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Sample records for acute fish test

  1. A strategy to reduce the numbers of fish used in acute ecotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Barrett, Sarah; Buzby, Mary; Constable, David; Hartmann, Andreas; Hayes, Eileen; Huggett, Duane; Laenge, Reinhard; Lillicrap, Adam D; Straub, Jürg Oliver; Thompson, Roy S

    2003-12-01

    The pharmaceutical industry gives high priority to animal welfare in the process of drug discovery and safety assessment. In the context of environmental assessments of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), existing U.S. Food and Drug Administration and draft European regulations may require testing of APIs for acute ecotoxicity to algae, daphnids, and fish (base-set ecotoxicity data used to derive the predicted no-effect concentration [PNECwater] from the most sensitive of three species). Subject to regulatory approval, it is proposed that testing can be moved from fish median lethal concentration (LC50) testing (typically using > or = 42 fish/API) to acute threshold tests using fewer fish (typically 10 fish/API). To support this strategy, we have collated base-set ecotoxicity data from regulatory studies of 91 APIs (names coded for commercial reasons). For 73 of the 91 APIs, the algal median effect concentration (EC50) and daphnid EC50 values were lower than or equal to the fish LC50 data. Thus, for approximately 80% of these APIs, algal and daphnid acute EC50 data could have been used in the absence of fish LC50 data to derive PNECwater values. For the other 18 APIs, use of an acute threshold test with a step-down factor of 3.2 is predicted to give comparable PNECwater outcomes. Based on this preliminary scenario of 91 APIs, this approach is predicted to reduce the total number of fish used from 3,822 to 1,025 (approximately 73%). The present study, although preliminary, suggests that the current regulatory requirement for fish LC50 data regarding APIs should be succeeded by fish acute threshold (step-down) test data, thereby achieving significant animal welfare benefits with no loss of data for PNECwater estimates.

  2. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test. If the toxicity of the test substance is not already known, a range finding test should be... analyzed. (F) If the measured concentrations of dissolved test substance are considerably lower (e.g., of the test substance.......

  3. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... test. If the toxicity of the test substance is not already known, a range finding test should be... analyzed. (F) If the measured concentrations of dissolved test substance are considerably lower (e.g., of the test substance.......

  4. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... construction materials, test chambers, and testing apparatus to dilution water or to test solutions prior to... tank with no recycling. (7) Incipient LC 50 means that test substance concentration, calculated from... substance. (F) A test substance delivery system for flow-through tests. (ii) Construction...

  5. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... construction materials, test chambers, and testing apparatus to dilution water or to test solutions prior to... tank with no recycling. (7) Incipient LC 50 means that test substance concentration, calculated from... substance. (F) A test substance delivery system for flow-through tests. (ii) Construction...

  6. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adjusted to the rate desired. (ii) The test substance is introduced into each test chamber. In a flow..., photodegradation, chemical reaction, volatilization, or sorption. (iii) Measurement of test substance. (A) For... includes determining the flow rate through each chamber and the concentration of the test...

  7. Introduction of moribund category to OECD fish acute test and its effect on suffering and LC50 values.

    PubMed

    Rufli, Hans

    2012-05-01

    It has become common practice in many laboratories in Europe to introduce the criterion "moribund" to reduce the suffering in fish acute lethality tests. Fish with severe sublethal symptoms might be declared moribund and are removed from the test as soon as this occurs (premature discontinuation of experiment). Moribund fish affect main study outcomes as the median lethal concentration (LC50) derived on fish declared as moribund may be lower than the conventional LC50. This was evaluated by a retrospective analysis of 328 fish acute toxicity tests of an industry laboratory based on five different definitions of moribund, and of 111 tests from 10 other laboratories from Europe and the United States. Using the criterion of moribund 10 to 23% of the fish were being declared as moribund in 49 to 79% of the studies. In 36 to 52% of the studies, the LC50(moribund) was lower than the conventional LC50 depending on the definitions of moribund. An inclusion of the moribund criterion in an updated Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development guideline for the acute fish toxicity test would reduce the period of suffering by up to 92 h, lowering the value of the main toxicity endpoint by a factor of approximately 2, and maximal by a factor of approximately 16.

  8. Progress Towards the Development of a Fathead Minnow Embryo Test and Comparison to the Zebrafish Embryo Test for Assessing Acute Fish Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Zebrafish Embryo Test (ZFET) for acute fish toxicity is a well developed method nearing adoption as an OECD Test Guideline. Early drafts of the test guideline (TG) envisioned a suite of potential test species to be covered including zebrafish, fathead minnow, Japanese Medaka...

  9. A high throughput passive dosing format for the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Schmidt, Stine N; Stinckens, Evelyn; Maho, Walid; Blust, Ronny; Mayer, Philipp; Covaci, Adrian; Knapen, Dries

    2015-11-01

    High throughput testing according to the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) test (OECD Testing Guideline 236) is usually conducted in well plates. In the case of hydrophobic test substances, sorptive and evaporative losses often result in declining and poorly controlled exposure conditions. Therefore, our objective was to improve exposure conditions in FET tests by evaluating a passive dosing format using silicone O-rings in standard 24-well polystyrene plates. We exposed zebrafish embryos to a series of phenanthrene concentrations until 120h post fertilization (hpf), and obtained a linear dilution series. We report effect values for both mortality and sublethal morphological effects based on (1) measured exposure concentrations, (2) (lipid normalized) body residues and (3) chemical activity. The LC50 for 120hpf was 310μg/L, CBR50 (critical body residue) was 2.72mmol/kg fresh wt and La50 (lethal chemical activity) was 0.047. All values were within ranges expected for baseline toxicity. Impaired swim bladder inflation was the most pronounced morphological effect and swimming activity was reduced in all exposure concentrations. Further analysis showed that the effect on swimming activity was not attributed to impaired swim bladder inflation, but rather to baseline toxicity. We conclude that silicone O-rings (1) produce a linear dilution series of phenanthrene in the 120hpf FET test, (2) generate and maintain aqueous concentrations for reliable determination of effect concentrations, and allow for obtaining mechanistic toxicity information, and (3) cause no toxicity, demonstrating its potential as an extension of the FET test when testing hydrophobic chemicals. PMID:26026258

  10. Fish embryo toxicity test: identification of compounds with weak toxicity and analysis of behavioral effects to improve prediction of acute toxicity for neurotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; König, Maria; Ortmann, Julia; Massei, Riccardo; Paschke, Albrecht; Kühne, Ralph; Scholz, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The fish embryo toxicity test has been proposed as an alternative for the acute fish toxicity test, but concerns have been raised for its predictivity given that a few compounds have been shown to exhibit a weak acute toxicity in the fish embryo. In order to better define the applicability domain and improve the predictive capacity of the fish embryo test, we performed a systematic analysis of existing fish embryo and acute fish toxicity data. A correlation analysis of a total of 153 compounds identified 28 compounds with a weaker or no toxicity in the fish embryo test. Eleven of these compounds exhibited a neurotoxic mode of action. We selected a subset of eight compounds with weaker or no embryo toxicity (cyanazine, picloram, aldicarb, azinphos-methyl, dieldrin, diquat dibromide, endosulfan, and esfenvalerate) to study toxicokinetics and a neurotoxic mode of action as potential reasons for the deviating fish embryo toxicity. Published fish embryo LC50 values were confirmed by experimental analysis of zebrafish embryo LC50 according to OECD guideline 236. Except for diquat dibromide, internal concentration analysis did not indicate a potential relation of the low sensitivity of fish embryos to a limited uptake of the compounds. Analysis of locomotor activity of diquat dibromide and the neurotoxic compounds in 98 hpf embryos (exposed for 96 h) indicated a specific effect on behavior (embryonic movement) for the neurotoxic compounds. The EC50s of behavior for neurotoxic compounds were close to the acute fish toxicity LC50. Our data provided the first evidence that the applicability domain of the fish embryo test (LC50s determination) may exclude neurotoxic compounds. However, neurotoxic compounds could be identified by changes in embryonic locomotion. Although a quantitative prediction of acute fish toxicity LC50 using behavioral assays in fish embryos may not yet be possible, the identification of neurotoxicity could trigger the conduction of a conventional fish

  11. Electrophiles and acute toxicity to fish

    SciTech Connect

    Hermens, J.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Effect concentrations in fish LC50 tests with directly acting electrophiles are lower than those of unreactive chemicals that act by narcosis. LC50 values of more hydrophobic reactive chemicals tend to approach those of unreactive chemicals. Quantitative studies to correlate fish LC50 data to physical-chemical properties indicate that LC50 values of reactive chemicals depend on hydrophobicity as well as chemical reactivity. In this paper, several examples will be given of chemical structures that are known as direct electrophiles. This classification might be useful to identify chemicals that are more effective at lower concentrations than unreactive compounds. Chemicals that require bioactivation are not included because almost no information is available on the influence of bioactivation on acute toxic effects in aquatic organisms.32 references.

  12. Handbook of acute toxicity of chemicals to fish and aquatic invertebrates : summaries of toxicity tests conducted at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory, 1965-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W. Waynon; Finley, Mack T.

    1980-01-01

    Acute toxicity is a major subject of research at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory for evaluating the impact of toxic chemicals on fishery resources. The Laboratory has played a leading role in developing research technology for toxicity testing and data interpretation. In 1965-78, more than 400 chemicals were tested against a variety of invertebrates and fish species representative of both cold- and warm-water climates. The use of acute toxicity tests for assessing the potential hazard of chemical contaminants to aquatic organisms is well documented (Boyd 1957; Henderson et al. 1960; Sanders and Cope 1966; Macek and McAllister 1970). Static acute toxicity tests provide rapid and (within limits) reproducible concentration-response curves for estimating toxic effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. These tests provide a database for determining relative toxicity of a large number of chemicals to a variety of species and for estimating acute effects of chemical spills on natural aquatic systems; they also assist in determining priority and design of additional toxicity studies. Acute toxicity tests usually provide estimates of the exposure concentration causing 50% mortality (LC50) to test organisms during a specified period of time. For certain invertebrates, the effective concentration is based on immobilization, or some other identifiable endpoint, rather than on lethality. The application of the LC50 has gained acceptance among toxicologists and is generally the most highly rated test for assessing potential adverse effects of chemical contaminants to aquatic life (Brungs and Mount 1978; American Institute for Biological Sciences 1978a). The literature contains numerous papers dealing with the acute toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms. However, there is a tremendous need for a concise compendium of toxicity data covering a large variety of chemicals and test species. This Handbook is a compilation of a large volume of acute toxicity

  13. Handbook of acute toxicity of chemicals to fish and aquatic invertebrates : summaries of toxicity tests conducted at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory, 1965-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W. Waynon; Finley, Mack T.

    1980-01-01

    Acute toxicity is a major subject of research at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory for evaluating the impact of toxic chemicals on fishery resources. The Laboratory has played a leading role in developing research technology for toxicity testing and data interpretation. In 1965-78, more than 400 chemicals were tested against a variety of invertebrates and fish species representative of both cold- and warm-water climates.The use of acute toxicity tests for assessing the potential hazard of chemical contaminants to aquatic organisms is well documented (Boyd 1957; Henderson et al. 1960; Sanders and Cope 1966; Macek and McAllister 1970). Static acute toxicity tests provide rapid and (within limits) reproducible concentration-response curves for estimating toxic effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. These tests provide a database for determining relative toxicity of a large number of chemicals to a variety of species and for estimating acute effects of chemical spills on natural aquatic systems; they also assist in determining priority and design of additional toxicity studies.Acute toxicity tests usually provide estimates of the exposure concentration causing 50% mortality (LC50) to test organisms during a specified period of time. For certain invertebrates, the effective concentration is based on immobilization, or some other identifiable endpoint, rather than on lethality. The application of the LC50 has gained acceptance among toxicologists and is generally the most highly rated test for assessing potential adverse effects of chemical contaminants to aquatic life (Brungs and Mount 1978; American Institute for Biological Sciences 1978a).The literature contains numerous papers dealing with the acute toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms. However, there is a tremendous need for a concise compendium of toxicity data covering a large variety of chemicals and test species. This Handbook is a compilation of a large volume of acute toxicity data

  14. Sediment bioaccumulation testing with fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; Burton, G. Allen

    1992-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss methods for conducting bioaccumulation bioassays with fish; the advantages and disadvantages of using fish rather than invertebrates; and problems associated with bioaccumulation testing, with a special emphasis on statistical treatment.

  15. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos.

  16. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos. PMID:24929227

  17. PNNL Tests Fish Passage System

    SciTech Connect

    Colotelo, Alison

    2015-03-13

    Scientists from PNNL are testing a fish transportation system developed by Whooshh Innovations. The Whooshh system uses a flexible tube that works a bit like a vacuum, guiding fish over hydroelectric dams or other structures. Compared to methods used today, this system could save money while granting fish quicker, safer passage through dams and hatcheries.

  18. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Karnik, N D; Gupta, V A; Hase, N K

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure.

  19. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Karnik, N D; Gupta, V A; Hase, N K

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure. PMID:26440398

  20. The OECD Fish Testing Framework Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    OECD Project 2.30 on a Fish Testing Framework was initiated in mid-2009, with the United States as the lead country. The objectives of the project are to review the regulatory needs and data requirements for fish testing and review the currency of existing OECD Test Guidelines. ...

  1. Effect of acute stresses on zebra fish (Danio rerio) metabolome measured by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mian Yahya; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti; Champagne, Danielle L; van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-01

    We applied an acute stress model to zebra fish in order to measure the changes in the metabolome due to biological stress. This was done by submitting the fish to fifteen minutes of acute confinement (netting) stress, and then five minutes for the open field and light/dark field tests. A polar extract of the zebra fish was then subjected to (1)H nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra showed a clear separation associated to a wide range of metabolites between zebra fish that were submitted to open field and light/dark field tests. Alanine, taurine, adenosine, creatine, lactate, and histidine were high in zebra fish to which the light/dark field test was applied, regardless of stress, while acetate and isoleucine/lipids appeared to be higher in zebra fish exposed to the open field test. These results show that any change in the environment, even for a small period of time, has a noticeable physiological impact. This research provides an insight of how different mechanisms are activated under different environments to maintain the homeostasis of the body. It should also contribute to establish zebra fish as a model for metabolomics studies. PMID:25098933

  2. Comparative acute and chronic sensitivity of fish and amphibians: a critical review of data.

    PubMed

    Weltje, Lennart; Simpson, Peter; Gross, Melanie; Crane, Mark; Wheeler, James R

    2013-04-01

    The relative sensitivity of amphibians to chemicals in the environment, including plant protection product active substances, is the subject of ongoing scientific debate. The objective of this study was to compare systematically the relative sensitivity of amphibians and fish to chemicals. Acute and chronic toxicity data were obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) ECOTOX database and were supplemented with data from the scientific and regulatory literature. The overall outcome is that fish and amphibian toxicity data are highly correlated and that fish are more sensitive (both acute and chronic) than amphibians. In terms of acute sensitivity, amphibians were between 10- and 100-fold more sensitive than fish for only four of 55 chemicals and more than 100-fold more sensitive for only two chemicals. However, a detailed inspection of these cases showed a similar acute sensitivity of fish and amphibians. Chronic toxicity data for fish were available for 52 chemicals. Amphibians were between 10- and 100-fold more sensitive than fish for only two substances (carbaryl and dexamethasone) and greater than 100-fold more sensitive for only a single chemical (sodium perchlorate). The comparison for carbaryl was subsequently determined to be unreliable and that for sodium perchlorate is a potential artifact of the exposure medium. Only a substance such as dexamethasone, which interferes with a specific aspect of amphibian metamorphosis, might not be detected using fish tests. However, several other compounds known to influence amphibian metamorphosis were included in the analysis, and these did not affect amphibians disproportionately. These analyses suggest that additional amphibian testing is not necessary during chemical risk assessment.

  3. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid to fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA; also called peroxyacetic acid) is a promising new therapeutant for parasites and fungus. It is registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an antimicrobial compound approved for indoor use on hard, non-porous surfaces. This study determined the acute toxi...

  4. Acute and chronic toxicity of the benzoylurea pesticide, lufenuron, in the fish, Colossoma macropomum.

    PubMed

    Rafaela Leão Soares, Priscila; Lucas Corrêa de Andrade, André; Pinheiro Santos, Thamiris; Caroline Barros Lucas da Silva, Stephannie; Freitas da Silva, Jadson; Rodrigues Dos Santos, Amanda; Hugo Lima da Silva Souza, Elton; Magliano da Cunha, Franklin; Wanderley Teixeira, Valéria; Sales Cadena, Marilia Ribeiro; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrício; Bezerra de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz; Gonçalves Cadena, Pabyton

    2016-10-01

    Lufenuron is a benzoylurea insecticide that interfere in chitin synthesis in insects. Although lufenuron is widely used in agriculture and aquaculture, rare are studies described that relates to possible toxic effects in fish. This work aimed to evaluate acute and chronic toxic effects of benzoylurea pesticide (lufenuron) on biological parameters of Colossoma macropomum (Tambaqui). In the acute test, juveniles of Tambaqui were divided into control group and five experimental groups with exposure from 0.1 to 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron for 96 h. Animals were also submitted to chronic toxicity test for four months in concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L of lufenuron, the concentration used in the treatment of ectoparasites in fish and 50% of LC50 96 h, respectively. The presence of hemorrhages was observed in eyes, fins and operculum of fish exposed to 0.7 and 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron. Histological analysis showed changes in the morphology of fish gills submitted to acute toxicity test, as lamellar aneurysm and blood congestion inside lamellae. Lufenuron promoted damage in fish retina as in ability to respond to stimuli in photoreceptors and in ON-bipolar cells in acute test. In chronic test, blood glucose analysis and morphometric parameters showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In general, Tambaqui exhibited behaviors associated with stress when exposed to lufenuron. Thus, lufenuron showed several toxic effects in relation to biological parameters in Tambaqui. This concerns about the use and discard of lufenuron, and indicates the requirement of environmental actions to prevent potential contamination of aquatic biota. PMID:27448754

  5. Acute and chronic toxicity of the benzoylurea pesticide, lufenuron, in the fish, Colossoma macropomum.

    PubMed

    Rafaela Leão Soares, Priscila; Lucas Corrêa de Andrade, André; Pinheiro Santos, Thamiris; Caroline Barros Lucas da Silva, Stephannie; Freitas da Silva, Jadson; Rodrigues Dos Santos, Amanda; Hugo Lima da Silva Souza, Elton; Magliano da Cunha, Franklin; Wanderley Teixeira, Valéria; Sales Cadena, Marilia Ribeiro; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrício; Bezerra de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz; Gonçalves Cadena, Pabyton

    2016-10-01

    Lufenuron is a benzoylurea insecticide that interfere in chitin synthesis in insects. Although lufenuron is widely used in agriculture and aquaculture, rare are studies described that relates to possible toxic effects in fish. This work aimed to evaluate acute and chronic toxic effects of benzoylurea pesticide (lufenuron) on biological parameters of Colossoma macropomum (Tambaqui). In the acute test, juveniles of Tambaqui were divided into control group and five experimental groups with exposure from 0.1 to 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron for 96 h. Animals were also submitted to chronic toxicity test for four months in concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L of lufenuron, the concentration used in the treatment of ectoparasites in fish and 50% of LC50 96 h, respectively. The presence of hemorrhages was observed in eyes, fins and operculum of fish exposed to 0.7 and 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron. Histological analysis showed changes in the morphology of fish gills submitted to acute toxicity test, as lamellar aneurysm and blood congestion inside lamellae. Lufenuron promoted damage in fish retina as in ability to respond to stimuli in photoreceptors and in ON-bipolar cells in acute test. In chronic test, blood glucose analysis and morphometric parameters showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In general, Tambaqui exhibited behaviors associated with stress when exposed to lufenuron. Thus, lufenuron showed several toxic effects in relation to biological parameters in Tambaqui. This concerns about the use and discard of lufenuron, and indicates the requirement of environmental actions to prevent potential contamination of aquatic biota.

  6. Acute toxicities to larval rainbow trout of representative compounds detected in Great Lakes fish

    SciTech Connect

    Edsall, C.C. )

    1991-02-01

    In recent years the National Fisheries Research Center-Great Lakes has ranked the potential hazard to fish and invertebrates of various chemical compounds detected in two Great Lakes fishes - lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, and walleye. Stizostedion vitreum vitreum. This hazard assessment has included the identification of the potential sources of the compound, determination of the occurrence and abundance of the compounds in Great Lakes fish, and the determination of acute toxicities of representative compounds of 19 chemical classes. The author focuses on four of the classes. The PAHs are products of fuel combustion and components of fossil fuels. The other three classes principally originate from industrial applications (alkyl halides), as fossil fuels, insecticides, solvents, and in perfumes (cyclic alkanes); and as herbicides and insecticides (heterocyclic nitrogen compounds). The authors purpose is to report results of static acute toxicity tests in which larval rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used as the test fish and to compare results of acute toxicity tests with previous studies.

  7. A mechanism for acute aluminium toxicity in fish.

    PubMed

    Exley, C; Chappell, J S; Birchall, J D

    1991-08-01

    Aluminium is acutely toxic to fish in acid waters. The gill is the principal target organ and death is due to a combination of ionoregulatory, osmoregulatory and respiratory dysfunction. The toxic mechanism has hitherto received little direct consideration and is unknown. In this paper the mechanism of acute aluminium toxicity is approached from a chemical perspective. Symptomatic evidence of toxicity is taken from the literature and combined with our own research to elucidate a biochemically sound model to describe a possible mechanism of acute aluminium toxicity in fish. The proposed model delineates the chemical conditions immediately adjacent to the gill surface and emphasizes their importance in aluminium's toxic mode of action. The mechanism is shown to be bipartite. Aluminium binding to functional groups both apically located at the gill surface and intracellularly located within lamellar epithelial cells disrupts the barrier properties of the gill epithelium. The concomitant iono- and osmoregulatory dysfunction results in accelerated cell necrosis, sloughing and death of the fish. The mechanism of epithelial cell death is proposed as a general mechanism of aluminium-induced accelerated cell death.

  8. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  9. Promoting the 3Rs to enhance the OECD fish toxicity testing framework.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Wheeler, James R; Gourmelon, Anne; Burden, Natalie

    2016-04-01

    Fish toxicity testing has been conducted since the 1860's in order to help define safe levels of chemical contaminants in lakes, rivers and coastal waters. The historical emphasis on acute lethality testing of chemicals has more recently focussed on long term sublethal effects of chemicals on fish and their prey species. Fish toxicity testing is now embedded in much environment legislation on chemical safety while it is recognized that animal use should be Replaced, Reduced and Refined (the 3Rs) where possible. The OECD Fish Toxicity Testing Framework provides a useful structure with which to address the needs of environmental safety assessment whilst implementing the 3Rs. This commentary aims to promote the implementation of the recommendations of the OECD Fish Toxicity Testing Framework. PMID:26873775

  10. Acute toxicities to larval rainbow trout of representative compounds detected in Great Lakes fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the National Fisheries Research Center-Great Lakes has ranked the potential hazard to fish and invertebrates of various chemical compounds detected in two Great Lakes fishes-- lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, and walleye, Stizostedion vitreum vitreum (Hesselberg and Seelye 1982). This hazard assessment has included the identification of the potential sources of the compounds, determination of the occurrence and abundance of the compounds in Great Lakes fish, and the determination of acute toxicities of representative compounds of 19 chemical classes (Passino and Smith 1987a). In further studies Smith et al. (1988) focused on 6 of the 19 classes of compounds using the zooplankter Daphnia pulex as the test organism. They ranked the six classes as follows (in decreasing order of toxicity): polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, and silicon-containing compounds.

  11. Acute toxicity value extrapolation with fish and aquatic invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckler, Denny R.; Mayer, Foster L.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Asfaw, Amha

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of risk posed by an environmental contaminant to an aquatic community requires estimation of both its magnitude of occurrence (exposure) and its ability to cause harm (effects). Our ability to estimate effects is often hindered by limited toxicological information. As a result, resource managers and environmental regulators are often faced with the need to extrapolate across taxonomic groups in order to protect the more sensitive members of the aquatic community. The goals of this effort were to 1) compile and organize an extensive body of acute toxicity data, 2) characterize the distribution of toxicant sensitivity across taxa and species, and 3) evaluate the utility of toxicity extrapolation methods based upon sensitivity relations among species and chemicals. Although the analysis encompassed a wide range of toxicants and species, pesticides and freshwater fish and invertebrates were emphasized as a reflection of available data. Although it is obviously desirable to have high-quality acute toxicity values for as many species as possible, the results of this effort allow for better use of available information for predicting the sensitivity of untested species to environmental contaminants. A software program entitled “Ecological Risk Analysis” (ERA) was developed that predicts toxicity values for sensitive members of the aquatic community using species sensitivity distributions. Of several methods evaluated, the ERA program used with minimum data sets comprising acute toxicity values for rainbow trout, bluegill, daphnia, and mysids provided the most satisfactory predictions with the least amount of data. However, if predictions must be made using data for a single species, the most satisfactory results were obtained with extrapolation factors developed for rainbow trout (0.412), bluegill (0.331), or scud (0.041). Although many specific exceptions occur, our results also support the conventional wisdom that invertebrates are generally more

  12. Test concentration setting for fish in vivo endocrine screening assays.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Panter, Grace H; Weltje, Lennart; Thorpe, Karen L

    2013-08-01

    Fish in vivo screening methods to detect endocrine active substances, specifically interacting with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, have been developed by both the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA). In application of these methods, i.e. regulatory testing, this paper provides a proposal on the setting of test concentrations using all available acute and chronic data and also discusses the importance of avoiding the confounding effects of systemic toxicity on endocrine endpoints. This guidance is aimed at reducing the number of false positives and subsequently the number of inappropriate definitive vertebrate studies potentially triggered by effects consequent to systemic, rather than endocrine, toxicity. At the same time it provides a pragmatic approach that maximizes the probability of detecting an effect, if it exists, thus limiting the potential for false negative outcomes.

  13. Comparison of acute toxicity of process chemicals used in the oil refinery industry, tested with the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis, the flagellate Isochrysis galbana, and the zebra fish, Brachydanio rerio

    SciTech Connect

    Roseth, S.; Edvardsson, T.; Botten, T.M.; Fuglestad, J.; Fonnum, F.; Stenersen, J.

    1996-07-01

    Chemicals under the trade names Nalco 537-DA, Nalco 625, Nalco 7607, Nalco 5165, Ivamin, and technical monoethanolamine are used extensively in the oil refinery industry. Aquatic toxicity tests were conducted using zebra fish fry (Brachydanio rerio) and the unicellular algae Isochrysis galbana (a flagellate) and Chaetoceros gracilis (a diatom). Inhibition of cell division, chlorophyll content, and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} uptake in the algae were sensitive end points. The effective concentrations (EC50s) of growth inhibition were 0.1 mg/L (Ivamin; I. galbana), 0.8 mg/L (Nalco 7607; I. galbana), 6 mg/L (Nalco 625; I. galbana), 10 mg/L (Nalco 5165; C. gracilis), and 15 mg/L (Nalco 537-DA; C. gracilis). The lethal concentrations (LC50s) (96 h) toward zebra fish fry was 1 mg/L for Nalco 7607, 6.5 mg/L for Nalco 537-DA, 7.1 mg/L for Nalco 625, and 20 mg/L for Ivamin 803. Monoethanolamine had an LC50 higher than 5,000 mg/L. Nalco 5165 was not tested on fish fry. The heartbeat frequency of fish embryos was reduced by 2.5 mg/L Nalco 537-DA, but this was an insensitive end point for the other chemicals.

  14. Standards for reporting fish toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, O.B.

    1961-01-01

    The growing impetus of studies on fish and pesticides focuses attention on the need for standardized reporting procedures. Good methods have been developed for laboratory and field procedures in testing programs and in statistical features of assay experiments; and improvements are being made on methods of collecting and preserving gish, invertebrates, and other materials exposed to economic poisons. On the other had, the reporting of toxicity data in a compete manner has lagged behind, and today's literature is little improved over yesterday's with regard to completeness and susceptibility to interpretation.

  15. Acute Toxicity and Bioaccumulation of Chloroform to Four Species of Freshwater Fish

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1980-08-01

    Acute toxicity of chloroform to four species of freshwater fish was studied in flow-through 96-hr toxicity tests. Chloroform is toxic to fish in the tens of parts per million, a concentration well above that which would be expected to be produced under normal power plant chlorination conditions. Investigations of acute toxicity of chloroform and the bioaccumulation of chlorinated compounds in tissues of fish revealed differences in tolerance levels and tissue accumulations. Mean 96-hr LC{sub 50}s for chloroform were 18 ppm for rainbow trout and bluegill, 51 ppm for largemouth bass and 75 ppm for channel catfish. Mortalities of bluegill and largemouth bass occurred during the first 4 hr of exposure while rainbow trout and channel catfish showed initial tolerance and mortalities occurred during the latter half of the 96-hr exposure. Rainbow trout had the highest level of chloroform tissue accumulation, 7 {micro}g/g tissue, catfish the second highest, 4 {micro}g/g tissue, followed by bluegill and largemouth bass which each accumulated about 3 {micro}g/g tissue. Accumulation of chloroform was less than one order of magnitude above water concentrations for all species.

  16. The OECD Fish Testing Framework Project: Summary of Workshop Recommendations

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated Fish Testing Framework was initiated in mid-2009 as OECD Project 2.30 with the United States as the lead country. The objectives of the project were to review the regulatory needs and data requirements for fish testing and review the currency of existing OECD Test ...

  17. Is gill cortisol concentration a good acute stress indicator in fish? A study in rainbow trout and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gesto, Manuel; Hernández, Juan; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Soengas, José L; Míguez, Jesús M

    2015-10-01

    Cortisol is the main biomarker of physiological stress in fish. It is usually measured in plasma, which requires blood collection. Though cortisol is produced in the anterior kidney, it can diffuse easily through cell membranes due to its lipophilic nature. Taking advantage of that, some non-invasive techniques have been developed to measure cortisol directly in the water from fish-holding tanks, in skin mucus or in scales. In this study, we explored the possibility to analyze fish cortisol from gill filaments as a reliable acute stress marker. Our results show that gill cortisol levels correlate well with plasma cortisol levels in both rainbow trout and zebrafish exposed or not to an acute stress protocol. Measuring cortisol in gill filaments increases the available possibilities for stress assessment in fish. Although this approach should yet be tested for its use with other stressors, it has several advantages: In relatively large fish (i.e. above 30 g) gill cortisol levels could be measured in vivo. Sampling of gill biopsies is very fast and easy, and the procedure does not induce stress if properly performed, making it an ideal option for in vivo stress assessment. In small fish, the use of gill tissue to measure cortisol has important technical advantages with respect to the current methods using whole-body homogenates. Gill homogenates could be used directly for ELISA cortisol analysis, avoiding the need of tedious and expensive cortisol extraction protocols, and, since no organic solvent is required, contributing for a more environmentally friendly analysis.

  18. Assessing chronic fish health: An application to a case of an acute exposure to chemically treated crude oil.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, F; Domenici, P; Farrell, A P; Lacroix, C; Le Floch, S; Lemaire, P; Nicolas-Kopec, A; Whittington, M; Zambonino-Infante, J L; Claireaux, G

    2016-09-01

    Human alteration of marine ecosystems is substantial and growing. Yet, no adequate methodology exists that provides reliable predictions of how environmental degradation will affect these ecosystems at a relevant level of biological organization. The primary objective of this study was to develop a methodology to evaluate a fish's capacity to face a well-established environmental challenge, an exposure to chemically dispersed oil, and characterize the long-term consequences. Therefore, we applied high-throughput, non-lethal challenge tests to assess hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed as proxies for a fish's functional integrity. These whole animal challenge tests were implemented before (1 month) and after (1 month) juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) had been acutely exposed (48h) to a mixture containing 0.08gL(-1) of weathered Arabian light crude oil plus 4% dispersant (Corexit© EC9500A), a realistic exposure concentration during an oil spill. In addition, experimental populations were then transferred into semi-natural tidal mesocosm ponds and correlates of Darwinian fitness (growth and survival) were monitored over a period of 4 months. Our results revealed that fish acutely exposed to chemically dispersed oil remained impaired in terms of their hypoxia tolerance and swimming performance, but not in temperature susceptibility for 1 month post-exposure. Nevertheless, these functional impairments had no subsequent ecological consequences under mildly selective environmental conditions since growth and survival were not impacted during the mesocosm pond study. Furthermore, the earlier effects on fish performance were presumably temporary because re-testing the fish 10 months post-exposure revealed no significant residual effects on hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed. We propose that the functional proxies and correlates of Darwinian fitness used here provide a useful

  19. Assessing chronic fish health: An application to a case of an acute exposure to chemically treated crude oil.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, F; Domenici, P; Farrell, A P; Lacroix, C; Le Floch, S; Lemaire, P; Nicolas-Kopec, A; Whittington, M; Zambonino-Infante, J L; Claireaux, G

    2016-09-01

    Human alteration of marine ecosystems is substantial and growing. Yet, no adequate methodology exists that provides reliable predictions of how environmental degradation will affect these ecosystems at a relevant level of biological organization. The primary objective of this study was to develop a methodology to evaluate a fish's capacity to face a well-established environmental challenge, an exposure to chemically dispersed oil, and characterize the long-term consequences. Therefore, we applied high-throughput, non-lethal challenge tests to assess hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed as proxies for a fish's functional integrity. These whole animal challenge tests were implemented before (1 month) and after (1 month) juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) had been acutely exposed (48h) to a mixture containing 0.08gL(-1) of weathered Arabian light crude oil plus 4% dispersant (Corexit© EC9500A), a realistic exposure concentration during an oil spill. In addition, experimental populations were then transferred into semi-natural tidal mesocosm ponds and correlates of Darwinian fitness (growth and survival) were monitored over a period of 4 months. Our results revealed that fish acutely exposed to chemically dispersed oil remained impaired in terms of their hypoxia tolerance and swimming performance, but not in temperature susceptibility for 1 month post-exposure. Nevertheless, these functional impairments had no subsequent ecological consequences under mildly selective environmental conditions since growth and survival were not impacted during the mesocosm pond study. Furthermore, the earlier effects on fish performance were presumably temporary because re-testing the fish 10 months post-exposure revealed no significant residual effects on hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed. We propose that the functional proxies and correlates of Darwinian fitness used here provide a useful

  20. Fish acute toxicity syndromes and their use in the QSAR approach to hazard assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, J.M.; Bradbury, S.P.; Niemi, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    Implementation of the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1977 creates the need to reliably establish testing priorities because laboratory resources are limited and the number of industrial chemicals requiring evaluation is overwhelming. The use of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models as rapid and predictive screening tools to select more potentially hazardous chemicals for in-depth laboratory evaluation has been proposed. Further implementation and refinement of quantitative structure-toxicity relationships in aqueous toxicology and hazard assessment requires the development of a mode-of-action database. With such a database, a qualitative structure-activity relationship can be formulated to assign the proper mode of action, and respective QSAR, to a given chemical structure. In this review, the development of fish acute toxicity syndromes (FATS), which are toxic-response sets based on various behavioral and physiological-biochemical measurements, and their projected use in the mode-of-action database are outlined. Using behavioral parameters monitored in the fathead minnow during acute toxicity testing, FATS associated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and narcotics could be reliably predicted. However, compounds classified as oxidative phosphorylation uncouplers or stimulants could not be resolved. Refinement of this approach by using respiratory-cardiovascular responses in the rainbow trout, enabled FATS associated with AChE inhibitors, convulsants, narcotics, respiratory blockers, respiratory membrane irritants, and uncouplers to be correctly predicted.

  1. In vitro studies of acute toxicity mechanisms and structure-activity relationships of nonionic surfactants in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Bodishbauah, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    In fish, gills are believed to be a primary target for a number of toxicants. Gills perform the essential systemic functions of gas exchange, waste elimination, and ion/pH balance, and are exposed to ambient environmental toxicant levels. Qualitative gill morphology changes are easily observed, but quantitative measures of impaired function are difficult. This in vitro technique utilizes the opercular epithelium of the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, as a surrogate for gill epithelium in mechanistic toxicity and structure-activity studies. This model has long been used by electrophysiologists studying osmoregulation in marine fish. Effects on trans-epithelial potential (TEP) and/or short-circuit current (I{sub sc}) across the opercular epithelium can be made for any pollutant of interest, using an epithelial voltage clamp and Ussing chamber. The nonionic synthetic surfactant class, alkylphenol ethoxylates, were chosen as a model toxicant class to test this experimental model. Synthetic surfactants are ubiquitous waterborne pollutants, with annual North American usage approaching eight billion pounds. Surfactants are recognized as potent, acute gill toxicants in fish. The exact mechanism of toxicity has yet to be elucidated. These compounds proved to be potent inhibitors of both TEP and I{sub sc} in vitro, at dose levels comparable to those causing lethality, suggesting that impaired osmoregulation plays a role in their acute toxicity. Similar structure-activity relationships were found for the endpoints of acute lethality to F. heteroclitus and impaired in vitro epithelial transport.

  2. Acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to selected lifestages of cold-, cool-, and warmwater fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Rach, Jeffery J.; Ramsay, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery personnel depend on therapeutant treatments to control diseases. Currently, hatchery managers in the United States are limited to one approved therapeutant (formalin) and three compounds of Low Regulatory Priority (sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid) to control external diseases of cultured fish. Hydrogen peroxide has been used to effectively control external columnaris and bacterial gill disease in rainbow trout, however, definitive safe treatment concentrations for hydrogen peroxide are lacking for a variety of species. We report the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to 11 species of fry and 13 species of fingerling freshwater fish. Most mortality occurred within the first 30 h after the first exposure to hydrogen peroxide with little change in the overall shape of survival curves over time. Our data predict that in an actual therapeutic application of hydrogen peroxide, most treatment-related mortalities would be observed shortly after the initial exposure. Coolwater species were more sensitive than coldwater species but were generally similar to warmwater species tested. Based on our mortality data, coldwater species and largemouth bass may be treated for 60 min at concentrations of ≤ 150 (μl/1 without harmful effects; all muskellunge, walleye, bluegill, channel catfish, yellow perch, pallid sturgeon fingerlings, fathead minnow fingerlings, white sucker fingerlings, and northern pike fry may be treated for 60 min at ≤ 100 μl/l; and northern pike fingerlings and white sucker, yellow perch and fathead minnow fry may be treated for 60 min at ≤ 50μl/l.

  3. Acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to selected lifestages of cold-, cool-, and warmwater fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Rach, J.J.; Ramsay, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery personnel depend on therapeutant treatments to control diseases. Currently, hatchery managers in the United States are limited to one approved therapeutant (formalin) and three compounds of Low Regulatory Priority (sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid) to control external diseases of cultured fish. Hydrogen peroxide has been used to effectively control external columnaris and bacterial gill disease in rainbow trout, however, definitive safe treatment concentrations for hydrogen peroxide are lacking for a variety of species. We report the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to 11 species of fry and 13 species of fingerling freshwater fish. Most mortality occurred within the first 30 h after the first exposure to hydrogen peroxide with little change in the overall shape of survival curves over time. Our data predict that in an actual therapeutic application of hydrogen peroxide, most treatment-related mortalities would be observed shortly after the initial exposure. Coolwater species were more sensitive than coldwater species but were generally similar to warmwater species tested. Based on our mortality data, coldwater species and largemouth bass may be treated for 60 min at concentrations of ??? 150 ??l/l without harmful effects; all muskellunge, walleye, bluegill, channel catfish, yellow perch, pallid sturgeon fingerlings, fathead minnow fingerlings, white sucker fingerlings, and northern pike fry may be treated for 60 min at ??? 100 ??l/l; and northern pike fingerlings and white sucker, yellow perch and fathead minnow fry may be treated for 60 min at ??? 50 ??l/l.

  4. Acute toxicity of cadmium, lead, zinc, and their mixtures to stream-resident fish and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Mebane, Christopher A; Dillon, Frank S; Hennessy, Daniel P

    2012-06-01

    The authors conducted 150 tests of the acute toxicity of resident fish and invertebrates to Cd, Pb, and Zn, separately and in mixtures, in waters from the South Fork Coeur d'Alene River watershed, Idaho, USA. Field-collected shorthead sculpin (Cottus confusus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi), two mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus and Rhithrogena sp.), a stonefly (Sweltsa sp.), a caddisfly (Arctopsyche sp.), a snail (Gyraulus sp.), and hatchery rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were tested with all three metals. With Pb, the mayflies (Drunella sp., Epeorus sp., and Leptophlebiidae), a Simuliidae black fly, a Chironomidae midge, a Tipula sp. crane fly, a Dytiscidae beetle, and another snail (Physa sp.), were also tested. Adult westslope cutthroat trout were captured to establish a broodstock to provide fry of known ages for testing. With Cd, the range of 96-h median effect concentrations (EC50s) was 0.4 to >5,329 µg/L, and the relative resistances of taxa were westslope cutthroat trout ≈ rainbow trout ≈ sculpin < other taxa; with Pb, EC50s ranged from 47 to 3,323 µg/L, with westslope cutthroat trout < rainbow trout < other taxa; and with Zn, EC50s ranged from 21 to 3,704 µg/L, with rainbow trout < westslope cutthroat trout ≈ sculpin < other taxa. With swim-up trout fry, a pattern of decreasing resistance with increasing fish size was observed. In metal mixtures, the toxicities of the three metals were less than additive on a concentration-addition basis.

  5. Acute toxicity of cadmium, lead, zinc, and their mixtures to stream-resident fish and invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mebane, Christopher A.; Dillon, Frank S.; Hennessy, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted 150 tests of the acute toxicity of resident fish and invertebrates to Cd, Pb, and Zn, separately and in mixtures, in waters from the South Fork Coeur d'Alene River watershed, Idaho, USA. Field-collected shorthead sculpin (Cottus confusus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi), two mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus and Rhithrogena sp.), a stonefly (Sweltsa sp.), a caddisfly (Arctopsyche sp.), a snail (Gyraulus sp.), and hatchery rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were tested with all three metals. With Pb, the mayflies (Drunella sp., Epeorus sp., and Leptophlebiidae), a Simuliidae black fly, a Chironomidae midge, a Tipula sp. crane fly, a Dytiscidae beetle, and another snail (Physa sp.), were also tested. Adult westslope cutthroat trout were captured to establish a broodstock to provide fry of known ages for testing. With Cd, the range of 96-h median effect concentrations (EC50s) was 0.4 to >5,329μg/L, and the relative resistances of taxa were westslope cutthroat trout ≈ rainbow trout ≈ sculpin << other taxa; with Pb, EC50s ranged from 47 to 3,323μg/L, with westslope cutthroat trout < rainbow trout < other taxa; and with Zn, EC50s ranged from 21 to 3,704μg/L, with rainbow trout < westslope cutthroat trout ≈ sculpin << other taxa. With swim-up trout fry, a pattern of decreasing resistance with increasing fish size was observed. In metal mixtures, the toxicities of the three metals were less than additive on a concentration-addition basis.

  6. Acute bioassays and hazard evaluation of representative contaminants detected in Great Lakes fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passino, Dora R. May; Smith, Stephen B.

    1987-01-01

    We have provided a hazard ranking for 19 classes of compounds representing many of the nearly 500 organic compounds identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) from the Great Lakes and Lake St. Clair. We initially made a provisional hazard ranking based on available published and unpublished information on aquatic toxicity, bioaccumulation, occurrence and sources. Acute toxicity tests with Daphnia pulex at 17A°C in reconstituted hard water were performed with 30 compounds representative of the 19 classes that were highest in the provisional ranking. The resulting toxicity data, along with information on the compounds' occurrence in Great Lakes fish and their sources, were ranked and weighted and then used in calculating the revised hazard ranking. The 10 most hazardous classes, in descending order, are as follows (values shown are mean 48-h EC50s, in μ/ml): arene halides (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT), 0.0011; phthalate esters, 0.133; chlorinated camphenes (toxaphene), 0.0082; polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; e.g., dimethylnaphthalene) and reduced derivatives, 1.01; chlorinated fused polycyclics (e.g., trans-nonachlor), 0.022; nitrogen-containing compounds (e.g., O-methylhydroxyl-amine), 1.35; alkyl halides (e.g., (bromomethyl)cyclohexene), 10.1; cyclic alkanes (e.g., cyclododecane), 20.9; silicon-containing compounds (e.g., dimethyldiethoxy silane), 1.25; and heterocyclic nitrogen compounds (e.g., nicotine), 2.48. We recommend that chronic bioassays be conducted with fish and invertebrates to determine the sublethal effects of the following classes of compounds, for which few toxicity data are available: PAHs, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, other nitrogen-containing compounds, alkyl halides, cyclic alkanes and silicon-containing compounds. Information from these types of studies will aid researchers in determining the possible causal role these contaminants play in

  7. Cyanide fishing and cyanide detection in coral reef fish using chemical tests and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mak, Karen K W; Yanase, Hideshi; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2005-06-15

    Sodium cyanide has been used in the Philippines to collect tropical marine fish for aquarium and food trades since the early 1960s. Cyanide fishing is a fast method to stun and collect fish. This practice is damaging the coral reefs irreversibly. In most countries cyanide fishing is illegal, but most of the exporting and importing countries do not have test and certificate systems. Many analytical methods are available for the detection of cyanide in environmental and biological samples. However, most of the techniques are time consuming, and some lack specificity or sensitivity. Besides, an ultra sensitive cyanide detection method is needed due to the rapid detoxification mechanisms in fish. The aim of this review is to give an overview of cyanide fishing problem in the south-east Asia and current strategies to combat this destructive practice, summarise some of the methods for cyanide detection in biological samples and their disadvantages. A novel approach to detect cyanide in marine fish tissues is briefly discussed.

  8. Cyanide fishing and cyanide detection in coral reef fish using chemical tests and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mak, Karen K W; Yanase, Hideshi; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2005-06-15

    Sodium cyanide has been used in the Philippines to collect tropical marine fish for aquarium and food trades since the early 1960s. Cyanide fishing is a fast method to stun and collect fish. This practice is damaging the coral reefs irreversibly. In most countries cyanide fishing is illegal, but most of the exporting and importing countries do not have test and certificate systems. Many analytical methods are available for the detection of cyanide in environmental and biological samples. However, most of the techniques are time consuming, and some lack specificity or sensitivity. Besides, an ultra sensitive cyanide detection method is needed due to the rapid detoxification mechanisms in fish. The aim of this review is to give an overview of cyanide fishing problem in the south-east Asia and current strategies to combat this destructive practice, summarise some of the methods for cyanide detection in biological samples and their disadvantages. A novel approach to detect cyanide in marine fish tissues is briefly discussed. PMID:15854827

  9. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Busquet, François; Strecker, Ruben; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas; Carr, Gregory J; Cenijn, Peter; Fochtman, Przemyslaw; Gourmelon, Anne; Hübler, Nicole; Kleensang, André; Knöbel, Melanie; Kussatz, Carola; Legler, Juliette; Lillicrap, Adam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Polleichtner, Christian; Rzodeczko, Helena; Salinas, Edward; Schneider, Katharina E; Scholz, Stefan; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Weigt, Stefan; Witters, Hilda; Halder, Marlies

    2014-08-01

    The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV<30%) for most chemicals and laboratories. The reproducibility was lower (CV>30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes.

  10. Harmonizing and Optimizing Fish Testing Methods: The OECD Framework Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) serves a key role in the international harmonization of testing of a wide variety of chemicals. An integrated fish testing framework project was initiated in mid-2009 through the OECD with the US as the lead country...

  11. Acute Hypoxic Test in Patients with Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Shatylo, Valerii B; Serebrovska, Tatiana V; Gavalko, Anna V; Egorov, Egor; Korkushko, Oleg V

    2016-06-01

    Shatylo, Valerii B., Tetiana V. Serebrovska, Anna V. Gavalko, Egor Egorov, and Oleg V. Korkushko. Acute hypoxic test in patients with prediabetes. High Alt Med Biol. 17:101-107, 2016.-Prediabetes is a state of impaired carbohydrate metabolism when not all of the symptoms required to label a person as diabetic are present, but blood glucose is higher than in healthy subjects. Recent evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) might provide a cost-effective strategy for improving metabolic functioning. One of the most important aspects of the successful IHT application is individualized approach to hypoxic dose and regimen prescription. To establish the relationships between indices of carbohydrate metabolism and individual resistance to hypoxia, the acute hypoxic test (AHT, breathing gas mixture with 12% O2 during 20 minutes) was performed in 33 healthy volunteers (mean age, 63.0, range, 44-76; fasting plasma glucose (FPG) less than 5.6 mmol/L and 2 hours postoral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glycemia less than 7.8 mmol/L) and 30 patients with impaired glucose metabolism (mean age, 65.5, range, 44-75; FPG from 5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L and 2 hours post-OGTT glycemia from 7.8 to 11 mmol/L). Negative correlation was found between the SaO2 level at 20th minute AHT and FPG (r = -0.83; p < 0.01) and insulin (r = -0.27; p < 0.05), as well as 2 hours post-OGTT glucose and insulin levels (r = -0.75 and -0.40, respectively). Longer recovery time and less effective functioning of respiratory and cardiovascular systems were also registered in patients with prediabetes showing that their cardiovascular resilience is impaired compared to normoglycemic controls. These patterns of relationship must be considered when assigning the individual modes of IHT. PMID:27213550

  12. Test system for exposing fish to resuspended, contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Wiener, J.G.; Steingraeber, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a new test system for exposing fish to resuspended sediments and associated contaminants. Test sediments were resuspended by revolving test chambers on rotating shafts driven by an electric motor. The timing, speed, and duration of test-chamber revolution were controlled by a rheostat and electronic timer. Each chamber held 45 litres of water and accommodated about 49 g of test fish. The system described had three water baths, each holding six test chambers. We illustrate the performance of this system with results from a 28-day test in which juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus were exposed to resuspended, riverine sediments differing in texture and cadmium content. The test had one sediment-free control and five sediment treatments, with three replicates (chambers) per treatment and 25 fish per replicate. Two-thirds (30 litres) of the test water and sediment in each chamber was renewed weekly. The mean concentration of total suspended solids (TSS) did not vary among treatments; the grand-mean TSS in the five sediment treatments was 975 mg litre-1, similar to the target TSS of 1000 mg litre-1. At the end of the test, an average of 50% of the introduced cadmium was associated with the suspended sediment compartment, whereas the filtered (0.45 μm) water contained 0.4% and bluegills 1.8% of the cadmium.

  13. Laboratory Test Surveillance following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Peterson, Josh F.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Hung, Adriana M.; Speroff, Theodore; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Parr, Sharidan K.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Siew, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. Methods We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 L/min/1.73 m2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Results A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. Conclusions Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease. PMID:25117447

  14. Quantitative comparisons of acute toxicity of organic chemicals to rat and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Janardan, S.K.; Olson, C.S.; Schaeffer, D.J.

    1984-12-01

    Relationships between the acute toxicity of chemicals to fish (LC50) and rat (LD50) were analyzed using a Model II regression analysis after logarithmic transformation. (Model II regression assumes errors in both variables.) Significant correlations were found among bluegill and fathead minnow LC50S and rat LD50 values for the priority pollutants. Fathead minnow and bluegill LC50S for 48 pesticides were highly correlated. No correlations were found between fishes and rats for carbamate plus organophosphate pesticides. Correlations were obtained among all species for the combined priority pollutant plus pesticide data and for chlorinated pesticides.

  15. Predicting acute aquatic toxicity of structurally diverse chemicals in fish using artificial intelligence approaches.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2013-09-01

    The research aims to develop global modeling tools capable of categorizing structurally diverse chemicals in various toxicity classes according to the EEC and European Community directives, and to predict their acute toxicity in fathead minnow using set of selected molecular descriptors. Accordingly, artificial intelligence approach based classification and regression models, such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPN), radial basis function neural network (RBFN), support vector machines (SVM), gene expression programming (GEP), and decision tree (DT) were constructed using the experimental toxicity data. Diversity and non-linearity in the chemicals' data were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of various models constructed here were compared using several statistical parameters. PNN and GRNN models performed relatively better than MLPN, RBFN, SVM, GEP, and DT. Both in two and four category classifications, PNN yielded a considerably high accuracy of classification in training (95.85 percent and 90.07 percent) and validation data (91.30 percent and 86.96 percent), respectively. GRNN rendered a high correlation between the measured and model predicted -log LC50 values both for the training (0.929) and validation (0.910) data and low prediction errors (RMSE) of 0.52 and 0.49 for two sets. Efficiency of the selected PNN and GRNN models in predicting acute toxicity of new chemicals was adequately validated using external datasets of different fish species (fathead minnow, bluegill, trout, and guppy). The PNN and GRNN models showed good predictive and generalization abilities and can be used as tools for predicting toxicities of structurally diverse chemical compounds.

  16. Acute outbreak of gnathostomiasis in a fishing community in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz Camacho, Sylvia Paz; Willms, Kaethe; de la Cruz Otero, Ma del Carmen; Zazueta Ramos, Magda Luz; Bayliss Gaxiola, Sergio; Castro Velázquez, Rafael; Osuna Ramírez, Ignacio; Bojórquez Contreras, Angel; Torres Montoya, Edith Hilario; Sánchez Gonzáles, Sergio

    2003-06-01

    An increasing number of human cases of gnathostomiasis have been reported in Sinaloa, Mexico, most of whom have a custom of eating of raw fish dishes such as 'cebiche'. Here we report five adult patients, three women and two men, having an acute episode of vomiting and abdominal pain a few minutes after eating a dish of cebiche prepared from a spotted sleeper perch (Eleotris picta) fished from a nearby lake in southern Sinaloa. All five patients experienced acute throat pain, chest and joint pains, headache and fever. One patient, a 55-year-old male, was hospitalized with suspected pancreatitis and pneumonia. By 8-9 days later, all five patients developed between three and 12 edematous, migrating skin lesions on the back, abdomen, upper and lower extremities, face, eye and scalp. By ELISA, all of them were sero-positive to Gnathostoma doloresi antigen and had elevated IgE levels. Eosinophilia was found in two patients. These patients lived in an agricultural and fishing community. In this community we carried out a sero-epidemiological survey and study of living conditions in a random sample of 309 individuals distributed in 74 households. Frequent consumption of raw fish was reported in 36% of households, and 12 individuals had a clinical history of migrating skin lesions. The sero-prevalence to Gnathostoma antigens was 34.95%. Five fish species and four species of ichthyophagous birds collected from three lakes in the village and a nearby estuary were infected with the advanced third-stage larvae of G. binucleatum, a species found in Ecuador and Mexico. The results describe the first known outbreak of acute gnathostomiasis on the American continent. PMID:12798924

  17. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Bosco de Salles, João; Matos Lopes, Renato; de Salles, Cristiane M. C.; Cassano, Vicente P. F.; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Cunha Bastos, Vera L. F.; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  18. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide.

    PubMed

    de Salles, João Bosco; Lopes, Renato Matos; de Salles, Cristiane M C; Cassano, Vicente P F; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Bastos, Vera L F Cunha; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  19. Exploring waiving opportunities for mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Asturiol, David; Prieto, Pilar; Worth, Andrew P

    2016-07-01

    A survey was carried out to explore opportunities for waiving mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests. We were interested in finding out whether data from a sub-acute toxicity test could be used to predict the outcome of an acute systemic toxicity test. The survey was directed at experts in the field of toxicity testing, and was carried out in the context of the upcoming 2018 final registration deadline for chemicals under the EU REACH Regulation. In addition to the survey, a retrospective data analysis of chemicals that had already been registered with the European Chemicals Agency, and for which both acute and sub-acute toxicity data were available, was carried out. This data analysis was focused on chemicals that were administered via the oral route. The answers to the questionnaire showed a willingness to adopt waiving opportunities. In addition, the responses showed that data from a sub-acute toxicity test or dose-range finding study might be useful for predicting chemicals that do not require classification for acute oral toxicity (LD50 > 2000mg/kg body weight). However, with the exception of substances that fall into the non-classified category, it is difficult to predict current acute oral toxicity categories. PMID:27494626

  20. Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Oikari, A.O.J.

    1987-07-01

    Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

  1. Acute toxicity of selected metals and phenols on RTG-2 and CHSE-214 fish cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Castano, A. |; Vega, M.M.; Tarazona, J.V.

    1995-08-01

    In vitro toxicity tests with fish cell lines appear as an alternative to single species bioassays and have been used successfully in different applications, both for single chemicals and for environmental samples, including Toxicity Identification Evaluation procedures. Different fish cell lines, such as BF-2, RTG-2, FHM and R1 have been employed in these toxicological studies. The aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of two salmonid fish cell lines, RTG-2 and CHSE-214, in evaluating toxicity of seven compounds (three metals and four phenolic chemicals), by measuring three endpoints: cellular mass, cell viability and intracellular ATP content of the cells. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Alternatives to the fish early life-stage test: Developing a conceptual model for early fish development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic fish toxicity is a key parameter for hazard classification and environmental risk assessment of chemicals, and the OECD 210 fish early life-stage (FELS) test is the primary guideline test used for various international regulatory programs. There exists a need to develop ...

  3. Freshwater Fish Sublethal Tests: A Review of the Sublethal Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure on animal testing has traditionally been the purview of mammalian toxicological science, but in the past few years, more attention is given also to environmental safety. As with higher vertebrate animal alternatives, balance between reduce animal use without impairing o...

  4. [Exercise test after acute myocardial infarction: without therapy?].

    PubMed

    Gregorio, G

    2001-12-01

    In this article we analyze the role of ECG exercise test in the clinical evaluation and prognostic stratification of patients after acute myocardial infarction. Moreover, we analyze if test results may be influenced by drugs. In clinical practice, most of the cardiologists working in hospital perform pre-discharge tests while patients are on medical therapy; after the acute event, exercise test is performed after pharmacological wash-out. In the thrombolytic age exercise test has a well-defined role in the evaluation and prognostic stratification of postinfarction patients, but some aspects regarding the way of performance and the opportunity of a pharmacological wash-out need further investigation.

  5. Acute toxicity and histopathology in ornamental fish amazon bluespotted corydora (Corydoras melanistius) exposed to formalin.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rudã F B; Dias, Henrique M; Fujimoto, Rodrigo Y

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the acute toxicity of formalin and histopathological effects on the Amazon ornamental fish, bluespotted coridora (Corydoras melanistius). A randomized design was used, with ten concentrations of formalin (40%) (0, 3, 6, 12, 25, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 mg.L(-1)) with four replicates and five fish per container (3L) in static system for 96 hours. The moribund fish were killed and fixed in 10% formalin to proceed the histopathological analysis of gill, liver and kidney. At the end of this experiment the following mortality rates (%) were obtained in increasing order of exposure: 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 65, 85, 100, 100 and 100%. The lethal concentration 50% (LC(50-96h (I))) estimated was 50.76 mg.L(-1) with regression of y = 0.51x, and r(2) = 0.80. Further, in higher concentrations morphological changes as gill hyperplasia, with filling of interlamellar spaces, disorganization of liver arrangement, and necrosis in kidney were observed. In this study, the formalin can be considered slightly toxic to bluespotted corydora, and cause morphological changes when exposed to high concentrations. The use of formalin to treat of ornamental fish in the inner river of capture with wrong concentration can provoke negative environmental and biological effects.

  6. Resolving some practical questions about Daphnia acute toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Barera, Y.; Adams, W.J.

    1981-10-01

    Acute toxicity tests were performed with six age groups of Daphnia magna, ranging from less than or equal to6 h to 216 h, and with five chemicals, selected on the basis of their physical and chemical properties as well as their acute toxicity to D. magna. The age of the daphnids did not significantly alter the 48-h EC/sub 50/ values for the chemicals tested. The maximum difference observed in the 48-h EC/sub 50/ values between the 6-h and 216-h age groups was a factor of 3.9 for linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS). For purposes of standardization, it appears that D. magna up to 48 h of age at the beginning of the test can be used to conduct acute toxicity tests with most chemicals. The results of static acute toxicity tests conducted with butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) and D. magna in the presence and absence of several commonly used solvents indicate that the acute toxicity of this chemical is not altered by the use of a solvent carrier. The 48-h EC/sub 50/ value for BBP without a solvent was 1.0 mg/L, compared with a range of 1.6 to 2.2 mg/L when acetone, dimethylformamide, ethanol, or triethylene glycol were used as solvent carriers. The acute toxicities of the solvents in the absence of BBP were also determined for D. magna. The values ranged from 9.3 to 52.4 g/L. The results of static acute tests performed with D. magna and BBP in the presence of various concentrations of daphnid foods (algae or trout chow), indicate that the 48-h EC/sub 50/ values increase proportionally with an increase in food concentrations. These results suggest that acute toxicity tests with D. magna should be conducted in the presence of food with chemicals with a high Ksigma if the results are to be used to select the test concentrations for a chronic study with daphnids. The type of food and the concentration used in the acute test should be the same as those used in a chronic test.

  7. Acute systemic toxicity--prospects for tiered testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Botham, P A

    2004-04-01

    After many years of controversy and debate, the LD50 test was finally deleted by the end of 2002. Three alternative animal tests, the Fixed Dose Procedure, the Acute Toxic Class Method and the Up and Down Procedure have been developed which give rise to significant improvements in animal welfare. They have recently undergone revision to improve their scientific performance but more importantly to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy for acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests within the next year or so to improve dose level selection and thus give further modest improvements in the numbers of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, and is at least 10 years away.

  8. Consideration of reactivity to acute fish toxicity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Furuhama, A; Aoki, Y; Shiraishi, H

    2012-01-01

    To understand the key factor for fish toxicity of 11 α,β-unsaturated carbonyl aldehydes and ketones, we used quantum chemical calculations to investigate their Michael reactions with methanethiol or glutathione. We used two reaction schemes, with and without an explicit water molecule (Scheme-1wat and Scheme-0wat, respectively), to account for the effects of a catalytic water molecule on the reaction pathway. We determined the energies of the reactants, transition states (TS), and products, as well as the activation energies of the reactions. The acute fish toxicities of nine of the carbonyl compounds were evaluated to correlate with their hydrophobicities; no correlation was observed for acrolein and crotonaldehyde. The most toxic compound, acrolein, had the lowest activation energy. The activation energy of the reaction could be estimated with Scheme-1wat but not with Scheme-0wat. The complexity of the reaction pathways of the compounds was reflected in the difficulty of the TS structure searches when Scheme-1wat was used with the polarizable continuum model. The theoretical estimations of activation energies of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with catalytic molecules or groups including hydrogen-bond networks may complement traditional tools for predicting the acute aquatic toxicities of compounds that cannot be easily obtained experimentally. PMID:22150015

  9. Exposure of fish to high-intensity sonar does not induce acute pathology.

    PubMed

    Kane, A S; Song, J; Halvorsen, M B; Miller, D L; Salierno, J D; Wysocki, L E; Zeddies, D; Popper, A N

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated immediate effects of intense sound exposure associated with low-frequency (170-320 Hz) or with mid-frequency (2.8-3.8 kHz) sonars on caged rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and hybrid sunfish Lepomis sp. in Seneca Lake, New York, U.S.A. This study focused on potential effects on inner ear tissues using scanning electron microscopy and on non-auditory tissues using gross and histopathology. Fishes were exposed to low-frequency sounds for 324 or 628 s with a received peak signal level of 193 dB re 1 microPa (root mean square, rms) or to mid-frequency sounds for 15 s with a received peak signal level of 210 dB re 1 microPa (rms). Although a variety of clinical observations from various tissues and organ systems were described, no exposure-related pathologies were observed. This study represents the first investigation of the effects of high-intensity sonar on fish tissues in vivo. Data from this study indicate that exposure to low and midfrequency sonars, as described in this report, might not have acute effects on fish tissues.

  10. Procalcitonin Strip Test as an Independent Predictor in Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Brendan Hermenigildo; Rozario, Anthony Prakash; Olakkengil, Santosh Antony; V, Anirudh

    2015-12-01

    Plasma procalcitonin (PCT) is a highly specific marker for the diagnosis of bacterial infection and sepsis. Studies have demonstrated its role in the setting of sepsis and acute pancreatitis. This study aims to analyze and compare the prognostic efficacy of plasma procalcitonin strip test in acute pancreatitis. A prospective study was conducted in the department of general surgery from June 2012 to June 2013. Plasma procalcitonin was estimated by the semiquantitative strip test. The study included a total of 50 patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. Data was collected and statistically analyzed using SPSS version 17. Thirty-nine out of the 50 patients (78 %) were males with a mean age of 46.8 years (range, 25-78 years) and 25 patients (50 %) had ethanol-induced pancreatitis, while 13 patients (26 %) had gall stone pancreatitis. Plasma PCT values were found to correlate better than CRP levels and total leukocyte count with the total duration of hospitalization, ITU, and ICU stay, as well as with the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. A cut off for plasma PCT of >2 ng/mL was found to be 100 % sensitive and 100 % specific and a cut off for CRP of >19 mg/dL was 70 % sensitive and 65 % specific for predicting the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. Plasma PCT also correlated well with antibiotic requirement. A cut off value of >0.5 ng/mL for plasma PCT was 100 % sensitive and 80 % specific and a cut off value of >18 mg/dL for CRP was 86 % sensitive and 63 % specific for predicting antibiotic requirement. Plasma procalcitonin is an early and reliable prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis. The procalcitonin strip test is a rapid test which is useful in analyzing prognosis in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27011501

  11. Procalcitonin Strip Test as an Independent Predictor in Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Brendan Hermenigildo; Rozario, Anthony Prakash; Olakkengil, Santosh Antony; V, Anirudh

    2015-12-01

    Plasma procalcitonin (PCT) is a highly specific marker for the diagnosis of bacterial infection and sepsis. Studies have demonstrated its role in the setting of sepsis and acute pancreatitis. This study aims to analyze and compare the prognostic efficacy of plasma procalcitonin strip test in acute pancreatitis. A prospective study was conducted in the department of general surgery from June 2012 to June 2013. Plasma procalcitonin was estimated by the semiquantitative strip test. The study included a total of 50 patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. Data was collected and statistically analyzed using SPSS version 17. Thirty-nine out of the 50 patients (78 %) were males with a mean age of 46.8 years (range, 25-78 years) and 25 patients (50 %) had ethanol-induced pancreatitis, while 13 patients (26 %) had gall stone pancreatitis. Plasma PCT values were found to correlate better than CRP levels and total leukocyte count with the total duration of hospitalization, ITU, and ICU stay, as well as with the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. A cut off for plasma PCT of >2 ng/mL was found to be 100 % sensitive and 100 % specific and a cut off for CRP of >19 mg/dL was 70 % sensitive and 65 % specific for predicting the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. Plasma PCT also correlated well with antibiotic requirement. A cut off value of >0.5 ng/mL for plasma PCT was 100 % sensitive and 80 % specific and a cut off value of >18 mg/dL for CRP was 86 % sensitive and 63 % specific for predicting antibiotic requirement. Plasma procalcitonin is an early and reliable prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis. The procalcitonin strip test is a rapid test which is useful in analyzing prognosis in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  12. Comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Toussaint, M.W.; Shedd, T.R.; VanDerSchal, W.H.; Leather, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus ccalyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photo bacterium phosphoreum - Microtox test, and a mixture of bacterial species - the polytox test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriadaphnta dubia), green algae (Setenastrum capricarnutum), fathead minnows (Pimephalespromelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC5O/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  13. A comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Toussaint, M.W.; Shedd, T.R.; Schalie, W.H. van der; Leather, G.R.

    1995-05-01

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus calyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photobacterium phosphoreum--Microtox{reg_sign} test, and a mixture of bacterial species--the Polytox{reg_sign} test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC50/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  14. Neutral red uptake cytotoxicity tests for estimating starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Stokes, William S; Casati, Silvia; Strickland, Judy; Paris, Michael

    2008-05-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity assays can be used as alternative toxicity tests to reduce the total number of animals needed for acute oral toxicity tests. This unit describes two methods for determining the in vitro cytotoxicity of test substances using neutral red uptake (NRU) and using the in vitro data to determine starting doses for in vivo acute oral systemic toxicity tests, e.g., the up-and-down procedure or the acute toxic class method. The use of the NRU methods to determine starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests may reduce the number of animals required, and for relatively toxic substances, this approach may also reduce the number of animals that die or require humane euthanasia due to severe toxicity. An interlaboratory validation study has demonstrated that the methods are useful and reproducible for these purposes. Two standardized protocols provide details for performing NRU tests with rodent and human cells.

  15. Effect of an acute and chronic toxicity of four commercial detergents on the freshwater fish Gambusia affinis Baird & Gerard.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pratibha; Sharma, Subhasini; Sharma, Shweta; Suryavathi, V; Grover, Ruby; Soni, Pratima; Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, K P

    2005-04-01

    The toxic effects of four commercial detergents (two washing powders and two cakes) are reported in this paper on behavior, mortality and RBC counts of a freshwater fish Gambusia affinis. During acute toxicity studies (96h), surface movements of fish increased markedly for 24h, only at higher concentrations (>10 ppm) of all the four detergents. Thereafter, they were lethargic and bottom dwellers similar to those exposed for a period of 30 days in the longterm ecotoxicological studies made on detergent powders at a sublethal concentration (10 ppm). The detergents exposed to fish were found slippery due to mucous secretion. Hemorrhage regions were also found on their gills. The dissolved oxygen content also decreased (10-18%) in the detergent treatments of higher concentration (> 10 ppm). During acute toxicity studies, cakes (LC50 = 6.69 - 19.98ppm) were found more toxic than powders (LC50 = 18.34-20.72ppm). In comparison to the control fish, RBC counts decreased (12-64%) in the detergent exposed fish, being more pronounced among those exposed to cakes. The chronic exposure (30 days) of the fish also resulted in reduction in the RBC counts (41-58%). It is thus evident that all the four detergents are toxic to the fish Gambusia affinis.

  16. Acute toxicity of 31 different nanoparticles to zebrafish (Danio rerio) tested in adulthood and in early life stages – comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kovrižnych, Jevgenij A.; Zeljenková, Dagmar; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena; Wimmerová, Soňa

    2013-01-01

    At present, nanoparticles are beginning to influence our lives in many ways and understanding the environmental health and safety aspect of nanomaterials has become a crucial issue. The aim of the work was to assess and compare the acute toxicity of 31 different nanomaterials to fish mature individuals Danio rerio with that to fish early life stages on using evaluation of the 48- and 96- hour LC50 values. A further aim was to evaluate teratogenicity of the nanoparticles tested to fish eggs. The nanoparticles tested were: 8 pure metals, 10 metal oxides, 5 other metal compounds and their mixtures, 2 silicon compounds, 3 calcium compounds, and 3 carbon compounds. Using 48-h and 96-h tests of acute toxicity (according to OECD 203), we evaluated mortality data, LC50 values, occurrence of malformations, as well as hatching time. In our study, 6 kinds of nanoparticles – calcium oxide, copper, copper in the form of oxide and CuZnFe4O4, magnesium oxide, and nickel – caused cumulative mortality. Two kinds of nanoparticles – copper and silver – were toxic for fish with LC50 values of approximately 3 mg/L. We did not observe marked differences between the 48-hour and 96-hour acute toxicity LC50 values, yet the possibility to evaluate hatching time in the 96-h acute fish toxicity test seems to be an advantage against that of the 48-hour toxicity. PMID:24179431

  17. Development of an alternative testing strategy for the fish early life-stage (FELS) test using the AOP framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the fish early life-stage (FELS) test (OECD 210) is the primary guideline used to estimate chronic toxicity of regulated chemicals. Although already more cost-efficient than adult fish tests, the FELS test has some important drawbacks. Both industry and regulatory inst...

  18. A Simple, Inexpensive in Situ Method for Assessing Acute Toxicity of Effluents to Fish

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2001-05-29

    Test chambers for conducting in situ fish bioassays were constructed from 8L polyethylene bottles. Yearling fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and young-of-the-year bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) demonstrated greater than 50 percent survival in the chambers after 65 days of exposure in a reservoir, river, and creek. Fathead minnow survival was substantially greater than that of bluegills. The chambers provide a simple, inexpensive, sensitive technique to screen effluents for toxicity.

  19. Acute and chronic toxicity testing of bisphenol A with aquatic invertebrates and plants.

    PubMed

    Mihaich, Ellen M; Friederich, Urs; Caspers, Norbert; Hall, A Tilghman; Klecka, Gary M; Dimond, Stephen S; Staples, Charles A; Ortego, Lisa S; Hentges, Steven G

    2009-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA, 4,4'-isopropylidine diphenol) is a commercially important chemical used primarily as an intermediate in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. Extensive effect data are currently available, including long-term studies with BPA on fish, amphibians, crustaceans, and mollusks. The aim of this study was to perform additional tests with a number of aquatic invertebrates and an aquatic plant. These studies include acute tests with the midge (Chironomus tentans) and the snail (Marisa cornuarietis), and chronic studies with rotifers (Brachionus calyciflorus), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and plants (Lemna gibba). The effect data on different aquatic invertebrate and plant species presented in this paper correspond well with the effect and no-effect concentrations (NOECs) available from invertebrate studies in the published literature and are within the range found for other aquatic species tested with BPA. PMID:19327838

  20. Design and testing of small scale fish meat bone separator useful for fish processing.

    PubMed

    Ali Muhammed, M; Manjunatha, N; Murthy, K Venkatesh; Bhaskar, N

    2015-06-01

    The present study relates to the food processing machinery and, more specifically machine for producing boneless comminuted meat from raw fish fillet. This machine is of belt and drum type meat bone separator designed for small scale fish processing in a continuous mode. The basic principal involved in this machine is compression force. The electric geared motor consists of 1HP and the conveyor belt has a linear velocity of 19 to 22 m min(-1), which was sufficient to debone the fish effectively. During the meat bone separation trials an efficiency up to 75 % on dressed fish weight basis was observed and with a capacity to separate 70 kg h(-1) of meat from fish at the machine speed of 25 rpm. During the trials, it was demonstrated that there was no significant change in the proximate composition of comminuted fish meat when compared to unprocessed fish meat. This design has a greater emphasis on hygiene, provision for cleaning-in-place (CIP) and gives cost effective need and reliability for small scale industries to produce fish meat in turn used for their value added products.

  1. Design and testing of small scale fish meat bone separator useful for fish processing.

    PubMed

    Ali Muhammed, M; Manjunatha, N; Murthy, K Venkatesh; Bhaskar, N

    2015-06-01

    The present study relates to the food processing machinery and, more specifically machine for producing boneless comminuted meat from raw fish fillet. This machine is of belt and drum type meat bone separator designed for small scale fish processing in a continuous mode. The basic principal involved in this machine is compression force. The electric geared motor consists of 1HP and the conveyor belt has a linear velocity of 19 to 22 m min(-1), which was sufficient to debone the fish effectively. During the meat bone separation trials an efficiency up to 75 % on dressed fish weight basis was observed and with a capacity to separate 70 kg h(-1) of meat from fish at the machine speed of 25 rpm. During the trials, it was demonstrated that there was no significant change in the proximate composition of comminuted fish meat when compared to unprocessed fish meat. This design has a greater emphasis on hygiene, provision for cleaning-in-place (CIP) and gives cost effective need and reliability for small scale industries to produce fish meat in turn used for their value added products. PMID:26028734

  2. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients.

  3. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients. PMID:26256397

  4. Interpretation of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, risk assessment and testing of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dang, ZhiChao

    2016-01-01

    Chemical induced changes in fish biomarkers vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics (SSC), and sex ratio indicate modes/mechanisms of action (MOAs) of EAS (estrogen, androgen and steroidogenesis) pathways. These biomarkers could be used for defining MOAs and the causal link between MOAs and adverse effects in fish for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This paper compiled data sets of 150 chemicals for VTG, 57 chemicals for SSC and 38 chemicals for sex ratio in fathead minnow, medaka and zebrafish. It showed 1) changes in fish biomarkers can indicate the MOAs as anticipated; 2) in addition to EAS pathways, chemicals with non-EAS pathways induced changes in fish biomarkers; 3) responses of fish biomarkers did not always follow the anticipated patterns of EAS pathways. These responses may result from the interaction of chemical-induced multiple MOAs and confounding factors like fish diet, infection, culture conditions, general toxicity and stress response. The complex response of fish biomarkers to a chemical of interest requires EDC testing at multiple biological levels. Interpretation of fish biomarker data should be combined with relevant information at different biological levels, which is critical for defining chemical specific MOAs. The utility of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, PBT assessment, risk assessment, and testing of EDCs in the regulatory context was discussed. This paper emphasizes the importance of fish biomarker data in the regulatory context, a weight of evidence approach for the interpretation of fish biomarker data and the need for defining levels of evidence for the identification of EDCs.

  5. Automated Lab-on-a-Chip Technology for Fish Embryo Toxicity Tests Performed under Continuous Microperfusion (μFET).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Wigh, Adriana; Friedrich, Timo; Devaux, Alain; Bony, Sylvie; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-15

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) biotest has gained popularity as one of the alternative approaches to acute fish toxicity tests in chemical hazard and risk assessment. Despite the importance and common acceptance of FET, it is still performed in multiwell plates and requires laborious and time-consuming manual manipulation of specimens and solutions. This work describes the design and validation of a microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip technology for automation of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test common in aquatic ecotoxicology. The innovative device supports rapid loading and immobilization of large numbers of zebrafish embryos suspended in a continuous microfluidic perfusion as a means of toxicant delivery. Furthermore, we also present development of a customized mechatronic automation interface that includes a high-resolution USB microscope, LED cold light illumination, and miniaturized 3D printed pumping manifolds that were integrated to enable time-resolved in situ analysis of developing fish embryos. To investigate the applicability of the microfluidic FET (μFET) in toxicity testing, copper sulfate, phenol, ethanol, caffeine, nicotine, and dimethyl sulfoxide were tested as model chemical stressors. Results obtained on a chip-based system were compared with static protocols performed in microtiter plates. This work provides evidence that FET analysis performed under microperfusion opens a brand new alternative for inexpensive automation in aquatic ecotoxicology.

  6. Correlation between heavy metal acute toxicity values in Daphnia magna and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Khangarot, B.S.; Ray, P.K.

    1987-04-01

    In the toxicant bioassays, invertebrates with special reference to aquatic arthropod species have been of recent interest as test models due to the need for developing nonmammalian tests system. The cladoceran Daphnia magna bioassays have several practical advantages. D. magna has been used as a useful test species and its sensitivity to environmental pollutants have been recognized as a general representative of other freshwater zooplankton species. The objectives of this study were to determine the acute toxicity of various heavy metals to Daphnia magna for 48 h of exposure and to compare these values with the existing LC50 values for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri); which is commonly used as a test animal in aquatic bioassay studies.

  7. Final turbine and test facility design report Alden/NREC fish friendly turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Thomas C.; Cain, Stuart A.; Fetfatsidis, Paul; Hecker, George E.; Stacy, Philip S.

    2000-09-01

    The final report provides an overview of the Alden/NREC Fish Friendly turbine design phase, turbine test plan, preliminary test results, costs, schedule, and a hypothetical application at a real world project.

  8. Interest of dynamic tests in acute ecotoxicity assessment in algae

    SciTech Connect

    Jouany, J.M.; Ferard, J.F.; Vasseur, P.; Gea, J.; Truhaut, R.; Rast, C.

    1983-04-01

    Sorption of toxics by algae may be important and occurs very early. Thus, a decrease of the experimental toxic concentrations in the medium results in understating toxicity when tests are conducted under static conditions. In this work, two different methods of exposure of algae (Chlorella vulgaris) are studied, the static test and the pseudodynamic test. Acute effects (biological and analytical effects) of inorganic compounds (Cu/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Pb/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 6 +/) have been evaluated for 96 hr of exposure; in each case, IC50 is much lower in the dynamic condition than in the static one. The percentage of reduction varies from 55 to 75% after 96 hr. Accumulation of metal by chlorellae is greater when testing by the pseudodynamic way, with Cu/sup 2 +/ and Pb/sup 2 +/. But in the case of Cd/sup 2 +/ and Cr/sup 6 +/, the concentration factors are similar in the two kinds of exposure. These results point out the advantage of the pseudodynamic test, of which the methodology is very easy, for a more realistic assessment of acute ecotoxicity in these organisms.

  9. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by fish muscle mitochondria: Potential role in acute heat-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Banh, Sheena; Wiens, Lilian; Sotiri, Emianka; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat challenge is known to induce cell-level oxidative stress in fishes. Mitochondria are well known for the capacity to make reactive oxygen species (ROS) and as such are often implicated as a source of the oxidants associated with this thermally-induced oxidative stress. This implication is often asserted, despite little direct data for mitochondrial ROS metabolism in fishes. Here we characterize mitochondrial ROS metabolism in three Actinopterygian fish species at two levels, the capacity for superoxide/H2O2 production and the antioxidant thiol-reductase enzyme activities. We find that red muscle mitochondria from all three species have measurable ROS production and respond to different assay conditions consistent with what might be anticipated; assuming similar relative contributions from difference ROS producing sites as found in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria. Although there are species and assay specific exceptions, fish mitochondria may have a greater capacity to produce ROS than that found in the rat when either normalized to respiratory capacity or determined at a common assay temperature. The interspecific differences in ROS production are not correlated with thiol-based antioxidant reductase activities. Moreover, mimicking an acute in vivo heat stress by comparing the impact of increasing assay temperature on these processes in vitro, we find evidence supporting a preferential activation of mitochondrial H2O2 production relative to the increase in the capacity of reductase enzymes to supply electrons to the mitochondrial matrix peroxidases. This supports the contention that mitochondria may be, at least in part, responsible for the ROS that lead to oxidative stress in fish tissues exposed to acute heat challenge.

  10. Use of various acute, sublethal and early life-stage tests to evaluate the toxicity of refinery effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Dutka, B.

    1997-11-01

    The toxicities of effluents from three Ontario, Canada, refineries were assessed with microbes, plants, invertebrates, and fish. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Microtox test, an assay based on electron transport activity in submitochondrial particles, and Daphnia magna (water flea); growth of Selenastrum capricornutum (alga); growth of Lemna minor (aquatic plant); germination of Lactuca sativa (nonaquatic plant); survival, growth, and maturation of Panagrellus redivivus (nematode); and genotoxicity in the SOS-Chromotest. Only the Microtox test and the submitochondrial particle test detected acute toxicity in the effluent samples. Reduced survival and sublethal responses were caused by some effluents, but not all effluents were toxic, and none caused a response in all of the tests applied. The results suggest that the effluent treatment systems used at Ontario refineries have largely eliminated acute toxicity to the organisms in their test battery. Although reduced survival and sublethal effects were detected in some of the effluents, the effects were minor. Some of the tests provided evidence, albeit weak, of variations in the responses of the test organisms to a temporal series of effluent samples. Not unexpectedly, there were also minor differences in the responses of the tests to effluents from the three refineries. The fathead minnow test seems to be a sensitive indicator of the sublethal toxicity of Ontario refinery effluents.

  11. Weapons testing and endangered fish coexist in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jelks, Howard; Tate, Bill; Jordan, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Okaloosa darters (Etheostoma okaloosae) are small fish found only in a few streams in the Florida panhandle. This species has been listed since 1973 as endangered due to habitat alteration resulting from erosion, the potential competition from brown darters (E. edwini), and a limited geographic distribution. In recent years, however, Okaloosa darters have benefited from improved resource management and adaptive population monitoring techniques developed collaboratively by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Loyola University New Orleans, and Eglin Air Force Base. As a result, the FWS reclassified the Okaloosa darter to the less critical category of threatened in March 2011.

  12. Acute Anteroseptal Myocardial Infarction after a Negative Exercise Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Al-Alawi, Abdullah M; Janardan, Jyotsna; Peck, Kah Y; Soward, Alan

    2016-05-01

    A myocardial infarction is a rare complication which can occur after an exercise stress test. We report a 48-year-old male who was referred to the Mildura Cardiology Practice, Victoria, Australia, in August 2014 with left-sided chest pain. He underwent an exercise stress test which was negative for myocardial ischaemia. However, the patient presented to the Emergency Department of the Mildura Base Hospital 30 minutes after the test with severe retrosternal chest pain. An acute anteroseptal ST segment elevation myocardial infarction was observed on electrocardiography. After thrombolysis, he was transferred to a tertiary hospital where coronary angiography subsequently revealed significant left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis. Thrombus aspiration and a balloon angioplasty were performed. The patient was discharged three days after the surgical procedure in good health.

  13. Investigating Alternatives to the Fish Early Life-Stage Test: A Strategy for Discovering and Annotating Adverse Outcome Pathways for Early Fish Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fish early life-stage (FELS) test (OECD Test Guideline 210) is the primary test used internationally to estimate chronic fish toxicity in support of ecological risk assessments and chemical management programs. As part of an on-going effort to develop efficient and cost-effec...

  14. Alternatives to the Fish Early Life-Stage Test: A Research Strategy for Discovering and Annotating Adverse Outcome Pathways During Fish Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The OECD 210 fish early life]stage (FELS) test is the primary guideline test used to estimate chronic fish toxicity, as well as support ecological risk assessments and chemical management programs around the world. As a step toward developing alternatives to the FELS test, a HES...

  15. Morphological and neurotoxicological findings in tropical freshwater fish (Astyanax sp.) after waterborne and acute exposure to water soluble fraction (WSF) of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Akaishi, F M; de Assis, H C Silva; Jakobi, S C G; Eiras-Stofella, D R; St-Jean, S D; Courtenay, S C; Lima, E F; Wagener, A L R; Scofield, A L; Ribeiro, C A Oliveira

    2004-02-01

    The water-soluble fraction (WSF) of crude oil is a complex highly volatile and toxic mixture of hydrocarbon chains (polyaromatics, heterocyclics), phenols, and heterocyclic compounds containing nitrogen and sulfur. To evaluate the toxic effects of WSF in tropical freshwater teleosts and to develop methodologies that could investigate the toxic mechanisms of WSF in tropical organisms, an acute toxicity experiment was conducted with Astyanax sp. Three dilutions (15%, 33%, and 50%) of WSF obtained from Campos Bay's crude oil (Brazil) were used to study morphological and biochemical responses of the fish. Prior to exposure, the distribution and rate of volatilization of the WSF into each aquarium for the same exposure period was quantified by spectrofluorimetry. Five individuals of Astyvanax sp. were exposed to duplicate WSF of 0, 15, 33, and 50% for each of 12-, 24-, and 96-h exposures for a total of 120 individuals. Liver and gills were sampled from five fish from each treatment and were analyzed by histology, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. A fragment of muscle was also collected from each fish to measure acetylcholinesterase activity. Water analysis showed that only 4 h after dilution, an important loss of hydrocarbons in 33% and 50% of WSF was observed. In addition, 50% of hydrocarbon mass was lost in all tested dilutions after 24 h with significant difference for the 50% WSF at all measured times, demonstrating the high volatility of WSF in freshwater. Damage in the liver and the gills included the presence of necrosis, loss of hepatocytes limit, inflammation areas, cellular proliferation, aneurysms, and disorganization of the second lamellae. The 33% WSF significantly reduced acetylcholinesterase activity in fish. Our study demonstrated that the WSF of crude oil caused damage in organs and tissues of tropical freshwater Astyanax sp. and provided also the basis for a better understanding of the toxic mechanisms of WSF in freshwater fishes. PMID

  16. The submitochondrial particle assay as a screening test for acute aquatic toxicity of surfactant molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bookland, E.A.; Bettermann, A.D.

    1995-12-31

    Two complementary protocols of the submitochondrial particle assay (SMP) were evaluated as screening tools for predicting the acute aquatic toxicity of various classes and chain lengths of surfactant molecules. SMP contain the functionally intact mitochondrial enzyme systems responsible for electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. Both the Electron Transfer Assay (ETR) and the Reverse Electron Transfer Assay (RET) have been shown in prior work to generally be sensitive to agents capable of membrane and protein interactions, both suspected mechanisms of action for surfactants. The toxicity of ten compounds; four anionic surfactants, C{sub 12} alkyl sulfate (C{sub 12}AS), C{sub 12} and C{sub 15} alkyl ethoxy sulfate (C{sub 12}E{sub 4}S, C{sub 15}E{sub 4}S), linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (C{sub 12.3}LAS); one nonionic surfactant, alkyl ethoxylate (C{sub 12}E{sub 3}); three cationic surfactants, C{sub 8}, C{sub 12}, and C{sub 16} alkyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C{sub 8}TMAC, C{sub 12}TMAC, C{sub 16}TMAC); an alcohol (C{sub 12}OH); and an amine, alkyl dimethylamine (C{sub 12}DMA); was determined. In all cases, both the ETR and the RET gave results showing equal or greater sensitivity than previously reported acute fish and invertebrate LC{sub 50}`s. In addition, increasing toxicity with increasing alkyl chain length was observed. As a rapid screening tool, the SMP bioassay avoids exposure concerns such as degradation of test material, a common concern for acute in vivo toxicity testing with rapidly degradable materials. Results indicate that the SMP bioassay can be useful as a predictive screening tool for the aquatic toxicity of surfactants.

  17. Acute toxicity of cadmium and sodium pentachlorophenate to daphnids and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.S.; Paulson, R.L.; Hall, L.W. Jr.; Burton, D.T.

    1986-08-01

    When estimating the toxicity of effluents it is desirable to use organisms sensitive to a wide range of pollutants. Currently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) recommends the use of Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Pimephales promelas to assess the toxicity of freshwater effluents. Ceriodaphnia sp. has also received increased attention as a standard toxicity test organism due to its sensitivity, short generation time, and ubiquitous distribution. Comparison of toxicity data generated by different investigators is often difficult because of differences in test procedures, dilution waters, or nutritional history of test organisms. The primary objectives of this research were to compare the sensitivity of Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulex, Ceriodaphnia reticulata, and Pimephales promelas to the reference toxicants CdCl/sub 2/ and sodium pentachlorophenate (NaPCP) and to compare results with those obtained by other investigators. A secondary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different dilution waters on the acute toxicity of these reference toxicants to the above test organisms.

  18. ALK status testing in non-small cell lung carcinoma: correlation between ultrasensitive IHC and FISH.

    PubMed

    Minca, Eugen C; Portier, Bryce P; Wang, Zhen; Lanigan, Christopher; Farver, Carol F; Feng, Yan; Ma, Patrick C; Arrossi, Valeria A; Pennell, Nathan A; Tubbs, Raymond R

    2013-05-01

    ALK gene rearrangements in advanced non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) are an indication for targeted therapy with crizotinib. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a recently approved companion in vitro diagnostic class FISH system commonly assesses ALK status. More accessible IHC is challenged by low expression of ALK-fusion transcripts in NSCLC. We compared ultrasensitive automated IHC with FISH for detecting ALK status on 318 FFPE and 40 matched ThinPrep specimens from 296 patients with advanced NSCLC. IHC was concordant with FFPE-FISH on 229 of 231 dual-informative samples (31 positive and 198 negative) and with ThinPrep-FISH on 34 of 34 samples (5 positive and 29 negative). Two cases with negative IHC and borderline-positive FFPE-FISH (15% and 18%, respectively) were reclassified as concordant based on negative matched ThinPrep-FISH and clinical data consistent with ALK-negative status. Overall, after including ThinPrep-FISH and amending the false-positive FFPE-FISH results, IHC demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity (95% CI, 0.86 to 1.00 and 0.97 to 1.00, respectively) for ALK detection on 249 dual-informative NSCLC samples. IHC was informative on significantly more samples than FFPE-FISH, revealing additional ALK-positive cases. The high concordance with FISH warrants IHC's routine use as the initial component of an algorithmic approach to clinical ALK testing in NSCLC, followed by reflex FISH confirmation of IHC-positive cases. PMID:23499337

  19. Quality control of the analysis of histamine in fish by proficiency test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelista, Warlley P.; Tette, Patrícia A. S.; Gloria, Maria Beatriz A.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of histamine is required by the European Union for the importation of tuna and other Scombroid fish. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of the analysis of histamine in fish, by means of reference material (RM) and of proficiency test (PT). Sample analysis carried out using RM provided 89.4% recovery. During the proficiency test, the histamine content of the sample was 311.9 mg/kg and the z-score was zero. These results assure the good performance of the laboratory in the analysis of histamine in fish, asuring reliability of results to clients.

  20. Interpretation of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, risk assessment and testing of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dang, ZhiChao

    2016-01-01

    Chemical induced changes in fish biomarkers vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics (SSC), and sex ratio indicate modes/mechanisms of action (MOAs) of EAS (estrogen, androgen and steroidogenesis) pathways. These biomarkers could be used for defining MOAs and the causal link between MOAs and adverse effects in fish for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This paper compiled data sets of 150 chemicals for VTG, 57 chemicals for SSC and 38 chemicals for sex ratio in fathead minnow, medaka and zebrafish. It showed 1) changes in fish biomarkers can indicate the MOAs as anticipated; 2) in addition to EAS pathways, chemicals with non-EAS pathways induced changes in fish biomarkers; 3) responses of fish biomarkers did not always follow the anticipated patterns of EAS pathways. These responses may result from the interaction of chemical-induced multiple MOAs and confounding factors like fish diet, infection, culture conditions, general toxicity and stress response. The complex response of fish biomarkers to a chemical of interest requires EDC testing at multiple biological levels. Interpretation of fish biomarker data should be combined with relevant information at different biological levels, which is critical for defining chemical specific MOAs. The utility of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, PBT assessment, risk assessment, and testing of EDCs in the regulatory context was discussed. This paper emphasizes the importance of fish biomarker data in the regulatory context, a weight of evidence approach for the interpretation of fish biomarker data and the need for defining levels of evidence for the identification of EDCs. PMID:27155823

  1. Usefulness of Leukocyte Esterase Test Versus Rapid Strep Test for Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A study to compare the usage of throat swab testing for leukocyte esterase on a test strip(urine dip stick-multi stick) to rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of Group A Beta hemolytic streptococci in cases of acute pharyngitis in children. Hypothesis: The testing of throat swab for leukocyte esterase on test strip currently used for urine testing may be used to detect throat infection and might be as useful as rapid strep. Methods: All patients who come with a complaint of sore throat and fever were examined clinically for erythema of pharynx, tonsils and also for any exudates. Informed consent was obtained from the parents and assent from the subjects. 3 swabs were taken from pharyngo-tonsillar region, testing for culture, rapid strep & Leukocyte Esterase. Results: Total number is 100. Cultures 9(+); for rapid strep== 84(-) and16 (+); For LE== 80(-) and 20(+) Statistics: From data configuration Rapid Strep versus LE test don’t seem to be a random (independent) assignment but extremely aligned. The Statistical results show rapid and LE show very agreeable results. Calculated Value of Chi Squared Exceeds Tabulated under 1 Degree Of Freedom (P<.0.0001) reject Null Hypothesis and Conclude Alternative Conclusions: Leukocyte esterase on throat swab is as useful as rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of strep pharyngitis on test strip currently used for urine dip stick causing acute pharyngitis in children. PMID:27335975

  2. Incorporation of a subacute test with zebra fish into a hierarchical system for evaluating the effect of toxicants in the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, A.H.; Allard, A.S.; Fischer, S.; Malmberg, M.; Viktor, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Single-species laboratory tests were used to assess the acute toxicity of halogenated phenolic compounds. No single test system was most sensitive to all of the compounds examined, substantial variations in the sensitivity of the various organisms were noted, and there was no correlation between the toxicities assayed with different test systems. The zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) embryo/larvae system was used to examine subacute effects using two of the compounds, and a protocol was developed with 6 weeks preexposure to the toxicant. Preexposure decreased the lowest observable effect concentration by a factor of about 4, and the effect was completely reversible during a 6-week postexposure period in the absence of the toxicant. An enclosed system for carrying out the zebra fish embryo/larvae test was developed and evaluated with three neutral volatile compounds: the median survival time and the frequency of occurrence of deformation were examined as end points. The effect of pH on toxicity was evaluated in buffered media for four of the test systems: toxicity increased markedly at the lower pH values, and it could be shown that the ionized forms of the phenols were not the only contributors to toxicity. It is proposed that the zebra fish system incorporating preexposure could be incorporated into a hierarchical system using a range of organisms for assessing acute toxicity in single species under laboratory conditions and multicomponent systems simulating natural ecosystems.

  3. Behavioural Effects of the Commonly Used Fish Anaesthetic Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Its Relevance for the Acetic Acid Pain Test

    PubMed Central

    Nordgreen, Janicke; Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Janczak, Andrew M.; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2014-01-01

    The pros and cons of using anaesthesia when handling fish in connection with experiments are debated. A widely adopted practice is to wait thirty minutes after anaesthesia before behavioural observations are initiated, but information about immediate effects of a treatment is then lost. This is pertinent for responses to acute stressors, such as acid injection in the acetic acid pain test. However, omission of anaesthetics in order to obtain data on immediate responses will compromise the welfare of fish and contribute to experimental noise due to stress. We therefore tested the effect of tricaine methanesulfonate on the behaviour of zebrafish. We predicted that tricaine (MS 222) would decrease swimming velocity and that the control fish would show an increased level of anxiety- and stress-related behaviours compared to the tricaine group. Following acclimatization to the test tank, baseline behaviour was recorded before immersion in either tricaine (168 mg l−1, treatment group, N = 8) or tank water (control group, N = 7). Latencies to lose equilibrium and to lose response to touch were registered. The fish was then returned to the test tank, and the latency to regain equilibrium was registered in anaesthetized fish. When equilibrium was regained, and at five, thirty and sixty minutes after the fish had been returned to the test tank, behaviour was recorded. The tricaine fish showed the following responses (mean ± sd): latency to lose equilibrium 22.6 s±3.9; latency to lose response to touch 101.9 s±26.8; latency to regain equilibrium 92.0 s±54.4. Contrary to our predictions, neither treatment caused a change in any of the behaviours registered. This indicates that tricaine has no effect on several commonly used behavioural parameters, and that it may be unnecessary to postpone behavioural observations to 30 min after anaesthesia. PMID:24658262

  4. Acute toxicity testing with the tropical marine copepod Acartia sinjiensis: optimisation and application.

    PubMed

    Gissi, F; Binet, M T; Adams, M S

    2013-11-01

    Globally there is limited toxicity data for tropical marine species, and there has been a call for further research and development in the area of tropical marine ecotoxicology. An increase in developmental pressures in northern tropical Australia is causing a higher demand for toxicity test protocols with ecologically relevant species. Copepods are a diverse group of zooplankton that are major components of marine food webs. The calanoid copepod Acartia sinjiensis is widely distributed across tropical and sub-tropical brackish to marine waters of Australia and was identified in a recent comprehensive review of marine tropical toxicity testing in Australia as a suitable test organism. Through a number of optimisation steps including feeding trials, changes to culture and test conditions; a 48-h acute toxicity test with A. sinjiensis was modified to become a highly reliable and reproducible standard test protocol. Control mobility was improved significantly, and the sensitivity of A. sinjiensis to copper (EC50 of 33µg/L), ammonia (EC50 of 10mg/L) and phenol (EC50 of 13mg/L) fell within the ranges of those reported previously, indicating that the modifications did not alter its sensitivity. In a comprehensive literature search we found that this species was the most sensitive to copper out of a range of marine copepods. The test was also successfully applied in toxicity assessments of four environmental samples: two produced formations waters (PFWs) and two mine tailing liquors (MTLs). The toxicity assessments utilised toxicity data from a suite of marine organisms (bacteria, microalgae, copepods, sea urchins, oysters, prawns, and fish). For the PFWs, which were predominantly contaminated with organic chemicals, A. sinjiensis was the most sensitive species (EC50 value 2-17 times lower than for any other test species). For the predominantly metal-contaminated mine tailing liquors, its sensitivity was similar to that of other test species used. The modified 48-h acute

  5. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet.

  6. DETERMINANTS OF VARIABILITY IN ACUTE TO CHRONIC TOXICITY RATIOS IN AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES AND FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variability in acute to chronic ratios (ACRs; LC50/chronic value) has been a continuing interest in aquatic toxicology because of the reliance on ACRs to estimate chronic toxicity for chemicals and species with known acute toxicity but limited or no information on sublethal toxic...

  7. SURROGATE SPECIES IN ASSESSING CONTAMINANT RISK FOR ENDANGERED FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout, fathead minnows, and sheepshead minnows were tested as surrogate species to assess contaminant risk for 17 endangered fishes and one toad species. Acute toxicity tests were conducted with carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin in accord...

  8. Quantifying Fish Swimming Behavior in Response to Acute Exposure of Aqueous Copper Using Computer Assisted Video and Digital Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Robin D.; Puglis, Holly J.; Little, Edward E.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to environmental contaminants can be precursors of other effects such as survival, growth, or reproduction. However, these responses may be subtle, and measurement can be challenging. Using juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) with copper exposures, this paper illustrates techniques used for quantifying behavioral responses using computer assisted video and digital image analysis. In previous studies severe impairments in swimming behavior were observed among early life stage white sturgeon during acute and chronic exposures to copper. Sturgeon behavior was rapidly impaired and to the extent that survival in the field would be jeopardized, as fish would be swept downstream, or readily captured by predators. The objectives of this investigation were to illustrate protocols to quantify swimming activity during a series of acute copper exposures to determine time to effect during early lifestage development, and to understand the significance of these responses relative to survival of these vulnerable early lifestage fish. With mortality being on a time continuum, determining when copper first affects swimming ability helps us to understand the implications for population level effects. The techniques used are readily adaptable to experimental designs with other organisms and stressors. PMID:26967350

  9. Effect of acute hexavalent chromium exposure on pituitary-thyroid axis of a freshwater fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ashish K; Mohanty, Banalata

    2015-01-01

    Acute exposure to hexavalent chromium (10 mg L(-1) , 20 mg L(-1) , and 40 mg L(-1) potassium dichromate for 96 h) dose-dependently affected the pituitary-thyroid axis of teleost, Channa punctatus. Significant hypertrophy of the thyroid follicle was observed in 20 mg L(-1) and 40 mg L(-1) groups; the follicular epithelium was however hypertrophied only in 40 mg L(-1) group. The colloid depletion in the lumen of thyroid follicle was evident in 20 mg L(-1) and 40 mg L(-1) groups. Serum thyroid hormones (thyroxine/T4 and triiodothyronine/T3) level increased significantly at both the higher doses. Increased immunointensity and significant hypertrophy of the pituitary thyrotrophs (anti TSHβ-immunoreactive cells) was observed in both 20 mg L(-1) and 40 mg L(-1) chromium-exposed fish. The increased thyroid hormones secretion observed in this study might be an adaptive response of the pituitary-thyroid axis under acute chromium-induced stress condition to maintain homeostasis. The long-term Cr(VI) exposures, however, may lead to attenuation/exhaustion of the pituitary-thyroid axis and pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  10. Quantifying Fish Swimming Behavior in Response to Acute Exposure of Aqueous Copper Using Computer Assisted Video and Digital Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Calfee, Robin D; Puglis, Holly J; Little, Edward E; Brumbaugh, William G; Mebane, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to environmental contaminants can be precursors of other effects such as survival, growth, or reproduction. However, these responses may be subtle, and measurement can be challenging. Using juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) with copper exposures, this paper illustrates techniques used for quantifying behavioral responses using computer assisted video and digital image analysis. In previous studies severe impairments in swimming behavior were observed among early life stage white sturgeon during acute and chronic exposures to copper. Sturgeon behavior was rapidly impaired and to the extent that survival in the field would be jeopardized, as fish would be swept downstream, or readily captured by predators. The objectives of this investigation were to illustrate protocols to quantify swimming activity during a series of acute copper exposures to determine time to effect during early lifestage development, and to understand the significance of these responses relative to survival of these vulnerable early lifestage fish. With mortality being on a time continuum, determining when copper first affects swimming ability helps us to understand the implications for population level effects. The techniques used are readily adaptable to experimental designs with other organisms and stressors. PMID:26967350

  11. Quantifying fish swimming behavior in response to acute exposure of aqueous copper using computer assisted video and digital image analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, Robin D.; Puglis, Holly J.; Little, Edward E.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to environmental contaminants can be precursors of other effects such as survival, growth, or reproduction. However, these responses may be subtle, and measurement can be challenging. Using juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) with copper exposures, this paper illustrates techniques used for quantifying behavioral responses using computer assisted video and digital image analysis. In previous studies severe impairments in swimming behavior were observed among early life stage white sturgeon during acute and chronic exposures to copper. Sturgeon behavior was rapidly impaired and to the extent that survival in the field would be jeopardized, as fish would be swept downstream, or readily captured by predators. The objectives of this investigation were to illustrate protocols to quantify swimming activity during a series of acute copper exposures to determine time to effect during early lifestage development, and to understand the significance of these responses relative to survival of these vulnerable early lifestage fish. With mortality being on a time continuum, determining when copper first affects swimming ability helps us to understand the implications for population level effects. The techniques used are readily adaptable to experimental designs with other organisms and stressors.

  12. A 3R compliant testing strategy to predict chronic fish toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    To ensure an ecologically relevant basis for environmental quality standards, whole-organism vertebrate tests are considered most suitable. Currently, the fish early life-stage (FELS) test (OECD 210), which involves an exposure up to one - two months, is used to estimate chronic ...

  13. Testing resonating vector strength: Auditory system, electric fish, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo van Hemmen, J.; Longtin, André; Vollmayr, Andreas N.

    2011-12-01

    Quite often a response to some input with a specific frequency ν○ can be described through a sequence of discrete events. Here, we study the synchrony vector, whose length stands for the vector strength, and in doing so focus on neuronal response in terms of spike times. The latter are supposed to be given by experiment. Instead of singling out the stimulus frequency ν○ we study the synchrony vector as a function of the real frequency variable ν. Its length turns out to be a resonating vector strength in that it shows clear maxima in the neighborhood of ν○ and multiples thereof, hence, allowing an easy way of determining response frequencies. We study this "resonating" vector strength for two concrete but rather different cases, viz., a specific midbrain neuron in the auditory system of cat and a primary detector neuron belonging to the electric sense of the wave-type electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. We show that the resonating vector strength always performs a clear resonance correlated with the phase locking that it quantifies. We analyze the influence of noise and demonstrate how well the resonance associated with maximal vector strength indicates the dominant stimulus frequency. Furthermore, we exhibit how one can obtain a specific phase associated with, for instance, a delay in auditory analysis.

  14. Copeptin Testing in Acute Myocardial Infarction: Ready for Routine Use?

    PubMed Central

    Reinstadler, Sebastian Johannes; Klug, Gert; Metzler, Bernhard; Mair, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Suspected acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of admission to emergency departments. In the last decade, biomarkers revolutionized the management of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes. Besides their pivotal assistance in timely diagnosis, biomarkers provide additional information for risk stratification. Cardiac troponins I and T are the most sensitive and specific markers of acute myocardial injury. Nonetheless, in order to overcome the remaining limitations of these markers, novel candidate biomarkers sensitive to early stage of disease are being extensively investigated. Among them, copeptin, a stable peptide derived from the precursor of vasopressin, emerged as a promising biomarker for the evaluation of suspected acute myocardial infarction. In this review, we summarize the currently available evidence for the usefulness of copeptin in the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction in comparison with routine biomarkers. PMID:25960596

  15. Do You Catch Undersized Fish? Let's Go Fishing to Learn Some Important Concepts in Multiple Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Qiujie; Lu, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    In the era of Big Data, because of diminishing cost of data collection and storage, a large number of statistical tests may even possibly be conducted all together by a high school student to seek for some "exciting" new scientific findings. In this article, we propose an interesting approach to introduce students to some important…

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Four Presumptive Tests for Blood to Detect Epithelial Injury on Fish

    SciTech Connect

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Smokorowski, Karen; Haxton, Tim; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-06-01

    Current methods of fish epithelial injury detection are limited to gross macroscopic examination that has a subjective bias as well as an inability to reliably quantify the degree of injury. Fluorescein, a presumptive test for blood, has been shown to have the capability to detect and quantify fish epithelial injury. However, there are several other presumptive tests for blood (Bluestar*, phenolphthalein, and HemastixH) that may have benefits over the use of fluorescein, particularly for field research on wild fish. This study investigated the capabilities of these four tests to detect and quantify a variety of injuries commonly encountered by fish (abrasion, cuts, fin frays, and punctures) using the freshwater bluegill Lepomis macrochirus as a model. Fluorescein was consistently found to be the most reliable (i.e., detected the highest proportion of true positive results and rarely detected false positive reactions) of the four presumptive tests for blood compared. Further testing was conducted to examine the reliability of fluorescein. By 24 h after an injury was inflicted, the injury was no longer detectable by fluorescein, and when fluorescein was applied to an injured fish, the fluorescein was no longer detectable 3 h after application. In a comparison of two common anaesthetics used in fisheries research, there was no significant difference in the proportion of injury detected when 3- aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester methanesulfate (tricaine) was used compared with a clove oil and ethanol (1:9) solution. In summary, fluorescein was the most reliable presumptive test for blood examined in this study for the detection and quantification of recent (hours) fish epithelial injury.

  17. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and interlaboratory testing, life stage, and species.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Chris G; Bauer, Candice; Hammer, Edward; Barron, Mace G

    2016-03-01

    The authors developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the 2 life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, and Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, and Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate that intralaboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2-fold for both life stages, whereas interlaboratory variability averaged 3.6-fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3-fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2-fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreased as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increased. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment. PMID:26369904

  18. Low yield of unselected testing in patients with acutely abnormal liver function tests

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To audit the diagnostic yield and cost implications of the use of a ‘liver screen’ for inpatients with abnormal liver function tests. Design We performed a retrospective audit of inpatients with abnormal liver function tests. We analysed all investigations ordered including biochemistry, immunology, virology and radiology. The final diagnosis was ascertained in each case, and the diagnostic yield and cost per positive diagnosis for each investigation were calculated. Setting St Thomas’ NHS Trust. Participants All inpatients investigated for abnormal liver function tests over a 12-month period. Main outcome measures We calculated the percentage of courses due to each diagnosis, the yield of each investigation and the cost per positive diagnosis for each investigation. Results A total of 308 patients were included, and a final diagnosis was made in 224 patients (73%) on the basis of both clinical data and investigations. There was considerable heterogeneity in the tests included in an acute liver screen. History and ultrasound yielded the most diagnoses (40% and 30%, respectively). The yield of autoimmune and metabolic screens was minimal. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the low yield of unselected testing in patients with abnormal liver function tests. A thorough history, ultrasound and testing for blood-borne viruses are the cornerstones of diagnosis. Specialist input should be sought before further testing. Prospective studies to evaluate the yield and cost-effectiveness of different testing strategies are needed. PMID:26770816

  19. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis.

  20. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  1. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  2. Minimally invasive prostate cancer detection test using FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Tinawi-Aljundi, Rima; Knuth, Shannon T; Gildea, Michael; Khal, Joshua; Hafron, Jason; Kernen, Kenneth; Di Loreto, Robert; Aurich-Costa, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The ability to test for and detect prostate cancer with minimal invasiveness has the potential to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies. This study was conducted as part of a clinical investigation for the development of an OligoFISH® probe panel for more accurate detection of prostate cancer. Materials and methods One hundred eligible male patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound biopsies were enrolled in the study. After undergoing digital rectal examination with pressure, voided urine was collected in sufficient volume to prepare at least two slides using ThinPrep. Probe panels were tested on the slides, and 500 cells were scored when possible. From the 100 patients recruited, 85 had more than 300 cells scored and were included in the clinical performance calculations. Results Chromosomes Y, 7, 10, 20, 6, 8, 16, and 18 were polysomic in most prostate carcinoma cases. Of these eight chromosomes, chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 were identified as having the highest clinical performance as a fluorescence in situ hybridization test and used to manufacture the fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panels. The OligoFISH® probes performed with 100% analytical specificity. When the OligoFISH® probes were compared with the biopsy results for each individual, the test results highly correlated with positive and negative prostate biopsy pathology findings, supporting their high specificity and accuracy. Probes for chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 showed in the receiver operator characteristics analysis an area under the curve of 0.83, with an accuracy of 81% in predicting the biopsy result. Conclusion This investigation demonstrates the ease of use with high specificity, high predictive value, and accuracy in identifying prostate cancer in voided urine after digital rectal examination with pressure. The test is likely to have positive impact on clinical practice and advance approaches to the detection of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is warranted. PMID

  3. Effects of Stream Fishes on Benthic Primary Productivity: A Mechanistic Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrave, C. W.

    2005-05-01

    I simultaneously tested three alternative hypotheses (the trophic cascade, nutrient enhancement via terrestrial nutrient translocation, and nutrient enhancement via bioturbation) for consumer regulation of primary productivity (PPR) by three widely distributed stream fish species (Orangethroat Darter, Western Mosquitofish, and Bullhead Minnow). I used stream mesocosms fitted with fish and terrestrial input barriers to address relative importance of localized fish predation versus access to terrestrial inputs for fish consumer effects. Orangethroat Darter, a benthic invertivore, increased PPR through an apparent trophic cascade, by localized reduction of benthic grazing invertebrate densities. Western mosquitofish, a surface feeding insectivore, increased PPR by enhancing nutrients through terrestrial nutrient translocation, and had no effect on benthic grazer invertebrate density. Bullhead Minnow, a benthic omnivore that disturbed sediments during foraging, increased PPR through nutrient enhancement via bioturbation, but within specific stream mesocosm areas two which the fish was restricted it also reduced benthic grazing invertebrates. Thus, suggesting this species may have affected PPR through a combination bioturbation and trophic cascade mechanisms. These mechanistic pathways are likely common processes by which fish affect food web structure and ecosystem function in many stream ecosystems.

  4. Effect of sulfate concentration on acute toxicity of selenite and selenate to invertebrates and fish. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.O.; McCauley, D.J.; McCool, P.; Winkler, N.; DeGraeve, M.

    1998-12-01

    The effect of sulfate concentration on the acute toxicity of selenite (Se IV) and selenate (Se VI) to freshwater organisms was evaluated using toxicity test data generated from this study and toxicity data obtained from the open literature. The acute toxicity of Se IV and Se VI to fathead minnows and two amphipod species, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and Hyalella azteca, were determined in four different sulfate concentrations. The newly generated toxicity data combined with the data obtained from the literature were evaluated using analysis of covariance to determine if there was a significant relationship between acute toxicity and sulfate concentration. The analysis of the Se IV data indicated that there was not a significant relationship between the acute toxicity of Se IV and sulfate concentration. A significant relationship was found between the acute toxicity of Se VI to freshwater organisms and sulfate concentration. Statistically significant slopes describing the relationship between Se VI toxicity and sulfate concentration were determined for individual species and for the combined data. A sulfate-based equation was constructed using the pooled slope to modify the criterion maximum concentration (CMC) for selenate: CMC = e{sup [0.4259(ln[sulfate]) + 4.6305]}.

  5. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving.

    PubMed

    Shiels, H A; Galli, G L J; Block, B A

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca(2+) transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation-contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range.

  6. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, H. A.; Galli, G. L. J.; Block, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation–contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca2+ transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation–contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range. PMID:25540278

  7. Toxicity test of landfill leachate using Sarotherodon mossambicus (freshwater fish)

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.H.

    1989-04-01

    Landfill leachate was collected in March and July, 1984, at the Gin Drinkers' Bay Landfill Site, and the properties of the two leachates were examined. The leachate collected in March contained higher contents of total solids, ammonia, and metals than that collected in July. The leachates were treated with EDTA (10(-3) M) and Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ (2 and 4 g/liter), alone and in combination. Addition of alum (2 g/liter) removed more than 60% of the phosphate content of the two leachates, and about 20 and 68% of total solids from leachates collected in March and July, respectively. Different concentrations of the leachates (untreated and alum-treated) were used to test the survival of tilapia, Sarotherodon mossambicus. The 96-hr LC50 for untreated leachates of March and July were 1.4 and 12%, respectively. The alum-treated leachates raised the 96-hr LC50 to 2.2 and 31.4%, accordingly.

  8. A multigeneration fish toxicity test as an aid in the hazard evaluation of aquatic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, C.S.

    1980-12-01

    A multigeneration toxicity study to assess the effects of pollutants on fish breeding and all the life stages is described. The convict cichlid (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum) was used to test the toxicity of trisodium carboxymethyloxysuccinate, a new sequestering agent being evaluated as a detergent builder. Results show that 100 mg/l of the chemical has no effect on fish fecundity, survival of eggs and fry, or adult breeding behavior. This concentration is two orders of magnitude greater than the predicted aquatic environmental concentration under the most unfavorable conditions of its use, sewage treatment, and discharge. (4 diagrams, 2 photos, 23 references, 1 tables)

  9. Testing the "read-across hypothesis" by investigating the effects of ibuprofen on fish.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpa; Panter, Grace H; Trollope, Henry T; Glennon, Yohanna C; Owen, Stewart F; Sumpter, John P; Rand-Weaver, Mariann

    2016-11-01

    Human pharmaceuticals present in the environment have the potential to cause adverse effects on non-target organisms. The "read-across hypothesis" stipulates that pharmaceuticals will exhibit similar biological effects across species (e.g. human and fish) if the molecular target has been conserved and the effective drug concentrations are reached (Cmax). We tested this hypothesis by evaluating if ibuprofen, a non-selective inhibitor of prostaglandins and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme, can mimic its primary effect in humans, on fish, at comparable plasma concentrations. The endpoints, prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) levels and the mRNA expression of COX (ptgs) gene, were measured in the gills of control and exposed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), using enzyme-immunoassay and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Fish were exposed, for 24-72 h, to measured water concentrations of 9 (n = 12), 370 (n = 40) and 470 μg ibuprofen/L (n = 12). Water and blood plasma concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Results showed that PGEM levels in fish exposed to 370 and 470 μg ibuprofen/L were significantly decreased compared to control fish, when mean plasma ibuprofen concentrations were 1.8-5.6-fold below the Cmax. The plasma ibuprofen concentrations and PGEM levels varied greatly between individuals. In fish exposed to 9 μg ibuprofen/L, when the mean plasma ibuprofen concentration was 224-fold below Cmax, no change in PGEM levels was observed. These data provide evidence for the read-across hypothesis, but suggest establishing a direct dose-response between internal plasma and PGEM is difficult, and would require significantly larger numbers of fish to overcome the inter-individual variation. PMID:27572306

  10. Multiple hypotheses testing of fish incidence patterns in an urbanized ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Higgins, C.L.; Shavlik, C.E.; Pope, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theories have focused traditionally on natural processes with little attempt to incorporate anthropogenic influences despite the fact that humans are such an integral part of virtually all ecosystems. A series of alternate models that incorporated anthropogenic factors and traditional ecological mechanisms of invasion to account for fish incidence patterns in urban lakes was tested. The models were based on fish biology, human intervention, and habitat characteristics. However, the only models to account for empirical patterns were those that included fish invasiveness, which incorporated species-specific information about overall tolerance and fecundity. This suggests that species-specific characteristics are more important in general distributional patterns than human-mediated dispersal. Better information of illegal stocking activities is needed to improve human-mediated models, and more insight into basic life history of ubiquitous species is needed to truly understand underlying mechanisms of biotic homogenization. ?? Springer 2005.

  11. Design and testing of fish drier system utilizing geothermal energy resource in Ie Suum, Aceh Besar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarak, Amir Zaki; Maulana, M. Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    In an effort to increase the value of fish produced by the community in Krueng Raya Sub-district, it has been designed and tested a fish drier system utilizing geothermal energy resource in IeSuum Village, Krueng Raya Sub-district, Aceh Besar District. The geothermal energy is in the form of hot water with the temperature range is between 86 and 86.4 °C. Based on the design consideration, it is used a terraced rack type drier system. The drier system consists of a heat exchanger, drying chamber, and a blower to blow the air. Hot water from the geothermal source is passed into the heat exchanger to increase the air temperature outside it. The air is then blown into the drying chamber. Based on the design analysis is obtained that to dry 200 kg of fish in 24 hour, it is required a drying chamber with 1m long, 1 m width and 0.4 m high, the temperature of hot water entering the exchanger is 80 °C and the temperature of the air entering the drying chamber is maintained at 60°C. The average time required to dry fish till 10% of water level is 18-20 jam. The research is then continued by developing and testing the drying system with three layer rack to put in the fish. From the experimental result is obtained that the average water temperature flows out of the chamber is in the range of 76-78 °C and the temperature in the chamber is in the range of 57-62 °C. In addition, the weight of the fish, which initially is 20 kg, becomes12 kg in average after 18 hours drying process.

  12. European Chemicals Agency dossier submissions as an experimental data source: refinement of a fish toxicity model for predicting acute LC50 values.

    PubMed

    Austin, Thomas; Denoyelle, Marieva; Chaudry, Amjad; Stradling, Sam; Eadsforth, Charles

    2015-02-01

    As a result of the stringent data requirements of the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation, a vast amount of ecotoxicological data has become available through the dissemination portal of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). As of April 2014, the database contained 12,439 unique substances from 47,909 dossiers. This vast database could be used to refine existing, or to create new, non-testing methods, such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). Acute fish toxicity data were mined from the ECHA database using the eChemPortal; after filtering for single organic substances, 1159 experimental data points remained, representing 564 compounds. To evaluate the quality and accessibility of this data, the authors used the data to refine and improve an existing QSAR. The reliability of the data submitted to the ECHA database, as well as the effectiveness of the Klimisch scoring system, were assessed by comparing the refined QSAR with established QSAR benchmarks. The model developed meets all Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development principles, has strong internal (leave-one-out internally cross-validated correlation coefficient [Q(2)(LOO)] = 0.91) and external (external coefficient of determination (predicted vs experimental [test set])) validation statistics, and can provide reliable fish median lethal concentration (LC50) predictions for non-polar narcotics. Although some issues with dossier misinformation were discovered, it was found that the ECHA dissemination portal is a valuable and reliable data source. When queried using the eChemPortal, chemical dossiers containing reliable data could be found quickly. The ECHA dissemination portal holds great potential for future QSAR development and improvement, such as updating QSARs within the Ecological Structure-Activity Relationships (ECOSAR) program.

  13. 3D tooth microwear texture analysis in fishes as a test of dietary hypotheses of durophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnell, Mark A.; Darras, Laurent P. G.

    2016-03-01

    differentiate between fishes with different diets even when they range widely in size, habitat, and in the structure of their trophic apparatus. The approach thus has great potential as an additional tool for dietary analysis in extant fishes, and for testing dietary hypotheses in ancient and extinct species.

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kia J.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia; however its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine- induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (−/−), heterozygote (+/−), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot- plate latency in CaMKIV (+/−) and (−/−) mice after acute nicotine treatment, while no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception. PMID:24196027

  15. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., lowest and middle test concentrations. (v) The test duration is 96 hours. The test is unacceptable if.... (C) Gammarids used in a particular test shall be of similar age and/or size and from the same...

  16. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., lowest and middle test concentrations. (v) The test duration is 96 hours. The test is unacceptable if.... (C) Gammarids used in a particular test shall be of similar age and/or size and from the same...

  17. Efficiency of a rapid test for detection of tetrodotoxin in puffer fish.

    PubMed

    Thattiyaphong, Aree; Unahalekhaka, Jirapa; Mekha, Nanthawan; Nispa, Wansatip; Kluengklangdon, Panawan; Rojanapantip, Laddawan

    2014-01-01

    The selling and importing of puffer fish species and their products was banned in Thailand in 2002, because of possible neurotoxic effects. However, the sale of their flesh is still happening in Thai markets. Standard methods for toxin quantification (HPLC and LC-MS) have significant limitations, therefore a lateral flow, immuno-chromatographic test (TTX-IC) was developed as a tool for rapid detection of toxin. A total of 750 puffer fishes (387 Lagocephalus lunaris(LL), and 363 Lagocephalus spadiceus (LS)) and 100 edible fishes were caught in Thailand from June 2011-February 2012. Screening of TTX from their flesh by TTX-IC revealed that 69 samples (17.8%) of LL possessed TTX at dangerous levels but LS and edible fishes did not. A selected 339 samples were quantified by LC-MS/MS, showing 50 LL possessed TTX at dangerous levels. Comparison of results with LC-MS/MS showed the TTX-IC to have 94.0% sensitivity and 92.4% specificity. The TTX-IC will be a useful tool for TTX screening of a large number of samples, reducing the testing required by LC-MS/MS, thus reducing costs. All positive cases found should be confirmed by standard methods.

  18. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... definitions also apply to this guideline: Death means the lack of reaction of a test organism to gentle... dilution water through each chamber is adjusted to the rate desired. In a static test, the test substance is introduced into each test chamber. In a flow-through test, the rate in which the test substance...

  19. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  20. Rapid regulation of blood parameters under acute hypoxia in the Amazonian fish Prochilodus nigricans.

    PubMed

    Val, Adalberto Luis; Gomes, Katia Regina Maruyama; de Almeida-Val, Vera Maria Fonseca

    2015-06-01

    Prochilodus nigricans, locally known as curimatã, is an Amazonian commercial fish that endures adverse environmental conditions, in particular low dissolved oxygen, during its migration. Poorer environmental conditions are expected in the near future. Prochilodus nigricans overcomes current seasonal and diurnal changes in dissolved oxygen by adjusting erythrocytic levels of ATP and GTP, modulators of Hb-O2 affinity. Will this fish species be endangered under more extreme environmental conditions as hypoxia and acidification tend to occur in a shorter period of time? As P. nigricans does not exhibit any apparent morphological alterations to exploit the air-water interface, it must rely on fast adjustments of blood properties. To investigate this aspect, basic hematology indices, pHe, pHi, plasma lactate, erythrocytic levels of ATP and GTP and functional properties of the hemolysate of P. nigricans were analyzed over a period of 6h in hypoxia and subsequent recovery in normoxia. The levels of erythrocytic GTP were four times higher than ATP and were reduced to ¼ of the original level after 3h under hypoxia. Erythrocytic levels of ATP were unaffected over the experimental period. All other analyzed blood parameters exhibited a time-course change in animals under hypoxia and returned to normoxic levels. Considering the hemolysate functional properties and the ability to regulate the above mentioned blood characteristics, P. nigricans is able to endure short-term changes in dissolved oxygen. PMID:25737030

  1. Screening acute cytotoxicity biomarkers using a microalga as test organism.

    PubMed

    Prado, Raquel; Rioboo, Carmen; Herrero, Concepción; Cid, Angeles

    2012-12-01

    The present study checked the suitability of the integration of flow cytometry (FCM) as technique and a freshwater microalga (Chlamydomonas moewusii) as cell system model for ecotoxicological studies, looking for sensitive biomarkers of acute cytotoxicity of potential contaminants in aquatic systems. The detection of the potential acute toxicity of a pollutant is of interest because pulse discharges of contaminants to natural waters could lead to high concentrations of these substances that are only present for short periods of time but can affect aquatic organisms such as microalgae. Physiological alterations in C. moewusii cells were analysed after 1h of exposure to different concentrations of the herbicide paraquat. Cell viability was not affected, but the acute toxicity of paraquat was evident at other levels of cell physiology. Herbicide-treated cells showed lower autofluorescence and higher size and internal complexity, lower esterase activity and lower mitochondrial membrane potential. Paraquat induced the depolarisation of the plasma membrane and the increase of intracellular free calcium level and cytosolic pH in a concentration-dependent percentage of cells. All these effects can be related to the oxidative stress induced by the herbicide, as revealed the significantly increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species in cultures exposed to paraquat concentrations which induced the physiological alterations mentioned above. Excluding cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential, these cytotoxicity endpoints could be considered sensitive biomarkers for the short-term exposure to pollutants such as herbicides.

  2. Screening acute cytotoxicity biomarkers using a microalga as test organism.

    PubMed

    Prado, Raquel; Rioboo, Carmen; Herrero, Concepción; Cid, Angeles

    2012-12-01

    The present study checked the suitability of the integration of flow cytometry (FCM) as technique and a freshwater microalga (Chlamydomonas moewusii) as cell system model for ecotoxicological studies, looking for sensitive biomarkers of acute cytotoxicity of potential contaminants in aquatic systems. The detection of the potential acute toxicity of a pollutant is of interest because pulse discharges of contaminants to natural waters could lead to high concentrations of these substances that are only present for short periods of time but can affect aquatic organisms such as microalgae. Physiological alterations in C. moewusii cells were analysed after 1h of exposure to different concentrations of the herbicide paraquat. Cell viability was not affected, but the acute toxicity of paraquat was evident at other levels of cell physiology. Herbicide-treated cells showed lower autofluorescence and higher size and internal complexity, lower esterase activity and lower mitochondrial membrane potential. Paraquat induced the depolarisation of the plasma membrane and the increase of intracellular free calcium level and cytosolic pH in a concentration-dependent percentage of cells. All these effects can be related to the oxidative stress induced by the herbicide, as revealed the significantly increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species in cultures exposed to paraquat concentrations which induced the physiological alterations mentioned above. Excluding cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential, these cytotoxicity endpoints could be considered sensitive biomarkers for the short-term exposure to pollutants such as herbicides. PMID:23084039

  3. Proficiency testing pilot for determination of total mercury in fresh fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santana, L. V.; Sarkis, J. E. S.; Ulrich, J. C.; Hortellani, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    A proficiency-testing scheme concerning total mercury determination in fish tissue involved 10 laboratories as participants, who used their regular in-house analytical methods, and the assigned value and the standard deviation used in proficiency testing program was derived from calibration against the certified reference values of the CRMs. The majority of participants obtained satisfactory Z-scores, and laboratories that need to revise their procedures were singled out. The objective these exercises were makes a useful contribution towards the production of proficiency test in Brazil. The uncertainty expanded calculated for the reference material was 22%.

  4. Cross-Sector Review of Drivers and Available 3Rs Approaches for Acute Systemic Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Seidle, Troy; Robinson, Sally; Holmes, Tom; Creton, Stuart; Prieto, Pilar; Scheel, Julia; Chlebus, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Acute systemic toxicity studies are carried out in many sectors in which synthetic chemicals are manufactured or used and are among the most criticized of all toxicology tests on both scientific and ethical grounds. A review of the drivers for acute toxicity testing within the pharmaceutical industry led to a paradigm shift whereby in vivo acute toxicity data are no longer routinely required in advance of human clinical trials. Based on this experience, the following review was undertaken to identify (1) regulatory and scientific drivers for acute toxicity testing in other industrial sectors, (2) activities aimed at replacing, reducing, or refining the use of animals, and (3) recommendations for future work in this area. PMID:20484382

  5. Seasonal changes in the tests of fish Puntius ticto, and their relation to heavy metal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pundir, R. ); Saxena, A.B. )

    1990-08-01

    An integrated hypothesis explaining the implications of environmental influence on the reproductive process has not emerged owing to paucity of data. Nevertheless, evidence is at hand to show that favorable physiological disposition for reproduction is brought about with external and internal factors through the mediation of the neuroendocrine mechanisms. It is now clear that the environmental factors impinge on the exteroreceptors and through them affect the central nervous system, the hypothalamus, the pituitary and finally the gonad. Another endogenous factor is the internal rhythm, which is known to regulate at least in part the seasonal reproductive activity. A review of literature reveals that comparatively much work has been done on the structure and seasonal changes of the testes of fishes. The aim of the present study is to observe seasonal changes in the testes of fish Puntius ticto and their relation to heavy metal toxicity.

  6. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... seq.). This guideline prescribes test procedures and conditions using freshwater and marine algae to... definitions also apply to this guideline: (1) Algicidal means having the property of killing algae. (2... volumes of nutrient medium and/or test solution. Start the test by introducing algae into the test...

  7. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... seq.). This guideline prescribes test procedures and conditions using freshwater and marine algae to... definitions also apply to this guideline: (1) Algicidal means having the property of killing algae. (2... volumes of nutrient medium and/or test solution. Start the test by introducing algae into the test...

  8. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... seq.). This guideline prescribes test procedures and conditions using freshwater and marine algae to... definitions also apply to this guideline: (1) Algicidal means having the property of killing algae. (2... volumes of nutrient medium and/or test solution. Start the test by introducing algae into the test...

  9. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... seq.). This guideline prescribes test procedures and conditions using freshwater and marine algae to... definitions also apply to this guideline: (1) Algicidal means having the property of killing algae. (2... volumes of nutrient medium and/or test solution. Start the test by introducing algae into the test...

  10. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... seq.). This guideline prescribes test procedures and conditions using freshwater and marine algae to... definitions also apply to this guideline: (1) Algicidal means having the property of killing algae. (2... volumes of nutrient medium and/or test solution. Start the test by introducing algae into the test...

  11. Fish oil-supplemented parenteral nutrition could alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xianxiang; Yang, Enqin; Zhang, Nanyang; Cao, Shougen; Zhou, Yanbing

    2015-09-01

    The objectives were to confirm that intravenous fish oil (FO) emulsions could alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis and to explore the mechanisms of these effects. Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups randomly. Two days after central venous catheterization, rats were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture to produce abdominal sepsis. Rats were assigned to receive normal saline or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) containing standard soybean oil emulsions or FO-supplemented TPN at the onset of sepsis for 5 days. A sham operation and control treatment were performed in control group rats. Acute lung injury scores, peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets, plasma cytokines, and Foxp3 expression in the spleen were determined. Compared with the normal saline and TPN without FO, FO-supplemented TPN beneficially altered the distributions of the T-lymphocyte subsets and downregulated the acute lung injury scores, plasma cytokines, and expression of Foxp3 due to sepsis. Fish oil-supplemented TPN can decrease acute lung injury scores, alleviate histopathology, reduce the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage fluid, modulate the lymphocyte subpopulation in the peripheral blood, downregulate Foxp3 expression in the spleen, and reduce plasma cytokines, which means that FO-supplemented TPN can alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis.

  12. Toxicity evaluation of water samples collected near a hospital waste landfill through bioassays of genotoxicity piscine micronucleus test and comet assay in fish Astyanax and ecotoxicity Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Margarete Casagrande Lass; Ramsdorf, Wanessa Algarte; Vicari, Taynah; Cestari, Marta Margarete

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we analyzed samples of water from a river and a lake located near a hospital waste landfill with respect to physico-chemical parameters and conducted bioassays of ecotoxicity using Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna, which are species commonly used to evaluate the water toxicity. We also evaluated damage to the genetic material of fish (Astyanax sp. B) that were exposed (96 h) to water from these two sites that were located near the tank ditch, using the alkaline comet assay and the piscine micronucleus test. Parameters including aluminum, manganese, biochemical oxygen demand, sulfide, conductivity, phenol, total coliforms and Escherichia coli counts, were above acceptable levels that have been established in environmental legislation. However, the toxicity bioassays that we carried out in Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna and the piscine micronucleus test in fish showed no immediate risk due to acute effects. Based on the results of the comet assay, however, it was possible to detect damage to genetic material in fish that were acutely exposed in the laboratory to water samples from the river and lake that are located near the trench septic tank. Thus, our results suggest that tests beyond those usually employed to test water toxicity, such as the comet assay we used in the fish, are required to assess the toxicity of water with greater accuracy.

  13. Fish Alternatives in Environmental Risk Assessment: Overview of the Current Landscape

    EPA Science Inventory

    The need for alternative testing strategies has recently expanded into the realm of environmental risk assessment leading to the development of new alternatives to standard aquatic vertebrate testing such as the OECD 203 acute fish toxicity test. The fish embryo test (FET) is one...

  14. SURROGATE SPECIES IN ASSESSING CONTAMINANT RISK FOR ENDANGERED FISHES, INCLUDING INTERSPECIES TOXICITY CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout, fathead minnows, and sheepshead minnows were tested as surrogate species to assess contaminant risk for 17 endangered fishes and one toad species. Acute toxicity tests were conducted with carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin in accorda...

  15. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dilution water through a test chamber or culture tank with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack... solutions. (ii) Construction materials. (A) Materials and equipment that contact test solutions should...

  16. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dilution water through a test chamber or culture tank with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack... solutions. (ii) Construction materials. (A) Materials and equipment that contact test solutions should...

  17. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dilution water through a test chamber or culture tank with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack... solutions. (ii) Construction materials. (A) Materials and equipment that contact test solutions should...

  18. Metabolic Cost of the Activation of Immune Response in the Fish-Eating Myotis (Myotis vivesi): The Effects of Inflammation and the Acute Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Otálora-Ardila, Aída; Herrera M., L. Gerardo; Flores-Martínez, José Juan; Welch, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and activation of the acute phase response (APR) are energetically demanding processes that protect against pathogens. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are antigens commonly used to stimulate inflammation and the APR, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that the APR after an LPS challenge was energetically more costly than the inflammatory response after a PHA challenge in the fish-eating Myotis bat (Myotis vivesi). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) after bats were administered PHA and LPS. We also measured skin temperature (Tskin) after the LPS challenge and skin swelling after the PHA challenge. Injection of PHA elicited swelling that lasted for several days but changes in RMR and body mass were not significant. LPS injection produced a significant increase in Tskin and in RMR, and significant body mass loss. RMR after LPS injection increased by 140–185% and the total cost of the response was 6.50 kJ. Inflammation was an energetically low-cost process but the APR entailed a significant energetic investment. Examination of APR in other bats suggests that the way in which bats deal with infections might not be uniform. PMID:27792729

  19. Species specificity in the magnitude and duration of the acute stress response in Mediterranean marine fish in culture.

    PubMed

    Fanouraki, E; Mylonas, C C; Papandroulakis, N; Pavlidis, M

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the species-specific stress response for seven Mediterranean fishes in culture. Also, to evaluate the method of measuring free cortisol concentration in the rearing water as a non-invasive and reliable indicator of stress in marine species, of aquaculture importance. Gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata (Sparidae); common dentex, Dentex dentex (Sparidae); common Pandora, Pagellus erythrinus (Sparidae); sharpsnout sea bream, Diplodus puntazzo (Sparidae); dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Serranidae); meagre, Argyrosomus regius (Sciaenidae) and European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax (Moronidae) were subjected to identical acute stress (5-6 min chasing and 1-1.5 min air exposure) under the same environmental conditions and samples were analyzed by the same procedures. Results indicated that there was a clear species-specificity in the magnitude, timing and duration of the stress response in terms of cortisol, glucose and lactate. European sea bass showed a very high response and dusky grouper and meagre a very low response, except plasma glucose concentrations of dusky grouper which was constantly high, while sharpsnout sea bream presented a protracted stress response, up to 8h. The present study confirmed that free cortisol release rate into the water can be used as a reliable stress indicator. PMID:21712040

  20. IgG Avidity ELISA Test for Diagnosis of Acute Toxoplasmosis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari, Amir Hossien; Keshavarz, Hossien; Mohebali, Mehdi; Rezaeian, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Serum samples, 100 in the total number, were collected from different laboratories in Tehran, Iran and tested for anti-Toxoplasma specific IgG and IgM antibodies using indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Using the IgG (chronic) and IgM (acute) positive samples, the IgG avidity test was performed by ELISA in duplicate rows of 96-well microtiter plates. One row was washed with 6 M urea and the other with PBS (pH 7.2), then the avidity index (AI) was calculated. Sixteen out of 18 (88.9%) sera with acute toxoplasmosis showed low avidity levels (AI≤50), and 76 out of 82 (92.7%) sera in chronic phase of infection showed high avidity index (AI>60). Six sera had borderline ranges of AI. The results showed that the IgG avidity test by ELISA could distinguish the acute and chronic stages of toxoplasmosis in humans. PMID:22711919

  1. On the performance of acute toxicity tests using the National Reference Toxicant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidhk, B.

    1995-12-31

    The US National Reference Toxicant Database was used to compile data from 158 Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 187 fathead minnow acute toxicity tests. The data are analyzed using the EPA flow-chart for acute toxicity tests to determine the distribution of test methods selected. The data are reanalyzed using maximum likelihood estimation assuming probit, logit and Gompertz tolerance distributions and non-parametrically using the Spearman-Karber method with and without trimming. The results of these analyses are compared with respect to mean square error for the parametric methods and confidence intervals for the point estimate for all analyses.

  2. Is the Posner Reaction Time Test More Accurate Than Clinical Tests in Detecting Left Neglect in Acute and Chronic Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Rengachary, Jennifer; d'Avossa, Giovanni; Sapir, Ayelet; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of common clinical tests for left neglect with that of a computerized reaction time Posner test in a stroke population. Design Neglect measures were collected longitudinally in stroke patients at the acute (≈2wk) and chronic (≈9mo) stage. Identical measures were collected in a healthy control group. Setting Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation. Participants Acute stroke patients (n=59) with left neglect, 30 of whom were tested longitudinally; healthy age-matched controls (n=30). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures A receiver operating characteristic analysis, ranking the measures' sensitivity and specificity using a single summary statistic. Results Most clinical tests were adequately accurate at the acute stage, but many were near chance at the chronic stage. The Posner test was the most sensitive test at both stages, the most sensitive variable being the reaction time difference for detecting targets appearing on the left compared to the right side. Conclusions Computerized reaction time tests can be used to screen for subtle but potentially clinically relevant left neglect, which may not be detectable by conventional clinical tests, especially at the chronic stage. Such tests may be useful to assess the severity of the patients' deficits and provide more accurate measures of the degree of recovery in clinical trials than established clinical measures. PMID:19969172

  3. Toxicity of 8-Hydroxyquinoline in Cryprinus carpio Using the Acute Toxicity Test, Hepatase Activity Analysis and the Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuaiguo; Chen, Lili; Dou, Xiaofei; Qi, Meng; Du, Qiyan; He, Qiaoqiao; Nan, Mingge; Chang, Zhongjie; Nan, Ping

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the environmental toxicity of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ), an important industrial raw material found in China's major ornamental fish, Cryprinus carpio, using the acute toxicity test, hepatase activity analysis and the comet assay. The results indicated that 8-HOQ had significant acute toxicity in adult C. carpio with a 96 h-LC50 of 1.15 and 0.22 mg L(-1) hepatic quinoline residues as assessed by HPLC. 8-HOQ also induced genotoxicity in the form of strand breaks in the DNA of hepatic cells as shown by the comet assay. With regard to physiological toxicity, 8-HOQ induced a decrease in the activities of hepatic GOT and GPT with increased exposure concentration and time. These data suggest that 8-HOQ may be toxic to the health of aquatic organisms when accidentally released into aquatic ecosystems. The data also suggest that the comet assay may be used in biomonitoring to determine 8-HOQ genotoxicity and hepatic GPT and GOT activities may be potential biomarkers of physiological toxicity.

  4. Toxicity of 8-Hydroxyquinoline in Cryprinus carpio Using the Acute Toxicity Test, Hepatase Activity Analysis and the Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuaiguo; Chen, Lili; Dou, Xiaofei; Qi, Meng; Du, Qiyan; He, Qiaoqiao; Nan, Mingge; Chang, Zhongjie; Nan, Ping

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the environmental toxicity of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ), an important industrial raw material found in China's major ornamental fish, Cryprinus carpio, using the acute toxicity test, hepatase activity analysis and the comet assay. The results indicated that 8-HOQ had significant acute toxicity in adult C. carpio with a 96 h-LC50 of 1.15 and 0.22 mg L(-1) hepatic quinoline residues as assessed by HPLC. 8-HOQ also induced genotoxicity in the form of strand breaks in the DNA of hepatic cells as shown by the comet assay. With regard to physiological toxicity, 8-HOQ induced a decrease in the activities of hepatic GOT and GPT with increased exposure concentration and time. These data suggest that 8-HOQ may be toxic to the health of aquatic organisms when accidentally released into aquatic ecosystems. The data also suggest that the comet assay may be used in biomonitoring to determine 8-HOQ genotoxicity and hepatic GPT and GOT activities may be potential biomarkers of physiological toxicity. PMID:26067700

  5. Evaluation of a Western Blot Test in an Outbreak of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Pizzini, Claudia V.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Reiss, Errol; Hajjeh, Rana; Kaufman, Leo; Peralta, José Mauro

    1999-01-01

    A western blot (WB) test was evaluated for detection of antibodies against native glycosylated and chemically deglycosylated M and H antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum in serum obtained from patients during the acute phase of pulmonary histoplasmosis that occurred during an outbreak. Of 275 serum samples tested by immunodiffusion and complement fixation (CF) samples from 40 patients affected during this outbreak and from 37 negative controls were tested by WB test. A group of patients whose sera were negative for CF antibodies and precipitins early in the acute stage of histoplasmosis but who all seroconverted during convalescence 6 weeks later were tested with the WB test. Antibodies against untreated H and M antigens were detected at a 1:100 dilution by WB test in 45% of the 20 acute-phase serum samples and in all 20 of the convalescent-phase specimens. The WB test’s sensitivity for acute-phase specimens increased to 90% (18 of 20 specimens) when H and M antigens were treated by periodate oxidation to inactivate susceptible carbohydrate epitopes. When native glycosylated antigens were used in the WB test, positive reactions were observed in negative control serum specimens (3 of 37 specimens; 8%) and in serum specimens obtained from asymptomatic persons screened as part of the outbreak investigation (13 of 20 specimens; 65%). These positive reactions were also attributed to glycosidic epitopes since the specificity of the WB test increased from 78 to 100% when periodate-treated H and M antigens were used. WB test with deglycosylated H and M antigens of histoplasmin provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific test to diagnose acute pulmonary histoplasmosis before precipitins can be detected. PMID:9874658

  6. Comparison of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as test species in the Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT).

    PubMed

    Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin L; Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Bjerregaard, Poul; Petersen, Gitte I; Norrgren, Leif; Orn, Stefan; Braunbeck, Thomas; Baumann, Lisa; Bomke, Christiane; Dorgerloh, Michael; Bruns, Eric; Ruehl-Fehlert, Christine; Green, John W; Springer, Timothy A; Gourmelon, Anne

    2012-03-01

    Results are presented from a validation (with 5 laboratories) of the Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT) developed to detect endocrine disrupters (EDs) and included in the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) working program. The aromatase-inhibiting fungicide prochloraz was tested in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). The fish were exposed during sexual differentiation and development from 0 to 60 days post hatch (dph). After exposure, the vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations were quantified in head/tail homogenate and the sex ratio was determined (defined as female, male, intersex or undifferentiated). NOEC/LOEC and EC(x) designs were compared to optimize the test approach. Results show that both species are highly sensitive to prochloraz during sexual development. They respond by skewing of the sex ratio towards male phenotype and by a VTG decline in females. The NOEC/LOEC approach is preferred because sex ratio is difficult to analyze with a regression model. The mean NOEC/LOEC for prochloraz on the sex ratio was 43.3/134 μg/L and 101/293 μg/L for zebrafish and fathead minnow, respectively. The mean NOEC/LOEC on the decline in female VTG concentration was 65/110 μg/L and ~30/68 μg/L respectively. In conclusion, zebrafish and fathead minnow are suitable species in the FSDT and their sexual differentiation is equally labile to EDs. PMID:22115822

  7. Effects of a test flood on fishes of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valdez, R.A.; Hoffnagle, T.L.; McIvor, C.C.; McKinney, T.; Leibfried, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    A beach/habitat-building flow (i.e., test flood) of 1274 m3/s, released from Glen Canyon Dam down the Colorado River through Grand Canyon, had little effect on distribution, abundance, or movement of native fishes, and only short-term effects on densities of some nonnative species Shoreline and backwater catch rates of native fishes, including juvenile humpback chub (Gila cypha), flannelmouth suckers (Catostomus latipinnis), and bluehead suckers (C. discobolus), and all ages of speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus), were not significantly different before and after the flood. Annual spring spawning migrations of flannelmouth suckers into the Paria River and endangered humpback chub into the Little Colorado River (LCR) took place during and after the flood, indicating no impediment to fish migrations. Pre-spawning adults staged in large slack water pools formed at the mouths of these tributaries during the flood. Net movement and habitat used by nine radio-tagged adult humpback chub during the flood were not significantly different from prior observations. Diet composition of adult humpback chub varied, but total biomass did not differ significantly before, during, and after the flood, indicating opportunistic feeding for a larger array of available food items displaced by the flood. Numbers of nonnative rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) <152 mm total length decreased by ???8% in electrofishing samples from the dam tailwaters (0-25 km downstream of the dam) during the flood. Increased catch rates in the vicinity of the LCR (125 km downstream of the dam) and Hell's Hollow (314 km downstream of the dam) suggest that these young trout were displaced downstream by the flood, although displacement distance was unknown since some fish could have originated from local populations associated with intervening tributaries. Abundance, catch rate, body condition, and diet of adult rainbow trout in the dam tailwaters were not significantly affected by the flood, and the flood

  8. An accurate test for acute appendicitis: In-111 WBC imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dosRemedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.

    1985-05-01

    The decision to operate when acute appendicitis (APPY) is suspected is often difficult. Surgeons accept up to a 20% false positive rate to avoid any delay that may result in appendiceal rupture and peritonitis. The authors have successfully improved early diagnostic accuracy by using abdominal imaging beginning 2 hours after injecting In-111 labeled WBC. Patients with clear-cut (APPY) had laparotomy and were not studied. Those who were to be observed in the ER for possible (APPY) had their leukocytes harvested, labeled with In-111 oxine, and reinjected. Abnormal localized activity in the right lower quadrant (RLQ) imaged at 2 hours was graded relative to bone marrow activity (8M): 0, 1+BM. When available the surgical specimen was imaged for In-111 activity. Of 31 patients studied there were 13 with positive scans for (APPY) all surgically confirmed. There were 4 additional abnormal studies all demonstrating known diagnostic patterns, 2 of pertonitis and 2 of colitis. There were 14 negative studies in 8 of whom the clinical course was benign; the remaining 6 had laparotomy with 3 having (APPY) and 3 not. Thus there were no false positives and 3 false negatives. One case negative at 2 hours had appendiceal activity later. The 3 cases with 3+ activity all had apendiceal abscesses. This new application of In-111 oxine WBC imaging is safe, simple, sensitive and specific. It shortens the time to surgical intervention and should reduce the surgical false positive rate.

  9. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the temperature and chemistry of the dilution water used for holding or culturing the test organisms... source, conductivity and total organic carbon (or chemical oxygen demand) shall be measured on each...

  10. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... through a test chamber or a holding or acclimation tank, with no recycling. LC50 means the median lethal... the entry of dust or other particulates into the solutions. (ii) Construction materials....

  11. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... through a test chamber or a holding or acclimation tank, with no recycling. LC50 means the median lethal... the entry of dust or other particulates into the solutions. (ii) Construction materials....

  12. PAH toxicity at aqueous solubility in the fish embryo test with Danio rerio using passive dosing.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Best, Nina; Fernqvist, Margit Møller; Hercht, Hendrik; Smith, Kilian E C; Braunbeck, Thomas; Mayer, Philipp; Hollert, Henner

    2014-10-01

    As part of the risk assessment process within REACh, prior to manufacturing and distribution of chemical substances their (eco)toxicological impacts have to be investigated. The fish embryo toxicity test (FET) with the zebrafish Danio rerio has gained a high significance as an in vitro alternative to animal testing in (eco)toxicology. However, for hydrophobic organic chemicals it remains a technical challenge to ensure constant freely dissolved concentration at the maximum exposure level during such biotests. Passive dosing with PDMS silicone was thus applied to control the freely dissolved concentration of ten PAHs at their saturation level in the FET. The experiments gave repeatable results, with the toxicity of the PAHs generally increasing with the maximum chemical activities of the PAHs. HPLC analysis confirmed constant exposure at the saturation level. In additional experiments, fish embryos without direct contact to the silicone surface showed similar mortalities as those exposed with direct contact to the silicone. Silicone oil overlaying the water phase as a novel passive dosing phase had no observable effects on the development of the fish embryos until hatching. This study provides further data to support the close relationship between the chemical activity and the toxicity of hydrophobic organic compounds. Passive dosing from PDMS silicone enabled reliable toxicity testing of (highly) hydrophobic substances at aqueous solubility, providing a practical way to control toxicity exactly at the maximum exposure level. This approach is therefore expected to be useful as a cost-effective initial screening of hydrophobic chemicals for potential adverse effects to freshwater vertebrates. PMID:25048891

  13. A simultaneous multiple species acute toxicity test comparing relative sensitivities of six aquatic organisms to HgCl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.E.; Heagler, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    In the last few years there has been concern in the scientific community about observed declines in some amphibian species. These population declines could be reflecting a global phenomenon due to a general class sensitivity or may be part of a natural cycle. The suggestion of an overall greater sensitivity of amphibians is not supported. Studies show that amphibians, as a class, are neither more or less susceptible than fish to environmental conditions. Mercury has been found to be one of the most toxic of the heavy metals introduced into amphibian breeding waters. Six aquatic species were simultaneously exposed in a comparative acute toxicity test with mercury chloride: three amphibians, Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog), R. clamitans (green frog), and R. sphenocephala (southern leopard frog, formally classified as R. utricularia); two fish, Gambusia affinis (mosquitofish) and Notemigonus crysoleucas (golden shiner); one aquatic aligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus (aquatic earthworm). The five test concentrations used were 1.4, 3.9, 12.0, 110.0, and 487.0 {micro}g Hg/L respectively. Ten organisms per species were randomly placed into the six test tanks (control and five concentrations), each species in a separate chamber. The resultant LC50-96hr values produced the following rank order: R. sphenocephala, 6.59 {micro}g Hg/L; R. clamitans, 14.7 {micro}g Hg/L; N. crysoleucas, 16.75 {micro}g Hg/L; L. variegatus, 43.72,ug Hg/L; G. affinis, 52.62 {micro}g Hg/L; R. catesbeiana, 63.36 {micro}g Hg/L. No general organism class sensitivity trend, for amphibians, was developed from this data, contrary to the implicit suggestions of some researchers.

  14. Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2011-10-01

    The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges

  15. Acute effects of tetracycline exposure in the freshwater fish Gambusia holbrooki: antioxidant effects, neurotoxicity and histological alterations.

    PubMed

    Nunes, B; Antunes, S C; Gomes, R; Campos, J C; Braga, M R; Ramos, A S; Correia, A T

    2015-02-01

    A large body of evidence was compiled in the recent decades showing a noteworthy increase in the detection of pharmaceutical drugs in aquatic ecosystems. Due to its ubiquitous presence, chemical nature, and practical purpose, this type of contaminant can exert toxic effects in nontarget organisms. Exposure to pharmaceutical drugs can result in adaptive alterations, such as changes in tissues, or in key homeostatic mechanisms, such as antioxidant mechanisms, biochemical/physiological pathways, and cellular damage. These alterations can be monitored to determine the impact of these compounds on exposed aquatic organisms. Among pharmaceutical drugs in the environment, antibiotics are particularly important because they include a variety of substances widely used in medical and veterinary practice, livestock production, and aquaculture. This wide use constitutes a decisive factor contributing for their frequent detection in the aquatic environment. Tetracyclines are the individual antibiotic subclass with the second highest frequency of detection in environmental matrices. The characterization of the potential ecotoxicological effects of tetracycline is a much-required task; to attain this objective, the present study assessed the acute toxic effects of tetracycline in the freshwater fish species Gambusia holbrooki by the determination of histological changes in the gills and liver, changes in antioxidant defense [glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), and lipoperoxidative damage] as well as potential neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase activity). The obtained results suggest the existence of a cause-and-effect relationship between the exposure to tetracycline and histological alterations (more specifically in gills) and enzymatic activity (particularly the enzyme CAT in liver and GST in gills) indicating that this compound can exert a pro-oxidative activity. PMID:25475590

  16. Effects of elevated CO2 on predator avoidance behaviour by reef fishes is not altered by experimental test water

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Megan J.; Allan, Bridie J.M.; Watson, Sue-Ann; McMahon, Shannon J.; McCormick, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Pioneering studies into the effects of elevated CO2 on the behaviour of reef fishes often tested high-CO2 reared fish using control water in the test arena. While subsequent studies using rearing treatment water (control or high CO2) in the test arena have confirmed the effects of high CO2 on a range of reef fish behaviours, a further investigation into the use of different test water in the experimental arena is warranted. Here, we used a fully factorial design to test the effect of rearing treatment water (control or high CO2) and experimental test water (control or high CO2) on antipredator responses of larval reef fishes. We tested antipredator behaviour in larval clownfish Amphiprion percula and ambon damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis, two species that have been used in previous high CO2 experiments. Specifically, we tested if: (1) using control or high CO2 water in a two channel flume influenced the response of larval clownfish to predator odour; and (2) using control or high CO2 water in the test arena influenced the escape response of larval damselfish to a startle stimulus. Finally, (3) because the effects of high CO2 on fish behaviour appear to be caused by altered function of the GABA-A neurotransmitter we tested if antipredator behaviours were restored in clownfish treated with a GABA antagonist (gabazine) in high CO2 water. Larval clownfish reared from hatching in control water (496 µatm) strongly avoided predator cue whereas larval clownfish reared from hatching in high CO2 (1,022 µatm) were attracted to the predator cue, as has been reported in previous studies. There was no effect on fish responses of using either control or high CO2 water in the flume. Larval damselfish reared for four days in high CO2 (1,051 µatm) exhibited a slower response to a startle stimulus and slower escape speed compared with fish reared in control conditions (464 µatm). There was no effect of test water on escape responses. Treatment of high-CO2 reared clownfish with

  17. [Blood matching and transfusion for 12 acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia patients by extracorporal hemolysis test].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Min; Tang, Cong-Hai; Wu, A-Yang; Yang, Hui-Cong; Gan, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Tian-Xin; Huang, Yan-Xue; Xu, Wei-Ping

    2014-12-01

    In order to screen the compatible red cells by using extracorporal hemolysis test for acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients who were difficult to be matched by automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test. Twenty-six cases of AIHA were chosen as control group, to whom the same type of donor red blood cells were infused with the weakest blood agglutination; 12 cases of acute AIHA patients were chosen as test group, these patients were difficult to be matched by automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test, and the donor red cells without hemolysis by extracoral hemolysis test were transfused for them. The results showed that compared with the control group,the effect of transfusion was better in test group (P < 0.01), with 2.26 U leukocyte-depleted erythrocyte suspension in average, whose hemoglobin, reticulocyte and total bilirubin levels were changed significantly compared with those before blood transfusion (P < 0.01) . It is concluded that the compatible red blood cells for the acute AIHA patients can be screened by the extracorporal hemolysis test, when it is difficult to screen by the automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test.

  18. Ecological risk assessment of substances with suspected estrogenic activity using standard laboratory fish tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gimeno, S.; Bowmer, C.T.

    1999-07-01

    The assessment of risks to the aquatic environment in the European Union is generally based on a comparison of Predicted Environmental Concentrations (PEC) with Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNEC) for surrogate, or representative, organisms of the receiving waters. Such risk assessments are required for new and priority existing chemicals, pesticides, and, in the near future, biocides; they are dependent on robust in vivo test data. Current strategies for ecological risk assessment were not designed to assess the risk of endocrine disrupters. The selection of suitable fish species and practical in vivo end points for determining endocrine disruption in fish are discussed, including the adaptation of some existing guidelines. This paper is partly based on a series of experiments conducted at the laboratory to look at the effects of a model alkylphenol (4-tert-pentylphenol), an industrial chemical intermediate, acting as a pseudo-estrogen on an all-male population of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio. Exposure to the test substance occurred at critical life stages for endocrine disruption. Biochemical parameters as well as histological parameters were applied, and their suitability to be used in ecological risk assessment is discussed.

  19. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis of Test Endpoints for Detecting the Effects of Endocrine Active Substances in Fish Full Life Cycle Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish full life cycle (FFLC) tests are increasingly required in the ecotoxicological assessment of endocrine active substances. However, FFLC tests have not been internationally standardized or validated, and it is currently unclear how such tests should best be designed to provid...

  20. Micronucleus test in fishes as indicators of environmental quality in subestuaries of the Río de la Plata (Uruguay).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Villar, Silvia; Acuña Plavan, Alicia

    2015-02-28

    Genotoxic agents may exert damage that may be active through following generations. Micronuclei are cytoplasmic chromatin masses outside the main cell nucleus, indicators of chromosomal damage. This study applied micronuclei test to evaluate genetic damage of fish in three breeding and nursery areas of commercially important fishes exposed to differing degrees of anthropogenic impact: Pando, Solís Chico and Solís Grande sub-estuaries. The micronuclei test revealed differences in the presence and concentrations of genotoxic components in these sub-estuaries. Fish in the urban and industrialized Pando sub-estuary presented the highest percentages of micronuclei. The absence of seasonal changes in micronuclei in Pando fish could be explained by physical characteristics of the sub-estuary and by regional weather conditions. Odontesthes argentinensis (Valenciennes, 1835) was the species most susceptible to genotoxic components. It is recommended the use of a battery of biomarkers to better explain the health of organisms in that important nursery area.

  1. Hydroxychloroquine-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis with positive patch-testing

    PubMed Central

    Charfi, Ons; Kastalli, Sarrah; Sahnoun, Rym; Lakhoua, Ghozlane

    2015-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction, mostly induced by drugs. Hydroxychloroquine have been rarely reported in literature as a causative drug of this reaction. We report a case of AGEP induced by hydroxychloroquine with systemic involvement and confirmed by positive patch testing. PMID:26729969

  2. Alternative methods for toxicity assessments in fish: comparison of the fish embryo toxicity and the larval growth and survival tests in zebrafish and fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Marlo K Sellin; Stultz, Amy E; Smith, Austin W; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Oris, James T

    2014-11-01

    An increased demand for chemical toxicity evaluations has resulted in the need for alternative testing strategies that address animal welfare concerns. The fish embryo toxicity (FET) test developed for zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one such alternative, and the application of the FET test to other species such as the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) has been proposed. In the present study, the performances of the FET test and the larval growth and survival (LGS; a standard toxicity testing method) test in zebrafish and fathead minnows were evaluated. This required that testing methods for the fathead minnow FET and zebrafish LGS tests be harmonized with existing test methods and that the performance of these testing strategies be evaluated by comparing the median lethal concentrations of 2 reference toxicants, 3,4-dicholoraniline and ammonia, obtained via each of the test types. The results showed that procedures for the zebrafish FET test can be adapted and applied to the fathead minnow. Differences in test sensitivity were observed for 3,4-dicholoraniline but not ammonia; therefore, conclusions regarding which test types offer the least or most sensitivity could not be made. Overall, these results show that the fathead minnow FET test has potential as an alternative toxicity testing strategy and that further analysis with other toxicants is warranted in an effort to better characterize the sensitivity and feasibility of this testing strategy.

  3. The model test of restoration project of the gravel beach of Chen Village fishing port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. X.; Gui, J. S.; Sun, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    Gravel beach is a case in coastal landform by wave action. It is more and more crucial for the environment of coastal engineering in recent years. However, it is poorly studied for it in China. And this paper which is based on the model test of Restoration Project of the Gravel Beach of Chen Village Fishing Port, uses two dimensional normal physical models, aiming at exploring the movement of gravel beach under wave action and verifying the stability of the gravel beach section. The test depends on different water levels (designed high water level, designed low water level, and extreme high water level) and return periods (2, 5, 10, 25, 50 years once). Finally, two distinct experimental sections are got under the changed conditions and the movement law of gravels is obtained.

  4. Tigriopus fulvus: The interlaboratory comparison of the acute toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Faraponova, Olga; Giacco, Elisabetta; Biandolino, Francesca; Prato, Ermelinda; Del Prete, Francesco; Valenti, Alessandra; Sarcina, Stefania; Pasteris, Andrea; Montecavalli, Adele; Comin, Stefano; Cesca, Claudia; Francese, Marco; Cigar, Monica; Piazza, Veronica; Falleni, Fabrizio; Lacchetti, Ines

    2016-02-01

    The paper reports the results of an interlaboratory comparison involving 11 laboratories, with the objectives of apply and validate a new standardized ecotoxicological method on marine crustacean Tigriopus fulvus. Copper was chosen as reference toxicant as indicated in the official method. The results of two independent tests performed by all the participants, demonstrated that the new method is simple, fast and easy to learn. This is confirmed even by the values of z-score index calculated for each laboratory and the relative coefficient of variation (CV) which are 6.32% after 24h, 6.56 after 48h and 35.3% after 96h, mentioned in the ISO standards for the precision of interlaboratory assays. Therefore its use could be recommended in environmental studies and monitoring. PMID:26584461

  5. Results of acute and chronic toxicity tests conducted at SRS NPDES outfalls, July--October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Acute (48 hour LC50) and chronic (7-day reproductive impairment) toxicity tests were conducted on Ceriodaphnia dubia in water collected from 53 NPDES outfalls. All tests were conducted at the in-stream waste concentration. only 12 of the 53 outfalls showed no evidence of toxicity. Twenty-eight of the outfalls were acutely toxic, often producing 100% mortality during the first day of exposure. Fourteen outfalls had no discharge at the time of sampling and could not be tested. Three outfalls were not tested because their toxicity has been adequately characterized in other investigations. Elevated concentrations of total residual chlorine are suspected to be responsible for the observed toxicity of many NPDES outfalls, particularly the sanitary wastewater treatment plants. Chemical data from previous studies indicate that metals may also be present in toxic concentrations at many outfalls. Toxicity identification and reduction options are discussed.

  6. [Are urgent imaging tests indicated in the management of acute pancreatitis?].

    PubMed

    Fornell Pérez, R; Lozano Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common emergency within abdominal disease. It is accepted that two of three conditions must be fulfilled for its diagnosis: characteristic clinical presentation, characteristic laboratory findings, and/or characteristic diagnostic imaging findings. The first two conditions are the most often used, probably for reasons of efficiency and frequency. Nevertheless, the need for imaging studies is sometimes a source of conflict. For this reason, we decided to review the current evidence regarding the indication of urgent imaging tests in the management of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Standardization of formulations for the acute amino acid depletion and loading tests.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B; Dougherty, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    The acute tryptophan depletion and loading and the acute tyrosine plus phenylalanine depletion tests are powerful tools for studying the roles of cerebral monoamines in behaviour and symptoms related to various disorders. The tests use either amino acid mixtures or proteins. Current amino acid mixtures lack specificity in humans, but not in rodents, because of the faster disposal of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) by the latter. The high content of BCAA (30-60%) is responsible for the poor specificity in humans and we recommend, in a 50g dose, a control formulation with a lowered BCAA content (18%) as a common control for the above tests. With protein-based formulations, α-lactalbumin is specific for acute tryptophan loading, whereas gelatine is only partially effective for acute tryptophan depletion. We recommend the use of the whey protein fraction glycomacropeptide as an alternative protein. Its BCAA content is ideal for specificity and the absence of tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine render it suitable as a template for seven formulations (separate and combined depletion or loading and a truly balanced control). We invite the research community to participate in standardization of the depletion and loading methodologies by using our recommended amino acid formulation and developing those based on glycomacropeptide.

  8. Unexpectedly high incidence of indigenous acute hepatitis E within South Hampshire: time for routine testing?

    PubMed

    De Silva, Aminda N; Muddu, Ajay K; Iredale, John P; Sheron, Nick; Khakoo, Salim I; Pelosi, Emanuela

    2008-02-01

    Hepatitis E indigenous to developed countries (hepatitis EIDC) is a form of hepatitis E in persons with no travel history to highly endemic areas. It has been recognized recently as an emerging clinical entity in a significant number of economically developed countries including UK. However, it is still perceived as a rare disease and routine laboratory testing for hepatitis E is not performed. A series of 13 cases of hepatitis EIDC, diagnosed in a 13-month period from June 2005 within a single center in South Hampshire, UK, is presented. These patients were identified after implementing a novel-screening algorithm that introduced routine hepatitis E serological investigations. Patients were middle aged or elderly and males were affected more commonly. Four patients (31%) required hospital admission. All reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed cases carried hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype-3, which bore close sequence homology to HEV circulating in UK pigs. None of these patients recalled eating undercooked pork products or close contact with pigs during the 2 months preceding the onset of acute hepatitis. In comparison, during the same period, only two cases of hepatitis A and five cases of acute hepatitis B were diagnosed. These data illustrate the importance of introducing routine hepatitis E testing in all patients with unexplained acute liver disease and absence of relevant travel history. Routine testing can clarify hepatitis E epidemiology whilst improving the clinical management of patients with acute liver disease. PMID:18098134

  9. Snakehead-fish cell line, SSN-1 (Ophicephalus striatus) as a model for cadmium genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Aramphongphan, A; Laovitthayanggoon, S; Himakoun, L

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of snakehead-fish cell line (SSN-1 cells) derived from a striped snakehead (Ophicephalus striatus) as a model in the genotoxic assessment of cadmium (Cd). The first approach employed was to determine the contaminated Cd levels in commercial snakehead fish by the Graphite Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. In the second approach, the sensitivity of SSN-1 cells to cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cd was assessed by Trypan blue and micronucleus assays following 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation period. Exposure of SSN-1 cells to four increasing Cd concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 5 ppm for 72 h did not affect their survival as compared to the control cells. The Cd uptake by SSN-1 cells showed a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Cd levels. Three non-cytotoxic Cd concentrations (0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm) showed a concentration-dependent genotoxic effect, compared to relevant control cells. Both micronucleus frequencies and cadmium uptake levels by SSN-1 cells depended on exposure concentrations. These results showed that the SSN-1 cells are suitable for use as a model for in vitro Cd genotoxicity testing.

  10. Cannabinoids & Stress: impact of HU-210 on behavioral tests of anxiety in acutely stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Kinden, Renee; Zhang, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the most prevalent classes of mental disorders affecting the general population, but current treatment strategies are restricted by their limited efficacy and side effect profiles. Although the cannabinoid system is speculated to be a key player in the modulation of stress responses and emotionality, the vast majority of current research initiatives had not incorporated stress exposure into their experimental designs. This study was the first to investigate the impact of exogenous cannabinoid administration in an acutely stressed mouse model, where CD1 mice were pre-treated with HU-210, a potent CB1R agonist, prior to acute stress exposure and subsequent behavioral testing. Exogenous cannabinoid administration induced distinct behavioral phenotypes in stressed and unstressed mice. While low doses of HU-210 were anxiolytic in unstressed subjects, this effect was abolished when mice were exposed to an acute stressor. The administration of higher HU-210 doses in combination with acute stress exposure led to severe locomotor deficits that were not previously observed at the same dose in unstressed subjects. These findings suggest that exogenous cannabinoids and acute stress act synergistically in an anxiogenic manner. This study underlies the importance of including stress exposure into future anxiety-cannabinoid research due to the differential impact of cannabinoid administration on stressed and unstressed subjects.

  11. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  12. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  13. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R.; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Bauer, Candice R.; Hammer, Edward J.; Barron, Mace G.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and inter-laboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the two life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate intra-laboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2 fold for both life stages, while inter-laboratory variability averaged 3.6 fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3 fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2 fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of the sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreases as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increases. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment.

  14. A system for conducting flow-through toxicity tests with larval fish

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-08-01

    Assessment of toxicological effects in aquatic systems commonly include larval fish 96-h LC50 determinations. The LC50 tests are conducted using static renewal as well as flow-through methods. However, in the case of chemicals with high vapor pressures or fugacity, static renewal methods may produce inconsistent results arising from the pulsed nature of exposure. In addition, in exposures involving these types of compounds, the fluctuation in concentration that can occur between renewals is unlike most exposure scenarios in nature. For these reasons, flow-through systems are often preferable. The authors report here on an inexpensive, easily constructed, flow-through system for toxicant exposure of small organisms. Data are presented to illustrate the capacity of the system to maintain uniform toxicant concentrations relative to static renewal methods.

  15. Development of in vivo genotoxicity tests in estuarine fish and their application to aquatic toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Means, J.C.; Daniels, C.B.; Baksi, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Genotoxicity assays were developed in embryonic stages of two species of fish, striped bass (Morone saxitilis) and sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and in the adults of Fundulus heteroclitus using metaphase chromosome aberrations as the endpoint. Dose-dependent responses were obtained with several chemical mutagens, including 9-aminoacridine, ethylmethane sulphonate, cyclophosphamide and n-methyl-n-nitro-n-nitroguanidine, added to estuarine water at doses spanning several orders of magnitude in compound concentration. Exposures ranged from one to four days; however, two-day exposure time was found to be optimal in eggs and larvae. Tissues from the gills, kidney and intestinal tract of adult Fundulus were found to be responsive to mutagen exposure; however, the intestine gave the best responses. The results of these experiments suggest that these assays are sufficiently sensitive to be used in the field as well as in laboratory tests.

  16. Evaluation of acute sensory--motor effects and test sensitivity using termiticide workers exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Dick, R B; Steenland, K; Krieg, E F; Hines, C J

    2001-01-01

    Sensory and motor testing was performed on a group of termiticide workers primarily using chlorpyrifos-containing products to evaluate both the acute effects from current exposure and sensitivity of the measures to detect effects. The study group comprised 106 applicators and 52 nonexposed participants. Current exposure was measured by urinary concentrations of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) collected the morning of testing. The mean TCP value for the 106 applicators was 200 microg/g creatinine. Participants received 4--5 h of testing and were evaluated using a sensory--motor test battery recommended by a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-sponsored advisory panel to be appropriate for testing effects from pesticide exposures. Measurements testing olfactory dysfunction, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, color vision, vibrotactile sensitivity, tremor, manual dexterity, eye--hand coordination, and postural stability were analyzed. Study results indicated limited acute effects from exposure to chlorpyrifos using urinary TCP as a measure of current exposure. The effects occurred primarily on measures of postural sway in the eyes closed and soft-surface conditions, which suggests a possible subclinical effect involving the proprioceptive and vestibular systems. Several other tests of motor and sensory functions did not show any evidence of acute exposure effects, although statistically significant effects of urinary TCP on the Lanthony color vision test scores and one contrast sensitivity test score were found. The visual measures, however, were not significant when a step-down Bonferroni correction was applied. Information also is presented on the sensitivity of the measures to detect effects in an occupationally exposed population using standard error of the parameter estimates. PMID:11485841

  17. [Clinical use of the ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) tests for urothelial carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Lodde, Michele; Mian, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades years, we have witnessed the propagation and marketing of numerous diagnostic tests capable of detecting, in the urine of patients, the presence of urothelial tumor markers. Among None of the different markers studied to date , no one has been able to meet all the requirements of the ideal marker. We present and discuss below we discuss the results reported in the literature of about two tests approved by the Food and Drug Administration [ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH)], which have been and commercially available for about 10 years., ImmunoCyt/uCyt + and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH).

  18. Mixture toxicity of wood preservative products in the fish embryo toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Coors, Anja; Dobrick, Jan; Möder, Monika; Kehrer, Anja

    2012-06-01

    Wood preservative products are used globally to protect wood from fungal decay and insects. We investigated the aquatic toxicity of five commercial wood preservative products, the biocidal active substances and some formulation additives contained therein, as well as six generic binary mixtures of the active substances in the fish embryo toxicity test (FET). Median lethal concentrations (LC50) of the single substances, the mixtures, and the products were estimated from concentration-response curves and corrected for concentrations measured in the test medium. The comparison of the experimentally observed mixture toxicity with the toxicity predicted by the concept of concentration addition (CA) showed less than twofold deviation for all binary mixtures of the active substances and for three of the biocidal products. A more than 60-fold underestimation of the toxicity of the fourth product by the CA prediction was detected and could be explained fully by the toxicity of one formulation additive, which had been labeled as a hazardous substance. The reason for the 4.6-fold underestimation of toxicity of the fifth product could not be explained unambiguously. Overall, the FET was found to be a suitable screening tool to verify whether the toxicity of formulated wood preservatives can reliably be predicted by CA. Applied as a quick and simple nonanimal screening test, the FET may support approaches of applying component-based mixture toxicity predictions within the environmental risk assessment of biocidal products, which is required according to European regulations.

  19. [Acute perceptive hearing loss. Importance of tuning fork test in primary care].

    PubMed

    Verburg, A F E Arianne; Alkhateeb, W H F Waiel; Merkus, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with acute right-sided hearing loss. At first presentation she was diagnosed as having otitis media with effusion. No tuning fork test was performed. After four weeks she was finally correctly diagnosed as having a right-sided sensorineural hearing loss of 90 dB. As a result of the delay no treatment was started. Her hearing loss did not show any improvement after three months. Sensorineural hearing loss is a rare, potentially invalidating condition with a considerable psychological impact. The treatment consists of systemic steroids, which may only be useful if started within 14 days after symptoms start. Some patients are initially treated for conductive hearing loss. Routine performance of the tuning fork test helps in differentiating between conductive and perceptive hearing loss. In cases of acute perceptive hearing loss, patients should be referred to the otorhinolaryngologist to exclude possible causes and start treatment and guidance.

  20. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to sulfamethoxazol with positive lymphocyte transformation test (LTT).

    PubMed

    Anliker, Mark David; Wüthrich, Brunello

    2003-01-01

    We studied an acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) due to sulfamethoxazol in a 48-year-old woman with unusual findings in allergy testing. The histological picture provided evidence for a pustular drug eruption and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Skin testing with sulfamethoxazol was negative for immediate-type reaction (scratch test) and delayed-type reaction (epicutaneous testing). A lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) showed a significant lymphocyte stimulation (stimulation index 5.04/2.61) toward sulfamethoxazol (200/100 mg/ml) by measuring the rate of built-in tritium-thymidine in the DNS of the patients lymphocytes, implicating a drug-specific hypersensibility of lymphocytes; we could be dealing with a combined type III and IV reaction by Coombs and Gell in this case. LTT may play a possible role in the determination of drug allergy in AGEP despite negative skin testing. PMID:12861854

  1. Direct Comparison of Flow-FISH and qPCR as Diagnostic Tests for Telomere Length Measurement in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Rodrigues, Fernanda; Santana-Lemos, Bárbara A.; Scheucher, Priscila S.; Alves-Paiva, Raquel M.; Calado, Rodrigo T.

    2014-01-01

    Telomere length measurement is an essential test for the diagnosis of telomeropathies, which are caused by excessive telomere erosion. Commonly used methods are terminal restriction fragment (TRF) analysis by Southern blot, fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with flow cytometry (flow-FISH), and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Although these methods have been used in the clinic, they have not been comprehensively compared. Here, we directly compared the performance of flow-FISH and qPCR to measure leukocytes' telomere length of healthy individuals and patients evaluated for telomeropathies, using TRF as standard. TRF and flow-FISH showed good agreement and correlation in the analysis of healthy subjects (R2 = 0.60; p<0.0001) and patients (R2 = 0.51; p<0.0001). In contrast, the comparison between TRF and qPCR yielded modest correlation for the analysis of samples of healthy individuals (R2 = 0.35; p<0.0001) and low correlation for patients (R2 = 0.20; p = 0.001); Bland-Altman analysis showed poor agreement between the two methods for both patients and controls. Quantitative PCR and flow-FISH modestly correlated in the analysis of healthy individuals (R2 = 0.33; p<0.0001) and did not correlate in the comparison of patients' samples (R2 = 0.1, p = 0.08). Intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was similar for flow-FISH (10.8±7.1%) and qPCR (9.5±7.4%; p = 0.35), but the inter-assay CV was lower for flow-FISH (9.6±7.6% vs. 16±19.5%; p = 0.02). Bland-Altman analysis indicated that flow-FISH was more precise and reproducible than qPCR. Flow-FISH and qPCR were sensitive (both 100%) and specific (93% and 89%, respectively) to distinguish very short telomeres. However, qPCR sensitivity (40%) and specificity (63%) to detect telomeres below the tenth percentile were lower compared to flow-FISH (80% sensitivity and 85% specificity). In the clinical setting, flow-FISH was more accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific in the

  2. FISH in micronucleus test demonstrates aneugenic action of rotenone in a common freshwater fish species, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Melo, Karina M; Grisolia, Cesar K; Pieczarka, Julio C; de Souza, Ludmilla R; Filho, José de Souza; Nagamachi, Cleusa Y

    2014-05-01

    Aneuploidies are numerical genetic alterations that lead to changes in the normal number of chromosomes due to abnormal segregation during cell division. This type of alteration can occur spontaneously or as a result of exposure to mutagenic agents. The presence of these agents in the environment has increased concern about potential damage to human health. Rotenone, derived from plants of the genera Derris and Lonchocarpus, is a product that is used all over the world as a pesticide and piscicide. Before establishing its potential and efficiency for these purposes, it is essential to know more about the possible adverse effects that it may cause. The current work aimed to evaluate the mutagenic potential of rotenone using fish from the species Oreochromis niloticus, as well as to help in understanding its action mechanism. Our results showed the mutagenic potential of rotenone evidenced by increased formation of micronuclei and nuclear buds at low doses of exposure. The use of fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique made it possible to measure the aneugenic potential of the substance, probably due to its impairment of mitotic spindle formation.

  3. Investigation of mucus obtained from different fish species on the acute pain induced with scalpel incision in paw of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahtiyar; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kiran, Altan; Gencoglu, Songul; Duzgun, Ahmet; Kurtoglu, Ilker Zeki; Yarali, Oguzhan; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    No comparative study could be found for the analgesic activity of mucuses from the Oncorhynchus mykiss (OM), Salvelinus fontinalis (SF), Salmo coruhensis (SC), Acipenser gueldenstaedtii (AG), and Acipenser baerii (AB) fish species in the literature. We aimed to investigate the effects of mucuses obtained from the abovementioned fish species on scalpel incision-induced pain in the rat paw and to examine the role of oxidant/antioxidant parameters and COX-2 gene expression in the analgesic activities. Animals were divided into groups: SIC (scalpel incision; SI), SIDS (SI+25 mg/kg diclofenac sodium), SOM (SI+25 mg/kg OM mucus), SFM (SI+25 mg/kg SF mucus), SCM (SI+25 mg/kg SC mucus), SAgM (SI+25 mg/kg AG mucus), SAbM (SI+25 mg/kg AB mucus), and HG (healthy). The paw pain thresholds were measured with a Basile algesimeter before and after diclofenac sodium (DS) or mucus administration, and then the rats were euthanized with thiopental sodium. Oxidant/antioxidant and COX-2 gene expression parameters were measured in paw tissues. OM, SC, AG, and AB fish mucuses could not decrease the SI-induced pain. However, SF fish mucus prevented this pain by 69% after the first hour and by 58.3% after the third hour. DS was shown to suppress pain more weakly than SF, preventing the pain by 62.1% and 50.0% after the first and third hours, respectively. SF mucus and DS significantly inhibited increase of COX-2 gene expression, while other fish mucuses could not. None of the fish mucuses except SF mucus in conjunction with DS could significantly inhibit the increase in oxidant parameters and decrease in antioxidants. SF fish mucus should be comparatively assessed in clinical practice for treatment of postoperative pain. PMID:26490740

  4. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current

  5. Design of a testing strategy using non-animal based test methods: lessons learnt from the ACuteTox project.

    PubMed

    Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Prieto, Pilar; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Stanzel, Sven

    2013-06-01

    In the framework of toxicology, a testing strategy can be viewed as a series of steps which are taken to come to a final prediction about a characteristic of a compound under study. The testing strategy is performed as a single-step procedure, usually called a test battery, using simultaneously all information collected on different endpoints, or as tiered approach in which a decision tree is followed. Design of a testing strategy involves statistical considerations, such as the development of a statistical prediction model. During the EU FP6 ACuteTox project, several prediction models were proposed on the basis of statistical classification algorithms which we illustrate here. The final choice of testing strategies was not based on statistical considerations alone. However, without thorough statistical evaluations a testing strategy cannot be identified. We present here a number of observations made from the statistical viewpoint which relate to the development of testing strategies. The points we make were derived from problems we had to deal with during the evaluation of this large research project. A central issue during the development of a prediction model is the danger of overfitting. Procedures are presented to deal with this challenge.

  6. Critique on the use of the standardized avian acute oral toxicity test for first generation anticoagulant rodenticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    Avian risk assessments for rodenticides are often driven by the results of standardized acute oral toxicity tests without regards to a toxicant's mode of action and time course of adverse effects. First generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs) generally require multiple feedings over several days to achieve a threshold concentration in tissue and cause adverse effects. This exposure regimen is much different than that used in the standardized acute oral toxicity test methodology. Median lethal dose values derived from standardized acute oral toxicity tests underestimate the environmental hazard and risk of FGARs. Caution is warranted when FGAR toxicity, physiological effects, and pharmacokinetics derived from standardized acute oral toxicity testing are used for forensic confirmation of the cause of death in avian mortality incidents and when characterizing FGARs' risks to free-ranging birds.

  7. Acute toxicity, respiratory reaction, and sensitivity of three cyprinid fish species caused by exposure to four heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Liang, Youguang; Li, Sixin; Chang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Using 3 cyprinid fish species zebra fish, rare minnow, and juvenile grass carp, we conducted assays of lethal reaction and ventilatory response to analyze sensitivity of the fish to 4 heavy metals. Our results showed that the 96 h LC50 of Hg(2+) to zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnow were 0.14 mg L(-1), 0.23 mg L(-1), and 0.10 mg L(-1), respectively; of Cu(2+)0.17 mg L(-1), 0.09 mg L(-1), and 0.12 mg L(-1) respectively; of Cd(2+)6.5 mg L(-1), 18.47 mg L(-1), 5.36 mg L(-1), respectively; and of Zn(2+)44.48 mg L(-1), 31.37 mg L(-1), and 12.74 mg L(-1), respectively. Under a 1-h exposure, the ventilatory response to the different heavy metals varied. Ventilatory frequency (Vf) and amplitude (Va) increased in zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnows exposed to Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) (P<0.05), and the Vf and Va of the 3 species rose initially and then declined when exposed to Cd(2+). Zn(2+) had markedly different toxic effects than the other heavy metals, whose Vf and Va gradually decreased with increasing exposure concentration (P<0.05). The rare minnow was the most highly susceptible of the 3 fish species to the heavy metals, with threshold effect concentrations (TEC) of 0.019 mg L(-1), 0.046 mg L(-1), 2.142 mg L(-1), and 0.633 mg L(-1) for Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+), respectively. Therefore, it is feasible to use ventilatory parameters as a biomarker for evaluating the pollution toxicity of metals and to recognize early warning signs by using rare minnows as a sensor.

  8. Claudins in a primary cultured puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) gill epithelium model alter in response to acute seawater exposure.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong; Kelly, Scott P

    2015-11-01

    Gill epithelium permeability and qualitative/quantitative aspects of gill claudin (cldn) tight junction (TJ) protein transcriptomics were examined with a primary cultured model gill epithelium developed using euryhaline puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) gills. The model was prepared using seawater-acclimated fish gills and was cultured on permeable cell culture filter supports. The model is composed of 1-2 confluent layers of gill pavement cells (PVCs), with the outer layer exhibiting prominent apical surface microridges and TJs between adjacent cells. During development of electrophysiological characteristics, the model exhibits a sigmoidal increase in transpithelial resistance (TER) and plateaus around 30 kΩcm(2). At this point paracellular movement of [(3)H]polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 was low at ~1.75 cm s(-1)×10(-7). When exposed to apical seawater (SW) epithelia exhibit a marked decrease in TER while PEG flux remained unchanged for at least 6 h. In association with this, transcript encoding cldn TJ proteins cldn3c, -23b, -27a, -27c, -32a and -33b increased during the first 6 h while cldn11a decreased. This suggests that these proteins are involved in maintaining barrier properties between gill PVCs of SW fishes. Gill cldn mRNA abundance also altered 6 and 12 h following abrupt SW exposure of puffer fish, but in a manner that differed qualitatively and quantitatively from the cultured model. This most likely reflects the cellular heterogeneity of whole tissue and/or the contribution of the endocrine system in intact fish. The current study provides insight into the physiological and transcriptomic response of euryhaline fish gill cells to a hyperosmotic environment.

  9. Claudins in a primary cultured puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) gill epithelium model alter in response to acute seawater exposure.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong; Kelly, Scott P

    2015-11-01

    Gill epithelium permeability and qualitative/quantitative aspects of gill claudin (cldn) tight junction (TJ) protein transcriptomics were examined with a primary cultured model gill epithelium developed using euryhaline puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) gills. The model was prepared using seawater-acclimated fish gills and was cultured on permeable cell culture filter supports. The model is composed of 1-2 confluent layers of gill pavement cells (PVCs), with the outer layer exhibiting prominent apical surface microridges and TJs between adjacent cells. During development of electrophysiological characteristics, the model exhibits a sigmoidal increase in transpithelial resistance (TER) and plateaus around 30 kΩcm(2). At this point paracellular movement of [(3)H]polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 was low at ~1.75 cm s(-1)×10(-7). When exposed to apical seawater (SW) epithelia exhibit a marked decrease in TER while PEG flux remained unchanged for at least 6 h. In association with this, transcript encoding cldn TJ proteins cldn3c, -23b, -27a, -27c, -32a and -33b increased during the first 6 h while cldn11a decreased. This suggests that these proteins are involved in maintaining barrier properties between gill PVCs of SW fishes. Gill cldn mRNA abundance also altered 6 and 12 h following abrupt SW exposure of puffer fish, but in a manner that differed qualitatively and quantitatively from the cultured model. This most likely reflects the cellular heterogeneity of whole tissue and/or the contribution of the endocrine system in intact fish. The current study provides insight into the physiological and transcriptomic response of euryhaline fish gill cells to a hyperosmotic environment. PMID:26239219

  10. Acute toxicity, respiratory reaction, and sensitivity of three cyprinid fish species caused by exposure to four heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Liang, Youguang; Li, Sixin; Chang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Using 3 cyprinid fish species zebra fish, rare minnow, and juvenile grass carp, we conducted assays of lethal reaction and ventilatory response to analyze sensitivity of the fish to 4 heavy metals. Our results showed that the 96 h LC50 of Hg(2+) to zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnow were 0.14 mg L(-1), 0.23 mg L(-1), and 0.10 mg L(-1), respectively; of Cu(2+)0.17 mg L(-1), 0.09 mg L(-1), and 0.12 mg L(-1) respectively; of Cd(2+)6.5 mg L(-1), 18.47 mg L(-1), 5.36 mg L(-1), respectively; and of Zn(2+)44.48 mg L(-1), 31.37 mg L(-1), and 12.74 mg L(-1), respectively. Under a 1-h exposure, the ventilatory response to the different heavy metals varied. Ventilatory frequency (Vf) and amplitude (Va) increased in zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnows exposed to Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) (P<0.05), and the Vf and Va of the 3 species rose initially and then declined when exposed to Cd(2+). Zn(2+) had markedly different toxic effects than the other heavy metals, whose Vf and Va gradually decreased with increasing exposure concentration (P<0.05). The rare minnow was the most highly susceptible of the 3 fish species to the heavy metals, with threshold effect concentrations (TEC) of 0.019 mg L(-1), 0.046 mg L(-1), 2.142 mg L(-1), and 0.633 mg L(-1) for Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+), respectively. Therefore, it is feasible to use ventilatory parameters as a biomarker for evaluating the pollution toxicity of metals and to recognize early warning signs by using rare minnows as a sensor. PMID:23755209

  11. Intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.; Bidwell, Joseph R.; Cope, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Geis, S.; Greer, I.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kane, C.M.; May, T.W.; Neves, R.J.; Newton, T.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Whites, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the performance and variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and newly transformed juvenile mussels using the standard methods outlined in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Multiple 48-h toxicity tests with glochidia and 96-h tests with juvenile mussels were conducted within a single laboratory and among five laboratories. All tests met the test acceptability requirements (e.g., ???90% control survival). Intralaboratory tests were conducted over two consecutive mussel-spawning seasons with mucket (Actinonaias ligamentina) or fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. For the glochidia of both species, the variability of intralaboratory median effective concentrations (EC50s) for the three toxicants, expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV), ranged from 14 to 27% in 24-h exposures and from 13 to 36% in 48-h exposures. The intralaboratory CV of copper EC50s for juvenile fatmucket was 24% in 48-h exposures and 13% in 96-h exposures. Interlaboratory tests were conducted with fatmucket glochidia and juveniles by five laboratories using copper as a toxicant. The interlaboratory CV of copper EC50s for glochidia was 13% in 24-h exposures and 24% in 48-h exposures, and the interlaboratory CV for juveniles was 22% in 48-h exposures and 42% in 96-h exposures. The high completion success and the overall low variability in test results indicate that the test methods have acceptable precision and can be performed routinely. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  12. D-dimer testing: advantages and limitations in emergency medicine for managing acute venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    D-dimer values can be rapidly determined and used for the management of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, its role in the setting of emergency still remains unclear and inappropriate testing is a significant clinical problem. This review discusses the currently used assays, clinical indications, and limitations of D-dimer measurement. Studies in English language were identified by searching PubMed from December 1985 to December 2005. Available literature on D-dimer was identified from Medline, along with cross referencing from the reference lists of major articles and reviews on this subject. Among 56 articles collected, 14 papers, 4 overviews and 1 systemic review were selected accordingly to predefined criteria. Data synthesis shows that D-dimer testing has sufficient diagnostic accuracy for ruling out acute VTE if used in combination with standardised clinical judgement. D-dimer seems to be also a useful tool for managing suspected VTE patients in absence of immediate imaging. Attention should be paid to exclude conditions that may affect the accuracy of the test, such as concomitant disease, heparin administration and symptom duration >15 days. Although enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay determination has the highest accuracy, immunoturbidimetric assay seems the most suitable on an emergency basis because of its rapid performance. In conclusion, at present D-dimer testing can be safely used in the management of acute VTE in emergency medicine. However, because of its heterogeneity related to the method used and setting implemented, it is preferable to assess D-dimer accuracy before its implementation in management strategies for VTE. PMID:16941816

  13. [Evaluation of an immunochromatographic fourth generation test for the rapid diagnosis of acute HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Takuya; Nagashima, Mami; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kojima, Yoko; Mori, Haruyo

    2013-07-01

    The early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is important to provide effective antiviral treatment and to prevent transmission of HIV. One of the key issues to achieve this goal is to shorten the so-called "diagnostic window period" when the humoral immune response toward the virus is not fully developed during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. In 2008, the Espline HIV Ag/Ab test kit (E4G, Fujirebio Inc. Japan) was marketed in Japan belonging to the fourth generation of HIV test kits characterized by its ability to detect both viral antigens (Ag) and anti-HIV-1/2 antibodies (Ab). E4G is the first and only fourth generation immunochromatographic HIV test kit approved in Japan at present. To evaluate its performance to diagnose acute HIV infection (AHI), E4G was compared with fourth generation Ag/Ab ELISA test kits, a third generation PA test kit, WB and real-time PCR for the testing of 25 AHI clinical specimens. E4G detected HIV infection in 18/25 specimens (sensitivity : 72.0%), of which the viral Ag was detected in only 2 specimens (8.0%) bearing a viral load > 10 million copies/mL. No spesimens were simultaneously reactive to both Ag and Ab against HIV. The third generation PA achieved a positive score of 17/ 25 specimens (68.0%), which was almost the same as the E4G figure. In contrast the fourth generation Ag/ Ab ELISA scored all the 25 AHI specimens positive (sensitivity : 100%). Overall, although having the merit of offering a rapid diagnostic test for HIV infection, E4G does not provide a sensitivity in AHI diagnosis superior to test kits currently available.

  14. Acute and sublethal toxicity tests to monitor the impact of leachate on an aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Bloor, M C; Banks, C J; Krivtsov, V

    2005-02-01

    In this study, a specific landfill leachate (1200 mg l(-1) COD and 600 mg l(-1) BOD(5)) was used to develop a standardised short-term acute and longer-term sublethal ex-situ toxicity testing programme, in order to determine the potential ecological implications of leaching contaminants reaching the water table. Bioassays were undertaken with juvenile Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus macro-invertebrates. Preliminary acute test variables included static and static renewed flow rates for 96-h, starved and fed specimens, and aerobic and oxygen depleting conditions. However, regardless of any test variable, the lethal concentration (LC(50)) for A. aquaticus remained at 12.3% v/v leachate in deionized water, whilst that for G. pulex was only 1%. Sublethal toxicity was judged on the basis of frequency of births and the growth rate of newly born individuals. Tests showed that even a dilution as high as 1:66- would influence the fecundity of a Gammarus population, whilst a dilution of 1:20 would affect the size of an Asellus breeding colony.

  15. Effects of DHA-rich fish oil supplementation on the lipid profile, markers of muscle damage, and neutrophil function in wheelchair basketball athletes before and after acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Marques, Camila Garcia; Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; Levada-Pires, Adriana Cristina; Jacintho, Thiago Manzoni; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tânia Cristina; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich fish oil (FO) supplementation on the lipid profile, levels of plasma inflammatory mediators, markers of muscle damage, and neutrophil function in wheelchair basketball players before and after acute exercise. We evaluated 8 male basketball wheelchair athletes before and after acute exercise both prior to (S0) and following (S1) FO supplementation. The subjects were supplemented with 3 g of FO daily for 30 days. The following components were measured: the plasma lipid profile (total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides), plasma inflammatory mediators (C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α), markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)), and neutrophil function (cytokine production, phagocytic capacity, loss of membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, neutral lipid accumulation, phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)). Acute exercise increased the plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDH, IL1ra, and IL-6, led to the loss of membrane integrity, ROS production, and a high mitochondrial membrane potential in neutrophils, and reduced the phagocytic capacity and IL-6 production by the neutrophils (S0). However, supplementation prevented the increases in the plasma levels of LDH and IL-6, the loss of membrane integrity, and the alterations in ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential in the neutrophils that were induced by exercise (S1). In conclusion, DHA-rich FO supplementation reduces the markers of muscle damage, inflammatory disturbances, and neutrophil death induced by acute exercise in wheelchair athletes.

  16. Antecedent acute cycling exercise affects attention control: an ERP study using attention network test.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Pesce, Caterina; Chiang, Yi-Te; Kuo, Cheng-Yuh; Fong, Dong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the after-effects of an acute bout of moderate intensity aerobic cycling exercise on neuroelectric and behavioral indices of efficiency of three attentional networks: alerting, orienting, and executive (conflict) control. Thirty young, highly fit amateur basketball players performed a multifunctional attentional reaction time task, the attention network test (ANT), with a two-group randomized experimental design after an acute bout of moderate intensity spinning wheel exercise or without antecedent exercise. The ANT combined warning signals prior to targets, spatial cueing of potential target locations and target stimuli surrounded by congruent or incongruent flankers, which were provided to assess three attentional networks. Event-related brain potentials and task performance were measured during the ANT. Exercise resulted in a larger P3 amplitude in the alerting and executive control subtasks across frontal, central and parietal midline sites that was paralleled by an enhanced reaction speed only on trials with incongruent flankers of the executive control network. The P3 latency and response accuracy were not affected by exercise. These findings suggest that after spinning, more resources are allocated to task-relevant stimuli in tasks that rely on the alerting and executive control networks. However, the improvement in performance was observed in only the executively challenging conflict condition, suggesting that whether the brain resources that are rendered available immediately after acute exercise translate into better attention performance depends on the cognitive task complexity.

  17. Clavulanic acid does not affect convulsions in acute seizure tests in mice.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Maciej; Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wlaź, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CLAV) inhibits bacterial β-lactamases and is commonly used to aid antibiotic therapy. Prompted by the initial evidence suggestive of the potential anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of CLAV, the present study was undertaken to systematically evaluate its acute effects on seizure thresholds in seizure tests typically used in primary screening of potential antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In the present study, 6-Hz seizure threshold, maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test, and intravenous pentylenetetrazole (i.v. PTZ) seizure tests were used to determine anticonvulsant effects of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered CLAV in mice. Acute effects on motor coordination and muscle strength were assessed in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. Doses of CLAV studied in the present study were either comparable or extended the doses reported in the literature to be effective against kainic acid-induced convulsions in mice or behaviorally active in rodents and monkeys. CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds in the 6-Hz (64 ng/kg to 1 mg/kg) and MEST (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) seizure tests. Similarly, CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds for i.v. PTZ-induced myoclonic twitch, clonic convulsions, and tonic convulsions (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg). Finally, CLAV (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) had no effect on the motor performance and muscle strength in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. In summary, CLAV failed to affect seizure thresholds in three seizure tests in mice. Although the results of the present study do not support further development of CLAV as an AED, its beneficial effects in chronic epilepsy models warrant further evaluation owing to its, for example, potential neuroprotective properties.

  18. Micronucleus test in fishes as indicators of environmental quality in subestuaries of the Río de la Plata (Uruguay).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Villar, Silvia; Acuña Plavan, Alicia

    2015-02-28

    Genotoxic agents may exert damage that may be active through following generations. Micronuclei are cytoplasmic chromatin masses outside the main cell nucleus, indicators of chromosomal damage. This study applied micronuclei test to evaluate genetic damage of fish in three breeding and nursery areas of commercially important fishes exposed to differing degrees of anthropogenic impact: Pando, Solís Chico and Solís Grande sub-estuaries. The micronuclei test revealed differences in the presence and concentrations of genotoxic components in these sub-estuaries. Fish in the urban and industrialized Pando sub-estuary presented the highest percentages of micronuclei. The absence of seasonal changes in micronuclei in Pando fish could be explained by physical characteristics of the sub-estuary and by regional weather conditions. Odontesthes argentinensis (Valenciennes, 1835) was the species most susceptible to genotoxic components. It is recommended the use of a battery of biomarkers to better explain the health of organisms in that important nursery area. PMID:25455785

  19. Development of miniaturized acute toxicity tests for Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.L.; Kimerle, R.A.; Moser, E.M.; McKee, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Standard EPA methods for conducting static, 48-hour, acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) can be miniaturized to successfully yield accurate LC50/EC50 values. The screening procedure involves exposing the test organisms to 1 mL of test solution, in test chambers which consist of the wells on 48-well microliter plates. Toxicity of the microliter plates and solvent, DO concentration, organism biomass to test solution ratio, partitioning of the chemicals and dilution of the test solution during transfer of the test organisms were examined. Survival and exposure were not significantly altered using non-standard test chambers. Toxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), pentachlorophenol (PCP), kepone, and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) was determined using D. magna and fathead minnows. Serial dilutions were made and 1 mL aliquots pipetted into the wells. Daphnia magna, < 24 hours old, and newly hatched fathead minnows, were transferred into the wells, twenty individuals per concentration, one per well. Dose-response curves were established for all test compounds. LC50/EC50`s values obtained using miniaturized methods strongly correlated with those obtained using standard EPA procedures. The tests were repeated a number of times with coefficient of variances for D. magna ranging from 10% with kepone to 64% with SLS. For fathead minnows CVs ranged from 0% with PCP to 23% with kepone. It was concluded that current methods can be miniaturized, yet still provide accurate information regarding toxicity for compounds in limited supply. This method may also be amenable to effluent testing i.e. TIE fractions. Other benefits include reducing the amount of equipment and space needed to conduct a test and the time involved.

  20. New Immunochromatographic Rapid Test for Diagnosis of Acute Puumala Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hujakka, Helena; Koistinen, Vesa; Eerikäinen, Pekka; Kuronen, Ilpo; Mononen, Ilkka; Parviainen, Markku; Lundkvist, Åke; Vaheri, Antti; Närvänen, Ale; Vapalahti, Olli

    2001-01-01

    A new immunochromatographic rapid test, POC PUUMALA (Erilab Ltd., Kuopio, Finland), for detection of acute-phase Puumala virus (PUUV) infection was developed based on a highly purified baculovirus-expressed PUUV nucleocapsid protein antigen and lateral immunodiffusion techniques. After addition of sample (5 μl of serum, plasma, or fingertip blood) and buffer, PUUV-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, if present, together with the gold-conjugated anti-human IgM, formed a specific colored line in 5 min. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated with 200 serum samples and 30 fingertip blood samples. The reference method for the serum samples was a μ-capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for IgM and an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for IgG antibodies. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 100 and 99%, respectively, for unfrozen serum samples (n = 103; 12 PUUV IgM-positive samples). When freeze-thawed serum samples were used, the sensitivity and specificity were each 97.1% (n = 70; 35 PUUV IgM-positive samples). The specificity of the test was 96.2% for 27 serum samples with nonspecific IgM antibodies or rheumatoid factor (RF). The fingertip blood samples (n = 30) were negative, but they gave clear positive results when spiked with IgM-positive sera (n = 20). The results were in good agreement with the standard diagnostic methods. The rapid performance, the lack of need for refined laboratory equipment, and the high specificity with fresh serum and fingertip blood samples indicate that the developed POC PUUMALA rapid test is a useful tool for fast diagnosis of acute PUUV infection. PMID:11376049

  1. The effect of acute stress on subsequent neuropsychological test performance (2003).

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard; Al'Absi, Mustafa

    2004-06-01

    Acute mental stressors have been implicated as variables that may deleteriously affect neuropsychological test performance by increasing distractibility and decreasing working memory function. This study examined 25 subjects with no known neurological or psychiatric impairment on a brief battery of neuropsychological measures on alternate days following either rest or induced mental stress in a counterbalanced design. The test battery consisted of the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test, the Rey Complex Figure, and three Wechsler Memory Scale-III subtests (Logical Memory, Digit Span, and Visual Memory Span). The Ss average age was 24.8 years (S.D. = 10.1) and average education was 15.0 years (S.D. = 1.6). The mental stressor employed was a videotaped public-speaking exercise that has been shown in previous work to induce negative mood, cardiovascular reactivity, and perceived mental stress. Ss demonstrated statistically significant (P < .05) increases in negative mood, heart rate, diastolic blood pressure, and systolic blood pressure as well as elevated cortisol concentration following induced stress, suggesting substantially increased adrenocortical reactivity and cardiovascular stress response. There were, however, no statistically significant differences in any of the neuropsychological measures when stress versus rest days were compared. The results suggest that acute mental stressors may have no measurable effect on subsequent performance on selected neuropsychological tests in a normal population. Further work is suggested to determine whether pre-existing anxiety-related psychopathology or pre-existing neurological compromise might interact with induced mental stress to cause decrements in neuropsychological test performance.

  2. Acute effects of mercuric chloride on intracellular GSH levels and mercury distribution in the fish Oreochromic aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.; Min, S.Y.; Keong, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the effects of trace metals on intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH). Most of the research has been performed on rats. As GSH is ubiquitous in living organisms it is of interest to establish a relationship between mercury intoxication and intracellular GSH levels in fish; especially as fish living in rivers and coastal areas are often expose to mercury as an aquatic pollutant. The role of GSH in fish trace metal toxicity has not been thoroughly investigated. The distribution of total glutathione (oxidized + reduced) in selected black sea bass organs seems to follow the established pattern for mammalian organs. Thus, it would appear that teleostian and mammalian glutathione metabolism may have many similarities. There are few reports concerning the effects of mercury during the first few hours of exposure. The aim of this investigation is to establish any changes in organ GSH and mercury levels following just 2 h exposure to mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/).

  3. Comparison of feeding strategies in acute toxicity tests of crude oil and commercial bioremediation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cavender, R.C.; Cherry, D.S.; Yeager, M.M.; Bidwell, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Proposed modifications to the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan have prompted examinations of the methodology used in toxicity testing of the water soluble fraction (WSF) of oil, commercial bioremediation agents (CBA), and a combination of the two. The organisms currently used in acute (96 hr) testing of these agents are the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, and an estuarine mysid, Mysidopsis bahia. The mysid is a carnivorous species that must be fed during a test in order to prevent predation within the test chambers. Currently proposed methodology for silverside testing also includes feeding. The high oxygen demand of CBAs and the WSF of oil causes dissolved oxygen to be a factor in toxicity. This effect can be intensified by the addition of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) to the test chambers. The purpose of this study was to compare the toxicity of CBAs in combination with the WSF of oil to silversides with and without the addition of food. Tests were conducted using both 24-hour and 14-day spinning times for the CBA/WSF mixture. With the 24-hour spinning time, LC50 values from each day of the 4-day test were consistently lower in the Artemia fed test (47.8--22.6%) as compared to the unfed test (72.1--43.0%). A similar trend was seen in the 24 and 48 hour LC50`s in the 14-day spinning time. Overall, low dissolved oxygen was found to be most relevant at the highest CBA/WSF concentrations where D.O. dropped below 2 mg/l in Artemia fed tests.

  4. A methodology for community-level hypothesis testing applied to detect trends in phytoplankton and fish communities in Irish waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynam, Christopher P.; Cusack, Caroline; Stokes, David

    2010-04-01

    Many simple (univariate, bivariate) and complex (multivariate) statistical techniques are used to investigate trends in biological communities and to test hypotheses about potential relationships between ecosystem components. However, the simple methods that are commonly used (regression and correlation) are prone to Type I error (rejecting a true null hypothesis) when applied repeatedly. Although multivariate methods are preferable for community analysis, their computations are mathematically demanding and the interpretation of their outputs can be challenging. We present simple community analysis (SCA), an intuitive methodology with which to test for trend and correlation at the community-level. We demonstrate SCA using fish survey and phytoplankton count data: the non-parametric test statistic, Kendall's tau, is used to determine the strength of trends in abundance in 65 species of fish sampled during the Irish groundfish survey (maximal length of sampling periods were 1999-2007 in ICES division VIIg and 2002-2007 in divisions VIa, VIIb and VIIj, however catches of numerous species were not recorded prior to 2003) and in 77 genera of phytoplankton sampled at Irish aquaculture sites (1991-2002). The sample distribution of the test statistic (tau is used here, but other measures may be used) is compared to the expected distribution using distributional tests (Kolmogorov-Smirnov) to evaluate the significance of community-level trends. The phytoplankton community has been increasing in abundance on Irish western and southwestern coasts (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test D > 0.5, p < 0.001). Similarly, and in agreement with previously published long-term studies, Lusitanian fish have been increasing on the shelf to the north and west of Ireland ( D ≥ 0.35, p < 0.001), while the boreal community has been declining to the south (southeast, D = 0.47, p < 0.001; southwest, D = 0.32, p = 0.03). Although SCA cannot identify causality, the trends in fish communities are as expected

  5. Field and laboratory tests on acute toxicity of cadmium to freshwater crayfish

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Environmental regulatory standards for cadmium (EPA 1980), like those for most pollutants, are based on acute, laboratory toxicity tests of single species. Such tests can be conducted rapidly and inexpensively in comparison to acute or chronic field studies, but their validity has often been questioned. Laboratory-based criteria are subject to two criticisms: (1) chemical and physical conditions differ greatly in degree and variability from laboratory to field, and (2) species are not isolated, but live in an ecosystem of interacting taxa and biofeedback. To investigate the validity of basing field toxicity standards on laboratory data, the authors subjected the freshwater crayfish Orconectes immunis for 96 h to various levels of cadmium in laboratory aquaria and experimental ponds. The study was designed to evaluate in part the first criticism of lab-based criteria. The studies were conducted concurrently with similar short-term experiments on the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and coincided with studies of chronic cadmium stress on fathead minnows in experimental ponds.

  6. Tolerance development to Morris water maze test impairments induced by acute allopregnanolone.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, S; Löfgren, M; Birzniece, V; Bäckström, T; Johansson, I-M

    2006-05-12

    The progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, like benzodiazepines, reduces learning and impairs memory in rats. Both substances act as GABA agonists at the GABA-A receptor and impair the performance in the Morris water maze test. Women are during the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and during hormone replacement therapy exposed to allopregnanolone or allopregnanolone-like substances for extended periods. Long-term benzodiazepine treatment can cause tolerance against benzodiazepine-induced learning impairments. In this study we evaluated whether a corresponding allopregnanolone tolerance develops in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were pretreated for 3 days with i.v. allopregnanolone injections (2 mg/kg) one or two times a day, or for 7 days with allopregnanolone injections 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally, twice a day. Thereafter the rats were tested in the Morris water maze for 5 days and compared with relevant controls. Rats pretreated with allopregnanolone twice a day had decreased escape latency, path length and thigmotaxis compared with the acute allopregnanolone group that was pretreated with vehicle. Pretreatment for 7 days resulted in learning of the platform position. However, the memory of the platform position was in these tolerant rats not as strong as in controls only given vehicle. Allopregnanolone treatment was therefore seen to induce a partial tolerance against acute allopregnanolone effects in the Morris water maze.

  7. Some potentials and limits of the leucocrit test as a fish health assessment method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Gould, R.W.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of the leucocrit as a stress tolerance and fish health assessment method was evaluated by subjecting juvenile coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, or steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri, to standardized crowding, handling, temperature and disease challenges. The leucocrit was a sensitive indicator of the physiological stress resulting from crowding at population densities of 0·2–0·4 kg l−1, and to the stress of handling and to temperature changes. It was relatively insensitive to physiological sampling procedures which supports its continued development as a stress assessment method.In the case of fish diseases, subclinical or active Renibacterium salmoninarum and Yersinia ruckeriinfections had essentially no effect on leucocrit values. In contrast, active Aeromonas salmonicidainfections significantly depressed the leucocrit. However, no change was seen during the subclinical (incubation) phase prior to the development of an epizootic. Thus, the potential of the leucocrit as a fish health assessment method appears limited.

  8. In vivo testing of chemicals that undergo substantial biotransformation: An opportunity to advance in vitro-in vivo metabolism extrapolation procedures for fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is one of several keynote presentations given at the beginning of a one-day workshop on in vivo testing with fish. The purpose of this talk is to describe recent progress on using in vitro data to predict metabolism impacts on chemical accumulation by fish. The focus of th...

  9. EVALUATION OF A COMMERCIAL RAPID TEST KIT FOR DETECTION OF ACUTE DENGUE INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Krishnananthasivam, Shivankari; Fernando, Anira N; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Tennekoon, Rashika; De Man, Jeroen; Seneviratne, Dammika; Premawansa, Sunil; Premawansa, Gayani; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan

    2015-07-01

    Early diagnosis is important for clinical management of dengue disease. While classic laboratory tests are often tedious and time consuming, point of care devices offer a rapid, cost-effective and user-friendly alternative provided their accuracy is acceptable. This study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and efficiency of SD BIOLINE Dengue Duo® rapid NS1, IgM and IgG test kit for diagnosis of acute dengue virus infection. Standard laboratory diagnostics, RT-PCR, IgM and IgG capture ELISAs were carried out on 143 suspected dengue patient samples obtained from a Sri Lankan population. Using the results of these standard laboratory tests as reference, the sensitivity and specificity of the SD Dengue Duo® NS1 test was 57% and 87%, respectively, and those of the IgM test was 50% and 84%, respectively. The combined sensitivity and specificity of the SD Dengue Duo® NS1/ IgM test was 72% and 80%, respectively. The SD Dengue Duo® NS1 test detected NS1 for up to 9 days from onset of fever. Primary and secondary dengue cases were classified according to the IgG test, of which the kit identified 88% and 26% of primary and of secondary infection, respectively. Although the SD Dengue Duo® kit was not as accurate as the standard tests, it still can serve the useful reference for initial screening of suspected dengue cases, especially in poor resource hospital settings and aid in clinical disease management of dengue infection. PMID:26867379

  10. Testing Three Species Distribution Modelling Strategies to Define Fish Assemblage Reference Conditions for Stream Bioassessment and Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter M.; Kennard, Mark J.; Moffatt, David B.; Sheldon, Fran; Butler, Gavin L.

    2016-01-01

    Species distribution models are widely used for stream bioassessment, estimating changes in habitat suitability and identifying conservation priorities. We tested the accuracy of three modelling strategies (single species ensemble, multi-species response and community classification models) to predict fish assemblages at reference stream segments in coastal subtropical Australia. We aimed to evaluate each modelling strategy for consistency of predictor variable selection; determine which strategy is most suitable for stream bioassessment using fish indicators; and appraise which strategies best match other stream management applications. Five models, one single species ensemble, two multi-species response and two community classification models, were calibrated using fish species presence-absence data from 103 reference sites. Models were evaluated for generality and transferability through space and time using four external reference site datasets. Elevation and catchment slope were consistently identified as key correlates of fish assemblage composition among models. The community classification models had high omission error rates and contributed fewer taxa to the ‘expected’ component of the taxonomic completeness (O/E50) index than the other strategies. This potentially decreases the model sensitivity for site impact assessment. The ensemble model accurately and precisely modelled O/E50 for the training data, but produced biased predictions for the external datasets. The multi-species response models afforded relatively high accuracy and precision coupled with low bias across external datasets and had lower taxa omission rates than the community classification models. They inherently included rare, but predictable species while excluding species that were poorly modelled among all strategies. We suggest that the multi-species response modelling strategy is most suited to bioassessment using freshwater fish assemblages in our study area. At the species level

  11. Contrasting patterns of larval mortality in two sympatric riverine fish species: a test of the critical period hypothesis.

    PubMed

    McCasker, Nicole; Humphries, Paul; Meredith, Shaun; Klomp, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the causal mechanisms that determine recruitment success is critical to the effective conservation of wild fish populations. Although recruitment strength is likely determined during early life when mortality is greatest, few studies have documented age-specific mortality rates for fish during this period. We investigated age-specific mortality of individual cohorts of two species of riverine fish from yolksac larvae to juveniles, assaying for the presence of a "critical period": A time when mortality is unusually high. Early life stages of carp gudgeons (Hypseleotris spp.) and unspecked hardyhead (Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum fulvus)-two fishes that differ in fecundity, egg size and overlap between endogenous and exogenous feeding-were collected every second day for four months. We fitted survivorship curves to 22 carp gudgeon and 15 unspecked hardyhead four-day cohorts and tested several mortality functions. Mortality rates declined with age for carp gudgeon, with mean instantaneous mortality rates (-Z) ranging from 1.40-0.03. In contrast, mortality rates for unspecked hardyhead were constant across the larval period, with a mean -Z of 0.15. There was strong evidence of a critical period for carp gudgeon larvae from hatch until 6 days old, and no evidence of a critical period for unspecked hardyhead. Total larval mortality for carp gudgeon and unspecked hardyhead up to 24 days of age was estimated to be 97.8 and 94.3%, respectively. We hypothesise that life history strategy may play an important role in shaping overall mortality and the pattern of mortality during early life in these two fishes.

  12. Contrasting Patterns of Larval Mortality in Two Sympatric Riverine Fish Species: A Test of the Critical Period Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    McCasker, Nicole; Humphries, Paul; Meredith, Shaun; Klomp, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the causal mechanisms that determine recruitment success is critical to the effective conservation of wild fish populations. Although recruitment strength is likely determined during early life when mortality is greatest, few studies have documented age-specific mortality rates for fish during this period. We investigated age-specific mortality of individual cohorts of two species of riverine fish from yolksac larvae to juveniles, assaying for the presence of a “critical period”: A time when mortality is unusually high. Early life stages of carp gudgeons (Hypseleotris spp.) and unspecked hardyhead (Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum fulvus)—two fishes that differ in fecundity, egg size and overlap between endogenous and exogenous feeding—were collected every second day for four months. We fitted survivorship curves to 22 carp gudgeon and 15 unspecked hardyhead four-day cohorts and tested several mortality functions. Mortality rates declined with age for carp gudgeon, with mean instantaneous mortality rates (-Z) ranging from 1.40–0.03. In contrast, mortality rates for unspecked hardyhead were constant across the larval period, with a mean -Z of 0.15. There was strong evidence of a critical period for carp gudgeon larvae from hatch until 6 days old, and no evidence of a critical period for unspecked hardyhead. Total larval mortality for carp gudgeon and unspecked hardyhead up to 24 days of age was estimated to be 97.8 and 94.3%, respectively. We hypothesise that life history strategy may play an important role in shaping overall mortality and the pattern of mortality during early life in these two fishes. PMID:25299441

  13. Testing Three Species Distribution Modelling Strategies to Define Fish Assemblage Reference Conditions for Stream Bioassessment and Related Applications.

    PubMed

    Rose, Peter M; Kennard, Mark J; Moffatt, David B; Sheldon, Fran; Butler, Gavin L

    2016-01-01

    Species distribution models are widely used for stream bioassessment, estimating changes in habitat suitability and identifying conservation priorities. We tested the accuracy of three modelling strategies (single species ensemble, multi-species response and community classification models) to predict fish assemblages at reference stream segments in coastal subtropical Australia. We aimed to evaluate each modelling strategy for consistency of predictor variable selection; determine which strategy is most suitable for stream bioassessment using fish indicators; and appraise which strategies best match other stream management applications. Five models, one single species ensemble, two multi-species response and two community classification models, were calibrated using fish species presence-absence data from 103 reference sites. Models were evaluated for generality and transferability through space and time using four external reference site datasets. Elevation and catchment slope were consistently identified as key correlates of fish assemblage composition among models. The community classification models had high omission error rates and contributed fewer taxa to the 'expected' component of the taxonomic completeness (O/E50) index than the other strategies. This potentially decreases the model sensitivity for site impact assessment. The ensemble model accurately and precisely modelled O/E50 for the training data, but produced biased predictions for the external datasets. The multi-species response models afforded relatively high accuracy and precision coupled with low bias across external datasets and had lower taxa omission rates than the community classification models. They inherently included rare, but predictable species while excluding species that were poorly modelled among all strategies. We suggest that the multi-species response modelling strategy is most suited to bioassessment using freshwater fish assemblages in our study area. At the species level

  14. An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer-term toxicity from plant protection product active substances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Maynard, Samuel K; Crane, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full life cycle (FLC) tests are generally required only when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine-disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ELS and FLC studies first established more than 35 yrs ago. Recently, this relationship has been challenged by some regulatory authorities, and it has been recommended that more substances should undergo FLC testing. In addition, a project proposal has been submitted to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to develop a fish partial life cycle (PLC) test including a reproductive assessment. Both FLC and PLC tests are animal- and resource-intensive and technically challenging and should therefore be undertaken only if there is clear evidence that they are necessary for coming to a regulatory decision. The present study reports on an analysis of a database of paired fish ELS and FLC endpoints for plant protection product active substances from European Union draft assessment reports and the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs Pesticide Ecotoxicity Database. Analysis of this database shows a clear relationship between ELS and FLC responses, with similar median sensitivity across substances when no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) are compared. There was also no indication that classification of a substance as a mammalian reproductive toxicant leads to more sensitive effects in fish FLC tests than in ELS tests. Indeed, the response of the ELS tests was generally more sensitive than the most sensitive reproduction NOEC from a FLC test. This analysis indicates that current testing strategies and guidelines are fit for purpose and that there is no need for fish full or partial life cycle tests for most plant protection

  15. An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer-term toxicity from plant protection product active substances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Maynard, Samuel K; Crane, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full life cycle (FLC) tests are generally required only when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine-disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ELS and FLC studies first established more than 35 yrs ago. Recently, this relationship has been challenged by some regulatory authorities, and it has been recommended that more substances should undergo FLC testing. In addition, a project proposal has been submitted to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to develop a fish partial life cycle (PLC) test including a reproductive assessment. Both FLC and PLC tests are animal- and resource-intensive and technically challenging and should therefore be undertaken only if there is clear evidence that they are necessary for coming to a regulatory decision. The present study reports on an analysis of a database of paired fish ELS and FLC endpoints for plant protection product active substances from European Union draft assessment reports and the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs Pesticide Ecotoxicity Database. Analysis of this database shows a clear relationship between ELS and FLC responses, with similar median sensitivity across substances when no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) are compared. There was also no indication that classification of a substance as a mammalian reproductive toxicant leads to more sensitive effects in fish FLC tests than in ELS tests. Indeed, the response of the ELS tests was generally more sensitive than the most sensitive reproduction NOEC from a FLC test. This analysis indicates that current testing strategies and guidelines are fit for purpose and that there is no need for fish full or partial life cycle tests for most plant protection

  16. False-positive rapid plasma reagin testing in patients with acute Plasmodium vivax malaria: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Dean, Katherine; Gadea, Nilda; Halsey, Eric S; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2014-01-01

    Non-treponemal tests such as the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assay are mainstays of syphilis diagnosis, but false-positive tests are common. We identified false-positive RPR titers in 8.2% of patients with malaria due to Plasmodium vivax in northern Peru. Similar rates were not detected in patients with other acute febrile illnesses.

  17. "Fish Friendly" Hydropower Turbine Development and Deployment. Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of a collaborative research project funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and hydropower industry partners with the objective of completing the remaining developmental engineering required for a “fish-friendly” hydropower turbine called the Alden turbine.

  18. Testing the influence of environmental heterogeneity on fish species richness in two biogeographic provinces

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Raphaël; Cabana, Gilbert; Rodríguez, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental homogenization in coastal ecosystems impacted by human activities may be an important factor explaining the observed decline in fish species richness. We used fish community data (>200 species) from extensive surveys conducted in two biogeographic provinces (extent >1,000 km) in North America to quantify the relationship between fish species richness and local (grain <10 km2) environmental heterogeneity. Our analyses are based on samples collected at nearly 800 stations over a period of five years. We demonstrate that fish species richness in coastal ecosystems is associated locally with the spatial heterogeneity of environmental variables but not with their magnitude. The observed effect of heterogeneity on species richness was substantially greater than that generated by simulations from a random placement model of community assembly, indicating that the observed relationship is unlikely to arise from veil or sampling effects. Our results suggest that restoring or actively protecting areas of high habitat heterogeneity may be of great importance for slowing current trends of decreasing biodiversity in coastal ecosystems. PMID:25699209

  19. Use of butterflies as nontarget insect test species and the acute toxicity and hazard of mosquito control insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Honeybees are the standard insect test species used for toxicity testing of pesticides on nontarget insects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Butterflies are another important insect order and a valued ecological resource in pollination. The current study conducted acute toxicity tests with naled, permethrin, and dichlorvos on fifth larval instar (caterpillars) and adults of different native Florida, USA, butterfly species to determine median lethal doses (24-h LD50), because limited acute toxicity data are available with this major insect group. Thorax- and wing-only applications of each insecticide were conducted. Based on LD50s, thorax and wing application exposures were acutely toxic to both caterpillars and adults. Permethrin was the most acutely toxic insecticide after thorax exposure to fifth instars and adult butterflies. However, no generalization on acute toxicity (sensitivity) of the insecticides could be concluded based on exposures to fifth instars versus adult butterflies or on thorax versus wing exposures of adult butterflies. A comparison of LD50s of the butterflies from this study (caterpillars and adults) with honeybee LD50s for the adult mosquito insecticides on a µg/organism or µg/g basis indicates that several butterfly species are more sensitive to these insecticides than are honeybees. A comparison of species sensitivity distributions for all three insecticides shows that permethrin had the lowest 10th percentile. Using a hazard quotient approach indicates that both permethrin and naled applications in the field may present potential acute hazards to butterflies, whereas no acute hazard of dichlorvos is apparent in butterflies. Butterflies should be considered as potential test organisms when nontarget insect testing of pesticides is suggested under FIFRA. PMID:21309017

  20. Use of butterflies as nontarget insect test species and the acute toxicity and hazard of mosquito control insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Honeybees are the standard insect test species used for toxicity testing of pesticides on nontarget insects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Butterflies are another important insect order and a valued ecological resource in pollination. The current study conducted acute toxicity tests with naled, permethrin, and dichlorvos on fifth larval instar (caterpillars) and adults of different native Florida, USA, butterfly species to determine median lethal doses (24-h LD50), because limited acute toxicity data are available with this major insect group. Thorax- and wing-only applications of each insecticide were conducted. Based on LD50s, thorax and wing application exposures were acutely toxic to both caterpillars and adults. Permethrin was the most acutely toxic insecticide after thorax exposure to fifth instars and adult butterflies. However, no generalization on acute toxicity (sensitivity) of the insecticides could be concluded based on exposures to fifth instars versus adult butterflies or on thorax versus wing exposures of adult butterflies. A comparison of LD50s of the butterflies from this study (caterpillars and adults) with honeybee LD50s for the adult mosquito insecticides on a µg/organism or µg/g basis indicates that several butterfly species are more sensitive to these insecticides than are honeybees. A comparison of species sensitivity distributions for all three insecticides shows that permethrin had the lowest 10th percentile. Using a hazard quotient approach indicates that both permethrin and naled applications in the field may present potential acute hazards to butterflies, whereas no acute hazard of dichlorvos is apparent in butterflies. Butterflies should be considered as potential test organisms when nontarget insect testing of pesticides is suggested under FIFRA.

  1. An Evaluation of Select Test Variables Potentially Affecting Acute Oil Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Echols, Brandi S; Smith, A; Gardinali, P; Rand, G

    2016-02-01

    In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon incident (2010) in the Gulf of Mexico, an abundance of research studies have been performed, but the methodologies used have varied making comparisons and replication difficult. In this study, acute toxicity tests with mysids and inland silversides were performed to examine the effect of different variables on test results. The toxicity test variables evaluated in this study included (1) open versus closed static test chambers, (2) natural versus artificial diluent, (3) aerated versus nonaerated test solution, and (4) low versus medium energy water-accommodated (WAF) mixing energies. The use of tests using natural or artificial diluent showed no difference in either toxicity test or analytical chemistry results. Based on median lethal concentrations (LC50) of WAFs of unweathered oil (MASS), mysid tests performed in closed chambers were approximately 41 % lower than LC50 values from open-chamber studies, possibly a result of the presence of low-molecular weight volatile aromatics (i.e., naphthalenes). This research also showed that using a medium-energy WAF (with a 20–25 % vortex) increases the number of chemical components compared with low-energy WAF, thus affecting the composition of the exposure media and increasing toxicity. The comparison of toxic units as a measure of the potential toxicity of fresh and weathered oils showed that weathered oils (e.g., Juniper, CTC) are less toxic than the unweathered MASS oil. In the event of future oil spills, these variables should be considered to ensure that data regarding the potential toxicity and environmental risk are of good quality and reproducible.

  2. An Evaluation of Select Test Variables Potentially Affecting Acute Oil Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Echols, Brandi S; Smith, A; Gardinali, P; Rand, G

    2016-02-01

    In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon incident (2010) in the Gulf of Mexico, an abundance of research studies have been performed, but the methodologies used have varied making comparisons and replication difficult. In this study, acute toxicity tests with mysids and inland silversides were performed to examine the effect of different variables on test results. The toxicity test variables evaluated in this study included (1) open versus closed static test chambers, (2) natural versus artificial diluent, (3) aerated versus nonaerated test solution, and (4) low versus medium energy water-accommodated (WAF) mixing energies. The use of tests using natural or artificial diluent showed no difference in either toxicity test or analytical chemistry results. Based on median lethal concentrations (LC50) of WAFs of unweathered oil (MASS), mysid tests performed in closed chambers were approximately 41 % lower than LC50 values from open-chamber studies, possibly a result of the presence of low-molecular weight volatile aromatics (i.e., naphthalenes). This research also showed that using a medium-energy WAF (with a 20–25 % vortex) increases the number of chemical components compared with low-energy WAF, thus affecting the composition of the exposure media and increasing toxicity. The comparison of toxic units as a measure of the potential toxicity of fresh and weathered oils showed that weathered oils (e.g., Juniper, CTC) are less toxic than the unweathered MASS oil. In the event of future oil spills, these variables should be considered to ensure that data regarding the potential toxicity and environmental risk are of good quality and reproducible. PMID:26467150

  3. Feeling the heat: the effect of acute temperature changes on predator–prey interactions in coral reef fish

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Bridie J. M.; Domenici, Paolo; Munday, Phillip L.; McCormick, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that the elevated temperatures predicted to occur by the end of the century can affect the physiological performance and behaviour of larval and juvenile fishes; however, little is known of the effect of these temperatures on ecological processes, such as predator–prey interactions. Here, we show that exposure to elevated temperatures significantly affected the predator–prey interactions of a pair of common reef fish, the planktivorous damselfish (Pomacentrus wardi) and the piscivorous dottyback (Pseudochromis fuscus). When predators exposed to elevated temperatures interacted with prey exposed in a similar manner, maximal attack speeds increased. This effect coupled with decreasing prey escape speeds and escape distances led to increased predation rates. Prey exposed to elevated temperatures also had decreased reaction distances and increased apparent looming threshold, suggesting that their sensory performance was affected. This occurred despite the increase in maximal attack speeds, which in other species has been shown to increase reaction distances. These results suggest that the escape performance of prey is sensitive to short-term increases in ambient temperature. As marine environments become more thermally variable in the future, our results demonstrate that some predators may become more successful, suggesting that there will be strong selection for the maintenance of maximal escape performance in prey. In the present era of rapid climate change, understanding how changes to individual performance influence the relationships between predators and their prey will be increasingly important in predicting the effects of climate change within ecosystems. PMID:27293696

  4. Feeling the heat: the effect of acute temperature changes on predator-prey interactions in coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Allan, Bridie J M; Domenici, Paolo; Munday, Phillip L; McCormick, Mark I

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that the elevated temperatures predicted to occur by the end of the century can affect the physiological performance and behaviour of larval and juvenile fishes; however, little is known of the effect of these temperatures on ecological processes, such as predator-prey interactions. Here, we show that exposure to elevated temperatures significantly affected the predator-prey interactions of a pair of common reef fish, the planktivorous damselfish (Pomacentrus wardi) and the piscivorous dottyback (Pseudochromis fuscus). When predators exposed to elevated temperatures interacted with prey exposed in a similar manner, maximal attack speeds increased. This effect coupled with decreasing prey escape speeds and escape distances led to increased predation rates. Prey exposed to elevated temperatures also had decreased reaction distances and increased apparent looming threshold, suggesting that their sensory performance was affected. This occurred despite the increase in maximal attack speeds, which in other species has been shown to increase reaction distances. These results suggest that the escape performance of prey is sensitive to short-term increases in ambient temperature. As marine environments become more thermally variable in the future, our results demonstrate that some predators may become more successful, suggesting that there will be strong selection for the maintenance of maximal escape performance in prey. In the present era of rapid climate change, understanding how changes to individual performance influence the relationships between predators and their prey will be increasingly important in predicting the effects of climate change within ecosystems.

  5. Feeling the heat: the effect of acute temperature changes on predator-prey interactions in coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Allan, Bridie J M; Domenici, Paolo; Munday, Phillip L; McCormick, Mark I

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that the elevated temperatures predicted to occur by the end of the century can affect the physiological performance and behaviour of larval and juvenile fishes; however, little is known of the effect of these temperatures on ecological processes, such as predator-prey interactions. Here, we show that exposure to elevated temperatures significantly affected the predator-prey interactions of a pair of common reef fish, the planktivorous damselfish (Pomacentrus wardi) and the piscivorous dottyback (Pseudochromis fuscus). When predators exposed to elevated temperatures interacted with prey exposed in a similar manner, maximal attack speeds increased. This effect coupled with decreasing prey escape speeds and escape distances led to increased predation rates. Prey exposed to elevated temperatures also had decreased reaction distances and increased apparent looming threshold, suggesting that their sensory performance was affected. This occurred despite the increase in maximal attack speeds, which in other species has been shown to increase reaction distances. These results suggest that the escape performance of prey is sensitive to short-term increases in ambient temperature. As marine environments become more thermally variable in the future, our results demonstrate that some predators may become more successful, suggesting that there will be strong selection for the maintenance of maximal escape performance in prey. In the present era of rapid climate change, understanding how changes to individual performance influence the relationships between predators and their prey will be increasingly important in predicting the effects of climate change within ecosystems. PMID:27293696

  6. Effects of acute fluoxetine, paroxetine and desipramine on rats tested on the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Drapier, Dominique; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Laviolle, Bruno; Millet, Bruno; Allain, Hervé; Bourin, Michel; Reymann, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-25

    Antidepressants are usually prescribed for the treatment of depression but more recently have also been recommended for the treatment of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anxiogenic- or anxiolytic-like effects of an acute administration of antidepressants (serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds) in male Wistar rats submitted to the elevated plus-maze. Fluoxetine (2.5, 5, 10, 15mg/kg), paroxetine (0.1, 0.5, 3, 12mg/kg) and desipramine (2.5, 5, 10mg/kg) or their vehicles were administered intraperitoneally 30min prior to testing. Diazepam (0.5, 1.5, 2.5mg/kg) was used as a positive comparator for anxiolytic effect. In comparison with control animals, the percentage of time the rats treated with fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (3 and 12mg/kg) spent in the open arms decreased. The percent of inactive time spent in the open arms also decreased in rats given fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (12mg/kg). Desipramine was inactive on all these parameters. In conclusion, acute treatment with fluoxetine and paroxetine, but not with desipramine, produced a pattern of anxiety behavior. Thus, the pharmacological mechanism appears to be due more to serotonergic than adrenergic neurotransmission. The elevated plus-maze exhibits good sensitivity for detecting anxiogenic effects of antidepressant drugs and the conventional parameters are sufficient and reliable for detecting such effects.

  7. A case of salicylazosulfapyridine (Salazopyrin)-induced acute pancreatitis with positive lymphocyte stimulation test (LST).

    PubMed

    Chiba, M; Horie, Y; Ishida, H; Arakawa, H; Masamune, O

    1987-04-01

    A case of acute pancreatitis induced by salicylazosulfapyridine (Salazopyrin, SASP) was reported. A 33-year-old man with ulcerative colitis was given SASP. Five weeks later, P-type serum amylase was found to be elevated. The amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) and serum lipase were also elevated. There were neither subjective symptoms nor abnormal ultrasound findings in the pancrease. Lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) to SASP was positive. Asymptomatic pancreatitis by SASP was suspected and SASP administration was halted. Afterwards the abnormal data became normal. Readministration of SASP because of relapse caused an episode of pancreatitis similar to the first occasion. LST was negative before SASP intake and became positive after intake. Desensitization to SASP was unsuccessful. LST was negative before attempting desensitization and became positive when the dosage of SASP increased to 100 mg daily. This is the second case of acute pancreatitis reported to be induced by SASP and this is the first case in which LST to SASP was described. To our knowledge, this is also the first case in which a positive LST was described in drug-induced pancreatitis. This case provides evidence for the role of delayed type hypersensitivity in the etiopathogenesis of SASP allergy and of dose-independent drug-induced pancreatitis. PMID:2885242

  8. Decision support for acute problems: the role of the standardized patient in usability testing.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jeffrey A; Rose, Alan F; Palchuk, Matvey B; Chang, Frank; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Chan, Joseph C; Middleton, Blackford

    2006-12-01

    For applications that require clinician use while interacting with patients, usability testing with standardized patients has the potential to approximate actual patient care in a controlled setting. We used hypothetical scenarios and a standardized patient to collect quantitative and qualitative results in testing an early prototype of a new application, the Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Smart Form. The standardized patient fit well into the usability testing sessions. Clinicians had a positive response to the standardized patients and behaved as they normally would during a clinical encounter. Positive findings of the ARI Smart Form included that users thought it had impressive functionality and the potential to save time. Criticism focused on the visual design, which could be streamlined, and navigation, which was difficult in some areas. Based on these results, we are modifying the ARI Smart Form in preparation for use in actual patient care. Standardized patients should be considered for usability testing, especially if an application is to be used during the patient interview.

  9. Amygdala lesions produce analgesia in a novel, ethologically relevant acute pain test.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M A; Ardid, D; Henrie, J A; Tamashiro, K; Blanchard, D C; Blanchard, R J

    1999-08-01

    Acute pain tests using mechanical stimuli typically do not involve objects important in the evolutionary history of the subjects, and may fail to evaluate the contribution of biobehavioral defensive reactions to the total pain response. Spines are common structural defenses that protect plants and animals against predation. The present studies examined the reaction to contact with such natural, mechanical pain stimuli in the laboratory rat, utilizing a floor board with protruding pins located in the middle of a novel alley (the "fakir" test). Behavioral responses were characterized in 10-min tests (Experiment 1). Subjects showed voluntary contact with the pins followed by patterns of avoidance and risk assessment (stretch attend and stretch approach). Few subjects crossed the array of pins. The amygdala has been implicated in the perception of pain, particularly in stressful or fearful contexts. In Experiment 2, the fakir test was used to examine, concurrently, the effects of amygdala lesions on analgesiometric (frequency and duration of pin crossings) and anxiometric (risk assessment) measures. Large, bilateral, lesions of the amygdala significantly increased both the number of pin crossings and time spent on the pins without affecting the risk assessment measures. These findings suggest a possible dissociation between anxiety and pain perception with an important (nonaffective) role for the amygdala in the latter.

  10. Further Tests of Changes in Fish Escape Behavior Resulting from Sublethal Stresses Associated with Hydroelectric Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, M.G.

    2004-10-20

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. The most commonly used laboratory technique for assessing susceptibility to predation is the predator preference test. In this report, we evaluate the field application of a new technique that may be valuable for assessing indirect mortality, based on changes in a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. Initial studies demonstrated that turbulence created in a small laboratory tank can alter escape behavior. As a next step, we converted our laboratory design to a more portable unit, transported it to Alden Research Laboratory in Holden, Massachusetts, and used it to test fish that passed uninjured through a pilot-scale turbine runner. Rainbow trout were either passed through the turbine or exposed to handling stresses, and their behavior was subsequently evaluated. Groups of five fish were given a startle stimulus (a visual and pressure wave cue) and filmed with a high-speed (500 frames per s) video camera. The reactions of each group of fish to the startle stimulus were filmed at nominally 1-, 5-, and 15-min post-exposure. We compared the behaviors of 70 fish passed through the turbine

  11. [Development and clinical testing of the Russian version of the Acute Cystitis Symptom Score - ACSS].

    PubMed

    Alidjanov, J F; Abdufattaev, U A; Makhmudov, D Kh; Mirkhamidov, D Kh; Khadzhikhanov, F A; Azgamov, A V; Pilatz, A; Naber, K G; Wagenlehner, F M; Akilov, F A

    2014-01-01

    The Acute Cystitis Symptom Score - ACSS was originally developed in the Uzbek language and has demonstrated high reliability and validity. The study was aimed to develop a Russian version of the ACSS questionnaire and evaluate its psychometric properties. Translation and adaptation of the ACSS questionnaire containing 18 questions, 6 of them - for the typical symptoms of acute cystitis (AC), 4 - for the differential diagnosis; 3 - for the quality of life, and 5 - for the conditions that may affect the choice of treatment, were performed according to the recommendations developed by the Mapi Research Institute. Study involved 83 Russian-speaking women (mean age, 35.6 ±13.7 years); 38 (45.8%) patients were in the main group (patients with AC), and 45 (54.2%) - in the control group (without AC). Medical examination and appropriate treatment of the respondents were conducted in accordance with approved standards. After completing the course of therapy, 19 (50%) patients of the main group came for the control examination. There was statistically significant difference in the scores obtained in the two groups. Score profiles positively correlated with the results of laboratory tests (rho = 0.26-0.48). Cronbach's alpha for the Russian version of the questionnaire was 0.86 (95% CI, 0.81-0.91), area under the curve in the ROC analysis was 0.96. The results of testing the Russian version correspond to those of the original version. The Russian version of the ACSS questionnaire has high. reliability and validity, and can be recommended for clinical research and diagnosis of primary AC, and dynamic monitoring of the effectiveness of the treatment of the Russian-speaking population of patients.

  12. Dexamethasone acutely down-regulates genes involved in steroidogenesis in stallion testes.

    PubMed

    Ing, Nancy H; Forrest, David W; Riggs, Penny K; Loux, Shavahn; Love, Charlie C; Brinsko, Steven P; Varner, Dickson D; Welsh, Thomas H

    2014-09-01

    In rodents, livestock and primate species, a single dose of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone acutely lowers testosterone biosynthesis. To determine the mechanism of decreased testosterone biosynthesis, stallions were treated with 0.1mg/kg dexamethasone 12h prior to castration. Dexamethasone decreased serum concentrations of testosterone by 60% compared to saline-treated control stallions. Transcriptome analyses (microarrays, northern blots and quantitative PCR) of testes discovered that dexamethasone treatment decreased concentrations of glucocorticoid receptor alpha (NR3C1), alpha actinin 4 (ACTN4), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR), squalene epoxidase (SQLE), 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24), glutathione S-transferase A3 (GSTA3) and aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNAs. Dexamethasone increased concentrations of NFkB inhibitor A (NFKBIA) mRNA in testes. SQLE, DHCR24 and GSTA3 mRNAs were predominantly expressed by Leydig cells. In man and livestock, the GSTA3 protein provides a major 3-ketosteroid isomerase activity: conversion of Δ(5)-androstenedione to Δ(4)-androstenedione, the immediate precursor of testosterone. Consistent with the decrease in GSTA3 mRNA, dexamethasone decreased the 3-ketosteroid isomerase activity in testicular extracts. In conclusion, dexamethasone acutely decreased the expression of genes involved in hormone signaling (NR3C1, ACTN4 and LHCGR), cholesterol synthesis (SQLE and DHCR24) and steroidogenesis (GSTA3 and CYP19A1) along with testosterone production. This is the first report of dexamethasone down-regulating expression of the GSTA3 gene and a very late step in testosterone biosynthesis. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms involved may lead to new approaches to modulate androgen regulation of the physiology of humans and livestock in health and disease. PMID:25010478

  13. Prognostic utility of intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging and exercise testing after an acute infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Leppo, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    To define the prognosis in asymptomatic survivors of acute infarcts (MI), coronary vasodilation was induced with I.V. dipyridamole, followed by Thallium-201 (T1) imaging in 26 patients just prior to discharge. All patients (pts) also had a modified exercise treadmill (MET) test. During the imaging protocol, 10 (39%) pts experienced transient adverse effects and 12 (46%) pts had either angina or ST depression with MET. During a mean follow-up of 17 months, 13 (50%) pts had a cardiac event defined as readmission for control of angina, MI or death. In the 13 pts having cardiac events, 4 (31%) had ST depression and 2 (15%) had angina during MET, but 12 (92%) demonstrated T1 redistribution (RD) as determined by at least 1 segment/scan having a transient defect. A logistic regression analysis using several exercise, scintigraphic and general clinical parameters, showed that the presence of T1 RD was the only significant (p <0.001) predictor for future cardiac events. The predicted probability for events in pts with T1 RD was 80 +- 10% (SD) and was 9 +- 9% in those without T1 RD. The mean number of defects per scan was similar in pts with and without cardiac events, but compared to persistent defects, transient ones are associated with potentially ischemic myocardium. Although the pt population is relatively small, dipyridamole T1 imaging after MI appears to be safe and has demonstrated prognostic value. It also offers an alternative and/or addition to exercise testing in the predischarge evaluation after acute MI.

  14. Cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells present a valuable alternative to fish lethal testing for azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elsa T; Pardal, Miguel Â; Laizé, Vincent; Cancela, M Leonor; Oliveira, Paulo J; Serafim, Teresa L

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims at identifying, among six mammalian and fish cell lines, a sensitive cell line whose in vitro median inhibitory concentration (IC50) better matches the in vivo short-term Sparus aurata median lethal concentration (LC50). IC50s and LC50 were assessed after exposure to the widely used fungicide azoxystrobin (AZX). Statistical results were relevant for most cell lines after 48 h of AZX exposure, being H9c2 the most sensitive cells, as well as the ones which provided the best prediction of fish toxicity, with a LC50,96h/IC50,48h = 0.581. H9c2 cell proliferation upon 72 h of AZX exposure revealed a LC50,96h/IC50,72h = 0.998. Therefore, identical absolute sensitivities were attained for both in vitro and in vivo assays. To conclude, the H9c2 cell-based assay is reliable and represents a suitable ethical alternative to conventional fish assays for AZX, and could be used to get valuable insights into the toxic effects of other pesticides.

  15. Comparisons among survey methodologies to test for abundance and size of a highly targeted fish species.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J P A; Struthers, C D

    2013-01-01

    Three sampling methods for estimating abundance and size of blue cod Parapercis colias were compared inside and outside Kapiti Marine Reserve, New Zealand (40° 49' 31·77('') S; 174° 55' 02·87('') E). Two baited methods, baited underwater video (BUV) and experimental angling (EA), were more efficient and had lower levels of estimate variation than diver-based underwater visual census (UVC). The BUV and EA recorded more fish and of greater size ranges than UVC, and also had fewer zero count replicates. The BUV and EA methodologies revealed highly significant differences in abundance and size of fish between sites (reserve v. non-reserve), whereas UVC revealed no such differences. These results indicate that BUV is likely to be the most accurate, cost-effective and easy to use methodology for the surveying of carnivorous temperate reef fishes for future monitoring. It is noted, however, that new data acquired using the BUV methodology may need to be compared over a calibration period to data acquired using the UVC methodology to ensure that historical data sets derived from UVC still have validity and application for future monitoring activity.

  16. γ-Oryzanol protects against acute cadmium-induced oxidative damage in mice testes.

    PubMed

    Spiazzi, Cristiano C; Manfredini, Vanusa; Barcellos da Silva, Fabiana E; Flores, Erico M M; Izaguirry, Aryele P; Vargas, Laura M; Soares, Melina B; Santos, Francielli W

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal that is present at low levels mainly in food and water and also in cigar smoke. The present study evaluated the testicular damage caused by acute cadmium exposure and verified the protective role of γ-oryzanol (ORY). Mice were administrated with a single dose of 2.5mg/kg of CdCl2, and then treated with ORY (50mM in canola oil, 5mL/kg). Testes were removed after 24h and tested for lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein carbonylation, DNA breakage, ascorbic acid, cadmium and non-proteic thiols contents, and for the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and δ-aminolevulic acid dehydratase (δ-ALA-D). Cadmium presented a significant alteration in all parameters, except GPx and CAT activities. Therapy reduced in a slight degree cadmium concentration in testes (around 23%). ORY restored SOD and GST activities as well as TBARS production to the control levels. Furthermore, ORY partially recovered δ-ALA-D activity inhibited by cadmium. This study provides the first evidence on the therapeutic properties of ORY in protecting against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:23395783

  17. Linking the response of endocrine regulated genes to adverse effects on sex differentiation improves comprehension of aromatase inhibition in a Fish Sexual Development Test.

    PubMed

    Muth-Köhne, Elke; Westphal-Settele, Kathi; Brückner, Jasmin; Konradi, Sabine; Schiller, Viktoria; Schäfers, Christoph; Teigeler, Matthias; Fenske, Martina

    2016-07-01

    The Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT) is a non-reproductive test to assess adverse effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals. With the present study it was intended to evaluate whether gene expression endpoints would serve as predictive markers of endocrine disruption in a FSDT. For proof-of-concept, a FSDT according to the OECD TG 234 was conducted with the non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (test concentrations: 10μg/L, 32μg/L, 100μg/L) using zebrafish (Danio rerio). Gene expression analyses using quantitative RT-PCR were included at 48h, 96h, 28days and 63days post fertilization (hpf, dpf). The selection of genes aimed at finding molecular endpoints which could be directly linked to the adverse apical effects of aromatase inhibition. The most prominent effects of fadrozole exposure on the sexual development of zebrafish were a complete sex ratio shift towards males and an acceleration of gonad maturation already at low fadrozole concentrations (10μg/L). Due to the specific inhibition of the aromatase enzyme (Cyp19) by fadrozole and thus, the conversion of C19-androgens to C18-estrogens, the steroid hormone balance controlling the sex ratio of zebrafish was altered. The resulting key event is the regulation of directly estrogen-responsive genes. Subsequently, gene expression of vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and of the aromatase cyp19a1b isoform (cyp19a1b), were down-regulated upon fadrozole treatment compared to controls. For example, mRNA levels of vtg1 were down-regulated compared to the controls as early as 48 hpf and 96 hpf. Further regulated genes cumulated in pathways suggested to be controlled by endocrine mechanisms, like the steroid and terpenoid synthesis pathway (e.g. mevalonate (diphospho) decarboxylase (mvd), lanosterol synthase (2,3-oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclase; lss), methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (sc4mol)) and in lipid transport/metabolic processes (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star), apolipoprotein Eb (apoEb)). Taken together

  18. Beyond U(crit): matching swimming performance tests to the physiological ecology of the animal, including a new fish 'drag strip'.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A; Gotwalt, P S; Reidy, S P; Webber, D M

    2002-10-01

    Locomotor performance of animals is of considerable interest from management, physiological, ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Yet, despite the extensive commercial exploitation of fishes and interest in the health of various fish stocks, the relationships between performance capacity, natural selection, ecology and physiology are poorly known for fishes. One reason may be the technical challenges faced when trying to measure various locomotor capacities in aquatic species, but we will argue that the slow pace of developing new species-appropriate swim tests is also hindering progress. A technique developed for anadromous salmonids (the U(crit) procedure) has dominated the fish exercise physiology field and, while accounting for major advances in the field, has often been used arbitrarily. Here we propose criteria swimming tests should adhere to and report on several attempts to match swimming tests to the physiological ecology of the animal. Sprint performance measured with a laser diode/photocell timed 'drag strip' is a new method employing new technology and is reported on in some detail. A second new test involves accelerating water past the fish at a constant rate in a traditional swim tunnel/respirometer. These two performance tests were designed to better understand the biology of a bentho-pelagic marine fish, the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Finally, we report on a modified incremental velocity test that was developed to better understand the biology of the blacknose dace (Rhinichthys atratulus), a Nearctic, lotic cyprinid.

  19. Standardizing acute toxicity data for use in ecotoxicology models: influence of test type, life stage, and concentration reporting.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Vivian, Deborah N; Barron, Mace G

    2009-10-01

    Ecotoxicological models generally have large data requirements and are frequently based on existing information from diverse sources. Standardizing data for toxicological models may be necessary to reduce extraneous variation and to ensure models reflect intrinsic relationships. However, the extent to which data standardization is necessary remains unclear, particularly when data transformations are used in model development. An extensive acute toxicity database was compiled for aquatic species to comprehensively assess the variation associated with acute toxicity test type (e.g., flow-through, static), reporting concentrations as nominal or measured, and organism life stage. Three approaches were used to assess the influence of these factors on log-transformed acute toxicity: toxicity ratios, log-linear models of factor groups, and comparison of interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models developed using either standardized test types or reported concentration type. In general, median ratios were generally less than 2.0, the slopes of log-linear models were approximately one for well-represented comparisons, and ICE models developed using data from standardized test types or reported concentrations did not differ substantially. These results indicate that standardizing test data by acute test type, reported concentration type, or life stage may not be critical for developing ecotoxicological models using large datasets of log-transformed values.

  20. Prognostic value of predischarge low-level exercise thallium testing after thrombolytic treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Tilkemeier, P.L.; Guiney, T.E.; LaRaia, P.J.; Boucher, C.A. )

    1990-11-15

    Low-level exercise thallium testing is useful in identifying the high-risk patient after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To determine whether this use also applies to patients after thrombolytic treatment of AMI, 64 patients who underwent early thrombolytic therapy for AMI and 107 patients without acute intervention were evaluated. The ability of both the electrocardiogram and thallium tests to predict future events was compared in both groups. After a mean follow-up of 374 days, there were 25 and 32% of cardiac events in the 2 groups, respectively, with versus without acute intervention. These included death, another AMI, coronary artery bypass grafting or angioplasty with 75% of the events occurring in the 3 months after the first infarction. The only significant predictors of outcome were left ventricular cavity dilatation in the intervention group and ST-segment depression and increased lung uptake in the nonintervention group. The sensitivity of exercise thallium was 55% in the intervention group and 81% in the nonintervention group (p less than 0.05). Therefore, in patients having thrombolytic therapy for AMI, nearly half the events after discharge are not predicted by predischarge low-level exercise thallium testing. The relatively weak correlation of outcome with unmasking ischemia in the laboratory before discharge may be due to an unstable coronary lesion or rapid progression of disease after the test. Tests considered useful for prognostication after AMI may not necessarily have a similar value if there has been an acute intervention, such as thrombolytic therapy.

  1. A Miniature Bioassay for Testing the Acute Phytotoxicity of Photosystem II Herbicides on Seagrass

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; O’Brien, Jake; Ralph, Peter J.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/Fm’) was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/Fm’ by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes), indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m-2 s-1). High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future. PMID:25674791

  2. A miniature bioassay for testing the acute phytotoxicity of photosystem II herbicides on seagrass.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; O'Brien, Jake; Ralph, Peter J; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/F(m)') was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/F(m)' by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes), indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future. PMID:25674791

  3. Four-Stage Audit Demonstrating Increased Uptake of HIV Testing in Acute Neurology Admissions Using Staged Practical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sokhi, Dilraj Singh; Oxenham, Chantal; Coates, Rebecca; Forbes, Mhairi; Gupta, Nadi K.; Blackburn, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background UK National Guidelines (UKNG) advise HIV testing in clinically indicated neurological presentations. We audited the impact of our practical strategies to increase uptake of HIV testing at a regional acute neurology admissions unit. Methods We audited HIV testing in 4 periods over 2 years: before we designed a UKNG-based “HIV testing in Neurology” protocol (“pre-protocol”); after dissemination of the protocol alone (“post-protocol”); post-protocol dissemination combined with both a tailored departmental admissions clerking proforma to prompt for HIV testing & consenting, and regular focussed tutorials to doctors on HIV testing in neurological patients (“post-proforma”); and finally one year after the post-proforma period (“+1 year”). We also looked at the total number of HIV tests sent from the unit during the two-year period. We assessed significance using Fisher’s exact test. Results 47.8% of all acute neurology non-stroke admissions were eligible for HIV testing during all the audit periods. Testing rates were as follows: pre-protocol 21.9%; post-protocol 36.6%; post-proforma 83.3%; and at +1 year 65.4% (p<0.05 for both post-protocol and +1 year when compared to pre-protocol). Documentation of consent for HIV testing improved from 25% to 67.6% with the HIV-tailored clerking proforma. The total number of HIV tests requested from the unit doubled in the post-proforma period compared to pre-protocol (p<0.05). Conclusion In conclusion: the combination of an HIV testing protocol, a tailored departmental clerking proforma and regular focussed teaching to doctors on indications for HIV testing led to a sustained increase in HIV testing uptake in our regional acute neurology admissions unit. PMID:26335351

  4. Effect of acute and chronic arsenic exposure on growth, structure and virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from fish.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ramansu; Ghosh, Debabrata; Saha, Dhira Rani; Padhy, Pratap Kumar; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2011-02-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila being a ubiquitous bacterium is prone to arsenic exposure. The present study was designed to determine the role of arsenic on growth and virulence of A. hydrophila. Exposure to arsenic (1 mg L(-1) and 2 mg L(-1)) had no effect on growth but significantly inhibited the hemolytic and cytotoxic potential of exposed bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy revealed loss of membrane integrity and presence of condensed cytoplasm suggestive of acute stress in bacteria exposed to arsenic. Arsenic-adapted bacteria were developed by repeated sub-culturing in presence of arsenic. Arsenic-adaptation led to significant recovery in hemolytic and cytotoxic potential. The arsenic-adapted bacteria exhibited normal membrane integrity, decreased cytoplasmic condensation and possessed scattered polysome like structures in the cytoplasm. A positive correlation was observed between arsenic tolerance and resistance to several antimicrobials. Arsenic-adaptation failed to confer cross-protection to mercury and cadmium stress. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the expression of two new proteins of approximately 85 kDa and 79 kDa respectively in arsenic-adapted A. hydrophila. Plasmid-curing and transformation studies clearly indicate plasmid has no role on arsenic resistance trait of the bacteria. Our study, for the first time, reports a structure and function relationship of xenobiotics on bacteria.

  5. Evaluation of reduced sediment volume procedures for acute toxicity tests using the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jacob K; Kennedy, Alan J; Farrar, J Daniel; Mount, David R; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-12-01

    The volume of sediment required to perform a sediment toxicity bioassay is a major driver of the overall cost associated with that bioassay. Sediment volume affects bioassay cost because of sediment collection, transportation, storage, and disposal costs as well as labor costs associated with organism recovery at the conclusion of the exposure. The objective of the current study was to evaluate reduced sediment volume versions of the standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) 10-d acute Leptocheirus plumulosus method that uses a beaker size of 1,000 ml and 20 organisms. The test design used evaluated the effects of beaker size (250 and 100 ml) and associated sediment volume (75 and 30 ml, respectively) as well as organism loading density (10 and 20 organisms) on test endpoint responsiveness relative to the standard 10-d test method. These comparisons were completed with three different types of contaminated sediments: a field-collected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediment, a lead-spiked control sediment, and a control sediment spiked with mineral oil. Assessment criteria included test endpoint sensitivity, endpoint consistency, statistical power, water quality, and logistical assessments. Results indicate that the current U.S. EPA method is preferable to the reduced sediment volume methods we assessed, but that a 250-ml beaker/10 organism experimental design is of comparable utility and may be advantageous when reduced sediment volumes are desirable because of high contaminant (spiking studies) or sediment disposal costs. In addition, the results of the current study provide toxicity reference values for PAHs, lead, and an oil surrogate for petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:20890914

  6. Fish community results

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Scott, E.M. Jr.; Brown, A.M.

    1991-05-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operates 9 reservoirs on the Tennessee River and 37 reservoirs on its tributaries. TVA is committed to maintaining the health of aquatic resources created when the reservoir system was built. To that end, TVA in cooperation with Valley states, operates a water resource monitoring program that includes physical, chemical, and biological data collection components. Biological monitoring will target the following selected elements within three zones of the reservoir (inflow, transition, and forebay): Sediment/Water-column Acute Toxicity Screening, Benthic macroinvertebrates, and Fish. Reservoir fisheries monitoring is divided into the following activities: Fish Biomass, Fish Tissue Contamination, Fish Community Monitoring, and Fish Health Assessment. This report presents the results of fish community monitoring and fish health assessments.

  7. Testing for synchrony in recruitment among four Lake Michigan fish species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, David; Höök, Tomas O.; Troy, Cary D.; Liu, Wentao; Madenjian, Charles P.; Adams, Jean V.

    2016-01-01

    In the Great Lakes region, multiple fish species display intra-specific spatial synchrony in 28 recruitment success, with inter-annual climate variation hypothesized as the most likely driver. 29 In Lake Michigan, we evaluated whether climatic or other physical variables could also induce 30 spatial synchrony across multiple species, including bloater (Coregonus hoyi), rainbow smelt 31 (Osmerus mordax), yellow perch (Perca flavescens), and alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). The 32 residuals from stock-recruitment relationships revealed yellow perch recruitment to be correlated 33 with recruitment of both rainbow smelt (r = 0.37) and alewife (r = 0.36). Across all four species, 34 higher than expected recruitment occurred in 5 years between 1978 and 1987 and then switched 35 to lower than expected recruitment in 5 years between 1996 and 2004. Generalized additive 36 models revealed warmer spring and summer water temperatures and lower wind speeds 37 corresponded to higher than expected recruitment for the nearshore-spawning species, and 38 overall variance explained ranged from 14% (yellow perch) to 61% (alewife). For all species 39 but rainbow smelt, higher recruitment also occurred in extremely high or low years of the North 40 Atlantic Oscillation index. Future development of indices that describe the physical Great Lakes 41 environment could improve understanding of how climate can synchronize fish populations 42 within and across species.

  8. An experimental field test of susceptibility to ectoparasitic gnathiid isopods among Caribbean reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Coile, A M; Sikkel, P C

    2013-06-01

    Susceptibility to infestation by a gnathiid isopod (Gnathia marleyi: Crustacea: Isopoda) was examined among 16 species from 9 families and 3 orders of common Caribbean reef fishes off St. John, United States Virgin Islands. Fish were placed in cages during times of peak gnathiid activity. Individuals from most (n=14) species were compared against a single species (French Grunt, Haemulon flavolineatum) that served as a standard and effectively controlled for the effects of habitat and variation in gnathiid abundance on exposure to and the likelihood and intensity of host infestation by gnathiids. All species were susceptible to infestation by gnathiids, with individual hosts harbouring up to 368 gnathiids. However, there was significant variation in levels of infestation among the 14 comparison species. Controlling for body size, nocturnal species from the families Haemulidae and Lutjanidae had the highest gnathiid infestation. Our finding that haemulids and lutjanids are particularly susceptible has important implications for the role of gnathiids in Caribbean reef food webs, given the role members of these families play in trophic connectivity between reefs and associated habitats. To our knowledge this is the first manipulative field study to examine variation among potential hosts in susceptibility to an ectoparasite in any terrestrial or aquatic system and is the greatest number of teleost hosts documented for any gnathiid species.

  9. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exclusively. The number of organisms used should be gradually increased to approximately 5,000 nauplii by test... group used in the other test chambers, except that none of the test substance is added. If a carrier... solution and the calibration of the test substance delivery system. If......

  10. Teflubenzuron as a tool for control of trichodinids in freshwater fish: Acute toxicity and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ikefuti, Cynthia Venâncio; Carraschi, Silvia Patrícia; Barbuio, Roberto; da Cruz, Claudinei; de Pádua, Santiago Benites; Onaka, Eduardo Makoto; Ranzani-Paiva, Maria José Tavares

    2015-07-01

    In this study we describe the anti-Trichodina effects of teflubenzuron (TFB) for Oreochromis niloticus and for Piaractus mesopotamicus. We also evaluated the acute toxicity, for both species, by using TFB in the concentrations of 700.0, 800.0, 900.0 and 1000.0 mg L(-1) and a control, without the drug. To assess the efficacy of TFB against Trichodina spp., we used the concentrations of 30.0 or 50.0 mg L(-1) for one hour exposure in tilapia, and the concentration of 30.0, 50.0 and 80.0 mg L(-1) for one hour and 50 mg L(-1) for two hours exposures in pacu. Teflubenzuron did not present significant toxicity in either species, with LC50;48h > 1000.0 mg L(-1). The drug effectiveness was observed against four identified Trichodina species: T. magna, T. heterodentata, T. compacta and T. centrostrigeata, with 87.9% parasite reduction with one hour exposure to 50.0 mg L(-1) TFB on O. niloticus and 96.1% with two hours exposure to 50.0 mg L(-1) TFB on P. mesopotamicus. Teflubenzuron is a drug with potential to be used in Brazilian aquaculture; it attends to important requirements, such as low toxicity and high efficacy in controlling Trichodina spp. infection in O. niloticus and P. mesopotamicus.

  11. Teflubenzuron as a tool for control of trichodinids in freshwater fish: Acute toxicity and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ikefuti, Cynthia Venâncio; Carraschi, Silvia Patrícia; Barbuio, Roberto; da Cruz, Claudinei; de Pádua, Santiago Benites; Onaka, Eduardo Makoto; Ranzani-Paiva, Maria José Tavares

    2015-07-01

    In this study we describe the anti-Trichodina effects of teflubenzuron (TFB) for Oreochromis niloticus and for Piaractus mesopotamicus. We also evaluated the acute toxicity, for both species, by using TFB in the concentrations of 700.0, 800.0, 900.0 and 1000.0 mg L(-1) and a control, without the drug. To assess the efficacy of TFB against Trichodina spp., we used the concentrations of 30.0 or 50.0 mg L(-1) for one hour exposure in tilapia, and the concentration of 30.0, 50.0 and 80.0 mg L(-1) for one hour and 50 mg L(-1) for two hours exposures in pacu. Teflubenzuron did not present significant toxicity in either species, with LC50;48h > 1000.0 mg L(-1). The drug effectiveness was observed against four identified Trichodina species: T. magna, T. heterodentata, T. compacta and T. centrostrigeata, with 87.9% parasite reduction with one hour exposure to 50.0 mg L(-1) TFB on O. niloticus and 96.1% with two hours exposure to 50.0 mg L(-1) TFB on P. mesopotamicus. Teflubenzuron is a drug with potential to be used in Brazilian aquaculture; it attends to important requirements, such as low toxicity and high efficacy in controlling Trichodina spp. infection in O. niloticus and P. mesopotamicus. PMID:25913667

  12. Evaluation of Four Commercial Multiplex Molecular Tests for the Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Salez, Nicolas; Vabret, Astrid; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Andreoletti, Laurent; Carrat, Fabrice; Renois, Fanny; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs) are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Documentation of respiratory specimens can help for an appropriate clinical management with a significant effect on the disease progress in patient, the antimicrobial therapy used and the risk of secondary spread of infection. Here, we compared the performances of four commercial multiplex kits used in French University Hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratories for the detection of ARI pathogens (i.e., the xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel Fast, RespiFinder SMART 22, CLART PneumoVir and Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory Pathogen 33 kits). We used a standardised nucleic acids extraction protocol and a comprehensive comparative approach that mixed reference to well established real-time PCR detection techniques and analysis of convergent positive results. We tested 166 respiratory clinical samples and identified a global high degree of correlation for at least three of the techniques (xTAG, RespiFinder and FTD33). For these techniques, the highest Youden’s index (YI), positive predictive (PPV) and specificity (Sp) values were observed for Core tests (e.g., influenza A [YI:0.86–1.00; PPV:78.95–100.00; Sp:97.32–100.00] & B [YI:0.44–1.00; PPV:100.00; Sp:100.00], hRSV [YI:0.50–0.99; PPV:85.71–100.00; Sp:99.38–100.00], hMPV [YI:0.71–1.00; PPV:83.33–100.00; Sp:99.37–100.00], EV/hRV [YI:0.62–0.82; PPV:93.33–100.00; Sp:94.48–100.00], AdV [YI:1.00; PPV:100.00; Sp:100.00] and hBoV [YI:0.20–0.80; PPV:57.14–100.00; Sp:98.14–100.00]). The present study completed an overview of the multiplex techniques available for the diagnosis of acute respiratory infections. PMID:26107509

  13. Further tests of changes in fish escape behavior resulting from sublethal stresses associated with hydroelectric turbine passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, Michael G.; Cada, Glenn F.; Smith, John G.

    2004-04-01

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. The most commonly used laboratory technique for assessing susceptibility to predation is the predator preference test. This report evaluates the field application of a new technique that may be valuable for assessing indirect mortality, based on changes in a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). The study compared the behaviors of 70 fish passed through the turbine and another 70 under control conditions (either transferred from the holding tank or injected into the Alden loop downstream of turbine). The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a startle response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of the maximum C-shape, time to completion of the C-shape, completeness of the C-shape, direction of turn, and degree of turn. The data were evaluated for statistical significance and patterns of response were identified.

  14. Development of a novel in vitro method for drug development for fish; application to test efficacy of antimicrosporidian compounds.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Kumar, G; Abdel-Baki, A-A; Dkhil, M; El-Matbouli, M; Al-Quraishy, S

    2014-12-01

    Few drugs are approved for treating diseases caused by parasites in minor species such as fish. This is due, in part, to the expense of drug development and to the comparatively small market. In vivo effectiveness trials for antiparasitic drugs are costly, time consuming and require ethics approval, therefore an in vitro screening approach is a cost-effective alternative to finding promising drug candidates. We developed an in vitro testing system to test antimicrosporidial compounds against a microsporidian pathogen Heterosporis saurida. Five antiparasitic compounds, albendazole, fumagillin, TNP-70, nitazoxanide and lufenuron, were assayed for antimicrosporidial activity. All compounds reduced the number of H saurida spores in infected cells when applied at a concentration that did not appear to be toxic to the host cells. Albendazole inhibited replication of H saurida by >60 per cent, fumagillin and its analogue TNP-470 inhibited H saurida >80 per cent, nitazoxanide and lufenuron inhibited growth >70 per cent. The data suggest that both fumagillin and its analogous TNP-70 hold the best promise as therapeutic agents against H saurida. The ability to use fish cell cultures to assess drugs against H saurida demonstrates an approach that may be helpful to evaluate other drugs on different microsporidia and host cells. PMID:25200429

  15. Acute heat stress induces differential gene expressions in the testes of a broiler-type strain of Taiwan country chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Han; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Tang, Pin-Chi; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Pai; Huang, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The expression of testicular genes following acute heat stress has been reported in layer-type roosters, but few similar studies have been conducted on broilers. This study investigated the effect of acute heat stress on the gene expression in the testes of a broiler-type strain of Taiwan country chickens. Roosters were subjected to acute heat stress (38°C) for 4 h, and then exposed to 25°C, with testes collected 0, 2, and 6 h after the cessation of heat stress, using non-heat-stressed roosters as controls (n = 3 roosters per group). The body temperature and respiratory rate increased significantly (p<0.05) during the heat stress. The numbers of apoptotic cells increased 2 h after the acute heat stress (79 ± 7 vs. 322 ± 192, control vs. heat stress; p<0.05), which was earlier than the time of increase in layer-type roosters. Based on a chicken 44 K oligo microarray, 163 genes were found to be expressed significantly different in the testes of the heat-stressed chickens from those of the controls, including genes involved in the response to stimulus, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell adhesion, transcription, and apoptosis. The mRNA expressions of upregulated genes, including HSP25, HSP90AA1, HSPA2, and LPAR2, and of downregulated genes, including CDH5, CTNNA3, EHF, CIRBP, SLA, and NTF3, were confirmed through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Moreover, numerous transcripts in the testes exhibited distinct expressions between the heat-stressed broiler-type and layer-type chickens. We concluded that the transcriptional responses of testes to acute heat stress may differ between the broiler-type and layer-type roosters. Whether the differential expression patterns associate with the heat-tolerance in the strains require a further exploration.

  16. Testing the stages model in the adaptive radiation of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika

    PubMed Central

    Muschick, Moritz; Nosil, Patrik; Roesti, Marius; Dittmann, Marie Theres; Harmon, Luke; Salzburger, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive radiation (AR) is a key process in the origin of organismal diversity. However, the evolution of trait disparity in connection with ecological specialization is still poorly understood. Available models for vertebrate ARs predict that diversification occurs in the form of temporal stages driven by different selective forces. Here, we investigate the AR of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika and use macroevolutionary model fitting to evaluate whether diversification happened in temporal stages. Six trait complexes, for which we also provide evidence of their adaptiveness, are analysed with comparative methods: body shape, pharyngeal jaw shape, gill raker traits, gut length, brain weight and body coloration. Overall, we do not find strong evidence for the ‘stages model’ of AR. However, our results suggest that trophic traits diversify earlier than traits implicated in macrohabitat adaptation and that sexual communication traits (i.e. coloration) diversify late in the radiation. PMID:25274371

  17. Can Species Distribution Models Aid Bioassessment when Reference Sites are Lacking? Tests Based on Freshwater Fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labay, Ben J.; Hendrickson, Dean A.; Cohen, Adam E.; Bonner, Timothy H.; King, Ryan S.; Kleinsasser, Leroy J.; Linam, Gordon W.; Winemiller, Kirk O.

    2015-10-01

    Recent literature reviews of bioassessment methods raise questions about use of least-impacted reference sites to characterize natural conditions that no longer exist within contemporary landscapes. We explore an alternate approach for bioassessment that uses species site occupancy data from museum archives as input for species distribution models (SDMs) stacked to predict species assemblages of freshwater fishes in Texas. When data for estimating reference conditions are lacking, deviation between richness of contemporary versus modeled species assemblages could provide a means to infer relative biological integrity at appropriate spatial scales. We constructed SDMs for 100 freshwater fish species to compare predicted species assemblages to data on contemporary assemblages acquired by four independent surveys that sampled 269 sites. We then compared site-specific observed/predicted ratios of the number of species at sites to scores from a multimetric index of biotic integrity (IBI). Predicted numbers of species were moderately to strongly correlated with the numbers observed by the four surveys. We found significant, though weak, relationships between observed/predicted ratios and IBI scores. SDM-based assessments identified patterns of local assemblage change that were congruent with IBI inferences; however, modeling artifacts that likely contributed to over-prediction of species presence may restrict the stand-alone use of SDM-derived patterns for bioassessment and therefore warrant examination. Our results suggest that when extensive standardized survey data that include reference sites are lacking, as is commonly the case, SDMs derived from generally much more readily available species site occupancy data could be used to provide a complementary tool for bioassessment.

  18. Alternatives to in vivo tests to detect endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in fish and amphibians--screening for estrogen, androgen and thyroid hormone disruption.

    PubMed

    Scholz, S; Renner, P; Belanger, S E; Busquet, F; Davi, R; Demeneix, B A; Denny, J S; Léonard, M; McMaster, M E; Villeneuve, D L; Embry, M R

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disruption is considered a highly relevant hazard for environmental risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, biocides and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, screening tests with a focus on interference with estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone pathways in fish and amphibians have been developed. However, they use a large number of animals and short-term alternatives to animal tests would be advantageous. Therefore, the status of alternative assays for endocrine disruption in fish and frogs was assessed by a detailed literature analysis. The aim was to (i) determine the strengths and limitations of alternative assays and (ii) present conclusions regarding chemical specificity, sensitivity, and correlation with in vivo data. Data from 1995 to present were collected related to the detection/testing of estrogen-, androgen-, and thyroid-active chemicals in the following test systems: cell lines, primary cells, fish/frog embryos, yeast and cell-free systems. The review shows that the majority of alternative assays measure effects directly mediated by receptor binding or resulting from interference with hormone synthesis. Other mechanisms were rarely analysed. A database was established and used for a quantitative and comparative analysis. For example, a high correlation was observed between cell-free ligand binding and cell-based reporter cell assays, between fish and frog estrogenic data and between fish embryo tests and in vivo reproductive effects. It was concluded that there is a need for a more systematic study of the predictive capacity of alternative tests and ways to reduce inter- and intra-assay variability.

  19. Refinement and reduction of acute oral toxicity testing: a critical review of the use of cytotoxicity data.

    PubMed

    Schrage, Arnhild; Hempel, Katja; Schulz, Markus; Kolle, Susanne N; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Acute oral toxicity testing is still required for the classification and labelling of chemicals, agrochemicals and related formulations. There have been increasing efforts over the last two decades to reduce the number of animals needed for this testing, according to the Three Rs concept. To evaluate the utility of an in vitro cytotoxicity test in our routine testing for acute oral toxicity, we have implemented in our laboratory the neutral red uptake (NRU) method, with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts after a 48-hour exposure, which was recommended in ICCVAM Report 07-4519, 2006. Initially, we tested 16 substances that had existing in vivo and in vitro data available, to prove our technical proficiency with the in vitro test. Then, testing was performed with 187 test substances, including a broad variety of chemicals, agrochemicals and formulations. The starting dose for acute oral systemic toxicity assays in rats (LD50) was estimated by using the prediction model presented in the ICCVAM validation study, and subsequently compared to the results obtained by in vivo testing performed according to, or similar to, OECD Test Guideline 423. Comparison of all of the 203 predicted LD50 values that were deduced from the in vitro IC50 values, with the in vivo results from oral toxicity studies in rats, resulted in a low overall concordance of 35%. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay achieved a good concordance of 74%, only for the weakly toxic substances (EU-GHS Cat. 4). However, it must be noted that 71% of the substances tested (i.e. 145/203) were classified as being weakly toxic in vitro. We further analysed the utility of the in vitro test for predicting the starting dose for an in vivo study, and the potential reduction in animal usage that this would engender. In this regard, the prediction by the cytotoxicity test was useful for 59% of the substances. However, the use of a standard starting dose of 300 mg/kg bw by default (without previous cytotoxicity testing) would have been

  20. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated. PMID:24889716

  1. In vitro cytotoxicity testing of 30 reference chemicals to predict acute human and animal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Barile, F.A.; Arjun, S.; Borges, L. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted in cooperation with the Scandinavian Society of Cell Toxicology, as part of the Multicenter Evaluation for In Vitro Cytotoxicity (MEIC), and was designed to develop an in vitro model for predicting acute human and animal toxicity. The technique relies on the ability of cultured transformed rat lung epithelial cells (L2) to incorporate radiolabled amino acids into newly synthesized proteins in the absence or presence of increasing doses of the test chemical, during a 24-hr incubation. IC50 values were extrapolated from the dose-response curves after linear regression analysis. Human toxic blood concentrations estimated from rodent LD50 values suggest that our experimental IC50's are in close correlation with the former. Validation of the data by the MEIC committee shows that our IC50 values predicted human lethal dosage as efficient as rodent LD50's. It is anticipated that this and related procedures may supplement or replace currently used animal protocols for predicting human toxicity.

  2. Acute toxicity tests and meta-analysis identify gaps in tropical ecotoxicology for amphibians.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Sonia L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Kerby, Jacob; Whitfield, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, particularly in tropical regions where amphibian diversity is highest. Pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, have been identified as a potential contributor to decline, yet toxicological studies of tropical amphibians are very rare. The present study assesses toxic effects on amphibians of 10 commonly used commercial pesticides in tropical agriculture using 2 approaches. First, the authors conducted 8-d toxicity assays with formulations of each pesticide using individually reared red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles. Second, they conducted a review of available data for the lethal concentration to kill 50% of test animals from the US Environmental Protection Agency's ECOTOX database to allow comparison with their findings. Lethal concentration estimates from the assays ranged over several orders of magnitude. The nematicides terbufos and ethoprophos and the fungicide chlorothalonil were very highly toxic, with evident effects within an order of magnitude of environmental concentrations. Acute toxicity assays and meta-analysis show that nematicides and fungicides are generally more toxic than herbicides yet receive far less research attention than less toxic herbicides. Given that the tropics have a high diversity of amphibians, the findings emphasize the need for research into the effects of commonly used pesticides in tropical countries and should help guide future ecotoxicological research in tropical regions.

  3. A Five-Gene Peripheral Blood Diagnostic Test for Acute Rejection in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Khatri, Purveshkumar; Sigdel, Tara K.; Tran, Tim; Ying, Lihua; Vitalone, Matthew; Chen, Amery; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Meixia; Naesens, Maarten; Zarkhin, Valeriya; Sansanwal, Poonam; Chen, Rong; Mindrinos, Michael; Xiao, Wenzhong; Benfield, Mark; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Brad; Davis, Ron; Butte, Atul J.; Salvatierra, Oscar; Sarwal, Minnie

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of renal graft status through peripheral blood (PB) rather than invasive biopsy is important as it will lessen the risk of infection and other stresses, while reducing the costs of rejection diagnosis. Blood gene biomarker panels were discovered by microarrays at a single center and subsequently validated and cross-validated by QPCR in gthe NIH SNSO1 randomized study from 12 US pediatric transplant programs. A total of 367 unique human PB samples, each paired with a graft biopsy for centralized, blinded phenotype classification, were analyzed (115 acute rejection (AR), 180 stable and 72 other causes of graft injury). Of the differentially expressed genes by microarray, Q-PCR analysis of a five gene-set (DUSP1, PBEF1, PSEN1, MAPK9 and NKTR) classified AR with high accuracy. A logistic regression model was built on independent training-set (n=47) and validated on independent test-set (n=198)samples, discriminating AR from STA with 91% sensitivity and 94% specificity and AR from all other non-AR phenotypes with 91% sensitivity and 90% specificity. The 5-gene set can diagnose AR potentially avoiding the need for invasive renal biopsy. These data support the conduct of a prospective study to validate the clinical predictive utility of this diagnostic tool. PMID:23009139

  4. Acute toxicity and inactivation tests of CO2 on invertebrates in drinking water treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Jin-Song; Liu, Li-Jun; Zhao, Jian-Shu; Li, Tuo

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the esthetic problem caused by invertebrates, researchers are recently starting to be more aware of their potential importance in terms of public health. However, the inactivation methods of invertebrates which could proliferate in drinking water treatment systems are not well developed. The objective of this study is to assess the acute toxicity and inactivation effects of CO2 on familiar invertebrates in water treatment processes. The results of this study revealed that CO2 has a definite toxicity to familiar invertebrates. The values of 24-h LC50 (median lethal concentration) were calculated for each test with six groups of invertebrates. The toxicity of CO2 was higher with increasing concentrations in solution but was lower with the increase in size of the invertebrates. Above the concentration of 1,000 mg/L for the CO2 solution, the 100% inactivation time of all the invertebrates was less than 5 s, and in 15 min, the inactivation ratio showed a gradient descent with a decline in concentration. As seen for Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides, by dosing with a sodium bicarbonate solution first and adding a dilute hydrochloric acid solution 5 min later, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory inactivation effect in the GAC (granular activated carbon) filters.

  5. Liver function test results and outcomes in children with acute liver failure due to dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Hutagalung, Yanee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study compared the liver function test results and outcomes between children with acute liver failure (ALF) due to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and due to other causes. We retrospectively reviewed patients less than 15 years old with a diagnosis of ALF admitted to 13 participating centers from different parts of Thailand for the years 2000 and 2001, and those admitted to King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital for the year 1997 to 2004. The diagnosis of ALF was based on prothrombin time (PT) prolongation to greater than 2 times the normal control value and the presence of encephalopathy without pre-existing liver disease. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group I (n=16) had DHF with ALF and group II (n=37) had ALF due to other causes. DHF patients had AST levels significantly higher than ALT levels. The mortality rate in group I (50%) was lower than in group II (72.9%), although the difference was not statistically significant. The non-DHF patients who died had a significantly longer duration of jaundice before the onset of encephalopathy and a significantly higher PT ratio compared to survivors. There were no significant differences in the duration of jaundice before the onset of encephalopathy and liver function between dengue patients who died and those who survived.

  6. Acute toxicity tests and meta-analysis identify gaps in tropical ecotoxicology for amphibians.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Sonia L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Kerby, Jacob; Whitfield, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, particularly in tropical regions where amphibian diversity is highest. Pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, have been identified as a potential contributor to decline, yet toxicological studies of tropical amphibians are very rare. The present study assesses toxic effects on amphibians of 10 commonly used commercial pesticides in tropical agriculture using 2 approaches. First, the authors conducted 8-d toxicity assays with formulations of each pesticide using individually reared red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles. Second, they conducted a review of available data for the lethal concentration to kill 50% of test animals from the US Environmental Protection Agency's ECOTOX database to allow comparison with their findings. Lethal concentration estimates from the assays ranged over several orders of magnitude. The nematicides terbufos and ethoprophos and the fungicide chlorothalonil were very highly toxic, with evident effects within an order of magnitude of environmental concentrations. Acute toxicity assays and meta-analysis show that nematicides and fungicides are generally more toxic than herbicides yet receive far less research attention than less toxic herbicides. Given that the tropics have a high diversity of amphibians, the findings emphasize the need for research into the effects of commonly used pesticides in tropical countries and should help guide future ecotoxicological research in tropical regions. PMID:24934557

  7. Apple flavonols and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich fish oil lowers blood C-reactive protein in rats with hypercholesterolemia and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Catalli, Adriana; Kulka, Marianna; Wang, Yanwen; Shahidi, Fereidoon; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-06-01

    Both quercetin glycosides and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) are well established for their individual health benefits in ameliorating metabolic disease. However, their combined effects are not well documented. It was hypothesized that the beneficial properties of quercetin glycosides can be enhanced when provided in combination with n-3 PUFA. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of apple flavonols (AF) and fish oil (FO), alone and in combination, on proinflammatory biomarkers and lipid profiles in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 12) and fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks. One of the 5 groups of rats was used as the high-fat control. The other 4 groups of rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally, 5 hours before euthanization. One of these 4 groups was used as the hypercholerolemic and inflammatory control (high-fat with lipopolysaccharide [HFL]), and the other 3 received AF (HFL + 25 mg/kg per day AF), FO (HFL + 1 g/kg per day FO), or the combination (HFL + AF + FO). Compared to the HFL group, the AF, FO, and AF + FO groups showed lower serum concentrations of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The AF, FO, and AF + FO also had lowered serum triacylglycerol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations, but higher HDL-C levels relative to the HFL group. An additive effect was observed on serum CRP in the AF + FO group as compared with the AF or FO groups. The results demonstrated that AF and FO inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators and showed an improved efficacy to lower serum CRP when administered in combination, and they significantly improved blood lipid profiles in rats with diet-induced hyperlipidemia and LPS-induced acute inflammation.

  8. Apple flavonols and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich fish oil lowers blood C-reactive protein in rats with hypercholesterolemia and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Catalli, Adriana; Kulka, Marianna; Wang, Yanwen; Shahidi, Fereidoon; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-06-01

    Both quercetin glycosides and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) are well established for their individual health benefits in ameliorating metabolic disease. However, their combined effects are not well documented. It was hypothesized that the beneficial properties of quercetin glycosides can be enhanced when provided in combination with n-3 PUFA. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of apple flavonols (AF) and fish oil (FO), alone and in combination, on proinflammatory biomarkers and lipid profiles in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 12) and fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks. One of the 5 groups of rats was used as the high-fat control. The other 4 groups of rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally, 5 hours before euthanization. One of these 4 groups was used as the hypercholerolemic and inflammatory control (high-fat with lipopolysaccharide [HFL]), and the other 3 received AF (HFL + 25 mg/kg per day AF), FO (HFL + 1 g/kg per day FO), or the combination (HFL + AF + FO). Compared to the HFL group, the AF, FO, and AF + FO groups showed lower serum concentrations of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The AF, FO, and AF + FO also had lowered serum triacylglycerol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations, but higher HDL-C levels relative to the HFL group. An additive effect was observed on serum CRP in the AF + FO group as compared with the AF or FO groups. The results demonstrated that AF and FO inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators and showed an improved efficacy to lower serum CRP when administered in combination, and they significantly improved blood lipid profiles in rats with diet-induced hyperlipidemia and LPS-induced acute inflammation. PMID:25026921

  9. Feeding in extinct jawless heterostracan fishes and testing scenarios of early vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    How long-extinct jawless fishes fed is poorly understood, yet interpretations of feeding are an important component of many hypotheses concerning the origin and early evolution of vertebrates. Heterostracans were the most diverse clade of armoured jawless vertebrates (stem gnathostomes), and the structure of the mouth and its use in feeding are the subjects of long-standing and heated controversy. I present here evidence that heterostracan feeding structures exhibit recurrent patterns of in vivo wear, are covered internally by microscopic oral denticles, and that the mouth may have been less flexible than has been thought. These data, particularly the absence of wear at the tips of oral plates, and the evidence that the mouth was lined with delicate outwardly directed denticles, effectively falsify all but one hypothesis of feeding in heterostracans: heterostracans were microphagous suspension feeders. This has a direct bearing on hypotheses that address ecological aspects of early vertebrate diversity and evolution, contradicting the widespread view that the pattern of early vertebrate evolution reflects a long-term trend towards increasingly active and predatory habits. PMID:11788040

  10. Aneuploidy in human sperm: The use of multicolor FISH to test various theories of nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, E.L.; Martin, R.H.

    1996-02-01

    While it is known that all chromosomes are susceptible to meiotic nondisjunction, it is not clear whether all chromosomes display the same frequency of nondisjunction. By use of multicolor FISH and chromosome-specific probes, the frequency of disomy in human sperm was determined for chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 9, 12, 15, 16, 18, 20, and 21, and the sex chromosomes. A minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei were scored from each of five healthy, chromosomally normal donors for every chromosome studied, giving a total of 418,931 sperm nuclei. The mean frequencies of disomy obtained were 0.09% for chromosome 1; 0.08% for chromosome 2; 0.11% for chromosome 4; 0.14% for chromosome 9; 0.16% for chromosome 12; 0.11% for chromosomes 15, 16, and 18; 0.12% for chromosome 20; 0.29% for chromosome 21; and 0.43% for the sex chromosomes. Data for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, and 18, and the sex chromosomes have been published elsewhere. When the mean frequencies of disomy were compared, the sex chromosomes and chromosome 21 had significantly higher frequencies of disomy than that of any other autosome studied. These results corroborate the pooled data obtained from human sperm karyotypes and suggest that the sex chromosome bivalent and the chromosome 21 bivalent are more susceptible to nondisjunction during spermatogenesis. From these findings, theories proposed to explain the variable incidence of nondisjunction can be supported or discarded as improbable. 33 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. False positive dengue NS1 antigen test in a traveller with an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gyurech, Danielle; Schilling, Julian; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Cassinotti, Pascal; Kaeppeli, Franz; Dobec, Marinko

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland by a traveller returning from Canoa Quebrada, Ceará state, in the north-eastern part of Brazil. Due to a false positive dengue virus NS1 antigen test, IgG antibody seroconversion and a suggestive clinical picture,an acute dengue fever was initially considered. However, because of lack of specific IgM-antibodies, stationary IgG antibody titre and a negative dengue virus PCR test result, a dengue virus infection was excluded and a cross-reaction with other, causative flaviviruses was postulated. Based on recent reports of Zika fever cases in the north-eastern parts of Brazil, an acute Zika virus infection was suspected. Because of a lack of commercially available Zika virus diagnostic tests, the case was confirmed in the WHO reference laboratory. As the clinical presentation of Zika virus infection can be confused with dengue fever and chikungunya fever, and because of possible public health implications, all patients returning from affected areas should be additionally tested for Zika virus. This case illustrates the urgent medical need for a broadly available assay capable of differentiating Zika from Dengue infections.

  12. Big fish in big ponds: a multilevel analysis of test anxiety and achievement in special gifted classes.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Thomas; Preckel, Franzis; Zeidner, Moshe; Schleyer, Esther

    2008-04-01

    This study analyzes the effects of individual achievement and achievement level of student reference group on test anxiety in a national sample of 769 gifted Israeli students (grade levels 4-9), which was previously investigated by Zeidner and Schleyer (1999a). We hypothesized that when controlling for individual achievement, students' experiences of test anxiety should increase with the increasing ability level of their peer reference group. It was assumed that this effect was largely mediated by reference group effects on academic self-concept (big-fish-little-pond effect). Zeidner and Schleyer found that gifted students within a gifted peer reference group showed higher levels of test anxiety than gifted students within a non-gifted peer reference group. Of note, the present study focused exclusively on gifted students attending special gifted classes. The main research question was whether or not the assumed effects of individual and class achievement can be found for gifted students in special gifted classes when taking the variance of achievement level (grades) of the special gifted classes into account. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) methodology, the assumed effects were vindicated for this special group of high ability students. Thus, in line with previous results, the Worry component of test anxiety was more highly reactive to the effects of individual achievement than the Emotionality component. Also, in line with our theoretical assumptions, achievement/anxiety relations were largely mediated by the effects of academic self-concept. PMID:18350396

  13. World association for the advancement of veterinary parasitology (WAAVP) guideline for testing the efficacy of ectoparasiticides for fish.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, C; Endris, R; Bell, T A; Ogawa, K; Buchmann, K; Sweeney, D

    2016-03-30

    This guideline is intended to assist in the planning and execution of studies designed to assess the efficacy of ectoparasiticides for fish. It is the first ectoparasite-specific guideline to deal with studies set in the aquatic environment and therefore provides details for the maintenance of environmental standards for finfish. Information is included on a range of pre-clinical study designs as well as clinical studies in commercial/production sites, set within a regulatory framework. It provides information on the study animals, their welfare, husbandry and environmental requirements during the study. The most commonly pathogenic ectoparasites are presented with relevant points regarding life history, host challenge and numeric evaluation. Preparation and presentation of both topical and oral test treatments is provided, together with guidance on data collection and analysis. The guideline provides a quality standard or efficacy studies on finfish, which will assist researchers and regulatory authorities worldwide and contribute to the wider objective of harmonisation of procedures. PMID:27351036

  14. In vitro bioconversion of [14C]androstenedione by testes of the Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens Regan (Anabantoidei, Belontiidae).

    PubMed

    Leitz, T; Reinboth, R

    1985-06-01

    Minced testes of the Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens were incubated with [14C]androstenedione at 27 degrees C for 15, 30, 60, and 120 min. The metabolic products were characterized by paper and thin-layer chromatography, derivative formation, and eventually by crystallization to constant specific activity. After 2 hr of incubation 80.5% of total radioactivity was converted to 11-oxygenated androgens. 11-Ketotestosterone was the main metabolite (56.2%). Our data suggest the existence of two biosynthetic pathways for the formation of 11-ketotestosterone from androstenedione. The sequence androstenedione----testosterone----11 beta-hydroxytestosterone----11-ketotestosterone predominates. To a lesser extent 11 beta-hydroxylation takes place as the first step--followed by formation of 11 beta-hydroxytestosterone and its subsequent oxidation to 11-ketotestosterone.

  15. World association for the advancement of veterinary parasitology (WAAVP) guideline for testing the efficacy of ectoparasiticides for fish.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, C; Endris, R; Bell, T A; Ogawa, K; Buchmann, K; Sweeney, D

    2016-03-30

    This guideline is intended to assist in the planning and execution of studies designed to assess the efficacy of ectoparasiticides for fish. It is the first ectoparasite-specific guideline to deal with studies set in the aquatic environment and therefore provides details for the maintenance of environmental standards for finfish. Information is included on a range of pre-clinical study designs as well as clinical studies in commercial/production sites, set within a regulatory framework. It provides information on the study animals, their welfare, husbandry and environmental requirements during the study. The most commonly pathogenic ectoparasites are presented with relevant points regarding life history, host challenge and numeric evaluation. Preparation and presentation of both topical and oral test treatments is provided, together with guidance on data collection and analysis. The guideline provides a quality standard or efficacy studies on finfish, which will assist researchers and regulatory authorities worldwide and contribute to the wider objective of harmonisation of procedures.

  16. Fabrication, testing and modeling of a new flexible armor inspired from natural fish scales and osteoderms.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Ravi Kiran; Mirkhalaf, Mohammad; Dastjerdi, Ahmad Khayer; Barthelat, Francois

    2014-09-01

    Crocodiles, armadillo, turtles, fish and many other animal species have evolved flexible armored skins in the form of hard scales or osteoderms, which can be described as hard plates of finite size embedded in softer tissues. The individual hard segments provide protection from predators, while the relative motion of these segments provides the flexibility required for efficient locomotion. In this work, we duplicated these broad concepts in a bio-inspired segmented armor. Hexagonal segments of well-defined size and shape were carved within a thin glass plate using laser engraving. The engraved plate was then placed on a soft substrate which simulated soft tissues, and then punctured with a sharp needle mounted on a miniature loading stage. The resistance of our segmented armor was significantly higher when smaller hexagons were used, and our bio-inspired segmented glass displayed an increase in puncture resistance of up to 70% compared to a continuous plate of glass of the same thickness. Detailed structural analyses aided by finite elements revealed that this extraordinary improvement is due to the reduced span of individual segments, which decreases flexural stresses and delays fracture. This effect can however only be achieved if the plates are at least 1000 stiffer than the underlying substrate, which is the case for natural armor systems. Our bio-inspired system also displayed many of the attributes of natural armors: flexible, robust with 'multi-hit' capabilities. This new segmented glass therefore suggests interesting bio-inspired strategies and mechanisms which could be systematically exploited in high-performance flexible armors. This study also provides new insights and a better understanding of the mechanics of natural armors such as scales and osteoderms. PMID:24613857

  17. Opportunities for animal alternatives implementation in the evolving OECD fish testing framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews opportunities for animal alternative approaches in the FTF. These will be placed in the context of in vivo tests required in many regulatory situations for the registration of industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. The Framework inte...

  18. Standard operating procedures for conducting acute and chronic aquatic toxicity tests with Eurytemora affinis, a calanoid copepod

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegenfuss, M.C.; Hall, L.W.

    1998-10-01

    Eurytemora affinis, a calanoid copepod, was selected for standard toxicity testing protocol development subsequent to screening 25 resident Chesapeake Bay species including fish, invertebrates, and plants. Eurytemora was selected because of its ecological importance as an essential component in the trophic structure of the estuary, its relative practicability of culturing in the laboratory for year-round availability, and its sensitivity to toxic substances. The standards operating procedures described in this document provide detailed procedures for culturing, holding, and toxicity testing of E. affinis.

  19. The acute phase inflammatory response to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Liem, Robert I; Onyejekwe, Kasiemobi; Olszewski, Marie; Nchekwube, Chisalu; Zaldivar, Frank P; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Rodeghier, Mark J; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-12-01

    Although individuals with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) have elevated baseline inflammation and endothelial activation, the acute phase response to maximal exercise has not been evaluated among children with SCA. We measured the acute phase response to maximal exercise testing for soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM) as well as interleukin 6 (IL6), total white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer in a cohort of children with SCA and matched controls at baseline, immediately after, and 30, 60 and 120 min following exercise. Despite higher baseline levels of all biomarkers except CRP, the acute phase response from baseline to immediately after exercise was significantly greater in subjects versus controls for CRP (2·1 vs. 0·2 mg/l, P = 0·02) and D-dimer (160 vs. 10 μg/l, P < 0·01) only. Similar between-group trends were observed over time for all biomarkers, including sVCAM, IL6, total WBC, CRP and D-dimer. Lower fitness, defined by peak oxygen consumption (VO2 ), was independently associated with greater acute phase responses to exercise for sVCAM. Our results suggest maximal exercise may not be associated with any greater escalation of endothelial activation or inflammation in SCA and provide preliminary biomarker evidence for the safety of brief, high-intensity physical exertion in children with SCA.

  20. A novel system for embryo-larval toxicity testing of pelagic fish: Applications for impact assessment of Deepwater Horizon crude oil.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, John D; Mager, Edward M; Hoenig, Ronald H; Alloy, Matthew; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Bodinier, Charlotte; Benetti, Daniel D; Roberts, Aaron P; Grosell, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Key differences in the developmental process of pelagic fish embryos, in comparison to embryos of standard test fish species, present challenges to obtaining sufficient control survival needed to successfully perform traditional toxicity testing bioassays. Many of these challenges relate to the change in buoyancy, from positive to negative, of pelagic fish embryos that occurs just prior to hatch. A novel exposure system, the pelagic embryo-larval exposure chamber (PELEC), has been developed to conduct successful bioassays on the early life stages (ELSs; embryos/larvae) of pelagic fish. Using this unique recirculating upwelling system, it was possible to significantly improve control survival in pelagic fish ELS bioassays compared to commonly used static exposure methods. Results demonstrate that control performance of mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos in the PELEC system, measured as percent survival after 96-hrs, significantly outperformed agitated static exposure and static exposure systems. Similar significant improvements in 72-hr control survival were obtained with yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). The PELEC system was subsequently used to test the effects of photo-induced toxicity of crude oil to mahi-mahi ELSs over the course of 96-hrs. Results indicate a greater than 9-fold increase in toxicity of Deepwater Horizon (DWH) crude oil during co-exposure to ambient sunlight compared to filtered ambient sunlight, revealing the importance of including natural sunlight in 96-hr DWH crude oil bioassays as well as the PELEC system's potential application in ecotoxicological assessments. PMID:27505137

  1. Alternatives to in vivo Tests to Detect Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) in Fish and Amphibians

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant amount of current research in risk assessment of chemicals is targeted to evaluate alternative test methods that may reduce, replace or refine the use of animals, while ensuring human and environmental health and safety. In 2009, the US EPA began implementation of t...

  2. Closed-loop control of zebrafish response using a bioinspired robotic-fish in a preference test

    PubMed Central

    Kopman, Vladislav; Laut, Jeffrey; Polverino, Giovanni; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the response of zebrafish to a robotic-fish whose morphology and colour pattern are inspired by zebrafish. Experiments are conducted in a three-chambered instrumented water tank where a robotic-fish is juxtaposed with an empty compartment, and the preference of live subjects is scored as the mean time spent in the vicinity of the tank's two lateral sides. The tail-beating of the robotic-fish is controlled in real-time based on feedback from fish motion to explore a spectrum of closed-loop systems, including proportional and integral controllers. Closed-loop control systems are complemented by open-loop strategies, wherein the tail-beat of the robotic-fish is independent of the fish motion. The preference space and the locomotory patterns of fish for each experimental condition are analysed and compared to understand the influence of real-time closed-loop control on zebrafish response. The results of this study show that zebrafish respond differently to the pattern of tail-beating motion executed by the robotic-fish. Specifically, the preference and behaviour of zebrafish depend on whether the robotic-fish tail-beating frequency is controlled as a function of fish motion and how such closed-loop control is implemented. PMID:23152102

  3. The fish embryo toxicity test as a replacement for the larval growth and survival test: A comparison of test sensitivity and identification of alternative endpoints in zebrafish and fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Marlo K Sellin; Stultz, Amy E; Smith, Austin W; Stephens, Dane A; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Oris, James T

    2015-06-01

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) test has been proposed as an alternative to the larval growth and survival (LGS) test. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the sensitivity of the FET and LGS tests in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) and to determine if the inclusion of sublethal metrics as test endpoints could enhance test utility. In both species, LGS and FET tests were conducted using 2 simulated effluents. A comparison of median lethal concentrations determined via each test revealed significant differences between test types; however, it could not be determined which test was the least and/or most sensitive. At the conclusion of each test, developmental abnormalities and the expression of genes related to growth and toxicity were evaluated. Fathead minnows and zebrafish exposed to mock municipal wastewater-treatment plant effluent in a FET test experienced an increased incidence of pericardial edema and significant alterations in the expression of genes including insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2, heat shock protein 70, and cytochrome P4501A, suggesting that the inclusion of these endpoints could enhance test utility. The results not only show the utility of the fathead minnow FET test as a replacement for the LGS test but also provide evidence that inclusion of additional endpoints could improve the predictive power of the FET test.

  4. Effect of olive mill wastewaters on the oxygen consumption by activated sludge microorganisms: an acute toxicity test method.

    PubMed

    Paixão, S M; Anselmo, A M

    2002-01-01

    The test for inhibition of oxygen consumption by activated sludge (ISO 8192-1986 (E)) was evaluated as a tool for assessing, the acute toxicity of olive mill wastewaters (OMW). According to the ISO test, information generated by this method may be helpful in estimating the effect of a test material on bacterial communities in the aquatic environment, especially in aerobic biological treatment systems. However, the lack of standardized bioassay methodology for effluents imposed that the test conditions were modified and adapted. The experiments were conducted in the presence or absence of an easily biodegradable carbon source (glucose) with different contact times (20 min and 24 h). The results obtained showed a remarkable stimulatory effect of this effluent to the activated sludge microorganisms. In fact, the oxygen uptake rate values increase with increasing effluent concentrations and contact times up to 0.98 microl O(2) h(-1) mg(-1) dry weight for a 100% OMW sample, 24 h contact time, with blanks exhibiting an oxygen uptake rate of ca. 1/10 of this value (0.07-0.10). It seems that the application of the ISO test as an acute toxicity test for effluents should be reconsidered, with convenient adaptation for its utilization as a method of estimating the effect on bacterial communities present in aerobic biological treatment systems. PMID:12015797

  5. An Analysis of Viral Testing in non-Acetaminophen (non-APAP) Pediatric Acute Liver Failure (PALF)

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Kathleen B.; Olio, Dominic Dell; Lobritto, Steven J.; Lopez, M James; Rodriguez-Baez, Norberto; Yazigi, Nada A.; Belle, Steven H.; Zhang, Song; Squires, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Viral infections are often suspected to cause pediatric acute liver failure (PALF) but large-scale studies have not been performed. We analyzed results of viral testing among non-acetaminophen (non APAP) PALF study participants. Methods Participants were enrolled in the PALF registry. Diagnostic evaluation and final diagnosis were determined by the site investigator and methods for viral testing by local standard of care. Viruses were classified as either Causative Viruses (CV) or Associated Viruses (AV). Supplemental testing for CV was performed if not done clinically and serum was available. Final diagnoses included “Viral”, “Indeterminate” and “Other”. Results Of 860 participants, 820 had at least one test result for a CV or AV. A positive viral test was found in 166/820 (20.2%) participants and distributed among “Viral” [66/80 (82.5%)], “Indeterminate” [52/420 (12.4%)] and “Other” [48/320 (15.0%)] diagnoses. CV accounted for 81/166 (48.8%) positive tests. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) was positive in 39/335 (11.6%) who were tested: 26/103 (25.2%) and 13/232 (5.6%) among infants 0 - 6 months and over 6 months, respectively. HSV was not tested in 61.0% and 53% of the over-all cohort and those 0 - 6 months, respectively. Supplemental testing yielded 17 positive, including 5 HSV. Conclusions Viral testing in PALF occurs frequently but is often incomplete. Evidence for acute viral infection was found in 20.2% of those tested for viruses. HSV is an important viral cause for PALF in all age groups. The etiopathogenic role of CV and AV in PALF requires further investigation. PMID:25079486

  6. Fish multigeneration test with preliminary short-term reproduction assay for estrone using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ataru; Tamura, Ikumi; Takanobu, Hitomi; Yamamuro, Masumi; Iguchi, Taisen; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    The most potent chemicals potentially causing adverse effects on fish species are estrogens in human waste.Sewage is a source of these estrogens and it is difficult to reduce. In particular, although the bioactivity of estrone is estimated to be about half of that of estradiol, multiple studies report that more than 100 ng l(–1) of estrone can be detected in urban rivers, including discharges from sewage treatment works; approximately two times as high as estradiol. Few studies have been conducted to investigate the long-term effects of estrone on wildlife; therefore, we conducted fish multigeneration test using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Medaka were exposed to estrone for 27 weeks across three generations in environmentally relevant concentrations, being 5.74, 11.4, 24.0, 47.1 and 91.4 ng l(–1). No effects on reproduction were observed in the first generation; however, a decline in egg production and fertility was observed in the second generation exposed to 91.4 ng l(–1) estrone, which is lower than some known environmental concentrations in urban environments. Furthermore, histopathological abnormalities were observed in the third generation exposed to both 47.1 and 91.4 ng l(–1), suggesting that estrone possibly exerts severe effects on the third or later generations. However, appearances of testis–ova were observed in the second and third generation they were not consistent with actual effects on reproduction, notwithstanding the testis-ovais regarded as the key evidence for endocrine disruption. Accordingly, we consider that qualitative measurement of abnormalities using histopathological observations is required for appropriate evaluation of endocrine disruption. PMID:25580481

  7. Fish Aversion and Attraction to Selected Agrichemicals.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Giacomini, Ana Cristina Varrone; Koakoski, Gessi; Kalichak, Fabiana; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Alcântara Barcellos, Heloísa Helena; Barreto, Rodrigo Egydio; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2016-10-01

    In agriculture intensive areas, fishponds and natural water bodies located in close proximity to these fields receive water with variable amounts of agrichemicals. Consequently, toxic compounds reach nontarget organisms. For instance, aquatic organisms can be exposed to tebuconazole-based fungicides (TBF), glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), and atrazine-based herbicides (ABH) that are potentially dangerous, which motivates the following question: Are these agrichemicals attractant or aversive to fish? To answer this question, adult zebrafish were tested in a chamber that allows fish to escape from or seek a lane of contaminated water. This attraction and aversion paradigm was evaluated with zebrafish in the presence of an acute contamination with these compounds. We showed that only GBH was aversive to fish, whereas ABH and TBF caused neither attraction nor aversion for zebrafish. Thus, these chemicals do not impose an extra toxic risk by being an attractant for fish, although TBF and ABH can be more deleterious, because they induce no aversive response. Because the uptake and bioaccumulation of chemicals in fish seems to be time- and dose-dependent, a fish that remains longer in the presence of these substances tends to absorb higher concentrations than one that escapes from contaminated sites. PMID:27423874

  8. Fish Aversion and Attraction to Selected Agrichemicals.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Giacomini, Ana Cristina Varrone; Koakoski, Gessi; Kalichak, Fabiana; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Alcântara Barcellos, Heloísa Helena; Barreto, Rodrigo Egydio; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2016-10-01

    In agriculture intensive areas, fishponds and natural water bodies located in close proximity to these fields receive water with variable amounts of agrichemicals. Consequently, toxic compounds reach nontarget organisms. For instance, aquatic organisms can be exposed to tebuconazole-based fungicides (TBF), glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), and atrazine-based herbicides (ABH) that are potentially dangerous, which motivates the following question: Are these agrichemicals attractant or aversive to fish? To answer this question, adult zebrafish were tested in a chamber that allows fish to escape from or seek a lane of contaminated water. This attraction and aversion paradigm was evaluated with zebrafish in the presence of an acute contamination with these compounds. We showed that only GBH was aversive to fish, whereas ABH and TBF caused neither attraction nor aversion for zebrafish. Thus, these chemicals do not impose an extra toxic risk by being an attractant for fish, although TBF and ABH can be more deleterious, because they induce no aversive response. Because the uptake and bioaccumulation of chemicals in fish seems to be time- and dose-dependent, a fish that remains longer in the presence of these substances tends to absorb higher concentrations than one that escapes from contaminated sites.

  9. Fish Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fish Allergy KidsHealth > For Parents > Fish Allergy Print A ... From Home en español Alergia al pescado About Fish Allergy A fish allergy is not exactly the ...

  10. Toxicological assessment of enzyme-treated asparagus extract in rat acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies and genotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Ono, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuya; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    The safety of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) developed as a novel anti-stress functional material was assessed in acute and subchronic studies and genotoxicity assays. In the acute oral dose toxicity study, all rats survived during the test period and ETAS did not influence clinical appearance, body weight gain and necropsy findings at a dosage of 2000mg/kg body weight. Thus, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ETAS was determined to be greater than 2000mg/kg. The 90-day subchronic study (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg body weight, delivered by gavage) in rats reported no significant adverse effects in food consumption, body weight, mortality, urinalysis, hematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology. In the micronucleus test of mice, the incidence of micronuclei in ETAS-administered groups (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg/day, injected twice) was equivalent to that of the negative control group, while the positive control group receiving mitomycin C showed a high incidence. The potential of ETAS to induce gene mutation was tested using four Salmonella typhimurium strains and Escherichia coli WP2uvrA. The test sample was not mutagenic to the test strains. These results support the safety of ETAS as food and dietary supplement.

  11. Differences in detection of Aeromonas salmonicida in covertly infected salmonid fishes by the stress-inducible furunculosis test and culture-based assays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cipriano, R.C.; Ford, L.A.; Smith, D.R.; Schachte, J.H.; Petrie, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate detection of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (the cause of furunculosis disease) in covertly infected salmonids is difficult and is a cause of concern for those involved in fish health inspection and resource management programs. In this study, we examined populations of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, and lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that previously sustained natural episodes of furunculosis. Consequently, the sampled fish were presumed to harbor latent infections. Mucus, gill, liver, kidney, heart, spleen, and intestine samples (N = 100 fish per group sampled) were processed and examined by (1) direct dilution counts and (2) quadrant streaking after a 48-h pre-enrichment in trypticase soy broth (TSB). Another subsample of fish from each group was then subjected to stress-inducible furunculosis tests. Stress tests detected A. salmonicida in three of four groups of fish that were examined whereas the pathogen was detected in only two of the groups analyzed with culture-based assays. Although pre-enrichment in TSB enhanced detection within internal sampling sites including the liver, heart, spleen, and kidney, enrichment did not enhance detection from mucus, gill, or intestinal samples.

  12. Application of a fish DNA damage assay as a biological toxicity screening tool for metal plating wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.; Zong, M.; Meier, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The utility of a fish DNA damage assay as a rapid monitoring tool was investigated. Metal plating wastewater was chosen as a sample because it contains various genotoxic metal species. Fish DNA damage assay results were compared to data generated from the conventional whole effluent toxicity (WET) test procedure. The Microtox{reg_sign} assay (Azur Environmental, Carlsbad, CA, USA) using Vibrio fischeri was also employed. Eleven samples from two metal plating companies were collected for this evaluation. For the fish DNA damage assay, 7-d-old fathead minnow larvae, Pimephales promelas, were utilized. They were exposed to a series of dilutions at 20 C for 2 h. Whole effluent toxicity tests conducted in this study included two acute toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and fathead minnows and two chronic toxicity tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows. The fish DNA damage assay showed good correlations with both the acute and chronic WET test results, especially with those obtained with fathead minnows. The kappa values, an index of agreement, between the fish DNA damage assay and WET tests were shown to be acceptable. These findings imply that this novel fish DNA damage assay has use as an expedient toxicity screening procedure since it produces comparable results to those of the acute and chronic fathead minnow toxicity tests.

  13. Testing monophyly of the freshwater fish Leporinus (Characiformes, Anostomidae) through molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, J L; Carvalho-Costa, L F; Venere, P C; Carvalho, D C; Troy, W P; Galetti, P M

    2016-03-01

    Monophyly of the genus Leporinus (Characiformes: Anostomidae) was tested by sequencing and analysing a total of 4732 bp, including two mitochondrial [cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) and cytochrome b (Cytb)] and three nuclear [myosin heavy chain 6 cardiac muscle alpha (Myh6), recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) and recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2)] loci for 22 species of Leporinus, or c. 25% of all described species in the genus. Phylogenetic tree analyses (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian species tree) indicate Leporinus to be paraphyletic, with monophyly being rejected by both Kishino-Hasegawa and Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests. The sequenced species of Leporinus are distributed across five clades that are interleaved among other anostomid genera. Several taxonomic changes are suggested as being necessary to restore monophyly for the group. The clade containing the type species, Leporinus fasciatus, should be considered Leporinus sensu stricto and at least three new genera should be described for other species currently considered part of Leporinus.

  14. Multispecific T cell response and negative HCV RNA tests during acute HCV infection are early prognostic factors of spontaneous clearance

    PubMed Central

    Spada, E; Mele, A; Berton, A; Ruggeri, L; Ferrigno, L; Garbuglia, A R; Perrone, M P; Girelli, G; Del Porto, P; Piccolella, E; Mondelli, M U; Amoroso, P; Cortese, R; Nicosia, A; Vitelli, A; Folgori, A

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in a high frequency of chronic disease. The aim of this study was to identify early prognostic markers of disease resolution by performing a comprehensive analysis of viral and host factors during the natural course of acute HCV infection. Methods: The clinical course of acute hepatitis C was determined in 34 consecutive patients. Epidemiological and virological parameters, as well as cell mediated immunity (CMI) and distribution of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) alleles were analysed. Results: Ten out of 34 patients experienced self-limiting infection, with most resolving patients showing fast kinetics of viral clearance: at least one negative HCV RNA test during this phase predicted a favourable outcome. Among other clinical epidemiological parameters measured, the self-limiting course was significantly associated with higher median peak bilirubin levels at the onset of disease, and with the female sex, but only the latter parameter was independently associated after multivariate analysis. No significant differences between self-limiting or chronic course were observed for the distribution of DRB1 and DQB1 alleles. HCV specific T cell response was more frequently detected during acute HCV infection, than in patients with chronic HCV disease. A significantly broader T cell response was found in patients with self-limiting infection than in those with chronic evolving acute hepatitis C. Conclusion: The results suggest that host related factors, in particular sex and CMI, play a crucial role in the spontaneous clearance of this virus. Most importantly, a negative HCV RNA test and broad CMI within the first month after onset of the symptoms represent very efficacious predictors of viral clearance and could thus be used as criteria in selecting candidates for early antiviral treatment. PMID:15479691

  15. One Fish Two Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michele

    1998-01-01

    This activity explains fisheries resource management to seven-year olds. First-grade students learn concepts such as offspring viability, life expectancy, and distribution of species, which help to determine when, where, and how people fish and the importance of fishing responsibly. Lists materials, procedures, and extensions. (SJR)

  16. Field trial tests of FKC vaccines against RSIV genotype Megalocytivirus in cage-cultured mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) in an inland reservoir.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youyong; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Dong, Chuanfu

    2013-11-01

    Megalocytiviruses are one of the most important causative agents in finfish industry in China, Japan and South East Asia. The viruses are mainly composed of ISKNV, RSIV and TRBIV genotypes. Among them, ISKNV genotype isolate is the most important causative agent in mandarin fish industry in South China. Since its first occurrence in mid-1990s in China, no effective drug has been developed to prevent and control this virus until our recent work. In this study, unusual RSIV genotype Megalocytivirus was validated as the causative agent in natural mass mortality of cage-cultured mandarin fish in an inland reservoir. One isolate was obtained using MFF-1 cells from natural mass mortality of mandarin fish and designated as Megalocyti-LJ2012. Based on two previous megalocytiviral isolates, formalin-killed cell (FKC) vaccines were prepared to immunize 2000 and 9000 cage-cultured mandarin in October 2011 and August 2012, respectively. As results, greater than 70% protective effects were observed in vaccination group in both individual field tests. Adjuvant-emulsified FKC vaccine provided even greater than 99% protective effect (N = 1000). In contrast, almost all fish died in non-vaccination group (N = 1000). Immuno-protection test under laboratory condition showed that 100% relative percent survival was obtained in surviving fish from vaccination group after challenge with Megalocyti-LJ2012 at 4 months post vaccination. Taken together, the present study shows that FKC vaccine is also efficient in preventing RSIV genotype Megalocytivirus in cage-cultured mandarin fish in two field tests.

  17. General-linear-models approach for comparing the response of several species in acute-toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, K.L.; Goyert, J.C.; Farrell, M.P.; Strand, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests (bioassays) estimate the concentration of a chemical required to produce a response (usually death) in fifty percent of a population (the LC50). Simple comparisons of LC5C values among several species are often inadequate because species can have identical LC50 values while their overall response to a chemical may differ in either the threshold concentration (intercept) or the rate of response (slope). A sequential approach using a general linear model is presented for testing differences among species in their overall response to a chemical. This method tests for equality of slopes followed by a test for equality of regression lines. This procedure employs the Statistical Analysis System's General Linear Models procedure for conducting a weighted least squares analysis with a convariable.

  18. SALT MARSH HABITAT FROM A FISH EYE VIEW: A TEST OF THE DIMENSIONLESS INDEX OF HABITAT COMPLEXITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salt marshes are considered important foraging and predator refuge areas for fish, but these functions are rarely measured. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between the structural complexity of the habitat and fish size in marshes subjected to different wat...

  19. Field test of a bioassay procedure for assessing habitat quality on fish spawning grounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Jude, David J.; Eshenroder, Randy L.

    1989-01-01

    A bioassay procedure to assess habitat quality was tested on Port Austin reef in southern Lake Huron, a spawning area of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. In 1986, Plexiglas incubators filled with fertilized lake trout eggs were buried by scuba divers in rock rubble at two sites. The incubators then were attached to chains between large trap-net anchors on the bottom and left over winter. At one site, egg hatch rate was significantly higher in incubators that remained buried in substrate (24%) than in incubators that were dislodged out onto the substrate (13%). At the other, more exposed site, no significant difference was found in percent hatch between eggs that incubated in (10%) and on (8%) the substrate. Percent hatch at both sites was significantly lower than that (40%) of eggs from the same source that were incubated in controlled laboratory conditions. In autumn, concentrations of dissolved ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrate near bottom and in the substrate posed no threat to lake trout embryos and were not correlated with hatch rate; concentrations differed significantly between the two sites. During winter, 15 cm of sediment settled from the water onto the reef but did not accumulate or smother the eggs. The bioassay procedure is easy to implement, is recommended for use in the Great Lakes, and could be adapted easily for use elsewhere.

  20. Acute toxicity tests using rotifers. 4. Effects of cyst age, temperature, and salinity on the sensitivity of Brachionus calyciflorus

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, T.W.; Moffat, B.D.; Janssen, C.; Persoone, G. )

    1991-06-01

    Several aspects of the response to toxicants using a standardized toxicity test with the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus are described. Test animals are obtained by hatching cysts which produce animals of similar age and physiological condition. The acute toxicity of 28 compounds is described with 24-hr LC50's. The LC50's span five orders of magnitude, from silver at 0.008 mg.liter-1 to benzene at more than 1000 mg.liter-1. Control mortality in 84 tests averaged 2% with a standard deviation of 3%, indicating very consistent test sensitivity. Only once in 84 trials did a test fail because of excessive control mortality, yielding a failure rate of 1.2%. Cyst age from 0 to 18 months had no effect on the sensitivity of neonates to reference toxicants. Both high and low temperatures increased rotifer sensitivity to reference toxicants. Copper sensitivity was greater at 10, 25, and 30 degrees C compared with results at 20 degrees C. Likewise, sodium pentachlorophenol toxicity was greater at 10 and 30 degrees C compared with results at 20 degrees C. Survivorship curves at 25 degrees C of neonates under control conditions indicated that mortality begins at about 30 hr. This places a practical limit on toxicant exposure for the assay of 24 hr. B. calyciflorus cysts hatch at salinities up to 5 ppt and acute toxicity tests using pentachlorophenol at this salinity yielded LC50's about one-half those of standard freshwater. B. calyciflorus is preferred over Brachionus plicatilis for toxicity tests in salinities up to 5 ppt because it is consistently more sensitive.

  1. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a

  2. [Clinical application of blood matching with hemolytic test in vitro for transfusion treatment of crisis puerpera with acute hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Min; Tang, Cong-Hai; Gan, Wei-Wei; Wu, A-Yang; Yang, Hui-Cong; Zhang, Tian-Xin; Huang, Yan Xue; Qiu, Lu-Zhen; Chen, Hong-Pu; Lin, Feng-Li

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to establish the matching method of hemolytic test in vitro, and to guide the transfusion treatment for puerpera with acute hemolytic disease. The donor's erythrocytes were sensibilized by all the antibodies in plasma of patient in vitro and were added with complement, after incubation for 6.5 hours at 38 °C, the hemolysis or no hemolysis were observed. It is safe to transfuse if the hemolysis did not occur. The results showed that when the matching difficulty happened to puerpera with acute hemolytic disease, the compatible donor could be screened by hemolytic test in vitro. There were no untoward effects after transfusion of 6 U leukocyte-depleted erythrocyte suspension. The all hemoglobin, total bilirubins, indirect bilirubin, reticulocyte, D-dimex and so on were rapidly improved in patient after transfusion , showing obvious clinical efficacy of treatment. It is concluded that when the matching results can not judge accurately compatible or incompatible through the routine method of cross matching, the agglutinated and no-hemolytic erythrocytes can be screened by hemolytic test in vitro and can be transfused with good efficacy; the hemoglobin level can be promoted rapidly, and no untoward effects occur. PMID:25130835

  3. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies.

  4. Size doesn't matter, sex does: a test for boldness in sister species of Brachyrhaphis fishes

    PubMed Central

    Ingley, Spencer J; Rehm, Jeremy; Johnson, Jerald B

    2014-01-01

    The effect of divergent natural selection on the evolution of behavioral traits has long been a focus of behavioral ecologists. Predation, due to its ubiquity in nature and strength as a selective agent, has been considered an important environmental driver of behavior. Predation is often confounded with other environmental factors that could also play a role in behavioral evolution. For example, environments that contain predators are often more ecologically complex and “risky” (i.e., exposed and dangerous). Previous work shows that individuals from risky environments are often more bold, active, and explorative than those from low-risk environments. To date, most comparative studies of environmentally driven behavioral divergence are limited to comparisons among populations within species that occur in divergent selective environments but neglect comparisons between species following speciation. This limits our understanding of how behavior evolves post-speciation. The Central American live-bearing fish genus Brachyrhaphis provides an ideal system for examining the relationship between selective environments and behavior, within and between species. Here, we test for differences in boldness between sister species B. roseni and B. terrabensis that occur in streams with and without piscivorous predators, respectively. We found that species do differ in boldness, with species that occur with predators being bolder than those that do not. Within each species, we found that sexes differed in boldness, with males being bolder than females. We also tested for a relationship between size (a surrogate for metabolic rate) and boldness, but found no size effects. Therefore, sex, not size, affects boldness. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that complex and risky environments favor individuals with more bold behavioral traits, but they are not consistent with the hypothesis that size (and therefore metabolic rate) drives divergence in boldness. Finally

  5. Size doesn't matter, sex does: a test for boldness in sister species of Brachyrhaphis fishes.

    PubMed

    Ingley, Spencer J; Rehm, Jeremy; Johnson, Jerald B

    2014-11-01

    The effect of divergent natural selection on the evolution of behavioral traits has long been a focus of behavioral ecologists. Predation, due to its ubiquity in nature and strength as a selective agent, has been considered an important environmental driver of behavior. Predation is often confounded with other environmental factors that could also play a role in behavioral evolution. For example, environments that contain predators are often more ecologically complex and "risky" (i.e., exposed and dangerous). Previous work shows that individuals from risky environments are often more bold, active, and explorative than those from low-risk environments. To date, most comparative studies of environmentally driven behavioral divergence are limited to comparisons among populations within species that occur in divergent selective environments but neglect comparisons between species following speciation. This limits our understanding of how behavior evolves post-speciation. The Central American live-bearing fish genus Brachyrhaphis provides an ideal system for examining the relationship between selective environments and behavior, within and between species. Here, we test for differences in boldness between sister species B. roseni and B. terrabensis that occur in streams with and without piscivorous predators, respectively. We found that species do differ in boldness, with species that occur with predators being bolder than those that do not. Within each species, we found that sexes differed in boldness, with males being bolder than females. We also tested for a relationship between size (a surrogate for metabolic rate) and boldness, but found no size effects. Therefore, sex, not size, affects boldness. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that complex and risky environments favor individuals with more bold behavioral traits, but they are not consistent with the hypothesis that size (and therefore metabolic rate) drives divergence in boldness. Finally, our

  6. Comparative assessment of the acute skin irritation potential of detergent formulations using a novel human 4-h patch test method.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael K; Kruszewski, Francis H; Al-Atrash, Jenan; Blazka, Mark E; Gingell, Ralph; Heitfeld, Fred A; Mallon, David; Snyder, Neil K; Swanson, Judith E; Casterton, Phillip L

    2005-12-01

    Predictive skin irritation test methods, which do not require use of animals, are needed for the pre-market assessment of detergent formulations. The utility of a novel and ethical human acute skin irritation patch test method, originally developed for chemical skin irritation assessment, was evaluated. In this IRB-approved method, subjects were patched under occlusion for increasing periods of time up to 4h in duration. The total incidence of positive skin reactions for test products was compared to a positive control (20% aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]). Acutely irritating formulas were defined as those showing a significantly increased or equal incidence of positive responders compared with that of SDS. The time of exposure required for 50% of subjects to show a positive skin reaction (TR50 value) was calculated for each product and enabled test product comparisons within and between studies. Using this approach, 24 detergent formulations of various types were tested in seven individual studies. The skin irritation profiles were generally consistent within product types, which could be categorized as follows (by decreasing irritancy): mold/mildew removers (average TR50 = 0.37 h) > disinfectants/sanitizers (0.64 h) > fabric softener concentrate (1.09 h) = aluminum wash (1.20 h) > 20% SDS (1.81 h) > liquid laundry detergents (3.48 h) > liquid dish detergents (4.16 h) = liquid fabric softeners (4.56 h) = liquid hand soaps (4.58 h) = shampoos (5.40 h) = hard surface cleaners (6.34 h) > powder automatic dish detergents (>16 h) = powder laundry detergents (>16 h). In addition to formulation effects, some seasonal effects were noted; particularly greater winter-time reactivity to 20% SDS and the hard surface cleaner and liquid laundry formulations. These results demonstrate the utility of this patch test method for the comparative skin irritation assessment of these different product types. PMID:16026914

  7. Alternative acute inhalation toxicity testing by determination of the concentration-time-mortality relationship: experimental comparison with standard LC50 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zwart, A.; Arts, J.H.; Ten Berge, W.F.; Appelman, L.M. )

    1992-06-01

    A new design for acute inhalation toxicity testing was evaluated and compared with results obtained according to OECD guideline 403. The new design consists of a range-finding test, which is compatible with a conventional limit test, and can be followed by determination of a concentration-time-mortality relationship, enabling calculation of LC50 (50% mortality exposure concentration) values. By exposing pairs of rats for different periods of time to about four different test concentrations in a nose-only exposure unit, LT50 (50% mortality exposure time) values were obtained for five pairs of animals per concentration. The mortality data of the approximate 20 time-concentration combinations were used to calculate the probit relationship. Estimated mortality responses from these probit relations were compared with mortality figures obtained by exposing groups of five male rats and five female rats whole-body according to conventional toxicity testing. In general, there was good correspondence between the estimated and the observed mortality response. In this study, the determination of the concentration-time-mortality relationship takes about the same number of animals (40-50) as the conventional LC50 procedure according to the OECD guideline 403. However, the new method has several additional advantages such as: (A) LC50 values are obtained over a 10-fold range in time, with the potential of decreasing the number of animals used when regulations require acute toxicity data for different periods of exposure. (B) The obtained relationship contains considerably more valuable information for risk assessment than the LC50 value.

  8. Irritancy testing in occupational dermatology: comparison between two quick tests and the acute irritation induced by sodium lauryl sulphate.

    PubMed

    Bangha, E; Hinnen, U; Elsner, P

    1996-11-01

    To reduce the incidence of irritant contact dermatitis, the development of screening methods to identify subjects with increased susceptibility to irritants is essential. In a pilot study on the comparison between two quick, non-invasive irritancy tests (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) with the time-consuming patch testing with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), no correlation between the "quick tests" and SLS patch testing was observed. In the present paper the results of irritancy testing in 181 metal worker trainees are presented. Experimental irritant contact dermatitis reactions were induced on the medial third of the volar forearm using SLS 0.5%, applied for 23 h and as "quick tests" DMSO 90% and 95% and a solution of 0.2% mol/l NaOH applied for 5 min. Assessment of skin irritability was made by visual scoring and measurement of transepidermal water loss. Except for a statistically significant relationship between the irritations by DMSO 90% and 95%, correlations between the different techniques were weak or non-existent. This is most probably due to different pathophysiological pathways for the irritant reactions. We therefore propose to use a spectrum of different tests in occupational dermatology for predicting the individual's risk of irritant contact dermatitis.

  9. City Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    A program of supplying opportunities for fishing at locations within and near urban areas was developed. This effort included stocking, management of bodies of water for fishing, and presentation of fishing clinics for urban fishermen. (RE)

  10. Fish Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaxter, J. H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides related information about hearing in fish, including the sensory stimulus of sound in the underwater environment, mechanoreceptors in fish, pressure perception and the swimbladder, specializations in sound conduction peculiar to certain fish families. Includes numerous figures. (CS)

  11. Development of a Complete Life Cycle Sediment Toxicity Test for the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing sediment toxicity test methods are limited to acute and chronic exposure of invertebrates and acute exposure of vertebrates, with limited guidance on the chronic exposure of vertebrates, specifically fishes. A series of life stage-specific studies were conducted to dete...

  12. Acute effects of ketamine in the holeboard, the elevated-plus maze, and the social interaction test in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, J S; Nadal, R; Pallarés, M; Ferré, N

    1997-01-01

    Although noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists have shown an anxiolyticlike profile in several studies, such effects have not been observed consistently. Previous studies with ketamine, a noncompetitive NMDA antagonist, have employed only shock tests of anxiety based on conflict procedures. In the present experiment, the effect of an acute low dose of ketamine (7 mg/kg) was examined in adult male Wistar rats tested in three nonconflict tests: holeboard, social interaction, and elevated plus-maze paradigms. The results showed that ketamine decreased time spent in active social interaction and the number of rearings and central activity in the social interaction test. It also decreased the number of entries into the percentage of time spent in open arms and the total number of entries in the elevated plus-maze. No significant effect was observed in head dipping in the holeboard test, although the number of crossings did increase. These results suggest an anxiogeniclike effect of ketamine in contrast with results previously described for noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists. These effects of ketamine are more similar to those described for stimulant drugs such as caffeine, cocaine, or amphetamine in anxiety tests.

  13. [The influence of acute hypoxia on motility of rats in the open field test under the conditions of an altered photoperiod].

    PubMed

    Sopova, I Iu

    2014-01-01

    The influence of acute hypoxia on the motility of rats under the conditions of an altered photoperiod in the open field test was studied. Thus, keeping the animals in constant darkness after the modeling of acute hypoxia leads to the depression of locomotive and exploratory components of the behavior. At the same time the animals that were kept under the conditions of constant light show a change in the correlation between the components of motility after the action of hypoxia.

  14. Hepatitis C core antigen testing: a reliable, quick, and potentially cost-effective alternative to hepatitis C polymerase chain reaction in diagnosing acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Fiona V; Fisher, Martin; Hughes, Daniel J; Shaw, Simon G; Homer, Gary; Hassan-Ibrahim, Mohammed O

    2015-01-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasingly common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated the efficacy of HCV core antigen in diagnosing acute HCV in an HIV-infected cohort. Compared with HCV polymerase chain reaction, core antigen proved sensitive (100%) and specific (97.9%). As a quick, simple, and cost-effective test, it has considerable utility in screening for acute HCV.

  15. Is the Quality of Sushi Ruined by Freezing Raw Fish and Squid? A Randomized Double-Blind Trial With Sensory Evaluation Using Discrimination Testing

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kentaro; Fukuchi, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Sushi is a traditional Japanese cuisine enjoyed worldwide. However, using raw fish to make sushi may pose risk of certain parasitic infections, such as anisakidosis, which is most reported in Japan. This risk of infection can be eliminated by freezing fish; however, Japanese people are hesitant to freeze fish because it is believed that freezing ruins sushi's taste. Methods. A randomized double-blind trial with discrimination testing was conducted to examine the ability of Japanese individuals to distinguish between frozen and unfrozen sushi. A pair of mackerel and squid sushi, one once frozen and the other not, was provided to the participants, and they were asked to answer which one tasted better. Results. Among 120 rounds of discrimination testing involving the consumption of 240 pieces of mackerel sushi, unfrozen sushi was believed to taste better in 42.5% (51 dishes) of cases, frozen sushi was thought to taste better in 49.2% (59 dishes), and the participants felt the taste was the same in 8.3% (10 dishes). The odds ratio for selecting unfrozen sushi as “tastes better” over frozen sushi was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], .59–1.26; P = .45). For squid, unfrozen sushi was believed to be superior 48.3% of the time (58 dishes), and frozen sushi, 35.0% of the time (42 dishes). They were felt to be the same in 16.7% (20 dishes) (odds ratio, 1.38; 95% CI, .93–2.05; P = .11). Conclusions. Freezing raw fish did not ruin sushi's taste. These findings may encourage the practice of freezing fish before using it in sushi, helping to decrease the incidence of anisakidosis. PMID:25697740

  16. Arterial damages in acute elbow dislocations: which diagnostic tests are required?

    PubMed

    Lutter, Christoph; Pfefferkorn, Ronny; Schoeffl, Volker

    2016-07-19

    Blunt vessel injuries of peripheral arteries caused by a direct trauma are rare. Studies have described the frequency of arterial ruptures following closed elbow dislocations in 0.3-1.7% of all cases. However, arterial damage does not always necessarily appear as a complete rupture of the vessel with a loss of peripheral circulation and ischaemic symptoms; a relatively strong periarticular system of collaterals can maintain circulation. Furthermore, the traumatic dislocation can also cause intimal tears, arterial dissections and aneurysms or thrombosis. In all cases of vessel injury, including total disruption, a peripheral pulse might still be palpable. 3 weeks after an acute elbow dislocation, we have diagnosed a patient with a long-segment stenosis of the brachial artery and a thrombosis of the radial artery. Therefore, the close anatomic proximity to the neurovascular structures should always be considered in cases of elbow dislocations, even if peripheral pulses are traceable.

  17. There is need for antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests to identify common acute tropical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Henry; Suankratay, Chusana

    2007-01-01

    Enteric fever, typhus, leptospirosis, dengue, melioidosis, and tuberculous meningitis present urgent diagnostic problems that require experience and clinical judgment to make early evidence-based management decisions. Basic and applied research dealing with reliable antigen-based diagnostics has been published and confirmed for several of these infections. This should have initiated commercial production but has not. Established international firms see little profit in such diagnostic kits since they would be used in poor countries with little prospects for return of investment capital. We attempt to illustrate this issue, using common causes of acute febrile illnesses in the Southeast Asian region. We believe that rapid diagnostic technology could prevent significant delay in starting appropriate therapy, reduce hospital expenses, and even save lives.

  18. Value of serological tests in the diagnosis of viral acute respiratory infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Căruntu, F; Dogaru, D; Stefan, D; Căruntu, V; Angelescu, C; Streinu-Cercel, A; Colţan, G; Petrescu, A L; Tarţă, D; Bârnaure, F

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the antibody response to influenza viruses A (H1N1), A (H3N2) and B, to parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, to adenoviruses and respiratory syncytial virus was studied in paired serum samples collected from 110 patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and in 40 patients suffering from other diseases. Rises in serum antibody titers to 1--5 of the above mentioned antigens were detected in many of the patients of both groups. The fact is most likely due to the presence of some epidemiologically and clinically uncharacteristic viral ARI (influenza included); simultaneous or successive infections with influenza virus and different other viruses were very frequent. A greater efficiency of the etiological diagnosis of viral ARI can be achieved only by the association of epidemiological and clinical criteria with serological data, the visualization of viral antigens and virus isolation. PMID:3727398

  19. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or

  20. An Analysis of Hematological Parameters as a Diagnostic test for Malaria in Patients with Acute Febrile Illness: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jairajpuri, Zeeba Shamim; Rana, Safia; Hassan, Mohd Jaseem; Nabi, Farhat; Jetley, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hematological changes are among the most common complications encountered in malaria. This study analyzes and statistically evaluates the hematological changes as a diagnostic test for malaria in patients with acute febrile illness and whether these could guide the physician to institute specific antimalarial treatment. Methods The present study was an observational study, conducted from January to December 2012. A total of 723 patients presenting with acute febrile illness at our hospital were evaluated. A complete blood count and malarial parasite microscopy were performed for each patient. Results The findings showed that 172 out of 723 patients (24%) were diagnosed to have malaria by positive smear report. There were 121 males and 51 females with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. Maximum number of cases were seen in the 20-30 years age group. There was a statistically significant reduction in hemoglobin (p<0.005), platelet count (p<0.001) and total leukocyte count (p<0.001) levels in patients with malaria compared to those without the disease. Likelihood ratios for a positive result of platelets (6.2) and total leukocyte count (3.4) was relevant as compared to hemoglobin (1.61) and Red cell distribution width (1.79). The negative predictive values for hemoglobin (79%), total leukocyte count (86%), platelets (94%) and Red cell distribution width (93%) were significant. Red cell distribution width values were found to be higher in patients with malaria than in patients without malaria (p<0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that routinely used laboratory findings such as hemoglobin, leukocytes, platelet counts and even red cell distribution width values can provide a diagnostic clue in a patient with acute febrile illness in endemic areas, thus increasing the probability of malaria and enhancing prompt initiation of treatment. PMID:24498476

  1. Can mixed-species groups reduce individual parasite load? A field test with two closely related poeciliid fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta).

    PubMed

    Dargent, Felipe; Torres-Dowdall, Julián; Scott, Marilyn E; Ramnarine, Indar; Fussmann, Gregor F

    2013-01-01

    Predation and parasitism are two of the most important sources of mortality in nature. By forming groups, individuals can gain protection against predators but may increase their risk of being infected with contagious parasites. Animals might resolve this conflict by forming mixed-species groups thereby reducing the costs associated with parasites through a relative decrease in available hosts. We tested this hypothesis in a system with two closely related poeciliid fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta) and their host-specific monogenean ectoparasites (Gyrodactylus spp.) in Trinidad. Fish from three different rivers were sampled from single and mixed-species groups, measured and scanned for Gyrodactylus. The presence and abundance of Gyrodactylus were lower when fish of both species were part of mixed-species groups relative to single-species groups. This is consistent with the hypothesis that mixed-species groups provide a level of protection against contagious parasites. We discuss the importance of potentially confounding factors such as salinity and individual fish size.

  2. Can Mixed-Species Groups Reduce Individual Parasite Load? A Field Test with Two Closely Related Poeciliid Fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta)

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, Felipe; Torres-Dowdall, Julián; Scott, Marilyn E.; Ramnarine, Indar; Fussmann, Gregor F.

    2013-01-01

    Predation and parasitism are two of the most important sources of mortality in nature. By forming groups, individuals can gain protection against predators but may increase their risk of being infected with contagious parasites. Animals might resolve this conflict by forming mixed-species groups thereby reducing the costs associated with parasites through a relative decrease in available hosts. We tested this hypothesis in a system with two closely related poeciliid fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta) and their host-specific monogenean ectoparasites (Gyrodactylus spp.) in Trinidad. Fish from three different rivers were sampled from single and mixed-species groups, measured and scanned for Gyrodactylus. The presence and abundance of Gyrodactylus were lower when fish of both species were part of mixed-species groups relative to single-species groups. This is consistent with the hypothesis that mixed-species groups provide a level of protection against contagious parasites. We discuss the importance of potentially confounding factors such as salinity and individual fish size. PMID:23437237

  3. Acute toxicity of the cationic surfactant C12-benzalkonium in different bioassays: how test design affects bioavailability and effect concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Geurts, Marc; Sjollema, Sascha B; Kramer, Nynke I; Hermens, Joop L M; Droge, Steven T J

    2014-03-01

    Using an ion-exchange-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method, the freely dissolved concentrations of C12-benzalkonium were measured in different toxicity assays, including 1) immobilization of Daphnia magna in the presence or absence of dissolved humic acid; 2) mortality of Lumbriculus variegatus in the presence or absence of a suspension of Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) sediment; 3) photosystem II inhibition of green algae Chlorella vulgaris; and 4) viability of in vitro rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) in the presence or absence of serum proteins. Furthermore, the loss from chemical adsorption to the different test vessels used in these tests was also determined. The C12-benzalkonium sorption isotherms to the different sorbent phases were established as well. Our results show that the freely dissolved concentration is a better indicator of the actual exposure concentration than the nominal or total concentration in most test assays. Daphnia was the most sensitive species to C12-benzalkonium. The acute Daphnia and Lumbriculus tests both showed no enhanced toxicity from possible ingestion of sorbed C12-benzalkonium in comparison with water-only exposure, which is in accordance with the equilibrium partitioning theory. Moreover, the present study demonstrates that commonly used sorbent phases can strongly affect bioavailability and observed effect concentrations for C12-benzalkonium. Even stronger effects of decreased actual exposure concentrations resulting from sorption to test vessels, cells, and sorbent phases can be expected for more hydrophobic cationic surfactants. PMID:24273010

  4. Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish cell line (RTgill-W1)--towards water toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Glawdel, Tomasz; Elbuken, Caglar; Lee, Lucy E J; Ren, Carolyn L

    2009-11-21

    This study presents a microfluidic system that incorporates electroosmotic pumps, a concentration gradient generator and a fish cell line (rainbow trout gill) to perform toxicity testing on fish cells seeded in the system. The system consists of three mechanical components: (1) a toxicity testing chip containing a microfluidic gradient generator which creates a linear concentration distribution of toxicant in a cell test chamber, (2) an electroosmotic (EO) pump chip that controls the flow rate and operation of the toxicity chip, and (3) indirect reservoirs that connect the two chips allowing for the toxicant solution to be pumped separately from the electroosmotic pump solution. The flow rate and stability of the EO pumps was measured and tested by monitoring the gradient generator using fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a lethality test was performed with this system setup using a rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) as the test cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate as a model toxicant. A gradient of sodium dodecyl sulfate, from 0 to 50 microg mL(-1), was applied for 1 hr to the attached cells, and the results were quantified using a Live/Dead cell assay. This work is a preliminary study on the application of EO pumps in a living cell assay, with the potential to use the pumps in portable water quality testing devices with RTgill-W1 cells as the biosensors. PMID:19865731

  5. Fish gelatin.

    PubMed

    Boran, Gokhan; Regenstein, Joe M

    2010-01-01

    Gelatin is a multifunctional ingredient used in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and photographic films as a gelling agent, stabilizer, thickener, emulsifier, and film former. As a thermoreversible hydrocolloid with a narrower gap between its melting and gelling temperatures, both of which are below human body temperature, gelatin provides unique advantages over carbohydrate-based gelling agents. Gelatin is mostly produced from pig skin, and cattle hides and bones. Some alternative raw materials have recently gained attention from both researchers and the industry not just because they overcome religious concerns shared by Jews and Muslims but also because they provide, in some cases, technological advantages over mammalian gelatins. Fish skins from a number of fish species are among the other sources that have been comprehensively studied as sources for gelatin production. Fish skins have a significant potential for the production of high-quality gelatin with different melting and gelling temperatures over a much wider range than mammalian gelatins, yet still have a sufficiently high gel strength and viscosity. Gelatin quality is industrially determined by gel strength, viscosity, melting or gelling temperatures, the water content, and microbiological safety. For gelatin manufacturers, yield from a particular raw material is also important. Recent experimental studies have shown that these quality parameters vary greatly depending on the biochemical characteristics of the raw materials, the manufacturing processes applied, and the experimental settings used for quality control tests. In this review, the gelatin quality achieved from different fish species is reviewed along with the experimental procedures used to determine gelatin quality. In addition, the chemical structure of collagen and gelatin, the collagen-gelatin conversion, the gelation process, and the gelatin market are discussed.

  6. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates.

  7. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates. PMID:26696248

  8. Types, Risk Factors, Clinical symptoms and Diagnostic Tests of Acute Adult Meningitis in Northern Iran During 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Babamahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment and otherwise associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Aim The aim of this study was to assess types, risk factors, clinical symptoms and diagnostic tests of meningitis in hospitalized patients of Mazandaran University of medical sciences hospitals during 2006-2012. Matherials and Methods This is a retrospective descriptive study. Following approval of the ethics committee of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, records of adult patients diagnosed with acute meningitis from 2006 to 2012 were extracted from Mazandaran Provincial Health Center and patients attending hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Statistical Analysis Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, standard deviation, and median). Results In this study, of the 137 patients with meningitis, 73 (53.9%) were viral, 61 (46%) bacterial, 1 (0.7%) fungal, and 2 (1.4%) unknown. The majority of risk factors in patients were head trauma, upper respiratory infection, and drug addiction. The most common clinical signs were headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, and stiff neck. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of meningitis was much lower than any other country. It could be due to geographic variation or incomplete recording of patient's data. It is recommended to perform a longitudinal study during the coming years on patients with meningitis. PMID:26155497

  9. Comparative proteomic profiling and possible toxicological mechanism of acute injury induced by carbon ion radiation in pubertal mice testes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of acute injury in pubertal mice testes after exposure to carbon ion radiation (CIR). Serum testosterone was measured following whole-body irradiation with a 2Gy carbon ion beam. Comparative proteomic profiling and Western blotting were applied to identify potential biomarkers and measure protein expression, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was performed to detect apoptotic cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate protein localization. Serum testosterone was lowest at 24h after CIR, and 10 differentially expressed proteins were identified at this time point that included eIF4E, an important regulator of initiation that combines with mTOR and 4EBP1 to control protein synthesis via the mTOR signalling pathway during proliferation and apoptosis. Protein expression and localization studies confirmed their association with acute injury following exposure to CIR. These three proteins may be useful molecular markers for detecting abnormal spermatogenesis following exposure to environmental and cosmic radiation

  10. Laboratory Measures of Postural Control During the Star Excursion Balance Test After Acute First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris M.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context No researchers, to our knowledge, have investigated the immediate postinjury-movement strategies associated with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) as quantified by center of pressure (COP) and kinematic analyses during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Objective To analyze the kinematic and COP patterns of a group with acute first-time LAS and a noninjured control group during performance of the SEBT. Design Case-control study. Setting University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 81 participants with acute first-time LAS (53 men, 28 women; age = 23.22 ± 4.93 years, height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m, mass = 75.72 ± 13.86 kg) and 19 noninjured controls (15 men, 4 women; age = 22.53 ± 1.68 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.08 m, mass = 71.55 ± 11.31 kg). Intervention Participants performed the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed 3-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremity joints and associated fractal dimension (FD) of the COP path during performance of the SEBT. Results The LAS group had decreased normalized reach distances in the ANT, PL, and PM directions when compared with the control group on their injured (ANT: 58.16% ± 6.86% versus 64.86% ± 5.99%; PL: 85.64% ± 10.62% versus 101.14% ± 8.39%; PM: 94.89% ± 9.26% versus 107.29 ± 6.02%) and noninjured (ANT: 60.98% ± 6.74% versus 64.76% ± 5.02%; PL: 88.95% ± 11.45% versus 102.36% ± 8.53%; PM: 97.13% ± 8.76% versus 106.62% ± 5.78%) limbs (P < .01). This observation was associated with altered temporal sagittal-plane kinematic profiles throughout each reach attempt and at the point of maximum reach (P < .05). This result was associated with a reduced FD of the COP path for each reach direction on the injured limb only (P < .05). Conclusions Acute first-time LAS was associated with bilateral deficits in postural control, as evidenced by the bilateral

  11. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  12. An Acute Bout of Self-Myofascial Release in the Form of Foam Rolling Improves Performance Testing

    PubMed Central

    PEACOCK, COREY A.; KREIN, DARREN D.; SILVER, TOBIN A.; SANDERS, GABRIEL J.; VON CARLOWITZ, KYLE-PATRICK A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the strength and conditioning field have shown the incorporation of foam rolling self-myofascial release in adjunct with a dynamic warm-up. This is thought to improve overall training performance; however, minimal research exists supporting this theory. Therefore, determining if an acute bout of foam rolling self-myofascial release in addition to a dynamic warm-up could influence performance is of importance. In order to do so, eleven athletically trained male subjects participated in a two condition, counterbalanced, crossover within-subjects study comparing two particular warm-up routines. The two warm-up routines compared were a total-body dynamic warm-up (DYN) and a total-body dynamic warm-up in adjunct with a self-myofascial release, total-body foam rolling session (SMR). Following each warm-up condition, subjects performed tests of flexibility, power, agility, strength, and speed. Paired samples T-tests were utilized to determine if there were any significant differences in test results between conditions (DYN vs. SMR). The data indicated that SMR was effective at improving power, agility, strength, and speed when compared to DYN (P ≤ 0.024). A warm-up routine consisting of both a dynamic warm-up and a self-myofascial release, total-body foam rolling session resulted in overall improvements in athletic performance testing. PMID:27182404

  13. Testing an application of a biotic ligand model to predict acute toxicity of metal mixtures to rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yuichi; Kamo, Masashi; Naito, Wataru

    2015-04-01

    The authors tested the applicability of a previously developed biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict acute toxicity of single metals and metal mixtures (cadmium, lead, and zinc) to rainbow trout fry (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a single available dataset. The BLM used in the present study hypothesizes that metals inhibit an essential cation (calcium) and organisms die as a result of its deficiency, leading to an assumption that the proportion of metal-binding ligand (f) is responsible for the toxic effects of metals on the survival of rainbow trout. The f value is a function of free-ion concentrations of metals computed by a chemical speciation model, and the function has affinity constants as model parameters. First, the survival effects of single metals were statistically modeled separately (i.e., f-survival relationship) by using the generalized linear mixed model with binomial distribution. The modeled responses of survival rates to f overlapped reasonably irrespective of metals tested, supporting the theoretical prediction from the BLM that f-survival relationships are comparable regardless of metal species. The authors thus developed the generalized linear mixed model based on all data pooled across the single-metal tests. The best-fitted model well predicted the survival responses observed in mixture tests (r = 0.97), providing support for the applicability of the BLM to predict effects of metal mixtures.

  14. Time-course of changes in the social interaction test of anxiety following acute and chronic administration of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Irvine, E E; Cheeta, S; File, S E

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to explore the hypothesis that the effects of nicotine on anxiety depend on the time since administration and the duration of treatment. In the social interaction test of anxiety, acute nicotine administration (0.1 mg/kg, subcutaneously) decreased social interaction when rats were tested 5 min after injection, but increased it when they were tested 30 min after injection. Social interaction was also decreased 1 h post-injection, but levels returned to baseline between 3 and 30 h. As these changes were independent of any changes in locomotor activity, nicotine seemed to be having both anxiogenic and anxiolytic effects at different times after injection. An anxiolytic effect was also observed 30 min after the second nicotine injection, and the anxiogenic effect observed 5 min after injection remained after 4 days of nicotine administration. However, after 7 days of nicotine treatment, tolerance was observed to both these effects. When rats were tested 72 h after the last of 7 or 14 days of nicotine treatment, an anxiogenic withdrawal response was observed. Thus, an oppositional mechanism may underlie tolerance to the anxiolytic effects, whereas there is as yet no evidence for this type of mechanism mediating tolerance to the anxiogenic effects.

  15. Field testing of behavioral barriers for fish exclusion at cooling-water intake systems, Central Hudson Gas and Electric Company Roseton Generating Station: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matousek, J.A.; Wells, A.W.; McGroddy, P.M.

    1988-09-01

    A seasonal field testing program was conducted during 1986 and 1987 to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral barriers at Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corporations's Roseton Generating Station located in the euryhaline section of the Hudson River. This station was selected as representative of power plants with shoreline riverine/estuarine intake systems. Three commercially available devices (air bubble curtain, pneumatic gun, and underwater strobe light) were tested alone and in combination to determine their effectiveness in reducing impingement. The primary testing method incorporated three or four 6-h impingement collections during each test date, each consisting of two randomly assigned 3-h samples: one was an experimental test with a behavioral device in operation, the other a control test with no device operating. The effectiveness of the devices at excluding fish was determined by comparing impingement data from experimental and control periods. Results of the program do not establish that the deployment of underwater strobe lights, pneumatic guns, an air bubble curtain, or various combinations of the three devices will effectively lower fish impingement at power plants similar in design and location to the Roseton plant. Deterrent effectiveness was found to be species-specific and related to time of day. 51 refs., 67 figs., 72 tabs.

  16. Comparison of ethanol toxicity to Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia tested at two different temperatures: static acute toxicity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, I.T.; Cowgill, U.M.; Murphy, P.G.

    1987-08-01

    Ethanol is a commonly used solvent in toxicity testing, yet there are few studies in the literature devoted to its toxicity to zooplankton. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of Daphnia magna Straus 1820 and Ceriodaphnia dubia J. Richard 1894 to ethanol. Two temperatures were selected because most toxicity data involving D. magna has been carried out at 20/sup 0/C while all discussions concerning C. dubia appear to relate to temperatures oscillating around 25/sup 0/C. Thus, the response of these two organisms to ethanol was examined at 20/sup 0/C and at 24/sup 0/C.r

  17. Acute testing of the rate-smoothed pacing algorithm for ventricular rate stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, J K; Yee, R; Braney, M; Stoop, G; Begemann, M; Dunne, C; Klein, G J; Krahn, A D; Van Hemel, N M

    1999-04-01

    We evaluated the capability of a new pacemaker-based rate-smoothing algorithm (RSA) to reduce the irregular ventricular response of AF. RSA prevents sudden decreases in rate using a modified physiological band and flywheel feature. Twelve patients (51 +/- 21 years) with hemodynamically tolerated AF of 4 months to 20 years duration were studied. Atrial and ventricular leads were connected to the external pacemaker device in the electrophysiology laboratory. Consecutive RR intervals during AF were measured at baseline and after ventricular pacing with RSA ON. Ventricular pacing with the rate smoothing algorithm reduced maximum RR intervals (1,207 +/- 299 vs 855 +/- 148 ms, P = 0.0005), with no significant change in the minimum RR interval (401 +/- 55 vs 393 +/- 74 ms, P = 0.292). A small shortening of the mean RR interval (634 +/- 153 vs 594 +/- 135 ms, P = 0.007) was seen with no change in the median RR interval (609 +/- 153 vs 595 +/- 143 ms, P = 0.388). There was a 43% reduction in RR standard deviation (145 +/- 52 vs 82 +/- 28, P = 0.0005), 49% reduction in mean absolute RR interval difference (MAD) (152 +/- 64 vs 77 +/- 34, P = 0.0005) and MAD/mean RR ratio (0.23 +/- 0.05 vs 0.13 +/- 0.04, P = 0.0005). We conclude that rate-smoothed pacing effectively reduces RR variability of AF in the acute setting.

  18. In vitro methods for the determination of test chemicals metabolism utilizing fish liver subcellular fractions and hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this one-day short course is to train students on methods used to measure in vitro metabolism in fish and extrapolate this information to the intact animal. This talk is one of four presentations given by course instructors. The first part of this talk provides a...

  19. Increased RO concentrate toxicity following application of antiscalants - acute toxicity tests with the amphipods Gammarus pulex and Gammarus roeseli.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Mona; Beggel, Sebastian; Jaeger, Nadine; Geist, Juergen

    2015-02-01

    In reverse osmosis, a frequently used technology in water desalination processes, wastewater (RO concentrate) is generated containing the retained solutes as well as so-called antiscalants (AS), i.e. chemical substances that are commonly applied to prevent membrane-blocking. In this study, a risk assessment of a possible discharge of concentrate into a small stream was conducted. The acute toxicity of two concentrates containing two different ASs and of concentrate without AS to the amphipods Gammarus pulex and Gammarus roeseli was studied. Mortality of gammarids exposed to the concentrate without AS was not different to the control, whereas concentrates including ASs caused mortality rates up to 100% at the highest test concentrations after 168 h. Resulting EC50-values were 36.2-39.4% (v/v) after 96 h and 26.6-58.0% (v/v) after 168 h. These results suggest that the ecotoxicological relevance of antiscalants is greater than currently assumed.

  20. Developing and testing a patient information booklet for thrombolysis used in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Peter; Wanklyn, Peter; Raynor, D K; Waxman, Robin

    2010-12-01

    Objective  Thrombolysis decreases the chance of post-stroke dependence, although its use carries significant risk, notably of intra-cerebral haemorrhage. Patients (and families) face an important risk/benefit decision before consenting. We drafted a patient information booklet for this purpose, and applied performance-based readability testing with the aim that the most important information in the booklet could be found and understood. Methods  The booklet was developed with reference to best practice in information writing and design. We User-Tested its performance on 56 people without prior experience of stroke. After reading the booklet they were asked to find and explain 15 pieces of information. The booklet was revised according to its performance and re-tested, until each item was found and understood by at least 80% of participants. Key findings  The four-page information booklet contained approximately 900 words, organised into six sections. A risk-palette graphic showed the chance of positive and negative outcomes. The booklet was tested on four participant cohorts and revised, including more bold text, re-wording, changing the title and changing the graphic to a coloured bar chart. Testing the final version on the fourth cohort of 20 people showed that each of the 15 tested items of information met the target of at least 80% participants being able to find and understand it. Conclusions  The use of information design and User Testing produced a booklet that is understandable by people with no prior experience of stroke. User Testing is an inexpensive and quick method to ensure that information intended for patients is usable.

  1. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes Filho, José; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test), and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years’ experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m). The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05) after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76), while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46) with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance. PMID:27111088

  2. Stress testing for risk stratification of patients with low to moderate probability of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chandra, A; Rudraiah, L; Zalenski, R J

    2001-02-01

    In summary, this article focused on the use of stress testing to risk-stratify patients at the conclusion of their emergency evaluation for ACI. As discussed, those patients in the probably not ACI category require additional risk stratification prior to discharge. It should be kept in mind that patients in this category are heterogeneous, containing subgroups at both higher and lower risk of ACI and cardiac events. The patients with lower pretest probability for ACI may only need exercise testing in the ED. Patients with higher pretest probability should undergo myocardial perfusion or echocardiographic stress testing to maximize diagnostic and prognostic information. Prognostic information is the key to provocative testing in the ED. Prognostic information is the component that will help emergency physicians identify the patients who may be discharged home safely without having to worry about a 6% annual cardiac death rate and a 10% overall death rate over the next 30 months. Stress testing provides this key prognostic data, and it can be obtained in short-stay chest pain observation units in a safe, timely, and cost-effective fashion. PMID:11214405

  3. Assessing executive abilities following acute stroke with the trail making test and digit span.

    PubMed

    Tamez, Elaine; Myerson, Joel; Morris, Lucy; White, Desirée A; Baum, Carolyn; Connor, Lisa Tabor

    2011-01-01

    The Trail Making Test and Digit Span are neuropsychological tests widely used to assess executive abilities following stroke. The Trails B and Digits Backward conditions of these tests are thought to be more sensitive to executive impairment related to frontal lobe dysfunction than the Trails A and Digits Forward conditions. Trails B and Digits Backward are also thought to be more sensitive to brain damage in general. Data from the Stroke and Lesion Registry maintained by the Washington University Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Group were analyzed to compare the effects of frontal versus nonfrontal strokes and to assess the effects of stroke severity. Results showed that the performance of patients with frontal and nonfrontal strokes was comparable in each condition of both the Trail Making Test and Digit Span, providing no support for the widely held belief that Trails B and Digits Backward are more sensitive to frontal lobe damage. Further, Trails A was as strongly correlated with stroke severity as Trails B, whereas Digits Backward was more strongly correlated with stroke severity than Digits Forward. Overall, the Trail Making Test and Digit Span are sensitive to brain damage but do not differentiate between patients with frontal versus nonfrontal stroke.

  4. Nanoparticles in wastewater treatment plants: a novel acute toxicity test for ciliates and its implementation in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Corinna; von Tümpling, Wolf; Berendonk, Thomas; Jungmann, Dirk

    2015-05-01

    Nanomaterial (NM) release into wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is inevitable due to increased production and application throughout past decades and in the future. Concern arose about environmental risks and impact on activated sludge. Environmental risk assessment (ERA) for NMs according to established guidelines is considered not suitable, because NMs exhibit unique characteristics. For hazard identification on activated sludge, standard test organisms for aquatic toxicity testing are not meaningful. In this study, we developed an acute toxicity test for ciliates (Paramecium tetraurelia) as representatives of the important functional group of microbial predators and filter feeders. We chose silver nanoparticles (nAg) exemplarily for ion releasing nanoparticles and regarded toxicity by ions as well. Our results indicate that ions are more toxic (EC₅₀ 0.73 mg/L) than nanoparticles themselves (EC₅₀ 2.15 mg/L). However, nAg must be considered as a source of ions and requires size, surface coating, and compartment-specific ERA. We strived to develop such ERA based on our results, modeled environmental concentration data from literature, and surface area concentrations. Results indicated a probable risk toward activated sludge. This likely has effects on effluent water quality. We conclude that carefully modeled environmental concentrations are vital for more exact ERA for nAg and other NMs. PMID:25592910

  5. Acute exposure to waterborne psychoactive drugs attract zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Ana Cristina V; Gusso, Darlan; Rosa, João G S; Koakoski, Gessi; Kalichak, Fabiana; Idalêncio, Renan; Oliveira, Thiago A; Barcellos, Heloísa H A; Bonan, Carla D; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are widely used, and their prescription has increased worldwide, consequently increasing their presence in aquatic environments. Therefore, aquatic organisms can be exposed to psychotropic drugs that may be potentially dangerous, raising the question of whether these drugs are attractive or aversive to fish. To answer this question, adult zebrafish were tested in a chamber that allows the fish to escape or seek a lane of contaminated water. These attraction and aversion paradigms were evaluated by exposing the zebrafish to the presence of acute contamination with these compounds. The zebrafish were attracted by certain concentrations of diazepam, fluoxetine, risperidone and buspirone, which were most likely detected by olfaction, because this behavior was absent in anosmic fish. These findings suggest that despite their deleterious effects, certain psychoactive drugs attract fish.

  6. Incorporating Acute HIV Screening into Routine HIV Testing at Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics, and HIV Testing and Counseling Centers in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Pettifor, Audrey E.; Phiri, Sam; Kamanga, Gift; Hoffman, Irving F.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Rosenberg, Nora E.; Nsona, Dominic; Pasquale, Dana; Tegha, Gerald; Powers, Kimberly A.; Phiri, Mcleod; Tembo, Bisweck; Chege, Wairimu; Miller, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Integrating acute HIV-infection (AHI) testing into clinical settings is critical to prevent transmission, and realize potential treatment-as-prevention benefits. We evaluated acceptability of AHI testing and compared AHI prevalence at sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics and HIV testing and counseling (HTC) clinics in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods: We conducted HIV RNA testing for HIV-seronegative patients visiting STI and HTC clinics. AHI was defined as positive RNA and negative/discordant rapid antibody tests. We evaluated demographic, behavioral, and transmission-risk differences between STI and HTC patients and assessed performance of a risk-score for targeted screening. Results: Nearly two-thirds (62.8%, 9280/14,755) of eligible patients consented to AHI testing. We identified 59 persons with AHI (prevalence = 0.64%)–a 0.9% case-identification increase. Prevalence was higher at STI [1.03% (44/4255)] than at HTC clinics [0.3% (15/5025), P < 0.01], accounting for 2.3% of new diagnoses vs 0.3% at HTC clinic. Median viral load (VL) was 758,050 copies per milliliter; 25% (15/59) had VL ≥10,000,000 copies per milliliter. Median VL was higher at STI (1,000,000 copies/mL) compared with HTC (153,125 copies/mL, P = 0.2). Among persons with AHI, those tested at STI clinics were more likely to report genital sores compared with those tested at HTC clinics (54.6% vs 6.7%, P < 0.01). The risk score algorithm performed well in identifying persons with AHI at HTC clinics (sensitivity = 73%, specificity = 89%). Conclusions: The majority of patients consented to AHI testing. AHI prevalence was substantially higher in STI clinics than HTC clinics. Remarkably high VLs and concomitant genital scores demonstrate the potential for transmission. Universal AHI screening at STI clinics, and targeted screening at HTC centers, should be considered. PMID:26428231

  7. Using mitochondrial and ribosomal DNA sequences to test the taxonomic validity of Clinostomum complanatum Rudolphi, 1814 in fish-eating birds and freshwater fishes in Mexico, with the description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Sereno-Uribe, Ana L; Pinacho-Pinacho, Carlos D; García-Varela, Martín; de León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce

    2013-08-01

    The taxonomic history and species composition of the genus Clinostomum has been unstable. Two species, Clinostomum complanatum Rudolphi, 1814 and Clinostomum marginatum Rudolphi, 1819, have been particularly problematic and its validity has been disputed for nearly 200 years. In this paper, we have made use of an integrative taxonomy approach, and we used, in first instance, DNA sequences of two genes (cox1 and ITS) to test the validity of C. complanatum, a species apparently widely distributed in Mexico and to link the metacercariae and adult forms of the recognized species of Clinostomum. Combining molecular data with morphology, host association, and geographical distribution, we searched for the potential existence of undescribed species. A new species of Clinostomum is described based on adults found in the mouthy cavity of three species of fish-eating birds as well as in metacercariae found in freshwater and estuarine fishes. A few morphological characteristics distinguish the new species from other congeners even though reciprocal monophyly in a phylogenetic tree based on maximum-likelihood and Bayesian analysis, genetic divergence, and a multivariate analysis of variance and a principal component analysis of 18 morphometric traits for adults and metacercariae demonstrates the validity of the new species. Based on our results, it seems that C. complanatum is not currently distributed in Mexico, although this requires further verification with a more thoroughful sampling in other areas of the country, but it is plausible to support the hypothesis that C. marginatum is the American form, as previously suggested by other authors.

  8. Using stable isotopes to test for trophic niche partitioning: a case study with stream salamanders and fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Adam; Lowe, Winsor H.; Marra, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    5. Although we did not identify mechanisms that facilitate salamander and fish coexistence, our empirical data and use of novel approaches to describe the trophic niche did yield important insights on the role of predator–prey interactions and cannibalism as alternative coexistence mechanisms. In addition, we found that 95% kernel estimators are a simple and robust method to describe population-level measure of trophic structure.

  9. Effect of freezing/thawing process in different sizes of blue fish in the Mediterranean through lysosomal enzymatic tests.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Giuseppina R A; Barbagallo, Riccardo N; Todaro, Aldo; Bono, Gioacchino; Spagna, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    The assessment of freshness of different sizes of blue fish (Engraulis encrasicolus 12 cm, Sardina pilchardus 15 cm, Trachurus trachurus 40 cm, Scomber japonicus colias 60 cm) was carried out using non-conventional enzymatic methods. The activities of the three lysosomal enzymes (α-glucosidase (AG), β-galactosidase (B-GAL) and β-N-acetylglucosamidase (B-NA)) in extracts of blue fish muscle were measured over a period of 21 days of storage. A significant increase (p<0.05) of AG activity was observed in all species, with a large increase seen after only one day of storage. B-NA activity increased slightly in sardines, horse mackerels and chub mackerel during frozen/thawed storage. Finally, the increase of B-GAL activity was significant (p<0.05) only in the samples of larger blue fish as horse mackerel and chub mackerel. All of these enzyme activities may be helpful predictive markers to limit fraud in these species.

  10. Standard guide for acute toxicity test with the rotifer Brachionus. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-01

    This guide is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-47 on Biological Effects and Environmental Fate and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee E47.01 on Aquatic Toxicology. Current edition approved Sep. 15, 1991. Published November 1991. Reapproved 1998. Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  11. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam

  12. Effects of acute creatine supplementation on iron homeostasis and uric acid-based antioxidant capacity of plasma after wingate test

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary creatine has been largely used as an ergogenic aid to improve strength and athletic performance, especially in short-term and high energy-demanding anaerobic exercise. Recent findings have also suggested a possible antioxidant role for creatine in muscle tissues during exercise. Here we evaluate the effects of a 1-week regimen of 20 g/day creatine supplementation on the plasma antioxidant capacity, free and heme iron content, and uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels of young subjects (23.1 ± 5.8 years old) immediately before and 5 and 60 min after the exhaustive Wingate test. Results Maximum anaerobic power was improved by acute creatine supplementation (10.5 %), but it was accompanied by a 2.4-fold increase in pro-oxidant free iron ions in the plasma. However, potential iron-driven oxidative insult was adequately counterbalanced by proportional increases in antioxidant ferric-reducing activity in plasma (FRAP), leading to unaltered lipid peroxidation levels. Interestingly, the FRAP index, found to be highly dependent on uric acid levels in the placebo group, also had an additional contribution from other circulating metabolites in creatine-fed subjects. Conclusions Our data suggest that acute creatine supplementation improved the anaerobic performance of athletes and limited short-term oxidative insults, since creatine-induced iron overload was efficiently circumvented by acquired FRAP capacity attributed to: overproduction of uric acid in energy-depleted muscles (as an end-product of purine metabolism and a powerful iron chelating agent) and inherent antioxidant activity of creatine. PMID:22691230

  13. In vivo genotoxicity evaluation of atrazine and atrazine-based herbicide on fish Carassius auratus using the micronucleus test and the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Cavas, Tolga

    2011-06-01

    Atrazine is a selective triazine herbicide used to control broadleaf and grassy weeds mainly in corn, sorghum, sugarcane, pineapple, and other crops, and in conifer reforestation planting fields. It has been showed that atrazine is one of the most frequently detected pesticides in agricultural streams and rivers, over the past two decades. Although the toxic properties of atrazine are well known, the data on the genotoxic effects of atrazine on aquatic organisms are rather scarce. Thus, in the present study we aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effects of atrazine and an atrazine-based herbicide (Gesaprim®) on a model fish species Carassius auratus L., 1758, (Pisces: Cyprinidae) using the micronucleus test and the comet assay in peripheral blood erythrocytes. Fish were exposed to 5, 10 and 15 μg/L atrazine and to its commercial formulation for 2, 4 and 6 days. Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) at a single dose of 5 mg/L was used as positive control. Our results revealed significant increases in the frequencies of micronuclei and DNA strand breaks in erythrocytes of C. auratus, following exposure to commercial formulation of atrazine and thus demonstrated the genotoxic potential of this pesticide on fish.

  14. D-dimer testing for safe exclusion and risk stratification in patients with acute pulmonary embolism in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhou; Chen, Yiyi; Xie, Qiong; Shao, Zhexin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Safe exclusion and risk stratification are currently recommended for the initial management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). The aim of this study was to assess the safe exclusion and risk stratification value of D-dimer (DD) for APE when tested at the beginning of admission. Materials and Methods: All consecutive Chinese APE patients and controls were recruited from January 2010 to December 2012. All measurements of serum indexes were made in duplicate and blinded to the patients’ status. All the 40 patients with the first episode of APE were confirmed by multi-detector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. The plasma prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, and DD levels were measured within 24 h of admission. We used the Mann-Whitney U-test to determine the differences between groups and drew receiver operator characteristic curve to evaluate the indexes’ value in the APE screening. Results: The PT and DD in the APE group were significantly higher than those in the disease control group (P < 0.05). Taking PT and DD as the useful screening tests for APE and AUC was 0.765 and 0.822, respectively. DD yielded the higher screening efficiency, with DD >1820 μg/L as cut-off value, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value was 82.5%, 75.2%, 56.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The patients with APE showed significant higher DD levels compared with disease controls, suggesting a negative qualitative DD test result can safely and efficiently exclude APE in primary care. PMID:26622257

  15. Acute and chronic toxicity testing of TPH-contaminated soils with the earthworm, Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Nazerias, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Responses of Eisenia foetida to petroleum-contaminated soils are being assessed using a 21-day test described previously. The authors prepared dilutions of two soils, referred to as A and B, using their reference-soil counterparts, collected from near the contaminated sites. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of each soil was measured by latroscan before the dilutions were prepared. References for the A and B soils contained 167 and 1,869 ppm of TPH, respectively. Thus, neither reference soil was pristine. Dilutions of the A soil tested with E. foetida contained from 179 to 305 ppm TPH; dilutions of the B soil contained from 1,875 to 1,950 ppm TPH. E foetida survival was 100% in both dilution series. Mean growth of Eisenia in dilutions of the A soil ranged from 48 to 74 mg dry-weight growth per pair of worms; these values were lower than those in any dilution of the B soil series. Lipid levels of worms in higher concentrations of the A and B soils were similar to one another and to published values, suggesting little inhibition of feeding in either dilution series. Earthworm reproduction was zero in the A series, but moderately high in the B series. Thus, the A soil apparently contained materials other than TPH that inhibited earthworm growth and reproduction. This study shows that (1) TPH at concentrations as high as 1,800 ppm may not always be inhibitor to earthworm growth or reproduction and (2) that earthworm survival, as a test endpoint, is much less sensitive than either growth or reproduction.

  16. Effects of chronic and acute stress on rat behaviour in the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Suvrathan, Aparna; Tomar, Anupratap; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2010-11-01

    Stress and depression may share common neural plasticity mechanisms. Importantly, the development and reversal of stress-induced plasticity requires time. These temporal aspects, however, are not captured fully in the forced-swim test (FST), a behavioural model for testing antidepressant efficacy, used originally in naïve animals. The present study probed whether and how a rodent model of stress affects behaviour in the FST over time. We found that the intensity and duration of stress are critical in the development of depressive symptoms in male Wistar rats (n = 37) as tested in the FST. Chronic immobilization stress (2 h/day for 10 days) elicited a range of responses, from low to high values of immobility in the FST on day 1, and subsequent immobility on day 2 was inversely related to individual day 1 values. As a whole, chronically stressed rats did not exhibit any significant change in immobility either on day 1 or day 2 compared to control rats. However, climbing behaviour was reduced uniformly from day 1 to day 2, despite the differences in immobility. In contrast, a separate group of rats (n = 30) subjected to the same chronic stressor displayed a significant reduction in open-arm exploration in the elevated plus maze, indicative of a robust increase in anxiety-like behaviour. Furthermore, when the 10-day chronic stress paradigm was reduced to a single 2-h episode of immobilization stress, it triggered a uniform day 1 to day 2 increase in immobility, which was not persistent 10 days later. These results highlight a need for closer examination of the ways in which stress-induced modulation of behaviour in the FST may be used and interpreted in future studies aimed at exploring connections between stress and depression.

  17. Interim report on the genetic and animal toxicity testing of SRC-I products, intermediates, and waste materials. Appendix D. Acute animal studies reports

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdowicz, B.Z.; Kelly, C.M.

    1983-09-01

    Appendix D is a collection of 25 individual reports on the toxicity of SRC-I products, intermediates and residues to rabbits, rats and guinea pigs with acute oral, dermal and inhalation exposure. It includes also eye and dermal irritation tests in rabbits and guinea pigs and dermal sensitization studies in albino guinea pigs. (LTN)

  18. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species - SETAC Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and inter-laboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the two life stages; and the variation in sensitiv...

  19. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the 2 life stages; and the variation in se...

  20. Etiological Misidentification by Routine Biochemical Tests of Bacteremia Caused by Gordonia terrae Infection in the Course of an Episode of Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Sande, E.; Brun-Otero, M.; Campo-Cerecedo, F.; Esteban, E.; Aguilar, L.; García-de-Lomas, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gordonia terrae has been reported to be a rare cause of bacteremia. We report the first case of bacteremia associated with acute cholecystitis. Commercial biochemical testing was not able to identify the strain at the genus level, classifying it instead as Rhodococcus sp. Definitive identification was obtained by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:16825404

  1. Antarctic Fishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Joseph T.; DeVries, Arthur L.

    1986-01-01

    Explains the adaptations to Antarctic waters that Notothenioidei, a group of advanced bony fishes, have exhibited. Discusses the fishes' mechanisms of production of antifreeze properties and their capacities for neutral buoyancy in water. (ML)

  2. Ciguatera fish poisoning - New York City, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    During August 2010-July 2011, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) received reports of six outbreaks and one single case of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), involving a total of 28 persons. CFP results from consumption of certain large, predatory, tropical reef fish that have bioaccumulated ciguatoxins (CTX). CFP is characterized by various gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurologic symptoms. A prolonged period of acute illness can result, and the neurologic symptoms can last months, with variable asymptomatic and symptomatic periods. The first two outbreaks and the single case, involving 13 persons, were reported during August 6-September 13, 2010. DOHMH distributed a health alert in November 2010 requesting health-care providers be alert for CFP signs and symptoms. The health alert resulted in identification of 11 more cases that month and an additional two outbreaks involving four persons in July 2011. In comparison, only four CFP outbreaks, involving 21 persons total, had been reported in New York City (NYC) during the preceding 10 years (2000-2009). DOHMH's investigation revealed that 13 persons became ill after eating barracuda, and 15 became ill after eating grouper. Although specific and highly sensitive laboratory analyses can detect and confirm CTX in fish, no practical field tests are available for fish monitoring programs. CFP prevention depends on educating the public, seafood suppliers, and distributors about known CFP endemic areas and high-risk fish species. Traceback investigations of fish associated with outbreaks provide valuable information regarding fishing areas associated with CFP. Not all fish from CFP endemic areas are ciguatoxic, but persons who eat fish from endemic regions are at higher risk for CFP. If an illness is suspected to be CFP, public health authorities should be notified and informed of the case history for possible investigation and intervention measures.

  3. Acute effect of different stretching methods on Illinois agility test in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Sahebozamani, Mansour; Tabrizi, Kourosh G; Yusof, Ashril B

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static, dynamic, and the combination of static and dynamic stretching within a pre-exercise warm-up on the Illinois agility test (IAT) in soccer players. Nineteen professional soccer players (age = 22.5 ± 2.5 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.003 m, body mass = 74.8 ± 10.9 kg) were tested for agility performance using the IAT after different warm-up protocols consisting of static, dynamic, combined stretching, and no stretching. The players were subgrouped into less and more experienced players (5.12 ± 0.83 and 8.18 ± 1.16 years, respectively). There were significant decreases in agility time after no stretching, among no stretching vs. static stretching; after dynamic stretching, among static vs. dynamic stretching; and after dynamic stretching, among dynamic vs. combined stretching during warm-ups for the agility: mean ± SD data were 14.18 ± 0.66 seconds (no stretch), 14.90 ± 0.38 seconds (static), 13.95 ± 0.32 seconds (dynamic), and 14.50 ± 0.35 seconds (combined). There was significant difference between less and more experienced players after no stretching and dynamic stretching. There was significant decrease in agility time following dynamic stretching vs. static stretching in both less and more experienced players. Static stretching does not appear to be detrimental to agility performance when combined with dynamic warm-up for professional soccer players. However, dynamic stretching during the warm-up was most effective as preparation for agility performance. The data from this study suggest that more experienced players demonstrate better agility skills due to years of training and playing soccer.

  4. Antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil following acute and subchronic treatment in the forced swim test in mice: effects of restraint stress and monoamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Pieróg, Mateusz; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Wyska, Elżbieta; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    Sildenafil is a highly effective oral agent for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of multiple etiologies. Although in clinical practice sildenafil is often used in depressed patients, its influence on the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like activity following acute and subchronic treatment with sildenafil in naïve mice as well as in mice with reserpine- and restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Since corticosterone is released in response to acute stress, we also aimed to assess the influence of sildenafil on serum corticosterone level in non-stressed and stressed animals. The antidepressant activity of sildenafil was assessed in the forced swim test. Corticosterone serum level was determined by using ELISA method, while brain and serum sildenafil level via HPLC method. Sildenafil administered acutely exerted an antidepressant-like effect. Subchronic (14 days) administration of sildenafil resulted only in a weak antidepressant-like effect when evaluated 24 h after the last dose. Acute but not subchronic sildenafil administration reversed the reserpine- and stress-induced immobility in the forced swim test. The lack of effects of sildenafil after subchronic treatment could have been related to its complete elimination from the brain within 24 h from the last injection. Interestingly, acute administration of sildenafil produced a marked increase in serum corticosterone level in both non-stressed and stressed animals. Sildenafil exerts differential effects in the forced swim test after acute and subchronic administration. Further studies on the antidepressant activity of sildenafil are required. PMID:27283174

  5. Antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil following acute and subchronic treatment in the forced swim test in mice: effects of restraint stress and monoamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Pieróg, Mateusz; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Wyska, Elżbieta; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    Sildenafil is a highly effective oral agent for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of multiple etiologies. Although in clinical practice sildenafil is often used in depressed patients, its influence on the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like activity following acute and subchronic treatment with sildenafil in naïve mice as well as in mice with reserpine- and restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Since corticosterone is released in response to acute stress, we also aimed to assess the influence of sildenafil on serum corticosterone level in non-stressed and stressed animals. The antidepressant activity of sildenafil was assessed in the forced swim test. Corticosterone serum level was determined by using ELISA method, while brain and serum sildenafil level via HPLC method. Sildenafil administered acutely exerted an antidepressant-like effect. Subchronic (14 days) administration of sildenafil resulted only in a weak antidepressant-like effect when evaluated 24 h after the last dose. Acute but not subchronic sildenafil administration reversed the reserpine- and stress-induced immobility in the forced swim test. The lack of effects of sildenafil after subchronic treatment could have been related to its complete elimination from the brain within 24 h from the last injection. Interestingly, acute administration of sildenafil produced a marked increase in serum corticosterone level in both non-stressed and stressed animals. Sildenafil exerts differential effects in the forced swim test after acute and subchronic administration. Further studies on the antidepressant activity of sildenafil are required.

  6. Fish Dishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, Marie

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that was inspired by Greek pottery, specifically dishes shaped as fish. Explains that fourth-grade students drew a fish shape that was later used to create their clay version of the fish. Discusses how the students examined the pottery to make decisions about color and design. (CMK)

  7. Fish oil, but not soy bean or olive oil enriched infusion decreases histopathological severity of acute pancreatitis in rats without affecting eicosanoid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Maik; Heukamp, Ina; Gregor, Ja Ilja; Schimke, Ingolf; Kristiansen, Glen; Wenger, Frank Axel

    2011-12-01

    Different dietary fatty acids affect eicosanoid metabolism in different ways, thus influencing the pro- and anti-inflammatory balance of prostaglandins and leukotrienes. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of [n-3], [n-6], and [n-9] fatty acids on eicosanoid metabolism and histopathology in acute pancreatitis in rats. Seventy-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into five groups (n = 15). Group 1 underwent only laparotomy, while in groups, 2-5 pancreatitis was induced. Groups 1 and 2 were then given saline infusion, groups 3-5 received fat emulsion (group 3: rich in [n-6], group 4: rich in [n-9], group 5: rich in [n-3] fatty acids) for another 18 h. Infusion rich in [n-3] fatty acids significantly decreased histopathological severity of pancreatitis, compared to all other groups. There was no difference concerning the concentrations of prostaglandins and leukotrienes between all groups. Parenteral infusion rich in [n-3] fatty acids reduced histopathological severity of acute pancreatitis in rats without changing eicosanoid metabolism at the endpoint.

  8. Acute and chronic sensitivity, avoidance behavior and sensitive life stages of bullfrog tadpoles exposed to the biopesticide abamectin.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana M; Daam, Michiel A; dos Santos, Liliana R A; Sanches, Ana L M; Araújo, Cristiano V M; Espíndola, Evaldo L G

    2016-04-01

    As compared to other aquatic organism groups, relatively few studies have been conducted so far evaluating the toxicity of pesticides to amphibians. This may at least partly be due to the fact that regulations for registering pesticides usually do not require testing amphibians. The sensitivity of amphibians is generally considered to be covered by that based on toxicity tests with other aquatic organisms (e.g. fish) although the impact of a pesticide on amphibians may be very different. In the present study, acute and chronic laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of abamectin (as Vertimec(®) 18EC) to bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) tadpoles. Acute tests were conducted at two tadpole stages (Gosner stage 21G and 25G) and avoidance tests were also conducted with stage Gosner stage 21G tadpoles. Calculated acute toxicity values were greater than those reported for standard fish test species, hence supporting the use of fish toxicity data as surrogates for amphibians in acute risk assessments. Given the limited number and extent of available amphibian toxicity studies, however, research needs to increase our understanding of pesticide toxicity to amphibians are discussed. PMID:26758616

  9. Evaluation of the integrated testing strategy for PNEC derivation under REACH.

    PubMed

    May, Martin; Drost, Wiebke; Germer, Sabine; Juffernholz, Tanja; Hahn, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Species sensitivity evaluation represents an approach to avoid chronic toxicity testing of aquatic vertebrates in accordance with the animal welfare concept of the EU chemicals regulation. In this study a data set of chemicals is analysed for relative species sensitivity between Daphnia and fish in chronic testing to evaluate under what condition chronic fish tests can be waived without underestimating the environmental hazard. Chronic fish toxicity is covered in 84% of the evaluated substances by the chronic invertebrate test and an assessment factor of 50. Thus, animal testing can be avoided in environmental hazard assessment for many chemicals. Moreover, it is shown that species sensitivity in chronic testing is associated with species sensitivity in acute testing. The more sensitive species in chronic testing is predicted with a high probability if a species is >5x more sensitive in acute testing. If substances are comparable or more toxic to Daphnia in acute testing than to fish chronic fish toxicity is covered by the chronic Daphnia test and an assessment factor of 50 in about 95% of the evaluated cases. To provide decision support for the regulation of chemicals a categorization scheme on relative sensitivity comparison is presented. PMID:27103318

  10. Evaluation of the integrated testing strategy for PNEC derivation under REACH.

    PubMed

    May, Martin; Drost, Wiebke; Germer, Sabine; Juffernholz, Tanja; Hahn, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Species sensitivity evaluation represents an approach to avoid chronic toxicity testing of aquatic vertebrates in accordance with the animal welfare concept of the EU chemicals regulation. In this study a data set of chemicals is analysed for relative species sensitivity between Daphnia and fish in chronic testing to evaluate under what condition chronic fish tests can be waived without underestimating the environmental hazard. Chronic fish toxicity is covered in 84% of the evaluated substances by the chronic invertebrate test and an assessment factor of 50. Thus, animal testing can be avoided in environmental hazard assessment for many chemicals. Moreover, it is shown that species sensitivity in chronic testing is associated with species sensitivity in acute testing. The more sensitive species in chronic testing is predicted with a high probability if a species is >5x more sensitive in acute testing. If substances are comparable or more toxic to Daphnia in acute testing than to fish chronic fish toxicity is covered by the chronic Daphnia test and an assessment factor of 50 in about 95% of the evaluated cases. To provide decision support for the regulation of chemicals a categorization scheme on relative sensitivity comparison is presented.

  11. Anxiolytic-like effects of antidepressants after acute administration in a four-plate test in mice.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, M; Bourin, M; Colombel, M C; Fiocco, A J; Baker, G B

    2000-02-01

    The four-plate test (FPT) is an animal model of anxiety based on stress caused by unconditioned fear. An increase of spontaneous punished behavior was used as a measure to determine the anxiolytic effects of various antidepressants (ADs). In the present study. ADs with different mechanisms of action, including tricyclics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), and atypicals, were studied in the FPT to evaluate their anxiolytic-like effects following acute administration. The number of punished crossings was dramatically increased by the SSRIs citalopram, fluvoxamine, and paroxetine, but not fluoxetine. The mixed 5-HT/NE reuptake inhibitors, milnacipran and venlafaxine, also demonstrated strong antipunishment effects. The specific NE reuptake inhibitors, desipramine and maprotiline, and the atypical AD trazodone, enhanced freezing behavior, suggesting anxiogenic-like behavior. It was concluded that, in the FPT, a model based on spontaneous response, where animals are exposed to an aversive environment from which they can only escape by being motionless, this kind of behavior might be related to anticipatory anxiety. In this situation, ADs acting preferentially on 5-HT transmission possessed clear anxiolytic like effects. The balance between the two transmitters, 5-HT and NE, seemed to be a crucial factor.

  12. The oral glucose tolerance test for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in patients during acute coronary syndrome hospitalization: a meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The appropriateness of the routine performance of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to screen for diabetes mellitus (DM) during acute coronary syndrome hospitalization is still under debate. Methods A systematic search of databases (MEDLINE [1985 to March 2012], EMBASE [1985 to March 2012]) was conducted. All prospective cohort studies assessing the accuracy or reproducibility of an OGTT in ACS or non-ACS individuals were included. A bivariate model was used to calculate the pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). Heterogeneity was explored using subgroup analysis and meta-regression. Results Fifteen studies with 8,027 participants were included (10 ACS and 5 non-ACS studies). The pooled results on SEN, SPE, PLR, NLR, and DOR were 0.70 (95% CI, 0.60-0.78), 0.91 (95% CI, 0.86-0.94), 7.6 (95% CI, 4.9-11.7), 0.33 (95% CI, 0.25-0.45), and 23 (95% CI, 12–41), respectively. The OGTT has a slightly lower SPE in diagnosing DM in ACS than in non-ACS patients (0.86 [95% CI 0.81-0.92] versus 0.95 [95% CI 0.93-0.98], p<0.01), while the SEN values are comparable (0.71 [95% CI 0.60-0.82] versus 0.67 [95% CI 0.54-0.81], p=0.43). After adjusting the interval between repeated tests and age, the meta-regression did not show a difference in DOR between ACS and non-ACS studies. Conclusions Despite the discrepancy in the interval between the two OGTTs, performing an OGTT in patients with ACS provides accuracy that is similar to that in in non-ACS patients. It is reasonable to screen patients hospitalized for ACS for previously undiagnosed DM using an OGTT. PMID:23270530

  13. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals. PMID:22355456

  14. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Laing, Kerry J; Winton, James R

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  15. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  16. Evaluation of ETV6/RUNX1 Fusion and Additional Abnormalities Involving ETV6 and/or RUNX1 Genes Using FISH Technique in Patients with Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Cigdem; Cetin, Zafer; Manguoglu, Ayse Esra; Tayfun, Funda; Clark, Ozden Altiok; Kupesiz, Alphan; Akkaya, Bahar; Karauzum, Sibel Berker

    2016-06-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of childhood leukemia. Specifically, ALL is a malignant disorder of the lymphoid progenitor cells, with a peak incidence among children aged 2-5 years. The t(12;21)(p13;q22) translocation occurs in 25 % of childhood B cell precursor ALL. In this study, bone marrow samples were obtained from 165 patients with childhood ALL. We analyzed the t(12;21) translocation and other related abnormalities using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with the ETV6(TEL)/RUNX1(AML1) ES dual color translocation probe. Conventional cytogenetic analyses were also performed. ETV6 and RUNX1 related chromosomal abnormalities were found in 42 (25.5 %) of the 165 patients with childhood ALL. Among these 42 patients, structural changes were detected in 33 (78.6 %) and numerical abnormalities in 9 (21.4 %). The frequency of FISH abnormalities in pediatric ALL cases were as follows: 8.5 % for t(12;21)(p13;q22) ETV6/RUNX1 fusion, 6.0 % for RUNX1 amplification, 3.0 % for tetrasomy/trisomy 21, 1.8 % for ETV6 deletion, 1.21 % for ETV6 deletion with RUNX1 amplification, 1.21 % for ETV6 amplification with RUNX1 amplification, 0.6 % for polyploidy, 0.6 % for RUNX1 deletion, and 0.6 % for diminished ETV6 signal. The most common structural abnormality was the t(12;21) translocation, followed by RUNX1 amplification and ETV6 deletion, while the most commonly observed numerical abnormality was trisomy 21. PMID:27065576

  17. Acute aquatic toxicity and biodegradation potential of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Haws, R.A.; Zhang, X.; Marshall, E.A.; Reese, D.L.; Peterson, C.L.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    Recent studies on the biodegradation potential and aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels are reviewed. Biodegradation data were obtained using the shaker flask method observing the appearance of CO{sub 2} and by observing the disappearance of test substance with gas chromatography. Additional BOD{sub 5} and COD data were obtained. The results indicate the ready biodegradability of biodiesel fuels as well as the enhanced co-metabolic biodegradation of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel mixtures. The study examined reference diesel, neat soy oil, neat rape oil, and the methyl and ethyl esters of these vegetable oils as well as various fuel blends. Acute toxicity tests on biodiesel fuels and blends were performed using Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow Trout) in a static non-renewal system and in a proportional dilution flow replacement system. The study is intended to develop data on the acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels and blends under US EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. The test procedure is designed from the guidelines outlined in Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms and the Fish Acute Aquatic Toxicity Test guideline used to develop aquatic toxicity data for substances subject to environmental effects test regulations under TSCA. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an LC50, a lethal concentration effecting mortality in 50% of the test population.

  18. Toxicity test method development in southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Use of aquatic toxicity tests is relatively new in southeast Asia. As part of the ASEAN-Canada Cooperative Programme on Marine Science -- Phase 2, which includes development of marine environmental criteria, a need for tropical toxicity data was identified. A step-wise approach was used for test method development (simple, acute tests and easily measured endpoints first, then more complex short-term chronic methods), for test specific selection (using species found throughout the region first, and then considering species with narrower geographic distribution), and for integration of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) practices into all laboratory activities. Development of test protocols specifically for tropical species included acute and chronic toxicity tests with marine fish, invertebrates and algae. Criteria for test species selection will be reviewed. Method development was based on procedures and endpoints already widely used in North America and Europe (e.g., 96-h LC50 with fish), but adapted for use with tropical species. For example, a bivalve larval development test can use the same endpoints but the duration is only 24 hours. Test method development included research on culture and holding procedures, determination of test conditions (e.g., duration, test containers), and identification of appropriate endpoints. Acute tests with fish and invertebrates were developed first. The next step was development of short-term chronic tests to measure phytoplankton growth, bivalve and echinoderm embryo or larval development, and larval fish growth. The number of species and types of tests was increased in a staged approach, as laboratories became better equipped and personnel gained practical experience. In most cases, method development coincided with training workshops to introduce the principles of toxicity testing.

  19. Comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of Her-2/neu oncoprotein overexpression in breast cancer: HercepTest (Dako) for manual testing and Her-2/neuTest 4B5 (Ventana) for Ventana BenchMark automatic staining system with correlation to results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Mayr, Doris; Heim, Sibylle; Werhan, Cedric; Zeindl-Eberhart, Evelyn; Kirchner, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Overexpression of Her-2/neu-oncoprotein is used as marker for Herceptin therapy. To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of automatic immunohistochemistry (Benchmark, Ventana), we compared the results to the manual testing (Dako) in 130 breast carcinomas and validated the results by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Manual and automatic immunohistochemistry of Her-2/neu-oncoprotein using two different antibodies (HercepTest, Her-2/neuTest 4B5) was analyzed. FISH was performed in all cases with uncertain or strong overexpression in either immunohistochemical stainings or with different immunohistochemical results. Same immunohistochemical results were seen in 73.8%. Two cases with overexpression, detected with Her-2/neuTest 4B5 and confirmed by FISH, showed no overexpression using HercepTest. From 21 cases with 2+ by Her-2/neuTest 4B5, 15 cases had no gene amplification (two of them with 3+ HercepTest); three cases showed a gene amplification (one of them with failing overexpression by HercepTest); two other cases were polysomic; one could not be analyzed. Ventana immunohistochemistry seems to be of same reliability like Dako with a little better concordance to FISH in our study.

  20. Fish Rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Winton, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many important viral pathogens of fish are members of the family Rhabdoviridae. The viruses in this large group cause significant losses in populations of wild fish as well as among fish reared in aquaculture. Fish rhabdoviruses often have a wide host and geographic range, and infect aquatic animals in both freshwater and seawater. The fish rhabdoviruses comprise a diverse collection of isolates that can be placed in one of two quite different groups: isolates that are members of the established genusNovirhabdovirus, and those that are most similar to members of the genus Vesiculovirus. Because the diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses are important to aquaculture, diagnostic methods for their detection and identification are well established. In addition to regulations designed to reduce the spread of fish viruses, a significant body of research has addressed methods for the control or prevention of diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses, including vaccination. The number of reported fish rhabdoviruses continues to grow as a result of the expansion of aquaculture, the increase in global trade, the development of improved diagnostic methods, and heightened surveillance activities. Fish rhabdoviruses serve as useful components of model systems to study vertebrate virus disease, epidemiology, and immunology.

  1. Fish flavor.

    PubMed

    Kawai, T

    1996-02-01

    This article reviews features of flavor in three groups of fishes and summarizes them as follows: (1) fresh saltwater fish are nearly odorless because they contain a small quantity of volatiles; (2 freshwater fish give off pyrrolidine and earthy-odor compounds, which are responsible for their maturity and surrounding water pollution, and (3) euryhaline fish exhibit a variety of unsaturated carbonyls and alcohols derived from enzymatic and nonenzymatic oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PAs). These features are discussed, as are the effects of different enzymatic activities on PA oxidation and the effects of pH on mechanisms of formation of the volatiles. The monotonous volatile constitution of saltwater fish is likely caused by an unknown antioxidation system restraining the fish from oxidizing. The variety of constitution of euryhaline fish, especially that of anadromous fish under spawning conditions, could result from the loss of that system. The thermal environments of heated foods are also reviewed. The basic environment of fish, which allows the formation of flavor compounds, is discussed to confirm the volatiles found in unheated fish.

  2. Implementation of a minimal set of biological tests to assess the ecotoxic effects of effluents from land-based marine fish farms.

    PubMed

    Carballeira, C; De Orte, M R; Viana, I G; Carballeira, A

    2012-04-01

    Environmental monitoring plans (EMP) that include chemical analysis of water, a battery of bioassays and the study of local hydrodynamic conditions are required for land-based marine aquaculture. In this study, the following standardized toxicity tests were performed to assess the toxicity of effluents from eight land-base marine fish farms (LBMFFs) located on the northwest coast of Spain: bacterial bioluminescence (with Vibrio fischeri at 15 and 30 min), microalgal growth (with Phaeodactyllum tricornutum and Isochrysis galbana) and sea urchin larval development (with Paracentrotus lividus and Arbacia lixula). These bioassays were evaluated for inclusion in routine fish farm monitoring. Effective concentrations (EC(5), EC(10), EC(20), EC(50)) for each bioassay were calculated from dose-response curves, obtained by fitting the bioassay results to the best parametric model. Moreover, a graphical method of integrating the results from the battery of bioassays and classifying the toxicity was proposed, and the potential ecotoxic effects probe (PEEP) index was calculated. The bacterial bioluminiscence test at 30min, growth of I. galbana and larval development of A. lixula were found to be the most sensitive and useful tests. Graphical integration of these test results enabled definition of the ecotoxicological profiles of the different farms. The PEEP index, considering EC(20), efficiently reflected the toxic loading potential of LBMFF effluents. In conclusion, a battery of bioassays with species from different low trophic levels is recommended as a rapid and cost-effective methodology for assessing LBMFF discharges. The graphical integration method and the PEEP index are proposed for consideration in EMPs for such farms.

  3. The scale epithelium as a novel, non-invasive tool for environmental assessment in fish: Testing exposure to linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Alves, R M S; Pereira, B F; Ribeiro, R G L G; Pitol, D L; Ciamarro, C M; Valim, J R T; Caetano, F H

    2016-07-01

    Increasing pollution levels have turned our attention to assessing lethal and sublethal effects of toxic agents using the most informative techniques possible. We must seek non-invasive or non-lethal sampling methods that represent an attractive alternative to traditional techniques of environmental assessment in fish. Detergents are amongst the most common contaminants of water bodies, and LAS (Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate) is one of the most used anionic surfactant on the market. Our study analyzed morphological alterations (histological and histochemical) of the scale epithelium of Prochilodus lineatus under exposure to two concentrations of LAS, 3.6mg/L and 0.36mg/L, for a period of 30 days and evaluated at 14, 21 and 30 days. In order to establish morphological analysis of the scale epithelium as a new non-lethal environmental assessment tool that is reliable and comparable to classic methods, the relative sensibility of this technique was compared to a commonly used method of environmental assessment in fish, the estimation of the effects of pollutants upon branchial morphology. Two experiments were carried out, testing animals in tanks, and in individual aquariums. Results of analyses on gill tissue show that exposure to 3.6mg/L of surfactant caused severe damage, including hyperplasia, hypertrophy and fusion at 14 days, with aneurisms at 21 and 30 days; while exposure to 0.36mg/L had lighter effects on the organ, mainly lower incidence of fusion and hyperplasia. Aditionally, scale morphology was altered severely in response to 3.6mg/L of LAS, consistently showing increased mucous and club cell production. Epithelial thickness was the most variable parameter measured. Scale epithelium sensibility has the potential to be a reliable environmental marker for fish species since it has the advantage of being less invasive when compared to traditional methods. However, more studies are required to increase the robustness of the technique before it can be

  4. The scale epithelium as a novel, non-invasive tool for environmental assessment in fish: Testing exposure to linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Alves, R M S; Pereira, B F; Ribeiro, R G L G; Pitol, D L; Ciamarro, C M; Valim, J R T; Caetano, F H

    2016-07-01

    Increasing pollution levels have turned our attention to assessing lethal and sublethal effects of toxic agents using the most informative techniques possible. We must seek non-invasive or non-lethal sampling methods that represent an attractive alternative to traditional techniques of environmental assessment in fish. Detergents are amongst the most common contaminants of water bodies, and LAS (Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate) is one of the most used anionic surfactant on the market. Our study analyzed morphological alterations (histological and histochemical) of the scale epithelium of Prochilodus lineatus under exposure to two concentrations of LAS, 3.6mg/L and 0.36mg/L, for a period of 30 days and evaluated at 14, 21 and 30 days. In order to establish morphological analysis of the scale epithelium as a new non-lethal environmental assessment tool that is reliable and comparable to classic methods, the relative sensibility of this technique was compared to a commonly used method of environmental assessment in fish, the estimation of the effects of pollutants upon branchial morphology. Two experiments were carried out, testing animals in tanks, and in individual aquariums. Results of analyses on gill tissue show that exposure to 3.6mg/L of surfactant caused severe damage, including hyperplasia, hypertrophy and fusion at 14 days, with aneurisms at 21 and 30 days; while exposure to 0.36mg/L had lighter effects on the organ, mainly lower incidence of fusion and hyperplasia. Aditionally, scale morphology was altered severely in response to 3.6mg/L of LAS, consistently showing increased mucous and club cell production. Epithelial thickness was the most variable parameter measured. Scale epithelium sensibility has the potential to be a reliable environmental marker for fish species since it has the advantage of being less invasive when compared to traditional methods. However, more studies are required to increase the robustness of the technique before it can be

  5. Gill remodelling during terrestrial acclimation reduces aquatic respiratory function of the amphibious fish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Turko, Andy J; Cooper, Chris A; Wright, Patricia A

    2012-11-15

    The skin-breathing amphibious fish Kryptolebias marmoratus experiences rapid environmental changes when moving between water- and air-breathing, but remodelling of respiratory morphology is slower (~1 week). We tested the hypotheses that (1) there is a trade-off in respiratory function of gills displaying aquatic versus terrestrial morphologies and (2) rapidly increased gill ventilation is a mechanism to compensate for reduced aquatic respiratory function. Gill surface area, which varied inversely to the height of the interlamellar cell mass, was increased by acclimating fish for 1 week to air or low ion water, or decreased by acclimating fish for 1 week to hypoxia (~20% dissolved oxygen saturation). Fish were subsequently challenged with acute hypoxia, and gill ventilation or oxygen uptake was measured. Fish with reduced gill surface area increased ventilation at higher dissolved oxygen levels, showed an increased critical partial pressure of oxygen and suffered impaired recovery compared with brackish water control fish. These results indicate that hyperventilation, a rapid compensatory mechanism, was only able to maintain oxygen uptake during moderate hypoxia in fish that had remodelled their gills for land. Thus, fish moving between aquatic and terrestrial habitats may benefit from cutaneously breathing oxygen-rich air, but upon return to water must compensate for a less efficient branchial morphology (mild hypoxia) or suffer impaired respiratory function (severe hypoxia).

  6. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  7. A possible approach to large-scale laboratory testing for acute radiation sickness after a nuclear detonation.

    PubMed

    Adalja, Amesh A; Watson, Matthew; Wollner, Samuel; Toner, Eric

    2011-12-01

    After the detonation of an improvised nuclear device, several key actions will be necessary to save the greatest number of lives possible. Among these tasks, the identification of patients with impending acute radiation sickness is a critical problem that so far has lacked a clear solution in national planning. We present one possible solution: the formation of a public-private partnership to augment the capacity to identify those at risk for acute radiation sickness. PMID:21988186

  8. Boussignac CPAP system for brain death confirmation with apneic test in case of acute lung injury/adult respiratory distress syndrome – series of cases

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Andrzej; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are some patients with severe respiratory disturbances like adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and suspicion of brain death, for whom typical performance of the apneic test is difficult to complete because of quick desaturation and rapid deterioration without effective ventilation. To avoid failure of brain death confirmation and possible loss of organ donation another approach to apneic test is needed. We present two cases of patients with clinical symptoms of brain death, with lung pathology (acute lung injury, ARDS, lung embolism and lung infection), in whom apneic tests for recognizing brain death were difficult to perform. During typical performance of apneic test involving the use of oxygen catheter for apneic oxygenation we observed severe desaturation with growing hypotension and hemodynamic destabilization. But with the use of Boussignac CPAP system all necessary tests were successfully completed, confirming the patient’s brain death, which gave us the opportunity to perform procedures for organ donation. The main reason of apneic test difficulties was severe gas exchange disturbances secondary to ARDS. Thus lack of positive end expiratory pressure during classical performance of apneic test leads to quick desaturation and rapid hemodynamic deterioration, limiting the observation period below dedicated at least 10-minute interval. Conclusion The Boussignac CPAP system may be an effective tool for performing transparent apneic test in case of serious respiratory disturbances, especially in the form of acute lung injury or ARDS. PMID:26124664

  9. Results of Laboratory Testing for Diphacinone in Seawater, Fish, Invertebrates, and Soil Following Aerial Application of Rodenticide on Lehua Island, Kauai County, Hawaii, January 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orazio, Carl E.; Tanner, Michael J.; Swenson, Chris; Herod, Jeffrey J.; Dunlevy, Peter; Gale, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2009, rodenticide bait (Ramik Green pellets) containing the active ingredient diphacinone was aerially applied to Lehua Island. Reported herein are the results of laboratory analyses to determine diphacinone concentrations in samples of seawater, fillet of fish, soft tissue of limpets (opihi), whole-body crabs, and soil collected from Lehua Island, Kauai County, Hawaii, after aerial application of the rodenticide bait. Diphacinone was specifically chosen because of its low toxicity to nontarget organisms. Its use on Lehua Island is the second time it has ever been used for an aerial application to eradicate rodents. Testing of the Lehua Island samples for diphacinone utilized high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. No detectable concentrations of diphacinone were found in any of the samples from Lehua Island. The limits of detection for diphacinone were 0.4 nanograms per milliliter (parts per billion) seawater, 15 nanograms per gram (dry weight) soil, 20 nanograms per gram (parts per billion) fish fillet, 13 nanograms per gram whole crab, and 34 nanograms per gram soft tissue limpet.

  10. Aqueous CO{sup 2} vs. aqueous extraction of soils as a preparative procedure for acute toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.W.; Burks, S.L.

    1994-12-31

    This study was to determine if contaminated soils extracted with supercritical CO{sup 2} (SFE) would yield different results from soils extracted with an aqueous media. Soil samples from an abandoned oil refinery were subjected to aqueous and SFE extraction. Uncontaminated control sites were compared with contaminated sites. Each extract was analyzed for 48 hour acute Ceriodaphnia LC50s and Microtox{reg_sign} EC50s. Comparisons were then made between the aqueous extracts and the SFE extracts. An additional study was made with HPLC chromatographs of the SFE contaminated site extracts to determine if there was a correlation between LC50 results and peak area of different sections of the chromatograph. The 48 hour Ceriodaphnia LC50 of one contaminated site showed a significant increase in toxicity with the supercritical extract compared to the aqueous extract. All contaminated sites gave toxic responses with the supercritical procedure. The Microtox{reg_sign} assay showed a toxic response with 2 of the 3 contaminated sites for both aqueous and SFE extracts. Results indicate that the Ceriodaphnia assays were more sensitive than Microtox{reg_sign} to contaminants found in the refinery soil. SFE controls did not show adverse effects with the Ceriodaphnia, but did have a slight effect with Microtox{reg_sign}. The best correlation (r{sup 2} > 0.90) between the Ceriodaphnia LC50s and the peak areas of the chromatographs was obtained for sections with an estimated log K{sub ow} of 1 to 5. SFE extraction provided a fast, efficient and inexpensive method of collecting and testing moderately non-polar to strongly non-polar organic contaminants from contaminated soils.

  11. The effect of an experimentally induced acute mastitis on the test results of an Ostertagia ostertagi milk ELISA.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Johannes; Duchateau, Luc; Vangroenweghe, Frédéric; Claerebout, Edwin; Burvenich, Christian; Vercruysse, Jozef

    2006-03-15

    Antibody levels against Ostertagia ostertagi in the milk are a promising parameter to identify dairy cows or herds with production losses due to gastrointestinal nematodes. However, milk antibody levels can be influenced by udder-related factors. In this study, the effect of an experimentally induced mastitis on the test results (ODR) of a milk O. ostertagi ELISA was investigated. Twenty-five cows that were naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, were inoculated in their left udder quarters with Escherichia coli P4:O32 and quarter milk samples were collected at several intervals from 24 h before until 144 h after experimental infection. The effect of the contribution of milk from one or more infected quarters on the bulk tank milk ODR was estimated, based on a titration experiment. The mean O. ostertagi antibody levels of the infected udder quarters were significantly (P < 0.001) higher than those of the uninfected udder quarters at each sampling time post-infection. The largest difference was observed at 24 h post-infection with a mean difference of 0.251 ODR (95%CI: 0.172; 0.330). There was also a significant increase (P < 0.001) in total IgG levels with the largest difference being observed at 24 h post-infection. Highly significant (P < 0.005) correlation coefficients were observed between O. ostertagi ODR, total IgG ODR, Na+ and Cl- ion concentration and log transformed somatic cell counts at 24 h post-infection. The results demonstrate that an acute mastitis causes a flow of specific and non-specific antibodies from serum to milk with a subsequent increase in the O. ostertagi ODR values. The effect of the contribution of milk from infected quarters on the bulk tank milk O. ostertagi ODR was estimated to be minor if the relative number of infected quarters is small (< 3%).

  12. Does human-induced hybridization have long-term genetic effects? Empirical testing with domesticated, wild and hybridized fish populations

    PubMed Central

    Harbicht, Andrew; Wilson, Chris C; Fraser, Dylan J

    2014-01-01

    Current conservation practices exclude human-generated hybridized populations from protection, as the genetic effects of hybridization in the wild have been observed to be long-lasting based on neutral genetic markers and are considered potentially irreversible. Theory, however, predicts otherwise for genes under selection. We transplanted combinations of wild, domesticated and hybridized populations of a fish species to new environments. We then compared survival, phenotypic variation and plasticity to determine whether hybridization affects adaptive potential after multiple generations of selection in the wild. Although the fitness of our hybridized populations at the onset of hybridization cannot be assessed, our results suggest that within five to eleven generations, selection can remove introduced foreign genes from wild populations that have hybridized with domesticated conspecifics. The end result is hybridized populations that, in terms of survival, phenotypic plasticity, mean trait expression and overall general responses to environmental change, closely resemble neighbouring wild populations. These results have important implications for considering the potential conservation value of hybridized populations and illustrate the effectiveness of selection in a local environment. PMID:25558279

  13. Development of a list of reference chemicals for evaluating alternative methods to in vivo fish bioaccumulation tests.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Neus; Cronin, Mark Timothy David; Lillicrap, Adam; Madden, Judith Clare; Piechota, Przemyslaw; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-12-01

    The aim to reduce the number of animals in experiments has highlighted the need to develop and validate nonanimal methods as alternatives to bioaccumulation studies using fish. The present study details a novel 3-tier approach to develop a list of reference compounds to aid this process. The approach was based on 1) the inclusion of relevant chemical classes supported by high-quality in vivo data for the bioconcentration factor (BCF), whole-body biotransformation rates (K(met)), and metabolism characterization for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) (tiers I and II); and 2) the refinement to ensure a broad coverage of hydrophobicity, bioconcentration potential, molecular weight, maximum molecular diameter, whole-body biotransformation half-lives, and metabolic pathways (tier III). In silico techniques were employed to predict maximal log BCF and molecular and metabolic properties. Of the 157 compounds considered as reference compounds, 144 were supported by high-quality BCF data, 8 were supported by K(met) data, and 5 were supported by in vivo metabolism data. Additional criteria for refinement of the list of reference compounds were suggested to aid practical implementation in experimental efforts. The present list of reference compounds is anticipated to facilitate the development of alternative approaches, enhance understanding of in vivo and in vitro bioaccumulation relationships, and refine in silico BCF and metabolism predictions.

  14. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  15. Acute exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol disrupts audience effects on male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Buckman, Christina M

    2013-03-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals can have profound effects on the behavior of aquatic organisms residing in polluted waters. Males are especially sensitive to the effects of estrogen mimics and both courtship and aggression may be dramatically reduced by chemical exposure. Population-level impacts may occur if these chemicals decrease the ability of males to obtain mates or defend territories. Exposure might also have far-reaching impacts by interfering with information transfer within a network of individuals. For example, males exposed to an endocrine disruptor may be less sensitive to the presence of an audience. Male Siamese fighting fish were used to examine how short-term exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) alters audience effects on male-male interactions. Males either received a nominal dose of EE2 or remained unexposed and then interacted with an opponent in one of three treatments (female, male, or no audience). EE2 altered audience effects in this study. Opponent-directed gill flaring was lower when a female audience was present compared to when there was a male or no audience in both EE2 and control males. The number of opponent-directed tail beats did not differ as a function of audience type in EE2 males. In contrast, unexposed males increased opponent-directed tail beats when a female audience is present. Therefore, EE2 reduces the ability of males to communicate with multiple individuals simultaneously. If this is the case, endocrine disruptor exposure may alter population structure as selection should favor individuals that are able to readily adjust their signaling behavior as a function of social context.

  16. Acute exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol disrupts audience effects on male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Buckman, Christina M

    2013-03-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals can have profound effects on the behavior of aquatic organisms residing in polluted waters. Males are especially sensitive to the effects of estrogen mimics and both courtship and aggression may be dramatically reduced by chemical exposure. Population-level impacts may occur if these chemicals decrease the ability of males to obtain mates or defend territories. Exposure might also have far-reaching impacts by interfering with information transfer within a network of individuals. For example, males exposed to an endocrine disruptor may be less sensitive to the presence of an audience. Male Siamese fighting fish were used to examine how short-term exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) alters audience effects on male-male interactions. Males either received a nominal dose of EE2 or remained unexposed and then interacted with an opponent in one of three treatments (female, male, or no audience). EE2 altered audience effects in this study. Opponent-directed gill flaring was lower when a female audience was present compared to when there was a male or no audience in both EE2 and control males. The number of opponent-directed tail beats did not differ as a function of audience type in EE2 males. In contrast, unexposed males increased opponent-directed tail beats when a female audience is present. Therefore, EE2 reduces the ability of males to communicate with multiple individuals simultaneously. If this is the case, endocrine disruptor exposure may alter population structure as selection should favor individuals that are able to readily adjust their signaling behavior as a function of social context. PMID:23333768

  17. [Epidemiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) of salmonid fish in France: study of the course of natural infection by combined use of viral and seroneutralization test and eradication attempts].

    PubMed

    Hattenberger-Baudouy, A M; Danton, M; Merle, G; de Kinkelin, P

    1995-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN), a rhabdoviral infection of salmonid fish, was considered to be an exotic disease in Europe until it was recognized in France and Italy in 1987. In France, the existence of this new condition led the authorities in charge of animal health to order epidemiological studies to be undertaken. These studies were based upon virological, serological and experimental diagnostic methods and also encompassed disease eradication attempts. Studies were conducted at 7 fish farming sites, involved 1,545 salmonid fish, of which 848 were sacrificed, and represented 262 virological examinations and 1,782 serum neutralization tests. The presence of the IHN virus was detected in the 7 trout farm fish populations that were located in 5 regions, one of which was situated 600 km from the place where the first isolation of IHN virus was made. Moreover, 6 out of 7 rainbow trout populations reared in these farms also harboured viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) often resulting in overt disease. Rainbow trout was the only salmonid fish species found infected with IHN. Overt infection, which was observed in fish ageing less than 2,200 degrees-days, always occurred at water temperatures below 14 degrees C, and the younger fish were more susceptible (mortality rate > or = 80%). Although the IHN virus is easily isolable from fish undergoing overt infection, it was hardly detectable in survivors until they were adults, at which stage the virus was shedded via sexual products which constituted suitable materials for virological examination and disease transmission assays. Survivors of overt and dormant IHN infection developed consistent immune response and special attention was paid to neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to IHN virus. The detection of such NAb in fish from infected farming sites or other NAb from presumably IHN-free sites, correlated fairly well with the presence and further detection of IHN virus among such fish populations. Our data

  18. Test of salt marsh as a site of production and export of fish biomass with implications for impoundment management and restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Philip W.

    2002-01-01

    Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, and although they are thought to enhance the productivity of open estuarine waters, the mechanism by which energy transfer occurs has been debated for decades. One possible mechanism is the transfer of saltmarsh production to estuarine waters by vagile fishes and invertebrates. Saltmarsh impoundments in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, that have been reconnected to the estuary by culverts provide unique opportunities for studying marsh systems with respect to aquatic communities. The boundaries between salt marshes and the estuary are clearly defined by a system of dikes that confine fishes into a known area, and the exchange of aquatic organisms are restricted to culverts where they may be easily sampled. A multi-gear approach was used monthly to estimate fish standing stock, fish ingress/egress, and predation. Changes in saltmarsh fish abundance, and exchange with the estuary reflected the seasonal pattern of marsh flooding in the xv northern Indian River Lagoon system. During a six month period of marsh flooding, saltmarsh fishes had continuous access to marsh food resources. Piscivorous fishes regularly entered the marsh via creeks and ditches to prey upon marsh fishes, and piscivorous birds aggregated following major fish migrations to the marsh surface or to deep habitats. As water levels receded in winter, saltmarsh fishes concentrated into deep habitats and migration to the estuary ensued. The monthly estimates of fish standing stock, net fish ingress, and predation were used to develop a biomass budget to estimate annual production of fishes and the relative yield to predatory fish, birds, and direct migration to the estuary. Annual production of saltmarsh fishes was estimated to be 17.7 g·m-2 salt marsh, which falls within the range of previously reported values for estuarine fish communities. The relative yields were at least 21% to piscivorous fishes, 14% to piscivorous birds, and 32

  19. Effects of carbamazepine on cortisol levels and behavioral responses to stress in the fish Jenynsia multidentata.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Emilia; Durando, Patricia; Valdés, M Eugenia; Franchioni, Liliana; Bistoni, María de los Ángeles

    2016-05-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an anticonvulsant drug, prescribed worldwide for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder and trigeminal neuralgia, which has been frequently detected in aquatic environments. The objective of this study was to analyze if CBZ modifies scototaxis and shoaling behaviors and/or whole-body cortisol levels of the one-sided livebearing fish Jenynsia multidentata under stress condition. Female adults of J. multidentata were exposed to 0, 10, 50 and 200μgCBZ/L during 14days. After CBZ exposure, fish were subjected to restraint stress during 15min. Control animals were not exposed to CBZ or stress. In the light/dark preference test (scototaxis), the individuals under acute restraint stress (without CBZ) exhibited a significant increase in the mean speed and in the time spent both in the light compartment and in the bottom of the tank with respect to controls. They also showed a tendency to stay longer frozen in the light compartment. Fish exposed to 10 and 50μgCBZ/L showed a significant reduction in mean speed compared to stressed fish without CBZ. A reduction in the time spent in the bottom of the tank was also observed in fish exposed to 10μgCBZ/L. Fish exposed to 200μgCBZ/L showed a decreasing tendency in all behavioral endpoints (time spent in the light compartment, mean speed, time spent at the bottom and freezing) in comparison to stressed fish not exposed to CBZ. Considering whole-body cortisol results, fish under acute restraint stress (without CBZ) significantly increased their hormone levels with respect to the control group, while fish exposed to CBZ and acute restraint stress, significantly decreased their whole-body cortisol levels. There were no significant changes in shoaling behavior due to either stress or CBZ exposure and no significant differences in whole-body cortisol levels between experimental groups. Considering that the light/dark and shoaling tests measure different stress response behaviors regulated by different

  20. Field testing of behavioral barriers for fish exclusion at cooling-water intake systems: Ontario Hydro Pickering Nuclear Generating Station: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, R.S.; Patrick, P.H.; Matousek, J.A.; Wells, A.W.

    1989-03-01

    A field sampling program was conducted during the spring--summer of 1985 and 1986 at a test facility located offshore of Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) on Lake Ontario. The objective of the field program was to evaluate the effectiveness of selected behavioral barriers for fish exclusion at generating facilities located on large freshwater lakes or impoundments. Three commercially available devices (air bubble curtain, pneumatic gun, and underwater strobe lights) were tested alone and in combination to determine their effectiveness in reducing impingement. Sampling was conducted at two identical structures with the behavioral barrier devices installed on one of the structures and the other structure acting as a control. The effectiveness of the devices at excluding alewife (the dominant local species) was determined by comparing net catches covering 2-h test periods between the two structures. All of the behavioral barrier devices or combinations of devices tested exhibited effectiveness index values greater than 50%. The greatest deterrent capability was associated with the pneumatic gun; the least with the air bubble curtain. Device combinations that included the pneumatic gun were generally less effective than the pneumatic gun alone. The underwater strobe light was only marginally effective at excluding alewife. The air bubble curtain and underwater strobe light combination was more effective than each device separately, but the results were variable. 48 refs., 41 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Texture Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to provide an opportunity for her first graders to explore texture through an engaging subject, the author developed a three-part lesson that features fish in a mixed-media artwork: (1) Exploring Textured Paint; (2) Creating the Fish; and (3) Role Playing. In this lesson, students effectively explore texture through painting, drawing,…

  2. Testing for shared biogeographic history in the lower Central American freshwater fish assemblage using comparative phylogeography: concerted, independent, or multiple evolutionary responses?

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Justin C; Johnson, Jerald B

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of comparative phylogeography is determining whether codistributed species experienced (1) concerted evolutionary responses to past geological and climatic events, indicated by congruent spatial and temporal patterns (“concerted-response hypothesis”); (2) independent responses, indicated by spatial incongruence (“independent-response hypothesis”); or (3) multiple responses (“multiple-response hypothesis”), indicated by spatial congruence but temporal incongruence (“pseudocongruence”) or spatial and temporal incongruence (“pseudoincongruence”). We tested these competing hypotheses using DNA sequence data from three livebearing fish species codistributed in the Nicaraguan depression of Central America (Alfaro cultratus, Poecilia gillii, and Xenophallus umbratilis) that we predicted might display congruent responses due to co-occurrence in identical freshwater drainages. Spatial analyses recovered different subdivisions of genetic structure for each species, despite shared finer-scale breaks in northwestern Costa Rica (also supported by phylogenetic results). Isolation-with-migration models estimated incongruent timelines of among-region divergences, with A. cultratus and Xenophallus populations diverging over Miocene–mid-Pleistocene while P. gillii populations diverged over mid-late Pleistocene. Approximate Bayesian computation also lent substantial support to multiple discrete divergences over a model of simultaneous divergence across shared spatial breaks (e.g., Bayes factor [B10] = 4.303 for Ψ [no. of divergences] > 1 vs. Ψ = 1). Thus, the data support phylogeographic pseudoincongruence consistent with the multiple-response hypothesis. Model comparisons also indicated incongruence in historical demography, for example, support for intraspecific late Pleistocene population growth was unique to P. gillii, despite evidence for finer-scale population expansions in the other taxa. Empirical tests for phylogeographic congruence

  3. Acute toxicity of TFM and a TFM/niclosamide mixture to selected species of fish, including lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus), in laboratory and field exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boogaard, M.A.; Bills, T.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of the lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2???,5-dichloro-4???-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) to non-target fishes has been a major point of concern since their use to control larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations began in the early 1960s. The toxicity of TFM to several non-target fish species has been demonstrated in previous studies. However, little information is available on the toxicity of the TFM/1 % niclosamide mixture. One species of particular concern is the lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens). Juvenile lake sturgeon of several size ranges were exposed to determine potential effects of the lampricides to individuals present in treatment streams. Sac fry were most resistant to the lampricides followed by fingerlings in the 200 to 225 mm size range. Swim-up fry and fingerlings less than 100 mm were the most sensitive. Concentrations that produced 50% mortality (LC50s) in juvenile lake sturgeon of these smaller size ranges were at or near the minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) required for effective control of larval sea lampreys. The mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus), an amphibian native to several tributaries of the Great Lakes, have also become a species of interest in recent years. Laboratory tests conducted with TFM and a TFM/1 % niclosamide mixture on adult mudpuppies indicate that although the amphibian is sensitive to the lampricides, an adequate margin of safety exists for adult mudpuppies to survive when exposed during stream treatments. Fifteen other fish species native to streams treated with lampricides were investigated in the laboratory to determine their sensitivity to the lampricides. Centrarchids, bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) were the least sensitive to TFM, while ictalurids, black bullhead (Ictalurus melas), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and tadpole madtom (Notorus gyrinus) were the most sensitive. On-site bioassays conducted before lampricide

  4. Acute toxicity of TFM and a TFM/niclosamide mixture to selected species of fish, including lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus), in laboratory and field exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boogaard, M.A.; Bills, T.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of the lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2',5-dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) to non-target fishes has been a major point of concern since their use to control larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations began in the early 1960s. The toxicity of TFM to several non-target fish species has been demonstrated in previous studies. However, little information is available on the toxicity of the TFM/1% niclosamide mixture. One species of particular concern is the lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens). Juvenile lake sturgeon of several size ranges were exposed to determine potential effects of the lampricides to individuals present in treatment streams. Sac fry were most resistant to the lampricides followed by fingerlings in the 200 to 225 mm size range. Swim-up fry and fingerlings less than 100 mm were the most sensitive. Concentrations that produced 50% mortality (LC50s) in juvenile lake sturgeon of these smaller size ranges were at or near the minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) required for effective control of larval sea lampreys. The mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus), an amphibian native to several tributaries of the Great Lakes, have also become a species of interest in recent years. Laboratory tests conducted with TFM and a TFM/1% niclosamide mixture on adult mudpuppies indicate that although the amphibian is sensitive to the lampricides, an adequate margin of safety exists for adult mudpuppies to survive when exposed during stream treatments. Fifteen other fish species native to streams treated with lampricides were investigated in the laboratory to determine their sensitivity to the lampricides. Centrarchids, bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) were the least sensitive to TFM, while ictalurids, black bullhead (Ictalurus melas), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and tadpole madtom (Notorus gyrinus) were the most sensitive. On-site bioassays conducted before lampricide

  5. Food poisonings by ingestion of cyprinid fish.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Manabu; Noguchi, Tamao

    2014-01-28

    Raw or dried gallbladders of cyprinid fish have long been ingested as a traditional medicine in the Asian countries, particularly in China, for ameliorating visual acuity, rheumatism, and general health; however, sporadic poisoning incidences have occurred after their ingestion. The poisoning causes complex symptoms in patients, including acute renal failure, liver dysfunction, paralysis, and convulsions of limbs. The causative substance for the poisoning was isolated, and its basic properties were examined. The purified toxin revealed a minimum lethal dose of 2.6 mg/20 g in mouse, when injected intraperitoneally. The main symptoms were paralysis and convulsions of the hind legs, along with other neurological signs. Liver biopsy of the euthanized mice clearly exhibited hepatocytes necrosis and infiltration of neutrophils and lymphocytes, suggesting the acute dysfunction of the liver. Blood tests disclosed the characteristics of acute renal failure and liver injury. Infrared (IR) spectrometry, fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicated, a molecular formula of C27H48O8S, containing a sulfate ester group for the toxin. Thus, we concluded that the structure of carp toxin to be 5α-cyprinol sulfate (5α-cholestane-3α, 7α, 12α, 26, 27-pentol 26-sulfate). This indicated that carp toxin is a nephro- and hepato- toxin, which could be the responsible toxin for carp bile poisoning in humans.

  6. Food Poisonings by Ingestion of Cyprinid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Manabu; Noguchi, Tamao

    2014-01-01

    Raw or dried gallbladders of cyprinid fish have long been ingested as a traditional medicine in the Asian countries, particularly in China, for ameliorating visual acuity, rheumatism, and general health; however, sporadic poisoning incidences have occurred after their ingestion. The poisoning causes complex symptoms in patients, including acute renal failure, liver dysfunction, paralysis, and convulsions of limbs. The causative substance for the poisoning was isolated, and its basic properties were examined. The purified toxin revealed a minimum lethal dose of 2.6 mg/20 g in mouse, when injected intraperitoneally. The main symptoms were paralysis and convulsions of the hind legs, along with other neurological signs. Liver biopsy of the euthanized mice clearly exhibited hepatocytes necrosis and infiltration of neutrophils and lymphocytes, suggesting the acute dysfunction of the liver. Blood tests disclosed the characteristics of acute renal failure and liver injury. Infrared (IR) spectrometry, fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicated, a molecular formula of C27H48O8S, containing a sulfate ester group for the toxin. Thus, we concluded that the structure of carp toxin to be 5α-cyprinol sulfate (5α-cholestane-3α, 7α, 12α, 26, 27-pentol 26-sulfate). This indicated that carp toxin is a nephro- and hepato- toxin, which could be the responsible toxin for carp bile poisoning in humans. PMID:24476713

  7. Comparison between Karyotyping-FISH-Reverse Transcription PCR and RNA- Sequencing-Fusion Gene Identification Programs in the Detection of KAT6A-CREBBP in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Torkildsen, Synne; Gorunova, Ludmila; Tierens, Anne; Tjønnfjord, Geir E.; Heim, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    An acute myeloid leukemia was suspected of having a t(8;16)(p11;p13) resulting in a KAT6A-CREBBP fusion because the bone marrow was packed with monoblasts showing marked erythrophagocytosis. The diagnostic karyotype was 46,XY,add(1)(p13),t(8;21)(p11;q22),der(16)t(1;16)(p13;p13)[9]/46,XY[1]; thus, no direct confirmation of the suspicion could be given although both 8p11 and 16p13 seemed to be rearranged. The leukemic cells were examined in two ways to find out whether a cryptic KAT6A-CREBBP was present. The first was the “conventional” approach: G-banding was followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The second was RNA-Seq followed by data analysis using FusionMap and FusionFinder programs with special emphasis on candidates located in the 1p13, 8p11, 16p13, and 21q22 breakpoints. FISH analysis indicated the presence of a KAT6A/CREBBP chimera. RT-PCR followed by Sanger sequencing of the amplified product showed that a chimeric KAT6A-CREBBP transcript was present in the patients bone marrow. Surprisingly, however, KATA6A-CREBBP was not among the 874 and 35 fusion transcripts identified by the FusionMap and FusionFinder programs, respectively, although 11 sequences of the raw RNA-sequencing data were KATA6A-CREBBP fragments. This illustrates that although many fusion transcripts can be found by RNA-Seq combined with FusionMap and FusionFinder, the pathogenetically essential fusion is not always picked up by the bioinformatic algorithms behind these programs. The present study not only illustrates potential pitfalls of current data analysis programs of whole transcriptome sequences which make them less useful as stand-alone techniques, but also that leukemia diagnosis still relies on integration of clinical, hematologic, and genetic disease features of which the former two by no means have become superfluous. PMID:24798186

  8. Contaminant levels in Gulf of Mexico reef fish after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill as measured by a fishermen-led testing program.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Timothy P; Gohlke, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    The BP oil disaster posed a significant threat to the U.S. seafood industry. Invertebrates (shrimp, oyster, crab) and other nearshore species comprised the majority of postspill testing by federal and state agencies. Deeper water finfish were sampled less frequently, despite population ranges that overlapped with affected waters. We report on a voluntary testing program with Gulf of Mexico commercial fishermen to ensure the safety of their catch. Seven species of reef fish were tested for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, several metals, and a constituent of Corexit 9500A and 9527A dispersants. Only two of 92 samples had detectable levels of benzo(a)pyrene-equivalents (a combined measure of carcinogenic potency across 7 different PAHs), which were still below federal safety thresholds. PAH ratios for these samples suggest pyrogenic (not petrogenic) contamination - indicating potential sources other than Deepwater Horizon. Metals were largely absent (cadmium, lead) or consistent with levels previously reported (mercury, arsenic). One notable exception was tilefish, which showed mercury concentrations lower than expected. We did not detect dispersant in any of our samples, indicating that it was not present in these species during the study period. Our findings suggest minimal risk to public health from these seafoods as a result of the disaster; however, the most contaminated areas were not sampled through this program. PMID:24401096

  9. Rapid identification of pathogens with the hemoFISH test applying a novel beacon-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (bbFISH) technology in positive blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Eva; Scherr, Sabrina; Strempfl, Christina; Krause, Robert; Feierl, Gebhard; Grisold, Andrea J

    2013-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of pathogens responsible for sepsis is essential for early and targeted antimicrobial therapy. Blood cultures are the current reference standard for detection of pathogens in blood, but culture-based identification methods are time consuming. We evaluated the hemoFISH assay by using the novel bbFISH technology for rapid and accurate identification of a broad range of microorganisms in positive blood cultures. A total of 103 positive blood culture bottles were investigated. In total, 106 bacterial species were detected in the blood cultures and subsequently identified with conventional methods. The Gram-staining indicated monomicrobial growth in 95.1% (98/103) and polymicrobial growth in 4.9% (5/103) blood cultures. In 65.0% (67/103) cultures Gram-positive, 32.0% (33/103) Gram-negative, and 3.0% (3/103) both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were identified. Depending on the Gram-staining results, either the hemoFISH Gram-positive or the hemoFISH Gram-negative panel was used. In case of a polymicrobial infection, both panels were applied. The hemoFISH assay showed a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (95% CIs of 96.34% to 100% and 30.48% to 100%, respectively). Of the 106 bacterial species, the hemoFISH assay correctly identified 55.7% (n = 59) to species level, 34.0% (n = 36) to genus level, and 7.5% (n = 8) to family level. The novel hemoFISH using bbFISH technology appears to be a valuable rapid tool for the identification of a broad range of microorganisms in positive blood cultures.

  10. Unexpected fetal demise despite the reactive nonstress test during the conservative management of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ayse Filiz; Yildirim, Melahat; Cinkaya, Aysegul

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Dealing with acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is a challenging problem due to unexpected nature of the disease. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a complicated case of a 29-year-old pregnant woman with a mild acute pancreatitis whose pregnancy ended up with an unexpected fetal demise at her 34th gestational week. This unfortunate outcome led us reconsider our obstetrical approach to acute pancreatitis during pregnancy. CONCLUSION Based on this unfortunate event, we now think that obstetricians should keep in mind that even in the presence of reassuring NST and biophysical profile assessment, an unpredictable fetal loss can occur during the medical management of the pregnancies complicated with mild acute pancreatitis. DISCUSSION The subject patient of this case report was diagnosed with mild AP and underwent conservative medical management. Since the patient was stable and fetal well-being was confirmed with BPP and NST, the termination of pregnancy was out of question at that time. The occurrence of unexpected fetal death despite assuring parameters led us reconsider the approach to the pregnant women with mild AP. PMID:25460471

  11. One Fish, Two Fish, Redfish, You Fish!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Katherine; Timmons, Maryellen; Medders, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The recreational fishing activity presented in this article provides a hands-on, problem-based experience for students; it unites biology, math, economics, environmental policy, and population dynamics concepts. In addition, the activity allows students to shape environmental policy in a realistic setting and evaluate their peers' work. By…

  12. Fishing Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    ROFFS stands for Roffer's Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service, Inc. Roffer combines satellite and computer technology with oceanographic information from several sources to produce frequently updated charts sometimes as often as 30 times a day showing clues to the location of marlin, sailfish, tuna, swordfish and a variety of other types. Also provides customized forecasts for racing boats and the shipping industry along with seasonal forecasts that allow the marine industry to formulate fishing strategies based on foreknowledge of the arrival and departure times of different fish. Roffs service exemplifies the potential for benefits to marine industries from satellite observations. Most notable results are reduced search time and substantial fuel savings.

  13. Healing rate and autoimmune safety of full-thickness wounds treated with fish skin acellular dermal matrix versus porcine small-intestine submucosa: a noninferiority study.

    PubMed

    Baldursson, Baldur Tumi; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Konrádsdóttir, Fífa; Gudnason, Palmar; Sigurjonsson, Gudmundur F; Lund, Sigrún Helga

    2015-03-01

    A novel product, the fish skin acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has recently been introduced into the family of biological materials for the treatment of wounds. Hitherto, these products have been produced from the organs of livestock. A noninferiority test was used to compare the effect of fish skin ADM against porcine small-intestine submucosa extracellular matrix in the healing of 162 full-thickness 4-mm wounds on the forearm of 81 volunteers. The fish skin product was noninferior at the primary end point, healing at 28 days. Furthermore, the wounds treated with fish skin acellular matrix healed significantly faster. These results might give the fish skin ADM an advantage because of its environmental neutrality when compared with livestock-derived products. The study results on these acute full-thickness wounds might apply for diabetic foot ulcers and other chronic full-thickness wounds, and the shorter healing time for the fish skin-treated group could influence treatment decisions. To test the autoimmune reactivity of the fish skin, the participants were tested with the following ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) tests: RF, ANA, ENA, anti ds-DNA, ANCA, anti-CCP, and anticollagen I and II. These showed no reactivity. The results demonstrate the claims of safety and efficacy of fish skin ADM for wound care.

  14. Ontogenetic improvement of visual function in the medaka Oryzias latipes based on an optomotor testing system for larval and adult fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carvalho, Paulo S. M.; Noltie, Douglas B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    We developed a system for evaluation of visual function in larval and adult fish. Both optomotor (swimming) and optokinetic (eye movement) responses were monitored and recorded using a system of rotating stripes. The system allowed manipulation of factors such as width of the stripes used, rotation speed of the striped drum, and light illuminance levels within both the scotopic and photopic ranges. Precise control of these factors allowed quantitative measurements of visual acuity and motion detection. Using this apparatus, we tested the hypothesis that significant posthatch ontogenetic improvements in visual function occur in the medaka Oryzias latipes, and also that this species shows significant in ovo neuronal development. Significant improvements in the acuity angle alpha (ability to discriminate detail) were observed from approximately 5 degrees at hatch to 1 degree in the oldest adult stages. In addition, we measured a significant improvement in flicker fusion thresholds (motion detection skills) between larval and adult life stages within both the scotopic and photopic ranges of light illuminance. Ranges of flicker fusion thresholds (X?? ?? SD) at log I=1.96 (photopic) varied from 37.2 ?? 1.6 cycles/s in young adults to 18.6 ?? 1.6 cycles/s in young larvae 10 days posthatch. At log I= - 2.54 (scotopic), flicker fusion thresholds varied from 5.8 ?? 0.7 cycles/s in young adults to 1.7 ?? 0.4 cycles/s in young larvae 10 days posthatch. Light sensitivity increased approximately 2.9 log units from early hatched larval stages to adults. The demonstrated ontogenetic improvements in visual function probably enable the fish to explore new resources, thereby enlarging their fundamental niche. ?? 2002 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Histology, ultrastructure, and in vitro steroidogenesis of the testes of two male phenotypes of the protogynous fish, Thalassoma duperrey (Labridae).

    PubMed

    Hourigan, T F; Nakamura, M; Nagahama, Y; Yamauchi, K; Grau, E G

    1991-08-01

    Species with multiple male reproductive phenotypes may serve as model systems to study the relationship between form and function in reproduction. Large and small males of the protogynous wrasse, Thalassoma duperrey differ in reproductive behavior, gonad morphology, and gonadal steroid production. Initial-phase (IP) males are small males that spawn in groups. They have large testes with high sperm production. Terminal-phase (TP) males are large, defend temporary spawning territories, and spawn individually with females. TP males are derived from either IP males or from sex-changed females. Regardless of origin, TP males have much smaller testes than do IP males, but steroid-producing Leydig cells in the gonads of TP males appear more numerous and better developed. Testes of TP males produce more testosterone (T) and especially 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in vitro than do testes of IP males, and the production is more responsive to salmon gonadotropin. 11-KT was the major metabolite produced by incubating the gonads of TP males with 14C-labeled steroid precursors. In vitro 11-KT production was correlated with plasma levels of 11-KT in TP males and these levels were significantly higher than those of IP males. The in vitro conversion of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone to 17 alpha, 20 beta-progestogen (17 alpha, 20 beta-P) for both types of males was similar, and was highest in winter when spawning occurred every day. Basal production of 17 alpha, 20 beta-P was similar in IP and TP male testes, and was enhanced by gonadotropin. The enzyme 20 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, responsible for the conversion of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone to 17 alpha, 20 beta-P resided in the sperm. These results indicate a function of 17 alpha, 20 beta-P in male reproductive function, probably spermiation, and a relationship of Leydig cell development and high levels of 11-KT production to the terminal male phenotype, perhaps reproductive or aggressive behavior, rather than to male

  16. Fish Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific fish used on the label. Read all product labels carefully before purchasing and consuming any item. Ingredients ... Getting Started Newly Diagnosed Emergency Care Plan Food Labels Mislabeled Products Tips for Managing Food Allergies Resources For... Most ...

  17. Fish Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... not eat any fish because they worry about mercury in seafood. Mercury is a metal that, at high levels, can ... many types of seafood have little or no mercury at all. So your risk of mercury exposure ...

  18. Designer Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which students are asked to design a fish that would survive in a natural system. A project to computerize the activity is discussed. The development of this artificial intelligence software is detailed. (CW)

  19. Application of the Liver Maximum Function Capacity Test in Acute Liver Failure: A Helpful Tool for Decision-Making in Liver Transplantation?

    PubMed

    Vondran, Florian Wolfgang Rudolf; Schumacher, Carsten; Johanning, Kai; Hartleben, Björn; Knitsch, Wolfgang; Wiesner, Olaf; Jaeckel, Elmar; Manns, Michael Peter; Klempnauer, Juergen; Bektas, Hueseyin; Lehner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite aggressive intensive medical management acute liver failure (ALF) may require high-urgency liver transplantation (LTx). Available prognostic scores do not apply for all patients; reliable tools to identify individuals in need of LTx are highly required. The liver maximum function capacity test (LiMAx) might represent an appropriate option. Referring to a case of ALF after Amanita phalloides-intoxication the potential of the LiMAx-test in this setting is discussed. Presentation of Case. LiMAx was performed in a 27-year-old patient prior to and after high-urgency LTx. In accordance with clinical appearance of hepatic encephalopathy, coagulopathy, and acute kidney failure, the LiMAx-test constituted a fulminant course of ALF with hardly any detectable metabolic activity. Following LTx with a marginal donor organ (95% hepatosteatosis), uptake of liver function was demonstrated by postoperative increase of the LiMAx-value. The patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 26. Discussion. ALF often is associated with a critical state of the patient that requires almost immediate decision-making regarding further therapy. Application of a noninvasive liver function test might help to determine the prognosis of ALF and support decision-making for or against LTx as well as acceptance of a critical donor organ in case of a critically ill patient. PMID:27274881

  20. Disease control in hatchery fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1947-01-01

    The method described herein has been extensively tested, both in the laboratory and at the producing hatchery, over a period of several years. Once familiarity with the details of application have been mastered, th8 reduction in effort required to treat fish is amazing. For example, two men have treated 20 large ponds containing several million fish, in one morning with no significant increase in mortality of the fish, whereas a crew of eight men required a full day to treat a single similar pond by hand dipping the fish with a subsequent loss approximating 50 percent of the stock.

  1. Salmon testes meal as a functional feed additive in fish meal and plant-protein based diets for rainbow trout(Oncorhynchus mykiss walbaum)and nile tilapia(Oreochromis niloticus L.) fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report that salmon testes meal (TM) produced from Alaskan seafood processing byproducts is a potential protein source for aquafeed formulations. A series of feeding trials was conducted using three different fish species; including Nile tilapia, rainbow trout, and white sturgeon at their early gr...

  2. Do wild fish species contribute to the transmission of koi herpesvirus to carp in hatchery ponds?

    PubMed

    Fabian, M; Baumer, A; Steinhagen, D

    2013-05-01

    The koi herpesvirus (KHV) has spread worldwide since its discovery in 1998 and causes disease and mortality in koi and common carp populations with a high impact on the carp production industry. Many investigations have been conducted to examine ways of distribution and to identify possible transmission vectors. The answers, however, raise many new questions. In the present study, different wild fish species taken from carp ponds with a history of KHV infection were examined for their susceptibility to the virus. In the tissue of these fish, the virus load was determined and it was tested whether a release of the virus could be induced by stress and the virus then could be transferred to naive carp. Wild fish were gathered from carp ponds during acute outbreaks of virus-induced mortality in summer and from ponds stocked with carp carrying a latent KHV infection. From these ponds, wild fish were collected during the harvesting process in autumn or spring when the ponds were drained. We found that regardless of season, temperature variation, age and infection status of the carp stock, wild fish from carp ponds and its outlets could be tested positive for the KHV genome using real-time PCR with a low prevalence and virus load. Furthermore, virus transfer to naive carp was observed after a period of cohabitation. Cyprinid and non-cyprinid wild fish can therefore be considered as an epidemiological risk for pond carp farms.

  3. Acute intestinal anisakiasis: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, H N; Avcu, S; Pauwels, W; Mortelé, K J; De Backer, A I

    2012-09-01

    Small bowel anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease that results from consumption of raw or insufficiently pickled, salted, smoked, or cooked wild marine fish infected with Anisakis larvae. We report a case of intestinal anisakiasis in a 63-year-old woman presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints one day after ingestion of raw wild-caught herring from the Northsea. Computed tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated thickening of the distal small bowel wall, mucosa with hyperenhancement, mural stratification, fluid accumulation within dilated small-bowel loops and hyperemia of mesenteric vessels. In patients with a recent history of eating raw marine fish presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints and CT features of acute small bowel inflammation the possibility of anisakiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal syndromes.

  4. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  5. Impact of rapid antigen detection testing on antibiotic prescription in acute pharyngitis in adults. FARINGOCAT STUDY: a multicentric randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute pharyngitis is one of the most frequent consultations to the general practitioner and in most of the cases an antibiotic is prescribed in primary care in Spain. Bacterial etiology, mainly by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), accounts for 10-20% of all these infections in adults. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of rapid antigen detection testing (RADT) to identify GABHS in acute pharyngitis on the utilization of antibiotics in primary care. Methods/design Multicentric randomized controlled trial in which antibiotic prescription between two groups of patients with acute pharyngitis will be compared. The trial will include two arms, a control and an intervention group in which RADT will be performed. The primary outcome measure will be the proportion of inappropriate antibiotic prescription in each group. Two hundred seventy-six patients are required to detect a reduction in antibiotic prescription from 85% in the control group to 75% in the intervention group with a power of 90% and a level of significance of 5%. Secondary outcome measures will be specific antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance rates, secondary effects, days without working, medical visits during the first month and patient satisfaction. Discussion The implementation of RADT would allow a more rational use of antibiotics and would prevent adverse effects of antibiotics, emergence of antibiotic resistance and the growth of inefficient health expenses. Trial registration ISRCTN23587778 PMID:20331895

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  7. Anticonvulsant and acute neurotoxic effects of imperatorin, osthole and valproate in the maximal electroshock seizure and chimney tests in mice: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Wojda, Ewa; Andres-Mach, Marta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Glensk, Michal; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare the anticonvulsant and acute adverse (neurotoxic) effects of imperatorin and osthole (two natural coumarin derivatives) with valproate (a classical antiepileptic drug) in the maximal electroshock seizure and chimney tests in mice. The anticonvulsant and acute adverse effects of imperatorin, osthole and valproate were determined at 15, 30, 60 and 120 min after their systemic (i.p.) administration. The evaluation of time-course and dose-response relationships for imperatorin, osthole and valproate in the maximal electroshock seizure test revealed that the compounds produced a clear-cut antielectroshock action in mice and the experimentally derived ED(50) values for imperatorin ranged between 167 and 290 mg/kg, those for osthole ranged from 253 to 639 mg/kg, whereas the ED(50) values for valproate ranged from 189 to 255 mg/kg. The evaluation of acute neurotoxic effects in the chimney test revealed that the TD(50) values for imperatorin ranged between 329 and 443 mg/kg, the TD(50) values for osthole ranged from 531 to 648 mg/kg, while the TD(50) values for valproate ranged from 363 to 512 mg/kg. The protective index (as a ratio of TD(50) and ED(50) values) for imperatorin ranged between 1.13 and 2.60, for osthole ranged from 0.83 to 2.44, and for valproate ranged between 1.72 and 2.00. In conclusion, both natural coumarin derivatives deserve more attention from a preclinical point of view as compounds possessing some potentially favorable activities in terms of suppression of seizures, quite similar to those reported for valproate. PMID:19406619

  8. Acute contact toxicity test of insecticides (Cipermetrina 25, Lorsban 48E, Thionex 35) on honeybees in the southwestern zone of Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Letelier, Leonidas; Mendoza-Spina, Yamandú; Branchiccela, María Belén

    2012-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant soybean cultivation is expanding rapidly in Uruguay, with its land area having increased by 95 times during the past 10 years. Because of the region's Neotropical conditions, insecticide use is required to ensure adequate soybean productivity. However, in areas shared by soybean crops and beekeepers - such as the southwestern zone of Uruguay (SWZU) - the use of insecticides can increase the risks of honeybee death and honey contamination. Uruguayan commercial and legal guidelines set out practices and field doses designed to prevent acute intoxication with insecticides. However, honeybees in the SWZU are predominantly a polyhybrid subspecies different from that used to set international reference values, and hence they may have a different acute toxicity response, thus rendering such precautions ineffective. The aim of this work was to assess the acute toxicity response of polyhybrid honeybees in the SWZU to cypermethrin (commercial formulation: Cipermetrina 25 Agrin®), chlorpyrifos (commercial formulation: Lorsban 48E®), and endosulfan (commercial formulation: Thionex 35®). Acute toxicity bioassays were conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of each insecticide for the honeybees. The results indicate that, compared with EU reference values, SWZU honeybees have a higher toxicological sensitivity to chlorpyrifos and endosulfan, and a lower toxicological sensitivity to cypermethrin, based on the commercial formulations tested. However, when these results were adjusted according to their field dose equivalents, only chlorpyrifos emerged as a potential problem for beekeeping, as the maximum recommended field dose of Lorsban 48E® for soybean crops in Uruguay is 23 times the corresponding LD(50) for honeybees in the SWZU. PMID:22440636

  9. Acute contact toxicity test of insecticides (Cipermetrina 25, Lorsban 48E, Thionex 35) on honeybees in the southwestern zone of Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Letelier, Leonidas; Mendoza-Spina, Yamandú; Branchiccela, María Belén

    2012-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant soybean cultivation is expanding rapidly in Uruguay, with its land area having increased by 95 times during the past 10 years. Because of the region's Neotropical conditions, insecticide use is required to ensure adequate soybean productivity. However, in areas shared by soybean crops and beekeepers - such as the southwestern zone of Uruguay (SWZU) - the use of insecticides can increase the risks of honeybee death and honey contamination. Uruguayan commercial and legal guidelines set out practices and field doses designed to prevent acute intoxication with insecticides. However, honeybees in the SWZU are predominantly a polyhybrid subspecies different from that used to set international reference values, and hence they may have a different acute toxicity response, thus rendering such precautions ineffective. The aim of this work was to assess the acute toxicity response of polyhybrid honeybees in the SWZU to cypermethrin (commercial formulation: Cipermetrina 25 Agrin®), chlorpyrifos (commercial formulation: Lorsban 48E®), and endosulfan (commercial formulation: Thionex 35®). Acute toxicity bioassays were conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of each insecticide for the honeybees. The results indicate that, compared with EU reference values, SWZU honeybees have a higher toxicological sensitivity to chlorpyrifos and endosulfan, and a lower toxicological sensitivity to cypermethrin, based on the commercial formulations tested. However, when these results were adjusted according to their field dose equivalents, only chlorpyrifos emerged as a potential problem for beekeeping, as the maximum recommended field dose of Lorsban 48E® for soybean crops in Uruguay is 23 times the corresponding LD(50) for honeybees in the SWZU.

  10. What makes mangroves attractive to fish? Use of artificial units to test the influence of water depth, cross-shelf location, and presence of root structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagelkerken, I.; Faunce, C. H.

    2008-09-01

    Mangroves are an attractive fish habitat because they provide shelter and food for juvenile fishes. However, because mangroves are almost always located in shallow water and in sheltered (i.e., lagoonal, estuarine or bay) environments, the degree to which the latter two factors contribute to the attractiveness of mangrove prop-roots as a fish habitat is unknown. Artificial Mangrove Units (AMUs) were placed at multiple depths and along a gradient from an embayment to, and including, the coral reef. Total fish density and species richness in AMUs placed in the embayment was lower at 1 m depth than at 2 and 3 m depth, suggesting that shallow water is not a prerequisite for the attractiveness of mangrove prop-roots as a fish habitat. Total fish density and species richness were equal or greater in AMUs on the coral reef than in the embayment, suggesting that placement of mangroves in a sheltered lagoonal environment is not solely responsible for the attractiveness of mangrove prop-roots either. After 3 weeks, removal of AMUs did not have a negative effect on total fish density or species richness. However, within the embayment AMU removal resulted in the complete collapse of the assemblage component comprised of species that use mangroves as juvenile habitats, highlighting the need for a species-based approach towards assessing the benefits provided by the presence of mangrove root structure for fishes.

  11. Acute and chronic toxicity of sodium sulfate to four freshwater organisms in water-only exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Ning; Consbrock, Rebecca A.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Hammer, Edward J.; Bauer, Candice R.; Mount, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The acute and chronic toxicity of sulfate (tested as sodium sulfate) was determined in diluted well water (hardness of 100 mg/L and pH 8.2) with a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 2-d and 7-d exposures), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 4-d and 41-d exposures), a unionid mussel (pink mucket, Lampsilis abrupta; 4-d and 28-d exposures), and a fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; 4-d and 34-d exposures). Among the 4 species, the cladoceran and mussel were acutely more sensitive to sulfate than the midge and fathead minnow, whereas the fathead minnow was chronically more sensitive than the other 3 species. Acute-to-chronic ratios ranged from 2.34 to 5.68 for the 3 invertebrates but were as high as 12.69 for the fish. The fathead minnow was highly sensitive to sulfate during the transitional period from embryo development to hatching in the diluted well water, and thus, additional short-term (7- to 14-d) sulfate toxicity tests were conducted starting with embryonic fathead minnow in test waters with different ionic compositions at a water hardness of 100 mg/L. Increasing chloride in test water from 10 mg Cl/L to 25 mg Cl/L did not influence sulfate toxicity to the fish, whereas increasing potassium in test water from 1mg K/L to 3mg K/L substantially reduced the toxicity of sulfate. The results indicate that both acute and chronic sulfate toxicity data, and the influence of potassium on sulfate toxicity to fish embryos, need to be considered when environmental guidance values for sulfate are developed or refined.

  12. Acute and chronic toxicity of sodium sulfate to four freshwater organisms in water-only exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Ning; Consbrock, Rebecca A.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Hammer, Edward J.; Bauer, Candice R.; Mount, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The acute and chronic toxicity of sulfate (tested as sodium sulfate) was determined in diluted well water (hardness of 100 mg/L and pH 8.2) with a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 2-d and 7-d exposures), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 4-d and 41-d exposures), a unionid mussel (pink mucket, Lampsilis abrupta; 4-d and 28-d exposures), and a fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; 4-d and 34-d exposures). Among the 4 species, the cladoceran and mussel were acutely more sensitive to sulfate than the midge and fathead minnow, whereas the fathead minnow was chronically more sensitive than the other 3 species. Acute-to-chronic ratios ranged from 2.34 to 5.68 for the 3 invertebrates but were as high as 12.69 for the fish. The fathead minnow was highly sensitive to sulfate during the transitional period from embryo development to hatching in the diluted well water, and thus, additional short-term (7- to 14-d) sulfate toxicity tests were conducted starting with embryonic fathead minnow in test waters with different ionic compositions at a water hardness of 100 mg/L. Increasing chloride in test water from 10 mg Cl/L to 25 mg Cl/L did not influence sulfate toxicity to the fish, whereas increasing potassium in test water from 1mg K/L to 3mg K/L substantially reduced the toxicity of sulfate. The results indicate that both acute and chronic sulfate toxicity data, and the influence of potassium on sulfate toxicity to fish embryos, need to be considered when environmental guidance values for sulfate are developed or refined.

  13. Acute and chronic toxicity of sodium sulfate to four freshwater organisms in water-only exposures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Dorman, Rebecca A; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Hardesty, Doug K; Brumbaugh, William G; Hammer, Edward J; Bauer, Candice R; Mount, David R

    2016-01-01

    The acute and chronic toxicity of sulfate (tested as sodium sulfate) was determined in diluted well water (hardness of 100 mg/L and pH 8.2) with a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 2-d and 7-d exposures), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 4-d and 41-d exposures), a unionid mussel (pink mucket, Lampsilis abrupta; 4-d and 28-d exposures), and a fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; 4-d and 34-d exposures). Among the 4 species, the cladoceran and mussel were acutely more sensitive to sulfate than the midge and fathead minnow, whereas the fathead minnow was chronically more sensitive than the other 3 species. Acute-to-chronic ratios ranged from 2.34 to 5.68 for the 3 invertebrates but were as high as 12.69 for the fish. The fathead minnow was highly sensitive to sulfate during the transitional period from embryo development to hatching in the diluted well water, and thus, additional short-term (7- to 14-d) sulfate toxicity tests were conducted starting with embryonic fathead minnow in test waters with different ionic compositions at a water hardness of 100 mg/L. Increasing chloride in test water from 10 mg Cl/L to 25 mg Cl/L did not influence sulfate toxicity to the fish, whereas increasing potassium in test water from 1 mg K/L to 3 mg K/L substantially reduced the toxicity of sulfate. The results indicate that both acute and chronic sulfate toxicity data, and the influence of potassium on sulfate toxicity to fish embryos, need to be considered when environmental guidance values for sulfate are developed or refined.

  14. Use of life tables and LC50 tests to evaluate chronic and acute toxicity effects of copper on the marine copepod Tisbe furcata (Baird)

    SciTech Connect

    Bechmann, R.K. . Dept. of Marine Zoology and Marine Chemistry)

    1994-09-01

    Cohorts of the epiphytic marine copepod Tisbe furcata were chronically exposed to copper in life-table experiments to test whether ecologically relevant impacts can occur at sublethal concentrations. Data on fecundity, longevity, and rate of development were used to calculate r[sub m]--the intrinsic rate of natural increase. Acute toxicity tests were done to compare the concentrations of copper affecting individual lethality and population biology. The LC50 value for Tisbe furcata nauplii was 2.8 [mu]M copper. The results from the life-table experiments show that 0.9 [mu]M copper can cause significant negative effects on demographic parameters (total production of nauplii, life span, and reproductive period for fertile females) and reduce the percentage of fertile females leading to a 61% reduction of r[sub m]. However, r[sub m] was still positive at 0.9 [mu]M copper, and the net reproductive rate (R[sub 0]) indicated a fivefold increase in population size from one generation to the next. Although there were no significant effects of copper at 0.5 [mu]M, there was a negative trend in almost all the demographic parameters, indicating that the observed 10% reduction of r[sub m] at this concentration was an effect of copper. For the substances tested so far with both acute LC50 tests and life-table experiments, r[sub m] was not reduced at concentrations below LC50/10. When life-table experiments are used as part of environmental hazard assessments, concentrations below LC50/10 should be tested to detect substances that are potentially harmful to the environment at sublethal concentrations, rather than testing concentrations close to LC50.

  15. QSAR models for predicting in vivo aquatic toxicity of chlorinated alkanes to fish.

    PubMed

    Zvinavashe, Elton; van den Berg, Hans; Soffers, Ans E M F; Vervoort, Jacques; Freidig, Andreas; Murk, Albertinka J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2008-03-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are expected to play a crucial role in reducing the number of animals to be used for toxicity testing resulting from the adoption of the new European Union chemical control system called Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH). The objective of the present study was to generate in vitro acute toxicity data that could be used to develop a QSAR model to describe acute in vivo toxicity of chlorinated alkanes. Cytotoxicity of a series of chlorinated alkanes to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was observed at concentrations similar to those that have been shown previously to be toxic to fish. Strong correlations exist between the acute in vitro toxicity of the chlorinated alkanes and (i) hydrophobicity [modeled by the calculated log K ow (octanol-water partition coefficient); r (2) = 0.883 and r int (2) = 0.854] and (ii) in vivo acute toxicity to fish ( r (2) = 0.758). A QSAR model has been developed to predict in vivo acute toxicity to fish, based on the in vitro data and even on in silico log K ow data only. The developed QSAR model is applicable to chlorinated alkanes with up to 10 carbon atoms, up to eight chlorine atoms, and log K ow values lying within the range from 1.71 to 5.70. Out of the 100204 compounds on the European Inventory of Existing Chemicals (EINECS), our QSAR model covers 77 (0.1%) of them. Our findings demonstrate that in vitro experiments and even in silico calculations can replace animal experiments in the prediction of the acute toxicity of chlorinated alkanes.

  16. Anaesthesia of farmed fish: implications for welfare.

    PubMed

    Zahl, Inger Hilde; Samuelsen, Ole; Kiessling, Anders

    2012-02-01

    During their life cycle as farmed animals, there are several situations in which fish are subjected to handling and confinement. Netting, weighing, sorting, vaccination, transport and, at the end, slaughter are frequent events under farming conditions. As research subjects, fish may also undergo surgical procedures that range from tagging, sampling and small incisions to invasive procedures. In these situations, treatment with anaesthetic agents may be necessary in order to ensure the welfare of the fish. The main objective of this paper is to review our knowledge of the effects of anaesthetic agents in farmed fish and their possible implications for welfare. As wide variations in response to anaesthesia have been observed both between and within species, special attention has been paid to the importance of secondary factors such as body weight, water temperature and acute stress. In this review, we have limited ourselves to the anaesthetic agents such as benzocaine, metacaine (MS-222), metomidate hydrochloride, isoeugenol, 2-phenoxyethanol and quinaldine. Anaesthetic protocols of fish usually refer to one single agent, whereas protocols of human and veterinary medicine cover combinations of several drugs, each contributing to the effects needed in the anaesthesia. As stress prior to anaesthesia may result in abnormal reactions, pre-anaesthetic sedation is regularly used in order to reduce or avoid stress and is an integral part of the veterinary protocols of higher vertebrates. Furthermore, the anaesthetic agents that are used in order to obtain general anaesthesia are combined with analgesic agents that target nociception. The increased use of such combinations in fish is therefore included as a special section. Anaesthetic agents are widely used to avoid stress during various farming procedures. While several studies report that anaesthetics are effective in reducing the stress associated with confinement and handling, there are indications that anaesthesia may

  17. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  18. Fish embryo tests with Danio rerio as a tool to evaluate surface water and sediment quality in rivers influenced by wastewater treatment plants using different treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Thellmann, Paul; Köhler, Heinz-R; Rößler, Annette; Scheurer, Marco; Schwarz, Simon; Vogel, Hans-Joachim; Triebskorn, Rita

    2015-11-01

    In order to evaluate surface water and the sediment quality of rivers connected to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different treatment technologies, fish embryo tests (FET) with Danio rerio were conducted using native water and sediment samples collected upstream and downstream of four WWTPs in Southern Germany. Two of these WWTPs are connected to the Schussen River, a tributary of Lake Constance, and use a sand filter with final water purification by flocculation. The two others are located on the rivers Schmiecha and Eyach in the area of the Swabian Alb and were equipped with a powdered activated carbon stage 20 years ago, which was originally aimed at reducing the release of stains from the textile industry. Several endpoints of embryo toxicity including mortality, malformations, reduced hatching rate, and heart rate were investigated at defined time points of embryonic development. Higher embryotoxic potentials were found in water and sediments collected downstream of the WWTPs equipped with sand filtration than in the sample obtained downstream of both WWTPs upgraded with a powdered activated carbon stage. PMID:25391229

  19. Fish embryo tests with Danio rerio as a tool to evaluate surface water and sediment quality in rivers influenced by wastewater treatment plants using different treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Thellmann, Paul; Köhler, Heinz-R; Rößler, Annette; Scheurer, Marco; Schwarz, Simon; Vogel, Hans-Joachim; Triebskorn, Rita

    2015-11-01

    In order to evaluate surface water and the sediment quality of rivers connected to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different treatment technologies, fish embryo tests (FET) with Danio rerio were conducted using native water and sediment samples collected upstream and downstream of four WWTPs in Southern Germany. Two of these WWTPs are connected to the Schussen River, a tributary of Lake Constance, and use a sand filter with final water purification by flocculation. The two others are located on the rivers Schmiecha and Eyach in the area of the Swabian Alb and were equipped with a powdered activated carbon stage 20 years ago, which was originally aimed at reducing the release of stains from the textile industry. Several endpoints of embryo toxicity including mortality, malformations, reduced hatching rate, and heart rate were investigated at defined time points of embryonic development. Higher embryotoxic potentials were found in water and sediments collected downstream of the WWTPs equipped with sand filtration than in the sample obtained downstream of both WWTPs upgraded with a powdered activated carbon stage.

  20. Measured and modeled toxicokinetics in cultured fish cells and application to in vitro-in vivo toxicity extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Stadnicka-Michalak, Julita; Tanneberger, Katrin; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Effect concentrations in the toxicity assessment of chemicals with fish and fish cells are generally based on external exposure concentrations. External concentrations as dose metrics, may, however, hamper interpretation and extrapolation of toxicological effects because it is the internal concentration that gives rise to the biological effective dose. Thus, we need to understand the relationship between the external and internal concentrations of chemicals. The objectives of this study were to: (i) elucidate the time-course of the concentration of chemicals with a wide range of physicochemical properties in the compartments of an in vitro test system, (ii) derive a predictive model for toxicokinetics in the in vitro test system, (iii) test the hypothesis that internal effect concentrations in fish (in vivo) and fish cell lines (in vitro) correlate, and (iv) develop a quantitative in vitro to in vivo toxicity extrapolation method for fish acute toxicity. To achieve these goals, time-dependent amounts of organic chemicals were measured in medium, cells (RTgill-W1) and the plastic of exposure wells. Then, the relation between uptake, elimination rate constants, and log KOW was investigated for cells in order to develop a toxicokinetic model. This model was used to predict internal effect concentrations in cells, which were compared with internal effect concentrations in fish gills predicted by a Physiologically Based Toxicokinetic model. Our model could predict concentrations of non-volatile organic chemicals with log KOW between 0.5 and 7 in cells. The correlation of the log ratio of internal effect concentrations in fish gills and the fish gill cell line with the log KOW was significant (r>0.85, p = 0.0008, F-test). This ratio can be predicted from the log KOW of the chemical (77% of variance explained), comprising a promising model to predict lethal effects on fish based on in vitro data. PMID:24647349

  1. TVA Reservoir Monitoring Program: Fish community results, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, E.M. Jr.

    1992-07-31

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operates 9 reservoirs on the Tennessee River and 37 reservoirs on its tributaries. TVA is committed to maintaining the health of aquatic resources created when the reservoir system was built. To that end, TVA conducts the Water Resources and Biological Monitoring Program that includes physical, chemical, and biological data collection components. Biological monitoring targets the following selected elements within three zones of the reservoir (inflow, transition, and forebay): Sediment/Water-column Acute Toxicity Screening (forebay and transition zone only); Benthic macroinvertebrates Fish Reservoir fish monitoring is divided into the following activities: Fish Biomass; Fish Tissue Contamination; Fish Community Monitoring; Fish Health Assessment. This report presents the results of fall1991 fish community monitoring and fish health assessment data using a new analytical approach: Reservoir Index of Biotic Integrity (RIBI). Fish health assessment is included in this report as one of the RIBI metrics.

  2. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C.

    2006-03-01

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock

  3. Fish robotics and hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauder, George

    2010-11-01

    Studying the fluid dynamics of locomotion in freely-swimming fishes is challenging due to difficulties in controlling fish behavior. To provide better control over fish-like propulsive systems we have constructed a variety of fish-like robotic test platforms that range from highly biomimetic models of fins, to simple physical models of body movements during aquatic locomotion. First, we have constructed a series of biorobotic models of fish pectoral fins with 5 fin rays that allow detailed study of fin motion, forces, and fluid dynamics associated with fin-based locomotion. We find that by tuning fin ray stiffness and the imposed motion program we can produce thrust both on the fin outstroke and instroke. Second, we are using a robotic flapping foil system to study the self-propulsion of flexible plastic foils of varying stiffness, length, and trailing edge shape as a means of investigating the fluid dynamic effect of simple changes in the properties of undulating bodies moving through water. We find unexpected non-linear stiffness-dependent effects of changing foil length on self-propelled speed, and as well as significant effects of trailing edge shape on foil swimming speed.

  4. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant fish kill for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Etnier, E.L.; Opresko, D.M.; Talmage, S.S.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the monitoring of fish kills in upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) from July 1990 to June 1993. Since the opening of Lake Reality (LR) in 1988, total numbers of fish inhabiting upper EFPC have increased. However, species diversity has remained poor. Water quality data have been collected in upper EFPC during the time period covered in this report. Total residual chlorine (TRC) levels have exceeded federal and state water quality criteria over the years. However, with the installation of two dechlorination systems in late 1992, TRC levels have been substantially lowered in most portions of upper EFPC. By June 1993, concentrations of TRC were 0.04 to 0.06 mg/L at the north-south pipes (NSP) and below detection limits at sampling station AS-8 and were 0 to 0.01 mg/L at the inlet and outlet of LR. The daily chronic fish mortality in upper EFPC has been attributed to background stress resulting from the continuous discharge of chlorine into upper EFPC. Mean daily mortality rates for 22 acute fish kills were three fold or more above background and usually exceeded ten fish per day. Total number of dead fish collected per acute kill event ranged from 30 to over 1,000 fish; predominant species killed were central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) and striped shiners (Luxilus chrysocephalus). Spills or elevated releases of toxic chemicals, such as acids, organophosphates, aluminum nitrate, ammonia, or chlorine, were identified as possible causative agents; however, a definitive cause-effect relationship was rarely established for any acute kills. Ambient toxicity testing, in situ chemical monitoring, and streamside experiments were used to examine TRC dynamics and ambient toxicity in EFPC.

  5. Comet assay with the fish cell line rainbow trout gonad-2 for in vitro genotoxicity testing of xenobiotics and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Sebastian; Segner, Helmut

    2005-08-01

    The present study examines the potential of the comet assay using the rainbow trout gonad cell line-2 (RTG-2) as an in vitro indicator test for genotoxicity assessment of aquatic contaminants and native surface waters. Initially, the comet assay protocol was adapted to the RTG-2 cell line. An exposure period of 2 h was found to be optimal, because DNA damage decreased when exposure was prolonged. Then, the sensitivity of the comet assay with RTG-2 cells toward six genotoxic reference substances was evaluated. The lowest-observed-effect concentration values for the directly acting genotoxins, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, were in the low nanomolar range. The RTG-2 test system clearly was less sensitive for the indirectly acting genotoxins benzo[a]pyrene, nitrofurantoin, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and dimethylnitrosamine, despite the presence of xenobiotic metabolic capacities in RTG-2 cells. The two effect endpoints used, tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM), did not differ with respect to sensitivity, but the linearity of the concentration-response curve was better with TM than with TL. The overall reproducibility of the assay results was good. Finally, the applicability of the comet assay with RTG-2 cells for genotoxicity screening of native surface water samples was studied. The assay tolerated the use of nonsterile water samples and was able to detect genotoxic potentials in native water samples; that is, extraction and concentration of the samples were not needed. The results of the present study indicate the suitability of the comet assay with the fish cell line, RTG-2, as in vitro screen for detecting genotoxic potencies of xenobiotics and environmental samples.

  6. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm.

  7. Exposure to Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Genistein during Activation Does Not Affect Sperm Motility in the Fighting Fish Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Clotfelter, Ethan D.; Gendelman, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μM) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μM) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  8. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  9. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid to fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA; also called peroxyacetic acid) is a stabilized mixture of acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and water that does not leave dangerous residues in the environment when it breaks down as most compounds do. PAA is a promising disinfectant in the US aquaculture industry to control paras...

  10. Acute toxicity and accumulation of zinc in the crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Zinc produces acute toxicity to freshwater organisms over a range of concentrations from 90 to 58, 100..mu..g Zn/L; with the range of acute median effect concentrations being similar for freshwater fish and invertebrates. The capacity to regulate internal zinc concentrations in decapod crustaceans has been described. Studies with the crayfish Austropotambius pallipes suggested a relatively high degree of tolerance to zinc by this animal. The present study is designed to describe the toxicity of zinc to the crayfish Orconectes virilis over a 2-wk exposure period. In addition, whole animal and tissue analyses were performed on the test organisms and compared to previous results.

  11. Effects of pollution on freshwater fish

    SciTech Connect

    Spehar, R.L.; Christensen, G.M.; Curtis, C.; Lemke, A.E.; Norberg, T.J.; Pickering, Q.H.

    1982-06-01

    An extensive review of the literature with 353 references dealing with the toxicity of inorganic and organic pollutants, and industrial and municipal effluents on fish is presented. Indices of water quality such as dissolved gases and pH were discussed. A very detailed summary with over 200 entries of the acute and chronic toxicity of inorganic and organic pollutants to freshwater fish is presented as a table.(KRM)

  12. Parental effects improve escape performance of juvenile reef fish in a high-CO2 world

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Bridie J. M.; Miller, Gabrielle M.; McCormick, Mark I.; Domenici, Paolo; Munday, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    Rising CO2 levels in the oceans are predicted to have serious consequences for many marine taxa. Recent studies suggest that non-genetic parental effects may reduce the impact of high CO2 on the growth, survival and routine metabolic rate of marine fishes, but whether the parental environment mitigates behavioural and sensory impairment associated with high CO2 remains unknown. Here, we tested the acute effects of elevated CO2 on the escape responses of juvenile fish and whether such effects were altered by exposure of parents to increased CO2 (transgenerational acclimation). Elevated CO2 negatively affected the reactivity and locomotor performance of juvenile fish, but parental exposure to high CO2 reduced the effects in some traits, indicating the potential for acclimation of behavioural impairment across generations. However, acclimation was not complete in some traits, and absent in others, suggesting that transgenerational acclimation does not completely compensate the effects of high CO2 on escape responses. PMID:24403326

  13. Parental effects improve escape performance of juvenile reef fish in a high-CO2 world.

    PubMed

    Allan, Bridie J M; Miller, Gabrielle M; McCormick, Mark I; Domenici, Paolo; Munday, Philip L

    2014-02-22

    Rising CO2 levels in the oceans are predicted to have serious consequences for many marine taxa. Recent studies suggest that non-genetic parental effects may reduce the impact of high CO2 on the growth, survival and routine metabolic rate of marine fishes, but whether the parental environment mitigates behavioural and sensory impairment associated with high CO2 remains unknown. Here, we tested the acute effects of elevated CO2 on the escape responses of juvenile fish and whether such effects were altered by exposure of parents to increased CO2 (transgenerational acclimation). Elevated CO2 negatively affected the reactivity and locomotor performance of juvenile fish, but parental exposure to high CO2 reduced the effects in some traits, indicating the potential for acclimation of behavioural impairment across generations. However, acclimation was not complete in some traits, and absent in others, suggesting that transgenerational acclimation does not completely compensate the effects of high CO2 on escape responses.

  14. Commercial Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is a curriculum framework for a program in commercial fishing to be taught in Florida secondary and postsecondary institutions. This outline covers the major concepts/content of the program, which is designed to prepare students for employment in occupations with titles such as net fishers, pot fishers, line fishers, shrimp boat…

  15. Gone Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson-Demme, Hillary; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity in which students create a model of an ocean ecosystem to gain an understanding of how humans can alter biodiversity through their actions. Uses differing levels of fishing technology to explore the concepts of sustainability and overfishing. (Author/SOE)

  16. 76 FR 1067 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Second Group of Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... physical/chemical properties and biodegradation); ecotoxicity (in fish, Daphnia, and algae); acute toxicity... toxicity (gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations). Ecotoxicity (studies in fish, Daphnia, and algae..., Daphnia, and algae); acute toxicity; genetic toxicity (gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations);...

  17. Habitat dynamics, marine reserve status, and the decline and recovery of coral reef fish communities

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, David H; Ceccarelli, Daniela M; Evans, Richard D; Jones, Geoffrey P; Russ, Garry R

    2014-01-01

    Severe climatic disturbance events often have major impacts on coral reef communities, generating cycles of decline and recovery, and in some extreme cases, community-level phase shifts from coral-to algal-dominated states. Benthic habitat changes directly affect reef fish communities, with low coral cover usually associated with low fish diversity and abundance. No-take marine reserves (NTRs) are widely advocated for conserving biodiversity and enhancing the sustainability of exploited fish populations. Numerous studies have documented positive ecological and socio-economic benefits of NTRs; however, the ability of NTRs to ameliorate the effects of acute disturbances on coral reefs has seldom been investigated. Here, we test these factors by tracking the dynamics of benthic and fish communities, including the important fishery species, coral trout (Plectropomus spp.), over 8 years in both NTRs and fished areas in the Keppel Island group, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Two major disturbances impacted the reefs during the monitoring period, a coral bleaching event in 2006 and a freshwater flood plume in 2011. Both disturbances generated significant declines in coral cover and habitat complexity, with subsequent declines in fish abundance and diversity, and pronounced shifts in fish assemblage structure. Coral trout density also declined in response to the loss of live coral, however, the approximately 2:1 density ratio between NTRs and fished zones was maintained over time. The only post-disturbance refuges for coral trout spawning stocks were within the NTRs that escaped the worst effects of the disturbances. Although NTRs had little discernible effect on the temporal dynamics of benthic or fish communities, it was evident that the post-disturbance refuges for coral trout spawning stocks within some NTRs may be critically important to regional-scale population persistence and recovery. PMID:24634720

  18. Habitat dynamics, marine reserve status, and the decline and recovery of coral reef fish communities.

    PubMed

    Williamson, David H; Ceccarelli, Daniela M; Evans, Richard D; Jones, Geoffrey P; Russ, Garry R

    2014-02-01

    Severe climatic disturbance events often have major impacts on coral reef communities, generating cycles of decline and recovery, and in some extreme cases, community-level phase shifts from coral-to algal-dominated states. Benthic habitat changes directly affect reef fish communities, with low coral cover usually associated with low fish diversity and abundance. No-take marine reserves (NTRs) are widely advocated for conserving biodiversity and enhancing the sustainability of exploited fish populations. Numerous studies have documented positive ecological and socio-economic benefits of NTRs; however, the ability of NTRs to ameliorate the effects of acute disturbances on coral reefs has seldom been investigated. Here, we test these factors by tracking the dynamics of benthic and fish communities, including the important fishery species, coral trout (Plectropomus spp.), over 8 years in both NTRs and fished areas in the Keppel Island group, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Two major disturbances impacted the reefs during the monitoring period, a coral bleaching event in 2006 and a freshwater flood plume in 2011. Both disturbances generated significant declines in coral cover and habitat complexity, with subsequent declines in fish abundance and diversity, and pronounced shifts in fish assemblage structure. Coral trout density also declined in response to the loss of live coral, however, the approximately 2:1 density ratio between NTRs and fished zones was maintained over time. The only post-disturbance refuges for coral trout spawning stocks were within the NTRs that escaped the worst effects of the disturbances. Although NTRs had little discernible effect on the temporal dynamics of benthic or fish communities, it was evident that the post-disturbance refuges for coral trout spawning stocks within some NTRs may be critically important to regional-scale population persistence and recovery.

  19. Habitat dynamics, marine reserve status, and the decline and recovery of coral reef fish communities.

    PubMed

    Williamson, David H; Ceccarelli, Daniela M; Evans, Richard D; Jones, Geoffrey P; Russ, Garry R

    2014-02-01

    Severe climatic disturbance events often have major impacts on coral reef communities, generating cycles of decline and recovery, and in some extreme cases, community-level phase shifts from coral-to algal-dominated states. Benthic habitat changes directly affect reef fish communities, with low coral cover usually associated with low fish diversity and abundance. No-take marine reserves (NTRs) are widely advocated for conserving biodiversity and enhancing the sustainability of exploited fish populations. Numerous studies have documented positive ecological and socio-economic benefits of NTRs; however, the ability of NTRs to ameliorate the effects of acute disturbances on coral reefs has seldom been investigated. Here, we test these factors by tracking the dynamics of benthic and fish communities, including the important fishery species, coral trout (Plectropomus spp.), over 8 years in both NTRs and fished areas in the Keppel Island group, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Two major disturbances impacted the reefs during the monitoring period, a coral bleaching event in 2006 and a freshwater flood plume in 2011. Both disturbances generated significant declines in coral cover and habitat complexity, with subsequent declines in fish abundance and diversity, and pronounced shifts in fish assemblage structure. Coral trout density also declined in response to the loss of live coral, however, the approximately 2:1 density ratio between NTRs and fished zones was maintained over time. The only post-disturbance refuges for coral trout spawning stocks were within the NTRs that escaped the worst effects of the disturbances. Although NTRs had little discernible effect on the temporal dynamics of benthic or fish communities, it was evident that the post-disturbance refuges for coral trout spawning stocks within some NTRs may be critically important to regional-scale population persistence and recovery. PMID:24634720

  20. Quantitative analysis of rat activity in the home cage by infrared monitoring. Application to the acute toxicity testing of acetanilide and phenylmercuric acetate.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, P; Sigg, H; Zbinden, G

    1989-01-01

    A new method for continuous in-cage monitoring of the activity of rats using passive sensors to detect the animals' infrared emissions, and its usefulness for toxicological screening tests is described. In order to obtain baseline values for toxicological tests, the differences between day and night activity, adaptation to changing day/night rhythm, the effects of handling the animals (measurement of body weight, food and water consumption) and the effect on activity patterns of the female estrus cycle were investigated. In two separate experiments, single doses of acetanilide and phenylmercuric acetate were administered. Passive infrared monitoring of motor activity proved to be a sensitive and discriminating method suitable for quantitative and qualitative assessment of acute toxic effects.