decameric epitope P15 (S411-420, KLPDDFMGCV) derived from the S protein was identified and found to localize within the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor-binding region of the S1 domain. P15 could significantly enhance the expression of HLA-A*0201 molecules on the T2 cell surface, stimulate IFN-gamma-producing CTLs from the PBMCs of former SARS patients, and induce specific CTLs from P15-immunized HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice in vivo. Furthermore, significant P15-specific CTLs were induced from HLA-A2.1-transgenic mice immunized by a DNA vaccine encoding the S protein; suggesting that P15 was a naturally processed epitope. Thus, P15 may be a novel SARS-associated coronavirus-specific CTL epitope and a potential target for characterization of virus control mechanisms and evaluation of candidate SARS vaccines. PMID:16887973

  18. Acute Lower Respiratory Infection in Childhood and Household Fuel Use in Bhaktapur, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Michael N.; Chandyo, Ram K.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Pokhrel, Amod K.; Mathisen, Maria; Basnet, Sudha; Shrestha, Prakash S.; Strand, Tor A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Globally, solid fuels are used by about 3 billion people for cooking. These fuels have been associated with many health effects, including acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in young children. Nepal has a high prevalence of use of biomass for cooking and heating. Objective: This case–control study was conducted among a population in the Bhaktapur municipality, Nepal, to investigate the relationship of cookfuel type to ALRI in young children. Methods: Cases with ALRI and age-matched controls were enrolled from an open cohort of children 2–35 months old, under active monthly surveillance for ALRI. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on family characteristics, including household cooking and heating appliances and fuels. The main analysis was carried out using conditional logistic regression. Population-attributable fractions (PAF) for stove types were calculated. Results: A total of 917 children (452 cases and 465 controls) were recruited into the study. Relative to use of electricity for cooking, ALRI was increased in association with any use of biomass stoves [odds ratio (OR) = 1.93; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.98], kerosene stoves (OR = 1.87; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.83), and gas stoves (OR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.50). Use of wood, kerosene, or coal heating was also associated with ALRI (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 0.97, 2.14), compared with no heating or electricity or gas heating. PAFs for ALRI were 18.0% (95% CI: 8.1, 26.9%) and 18.7% (95% CI: 8.4%–27.8%), for biomass and kerosene stoves, respectively. Conclusions: The study supports previous reports indicating that use of biomass as a household fuel is a risk factor for ALRI, and provides new evidence that use of kerosene for cooking may also be a risk factor for ALRI in young children. PMID:23512278

  19. Lung ventilation strategies for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chi, Chunjie; Guo, Libo; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Pi, Xin; Sun, Bo; Lian, Ailing; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    To identify the best lung ventilation strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we performed a network meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Web of Science were searched, and 36 eligible articles were included. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP], the hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were 0.624 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.419–0.98) for lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning and 0.572 (0.34–0.968) for pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning had the greatest potential to reduce mortality, and the possibility of receiving the first ranking was 61.6%. Permissive hypercapnia, recruitment maneuver, and low airway pressures were most likely to be the worst in terms of all-cause mortality. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP, pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning ventilation are associated with lower mortality in ARDS patients. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning ventilation and lower tidal volumes with pressure-volume (P–V) static curve-guided individual PEEP are potential optimal strategies for ARDS patients. PMID:26955891

  20. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  1. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  2. The University of Akron study on air pollution and human health effects II. Effects on acute respiratory illness.