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Sample records for acute fluoxetine treatment

  1. Acute Fluoxetine Treatment Induces Slow Rolling of Leukocytes on Endothelium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Nadine; Mauler, Maximilian; Witsch, Thilo; Stallmann, Daniela; Schmitt, Stefanie; Mezger, Julius; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Activated platelets release serotonin at sites of inflammation where it acts as inflammatory mediator and enhances recruitment of neutrophils. Chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) depletes the serotonin storage pool in platelets, leading to reduced leukocyte recruitment in murine experiments. Here, we examined the direct and acute effects of SSRI on leukocyte recruitment in murine peritonitis. Methods C57Bl/6 and Tph1−/− (Tryptophan hydroxylase1) mice underwent acute treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine or vehicle. Serotonin concentrations were measured by ELISA. Leukocyte rolling and adhesion on endothelium was analyzed by intravital microscopy in mesentery venules with and without lipopolysaccharide challenge. Leukocyte extravasation in sterile peritonitis was measured by flow cytometry of abdominal lavage fluid. Results Plasma serotonin levels were elevated 2 hours after fluoxetine treatment (0.70±0.1 µg/ml versus 0.27±0.1, p = 0.03, n = 14), while serum serotonin did not change. Without further stimulation, acute fluoxetine treatment increased the number of rolling leukocytes (63±8 versus 165±17/0.04 mm2min−1) and decreased their velocity (61±6 versus 28±1 µm/s, both p<0.0001, n = 10). In Tph1−/− mice leukocyte rolling was not significantly influenced by acute fluoxetine treatment. Stimulation with lipopolysaccharide decreased rolling velocity and induced leukocyte adhesion, which was enhanced after fluoxetine pretreatment (27±3 versus 36±2/0.04 mm2, p = 0.008, n = 10). Leukocyte extravasation in sterile peritonitis, however, was not affected by acute fluoxetine treatment. Conclusions Acute fluoxetine treatment increased plasma serotonin concentrations and promoted leukocyte-endothelial interactions in-vivo, suggesting that serotonin is a promoter of acute inflammation. E-selectin was upregulated on endothelial cells in the presence of serotonin, possibly explaining the observed

  2. Effects of acute or repeated paroxetine and fluoxetine treatment on affective behavior in male and female adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Amodeo, Leslie R.; Greenfield, Venuz Y.; Humphrey, Danielle E.; Varela, Veronica; Pipkin, Joseph A.; Eaton, Shannon E.; Johnson, Jelesa D.; Plant, Christopher P.; Harmony, Zachary R.; Wang, Li; Crawford, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine is one of the few drugs that is effective at treating depression in adolescent humans. In contrast, the SSRI paroxetine has limited efficacy and is more at risk for inducing suicidal behavior. Objective The purpose of the present study was to more fully characterize the differential actions of paroxetine and fluoxetine. Methods In Experiment 1, male and female rats were injected with paroxetine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), or vehicle for 10 days starting on postnatal day (PD) 35, and affective behaviors were assessed using sucrose preference and elevated plus maze tasks. A separate set of rats were used to examine monoamine levels. In Experiment 2, rats were injected with paroxetine (2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg), or vehicle during the same time frame as Experiment 1 and anxiety-like behaviors were measured using elevated plus maze, light/dark box, and acoustic startle. Results Repeated SSRI treatment failed to alter sucrose preference, although both paroxetine and fluoxetine reduced time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze and light compartment of the light/dark box. Paroxetine, but not fluoxetine, enhanced acoustic startle and interfered with habituation. Serotonin turnover was decreased by both acute and repeated fluoxetine treatment but unaltered by paroxetine administration. Discussion These results show that repeated treatment with paroxetine and fluoxetine has dissociable actions in adolescent rats. In particular, paroxetine, but not fluoxetine, increases acoustic startle at low doses and may increase sensitivity to environmental stressors. PMID:26141193

  3. Effects of acute and subchronic treatments with fluoxetine and desipramine on the memory of fear in moderate and high-intensity contextual conditioning.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julia M; Martinez, Raquel C R; Brandão, Marcus L

    2006-08-07

    Selective serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine and desipramine, respectively, are efficacious in the treatment of depression and chronic stress. Although they inhibit the reuptake of the biogenic monoamines soon after administration, therapeutic improvements occur only after 2 or 3 weeks. Freezing response and potentiated startle are common responses to moderate fear contextual conditioning. However, freezing but not startle is increased in rats that undergo intense fear conditioning. In this study, we evaluated the effects of acute and subchronic administration of fluoxetine and desipramine on these responses in testing sessions, as indices of fear in moderate and high fear conditioning. Fluoxetine did not show any significant effect on the moderate fear conditioning but reduced freezing and restored the startle response in rats under intense fear conditioning. In comparison, desipramine had no effect on the startle response when administered acutely or subchronically while freezing of the intense fear conditioning was reduced. Our findings indicate that intense contextual fear conditioning is sensitive to subchronic treatment with fluoxetine and resistant to desipramine. Fluoxetine appears to restore the serotoninergic function in brain areas recruited by intense contextual fear conditioning. These effects of fluoxetine may underlie its reported efficacy in the pharmacotherapy of panic disorders.

  4. Contrasting effects of acute and chronic treatment with imipramine and fluoxetine on inhibitory avoidance and escape responses in mice exposed to the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Karina Santos; de Carvalho-Netto, Eduardo Ferreira; Monte, Kátia Cristina Da Silva; Acco, Bruno; Nogueira, Paulo José de Campos; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2009-03-30

    The elevated T-maze (ETM) is an animal model of anxiety-like behavior that assesses two different defensive behavioral tasks in the same animal-acquisition of inhibitory avoidance and latency to escape from an open and elevated arm. In rats, cute and chronic treatments with anxiolytic-like drugs impair avoidance acquisition while only chronic administration of panicolytic-like drugs impairs open arm withdrawal. To date, only the acute effects of anxiolytic/anxiogenic or panicolytic/panicogenic drugs have been tested in the mouse ETM and the results have partially corroborated those found in the rat ETM. This study investigated the effects of acute (a single intraperitoneal injection 30 min before testing) and chronic (daily i.p. injections for 15 consecutive days) treatment with imipramine or fluoxetine, non-selective and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, respectively, on inhibitory avoidance and escape tasks in the mouse ETM. Neither acute nor chronic treatment with imipramine (0, 1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly changed the behavioral profile of mice in the two ETM tasks. Interestingly, while acute fluoxetine (0, 5, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg, i.p.) facilitated inhibitory avoidance and impaired escape latency, chronic treatment (0, 5, 20 or 40 mg/kg, i.p.) with this selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) produced an opposite effect, i.e., it impaired inhibitory avoidance acquisition and facilitated open arm withdrawal. Importantly, acute or chronic treatment with imipramine (except at the highest dose that increased locomotion when given acutely) or fluoxetine failed to alter general locomotor activity in mice as assessed in an ETM in which all arms were enclosed by lateral walls (eETM). These results suggest that inhibitory avoidance acquisition is a useful task for the evaluation of acute and chronic effects of SSRI treatment on anxiety in mice. However, as open arm latency was actually increased and reduced by acute and chronic fluoxetine

  5. Behavioral characterization of the alarm reaction and anxiolytic-like effect of acute treatment with fluoxetine in piauçu fish.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Júnior, Augusto; Alves, Fabiana Luca; Pereira, Aparecida de Sousa Fim; Ide, Liliam Midori; Hoffmann, Anette

    2012-02-01

    In Ostariophysan fish, the detection of the alarm substance liberated into the water as a consequence of an attack by a predator elicits an alarm reaction or anti-predatory behavior. In this study, experiments were performed to: (i) describe and quantitatively characterize the behavioral and ventilatory responses in piauçu fish (Leporinus macrocephalus), individually and as part of a school, to conspecific alarm substance (CAS) and; (ii) test the effect of acute fluoxetine treatment on alarm reaction. Histological analysis revealed the presence of club cells in the intermediate and superficial layers of the epidermis. The predominant behavioral response to CAS was freezing for fish held individually, characterized by the cessation of the swimming activity as the animal settles to a bottom corner of the aquarium. Fish exposed to CAS showed decrease in the mean ventilatory frequency (approximately 13%) relative to control. In schools, CAS elicited a biphasic response that was characterized by erratic movements followed by increased school cohesion and immobility, reflected as an increased school cohesion (65.5% vs. -5.8% for controls) and in the number of animals near the bottom of the aquarium (42.0% vs. 6.5% for controls). Animals treated with single i.p. injections of fluoxetine (10 μg/g b.w.) did not exhibit alarm behavior following CAS stimulation. These results show that an alarm pheromone system is present in piauçu fish, evidenced by the presence of epidermal club cells and an alarm reaction induced by CAS and consequently of a chemosensory system to transmit the appropriate information to neural structures responsible for initiating anti-predator behavioral responses. In addition, fluoxetine treatment caused an anxiolytic-like effect following CAS exposure. Thus, the alarm reaction in piauçu can be a useful model for neuroethological and pharmacological studies of anxiety-related states.

  6. Sprague-Dawley and Fischer female rats differ in acute effects of fluoxetine on sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Miryala, Chandra Suma J; Hiegel, Cindy; Uphouse, Lynda

    2013-02-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine, leads to sexual dysfunction in a substantial proportion of women. In studies with the Fischer inbred rat, the 5-HT(1A) receptor has been implicated in this sexual dysfunction. Whether this association with 5-HT(1A) receptors holds for other rat strains is not known. The effects of acute fluoxetine on sexual behavior in two strains of rats that differ in their response to a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist were examined. Whether the strain difference is comparable in naturally cycling and hormonally primed, ovariectomized rats was determined. Proestrous rats and ovariectomized rats, hormonally primed with estradiol benzoate and progesterone, were treated with varying doses of fluoxetine. Sexual behavior was examined before and after treatment with the SSRI. Lordosis to mount ratios, lordosis quality, and proceptive behaviors were quantified. Sprague-Dawley and Fischer females were compared on each of these measures. The IC(50) for inhibition of lordosis behavior was determined. In both the intact and the hormonally primed, ovariectomized model, Sprague-Dawley females were less sensitive to the effects of fluoxetine on sexual behavior. In both groups, fluoxetine showed dose dependency in behavioral inhibition, but a higher dose was required for Sprague-Dawley than for Fischer females. Naturally cycling, proestrous rats required a higher dose of fluoxetine than hormonally primed ovariectomized rats to produce significant inhibition of sexual behavior. Thus, the strain difference in the response to fluoxetine does not parallel strain differences in the response to a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist. Acute treatment with fluoxetine inhibits lordosis behavior in both Fischer and Sprague-Dawley females and the strain difference cannot be explained by reported strain differences in the response to a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist. Fluoxetine's inhibition of female rat sexual behavior may involve effects of the SSRI in addition to

  7. Fluoxetine and diazepam acutely modulate stress induced-behavior.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Luidia V; Siebel, Anna M; Zimerman, Fernanda F; Rambo, Cassiano L; Mocelin, Ricieri; Bonan, Carla D; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Drug residue contamination in aquatic ecosystems has been studied extensively, but the behavioral effects exerted by the presence of these drugs are not well known. Here, we investigated the effects of acute stress on anxiety, memory, social interaction, and aggressiveness in zebrafish exposed to fluoxetine and diazepam at concentrations that disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Stress increased the locomotor activity and time spent in the bottom area of the tank (novel tank). Fluoxetine and diazepam prevented these behaviors. We also observed that stress and fluoxetine and diazepam exposures decreased social interaction. Stress also increased aggressive behavior, which was not reversed by fluoxetine or diazepam. These data suggest that the presence of these drugs in aquatic ecosystems causes significant behavioral alterations in fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluoxetine

    MedlinePlus

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (bothersome thoughts that won't go away and the need to perform certain actions over and over), some eating disorders, and panic attacks ( ...

  9. Three cases of paraphilias responsive to fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Perilstein, R D; Lipper, S; Friedman, L J

    1991-04-01

    Three cases are presented in which fluoxetine was employed in the apparently successful treatment of paraphilia, a disorder which has been difficult to treat pharmacologically. Therapeutic benefit may have been related to the efficacy of fluoxetine in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorders or to direct effects on sexual activity, or both.

  10. Subchronic treatment with fluoxetine attenuates the proerectile effect of Aspidosperma ulei Markgr (Apocyanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Adriana Rolim; de Andrade Uchôa, Daniel Esdras; Rocha, Edilberto Silveira; Martins da Costa, José Galberto; Rao, Vietla Satyanarayana

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of acute or chronic treatment with fluoxetine to alter the proerectile effect of Aspidosperma ulei alkaloid-rich fraction (F3-5). Materials and Methods: In the first series of experiments, three groups of mice received either a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle, F3-5 (25 mg/kg) or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) + F3-5. Three behavioral responses were counted over a period of 30 min: erection, erection-like response and genital grooming. In a second series of experiments, animals treated for 13 days with fluoxetine or fluoxetine + F3-5 were assessed. Results: A. ulei has been suggested to have proerectile effect in mice. Subchronic (13-d) treatment with fluoxetine resulted in a reduction in the number erections in F3-5-treated mice. Conclusion: Sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant treatment continues to be a major compliance issue for antidepressant therapy. Acute administration of fluoxetine resulted in a near total reversal of the proerectile effect of F3-5. PMID:22144779

  11. Predictors of an acute antidepressant response to fluoxetine and sertraline.

    PubMed

    Flament, M F; Lane, R M; Zhu, R; Ying, Z

    1999-09-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine have different pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic profiles which may be of clinical relevance in the determination of response in different subtypes of depression. A randomized, double-blind, 6-week study comparing sertraline (50-100 mg/day) with fluoxetine (20-40 mg/day) in 286 outpatients with major depression, who had demonstrated comparable efficacy and tolerability for the two drugs, was analysed by subgroups of patients at baseline with melancholia, severe depression, single depressive episode, multiple depressive episodes, high anxiety, low anxiety, psychomotor retardation and psychomotor agitation. Multiple logistic regression with regressors including treatment-by-subgroup variables revealed that, within certain subgroups, the efficacy might differ substantially from that of the whole treatment group. However, the only treatment-by-subgroup interaction term that was significant was anxiety (P < 0.05). There was no evidence of interaction in single or recurrent episode subgroups, and these were not included in subsequent analyses. Subsequent two-sample statistical comparison tests of response (i.e. Hamilton Depression Scale reduction > or = 50%) rates at study endpoint between treatment groups demonstrated that patients with melancholic depression and those with symptoms of psychomotor agitation yielded a significantly greater proportion of responders with sertraline compared to fluoxetine (P < 0.05). Response rates in sertraline- and fluoxetine-treated patients, respectively, were: overall study 59%, 51%; melancholia 59%, 44%; severe depression 59%, 41%; low anxiety 71%, 55%; high anxiety 47%, 48%; psychomotor retardation, 48%, 46%; and psychomotor agitation 62%, 39%. Multiple logistic regression adjusting for possible confounding factors, that included a treatment by anxiety interaction term, also led to similar findings. In particular, the analysis showed that significant differences existed in favour of sertraline in patients

  12. Comparative efficacy and safety of nortriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of major depression: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Fabre, L F; Scharf, M B; Itil, T M

    1991-06-01

    The safety and efficacy of nortriptyline and fluoxetine were compared in a double-blind, randomized, multicenter 5-week trial involving 205 outpatients with acute major depression of moderate severity. Seventy-two nortriptyline and 84 fluoxetine patients completed at least 2 weeks of medication and were included in the efficacy analysis; all patients were evaluated for side effects. Average total scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) for both treatment groups declined from 22-23 at baseline to 11.5 at the conclusion of the 5-week period. At Week, 5, 71% of nortriptyline patients and 65% of fluoxetine patients were much or very much improved. Fluoxetine was associated more frequently with nausea (p less than .05), while nortriptyline was associated more frequently with dry mouth (p less than .05). These results are discussed in the context of selecting between nortriptyline and fluoxetine for a particular depressed patient.

  13. Fluoxetine treatment ameliorates depression induced by perinatal arsenic exposure via a neurogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christina R; Solomon, Benjamin R; Ulibarri, Adam L; Allan, Andrea M

    2014-09-01

    Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between arsenic exposure and increased rates of psychiatric disorders, including depression, in exposed populations. We have previously demonstrated that developmental exposure to low amounts of arsenic induces depression in adulthood along with several morphological and molecular aberrations, particularly associated with the hippocampus and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The extent and potential reversibility of this toxin-induced damage has not been characterized to date. In this study, we assessed the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, on adult animals exposed to arsenic during development. Perinatal arsenic exposure (PAE) induced depressive-like symptoms in a mild learned helplessness task and in the forced swim task after acute exposure to a predator odor (2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline, TMT). Chronic fluoxetine treatment prevented these behaviors in both tasks in arsenic-exposed animals and ameliorated arsenic-induced blunted stress responses, as measured by corticosterone (CORT) levels before and after TMT exposure. Morphologically, chronic fluoxetine treatment reversed deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) after PAE, specifically differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells. Protein expression of BDNF, CREB, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and HDAC2 was significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of arsenic animals after fluoxetine treatment. This study demonstrates that damage induced by perinatal arsenic exposure is reversible with chronic fluoxetine treatment resulting in restored resiliency to depression via a neurogenic mechanism.

  14. Fluoxetine treatment ameliorates depression induced by perinatal arsenic exposure via a neurogenic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Christina R.; Solomon, Benjamin R.; Ulibarri, Adam L.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between arsenic exposure and increased rates of psychiatric disorders, including depression, in exposed populations. We have previously demonstrated that developmental exposure to low amounts of arsenic induces depression in adulthood along with several morphological and molecular aberrations, particularly associated with the hippocampus and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. The extent and potential reversibility of this toxin-induced damage has not been characterized to date. In this study, we assessed the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, on adult animals exposed to arsenic during development. Perinatal arsenic exposure (PAE) induced depressive-like symptoms in a mild learned helplessness task and in the forced swim task after acute exposure to a predator odor (2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline, TMT). Chronic fluoxetine treatment prevented these behaviors in both tasks in arsenic-exposed animals and ameliorated arsenic-induced blunted stress responses, as measured by corticosterone (CORT) levels before and after TMT exposure. Morphologically, chronic fluoxetine treatment reversed deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) after PAE, specifically differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells. Protein expression of BDNF, CREB, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and HDAC2 was significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of arsenic animals after fluoxetine treatment. This study demonstrates that damage induced by perinatal arsenic exposure is reversible with chronic fluoxetine treatment resulting in restored resiliency to depression via a neurogenic mechanism. PMID:24952232

  15. Early Prediction of Acute Antidepressant Treatment Response and Remission in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Rongrong; Emslie, Graham; Mayes, Taryn; Nakonezny, Paul; Kennard, Betsy; Hughes, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    The rate of symptom improvement during the early weeks of acute fluoxetine treatment is a good indicator of remission. This finding was made after evaluating the outcome of the fluoxetine treatment on 168 children and adults with depression.

  16. Chronic fluoxetine treatment increases NO bioavailability and calcium-sensitive potassium channels activation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Camila A; Ferreira, Nathanne S; Mestriner, Fabiola L; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Evora, Paulo R B; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Carneiro, Fernando S; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-10-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), has effects beyond its antidepressant properties, altering, e.g., mechanisms involved in blood pressure and vasomotor tone control. Although many studies have addressed the acute impact of fluoxetine on the cardiovascular system, there is a paucity of information on the chronic vascular effects of this SSRI. We tested the hypothesis that chronic fluoxetine treatment enhances the vascular reactivity to vasodilator stimuli by increasing nitric oxide (NO) signaling and activation of potassium (K+) channels. Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (I) vehicle (water for 21 days) or (II) chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day in the drinking water for 21 days). Fluoxetine treatment increased endothelium-dependent and independent vasorelaxation (analyzed by mesenteric resistance arteries reactivity) as well as constitutive NO synthase (NOS) activity, phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine1177 and NO production, determined by western blot and fluorescence. On the other hand, fluoxetine treatment did not alter vascular expression of neuronal and inducible NOS or guanylyl cyclase (GC). Arteries from fluoxetine-treated rats exhibited increased relaxation to pinacidil. Increased acetylcholine vasorelaxation was abolished by a calcium-activated K+ channel (KCa) blocker, but not by an inhibitor of KATP channels. On the other hand, vascular responses to Bay 41-2272 and 8-bromo-cGMP were similar between the groups. In conclusion, chronic fluoxetine treatment increases endothelium-dependent and independent relaxation of mesenteric resistance arteries by mechanisms that involve increased eNOS activity, NO generation, and KCa channels activation. These effects may contribute to the cardiovascular effects associated with chronic fluoxetine treatment.

  17. Sex differences and estrous cycle in female rats interact with the effects of fluoxetine treatment on fear extinction

    PubMed Central

    Lebrón-Milad, K.; Tsareva, A.; Ahmed, N.; Milad, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    A common treatment for anxiety disorders is chronic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine. Recent data suggest that SSRIs modulate fear responses after conditioned fear extinction and that gonadal hormones influence fear extinction. In this study we investigated the influence of sex and the estrous cycle on the effects of acute (experiment 1) and chronic (experiment 2) fluoxetine treatment on fear extinction. In experiment 1, rats received tone-footshock pairings during day 1. On day 2, rats received either fluoxetine (10mg/kg in 0.5mL) or vehicle prior to extinction learning. On day 3, extinction memory was assessed during extinction recall. In experiment 2, rats were exposed to a similar behavioral protocol, except that fluoxetine and vehicle were administered for 14 consecutives days after conditioning (days 2–15). Extinction learning and extinction recall occurred on days 15 and 16, respectively. Acute administration of fluoxetine increased fear responses equally in males and females during extinction learning and extinction recall. Chronic administration of fluoxetine reduced fear responses during extinction learning and extinction recall in female but not in male rats and this effect seems to be modulated by the estrous cycle. The SSRI-induced reduction of freezing during extinction learning and recall suggest a general anxiolytic effect of the drug treatment rather than a specific effect on extinction learning per se. Our data show evidence of sex-specific anxiolytic effects of 14-day treatment of fluoxetine while the acute anxiogenic effect of SSRI seems independent of sex effects. PMID:23886596

  18. Acute Exposure to Fluoxetine Alters Aggressive Behavior of Zebrafish and Expression of Genes Involved in Serotonergic System Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Theodoridi, Antonia; Tsalafouta, Aleka; Pavlidis, Michail

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is an emerging model organism in stress and neurobehavioral studies. In nature, the species forms shoals, yet when kept in pairs it exhibits an agonistic and anxiety-like behavior that leads to the establishment of dominant-subordinate relationships. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is used as an anxiolytic tool to alter aggressive behavior in several vertebrates and as an antidepressant drug in humans. Pairs of male zebrafish were held overnight to develop dominant—subordinate behavior, either treated or non-treated for 2 h with fluoxetine (5 mg L−1), and allowed to interact once more for 1 h. Behavior was recorded both prior and after fluoxetine administration. At the end of the experiment, trunk and brain samples were also taken for cortisol determination and mRNA expression studies, respectively. Fluoxetine treatment significantly affected zebrafish behavior and the expression levels of several genes, by decreasing offensive aggression in dominants and by eliminating freezing in the subordinates. There was no statistically significant difference in whole-trunk cortisol concentrations between dominant and subordinate fish, while fluoxetine treatment resulted in higher (P = 0.004) cortisol concentrations in both groups. There were statistically significant differences between dominant and subordinate fish in brain mRNA expression levels of genes involved in stress axis (gr, mr), neural activity (bdnf, c-fos), and the serotonergic system (htr2b, slc6a4b). The significant decrease in the offensive and defensive aggression following fluoxetine treatment was concomitant with a reversed pattern in c-fos expression levels. Overall, an acute administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor alters aggressive behavior in male zebrafish in association with changes in the neuroendocrine mediators of coping styles. PMID:28487628

  19. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

    2015-01-01

    This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet. PMID:25830872

  20. Single fluoxetine treatment before but not after stress prevents stress-induced hippocampal long-term depression and spatial memory retrieval impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Huili; Dai, Chunfang; Dong, Zhifang

    2015-07-28

    A growing body of evidence has shown that chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a widely prescribed medication for treatment of depression, can affect synaptic plasticity in the adult central nervous system. However, it is not well understood whether acute fluoxetine influences synaptic plasticity, especially on hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD), and if so, whether it subsequently impacts hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Here, we reported that LTD facilitated by elevated-platform stress in hippocampal slices was completely prevented by fluoxetine administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before stress. The LTD was not, however, significantly inhibited by fluoxetine administration immediately after stress. Similarly, fluoxetine incubation (10 μM) during electrophysiological recordings also displayed no influence on the stress-facilitated LTD. In addition, behavioral results showed that a single fluoxetine treatment 30 min before but not after acute stress fully reversed the impairment of spatial memory retrieval in the Morris water maze paradigm. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fluoxetine treatment only before, but not after stress, can prevent hippocampal CA1 LTD and spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by behavioral stress in adult animals.

  1. Sex-specific antidepressant effects of dietary creatine with and without sub-acute fluoxetine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patricia J.; D'Anci, Kristen E.; Kanarek, Robin B.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2013-01-01

    The potential role of metabolic impairments in the pathophysiology of depression is motivating researchers to evaluate the treatment efficacy of creatine, a naturally occurring energetic and neuroprotective compound found in brain and muscle tissues. Growing evidence is demonstrating the benefit of oral creatine supplements for reducing depressive symptoms in humans and animals. A novel question is whether dietary creatine, when combined with antidepressant drug therapy, would be more effective than either compound alone. To answer this question, four studies were conducted to investigate the behavioral effects of combined creatine and low-dose fluoxetine treatment using the forced swim test in male and female rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed powdered rodent chow supplemented with 0%, 2% or 4% w/w creatine monohydrate for 5 weeks. Rats were injected with fluoxetine (5.0 or 10.0 mg/kg) or saline according to a sub-acute dosing schedule. Female rats maintained on a 4% creatine diet displayed antidepressant-like effects compared to non-supplemented females prior to fluoxetine treatment. In contrast, creatine did not alter behavior reliably in males. Following drug treatment and a second forced swim trial, the antidepressant-like profile of creatine remained significant only in females co-administered 5.0 mg/kg fluoxetine. Moreover, in females only, supplementation with 4% creatine produced a more robust antidepressant-like behavioral profile compared to either dose of fluoxetine alone. Estrous cycle data indicated that ovarian hormones influenced the antidepressant-like effects of creatine. Addressing the issue of sex differences in response to treatment may affect our understanding of creatine, its relationship with depressive behavior, and may lead to sex-specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:22429992

  2. Use of fluoxetine for the treatment of stereotypical pacing behavior in a captive polar bear.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, E M; Honeyman, V; Valentine, P A; Teskey, G C

    1996-10-15

    Stereotypical behaviors are common in captive animals, particularly captive polar bears. Effects of oral administration of fluoxetine on chronic stereotypical and typical behaviors in a captive polar bear were monitored. Fluoxetine treatment terminated stereotypic pacing behavior, facial tic, and huffing/coughing activity. The expression of typical polar bear behaviors was not affected by fluoxetine treatment, although the proportion of time spent engaged in typical behaviors changed during the course of the observation period. Response of the bear to fluoxetine treatment indicated that pharmacologic manipulation of the serotonergic system can safely eliminate stereotypical behaviors in captive polar bears.

  3. Anxiety-like effects induced by acute fluoxetine, sertraline or m-CPP treatment are reversed by pretreatment with the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB-242084 but not the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635.

    PubMed

    Bagdy, G; Graf, M; Anheuer, Z E; Modos, E A; Kantor, S

    2001-12-01

    The possible role of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2C receptors in the anxiety induced by fear, acute treatment with SSRI antidepressants or the 5-HT receptor agonist m-CPP were tested in the social interaction anxiety test in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Fluoxetine (2.5-10 mg/kg, i.p.), sertraline (15 mg/kg, i.p.) and m-CPP (0.5-2.0 mg/kg, i.p.) all had an anxiogenic-like profile (decrease in time of total social interaction and increase in self-grooming compared to vehicle) under low-light, familiar arena test conditions. All these effects were reversed by pretreatment with the highly subtype-selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, SB-242084 at doses of either 0.05 or 0.2 mg/kg, i.p. In contrast, the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (0.05 and 0.2 mg/kg, s.c.) failed to reverse SSRI-induced decrease in time of total social interaction, further, it augmented self-grooming response. SB-242084 (0.2 mg/kg) and WAY-100635 (0.05 and 0.2 mg/kg) reversed hypolocomotion caused by the SSRI antidepressants. SB-242084, tested alone against vehicle under high-light, unfamiliar arena test conditions associated with fear, caused significant anxiolysis at 0.2 mg/kg and higher doses. These results suggest that increased anxiety in rodents, and possibly, also in humans (e.g. agitation or jitteriness after SSRIs and panic after m-CPP), caused by acute administration of SSRI antidepressants or m-CPP, are mediated by activation of 5-HT2C receptors. Blockade of 5-HT1A autoreceptors may exacerbate certain acute adverse effects of SSRI antidepressants. Both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2C receptors are involved in the SSRI-induced decrease in locomotor activity. In addition, our studies confirm data that subtype-selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonists have strong anxiolytic actions.

  4. Diagnosis and Fluoxetine Treatment of Compulsive Behavior Disorder of Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodfish, James W.; Madison, James T.

    1993-01-01

    Ten adults with compulsive behavior disorder and six comparison subjects, all with mental retardation, were treated using the medication fluoxetine. Seven of the 10 experimental subjects responded favorably to fluoxetine treatment; none of the comparison subjects responded favorably to the medication. There appeared to be a relation between…

  5. Fluoxetine treatment of acral lick dermatitis in dogs: a placebo-controlled randomized double blind trial.

    PubMed

    Wynchank, D; Berk, M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of fluoxetine treatment of acral lick dermatitis (ALD) in dogs and to investigate ALD as an animal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Sixty-three dogs with ALD were treated with fluoxetine 20 mg daily, or placebo, for 6 weeks. In the fluoxetine group, owners rated both appearance of the lesion (t = 10.2, df = 29, P < 0.0001) and licking behavior (t = 10.2, df = 29, P < 0.0001) as significantly improved by the end of the trial. Veterinarian-rated pre- and post-treatment photographs showed statistically significant improvement in the fluoxetine group (mean = 2.55). There were no significant changes in the placebo group as rated by owners and veterinarians. These results demonstrate the efficacy of fluoxetine in the treatment of ALD and lend further support to ALD as an animal model of OCD.

  6. The effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment following injury of medial frontal cortex in mice.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Brendan B; Spanswick, Simon C; Patel, Payal P; Barneto, Alison A; Dyck, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Injury of the brain is a leading cause of long-term disability. Recent evidence indicates that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug fluoxetine may be beneficial when administered following brain injury. However, its potential to promote recovery and the mechanisms by which it might do so require further characterization. In the present experiment, fluoxetine was administered to mice for 4 weeks following injury of medial frontal cortex (MFC). MFC injury altered behavior, reducing locomotion, decreasing swim speed in the Morris water task, and decreasing anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Fluoxetine treatment did not affect these behavioral alterations, but it did increase the social dominance of the injured mice, as assessed by the tube test. Fluoxetine treatment also hastened learning of a T-maze position discrimination task, independently of lesion condition. Anatomically, fluoxetine failed to decrease lesion size, increase the survival of cells born 1-week post injury in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, or reverse the reduction in spine density in layer II/III pyramidal neurons in cingulate cortex caused by the lesions. Fluoxetine did, however, increase the dendritic arborization of these cells, which was reduced in the mice with lesions. Thus, while not all the effects of MFC injury were ameliorated, the behavioral outcome of mice with MFC injuries was improved, and one of the neuroanatomical sequelae of the lesions counteracted, by chronic fluoxetine, further contributing to the evidence that fluoxetine could be a useful treatment following brain injury.

  7. Acute locomotor effects of fluoxetine, sertraline, and nomifensine in young versus aged Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Stanford, John A; Currier, Theresa D; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous locomotor activity was measured in young (6-8 months) and aged (24-26 months) Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Following habituation to the activity monitors, aged rats demonstrated significantly diminished motor activity as quantified by total distance traveled and vertical activity. Movement speed did not differ significantly between the two groups. Following habituation, rats were administered acute doses of fluoxetine, sertraline, or nomifensine (1.0, 3.0, and 10.0 mg/kg). Fluoxetine diminished all three behavioral measures in the young rats, while in the old rats, fluoxetine's effects were limited to a robust attenuation of vertical activity. Sertraline decreased movement speed and vertical activity, but not total distance traveled, in the young rats. Unlike fluoxetine, sertraline produced no significant effects on any of the three behavioral variables in the old rats. Nomifensine increased behavioral scores for both age groups. The results are discussed in relation to acute motor side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in motor-impaired aged individuals, as these effects may influence their eventual use in the clinic.

  8. Acute efficacy of fluoxetine versus sertraline and paroxetine in major depressive disorder including effects of baseline insomnia.

    PubMed

    Fava, Maurizio; Hoog, Sharon L; Judge, Rajinder A; Kopp, Joan B; Nilsson, Mary E; Gonzales, Jill S

    2002-04-01

    This study assessed whether fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine differ in efficacy and tolerability in depressed patients and the impact of baseline insomnia on outcomes. Patients (N = 284) with DSM-IV major depressive disorder were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline for 10 to 16 weeks of treatment. Using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) sleep disturbance factor score, patients were categorized into low (<4) or high (>or=4) baseline insomnia subgroups. Changes in depression and insomnia were assessed. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), reasons for discontinuation, and AEs leading to discontinuation. In addition, AEs were evaluated within insomnia subgroups to determine emergence of activation or sedation. Depression improvement, assessed with the HAM-D-17 total score, was similar among treatments in all patients (p = 0.365) and the high (p = 0.853) and low insomnia (p = 0.415) subgroups. Insomnia improvement, assessed with the HAM-D sleep disturbance factor score, was similar among treatments in all patients (p = 0.868) and in the high (p = 0.852) and low insomnia (p = 0.982) subgroups. Analyses revealed no significant differences between treatments in the percentages of patients with substantial worsening, any worsening, worsening at endpoint, or improvement at endpoint in the HAM-D sleep disturbance factor in either insomnia subgroup. Treatments were well tolerated in most patients. No significant differences between treatments in the incidence of AEs suggestive of activation or sedation were seen in the insomnia subgroups. These data show no significant differences in acute treatment efficacy and tolerability across fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine in major depressive disorder patients. Improvement in overall depression and in associated insomnia was achieved by most patients regardless of baseline insomnia.

  9. Effects of combined nicotine and fluoxetine treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Faillace, M P; Zwiller, J; Bernabeu, R O

    2015-08-06

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in mammals within the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subarea. It is known to be induced by antidepressant treatment and reduced in response to nicotine administration. We checked here whether the antidepressant fluoxetine would inverse the decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis caused by nicotine. It is shown that repeated, but not a single injection of rats with fluoxetine was able to abolish the decrease in adult dentate cell proliferation produced by nicotine treatment. We measured the expression of several biochemical parameters known to be associated with neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Both drugs increased the expression of p75 neurotrophin receptor, which promotes proliferation and early maturation of dentate gyrus cells. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, we also gave both drugs in a context in which their rewarding properties could be measured. Fluoxetine produced a significant but less robust CPP than nicotine. A single injection of fluoxetine was found to reduce nicotine-induced CPP. Moreover, the rewarding properties of nicotine were completely abolished in response to repeated fluoxetine injections. Expression of nicotine-induced CPP was accompanied by an increase of phospho-CREB (cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein) and HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2) expression in the nucleus accumbens. The data suggest that fluoxetine reward, as opposed to nicotine reward, depends on dentate gyrus neurogenesis. Since fluoxetine was able to disrupt the association between nicotine and the environment, this antidepressant may be tested as a treatment for nicotine addiction using cue exposure therapy.

  10. New insights into the acute actions from a high dosage of fluoxetine on neuronal and cardiac function: Drosophila, crayfish and rodent models.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Zana R; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; Blümich, Sandra L E; Brailoiu, Eugen; Cooper, Robin L

    2015-01-01

    The commonly used mood altering drug fluoxetine (Prozac) in humans has a low occurrence in reports of harmful effects from overdose; however, individuals with altered metabolism of the drug and accidental overdose have led to critical conditions and even death. We addressed direct actions of high concentrations on synaptic transmission at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), neural properties, and cardiac function unrelated to fluoxetine's action as a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. There appears to be action in blocking action potentials in crayfish axons, enhanced occurrences of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion events in the presynaptic terminals at NMJs of both Drosophila and crayfish. In rodent neurons, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) rises by fluoxetine and is thapsigargin dependent. The Drosophila larval heart showed a dose dependent effect in cardiac arrest. Acute paralytic behavior in crayfish occurred at a systemic concentration of 2mM. A high percentage of death as well as slowed development occurred in Drosophila larvae consuming food containing 100μM fluoxetine. The release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons and the cardiac tissue as well as blockage of voltage-gated Na(+) channels in neurons could explain the effects on the whole animal as well as the isolated tissues. The use of various animal models in demonstrating the potential mechanisms for the toxic effects with high doses of fluoxetine maybe beneficial for acute treatments in humans. Future studies in determining how fluoxetine is internalized in cells and if there are subtle effects of these mentioned mechanisms presented with chronic therapeutic doses are of general interest.

  11. A double-blind comparison of sertraline and fluoxetine in the treatment of major depressive episode in outpatients.

    PubMed

    Sechter, D; Troy, S; Paternetti, S; Boyer, P

    1999-03-01

    Depression is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. As depressive disorders carry a high risk of relapse, treatment strategies include the use of a 6-month continuation period after resolution of the acute episode. Tolerability is of major importance when determining compliance and outcome during long-term therapy. Due to the superior tolerability profile of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) over the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), the former may be more suitable for extended therapy. Comparative studies have not shown differences between the SSRIs in terms of efficacy, but side-effect profiles may vary. A multicenter, double-blind, comparative study of sertraline and fluoxetine was carried out in outpatients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for major depressive disorder. Patients were randomised to receive sertraline (50-150 mg, n = 118) or fluoxetine (20-60 mg, n = 120) for 24 weeks. Assessments for depression (HAM-D, HAD, CGI-I, CGI-S), anxiety (Covi), sleep (Leeds Sleep Evaluation scale) and quality of life (SIP) were made at study entry and at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24. All adverse events were recorded to allow evaluation of tolerability. In total, 88 patients in the sertraline group completed the study compared with 79 in the fluoxetine group. Side effects were responsible for the premature treatment withdrawal of seven (6%) sertraline patients and 12 (10%) fluoxetine patients. Two-hundred and thirty-four patients were included in an ITT analysis up to last visit (116 sertraline, 118 fluoxetine). At study endpoint, both treatments produced a significant improvement over baseline on all efficacy variables (P < 0.001). Although the magnitude of global changes in depression, anxiety, and quality of life was larger with sertraline than fluoxetine, none of the between-group differences reached statistical significance. However, significant differences in favour of sertraline were observed for individual HAM-D items

  12. Black cohosh and fluoxetine in the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms: a prospective, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Mesut; Eroglu, Derya; Karahan, Hilal B; Taskintuna, Nilgun; Kuscu, Esra; Zeyneloglu, Hulusi B

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fluoxetine and black cohosh in the treatment of women with postmenopausal symptoms. A total of 120 healthy women with menopausal symptoms were recruited to this prospective study with a follow-up period of 6 mo. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups and were treated with fluoxetine or black cohosh. After entry into the study, patients were examined at the first, second, third, and sixth months of the treatment period. The women kept diaries in which they reported the daily number and intensity of hot flushes and night sweats. In addition, at the beginning and end of the third month, they completed questionnaires consisting of a modified Kupperman Index, Beck's Depression Scale, and a RAND-36 Quality-of-Life Questionnaire. Statistically significant differences were noted in the Kupperman Index and Beck's Depression Scale at the end of the third month in both groups compared with baseline values. In the black cohosh group, the Kupperman Index decreased significantly compared with that in the fluoxetine group by the end of the third month. On the other hand, in the fluoxetine group, Beck's Depression Scale decreased significantly compared with that in the black cohosh group. Monthly scores for hot flushes and night sweats decreased significantly in both groups; however, black cohosh reduced monthly scores for hot flushes and night sweats to a greater extent than did fluoxetine. At the end of the sixth month of treatment, black cohosh reduced the hot flush score by 85%, compared with a 62% result for fluoxetine. By the sixth month of the study, 40 women had discontinued the study--20 (33%) in the fluoxetine group and 20 (33%) in the black cohosh group. Compared with fluoxetine, black cohosh is more effective for treating hot flushes and night sweats. On the other hand, fluoxetine is more effective in improvements shown on Beck's Depression Scale.

  13. Serotonin and suicidality: the impact of acute fluoxetine administration. I: Serotonin and suicide.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Segman, R H; Anderson, G M

    1994-01-01

    The general enhancement of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission following long-term administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to play an important role in these drugs' anti-depressant efficacy. Because suicide and/or aggression appear linked to diminished levels of brain 5-HT and its metabolites, it has been suggested that SSRIs may be particularly effective in reducing suicidality. Case reports of increased or new suicidal ideation following administration of fluoxetine and other SSRIs, however, raise questions about how these potential side effects may relate to the SSRI's acute effects on 5-HT transmission. Part I of this review examines fluoxetine's effects on suicidality and related behaviors and reviews the relationship of suicidality to serotonergic dysregulation.

  14. Acute fluoxetine exposure alters crab anxiety-like behaviour, but not aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trevor James; Kwan, Garfield T; Gallup, Joshua; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-01-25

    Aggression and responsiveness to noxious stimuli are adaptable traits that are ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom. Like vertebrate animals, some invertebrates have been shown to exhibit anxiety-like behaviour and altered levels of aggression that are modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin. To investigate whether this influence of serotonin is conserved in crabs and whether these behaviours are sensitive to human antidepressant drugs; the striped shore crab, Pachygrapsus crassipes, was studied using anxiety (light/dark test) and aggression (mirror test) paradigms. Crabs were individually exposed to acute doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (5 or 25 mg/L), commonly known as Prozac®, followed by behavioural testing. The high dose of fluoxetine significantly decreased anxiety-like behaviour but had no impact on mobility or aggression. These results suggest that anxiety-like behaviour is more sensitive to modulation of serotonin than is aggressiveness in the shore crab.

  15. Acute fluoxetine exposure alters crab anxiety-like behaviour, but not aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trevor James; Kwan, Garfield T.; Gallup, Joshua; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Aggression and responsiveness to noxious stimuli are adaptable traits that are ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom. Like vertebrate animals, some invertebrates have been shown to exhibit anxiety-like behaviour and altered levels of aggression that are modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin. To investigate whether this influence of serotonin is conserved in crabs and whether these behaviours are sensitive to human antidepressant drugs; the striped shore crab, Pachygrapsus crassipes, was studied using anxiety (light/dark test) and aggression (mirror test) paradigms. Crabs were individually exposed to acute doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (5 or 25 mg/L), commonly known as Prozac®, followed by behavioural testing. The high dose of fluoxetine significantly decreased anxiety-like behaviour but had no impact on mobility or aggression. These results suggest that anxiety-like behaviour is more sensitive to modulation of serotonin than is aggressiveness in the shore crab. PMID:26806870

  16. Fluoxetine treatment reverses the intergenerational impact of maternal separation on fear and anxiety behaviors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Gui-Jing; Yang, Yuan; Cao, Jun; Mao, Rong-Rong; Xu, Lin

    2015-05-01

    Early life stress increases risks of fear and anxiety related disorders in adulthood, which may be alleviated by fluoxetine treatment. However, the intergenerational impacts of maternal separation (MS) on fear and anxiety behaviors from father to their offspring are little known. And the potential effects of fluoxetine treatment on the intergenerational transmission have not been well tested. Here, we investigated whether fluoxetine can reverse the intergenerational effects of MS on fear and anxiety behaviors. The first generation (F1) male rats were exposed to MS 3 h daily from postnatal day 2-14 and then treated with fluoxetine for four weeks during adulthood before fear conditioning. We found that maternal separation significantly impaired contextual fear extinction in F1 adult male rats but not in their second generation (F2). Although no obvious effects of MS on anxiety were observed in F1 male rats, the F2 offspring displayed a phenotype of low anxiety-like behaviors despite they were reared in normal condition. Fluoxetine treatment in F1 males not only reversed the impairment of fear extinction in F1 males but also the low anxiety-like behaviors in their F2 offspring. These findings highlight the intergenerational impacts of early life stress on fear and anxiety behaviors, and provide a new sight of the intergenerational effect of fluoxetine therapy for early life stress related mental problems.

  17. Effect of long-term fluoxetine treatment on the human serotonin transporter in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Iceta, Ruth; Mesonero, José E; Alcalde, Ana I

    2007-03-27

    Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) broadly used in the treatment of human mood disorders and gastrointestinal diseases involving the serotoninergic system. The effectiveness of this therapy depends on repeated long-term treatment. Most of the long-term studies in vivo of SSRI effects on serotoninergic activity have focused on their effects on autoreceptors or postsynaptic receptors. The chronic effect of SSRIs on the activity of the serotonin transporter (SERT) has been less studied and the results have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to determine the specific effect of long-term fluoxetine treatment on human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in vitro, by using the human enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. Results show that fluoxetine diminished the 5-HT uptake in a concentration-dependent way and that this effect was reversible. Fluoxetine affected mainly the hSERT transport rate by reducing the availability of the transporter in the membrane with no significant alteration of either the total hSERT protein content or the hSERT mRNA level. These results suggest that the effect of fluoxetine on the expression of hSERT is post-translational and has shown itself to be independent of PKC and PKA activity. This study may be useful to clarify the effect of the long-term fluoxetine therapy in both gastrointestinal and central nervous system disorders.

  18. Cognitive-behavioral therapy added to fluoxetine in major depressive disorder after 4 weeks of fluoxetine-treatment: 16-week open label study.

    PubMed

    Maneeton, Narong; Thongkam, Annop; Maneeton, Benchalak

    2010-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) not responding to antidepressant treatment poses challenges in planning therapy and prognostic uncertainties. Adjunctive treatment to antidepressants with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) may be useful for these patients. Determine the efficacy of CBT augmentation in patients with MDD not responding to fluoxetine. Ten patients diagnosed with MDD, by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria between December 2007 and July 2008 were enrolled to the present study. All patients had taken fluoxetine at least 20 mg a day and for at least 4 weeks prior to consent. Baseline Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) ratings were all moderate to severe (22-44 point). The maximum number of sessions of CBT was 16. Patients treated with CBT for at least 8 weeks were defined as the completed treatment group. Response was defined as a reduction in MADRS score by at least 50 percent from baseline and remission was defined as a reduction in score of 10 or less. Fluoxetine augmentation with CBT was a significantly effective treatment in patients with MDD not responding to 4 week-fluoxetine treatment alone according to MADRS, Clinical Global Impression-Severity of illness and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, Thai Version (p < 0.001, p = 0.002 and 0.004 respectively). The overall response and remission rates were 100% and 70% respectively. The VAS satisfaction scores increased from baseline significantly (p < 0.001). Overall quality of life of all patients by WHOQOL-BREF was improved significantly (p < 0.001). Adding CBT to fluoxetine in patients with MDD who did not respond to 4 weeks treatment of fluoxetine had significantly more efficacy than previous fluoxetine treatment alone. With no control group, a randomized and controlled method might substantiate these promising preliminary findings.

  19. Fluoxetine and suicide: a meta-analysis of controlled trials of treatment for depression.

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, C M; Dornseif, B E; Bosomworth, J C; Sayler, M E; Rampey, A H; Heiligenstein, J H; Thompson, V L; Murphy, D J; Masica, D N

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--A comprehensive meta-analysis of clinical trial data was performed to assess the possible association of fluoxetine and suicidality (suicidal acts and ideation). DESIGN--Retrospective analysis of pooled data from 17 double blind clinical trials in patients with major depressive disorder comparing fluoxetine (n = 1765) with a tricyclic antidepressant (n = 731) or placebo (n = 569), or both. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Multiple data sources were searched to identify patients with suicidal acts. Suicidal ideation was assessed with item 3 of the Hamilton depression rating scale, which systematically rates suicidality. Emergence of substantial suicidal ideation was defined as a change in the rating of this item from 0 or 1 at baseline to 3 or 4 during double blind treatment; worsening was defined as any increase from baseline; improvement was defined as a decrease from baseline at the last visit during the treatment. RESULTS--Suicidal acts did not differ significantly in comparisons of fluoxetine with placebo (0.2% v 0.2%, p = 0.494, Mantel-Haenszel adjusted incidence difference) and with tricyclic antidepressants (0.7% v 0.4%, p = 0.419). The pooled incidence of suicidal acts was 0.3% for fluoxetine, 0.2% for placebo, and 0.4% for tricyclic antidepressants, and fluoxetine did not differ significantly from either placebo (p = 0.533, Pearson's chi 2) or tricyclic antidepressants (p = 0.789). Suicidal ideation emerged marginally significantly less often with fluoxetine than with placebo (0.9% v 2.6%, p = 0.094) and numerically less often than with tricyclic antidepressants (1.7% v 3.6%, p = 0.102). The pooled incidence of emergence of substantial suicidal ideation was 1.2% for fluoxetine, 2.6% for placebo, and 3.6% for tricyclic antidepressants. The incidence was significantly lower with fluoxetine than with placebo (p = 0.042) and tricyclic antidepressants (p = 0.001). Any degree of worsening of suicidal ideation was similar with fluoxetine and placebo (15.4% v 17

  20. Predictors of Treatment Response to Fluoxetine in PTSD Following a Recent History of War Zone Stress Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    1-0283 TITLE: Predictors of Treatment Response to Fluoxetine in PTSD Following a Recent History of War Zone Stress Exposure...SUBTITLE Predictors of Treatment Response to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0283 Fluoxetine in PTSD Following a Recent History of...controlled trial of fluoxetine as an early intervention for recently redeployed soldiers, as well as to develop methodologies for understanding the

  1. Predictors and Moderators of Acute Outcome in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, John; Rohde, Paul; Simons, Anne; Silva, Susan; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher; Reinecke, Mark; Feeny, Norah; Wells, Karen; Pathak, Sanjeev; Weller, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, David; Kennard, Betsy; Robins, Michele; Ginsburg, Golda; March, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors and moderators of response to acute treatments among depressed adolescents (N = 439) randomly assigned to fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), both fluoxetine and CBT, or clinical management with pill placebo in the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS). Method: Potential baseline…

  2. Predictors and Moderators of Acute Outcome in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, John; Rohde, Paul; Simons, Anne; Silva, Susan; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher; Reinecke, Mark; Feeny, Norah; Wells, Karen; Pathak, Sanjeev; Weller, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, David; Kennard, Betsy; Robins, Michele; Ginsburg, Golda; March, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors and moderators of response to acute treatments among depressed adolescents (N = 439) randomly assigned to fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), both fluoxetine and CBT, or clinical management with pill placebo in the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS). Method: Potential baseline…

  3. Treatment of transvestic fetishism with fluoxetine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Mohammad Amir; K Gaur, Rakesh; Ahmad Azmi, Suhail; Gangwar, Sheshank

    2012-01-01

    Transvestic fetishism is having a sexual or erotic interest in cross-dressing. This case report describes a 17-year-old male with transvestic fetishism who suffered from obsessive thoughts and subsequent masturbation as compulsion. He was managed successfully with fluoxetine.

  4. Treatment of Transvestic Fetishism With Fluoxetine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Mohammad Amir; K Gaur, Rakesh; Ahmad Azmi, Suhail; Gangwar, Sheshank

    2012-01-01

    Transvestic fetishism is having a sexual or erotic interest in cross-dressing. This case report describes a 17-year-old male with transvestic fetishism who suffered from obsessive thoughts and subsequent masturbation as compulsion. He was managed successfully with fluoxetine. PMID:24644490

  5. Ecchymoses as an adverse effect of fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Samolis, Stavros; Iacovides, Apostolos; St Kaprinis, George

    2007-07-30

    We report a case of a 28-year-old major depressive female patient who manifested ecchymoses following fluoxetine use. After substitution of sertraline, her depression resolved after 4 weeks and ecchymoses 1.5 months latter. This is an unexplored side-effect with unknown long-term consequences that warrants further study.

  6. Chronic fluoxetine treatment and maternal adversity differentially alter neurobehavioral outcomes in the rat dam.

    PubMed

    Pawluski, Jodi L; Charlier, Thierry D; Fillet, Marianne; Houbart, Virginie; Crispin, Hilda T; Steinbusch, Harry W; van den Hove, Daniël L

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of stress and stress-related disorders with the transition to motherhood, such as postpartum depression, is estimated to be 20%. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications are currently the antidepressant of choice to treat maternal mood disorders. However, little is known about the effects of these medications on the maternal brain and behavior. Therefore, the present study investigated how a commonly used SSRI, fluoxetine, affects neurobehavioral outcomes in the mother using a model of maternal adversity. To do this, gestationally stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rat dams were treated with either fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Dams were divided into four groups: (1) Control + Vehicle, (2) Control + Fluoxetine, (3) Stress + Vehicle and (4) Stress + Fluoxetine. Fluoxetine or vehicle was administered to the dam during the postpartum period via osmotic minipump implants (Alzet) for 28 days. Results show that chronic fluoxetine treatment, after exposure to gestational stress, significantly decreased serum levels of corticosteroid binding globulin and increased hippocampal neurogenesis. In the absence of maternal stress, fluoxetine treatment alone significantly increased maternal arched-back nursing of pups, increased anxiety-related behavior, and decreased serum levels of corticosterone and corticosteroid binding globulin in the dam. This research provides important information on how SSRIs may act on the behavior, physiology, and neural plasticity of the mother. Although this is a first step in investigating the role of antidepressant treatment on the mother, much more work is needed before we can understand and improve the efficacy of these medications to treat mood disorders in pregnant and postpartum women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of depression and anxiety in infertile women: cognitive behavioral therapy versus fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Alipor, Ahmad; Esmaelzadeh, Seddigheh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Poladi, Karamolah; Pash, Hagar

    2008-05-01

    Infertility is a stressful event that can give rise to psychological difficulties. Both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are well-established treatments for depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy with fluoxetine in the resolution or decreasing of depression and anxiety in infertile women. In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 89 mild to moderate depressed infertile women (Beck scores 10-47) were recruited into three groups; cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), antidepressant therapy, and a control group. Twenty-nine participants in the CBT method received relaxation training, restructuring, and eliminating of negative automatic thoughts and dysfunctional attitudes to depression for 10 sessions. Thirty participants in the pharmacotherapy group took 20 mg fluoxetine daily for 90 days. Thirty control subjects did not receive any intervention. All participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory and Cattell Anxiety Inventory at the beginning and end of the study. Chi2 test, paired t-test, and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. The resolution of depression in the three groups was: fluoxetine group 50%, CBT 79.3%, and control 10%. The mean of the Beck scores at the beginning and end of the study was respectively: fluoxetine 23.2+/-8.6 versus 14.3+/-8.5(p<0.001), CBT 20.1+/-7.9 versus 7.7+/-4.8 (p<0.001), and control 19.8+/-8.5 versus 19.7+/-8.4 (p=0.9). Although both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than that of the control group, the decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than fluoxetine group. The CBT method decreased significantly the mean of the Cattell scores more than the fluoxetine and control groups, but the decrease in the anxiety mean scores of that fluoxetine group was no more than that of control group. CBT was not only a reliable alternative to pharmacotherapy but also was superior to fluoxetine in the resolution or reducing of

  8. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters the structure, connectivity and plasticity of cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Guirado, Ramon; Perez-Rando, Marta; Sanchez-Matarredona, David; Castrén, Eero; Nacher, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Novel hypotheses suggest that antidepressants, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, induce neuronal structural plasticity, resembling that of the juvenile brain, although the underlying mechanisms of this reopening of the critical periods still remain unclear. However, recent studies suggest that inhibitory networks play an important role in this structural plasticity induced by fluoxetine. For this reason we have analysed the effects of a chronic fluoxetine treatment in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of transgenic mice displaying eGFP labelled interneurons. We have found an increase in the expression of molecules related to critical period plasticity, such as the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), GAD67/65 and synaptophysin, as well as a reduction in the number of parvalbumin expressing interneurons surrounded by perineuronal nets. We have also described a trend towards decrease in the perisomatic inhibitory puncta on pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and an increase in the density of inhibitory puncta on eGFP interneurons. Finally, we have found that chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the structure of interneurons in the mPFC, increasing their dendritic spine density. The present study provides evidence indicating that fluoxetine promotes structural changes in the inhibitory neurons of the adult cerebral cortex, probably through alterations in plasticity-related molecules of neurons or the extracellular matrix surrounding them, which are present in interneurons and are known to be crucial for the development of the critical periods of plasticity in the juvenile brain.

  9. MOP Reduction During Long-Term Methamphetamine Withdrawal was Restored by Chronic Post-Treatment with Fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Takamatsu, Y; Imai, K; Kamegaya, E; Hagino, Y; Watanabe, M; Yamamoto, T; Sora, I; Koga, H; Ikeda, K

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we found fluoxetine reduces methamphetamine preference in mice. However, effects of fluoxetine on developed methamphetamine preference and on methamphetamine induced gene expression changes have been largely unknown. The present study investigates effects of post-treatment with fluoxetine on methamphetamine dependence and on gene expressions after long-term withdrawal in mice. First, we examined whether chronic post-treatment with fluoxetine attenuated methamphetamine-conditioned place preference. Next, we examined the changes in gene expression levels after long-term withdrawal (with saline or fluoxetine treatment) following chronic methamphetamine treatment. Using mRNA from the pooled frontal cortices of 10 mice per group, gene expression analyses were performed using a custom-developed cDNA array and a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Chronic post-treatments with fluoxetine abolished the conditioned place preference developed by methamphetamine administrations. Even after long-term withdrawal from repeated methamphetamine administration, µ-opioid receptor (MOP) gene expression was significantly reduced in the frontal cortex. The reduced MOP gene expression in the frontal cortex was restored by chronic administration with fluoxetine. These changes were confirmed by Western blot analyses. These findings suggest that the chronic post-treatments with fluoxetine might be effective for restoring the reduction of MOP levels in the frontal cortex following long-term abstinence from methamphetamine.

  10. Fluoxetine-induced change in rat brain expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor varies depending on length of treatment.

    PubMed

    De Foubert, G; Carney, S L; Robinson, C S; Destexhe, E J; Tomlinson, R; Hicks, C A; Murray, T K; Gaillard, J P; Deville, C; Xhenseval, V; Thomas, C E; O'Neill, M J; Zetterström, T S C

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may be implicated in the clinical action of antidepressant drugs. Repeated (2-3 weeks) administration of antidepressant drugs increases BDNF gene expression. The onset of this response as well as concomitant effects on the corresponding BDNF protein is however, unclear. The present study investigated the effects of acute and chronic administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10mg/kg p.o.), upon regional rat brain levels of BDNF mRNA and protein expression. To improve the clinical significance of the study, fluoxetine was administered orally and mRNA and protein levels were determined ex vivo using the techniques of in situ hybridisation histochemistry and immunocytochemistry respectively. Direct measurement of BDNF protein was also carried out using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Four days of once daily oral administration of fluoxetine induced decreases in BDNF mRNA (hippocampus, medial habenular and paraventricular thalamic nuclei). Whilst 7 days of treatment showed a non-significant increase in BDNF mRNA, there were marked and region-specific increases following 14 days of treatment. BDNF protein levels remained unaltered until 21 days of fluoxetine treatment, when the numbers of BDNF immunoreactive cells were increased, reaching significance in the pyramidal cell layer of CA1 and CA3 regions of Ammon's horn (CA1 and CA3) but not in the other sub-regions of the hippocampus. Indicative of the highly regional change within the hippocampus, the ELISA method failed to demonstrate significant up-regulation at 21 days, measuring levels of BDNF protein in the whole hippocampus. In contrast to the detected time dependent and biphasic response of the BDNF gene, activity-regulated, cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc) mRNA showed a gradual increase during the 14-day course of treatment. The results presented here show that BDNF is expressed differentially

  11. Open fluoxetine treatment of mixed anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, J M; Pine, D S; Tancer, N K; Dummit, E S; Kentgen, L M; Martin, J; Asche, B K; Klein, R G

    1997-01-01

    An open-label pilot study examined fluoxetine treatment in 16 outpatients (9-18 years old) with mixed anxiety disorders. Following nonresponse to psychotherapy, fluoxetine monotherapy was started at 5 mg daily and was increased weekly by 5 or 10 mg daily for 6-9 weeks until improvement occurred or to a maximum of 40 mg (children under 12) or 80 mg (adolescents). Among patients on fluoxetine, severity of illness ratings were "much improved" (mean final Clinical Global Impression scale score 2.8 +/- 0.7). Clinical improvement occurred in 10 of 10 patients with current separation anxiety disorder, 8 of 10 with social phobia, 4 of 6 with specific phobia, 3 of 5 with panic disorder, and 1 of 7 with generalized anxiety disorder. Mean time to improvement was 5 weeks. Mean doses were 24 mg (0.7 mg/kg) for children and 40 mg (0.71 mg/kg) for adolescents. Side effects were transient and included drowsiness (31% of patients), sleep problems (19%), decreased appetite (13%), nausea (13%), abdominal pain (13%), and excitement (13%). No patient developed disinhibition, akathisia, or suicidality. These preliminary findings suggest fluoxetine effectiveness in separation anxiety disorder and social phobia. Youths with only one anxiety disorder appeared to respond to lower doses of fluoxetine than patients with multiple anxiety disorders (0.49 +/- 0.14 versus 0.80 +/- 0.28 mg/kg, p < 0.05).

  12. Fluoxetine Treatment for Prevention of Relapse of Depression in Children and Adolescents: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emslie, Graham J.; Heiligenstein, John H.; Hoog, Sharon L.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Findling, Robert L.; McCracken, James T.; Nilsson, Mary E.; Jacobson, Jennie G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare fluoxetine 20 to 60 mg/day with placebo for prevention of relapse of major depressive disorder in children and adolescents who had achieved Children's Depression Rating Scale, Revised scores of [less than or equal to]28 during treatment with fluoxetine 20 to 60 mg. Method: In this 32-week relapse-prevention phase of a…

  13. Fluoxetine Treatment for Prevention of Relapse of Depression in Children and Adolescents: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emslie, Graham J.; Heiligenstein, John H.; Hoog, Sharon L.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Findling, Robert L.; McCracken, James T.; Nilsson, Mary E.; Jacobson, Jennie G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare fluoxetine 20 to 60 mg/day with placebo for prevention of relapse of major depressive disorder in children and adolescents who had achieved Children's Depression Rating Scale, Revised scores of [less than or equal to]28 during treatment with fluoxetine 20 to 60 mg. Method: In this 32-week relapse-prevention phase of a…

  14. Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction during treatment with fluoxetine, sertraline and trazodone; a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Rezaie, Leeba; Rezaei Payam, Nastarn; Najafi, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are common treatments for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, adverse effects of SSRIs on sexual function are common in the treatment of patients with MDD. There is a discrepancy in the reported frequency of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. On the other hand, there is also less evidence about sexual dysfunction with serotonin receptor antagonists and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs). Therefore, we aimed to assess sexual dysfunction in MDD patients who received fluoxetine, sertraline and trazodone. In a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial in Kermanshah, Iran, during 2009-2010, 195 patients who met the DSMIV-IR criteria for MDD were enrolled. The patients completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and the sexual function questionnaire (SFQ). Eligible patients were allocated in three treatment groups (receiving fluoxetine, sertraline or trazodone) for 14 weeks randomly. Measurement of HAMD was repeated in 4-week interval. Analysis for comparing sexual dysfunction among three groups and men and women was performed. There were 102 men and 93 women in the three groups receiving fluoxetine (n=64), sertraline (n=67) and trazodone (n=64). There was no significant difference in the sexual dysfunction of the patients in the three groups at baseline (P>.05). After treatment, both men and women who had received fluoxetine had the most impairment in desire/drive items (43%-51% and 44%-50%, respectively), while patients receiving trazodone had the least impairment in these items (12%-18% and 23%-24%, respectively). Trazodone was also induced with a lower rate of impairment in arousal/orgasm items in men (9%-15%) compared with the other two drugs. Compared with fluoxetine and trazodone, sertraline was associated with intermediate impairment in sexual function (39%-42% in desire/drive items and 32%-39% in arousal/orgasm items) that was lower than that with fluoxetine and more than that with trazodone

  15. Efficacy and safety of long-term fluoxetine treatment of obesity--maximizing success.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D J; Rampey, A H; Roback, P J; Wilson, M G; Hamilton, S H; Sayler, M E; Tollefson, G D

    1995-11-01

    Obesity is a major health care concern because of its associated medical complications and increased mortality. Despite a myriad of short-term weight loss strategies and the motivation of improving health, patients have difficulty maintaining reduced weight. Pharmacologic agents, such as fluoxetine, a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor, have been investigated as adjunctive therapy to standard weight management programs. Extended therapy with fluoxetine has demonstrated clinically meaningful benefits on weight loss and obesity-associated medical conditions in double-blind placebo-controlled studies. However, the magnitude of these benefits for individuals vary. Such findings are consistent with the belief that the obesity syndrome has differing etiologies. Accordingly not all patients are likely to benefit from a particular therapy. Studies should identify patient subgroups that are more likely to respond to a specific therapy. In this study of 719 fluoxetine-treated and 722 placebo treated patients in four multicenter, randomized, double-blind, long-term clinical trials, we investigated possible predictors of a beneficial long-term outcome from fluoxetine therapy. Patients' age, current smoking activity, and baseline uric acid concentration were predictors of a meaningful long-term treatment effect. Further review of the weight loss patterns of patients achieving long-term success provided the basis for a treatment monitor. Use of the predictors and the treatment monitor are strategies to maximize the benefits of therapy through improved patient selection and monitoring during a therapeutic program.

  16. Risk of prenatal depression and stress treatment: alteration on serotonin system of offspring through exposure to Fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Siran; Liu, Li; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Han; Lin, Shuo; Shang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Fluoxetine is widely used to treat depression, including depression in pregnant and postpartum women. Studies suggest that fluoxetine may have adverse effects on offspring, presumably through its action on various serotonin receptors (HTRs). However, definitive evidence and the underlying mechanisms are largely unavailable. As initial steps towards establishing a human cellular and animal model, we analyzed the expression patterns of several HTRs through the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells into neuronal cells, and analyzed expression pattern in zebrafish embryos. Treatment of zebrafish embryos with fluoxetine significantly blocked the expression of multiple HTRs. Furthermore, fluoxetine gave rise to a change in neuropsychology. Embryos treated with fluoxetine continued to exhibit abnormal behavior upto 12 days post fertilization due to changes in HTRs. These findings support a possible long-term risk of serotonin pathway alteration, possibly resulting from the “placental drug transfer”. PMID:27703173

  17. Chronic fluoxetine treatment promotes submissive behavior in the territorial frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui.

    PubMed

    Ten Eyck, Gary R; Regen, Erin M

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is an essential neurotransmitter for many physiological and behavioral processes. Clinically and experimentally 5-HT metabolism can be altered using a class of drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). SSRIs such as fluoxetine have proven effective tools for elevating 5-HT activity and are routinely utilized to study the role of 5-HT in aggressive behavior. The Puerto Rican coquí frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui, is a terrestrial amphibian that exhibits territoriality and paternal care. E. coqui have three different male behavioral modes, territorial (calling), non-calling, and paternal. Territorial male E. coqui aggressively maintain and defend territories by emitting advertisement calls. The objective of this study was to determine if the SSRI, fluoxetine, influences the establishment of the dominant (territorial)-subordinate (non-calling) relationship in male E. coqui. Wild captured adult territorial male E. coqui were grouped into 16 pairs in semi-natural terraria. Pharmacological treatment consisted of injecting (IP) experimental frogs with 25 μl (10mg/kg fluoxetine) of a fluoxetine/saline solution while control males received IP injections of saline. Injections were administered every other day for 20 days while observations continued until 40 days. Results indicated significantly higher numbers of advertisement calls emitted from control males after 20, 30, and 40 days. Additional, 13 of 16 control males emitted significantly more advertisement calls and became the territorial male. Fluoxetine treatment significantly reduced advertisement calling and territorial behavior in E. coqui males. These findings demonstrate that in E. coqui the 5-HT system has profound influence on male territorial and social behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluoxetine increases suicide ideation less than placebo during treatment of adults with minor depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Garlow, Steven J; Kinkead, Becky; Thase, Michael E; Judd, Lewis L; Rush, A John; Yonkers, Kimberly A; Kupfer, David J; Frank, Ellen; Schettler, Pamela J; Rapaport, Mark Hyman

    2013-09-01

    Some reports suggest an increase in suicide ideations and behaviors in patients treated with antidepressants. This is an analysis of the impact of fluoxetine on suicide ideations in outpatients with minor depressive disorder. Research subjects were adult outpatients with minor depressive disorder (N = 162), who received fluoxetine or placebo in a prospective, 12-week, double-blind randomized trial. The research participants were evaluated weekly with standard rating scales that included four suicide-related items: item 3 of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), item 18 of Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C), and items 15 and 59 of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90). Clinically significant intensification of suicide ideation was defined as an increase of ≥2 points on any of these items. Overall 60/162 subjects (37%) had an increase of ≥1 point during treatment and 17/162 (10.5%) of ≥2 points on at least one suicide item, with 12/81 (14.8%) placebo and 5/81 (6.2%) fluoxetine-treated subjects having a ≥2 point gain. Of the study participants with baseline suicide ideation, 9/22 (40.9%) placebo and 3/24 (12.5%) fluoxetine treated had ≥2 point increase (p = 0.04). Survival analysis revealed that subjects on placebo were significantly more likely (p = 0.050) to experience a ≥2 point increase on one or more item, a difference that emerged early and continued throughout the 12-week trial. Compared to placebo, fluoxetine was not associated with a clinically significant increase in suicide ideation among adults with minor depressive disorder during 12 weeks of treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Brain activity in adolescent major depressive disorder before and after fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Tao, Rongrong; Calley, Clifford S; Hart, John; Mayes, Taryn L; Nakonezny, Paul A; Lu, Hanzhang; Kennard, Betsy D; Tamminga, Carol A; Emslie, Graham J

    2012-04-01

    Major depression in adolescents is a significant public health concern because of its frequency and severity. To examine the neurobiological basis of depression in this population, the authors studied functional activation characteristics of the brain before and after antidepressant treatment in antidepressant-naive depressed adolescents and healthy comparison subjects. Depressed (N=19) and healthy (N=21) adolescents, ages 11 to 18 years, underwent functional MRI assessment while viewing fearful and neutral facial expressions at baseline and again 8 weeks later. The depressed adolescents received 8 weeks of open-label fluoxetine treatment after their baseline scan. Voxel-wise whole brain analyses showed that depressed youths have exaggerated brain activation compared with healthy comparison subjects in multiple regions, including the frontal, temporal, and limbic cortices. The 8 weeks of fluoxetine treatment normalized most of these regions of hyperactivity in the depressed group. Region-of-interest analyses of the areas involved in emotion processing indicated that before treatment, depressed youths had significantly greater activations to fearful relative to neutral facial expressions than did healthy comparison subjects in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex bilaterally. Fluoxetine treatment decreased activations in all three regions, as compared with the repeat scans of healthy comparison subjects. While effective treatments are available, the impact of depression and its treatment on the brain in adolescents is understudied. This study confirms increases in brain activation in untreated depressed adolescents and demonstrates reductions in these aberrant activations with treatment.

  20. The effects of aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment on circadian rhythms and suprachiasmatic nucleus expression of neuropeptide genes and 5-HT1B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Marilyn J.; Hester, James M.; Hopper, Jason A.; Franklin, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related changes in circadian rhythms, including attenuation of photic phase shifts, are associated with changes in the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Aging decreases expression of mRNA for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a key neuropeptide for rhythm generation and photic phase shifts, and increases expression of serotonin transporters and 5-HT1B receptors, whose activation inhibits these phase shifts. Here we describe studies in hamsters showing that aging decreases SCN expression of mRNA for gastrin-releasing peptide, which also modulates photic phase resetting. Because serotonin innervation trophically supports SCN VIP mRNA expression, and serotonin transporters decrease extracellular serotonin, we predicted that chronic administration of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, would attenuate the age-related changes in SCN VIP mRNA expression and 5-HT1B receptors. In situ hybridization studies showed that fluoxetine treatment does not alter SCN VIP mRNA expression, in either age group, at zeitgeber time (ZT)6 or 13 (ZT12 corresponds to lights off). However, receptor autoradiographic studies showed that fluoxetine prevents the age-related increase in SCN 5-HT1B receptors at ZT6, and decreases SCN 5-HT1B receptors in both ages at ZT13. Therefore, aging effects on SCN VIP mRNA and SCN 5-HT1B receptors are differentially regulated; the age-related increase in serotonin transporter sites mediates the latter but not the former. The studies also showed that aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment decrease total daily wheel running without altering the phase of the circadian wheel running rhythm, in contrast to previous reports of phase resetting by acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:20525077

  1. Fluoxetine vs. placebo for the treatment of recurrent vasovagal syncope with anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flevari, Panayota; Leftheriotis, Dionyssios; Repasos, Evangelos; Katsaras, Dimitrios; Katsimardos, Andreas; Lekakis, John

    2017-01-01

    The optimal medical therapy of patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS) remains controversial. Fluoxetine is effective against anxiety and panic disorders, while its use has shown promising results for VVS. Anxiety sensitivity is a personality trait observed in a considerable proportion of patients with VVS, associated with predisposition to anxiety and panic disorders. Our aim was to examine whether fluoxetine exerts beneficial effects regarding VVS prevention in the subset of patients with anxiety sensitivity. We assessed 106 patients with typical history of recurrent VVS, without other comorbidities, and a diagnostic, positive head-up tilt test. A psychiatric examination ruled out clinical psychiatric disease. Their psychological, stress-related profile was assessed by the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) questionnaire, a 16-item questionnaire, assessing fear of anxiety-related sensations, previously studied in VVS. Patients scoring positive for ASI (n = 60, 57% of the population) were randomized in a 2:1 fashion to receive either 10-40 mg fluoxetine daily (n = 40) or placebo (n = 20), and were followed-up for 1 year. A significant difference was observed between patients receiving fluoxetine and those with placebo, regarding the distribution of syncope-free time during the study (P < 0.05). A significant difference was also observed between the two groups regarding presyncopal events and the total number of patients who experienced syncope or presyncope during follow-up. Sensitivity to anxiety is a common personality trait in recurrent VVS. Fluoxetine is superior to placebo against syncope in these patients. This drug may be a first-line pharmacological treatment for this difficult-to-treat group. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Evaluation of antidepressant like activity of curcumin and its combination with fluoxetine and imipramine: an acute and chronic study.

    PubMed

    Sanmukhani, Jayesh; Anovadiya, Ashish; Tripathi, Chandrabhanu B

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of commonly used spice Curuma longa Linn. In the present study, the antidepressant like activity of curcumin and its combination with fluoxetine and imipramine was studied in acute model (three doses 24, 5 and 1 h before test) of forced swimming test (FST) in glass jar and tail suspension test (TST) in mice and in chronic model (14 day study) of FST with water wheel in rats. All the tests were carried out in the following seven groups (n = 6 in each group), drugs being given orally (doses for mice): Group 1 (vehicle), group 2 (curcumin 50 mg/kg), group 3 (curcumin 100 mg/kg), group 4 (fluoxetine 20 mg/kg), group 5 (imipramine 15 mg/kg), group 6 (curcumin 100 mg/kg plus fluoxetine 20 mg/kg) and group 7 (curcumin 100 mg/kg plus imipramine 15 mg/kg). Equivalent doses for rats were used. Both the acute model of FST and TST, and the chronic model of FST with water wheel showed significant antidepressant like activity of curcumin in 100 mg/kg dose as compared to vehicle control (p < 0.05). The effect of curcumin (100 mg/kg) was similar to that of fluoxetine and imipramine (p > 0.05) but its addition to fluoxetine and imipramine did not improve their antidepressant activity (p > 0.05). Curcumin increased both the swimming and climbing behavior in FST, thus its antidepressant like activity could be due to an increase in serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the brain. Curcumin can be a useful antidepressant especially in cases which respond to drugs having mixed effects on serotonin and catecholamines levels in the brain.

  3. Comparative evaluation between hypericin (hypiran) and fluoxetine in treatment of companion dogs with tail chasing

    PubMed Central

    Mosallanejad, Bahman; Najafzadeh Varzi, Hossein; Avizeh, Reza; Pourmahdi, Mahdi; Khalili, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of hypericin and fluoxetine in the treatment of companion dogs with tail chasing in Ahvaz district. In the present survey, eighteen dogs with tail chasing were assigned into three equal groups for a three-year period. The dogs were randomly classified based on different treatment groups. During 15 weeks, dogs of group A were given 0.05 mg kg-1 hypericin orally and dogs of group B received 1 mg kg-1 fluoxetine, orally. The group C was the control group. Changes in signs of tail chasing were weekly reported by the owners or a veterinarian. Treatment periods were assessed in five intervals: weeks 1-3, 4-6, 7-9, 10-12 and weeks 13-15, respectively. Hypericin (group A) was significantly more effective in the treatment of tail chasing compared with fluoxetine (group B), (p = 0.043). Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in each group between weeks 1-3 (X2 = 8.8, p = 0.01), 4-6 (X2 = 9.1, p = 0.01), 7-9 (X2 = 7.4, p = 0.03), 10-12 (X2 = 10.4, p = 0.005) and 13-15 (X2 = 12.5, p = 0.002). Improvement of behavior in the dogs of group A was significant compared with group B, between weeks 10-12 (X2 = 5.4, p = 0.02) and 13-15 (X2 = 7.2, p = 0.007). In conclusion, our survey showed that hypericin was more effective than fluoxetine in controlling signs of tail chasing. PMID:26261714

  4. Fluoxetine-induced anxiety and nervousness.

    PubMed

    Zienowicz, Małgorzata; Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Lehner, Małgorzata; Taracha, Ewa; Maciejak, Piotr; Sobolewska, Alicja; Szyndler, Janusz; Turzyńska, Danuta; Walkowiak, Jerzy; Płaźnik, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to model fluoxetine-induced increase in anxiety appearing in the initial phase of the treatment with this antidepressant drug. The effects of acute administration of fluoxetine given alone and co-administered with a subthreshold dose of pentetrazole (PTZ), a proconvulsant agent with well recognized anxiogenic properties, were examined in the open field test of neophobia in rats. It was found that a single injection of fluoxetine at the dose of 5 and 10 mg/kg did not change motor and exploratory behavior of rats. Furthermore, fluoxetine (10.0 mg/kg) co-administered with a subthreshold dose of PTZ (10.0 mg/kg) had a strong and selective inhibitory influence on rat exploratory behavior. Pharmacokinetic study did not show any changes in brain concentration of PTZ in fluoxetine-pretreated animals. The central mechanism of the reported effects might involve stimulation of 5-HT2C receptors by fluoxetine in animals with PTZ-induced decrease in the threshold for emotional arousal. The present data describe a new animal model to study the central action of antidepressants reflecting dysphoric-like effects observed in the initial phase of the treatment.

  5. Chronic fluoxetine treatment suppresses plasticity (long-term potentiation) in the mature rodent primary auditory cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dringenberg, Hans C; Branfield Day, Leora R; Choi, Deanna H

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have provided evidence that chronic treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine can facilitate synaptic plasticity (e.g., ocular dominance shifts) in the adult central nervous system. Here, we assessed whether fluoxetine enhances long-term potentiation (LTP) in the thalamocortical auditory system of mature rats, a developmentally regulated form of plasticity that shows a characteristic decline during postnatal life. Adult rats were chronically treated with fluoxetine (administered in the drinking water, 0.2 mg/mL, four weeks of treatment). Electrophysiological assessments were conducted using an anesthetized (urethane) in vivo preparation, with LTP of field potentials in the primary auditory cortex (A1) induced by theta-burst stimulation of the medial geniculate nucleus. We find that, compared to water-treated control animals, fluoxetine-treated rats did not express higher levels of LTP and, in fact, exhibited reduced levels of potentiation at presumed intracortical A1 synapses. Bioactivity of fluoxetine was confirmed by a reduction of weight gain and fluid intake during the four-week treatment period. We conclude that chronic fluoxetine treatment fails to enhance LTP in the mature rodent thalamocortical auditory system, results that bring into question the notion that SSRIs act as general facilitators of synaptic plasticity in the mammalian forebrain.

  6. Effect of fluoxetine treatment on mitochondrial bioenergetics in central and peripheral rat tissues.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Aline Isabel; Braz, Glauber Ruda Feitoza; Silva-Filho, Reginaldo; Pedroza, Anderson Apolonio; Ferreira, Diorginis Soares; Manhães de Castro, Raul; Lagranha, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Recent investigations have focused on the mitochondrion as a direct drug target in the treatment of metabolic diseases (obesity, metabolic syndrome). Relatively few studies, however, have explicitly investigated whether drug therapies aimed at changing behavior by altering central nervous system (CNS) function affect mitochondrial bioenergetics, and none has explored their effect during early neonatal development. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment of newborn male rats with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine on the mitochondrial bioenergetics of the hypothalamus and skeletal muscle during the critical nursing period of development. Male Wistar rat pups received either fluoxetine (Fx group) or vehicle solution (Ct group) from the day of birth until 21 days of age. At 60 days of age, mitochondrial bioenergetics were evaluated. The Fx group showed increased oxygen consumption in several different respiratory states and reduced production of reactive oxygen species, but there was no change in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening or oxidative stress in either the hypothalamus or skeletal muscle. We observed an increase in glutathione S-transferase activity only in the hypothalamus of the Fx group. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic exposure to fluoxetine during the nursing phase of early rat development results in a positive modulation of mitochondrial respiration in the hypothalamus and skeletal muscle that persists into adulthood. Such long-lasting alterations in mitochondrial activity in the CNS, especially in areas regulating appetite, may contribute to permanent changes in energy balance in treated animals.

  7. Degradation and acute toxicity removal of the antidepressant Fluoxetine (Prozac(®)) in aqueous systems by electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa Honda Ogihara; Dos Santos Batista, Ana Paula; Silva Costa Teixeira, Antonio Carlos; Borrely, Sueli Ivone

    2016-06-01

    Electron beam irradiation (EBI) has been considered an advanced technology for the treatment of water and wastewater, whereas very few previous investigations reported its use for removing pharmaceutical pollutants. In this study, the degradation of fluoxetine (FLX), an antidepressant marketed as Prozac(®), was investigated by using EBI at FLX initial concentration of 19.4 ± 0.2 mg L(-1). More than 90 % FLX degradation was achieved at 0.5 kGy, with FLX below the detection limit (0.012 mg L(-1)) at doses higher than 2.5 kGy. The elucidation of organic byproducts performed using direct injection mass spectrometry, along with the results of ion chromatography, indicated hydroxylation of FLX molecules with release of fluoride and nitrate anions. Nevertheless, about 80 % of the total organic carbon concentration remained even for 7.5 kGy or higher doses. The decreases in acute toxicity achieved 86.8 and 9.6 % for Daphnia similis and Vibrio fischeri after EBI exposure at 5 kGy, respectively. These results suggest that EBI could be an alternative to eliminate FLX and to decrease residual toxicity from wastewater generated in pharmaceutical formulation facilities, although further investigation is needed for correlating the FLX degradation mechanism with the toxicity results.

  8. Sertraline versus fluoxetine in the treatment of major depression: a combined analysis of five double-blind comparator studies.

    PubMed

    Feiger, Alan D; Flament, Martine F; Boyer, Patrice; Gillespie, John A

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine response and remission rates in outpatients treated with sertraline or fluoxetine who were suffering from two depression subtypes: anxious-depression and severe depression. Data were pooled from five double-blind studies comparing fluoxetine versus sertraline for the treatment of DSM-III-R or IV major depression. Clinical outcome was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale (CGI-I). One thousand and eighty-eight patients were randomized, with 654 (60%) meeting criteria for anxious depression and 212 (19%) meeting criteria for high severity depression. For the total sample, treatment response was similar for both sertraline and fluoxetine. In the high severity subgroup, the mean (+/-SD) HAM-D score at week 12 was 8.9+/-5.7 for sertraline and 10.8+/-6.9 for fluoxetine (P=0.07), and the mean (+/-SD) CGI-I score was 1.5+/-0.7 for sertraline and 2.0+/-1.1 for fluoxetine (P=0.005). CGI-I responder rates were 88% versus 71% (P=0.03) in the high severity subgroup, and 84% versus 79% (P=0.16) in the anxious-depression subgroup. Overall, sertraline and fluoxetine showed comparable antidepressant efficacy, although sertraline may offer an advantage in those patients with severe depression.

  9. Mitochondrial energy metabolism of rat hippocampus after treatment with the antidepressants desipramine and fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Bagini, Laura; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2017-07-15

    Alterations in mitochondrial functions have been hypothesized to participate in the pathogenesis of depression, because brain bioenergetic abnormalities have been detected in depressed patients by neuroimaging in vivo studies. However, this hypothesis is not clearly demonstrated in experimental studies: some suggest that antidepressants are inhibitors of mitochondrial metabolism, while others observe the opposite. In this study, the effects of 21-day treatment with desipramine (15 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) were examined on the energy metabolism of rat hippocampus, evaluating the catalytic activity of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways. Because of the micro-heterogeneity of brain mitochondria, we have distinguished between (a) non-synaptic mitochondria (FM) of neuronal perikaryon (post-synaptic compartment) and (b) intra-synaptic light (LM) and heavy (HM) mitochondria (pre-synaptic compartment). Desipramine and fluoxetine changed the catalytic activity of specific enzymes in the different types of mitochondria: (a) in FM, both drugs enhanced cytochrome oxidase and glutamate dehydrogenase, (b) in LM, the overall bioenergetics was unaffected and (c) in HM only desipramine increased malate dehydrogenase and decreased the activities of Electron Transport Chain Complexes. These results integrate the pharmacodynamic features of desipramine and fluoxetine at subcellular level, overcoming the previous conflicting data about the effects of antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, mainly referred to whole brain homogenates or to bulk of cerebral mitochondria. With the differentiation in non-synaptic and intra-synaptic mitochondria, this study demonstrates that desipramine and fluoxetine lead to adjustments in the mitochondrial bioenergetics respect to the energy requirements of pre- and post-synaptic compartments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sertraline and fluoxetine treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder: results of a double-blind, 6-month treatment study.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Richard; Ravindran, Arun V; Chaput, Yves; Goldner, Elliot; Swinson, Richard; van Ameringen, Michael A; Austin, Carol; Hadrava, Vratislav

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the comparative efficacy and tolerability of sertraline and fluoxetine in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Outpatients meeting DSM-IV criteria for OCD, with a Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive (Y-BOCS) total score >or= 17, an NIMH Global Obsessive-Compulsive (NIMH-OC) scale score >or= 7, and a CGI-Severity score >or= 4 were randomized to 24 weeks of double-blind treatment with sertraline (N = 77) or fluoxetine (N = 73). Primary efficacy measures consisted of the Y-BOCS, the NIMH-OC scale, and the CGI-Severity (CGI-S) and Improvement (CGI-I) scales. Equivalent and significant (p < 0.001) improvement was found at week 24 in Y-BOCS and NIMH-OC scale scores for sertraline and fluoxetine. After 12 weeks, 49.2% of patients on sertraline were rated on the CGI-S scale as being mildly ill or not ill compared to 24.6% on fluoxetine (p < 0.01). A Cox analysis found patients on sertraline to have a statistically nonsignificant 42% greater likelihood of achieving a response by week 12 (CGI-I, much or very much improved; 95% CI, 0.85, 2.38; p = 0.18). Sertraline treatment also resulted in a higher proportion of remissions than fluoxetine (defined as a CGI-I treatment of outpatients with moderate to severe OCD with the subjects treated with sertraline showing a greater likelihood of remission as well as an earlier improvement on some but not all efficacy measures

  11. Nortriptyline versus fluoxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a six-month, double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SN; Shirazi, HR Ghafarian; Mohammadi, A; Zadeh-Bagheri, GH; Noorian, KH; Malekzadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression is a common psychiatric disorder worldwide, including in Iran, and is estimated to affect 10%–15% of the population. Antidepressant drugs can have multiple side effects, so a good choice of drug is important for successful treatment. This study compared the efficacy of nortriptyline with that of fluoxetine in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder and assessed related factors, including age, gender, and level of education. Methods The study was a double-blind, randomized clinical trial with a six-month follow-up period. Participants were 120 patients aged 15–60 years with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder based on a psychiatry interview and the Beck depression rating scale, which were performed at the beginning, middle, and end of the study. The patients were treated with nortriptyline or fluoxetine. The paired t-test, independent t-test, and the k chi-square test were used to analyze the data. Results Twenty-three patients dropped out and 97 remained in the trial. Before intervention, the mean depression score was 32.85 ± 6.23 in the nortriptyline group and 33.12 ± 6.50 in the fluoxetine group. The results of the independent t-test showed a significant difference between depression score means before and after treatment in both groups. Changes at the end of the trial compared with baseline scores were 13.4 ± 4.68 and 16.96 ± 4.96 for nortriptyline and fluoxetine, respectively. Paired t-testing showed a significant difference in the mean depression score for both the nortriptyline and fluoxetine groups. Age, gender, and level of education had no significant effects on the outcome of treatment in the two groups. Conclusion The present study suggests that both nortriptyline and fluoxetine were effective in the treatment of depression, but that fluoxetine was more effective than nortriptyline after 3 and 6 months of treatment. PMID:22359466

  12. Quetiapine add-on therapy improves the depressive behaviors and hippocampal neurogenesis in fluoxetine treatment resistant depressive rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chang, Ting; Chen, Yun-Chun; Zhang, Rui-Guo; Wang, Hua-Ning; Wu, Wen-Jun; Peng, Zheng-Wu; Tan, Qing-Rong

    2013-09-15

    Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, may have efficacy as augmentation therapy in treatment resistant depression (TRD), but evidence is limited and the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate whether and how quetiapine can be served as an augmentation agent in fluoxetine treatment resistant depressive rats induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). In this study, the effects of CUMS regimen and antidepressant treatment were assessed by behavioral tests and hippocampal neurogenesis. Approximately 20-30% of depressive rats respond poorly to fluoxetine treatment. In their hippocampus, a significant decrease of neurogenesis was also observed. However, quetiapine add-on therapy significantly improved the depressive behaviors and increased the number of the newborn neurons in the hippocampus of fluoxetine treatment resistant depressive rats. Thus, our results suggest that quetiapine may be used as an augmentation agent in the treatment resistant depression partly mediated by increasing the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus.

  13. Fluoxetine and sleep EEG: effects of a single dose, subchronic treatment, and discontinuation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Feige, Bernd; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Riemann, Dieter; Dittmann, Ralf; Hohagen, Fritz; Berger, Mathias

    2002-02-01

    The goals of the current study were to evaluate whether a single dose of fluoxetine causes qualitatively different changes in sleep architecture and NREM sleep EEG than subchronic administration in healthy subjects and to determine degree and duration of such changes after the single dose and after discontinuation from subchronic administration. Our hypothesis was that subchronic intake should cause changes qualitatively different from the single dose and that such changes could be sufficiently long-lived to suggest the possibility of a dosing in intervals of several days. Ten healthy volunteers first took one single 60-mg dose of fluoxetine and a week later started to take a 40-mg dose every morning for three weeks. Sleep laboratory nights included two nights before and four nights after the single dose and every second night for two weeks after discontinuation from subchronic administration. The single dose caused only a slight increase in drug plasma concentrations but relatively clear changes in sleep structure. After discontinuation from subchronic administration, sleep quality indices normalized quickly (within 2-4 days), whereas REM latency and spectral power effects correlated with total SSRI plasma concentration and normalized more slowly, corresponding to the drug plasma half-life of about 10 days. The REM fraction of the sleep period showed a rebound, whereas the delta sleep ratio did not correlate with drug plasma levels and yet remained increased after the medication interval. Thus, the only qualitative difference seen between acute and subchronic medication was the initial sleep disturbance. REM latency and especially the delta sleep ratio remained increased for several days after discontinuation from subchronic administration, indicating the possibility of a less-than-daily maintenance medication after an initial daily interval. Finally, the pattern of change observed for the delta sleep ratio indicates that it may be due to secondary, adaptive

  14. Citalopram versus fluoxetine for the treatment of patients with bulimia nervosa: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leombruni, Paolo; Amianto, Federico; Delsedime, Nadia; Gramaglia, Carla; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo

    2006-01-01

    The most studied and most frequently used pharmacologic treatments in bulimia nervosa are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), in particular, fluoxetine. Less is known about the efficacy of the other SSRIs. To compare fluoxetine with citalopram in the treatment of bulimic patients, 37 bulimic patients were randomized to receive fluoxetine (n=18) or citalopram (n=19); these patients were assessed with regard to clinical (ie, body mass index, pathologic behaviors), psychopathologic (Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Body Shape Questionnaire, Binge-Eating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory), personality (Temperament and Character Inventory), and clinical global impression measures. These measures were compared between the 2 treatment groups at baseline and at the end of treatment. Dropout rates were similar in the 2 groups. Both groups showed significant improvement in eating psychopathology, angry feelings, and clinical global impression. Patients in the fluoxetine group displayed a greater reduction in introjected anger, whereas those in the citalopram group displayed a greater reduction in depressive feelings. Both treatments showed some effect on outcome measures, but efficacy profiles did not overlap. Citalopram may be useful in depressed patients with bulimia, whereas fluoxetine is more specific for those with introjected anger and bulimia.

  15. Fluoxetine: a case history of its discovery and preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Perez-Caballero, Laura; Torres-Sanchez, Sonia; Bravo, Lidia; Mico, Juan Antonio; Berrocoso, Esther

    2014-05-01

    Depression is a multifactorial mood disorder with a high prevalence worldwide. Until now, treatments for depression have focused on the inhibition of monoaminergic reuptake sites, which augment the bioavailability of monoamines in the CNS. Advances in drug discovery have widened the therapeutic options with the synthesis of so-called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine. The aim of this case history is to describe and discuss the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of fluoxetine, including its acute effects and the adaptive changes induced after long-term treatment. Furthermore, the authors review the effect of fluoxetine on neuroplasticity and adult neurogenesis. In addition, the article summarises the preclinical behavioural data available on fluoxetine's effects on depressive-like behaviour, anxiety and cognition as well as its effects on other diseases. Finally, the article describes the seminal studies validating the antidepressant effects of fluoxetine. Fluoxetine is the first selective SSRI that has a recognised clinical efficacy and safety profile. Since its discovery, other molecules that mimic its mechanism of action have been developed, commencing a new age in the treatment of depression. Fluoxetine has also demonstrated utility in the treatment of other disorders for which its prescription has now been approved.

  16. Fluoxetine ameliorates imbalance of redox homeostasis and inflammation in an acute kidney injury model.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Ugur; Guner, Ibrahim; Yaman, Onur M; Erman, Hayriye; Uzun, Duygu; Sengezer-Inceli, Meliha; Sahin, Ahmet; Yelmen, Nermin; Gelisgen, Remisa; Uzun, Hafize; Sahin, Gulderen

    2014-12-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) has been reported to be associated with augmented reactive oxygen radicals and cytokines. Currently, we aimed to examine the influence of fluoxetine, which is already used as a preoperative anxiolytic, in the context of IR induced by occlusion of infrarenal abdominal aorta (60 min of ischemia) and its effects on renal oxidative status, inflammation, renal function, and cellular integrity in reperfusion (120 min post-ischemia). Male rats were randomly assigned as control, IR, and pretreated groups. The pretreated group animals received fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) once daily for 3 days. Renal tissue oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6), histology, and function were assessed. As an anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 was also assessed. IR led to a significant increase in lipid hydroperoxide, malondialdehyde, and pro-oxidant antioxidant balance and decrease in superoxide dismutase activity and ferric reducing/antioxidant power level (p < 0.05), but fluoxetine was able to restore these parameters. High concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and myeloperoxidase activity caused by IR were significantly decreased in kidney tissue with fluoxetine. In addition, interleukin-10 levels were high in fluoxetine pretreated group. IR resulted in disrupted cellular integrity, infiltration of tissue with leukocytes, and decreased serum creatinine-urea levels (p < 0.05). Fluoxetine significantly restored impaired redox balance and inflammation parameters of rats subjected to IR to baseline values. This beneficial effect of fluoxetine on redox balance might be addressed to an improvement in renal function.

  17. Olanzapine, but Not Fluoxetine, Treatment Increases Survival in Activity-Based Anorexia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klenotich, Stephanie J; Seiglie, Mariel P; McMurray, Matthew S; Roitman, Jamie D; Le Grange, Daniel; Dugad, Priya; Dulawa, Stephanie C

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by extreme hypophagia, hyperactivity, and fear of weight gain. No approved pharmacological treatments exist for AN despite high mortality rates. The activity-based anorexia (ABA) phenomenon models aspects of AN in rodents, including progressive weight loss, reduced food intake, and hyperactivity. First, we optimized the ABA paradigm for mice. We compared mouse strains (Balb/cJ, A/J) for susceptibility with ABA, and evaluated the effects of different food access durations (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h) on ABA parameters. Balb/cJ mice exhibited significantly shorter survival time (days until 25% bodyweight loss) in the ABA paradigm compared with A/J mice. Furthermore, 6 h of food access reduced survival in mice housed with wheels without reducing survival in mice housed without wheels. We then evaluated the effects of chronic treatment with fluoxetine (4 weeks) or subchronic treatment with olanzapine (OLZ) (1 week) on ABA in BALB/cJ mice. OLZ (12 mg/kg/day) significantly increased survival and reduced food anticipatory activity (FAA). However, OLZ did not alter food intake or running wheel activity during ad-lib feeding (baseline) or restriction conditions, or in mice housed without wheels. Fluoxetine (18 mg/kg/day) increased food intake and reduced FAA, but did not alter survival. Here, we report for the first time that OLZ, but not fluoxetine, reduces ABA in mice. Our findings indicate further need for clinical investigations into the effects of OLZ, but not selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, on core features of AN. PMID:22395732

  18. USE OF ORAL FLUOXETINE FOR THE TREATMENT OF ABNORMAL AGGRESSION IN TWO RED-NECKED WALLABIES (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS).

    PubMed

    Olds, June E

    2017-09-01

    : Abnormal inter- and intraspecies aggression, perceived to be anxiety related, was identified in two male red-necked wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) housed within a zoo. Aggressive episodes were directed at conspecifics, other exhibit animals, and, in one case, human caretakers. The clinical use of oral fluoxetine (0.5 mg/kg po bid) for a period of approximately 4 mo was effective in eliminating aggression towards humans and other animals in these two individuals. There was no evidence of recrudescence of aggression in either case following discontinuation of therapy for up to 3 yr posttreatment. Other than a period of mild transient sedation in one animal, side effects were not noted with fluoxetine treatment in these cases. Additional studies on the pharmacokinetics and side effects of fluoxetine treatment for anxiety behaviors are warranted in wallabies.

  19. Fluoxetine for the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Open-Label, Long-Term Extension to a Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Duncan B.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Monk, Kelly; Kalas, Catherine; Ehmann, Mary; Bridge, Jeffrey; Wood, D. Scott; Muthen, Bengt; Brent, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of fluoxetine for the long-term treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Method: Children and adolescents (7-17 years old) with anxiety disorders were studied in open treatment for 1 year after they…

  20. Fluoxetine for the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Open-Label, Long-Term Extension to a Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Duncan B.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Monk, Kelly; Kalas, Catherine; Ehmann, Mary; Bridge, Jeffrey; Wood, D. Scott; Muthen, Bengt; Brent, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of fluoxetine for the long-term treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Method: Children and adolescents (7-17 years old) with anxiety disorders were studied in open treatment for 1 year after they…

  1. Gestational stress and fluoxetine treatment differentially affect plasticity, methylation and serotonin levels in the PFC and hippocampus of rat dams.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Mary; Rayen, Ine; van Donkelaar, Eva; Loftus, Tiffany; Steinbusch, Harry W; Kokras, Nikolaos; Dalla, Christina; Pawluski, Jodi L

    2016-07-07

    Women are more likely to develop depression during childbearing years with up to 20% of women suffering from depression during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. Increased prevalence of depression during the perinatal period has resulted in frequent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant treatment; however the effects of such medications on the maternal brain remain limited. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of the SSRI medication, fluoxetine, on neurobiological differences in the maternal brain. To model aspects of maternal depression, gestational stress was used. Sprague-Dawley rat dams were exposed to either gestational stress and/or fluoxetine (5mg/kg/day) to form the following four groups: 1. Control+Vehicle, 2. Stress+Vehicle, 3. Control+Fluoxetine, and 4. Stress+Fluoxetine. At weaning maternal brains were collected. Main findings show that gestational stress alone increased synaptophysin and serotonin metabolism in the cingulate cortex2 region of the cortex while fluoxetine treatment after stress normalized these effects. In the hippocampus, fluoxetine treatment, regardless of gestational stress exposure, decreased both global measures of methylation in the dentate gyrus, as measured by Dnmt3a immunoreactivity, as well as serotonin metabolism. No further changes in synaptophysin, PSD-95, or Dnmt3a immunoreactivity were seen in the cortical or hippocampal areas investigated. These findings show that gestational stress and SSRI medication affect the neurobiology of the maternal brain in a region-specific manner. This work adds to a much needed area of research aimed at understanding neurobiological changes associated with maternal depression and the role of SSRI treatment in altering these changes in the female brain. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Serotonin transporter immunoreactivity is modulated during development and after fluoxetine treatment in the rodent visual system.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Junior, Wandilson Dos Santos; Oliveira-Silva, Priscilla; Faria-Melibeu, Adriana da Cunha; Campello-Costa, Paula; Serfaty, Claudio Alberto

    2017-07-26

    The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) regulates serotonin homeostasis and has been used as a target for different drugs in depression treatment. Although the serotonergic system has received a lot of attention, little is known about the effects of these drugs over serotonin transporters. In this work, we investigated the expression pattern of 5-HTT during development of the visual system and the influence of fluoxetine on different signaling pathways. Our data showed that the expression of 5-HTT has a gradual increase from postnatal day 0 until 42 and decrease afterwards. Moreover, chronic fluoxetine treatment both in childhood and adolescence induces down regulation of 5-HTT expression and phosphorylation of ERK and AKT signaling pathways. Together these data suggest that the levels of 5-HTT protein could be important for the development of the central nervous system and suggest that the ERK and AKT are involved in the molecular pathways of antidepressants drugs, acting in concert to improve serotonergic signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute and chronic anxiogenic-like response to fluoxetine in rats in the elevated plus-maze: modulation by stressful handling.

    PubMed

    Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Renault, Alain; Reymann, Jean-Michel

    2011-07-07

    While antidepressants are widely prescribed to humans for the treatment of anxiety, the results achieved with animal anxiety models are conflicting. The experimental procedure and the prior test history of the animals are critical parameters that are largely susceptible to influence the results and their interpretation. We compared the effect of 5mg fluoxetine administered to six groups of rats subjected to the psychopharmacological test of the elevated plus-maze, under experimental conditions designed to demonstrate the effect of handling and one daily injection on the response to fluoxetine. The results show that for animals with the same recent experience, fluoxetine, when administered once or over a period of 15 days, induces anxiogenic-like behaviour. On the other hand, our results also show that stressful handling has an anxiolytic-like effect modulating the anxiogenic-like effect of fluoxetine, without eliminating it altogether. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine and sertraline prevents forced swimming test-induced hypercontractility of rat detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Sirri; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Bas, Duygu B; Aksoz, Elif; Savli, Evren; Ilkaya, Fatih; Kesim, Yuksel

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake inhibitors represent important targets for the development of new treatments for detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the forced swimming test (FST) on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle and to examine the effects of in vivo treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline on altered detrusor muscle contractility. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg ip) and sertraline (10 mg/kg ip) were administered once a day for 14 days. Rats were exposed to the FST on the 15th day. After the test, detrusor muscles were removed and placed in organ baths, and the contraction responses induced by carbachol, potassium chloride (KCl) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were recorded. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to carbachol and electrical field stimulation were found to be increased at all carbachol doses and frequencies, respectively. FST also increased the contractile responses to KCl, which is used to test the differences in postreceptor-mediated contractions. The hypercontractile responses of detrusor strips to carbachol, EFS and KCl were abolished by treatment with both fluoxetine and sertraline. These treatments also decreased the immobility duration in the FST consistent with an antidepressant-like effect in this test. The results of this study provide the first evidence that FST increases contractility of the rat detrusor muscle, and this hypercontractility was abolished by chronic treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline at antidepressant doses by decreasing the postreceptor-mediated events.

  5. Amisulpride vs. fluoxetine treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Matteo; Guida, Silvia; Primavera, Alberto; Krueger, Frank; Cocito, Leonardo; Gialloreti, Leonardo Emberti

    2011-03-01

    Different pharmacologic agents have been evaluated in the treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), albeit with moderate efficacy. Among the compounds thought to present with potential to be efficacious in CFS patients stands out low-dose amisulpride, a substituted benzamide that has been shown to be an useful treatment for conditions which exhibit some overlap with CFS such as dysthymia and somatoform disorders. We thus recruited forty non-depressed CFS patients that were randomized to receive either amisulpride 25mg bid, or fluoxetine 20mg uid; all subjects were un-blinded to the treatment regimen. At the time of enrollment in the study and after twelve weeks of treatment, enrolled subjects completed the Krupp Fatigue Severity Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a visual analog scale focused on pain and bodily discomfort. Moreover, all subjects were evaluated by a clinician, blinded to the treatment regimen, using the Clinical Global Impression Severity Scale. Our data revealed a significant improvement both in self-report, and observer-based measures for the amisulpride-treated, but not for the fluoxetine-treated patients. Amisulpride-treated subjects also presented with a significant reduction of somatic complaints, while the amisulpride effect on anxiety and mood levels was not significant. Both drugs were equally well tolerated. Summing up, we showed a positive symptomatic effect of amisulpride, compared to SSRI treatment, in a group of non-depressed CSF patients on self-report and on observer-based measures of fatigue and somatic complaints. If confirmed by larger, blinded studies, amisulpride thus could represent an effective approach to this difficult-to-treat condition.

  6. Continued Effectiveness of Relapse Prevention Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Following Fluoxetine Treatment in Youth With Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Emslie, Graham J; Kennard, Betsy D; Mayes, Taryn L; Nakonezny, Paul A; Moore, Jarrette; Jones, Jessica M; Foxwell, Aleksandra A; King, Jessica

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the continued effect of a sequential treatment strategy (fluoxetine followed by continued medication plus relapse prevention cognitive-behavioral therapy [RP-CBT]) on relapse prevention beyond the treatment phase. Youth (aged 8-17 years) with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated with fluoxetine for 6 weeks. Responders (≥50% reduction on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised [CDRS-R]) were randomized to continued medication management alone (MM) or continued medication management plus RP-CBT (MM+CBT) for an additional 6 months. Long-term follow-up assessments were conducted at weeks 52 and 78. Of 144 youth randomized to MM (n = 69) or MM+CBT (n = 75), 67% had at least 1 follow-up assessment, with equal rates in the 2 groups. Remission rates were high, although most had remitted during the 30-week treatment period. Only 6 additional participants remitted during long-term follow-up, and there were no differences on time to remission between MM+CBT and MM. The MM+CBT group had a significantly lower risk of relapse than the MM group throughout the 78-week follow-up period (hazard ratio = 0.467, 95% CI = 0.264 to 0.823; χ(2) = 6.852, p = .009). The estimated probability of relapse during the 78-week period was lower with MM+CBT than MM only (36% versus 62%). Mean time to relapse was also significantly longer with MM+CBT compared to MM alone by approximately 3 months (p = .007). The addition of RP-CBT after acute response to medication management had a continued effect on reducing risk of relapse even after the end of treatment. Clinical trial registration information-Sequential Treatment of Pediatric MDD to Increase Remission and Prevent Relapse; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00612313. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SET-C versus Fluoxetine in the Treatment of Childhood Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.; Ammerman, Robert T.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Crosby, Lori A.; Pathak, Sanjeev

    2007-01-01

    A study examines the effectiveness of fluoxetine, pill placebo and Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C) for children and adolescents with social phobia. The results conclude that both fluoxetine and SET-C are effective for social phobia but SET-C is better for enhancing social skills.

  8. SET-C versus Fluoxetine in the Treatment of Childhood Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.; Ammerman, Robert T.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Crosby, Lori A.; Pathak, Sanjeev

    2007-01-01

    A study examines the effectiveness of fluoxetine, pill placebo and Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C) for children and adolescents with social phobia. The results conclude that both fluoxetine and SET-C are effective for social phobia but SET-C is better for enhancing social skills.

  9. The effects of sertraline and fluoxetine on anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test in mice.

    PubMed

    Kurt, M; Arik, A C; Celik, S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute and chronic effects of two SSRIs (sertraline and fluoxetine) on anxiety by the elevated plus-maze test. Diazepam increased the time spent in open arms significantly whereas the anxiogenic m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) decreased the time significantly. Acute sertraline (10 mg x kg(-1)) and fluoxetine (20 mg x kg(-1)) treatment significantly decreased the time spent in open arms. Acute fluoxetine (20 mg x kg(-1)) treatment also decreased the total number of enclosed arm entries. Seven days sertraline treatment decreased the time spent in open arms, whereas 14 days fluoxetine treatment increased the time spent in open arms. These results show that acute administration of SSRIs may produce anxiogenic effects in the elevated plus-maze test.

  10. Fluoxetine alters adult freshwater mussel behavior and larval metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Hazelton, Peter D; Cope, W Gregory; Mosher, Shad; Pandolfo, Tamara J; Belden, Jason B; Barnhart, M Christopher; Bringolf, Robert B

    2013-02-15

    We used acute and partial-lifecycle tests to examine the effects of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine on freshwater mussels (Unionida). In acute tests lasting 24-48 h, we determined median effective concentrations (EC50s) for fluoxetine with larval (glochidia viability) and juvenile (survival) life-stages of fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and black sandshell (Ligumia recta). In a 28-d behavioral test we exposed brooding adult female wavy-rayed lampmussels (Lampsilis fasciola) to 0.37 and 29.3 μg/L fluoxetine to determine effects on adult behavior (foot protrusion, mantle lure display and glochidia parturition). We also assessed the effects of 24-h exposure of 1 and 100 μg/L fluoxetine on glochidia viability duration and metamorphosis success for the wavy-rayed lampmussel. Fluoxetine EC50s ranged from 62 μg/L for juveniles (96 h) to 293 μg/L for glochidia (24 h). In adults, statistically significant increases were observed in foot protrusion at 0.37 and 29.3 μg/L fluoxetine and lure display rates at 29.3 μg/L; glochidia parturition was not significantly affected at any test concentration. Twenty-four hour exposure of glochidia to fluoxetine did not affect viability duration, but likelihood of metamorphosis to the juvenile stage significantly increased with 1 and 100 μg/L treatments. Our results demonstrated effects of fluoxetine to unionid mussels at concentrations less than previously reported and approaching concentrations measured in surface waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute intracerebral hemorrhage (FMRICH): study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous, nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a subtype of stroke that causes a great amount of disability and economic and social burden. This is particularly true in developing countries where it accounts for between 20% and 50% of all strokes. Pharmacological and surgical interventions have been attempted to reduce the mortality and disability caused by ICH, with unsuccessful results. Recently, the use of fluoxetine in addition to physical rehabilitation has been proven useful to improve motor recovery following cerebral infarct. The purpose of this study is to test whether a 3-month treatment with fluoxetine enhances motor recovery in nondepressed patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods/design Our study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. We will recruit 86 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage of both sexes, aged >18 years, from four Mexican hospitals. The patients will receive either 20 mg of fluoxetine or a placebo once daily for 90 days. The primary outcome is the mean change in the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale score between inclusion (day 0) and day 90. The secondary outcomes will be changes in the Barthel Index, the Modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health stroke scale. The outcomes will be measured at day 42 ± 7days and at day 90, for a total of four visits with each subject (at screening and at 0, 42 and 90 days). Discussion Current guidelines recommend early supported hospital discharge and home-based rehabilitation programs as the only cost-effective intervention to aid the recovery of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Nevertheless, such interventions are dependent on available resources and funding, which make them very difficult to implement in developing countries. We believe that the identification of a helpful pharmacological intervention to aid the motor recovery of these patients will constitute a breakthrough that will have a major impact in

  12. Effect of repeated co-treatment with fluoxetine and amantadine on the behavioral reactivity of the central dopamine and serotonin system in rats.

    PubMed

    Rogóz, Zofia; Skuza, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    In the present study we found that repeated co-treatment with fluoxetine and amantadine for 14 days (but not for 7 days) enhanced the hyperactivity induced by amphetamine or quinpirole (a dopamine D(2/3) agonist), compared to treatment with either drug alone. Whereas repeated co-treatment with fluoxetine and amantadine for 7 days more potently inhibited the behavioral syndrome evoked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1A) receptor agonist (+/-)-8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), it did not change the action of the 5-HT(2) receptor agonist (+/-)-1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride (/+/-/-DOI). The obtained results support the hypothesis that repeated co-treatment with fluoxetine and amantadine may evoke more effective antidepressant activity than treatment with fluoxetine alone. Moreover, our results suggest that 5-HT(1A) receptors are useful targets for the development of more rapidly acting and more effective medication.

  13. Aquatic toxicology of fluoxetine: understanding the knowns and the unknowns.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Grossman, Leah; Nguyen, Michael; Maximino, Caio; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Echevarria, David J; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-11-01

    Fluoxetine is one of the most prescribed psychotropic medications, and is an agent of increasing interest for environmental toxicology. Fish and other aquatic organisms are excellent models to study neuroactive small molecules like fluoxetine. However, prone to variance due to experimental factors, data obtained in these models need to be interpreted with caution, using proper experimental protocols, study designs, validated endpoints as well as well-established models and tests. Choosing the treatment protocol and dose range for fluoxetine and other serotonergic drugs is critical for obtaining valid test results and correct data interpretation. Here we discuss the value of aquatic models to study fluoxetine effects, based on prior high-quality research, and outline the directions of future translational studies in the field. We review fluoxetine-evoked phenotypes in acute vs. chronic protocols, discussing them in the contact of complex role of serotonin in behavioral regulation. We conclude that zebrafish and other aquatic models represent a useful in-vivo tool for fluoxetine pharmacology and (eco)toxicology research.

  14. Persistent infection of human pancreatic cells with Coxsackievirus B4 is cured by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Alidjinou, Enagnon Kazali; Sané, Famara; Bertin, Antoine; Caloone, Delphine; Hober, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Group B Coxsackieviruses (CVB) are involved in various acute clinical features and they can play a role in the development of chronic diseases like type 1 diabetes. The persistence of CVB has been described in vitro and in vivo in various models. Fluoxetine was reported to inhibit the replication of CVB1-3, which prompted us to study the in vitro antiviral activity of fluoxetine against CVB4 in models of acute infection. In addition we took advantage of a chronically CVB4-infected Panc-1 cell line to evaluate the antiviral effect of fluoxetine in a model of persistent CVB4 infection. An inhibition of the CVB4 replication was obtained when fluoxetine was added at 5.48μM to Hep-2 cell cultures. No inhibitory effect was observed when CVB4 was mixed with fluoxetine for 2h and filtered to eliminate fluoxetine before inoculation to cells, or when cells were treated up to 96h and washed before viral inoculation. Fluoxetine (5.48μM) reduced viral replication by more than 50% in acutely infected Panc-1 cell cultures. A dramatic decrease of infectious particles levels in supernatants of Panc-1 cells chronically infected with CVB4 was obtained a few days after treatment with fluoxetine and no infectious viral particle was found as soon as day 21 of treatment, and intracellular enteroviral RNA was undetectable by RT-PCR after three weeks of treatment. These data display that fluoxetine can inhibit the replication of CVB4 and can cure Panc-1 cells chronically infected with CVB4.

  15. Chronic fluoxetine treatment induces anxiolytic responses and altered social behaviors in medaka, Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Kinoshita, Masato

    2016-04-15

    Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a small freshwater teleost that is an emerging model system for neurobehavioral research and toxicological testing. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants such as fluoxetine is one of the widely prescribed drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on medaka behaviors. To assess the behavioral effects of fluoxetine, we chronically administrated fluoxetine to medaka adult fish and analyzed the anxiety-related and social behaviors using five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and social interaction) with an automated behavioral testing system. Fish chronically treated with fluoxetine exhibited anxiolytic responses such as an overall increased time spent in the top area in the diving test and an increased time spent in center area in the open-field test. Analysis of socially evoked behavior showed that chronic fluoxetine administration decreased the number of mirror biting times in the mirror-biting test and increased latency to first contact in the social interaction test. Additionally, chronic fluoxetine administration reduced the horizontal locomotor activity in the open-field test but not the vertical activity in the diving test. These investigations are mostly consistent with previous reports in the other teleost species and rodent models. These results indicate that behavioral assessment in medaka adult fish will become useful for screening of effects of pharmaceutical and toxicological compounds in animal behaviors.

  16. Comparison of Saffron versus Fluoxetine in Treatment of Mild to Moderate Postpartum Depression: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kashani, L; Eslatmanesh, S; Saedi, N; Niroomand, N; Ebrahimi, M; Hosseinian, M; Foroughifar, T; Salimi, S; Akhondzadeh, S

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Postpartum depression is a common mental health problem that is associated with maternal suffering. The aim of this double-blind clinical trial was to compare safety and efficacy of saffron and fluoxetine in treatment of mild to moderate postpartum depression. Methods: This was a 6-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Subjects were women aged 18-45 years with mild to moderate postpartum depression who had Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS 17-item) score≤18. Eligible participants were randomized to receive either a capsule of saffron (15 mg capsule) or fluoxetine (20 mg capsule) twice daily for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was to evaluate efficacy of saffron compared to fluoxetine in improving depressive symptoms (HDRS score). Results: There was no significant effect for time×treatment interaction on HDRS score [F (4.90, 292.50)=1.04, p=0.37] between the 2 groups. 13 (40.60%) patients in the saffron group experienced complete response (≥50% reduction in HDRS score) compared with 16 (50%) in the fluoxetine group and the difference between the 2 groups was not significant in this regard (p=0.61). Frequency of adverse events was not significantly different between the treatment groups. Discussion: The results of this study may suggest that saffron is a safe alternative medication for improving depressive symptoms of postpartum depression. Nevertheless, it should be mentioned that the trial is not well powered and should be considered a preliminary study. Therefore, large clinical trials with longer treatment periods and comparison with placebo group would be appropriate for future studies.

  17. Potentiated gene regulation by methylphenidate plus fluoxetine treatment: Long-term gene blunting (Zif268, Homer1a) and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Beverley, Joel A; Piekarski, Cassandra; Van Waes, Vincent; Steiner, Heinz

    2014-12-01

    Use of psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) in medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy is increasing. Methylphenidate produces some addiction-related gene regulation in animal models. Recent findings show that combining selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants such as fluoxetine with methylphenidate potentiates methylphenidate-induced gene regulation. We investigated the endurance of such abnormal gene regulation by assessing an established marker for altered gene regulation after drug treatments - blunting (repression) of immediate-early gene (IEG) inducibility - 14 days after repeated methylphenidate+fluoxetine treatment in adolescent rats. Thus, we measured the effects of a 6-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or their combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related IEGs (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum, by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced modest gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine given in conjunction with methylphenidate produced pronounced potentiation of methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was seen in many functional domains of the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum. These enduring molecular changes were associated with potentiated induction of behavioral stereotypies in an open-field test. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs such as fluoxetine may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate. Key words: cognitive enhancer, dopamine, serotonin, gene expression, psychostimulant, SSRI antidepressant, striatum.

  18. Comparative efficacy, acceptability, and safety of medicinal, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and placebo treatments for acute major depressive disorder in children and adolescents: a multiple-treatments meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongfeng; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Xiangrong; Li, Lingjiang

    2014-06-01

    New generation antidepressant therapies, including serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were introduced in the late 1980s; however, few comprehensive studies compared the benefits and risks of various contemporary treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) in pediatric patients. Multiple-treatments meta-analysis (MTM) was conducted to assess efficacy, acceptability, and safety of contemporary interventions in children and adolescents with MDD. Cochrane Library, AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, LiLACS, MEDLINE, PSYCINFO, PSYNDEX, and Journal of Medicine and Pharmacy databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing medicinal interventions (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, mirtazapine, paroxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), combined fluoxetine with CBT, and placebo treatment for acute MDD from January 1988 to March 2013. Treatment success, dropout rate, and suicidal ideation/attempt outcomes were measured. Bayesian methods were used to conduct a MTM including age and funding subgroups. A total of 21 RCTs (4969 participants) were identified. Combined fluoxetine/CBT exhibited the highest efficacy, with fluoxetine alone superior to CBT, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram, escitalopram, and placebo treatment. Sertraline, paroxetine, escitalopram, and venlafaxine showed superior acceptability to fluoxetine and combined fluoxetine/CBT. Combined fluoxetine/CBT combination was less safe, though CBT was safer than fluoxetine alone. Combined fluoxetine/CBT, fluoxetine, and mirtazapine exhibited the highest efficacy; sertraline, escitalopram, venlafaxine, and paroxetine were the best tolerated; and mirtazapine and venlafaxine were the safest. Sertraline and mirtazapine exhibited optimally balanced efficacy, acceptability, and safety for first-line acute treatment of child and adolescent MDD.

  19. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response

    PubMed Central

    Panlilio, Jennifer M.; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B.; McDonald, M. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g−1 FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g−1 FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g−1 FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia. PMID:27499056

  20. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response.

    PubMed

    Panlilio, Jennifer M; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B; McDonald, M Danielle

    2016-08-08

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g(-1) FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g(-1) FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g(-1) FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia.

  1. Combination of fluoxetine and extinction treatments forms a unique synaptic protein profile that correlates with long-term fear reduction in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Popova, Dina; Ágústsdóttir, Arna; Lindholm, Jesse; Mazulis, Ulams; Akamine, Yumiko; Castrén, Eero; Karpova, Nina N

    2014-07-01

    The antidepressant fluoxetine induces synaptic plasticity in the visual and fear networks and promotes the structural remodeling of neuronal circuits, which is critical for experience-dependent plasticity in response to an environmental stimulus. We recently demonstrated that chronic fluoxetine administration together with extinction training in adult mice reduced fear in a context-independent manner. Fear conditioning and extinction alter excitatory and inhibitory transmissions within the fear circuitry. In this study, we investigated whether fluoxetine, extinction or their combination produced distinct long-lasting changes in the synaptic protein profile in the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of conditioned mice. We determined that extinction induced synaptophysin expression and down-regulated the GluA1:GluA2 ratio throughout the fear network in water- and fluoxetine-treated mice, suggesting a common fluoxetine-independent mechanism for increased synaptic transmission and re-arrangement of AMPA-receptors by extinction training. In contrast to common changes, the presynaptic vesicular neurotransmitter transporters VGAT and Vglut1 were upregulated after extinction in water- and fluoxetine-treated mice, respectively. The cortical levels of the GABA transporter Gat1 were reduced in high-freezing water-drinking mice, suggesting a maladaptive increase of GABA spillover at cortical inhibitory synapses. Fear conditioning decreased, and extinction induced the expression of GABA-receptor alpha1 and alpha2 subunits in water- and fluoxetine-treated mice, respectively. Only a combination of fluoxetine with extinction enhanced GluN2A expression in the amygdala and hippocampus, emphasizing the role of this NMDA-receptor subunit in the successful erasure of fear memories. Our finding provides novel data that may become helpful in developing beneficial pharmacological fear-reducing treatment strategies.

  2. Fluoxetine Protection in Decompression Sickness in Mice is Enhanced by Blocking TREK-1 Potassium Channel with the "spadin" Antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Kate; De Maistre, Sébastien; Royal, Perrine; Mazella, Jean; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation, and ischemia induce neurological damage that can lead to death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. Acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increases the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50 mg/kg) in wild-type (WT) and TREK-1 deficient mice (knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET). Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a 5-day treatment protocol with spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice). KO and KO-like mice were regarded as antidepressed models. In total, 167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux) constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive) constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux) and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux) died from decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62%) or KO-like mice (41%). After the decompression protocol, mice showed significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes. Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to exhibit DCS. Nevertheless, mice which had both blocked TREK-1 channels and fluoxetine treatment were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreased DCS severity but increased the survival rate.

  3. Fluoxetine in Treatment of Adolescent Patients with Autism: A Longitudinal Open Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Realmuto, George M.; Khan, Lubna; Thuras, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Retrospective chart reviews of seven adolescents and young adults (ages 9-20) with autistic disorder treated with fluoxetine alone or in combination with other medications were performed. Side effects included initial appetite suppression, vivid dreams, and hyperactivity. Improvement was seen in irritability, lethargy, sterotypy, and inappropriate…

  4. Adult-Onset Fluoxetine Treatment Does Not Improve Behavioral Impairments and May Have Adverse Effects on the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Markus; Hettich, Moritz M.; Ryan, Devon P.; Schnell, Susanne; Paesler, Katharina; Ehninger, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome is caused by triplication of chromosome 21 and is associated with neurocognitive phenotypes ranging from severe intellectual disability to various patterns of more selective neuropsychological deficits, including memory impairments. In the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome, excessive GABAergic neurotransmission results in local over-inhibition of hippocampal circuits, which dampens hippocampal synaptic plasticity and contributes to cognitive impairments. Treatments with several GABAA receptor antagonists result in increased plasticity and improved memory deficits in Ts65Dn mice. These GABAA receptor antagonists are, however, not suitable for clinical applications. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, in contrast, is a widely prescribed antidepressant that can also enhance plasticity in the adult rodent brain by lowering GABAergic inhibition. For these reasons, we wondered if an adult-onset 4-week oral fluoxetine treatment restores spatial learning and memory impairments in Ts65Dn mice. Fluoxetine did not measurably improve behavioral impairments of Ts65Dn mice. On the contrary, we observed seizures and mortality in fluoxetine-treated Ts65Dn mice, raising the possibility of a drug × genotype interaction with respect to these adverse treatment outcomes. Future studies should re-address this in larger animal cohorts and determine if fluoxetine treatment is associated with adverse treatment effects in individuals with Down syndrome. PMID:22848851

  5. A randomized, double-blind trial comparing sertraline and fluoxetine 6-month treatment in obese patients with Binge Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Leombruni, Paolo; Pierò, Andrea; Lavagnino, Luca; Brustolin, Annalisa; Campisi, Stefania; Fassino, Secondo

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies support the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), in overweight patients with Binge Eating Disorder (BED), but results are far from conclusive. Sertraline has been studied less extensively, and there have been a few studies concerning SSRIs that report follow-up data at more than 12 weeks of follow-up. The present study assesses the effectiveness of sertraline and fluoxetine over a period of 24 weeks in obese patients with BED (DSM-IV-TR). Forty-two obese outpatients were randomized and assigned to one of two different drug treatments: 22 were treated with sertraline (dose range: 100-200 mg/day) and 20 with fluoxetine (dose range: 40-80 mg/day). Subjects were assessed at baseline and at 8, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment for binge frequency, weight loss, and severity of psychopathology. No significant differences were found between the two treatments. After 8 weeks of treatment a significant improvement in the Binge Eating Scale score and a significant weight loss emerged. These results were maintained by responders (weigh loss of at least 5% of baseline weight) over 24 weeks. The results suggest that a 6-month treatment with SSRI may be an effective option to treat patients with BED.

  6. Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Perfectionism: A Predictor and Partial Mediator of Acute Treatment Outcome among Clinically Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of perfectionism on acute treatment outcomes was explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents (12-17 years of age) enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine, a combination of CBT and FLX, or pill placebo. Measures…

  7. Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Perfectionism: A Predictor and Partial Mediator of Acute Treatment Outcome among Clinically Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of perfectionism on acute treatment outcomes was explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents (12-17 years of age) enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine, a combination of CBT and FLX, or pill placebo. Measures…

  8. Atorvastatin and Fluoxetine Prevent Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Evoked by Glutamate Toxicity in Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Ludka, Fabiana K; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Binder, Luisa Bandeira; Constantino, Leandra Celso; Massari, Caio; Tasca, Carla I

    2017-07-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to exert a neuroprotective action by counteracting glutamatergic toxicity. Recently, we have shown atorvastatin also exerts an antidepressant-like effect that depends on both glutamatergic and serotonergic systems modulation. Excitotoxicity is involved in several brain disorders including depression; thus, it is suggested that antidepressants may target glutamatergic system as a final common pathway. In this study, a comparison of the mechanisms involved in the putative neuroprotective effect of a repetitive atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal slices was performed. Adult Swiss mice were treated with atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, p.o.), once a day during seven consecutive days. On the eighth day, animals were killed and hippocampal slices were obtained and subjected to an in vitro protocol of glutamate toxicity. An acute treatment of atorvastatin or fluoxetine was not neuroprotective; however, the repeated atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment prevented the decrease in cellular viability induced by glutamate in hippocampal slices. The loss of cellular viability induced by glutamate was accompanied by increased D-aspartate release, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine repeated treatment also presented an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment was effective in protecting mice hippocampal slices from glutamate toxicity by preventing the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Fluoxetine combined with clorazepate dipotassium and behaviour modification for treatment of anxiety-related disorders in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pineda, S; Anzola, B; Olivares, A; Ibáñez, M

    2014-03-01

    The effectiveness of clorazepate dipotassium combined with fluoxetine and a behaviour modification programme for the treatment of anxiety disorders in dogs was investigated. Forty dogs with anxiety disorders were initially enrolled and 36 dogs completed the trial. Dogs were classified into two behavioural categories (anxious dogs with aggression and anxious dogs without aggression) according to their presenting complaints, and were also subdivided into males, females, juveniles and adults. The dog owners were provided with a behaviour modification plan for their dogs to be commenced in the first week of therapy. Clorazepate dipotassium was administered PO at 1.0 mg/kg every 24 h for 4 weeks, and fluoxetine was administered PO at 1.0 mg/kg every 24 h for 10 weeks. Therapy with both drugs was initiated simultaneously. Improvement was reported in 25/36 dogs. Significant differences in treatment effects were observed between anxious dogs with aggression and anxious dogs without aggression (P<0.05). Positive correlations between owner compliance with the treatment plan and reported improvement achieved during three periods of study were also noted.

  10. Risk of suicide during treatment with venlafaxine, citalopram, fluoxetine, and dothiepin: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Roskell, Neil; Tennis, Pat; Mines, Daniel; Weich, Scott; Andrews, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Objective To compare the risk of suicide in adults using the antidepressant venlafaxine compared with citalopram, fluoxetine, and dothiepin. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting UK General Practice Research Database. Participants 219 088 patients, aged 18-89 years, who were prescribed venlafaxine, citalopram, fluoxetine, or dothiepin from 1995 to 2005. Main outcome measures Completed suicide and attempted suicide. Results Venlafaxine users had a higher burden of risk factors for suicide, including previous suicide attempts and proxies for severe depression or depression that was difficult to treat. In the analysis for completed suicides, unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios for venlafaxine compared with citalopram were 2.44 (95% confidence interval 1.12 to 5.31) and 1.70 (0.76 to 3.80), for venlafaxine compared with fluoxetine were 2.85 (1.37 to 5.94) and 1.63 (0.74 to 3.59), and for venlafaxine compared with dothiepin were 2.54 (1.07 to 6.02) and 1.31 (0.53 to 3.25). Compared with other study drugs, venlafaxine was also associated with an increased risk of attempted suicide, but adjustment for measured confounders substantially reduced the hazard ratios. Conclusions Venlafaxine use was consistently associated with higher risk of suicide compared with citalopram, fluoxetine, and dothiepin. Venlafaxine users had a higher burden of suicide risk factors, however, and adjustment for measured confounders substantially reduced the excess risks. Since the secondary data used in this analysis allowed only indirect and partial measurements of potential confounders, it is possible that residual confounding explains much, if not all, of the observed excess risk. PMID:17164297

  11. Assessing the environmental hazard of individual and combined pharmaceuticals: acute and chronic toxicity of fluoxetine and propranolol in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Varano, Valentina; Fabbri, Elena; Pasteris, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals are widespread emerging contaminants and, like all pollutants, are present in combination with others in the ecosystems. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the toxic response of the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to individual and combined pharmaceuticals. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor widely prescribed as antidepressant, and propranolol, a non-selective β-adrenergic receptor-blocking agent used to treat hypertension, were tested. Several experimental trials of an acute immobilization test and a chronic reproduction test were performed. Single chemicals were first tested separately. Toxicity of binary mixtures was then assessed using a fixed ratio experimental design. Five concentrations and 5 percentages of each substance in the mixture (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%) were tested. The MIXTOX model was applied to analyze the experimental results. This tool is a stepwise statistical procedure that evaluates if and how observed data deviate from a reference model, either concentration addition (CA) or independent action (IA), and provides significance testing for synergism, antagonism, or more complex interactions. Acute EC50 values ranged from 6.4 to 7.8 mg/L for propranolol and from 6.4 to 9.1 mg/L for fluoxetine. Chronic EC50 values ranged from 0.59 to 1.00 mg/L for propranolol and from 0.23 to 0.24 mg/L for fluoxetine. Results showed a significant antagonism between chemicals in both the acute and the chronic mixture tests when CA was adopted as the reference model, while absence of interactive effects when IA was used.

  12. The antidepressants fluoxetine and bupropion differentially affect proceptive behavior in the naturally cycling female rat.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Aquino, Elisa; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso

    2013-11-01

    Fluoxetine, like other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, inhibits women's sexual desire and female rats' sexual behavior. Bupropion produces pro-sexual effects in women with and without depression, and yohimbine increases men's and male rats' sexual motivation, but their effects on female rats' proceptivity are unknown. To investigate the effects of fluoxetine, bupropion, and yohimbine on proceptivity and receptivity in the naturally cycling female rat. We studied the effect of chronic (minimum 14 days) fluoxetine (1.25 mg/kg, subcutaneous) and bupropion (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) and acute yohimbine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) on sexual behavior of female rats selected in natural proestrus during an ejaculatory series. We also analyzed the effects of these treatments on locomotor activity. The main outcome measures were frequencies of hops/darts and ear wiggling, lordosis quotient and intensity, and locomotor activity. Fluoxetine inhibited ear wiggling and hopping/darting, while bupropion stimulated hopping/darting. These treatments did not modify the lordosis quotient and its intensity. Yohimbine did not change any aspect of female sexual behavior. At the doses and treatments used, fluoxetine and bupropion did not alter locomotor activity or disturb the length of the estrous cycle; however, yohimbine inhibited locomotor activity. The motivational components of female sexual behavior are more sensitive than the receptive components to the inhibitory actions of fluoxetine. Bupropion selectively stimulated hopping/darting, while yohimbine lacked an action on female sexual behavior. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Serotonin-2C receptors in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala mediate the anxiogenic effect of acute imipramine and fluoxetine administration.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Maria Adrielle; Zangrossi, Helio

    2012-04-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that facilitation of serotonin-2C receptor (5-HT2CR)-mediated neurotransmission in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is involved in anxiety generation. We investigated here whether BLA 5-HT2CRs exert a differential role in the regulation of defensive behaviours related to generalized anxiety (inhibitory avoidance) and panic (escape) disorders. We also evaluated whether activation of BLA 5-HT2CRs accounts for the anxiogenic effect caused by acute systemic administration of the antidepressants imipramine and fluoxetine. Male Wistar rats were tested in the elevated T-maze after intra-BLA injection of the endogenous agonist 5-HT, the 5-HT2CR agonist MK-212 or the 5-HT2CR antagonist SB-242084. This test allows the measurement of inhibitory avoidance acquisition and escape expression. We also investigated whether intra-BLA administration of SB-242084 interferes with the acute anxiogenic effect caused by imipramine and fluoxetine in the Vogel conflict test, and imipramine in the elevated T-maze. While intra-BLA administration of 5-HT and MK-212 facilitated inhibitory avoidance acquisition, suggesting an anxiogenic effect, SB-242084 had the opposite effect. None of these drugs affected escape performance. Intra-BLA injection of a sub-effective dose of SB-242084 fully blocked the anxiogenic effect caused either by the local microinjection of 5-HT or the systemic administration of imipramine and fluoxetine. Our findings indicate that 5-HT2CRs in BLA are selectively involved in the regulation of defensive behaviours associated with generalized anxiety, but not panic. The results also provide the first direct evidence that activation of BLA 5-HT2CRs accounts for the short-term aversive effect of antidepressants.

  14. Fluoxetine regulates mTOR signalling in a region-dependent manner in depression-like mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Luo, Liu; Mu, Rong-Hao; Liu, Bin-Bin; Geng, Di; Liu, Qing; Yi, Li-Tao

    2015-11-02

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has an important role in ketamine-induced, rapid antidepressant effects despite the acute administration of fluoxetine not affecting mTOR phosphorylation in the brain. However, the effects of long-term fluoxetine treatment on mTOR modulation have not been assessed to date. In the present study, we examined whether fluoxetine, a type of commonly used antidepressant agent, alters mTOR signaling following chronic administration in different brain regions, including the frontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. We also investigated whether fluoxetine enhanced synaptic protein levels in these regions via the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway and its downstream regulators, p70S6K and 4E-BP-1. The results indicated that chronic fluoxetine treatment attenuated the chronic, unpredictable, mild stress (CUMS)-induced mTOR phosphorylation reduction in the hippocampus and amygdala of mice but not in the frontal cortex or the hypothalamus. Moreover, the CUMS-decreased PSD-95 and synapsin I levels were reversed by fluoxetine, and these effects were blocked by rapamycin only in the hippocampus. In conclusion, our findings suggest that chronic treatment with fluoxetine can induce synaptic protein expression by activating the mTOR signaling pathway in a region-dependent manner and mainly in the hippocampus.

  15. Reversal of reduced parvalbumin neurons in hippocampus and amygdala of Angelman syndrome model mice by chronic treatment of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2014-08-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by autism, intellectual disability and motor disturbances. The disease is primarily caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited UBE3A. Ube3a maternal-deficient mice recapitulates many essential feature of AS. These AS mice have been shown to be under chronic stress and exhibits anxiety-like behaviour because of defective glucocorticoid receptor signalling. Here, we demonstrate that chronic stress in these mice could lead to down-regulation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala from early post-natal days. Down-regulation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons number could be because of decrease in the expression of parvalbumin in these neurons. We also find that treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, results in restoration of impaired glucocorticoid signalling, elevated serum corticosterone level, parvalbumin-positive interneurons and anxiety-like behaviours. Our findings suggest that impaired glucocorticod signalling in hippocampus and amygdala of AS mice is critical for the decrease in parvalbumin interneurons number, emergence of anxiety and other behavioural deficits and highlights the importance of fluoxetine in the recovery of these abnormalities.

  16. Depression-like behaviors in tree shrews and comparison of the effects of treatment with fluoxetine and carbetocin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaolu; Shen, Fang; Li, Chunlu; Li, Yonghui; Wang, Xuewei

    2016-06-01

    Tree shrews, a species phylogenetically close to primates, are regarded as a suitable and naturalistic animal model for depression studies. However, psychological symptoms that are essential for depression diagnosis and treatment, such as helplessness and social withdrawal, have not been studied in this model. Therefore, in this study, we first investigated learned helplessness, social interaction and sucrose preference induced by two chronic stress paradigms: uncontrollable foot shocks (1-week foot shocks) and multiple unpredictable stimuli (1-week foot shocks and 3-week unpredictable stressors) in tree shrews. Our results showed that uncontrollable foot shocks could only induce learned helplessness in animals; whereas animals treated with multiple unpredictable stimuli exhibited more depression-like behaviors including social withdrawal, anhedonia and learned helplessness. These findings suggested that multiple unpredictable stimuli could effectively induce various depression-like behaviors in tree shrews. More importantly, we compared the antidepressant effects of fluoxetine and carbetocin, a long-acting oxytocin analog, on specific depression-like behaviors. Our present data displayed that, compared with fluoxetine, carbetocin was also effective in reversing learned helplessness, elevating sucrose preference and improving social interaction behaviors in depression-like animals. Therefore, carbetocin might be a potential antidepressant with applications in humans.

  17. Mechanism of synergistic action following co-treatment with pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline in the forced swimming test in rats.

    PubMed

    Rogóz, Zofia; Skuza, Grazyna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of combined treatment of male Wistar rats with pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline in the forced swimming test. The obtained results showed that co-treatment with pramipexole (0.1 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or sertraline (5 mg/kg) (in doses inactive per se) exhibited antidepressant-like activity in the forced swimming test. Sulpiride (a dopamine D(2/3) receptor antagonist) and WAY 100635 (a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist), either being ineffective in the forced swimming test, inhibited the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline. However, SCH 23390 (a dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist) only partly did not alter the effect of pramipexole given jointly with antidepressant drugs; on the other hand, S 33084 (a dopamine D(3) receptor antagonist) only partly decreased (in a statistically insignificant manner) that effect. Moreover, progesterone and BD 1047 (a sigma(1) receptor antagonist) counteracted the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of pramipexole and sertraline (but not pramipexole and fluoxetine). In that test, active behavior did not reflect the increases in general activity, since combined administration of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline failed to enhance the locomotor activity of rats. None of the tested drugs (SCH 23390, sulpiride, S 33084, WAY 100635, BD 1047 and progesterone) - alone or in combination with pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline - changed locomotor activity. The results described in the present paper indicate that co-administration of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline may induce a more pronounced antidepressive activity than does treatment with pramipexole alone, and that in addition to other mechanisms, dopamine D(2/3) and 5-HT(1A) receptors may contribute to the antidepressant-like activity of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline in the forced swimming test in rats

  18. Comparing omeprazole with fluoxetine for treatment of patients with heartburn and normal endoscopy who failed once daily proton pump inhibitors: double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ostovaneh, M R; Saeidi, B; Hajifathalian, K; Farrokhi-Khajeh-Pasha, Y; Fotouhi, A; Mirbagheri, S S; Emami, H; Barzin, G; Mirbagheri, S A

    2014-05-01

    Patients with heartburn but without esophageal erosion respond less well to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). There is a growing body of evidence implicating the role of psychological comorbidities in producing reflux symptoms. Pain modulators improve symptoms in patients with other functional gastrointestinal disorders. We aimed to compare the efficacy of fluoxetine with omeprazole and placebo to achieve symptomatic relief in patients with heartburn and normal endoscopy who failed once daily PPIs. Endoscopy-negative patients with heartburn who failed once daily PPIs were randomly allocated to receive 6 weeks treatment of fluoxetine, omeprazole, or placebo. Random allocation was stratified according to ambulatory pH monitoring study. Percentage of heartburn-free days and symptom severity was assessed. Sixty patients with abnormal and 84 patients with normal pH test were randomized. Subjects receiving fluoxetine experienced more improvement in percentage of heartburn-free days (median 35.7, IQR 21.4-57.1) than those on omeprazole (median 7.14, IQR 0-50, p < 0.001) or placebo (median 7.14, IQR 0-33.6, p < 0.001). In normal pH subgroup, fluoxetine was superior to both omeprazole and placebo regarding percentage of heartburn-free days (median improvement, 57.1, IQR 35.7-57.1 vs 13.9, IQR, 0-45.6 and 7.14, 0-23.8, respectively, p < 0.001), but no significant difference was observed between medications in abnormal pH subgroup. Fluoxetine was superior to omeprazole for improving the symptoms of patients with heartburn and normal endoscopy who failed once daily PPIs. The superiority of fluoxetine was mostly attributed to those with normal esophageal pH rather than those with abnormal pH (ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01269788). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fluoxetine Protection in Decompression Sickness in Mice is Enhanced by Blocking TREK-1 Potassium Channel with the “spadin” Antidepressant

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Kate; De Maistre, Sébastien; Royal, Perrine; Mazella, Jean; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation, and ischemia induce neurological damage that can lead to death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. Acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increases the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50 mg/kg) in wild-type (WT) and TREK-1 deficient mice (knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET). Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a 5-day treatment protocol with spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice). KO and KO-like mice were regarded as antidepressed models. In total, 167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux) constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive) constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux) and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux) died from decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62%) or KO-like mice (41%). After the decompression protocol, mice showed significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes. Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to exhibit DCS. Nevertheless, mice which had both blocked TREK-1 channels and fluoxetine treatment were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreased DCS severity but increased the survival rate. PMID:26909044

  20. Acute Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    ÖZTÜRK, Vesile

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequent disabling neurological conditions with a major impact on the patient’s quality of life. Migraine has been described as a chronic disorder that characterized with attacks. Attacks are characterized by moderate–severe, often unilateral, pulsating headache attacks, typically lasting 4 to 72 hours. Migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated despite advances in the understanding of its pathophysiology. This article reviews management of migraine acute pharmacological treatment. Currently, for the acute treatment of migraine attacks, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and triptans (serotonin 5HT1B/1D receptor agonists) are recommended. Before intake of NSAID and triptans, metoclopramide or domperidone is useful. In very severe attacks, subcutaneous sumatriptan is first choice. The patient should be treated early in the attack, use an adequate dose and formulation of a medication. Ideally, acute therapy should be restricted to no more than 2 to 3 days per week to avoid medication overuse. PMID:28360580

  1. Chronic fluoxetine treatment directs energy metabolism towards the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hippocampal nonsynaptic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Dragana; Costina, Victor; Perić, Ivana; Stanisavljević, Andrijana; Findeisen, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Fluoxetine (Flx) is the principal treatment for depression; however, the precise mechanisms of its actions remain elusive. Our aim was to identify protein expression changes within rat hippocampus regulated by chronic Flx treatment versus vehicle-controls using proteomics. Fluoxetine-hydrohloride (15mg/kg) was administered daily to adult male Wistar rats for 3weeks, and cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial hippocampal proteomes were analyzed. All differentially expressed proteins were functionally annotated according to biological process and molecular function using Uniprot and Blast2GO. Our comparative study revealed that in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions, 60 and 3 proteins respectively, were down-regulated, and 23 and 60 proteins, respectively, were up-regulated. Proteins differentially regulated in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions were primarily related to cellular and metabolic processes. Of the identified proteins, the expressions of calretinin and parvalbumine were confirmed. The predominant molecular functions of differentially expressed proteins in both cell hippocampal fractions were binding and catalytic activity. Most differentially expressed proteins in nonsynaptic mitochondria were catalytic enzymes involved in the pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis, ATP transduction and glutamate metabolism. Results indicate that chronic Flx treatment may influence proteins involved in calcium signaling, cytoskeletal structure, chaperone system and stimulates energy metabolism via the upregulation of GAPDH expression in cytoplasm, as well as directing energy metabolism toward the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in nonsynaptic mitochondria. This approach provides new insight into the chronic effects of Flx treatment on protein expression in a key brain region associated with stress response and memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term treatment with fluoxetine induces desensitization of 5-HT4 receptor-dependent signalling and functionality in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Rebeca; Valdizán, Elsa M; Mostany, Ricardo; Pazos, Angel; Castro, Elena

    2009-08-01

    The mode of action of antidepressant drugs may be related to mechanisms of monoamines receptor adaptation, including serotonin 5-HT(4) receptor subtypes. Here we investigated the effects of repeated treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine for 21 days (5 and 10 mg/kg, p.o., once daily) on the sensitivity of 5-HT(4) receptors by using receptor autoradiography, adenylate cyclase assays and extracellular recording techniques in rat brain. Fluoxetine treatment decreased the density of 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the CA1 field of hippocampus as well as in several areas of the striatum over the doses of 5-10 mg/kg. In a similar way, we found a significant lower response to zacopride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the fluoxetine 10 mg/kg/day treated group. Furthermore, post-synaptic 5-HT(4) receptor activity in hippocampus-measured as the excitatory action of zacopride in the pyramidal cells of CA1 evoked by Schaffer collateral stimulation was attenuated in rats treated with both doses of fluoxetine. Taken together, these results support the concept that a net decrease in the signalization pathway of 5-HT(4) receptors occurs after chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment: this effect may underlie the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs.

  3. Efficacy and safety of olanzapine/fluoxetine combination in the treatment of treatment-resistant depression: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Shuxin; Wan, Hongquan; Wang, Shijun; Li, He; Zhang, Baogang

    2017-01-01

    Background Whether olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC) is superior to olanzapine or fluoxetine monotherapy in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) remains controversial. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the efficacy and safety of OFC with olanzapine or fluoxetine monotherapy for patients with TRD. Materials and methods RCTs published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were systematically reviewed to assess the efficacy and safety of OFC. Outcomes included mean changes from baseline in Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S), Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores, response rate, remission rate, and adverse events. Results were expressed with weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and risk ratio (RR) with 95% CIs. Results A total of five RCTs with 3,020 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with olanzapine or fluoxetine monotherapy, OFC was associated with greater changes from baseline in MADRS (WMD =−3.37, 95% CI: −4.76, −1.99; P<0.001), HAM-A (WMD =−1.82, 95% CI: −2.25, −1.40; P<0.001), CGI-S (WMD =−0.37, 95% CI: −0.45, −0.28; P<0.001), and BPRS scores (WMD =−1.46, 95% CI: −2.16, −0.76; P<0.001). Moreover, OFC had significantly higher response rate (RR =1.35, 95% CI: 1.12, 1.63; P=0.001) and remission rate (RR =1.71, 95% CI: 1.31, 2.23; P<0.001). The incidence of treatment-related adverse events was similar between the OFC and monotherapy groups (RR =1.01, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.08; P=0.834). Conclusion OFC is more effective than olanzapine or fluoxetine monotherapy in the treatment of patients with TRD. Our results provided supporting evidence for the use of OFC in TRD. However, considering the limitations in this study, more large-scale, well-designed RCTs are

  4. [Treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Naumovski-Mihalić, Slavica

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an autodigestive disease in which the pancreatic tissue is damaged by the digestive enzimes produces by the acinar cells and is associated with severe upper abdominal pain. The severity of acute pancreatitis ranges from edema to necrosis of the gland. The edematous form of the disease occurs in about 80-85% of patients and is self-limited, with recovery in few days. In the 15-20% of patients with the most severe form of pancreatitis, hospitalization is prolonged and commonly associated with infection and other complications including multiple organ failure. The main causes of acute pancreatitis in adults are gallstones, other gallbladder (biliary) diseases and alcohol abuse. Treatment of acute pancreatitis-depends on the severity oft he condition. Generaly, the patients need, hospitalisation with administration of intravenous fluid to help restore blood volume, pain control, supplemental oxygen as required and correction of electrolite and metabolic abnormalities. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and sistemic infection. Begin oral feeding once abdominal pain has resolved and the patients regains appetite. The diet should be low in fat and protein. Patients suffering from infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. During recent years the management of acute pancreatitis has changed. This has been due particulary in response to the general availability of computed tomography, improved intensive care facilities, knowledge about the central role of pancreatic infection and refinements in surgical and other interventional techniques.

  5. Effects of nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor or fluoxetine treatment on depression-like state and cardiovascular changes induced by chronic variable stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jeferson; Duarte, Josiane O; Oliveira, Leandro A; Crestani, Carlos C

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidity between mood disorders and cardiovascular disease has been described extensively. However, available antidepressants can have cardiovascular side effects. Treatment with selective inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) induces antidepressant effects, but whether the antidepressant-like effects of these drugs are followed by cardiovascular changes has not been previously investigated. Here, we tested in male rats exposed to chronic variable stress (CVS) the hypothesis that nNOS blockers are advantageous compared with conventional antidepressants in terms of cardiovascular side effects. We compared the effects of chronic treatment with the preferential nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) with those evoked by the conventional antidepressant fluoxetine on alterations that are considered as markers of depression (immobility in the forced swimming test, FST, decreased body weight gain and increased plasma corticosterone concentration) and cardiovascular changes caused by CVS. Rats were exposed to a 14-day CVS protocol, while being concurrently treated daily with either 7-NI (30 mg/kg) or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg). Fluoxetine and 7-NI prevented the increase in immobility in the FST induced by CVS and reduced plasma corticosterone concentration in stressed rats. Both these treatments also prevented the CVS-evoked reduction of the depressor response to vasodilator agents and baroreflex changes. Fluoxetine and 7-NI-induced cardiovascular changes independent of stress exposure, including cardiac autonomic imbalance, increased intrinsic heart rate and vascular sympathetic modulation, a reduction of the pressor response to vasoconstrictor agents, and impairment of baroreflex activity. Altogether, these findings provide evidence that fluoxetine and 7-NI have similar effects on the depression-like state induced by CVS and on cardiovascular function.

  6. Classics in Chemical Neuroscience: Fluoxetine (Prozac)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) was the first major breakthrough for the treatment of depression since the introduction of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) nearly 30 years earlier. It was the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, offering superior efficacy and reduced side effects relative to TCAs and MAOIs. Though a debate remains regarding the exact mechanism by which the clinical efficacy of fluoxetine is manifested, the importance of fluoxetine and related SSRIs to the field is unquestionable. The trade name Prozac has permeated popular culture, helping to raise awareness of depression and to diminish the prevalence of long-standing stigmas associated with this illness. In this Review, we will showcase the history and importance of fluoxetine to neuroscience in general, as well as for the treatment of depression, and review the synthesis, pharmacology, drug metabolism, and adverse effects of fluoxetine.

  7. Effects of Fluoxetine on Human Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kaihola, Helena; Yaldir, Fatma G.; Hreinsson, Julius; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The use of antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is increasing, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressants in pregnant women. Serotonin plays a role in embryogenesis, and serotonin transporters are expressed in two-cell mouse embryos. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed SSRI antidepressant world-wide, exposure influences the timing of different embryo developmental stages, and furthermore, to analyze what protein, and protein networks, are affected by fluoxetine in the early embryo development. Human embryos (n = 48) were randomly assigned to treatment with 0.25 or 0.5 μM fluoxetine in culture medium. Embryo development was evaluated by time-lapse monitoring. The fluoxetine-induced human embryo proteome was analyzed by shotgun mass spectrometry. Protein secretion from fluoxetine-exposed human embryos was analyzed by use of high-multiplex immunoassay. The lower dose of fluoxetine had no influence on embryo development. A trend toward reduced time between thawing and start of cavitation was noted in embryos treated with 0.5 μM fluoxetine (p = 0.065). Protein analysis by shotgun mass spectrometry detected 45 proteins that were uniquely expressed in fluoxetine-treated embryos. These proteins are involved in cell growth, survival, proliferation, and inflammatory response. Culturing with 0.5 μM, but not 0.25 μM fluoxetine, caused a significant increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fluoxetine has marginal effects on the timing of developmental stages in embryos, but induces expression and secretion of several proteins in a manner that depends on dose. For these reasons, and in line with current guidelines, the lowest possible dose of SSRI should be used in pregnant women who need to continue treatment. PMID:27378857

  8. Fluoxetine versus sertraline in the treatment of patients with undifferentiated somatoform disorder: a randomized, open-label, 12-week, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Han, Changsu; Pae, Chi-Un; Lee, Bun Hee; Ko, Young-Hoon; Masand, Prakash S; Patkar, Ashwin A; Jung, In-Kwa

    2008-02-15

    The present study was conducted to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of fluoxetine and sertraline in the treatment of undifferentiated somatoform disorder (USD), using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15), which was specifically designed for assessing the severity of somatic symptoms. A randomized, 12-week, open-label trial of fluoxetine (10-60 mg/d) and sertraline (25-350 mg/d) in patients with USD was conducted. Six visits, at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12, were scheduled. Assessments for effectiveness and tolerability were conducted at each visit. The primary effectiveness measure was the mean change in PHQ-15 total score, from baseline to the end of treatment. Secondary effectiveness measures were the mean changes in total scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), from baseline to the end of treatment. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled; of them, 28 were randomly assigned to receive fluoxetine and 17 to receive sertraline. The total score on the PHQ-15 from baseline to the end of treatment significantly decreased in the fluoxetine (-10.7, p<0.0001) and sertraline (-10.3, p<0.0001) treatment groups, with no between-group difference (F=0.0701, p=0.7924). Overall, both treatments were well tolerated and no serious adverse event was reported. This study suggests that both agents may have a potential role in the treatment of USD. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and/or head-to-head comparison study with larger samples are required to draw more definite conclusions.

  9. Robust presynaptic serotonin 5-HT1B receptor inhibition of the striatonigral output and its sensitization by chronic fluoxetine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shengyuan; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    The striatonigral projection is a striatal output pathway critical to motor control, cognition, and emotion regulation. Its axon terminals in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) express a high level of serotonin (5-HT) type 1B receptors (5-HT1BRs), whereas the SNr also receives an intense 5-HT innervation that expresses 5-HT transporters, providing an anatomic substrate for 5-HT and selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-based antidepressant treatment to regulate the striatonigral output. In this article we show that 5-HT, by activating presynaptic 5-HT1BRs on the striatonigral axon terminals, potently inhibited the striatonigral GABA output, as reflected in the reduction of the striatonigral inhibitory postsynaptic currents in SNr GABA neurons. Functionally, 5-HT1BR agonism reduced the striatonigral GABA output-induced pause of the spontaneous high-frequency firing in SNr GABA neurons. Equally important, chronic SSRI treatment with fluoxetine enhanced this presynaptic 5-HT1BR-mediated pause reduction in SNr GABA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that activation of the 5-HT1BRs on the striatonigral axon terminals can limit the motor-promoting GABA output. Furthermore, in contrast to the desensitization of 5-HT1 autoreceptors, chronic SSRI-based antidepressant treatment sensitizes this presynaptic 5-HT1BR-mediated effect in the SNr, a novel cellular mechanism that alters the striatonigral information transfer, potentially contributing to the behavioral effects of chronic SSRI treatment. PMID:25787955

  10. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  11. Fluoxetine Facilitates Fear Extinction Through Amygdala Endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Flynn, Shaun; Brockway, Emma; Kaugars, Katherine; Baldi, Rita; Ramikie, Teniel S; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; Patel, Sachin; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacologically elevating brain endocannabinoids (eCBs) share anxiolytic and fear extinction-facilitating properties with classical therapeutics, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. There are also known functional interactions between the eCB and serotonin systems and preliminary evidence that antidepressants cause alterations in brain eCBs. However, the potential role of eCBs in mediating the facilitatory effects of fluoxetine on fear extinction has not been established. Here, to test for a possible mechanistic contribution of eCBs to fluoxetine's proextinction effects, we integrated biochemical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral techniques, using the extinction-impaired 129S1/Sv1mJ mouse strain. Chronic fluoxetine treatment produced a significant and selective increase in levels of anandamide in the BLA, and an associated decrease in activity of the anandamide-catabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that fluoxetine-induced increases in anandamide were associated with the amplification of eCB-mediated tonic constraint of inhibitory, but not excitatory, transmission in the BLA. Behaviorally, chronic fluoxetine facilitated extinction retrieval in a manner that was prevented by systemic or BLA-specific blockade of CB1 receptors. In contrast to fluoxetine, citalopram treatment did not increase BLA eCBs or facilitate extinction. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel, obligatory role for amygdala eCBs in the proextinction effects of a major pharmacotherapy for trauma- and stressor-related disorders and anxiety disorders.

  12. Fluoxetine Facilitates Fear Extinction Through Amygdala Endocannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Flynn, Shaun; Brockway, Emma; Kaugars, Katherine; Baldi, Rita; Ramikie, Teniel S; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; Patel, Sachin; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologically elevating brain endocannabinoids (eCBs) share anxiolytic and fear extinction-facilitating properties with classical therapeutics, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. There are also known functional interactions between the eCB and serotonin systems and preliminary evidence that antidepressants cause alterations in brain eCBs. However, the potential role of eCBs in mediating the facilitatory effects of fluoxetine on fear extinction has not been established. Here, to test for a possible mechanistic contribution of eCBs to fluoxetine's proextinction effects, we integrated biochemical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral techniques, using the extinction-impaired 129S1/Sv1mJ mouse strain. Chronic fluoxetine treatment produced a significant and selective increase in levels of anandamide in the BLA, and an associated decrease in activity of the anandamide-catabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that fluoxetine-induced increases in anandamide were associated with the amplification of eCB-mediated tonic constraint of inhibitory, but not excitatory, transmission in the BLA. Behaviorally, chronic fluoxetine facilitated extinction retrieval in a manner that was prevented by systemic or BLA-specific blockade of CB1 receptors. In contrast to fluoxetine, citalopram treatment did not increase BLA eCBs or facilitate extinction. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel, obligatory role for amygdala eCBs in the proextinction effects of a major pharmacotherapy for trauma- and stressor-related disorders and anxiety disorders. PMID:26514583

  13. Altered water-maze search behavior in adult guinea pigs following chronic prenatal ethanol exposure: lack of mitigation by postnatal fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Teresa D; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N; Dringenberg, Hans C

    2008-08-22

    Ingestion of ethanol during pregnancy can result in teratogenic effects in humans, including significant and long-lasting neurobehavioral deficits. Similar results are seen in guinea pigs with chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) via maternal ethanol administration, which produces deficits in Morris water-maze performance and impaired hippocampal functioning (e.g., decreased long-term potentiation, LTP). In this study, we tested whether postnatal treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, decreases some of the neurobehavioral impairments produced by CPEE. Timed, pregnant guinea pigs received oral administration of ethanol (4g/kg maternal body weight) or isocaloric sucrose pair feeding (control) for 5 days/week throughout gestation. Offspring of the CPEE and control groups were randomly assigned to receive either fluoxetine (10mg/kg body weight/day) or saline intraperitoneally from postnatal day 10 to 48. Subsequent behavioral tests in the Morris water-maze revealed a significant increase in thigmotaxic swimming in CPEE offspring without apparent signs of impairment in spatial mapping of the hidden escape platform. Measures of hippocampal short- and long-term plasticity (paired-pulse facilitation, frequency facilitation, and LTP) were unaffected by CPEE, consistent with the behavioral data indicating normal hippocampal functioning. Postnatal fluoxetine administration resulted in a significant loss of body weight, but did not affect the increased thigmotaxic swimming following CPEE. These results indicate that changes in search strategies in the water-maze might be a highly sensitive index of CPEE-induced neurobehavioral toxicity that can occur in the absence of significant hippocampal dysfunction. Further, these data demonstrate that fluoxetine, at the selected treatment regime, does not mitigate the thigmotaxic swimming response to CPEE in the guinea pig.

  14. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-04

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice.

  15. Temporal variability of glucocorticoid receptor activity is functionally important for the therapeutic action of fluoxetine in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-S; Kim, Y-H; Park, W-S; Park, O-K; Kwon, S-H; Hong, K S; Rhim, H; Shim, I; Morita, K; Wong, D L; Patel, P D; Lyons, D M; Schatzberg, A F; Her, S

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent results regarding the actions of antidepressants on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signalling. To resolve these inconsistencies, we used a lentiviral-based reporter system to directly monitor rat hippocampal GR activity during stress adaptation. Temporal GR activation was induced significantly by acute stress, as demonstrated by an increase in the intra-individual variability of the acute stress group compared with the variability of the non-stress group. However, the increased intra-individual variability was dampened by exposure to chronic stress, which was partly restored by fluoxetine treatment without affecting glucocorticoid secretion. Immobility in the forced-swim test was negatively correlated with the intra-individual variability, but was not correlated with the quantitative GR activity during fluoxetine therapy; this highlights the temporal variability in the neurobiological links between GR signalling and the therapeutic action of fluoxetine. Furthermore, we demonstrated sequential phosphorylation between GR (S224) and (S232) following fluoxetine treatment, showing a molecular basis for hormone-independent nuclear translocation and transcriptional enhancement. Collectively, these results suggest a neurobiological mechanism by which fluoxetine treatment confers resilience to the chronic stress-mediated attenuation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

  16. Comparison of the Addition of Siberian Ginseng (Acanthopanax senticosus) Versus Fluoxetine to Lithium for the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Adolescents: A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shenhong; Tang, Jihua; Wang, Gaohua; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Background: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common, recurrent, and often life-long major psychiatric condition characterized by manic, depressive, and mixed episodes. Without treatment, there is substantial risk for morbidity and mortality, making BD a considerable public health problem. Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness and tolerability of Acanthopanax senficosus (A senficosus)—an herb that is derived from eleutherosides and polysaccharides found in the plant's root— versus fluoxetine added to lithium in the treatment of BD in adolescents. Methods: This was a double-blind, 6-week study. The patients were randomized into 2 treatment groups—A senticosus plus lithium (A senticosus group) and fluoxetine plus lithium (fluoxetine group). The patients underwent a baseline assessment using the 17-Item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) during the screening period. Patients were scheduled for clinical visits at the end of weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6. At the end of the 6-week treatment period, each patient's condition was rated as follows: response (indicating an improvement of ≥50% in the HAMD-17 score from baseline); remission (a HAMD-17 score of ⪯7); and switching to mania (a YMRS score >16, and meeting the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [Fourth Edition, Text Revision] for a manic episode). At each visit (with the exception of the enrollment visit), the patients were queried as to whether they experienced any health problems since the previous visit, a Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale assessment was completed, and the serum lithium concentration was analyzed. The patients were instructed to report adverse events (AEs) at any time during the study. AEs were also observed by the investigator(s) at clinical visits. Results: Seventy-nine Chinese adolescents were initially enrolled into the study. However, 76 adolescents were assessed for inclusion

  17. Immunohistochemical localization of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in frontal cortex and related limbic areas in obese Zucker rats: effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Zarate, J; Churruca, I; Echevarría, E; Casis, L; López de Jesús, M; Saenz del Burgo, L; Sallés, J

    2008-10-21

    In the present study, we report on the application of two specific polyclonal antibodies to different intracellular domains of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor to define the expression of the neural CB1 cannabinoid receptor at the histochemical level in frontal cortex and related limbic areas of the obese Zucker rats. Higher levels of CB1 receptor expression in frontal, cingulated and piriform cortex, without differences in temporal, parietal and occipital cortex, were observed in obese Zucker rats, with respect to their lean littermates. CB1 phosphorylated receptor (CB1-P) levels were also higher in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex in obese rats with respect to lean controls. Potential involvement of brain cortical CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the long-term effects of fluoxetine was studied. Experimental animals were administered with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3 weeks, whereas the control group was given 0.9% NaCl solution. In obese Zucker rats, a significant decrease in CB1 receptor levels, measured by western blot, was observed in brain cortex after fluoxetine treatment. Immunostaining for CB1 receptor expression was also carried out, showing a significant decrease in the density of neural cells positive for CB1 receptor in frontal, cingulate and piriform cortex, without changes in parietal, temporal and occipital regions. Regional prosencephalic immunostaining for CB1-P receptor level showed a significant decrease in the density of stained neural cells in frontal, temporal and parietal cortex, without changes in cingulated, piriform and occipital cortex. These results suggest the involvement of endocannabinoid system in the chronic effects of fluoxetine, especially in the frontal cortex.

  18. [Acute alcoholic hepatitis: treatments].

    PubMed

    Naveau, S

    2001-06-09

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a severe form of alcohol-related liver disease with a high short-term mortality that can reach 50%. Long-term outcome depends on definitive weaning from alcohol and the development of cirrhosis. Abstention from alcohol is the number one therapeutic measure required for treating AAH. Abstention must be total and definitive. The pathogenic mechanisms involved in AAH have led to close assessment of numerous treatment protocols. Thirty-three randomized trials have evaluated drug treatments based on various strategies: antiinflammatory action using corticosteroids or colchicine; reduction of the hypermetabolism using propylthiouracil; hepatoprotective effect against oxidative stress using cyanidalol, alpha lipoid acid, silymarine, amlopidine, malotilate; vasodilatation to improve oxygenation of the centrolublular region using a calcium channel inhibitor, amlopidine; increased liver regeneration using anabolism steroids, intravenous perfusion combining insulin and glucagon; antifibrosis action using colchicine, D penicillamine; improved microcirculation due to increased deformability of the red cells and inhibition of TNF-alpha using pentoxifyllin. Eleven therapeutic trials have investigated the effect of parenteral or enteral artificial nutrition. Among all these strategies, the only one with a proven efficacy is corticosteroid therapy. Four trials have demonstrated the effect of corticosteroid therapy on short-term survival and 3 of the 4 meta-analyses devoted to the topic have demonstrated the usefulness of corticosteroid therapy in severe forms defined by a Maddrey index > or = 32: bilirubin in mumol per liter/17 + 4.6 (patient's PT in seconds--control PT in seconds) and the presence or not of encephalopathy. The gold standard treatment for severe AAH is oral prednisolone 40 mg/d for 1 month (excluding contraindications). Despite the effect of corticosteroid therapy, mortality at 2 months in severe AAH is still about 30%. Recent

  19. Inhibition of serotonin reuptake in the prepubertal rat ovary by fluoxetine and effects on ovarian functions.

    PubMed

    Romero-Reyes, Jessica; Cárdenas, Mario; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Domínguez, Roberto; Ayala, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Fluoxetine (FLX), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is an antidepressant in the treatment of mood disorders. Its impact on reproductive processes is incompletely known. The present study analyzed the reproductive effects of FLX in prepubertal female rats. Two experiments were conducted. First (acute administration), 30-day-old female rats were injected intraperitoneally with 5mg/kg of fluoxetine-hydrochloride, and were terminated 24, 48 or 72h after the treatment. Second (subchronic administration), FLX was injected on days 30-33 of age, and the animals were terminated the day of first estrus. In acute treatment estradiol concentration increased to 72h. In subchronic treatment increased serotonin concentration in ovaries and decreased the number of ova shed. An increase in number of atretic follicles and oocyte fragmentation was observed in these animals. The results suggest that FLX acts on the ovary or hypothalamus-pituitary axis resulting in modifications of the follicular development and ovulation.

  20. Side effects after phototherapy implementation in addition to fluoxetine or sertraline treatment: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Swiecicki, Łukasz; Szafrański, Tomasz

    2002-04-01

    Serotonergic-type side effects (like diarrhoea, hyperthermia, nausea, confusion) were seen after phototherapy in patients receiving fluoxetine or sertraline. Phototherapy was discontinued and symptoms completely resolved. In the authors' opinion, the symptoms were likely to be associated with specific interaction (serotonin effect potentialisation). To the authors' knowledge this is the first report concerning such an effect.

  1. Higher levels of aggression are observed in socially dominant toadfish treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M Danielle; Gonzalez, Alexander; Sloman, Katherine A

    2011-01-01

    The following study set out to test the hypothesis that acute treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, would result in a rise in circulating 5-HT levels and consequently a decrease in territorial aggression in the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta. Size-matched pairs of toadfish were implanted intraperitoneally with the same dose of fluoxetine (0, 10 or 25 μg g⁻¹). After a social interaction between a pair of fish, circulating levels of serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine) and cortisol were measured and relative mRNA expression of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the toadfish brain was determined using quantitative (real-time) PCR (qPCR). Behavioral endpoints such as the number of aggressive acts and swimming activity were also quantified so that dominant and subordinate fish could be identified. Fluoxetine treatment resulted in an increase in circulating levels of 5-HT, regardless of social status. Circulating cortisol concentrations were unaffected by fluoxetine, but were significantly higher in subordinate individuals when compared to dominant fish. Toadfish brain 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA expression was not affected by treatment or social status. Lastly and contrary to our predictions, fluoxetine treatment resulted in an increase in the number of aggressive acts made by dominant individuals, with no differences in the level of aggression or swimming activity of subordinate fish. This study is the first to describe elevated aggression in a teleost fish with elevated circulating levels of 5-HT.

  2. A role for the extended amygdala in the fear-enhancing effects of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ravinder, S; Burghardt, N S; Brodsky, R; Bauer, E P; Chattarji, S

    2013-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are reported to exacerbate symptoms of anxiety when treatment is initiated. These clinical findings have been extended to animal models wherein SSRIs also potentiate anxiety and fear learning, which depend on the amygdala. Yet, little is known about the role of specific amygdalar circuits in these acute effects of SSRIs. Here, we first confirmed that a single injection of fluoxetine 1 h before auditory fear conditioning potentiated fear memory in rats. To probe the neural substrates underlying this enhancement, we analyzed the expression patterns of the immediate early gene, Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein). Consistent with previous reports, fear conditioning induced Arc protein expression in the lateral and basal amygdala. However, this was not enhanced further by pre-treatment with fluoxetine. Instead, fluoxetine significantly enhanced expression of Arc in the central amygdala (CeA) and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). Next, we tested whether direct targeted infusions of fluoxetine into the CeA, or BNST, leads to the same fear-potentiating effect. Strikingly, direct infusion of fluoxetine into the BNST, but not the CeA, was sufficient to enhance fear memory. Moreover, this behavioral effect was also accompanied by robust Arc expression in the CeA, similar to the systemic injection. Our results identify a novel role for the BNST in the acute fear-enhancing effects of SSRIs. These findings highlight the need to look beyond the traditional focus on input nuclei of the amygdala and add to accumulating evidence implicating these microcircuits in gating fear and anxiety. PMID:23321806

  3. Prolonged running, not fluoxetine treatment, increases neurogenesis, but does not alter neuropathology, in the 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Marlatt, Michael W; Potter, Michelle C; Bayer, Thomas A; van Praag, Henriette; Lucassen, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in adult neurogenesis have been documented in the original 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), notably occurring at the same age when spatial memory deficits and amyloid plaque pathology appeared. As this suggested reduced neurogenesis was associated with behavioral deficits, we tested whether activity and pharmacological stimulation could prevent memory deficits and modify neurogenesis and/or neuropathology in the 3xTg model backcrossed to the C57Bl/6 strain. We chronically administered the antidepressant fluoxetine to one group of mice, allowed access to a running wheel in another, and combined both treatments in a third cohort. All treatments lasted for 11 months. The female 3xTg mice failed to exhibit any deficits in spatial learning and memory as measured in the Morris water maze, indicating that when backcrossed to the C57Bl/6 strain, the 3xTg mice lost the behavioral phenotype that was present in the original 3xTg mouse maintained on a hybrid background. Despite this, the backcrossed 3xTg mice expressed prominent intraneuronal amyloid beta (Aβ) levels in the cortex and amygdala, with lower levels in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In the combined cohort, fluoxetine treatment interfered with exercise and reduced the total distance run. The extent of Aβ neuropathology, the tau accumulations, or BDNF levels, were not altered by prolonged exercise. Thus, neuropathology was present but not paralleled by spatial memory deficits in the backcrossed 3xTg mouse model of AD. Prolonged exercise for 11 months did improve the long-term survival of newborn neurons generated during middle-age, whereas fluoxetine had no effect. We further review and discuss the relevant literature in this respect.

  4. 12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

  5. 12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

  6. Initial Steps to inform selection of continuation cognitive therapy or fluoxetine for higher risk responders to cognitive therapy for recurrent major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R; Anna Clark, Lee; Thase, Michael E; Jarrett, Robin B

    2017-03-22

    Responders to acute-phase cognitive therapy (A-CT) for major depressive disorder (MDD) often relapse or recur, but continuation-phase cognitive therapy (C-CT) or fluoxetine reduces risks for some patients. We tested composite moderators of C-CT versus fluoxetine's preventive effects to inform continuation treatment selection. Responders to A-CT for MDD judged to be at higher risk for relapse due to unstable or partial remission (N=172) were randomized to 8 months of C-CT or fluoxetine with clinical management and assessed, free from protocol treatment, for 24 additional months. Pre-continuation-treatment characteristics that in survival analyses moderated treatments' effects on relapse over 8 months of continuation-phase treatment (residual symptoms and negative temperament) and on relapse/recurrence over the full observation period's 32 months (residual symptoms and age) were combined to estimate the potential advantage of C-CT versus fluoxetine for individual patients. Assigning patients to optimal continuation treatment (i.e., to C-CT or fluoxetine, depending on patients' pre-continuation-treatment characteristics) resulted in absolute reduction of relapse or recurrence risk by 16-21% compared to the other non-optimal treatment. Although these novel results require replication before clinical application, selecting optimal continuation treatment (i.e., personalizing treatment) for higher risk A-CT responders may decrease risks of MDD relapse and recurrence substantively.

  7. Methamphetamine and fluoxetine treatment of a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bussing, R; Levin, G M

    1993-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 11-year-old child with obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression, and attentiondeficit hyperactivity disorder was successfully treated with a combination of fluoxetine (mean 30 mg daily) and methamphetamine (sustained release 10 mg daily). Methamphetamine was selected because of the desirability of avoiding stimulants whose commercial formulations contain food dyes (this child appeared sensitive to tartrazine in dextroamphetamine and other agents), whose effects on hepatic metabolism were minimal (unlike methylphenidate) and whose mechanism of action is reliably rapid (unlike pemoline). Although methamphetamine carries the stigma of an abusable drug and has been implicated in neurotoxicity in animals when used at extremely high doses, methamphetamine may have certain advantages over other psychostimulants in some clinical situations. The combined use of fluoxetine and methamphetamine did not appear to be associated with significant adverse effects.

  8. [The treatment of acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Leemans, L

    2013-09-01

    Racecadotril has sufficient proven efficacy in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. Treatment outcomes in adults are less convincing. The place of gelatin tannate is unclear. Some sources point to potential hepatotoxicity and diminished iron absorption, with a concomitant risk of anemia, at least in case of excessive or prolonged use. Loperamide still has a prominent place in the treatment of acute and chronic diarrhea. Attention should be payed to correct dosing and some well-known contra-indications. Probiotics are indicated in children, as well as in the prevention of antibiotics-induced diarrhea. There is no evidence to support their use in the treatment of acute diarrhea in adults. Up till now publications disagree on the efficacy in the prevention of travelers' diarrhea. Astringents and absorbents are no longer supported in guidelines. Oral rehydration systems have a part to play in pediatric treatment.

  9. Chronic fluoxetine dissociates contextual from auditory fear memory.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeff; Mayford, Mark

    2016-10-06

    Fluoxetine is a medication used to treat Major Depressive Disorder and other psychiatric conditions. These experiments studied the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the contextual versus auditory fear memory of mice. We found that chronic fluoxetine treatment of adult mice impaired their contextual fear memory, but spared auditory fear memory. Hippocampal perineuronal nets, which are involved in contextual fear memory plasticity, were unaltered by fluoxetine treatment. These data point to a selective inability to form contextual fear memory as a result of fluoxetine treatment, and they suggest that a blunting of hippocampal-mediated aversive memory may be a therapeutic action for this medication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of fluoxetine on the oxidative status of peripheral blood leucocytes of restraint-stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Novío, Silvia; Núñez, María Jesús; Amigo, Gonzalo; Freire-Garabal, Manuel

    2011-11-01

    Emotional stress can be viewed as a cause of adverse circumstances that induces a wide range of biochemical and behavioural changes. Oxidative stress is a critical route of damage in various psychological stress-induced disorders such as depression. Antidepressants are widely prescribed to treat these conditions; however, no animal study has investigated the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species in peripheral blood leucocytes of stressed mice. In this study, mice were immobilized for a period of 6 hr. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg of body-weight) was administered 30 min. before subjecting the animals to acute stress. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species in leucocytes of the peripheral blood of stressed mice was investigated using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe, and the antioxidant response of fluoxetine was evaluated by superoxide dismutase, diaphorase, catalase and reduced glutathione. Our results show that restraint stress significantly increases the generation of reactive oxygen species in the peripheral defence cells. Treatment with fluoxetine partially reverses the adverse effects of stress. The improvement in cellular oxidative status may be an important mechanism underlying the protective pharmacological effects of fluoxetine, which are clinically observed in the treatment of depressive disorders.

  11. Dual effects of fluoxetine on mouse early embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Woon; Choe, Changyong; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lee, Jae-Ik; Yoon, Sook-Young; Cho, Young-Woo; Han, Sunkyu; Tak, Hyun-Min; Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2012-11-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis, in mammalian cells. Little is known about the role of fluoxetine in early embryonic development. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of fluoxetine during mouse early embryonic development. Late two-cell stage embryos (2-cells) were cultured in the presence of various concentrations of fluoxetine (1 to 50 μM) for different durations. When late 2-cells were incubated with 5 μM fluoxetine for 6 h, the percentage that developed into blastocysts increased compared to the control value. However, late 2-cells exposed to fluoxetine (5 μM) over 24 h showed a reduction in blastocyst formation. The addition of fluoxetine (5 μM) together with KN93 or KN62 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors) failed to increase blastocyst formation. Fluoxetine treatment inhibited TREK-1 and TREK-2, members of the two-pore domain K{sup +} channel family expressed in mouse embryos, activities, indicating that fluoxetine-induced membrane depolarization in late 2-cells might have resulted from TREK inhibition. In addition, long-term exposure to fluoxetine altered the TREK mRNA expression levels. Furthermore, injection of siRNA targeting TREKs significantly decreased blastocyst formation by ∼ 30% compared to injection of scrambled siRNA. Long-term exposure of fluoxetine had no effect on blastocyst formation of TREK deficient embryos. These results indicate that low-dose and short-term exposures of late 2-cells to fluoxetine probably increase blastocyst formation through activation of CaMKII-dependent signal transduction pathways, whereas long-term exposure decreases mouse early embryonic development through inhibition of TREK channel gating. Highlights: ► Short-term exposure of 2-cells to fluoxetine enhances mouse blastocyst formation. ► The enhancive effect of fluoxetine is resulted from Ca

  12. Phaeochromocytoma unearthed by fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, A

    2000-01-01

    Non-specific noradrenaline reuptake inhibition by high dose selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, along with catecholamine release from phaeochromocytoma, may lead to a hypertensive paroxysm. This may unmask a clinically silent phaeochromocytoma. Hypertensive paroxysm induced by paroxetine leading to detection of phaeochromocytoma has been reported. The first patient in whom fluoxetine unmasked a phaeochromocytoma is reported.


Keywords: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; fluoxetine; phaeochromocytoma PMID:10775287

  13. Predictors of Treatment Response to Fluoxetine in PTSD Following a Recent History of War Zone Stress Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    546---50. 28. Harmon RJ, Riggs PD. Clonidine for posttraumatic stress disorder in preschool children. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 1996;35:1247...9. 71. Meighen KG, Hines LA, Lagges AM. Risperidone treatment of preschool children with thermal burns and acute stress disorder. J Child Adolesc...intervention for recently redeployed soldiers, as well as to develop methodologies for understanding the multiple factors that may predict outcome. The

  14. Diazepam and Fluoxetine Decrease the Stress Response in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Koakoski, Gessi; Ferreira, Daiane; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Gusso, Darlan; Giacomini, Ana Cristina Varrone; Piato, Angelo Luis; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2014-01-01

    The presence of pharmaceutical products in the aquatic environment has been reported in several studies. However, the impact of these drugs on living organisms is still uncharacterized. Here, we investigated the effects of acute exposure to either diazepam or fluoxetine on the stress response in Danio rerio. We showed that diazepam and fluoxetine inhibited the stress axis in zebrafish. Intermediate concentrations of diazepam suppressed the stress response as measured by cortisol levels, whereas fluoxetine inhibited cortisol increase at concentrations similar to those found in the environment. These data suggest that the presence of psychoactive drugs in aquatic ecosystems could cause neuroendocrine dysfunction in fish. PMID:25054216

  15. Fluoxetine tenth anniversary update: the progress continues.

    PubMed

    Stokes, P E; Holtz, A

    1997-01-01

    This tenth anniversary review/update of fluoxetine concentrates on the past 5 years of its clinical application. The mechanism of action of fluoxetine; its metabolism; its efficacy in patients with various diagnostic subgroups of depression, patients with coincident medical disease, children and adolescents with depression, patients with eating disorders, and patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); its long-term (maintenance) efficacy; its side effects and toxicity; and pharmacoeconomic considerations are reviewed. Pharmacotherapy is currently the only proven method for treating major depressive disorder that is applicable to all levels of severity of major depressive illness. Since its introduction 10 years ago, fluoxetine has been available to psychiatrists, primary care physicians, and other nonpsychiatric physicians as full-dose effective pharmacotherapy for patients with depression. Fluoxetine has been widely prescribed by physicians knowledgeable in pharmacology and in the treatment of depression because of its proven efficacy (ie, equal to that of tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs]), its ease of administration (with full therapeutic dosing usually starting from day 1), its generally benign side-effect profile, its remarkable safety in over-dose, and its proven effectiveness in the most common depressed patient population--anxious, agitated, depressed patients--as well as in patients with various subtypes and severities of depression. In more recent years it has also proved effective in the treatment of bulimia, an entity for which only limited or inadequate treatment options had been previously available. In OCD, fluoxetine, with its more acceptable side-effect profile and greater ease of dosing, presents a favorable alternative to previous drug therapy and is useful in treating both obsessions and compulsions. Fluoxetine is currently recognized among clinicians as efficacious in treating anxiety disorders and is being used successfully in special

  16. Factors influencing fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sarah; Heckard, Danyeal; Hassell, James; Uphouse, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, produces sexual side effects with low sexual desire being the most prevalent effect in females. In few studies have preclinical models for such antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction been fruitful. In the current manuscript, the effects of fluoxetine on multiple measures of female sexual motivation and sexual receptivity were examined. Ovariectomized, Fischer rats were primed with 10 μg estradiol benzoate and 500 μg progesterone. Partner preference, active investigation of the male, and measures of sexual behavior were examined after injection with 15 mg/kg fluoxetine. Factors (pretesting for sexual behavior, size of the test arena, non-contact time with a male) that differ among experiments designed to study antidepressant-induced female rat sexual dysfunction were studied. The male preference ratio was not affected by fluoxetine treatment but active investigation of the male was reduced; lordosis behavior was inhibited and pretesting for sexual receptivity amplified fluoxetine's inhibition; size of the testing arena or non-contact experience with the male had no effect. Regardless of test condition, when given the opportunity to escape from the male, fluoxetine-treated females displayed escape behavior. Measures of male preference and active investigation, but not lordosis behavior, appeared to be affected by fluoxetine's impact on activity. The collective data provided a behavioral profile of fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. These findings reinforce the value of multiple measures when attempting to model antidepressant-induced female sexual dysfunction. PMID:22835821

  17. Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2017-02-01

    This article provides an update on the state of the art of the emergency treatment of acute ischemic stroke with particular emphasis on the alternatives for reperfusion therapy. The results of several randomized controlled trials consistently and conclusively demonstrating that previously functional patients with disabling strokes from a proximal intracranial artery occlusion benefit from prompt recanalization with mechanical thrombectomy using a retrievable stent have changed the landscape of acute stroke therapy. Mechanical thrombectomy within 6 hours of symptom onset should now be considered the preferred treatment for these patients along with IV thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) within the first 4.5 hours for all patients who do not have contraindications for systemic thrombolysis. Patients who are ineligible for IV rtPA can also benefit from mechanical thrombectomy. Collateral status and time to reperfusion are the main determinants of outcome. Timely successful reperfusion is the most effective treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Systems of care should be optimized to maximize the number of patients with acute ischemic stroke able to receive reperfusion therapy.

  18. Genetic background contributes to the co-morbidity of anxiety and depression with audiogenic seizure propensity and responses to fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Sarkisova, Karine Yu; Fedotova, Irina B; Surina, Natalia M; Nikolaev, Georgy M; Perepelkina, Olga V; Kostina, Zoya A; Poletaeva, Inga I

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety and depression are the most frequent comorbidities of different types of convulsive and non-convulsive epilepsies. Increased anxiety and depression-like phenotype have been described in the genetic absence epilepsy models as well as in models of limbic epilepsy and acquired seizure models, suggesting a neurobiological connection. However, whether anxiety and/or depression are comorbid to audiogenic epilepsy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anxiety or depression-like behavior can be found in rat strains with different susceptibility to audiogenic seizures (AS) and whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects this co-morbidity. Behavior in the elevated plus-maze and the forced swimming test was studied in four strains: Wistar rats non-susceptible to AS; Krushinsky-Molodkina (KM) strain, selectively bred for AS propensity from outbred Wistar rats; and a selection lines bred for maximal AS expression (strain "4") and for a lack of AS (strain "0") from KM×Wistar F2 hybrids. Effects of chronic antidepressant treatment on AS and behavior were also evaluated. Anxiety and depression levels were higher in KM rats (with AS) compared with Wistar rats (without AS), indicating the comorbidity with AS. However, in strains "4" and "0" with contrasting AS expression, but with a genetic background close to KM rats, anxiety and depression were not as divergent as in KMs versus Wistars. Fluoxetine treatment exerted an antidepressant effect in all rat strains irrespective of its effect on AS. Genetic background contributes substantively to the co-morbidity of anxiety and depression with AS propensity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluoxetine and the mitochondria: A review of the toxicological aspects.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto

    2016-09-06

    Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)) is used as an antidepressant by modulating the levels of serotonin in the synaptic cleft. Nevertheless, fluoxetine also induces undesirable effects, such as anxiety, sexual dysfunction, sleep disturbances, and gastrointestinal impairments. Fluoxetine has been viewed as an agent that may interfere with cell fate by triggering apoptosis. On the other hand, fluoxetine intake has been associated with increased cancer risk. Nonetheless, data remain contradictory and no conclusions were taken. Several studies demonstrated that fluoxetine interacts with mitochondria triggering apoptosis and/or altering mitochondrial function by modulating the activity of respiratory chain components and enzymes of the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, fluoxetine affects mitochondria-related redox parameters in different experimental models. In this review, data demonstrating the effects of fluoxetine upon mammalian mitochondria are described and discussed, as well as several unsolved questions in this field of research are addressed. A separate section deals with future needs regarding the research involving the impact of fluoxetine treatment upon mitochondria and mitochondria-related signaling.

  20. Comparable efficacy and safety of 8 weeks treatment with agomelatine 25-50mg or fluoxetine 20-40mg in Asian out-patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Shu, L; Sulaiman, A H; Huang, Y S; Fones Soon Leng, C; Crutel, V Strijckmans; Kim, Y S

    2014-04-01

    This randomized, double-blind study evaluates the efficacy and tolerability of agomelatine, using fluoxetine as an active comparator, in Asian patients suffering from moderate to severe major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients were randomly assigned to receive either agomelatine (25-50mg/day, n=314) or fluoxetine (20-40mg/day, n=314) during an 8-week treatment period. The main outcome measure was the change in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17 items (HAM-D17) scores. Secondary efficacy criteria included scores on Clinical Global Impression Severity of illness (CGI-S) and Improvement of illness (CGI-I), patient sleeping improvement using the self-rating Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (LSEQ) and anxiety using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) scores. Tolerability and safety evaluations were based on emergent adverse events. Agomelatine and fluoxetine exert a comparable antidepressant efficacy in the Asian population. Mean changes over 8 weeks were clinically relevant and similar in both groups (-14.8±7.3 and -15.0±8.1 on HAM-D17 scale in agomelatine and fluoxetine groups, respectively). The between-group difference reached statistical significance on non-inferiority test (p=0.015). Clinically relevant decreases in CGI-S and CGI-I scores were observed over the treatment period in both groups. The two treatments were equally effective on the symptoms of both anxiety and sleep. The good tolerability profile and safety of both doses of agomelatine was confirmed in the Asian population. Agomelatine and fluoxetine are equally effective in the treatment of MDD-associated symptoms in Asian depressed patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siket, Matthew S

    2016-11-01

    Although stroke declined from the third to fifth most common cause of death in the United States, the annual incidence and overall prevalence continue to increase. Since the available US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment options are time dependent, improving early stroke care may have more of a public health impact than any other phase of care. Timely and efficient stroke treatment should be a priority for emergency department and prehospital providers. This article discusses currently available and emerging treatment options in acute ischemic stroke focusing on the preservation of salvageable brain tissue, minimizing complications, and secondary prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anaphylaxis: acute treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Grosber, Martine; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Brockow, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is the maximal variant of an acute life-threatening immediate-type allergy. Due to its often dramatic onset and clinical course, practical knowledge in the management of these reactions is mandatory both for physicians and patients. It has to be distinguished between acute treatment modalities and general recommendations for management of patients who have suffered from an anaphylactic reaction. Acute treatment comprises general procedures like positioning, applying an intravenous catheter, call for help, comfort of the patient as well as the application of medication. The acute treatment modalities are selected depending upon the intensity of the clinical symptomatology as they are categorized in 'severity grades'. First of all it is important to diagnose anaphylaxis early and consider several differential diagnoses. This diagnosis is purely clinical and laboratory tests are of no help in the acute situation. Epinephrine is the essential antianaphylactic drug in the pharmacologic treatment. It should be first applied intramuscularly, only in very severe cases or under conditions of surgical interventions intravenous application can be tried. Furthermore, glucocorticosteroids are given in order to prevent protracted or biphasic courses of anaphylaxis; they are of little help in the acute treatment. Epinephrine autoinjectors can be used by the patient him/herself. Histamine H(1)-antagonists are valuable in mild anaphylactic reactions; they should be given intravenously if possible. The replacement of volume is crucial in antianaphylactic treatment. Crystalloids can be used in the beginning, in severe shock colloid volume substitutes have to be applied. Patients suffering from an anaphylactic episode should be observed over a period of 4-10 h according to the severity of the symptomatology. It is crucial to be aware or recognize risk patients as for example patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, or under beta-adrenergic blockade. When bronchial

  3. Ascorbic acid treatment, similarly to fluoxetine, reverses depressive-like behavior and brain oxidative damage induced by chronic unpredictable stress.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Morgana; Colla, André; de Oliveira Balen, Grasiela; dos Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Budni, Josiane; de Freitas, Andiara Espíndola; Farina, Marcelo; Severo Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia

    2012-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to play a role in the pathophysiology of depression. Taking into account that experimental chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induces depressive-like behavior and that ascorbic acid has antidepressant-like effect in animals, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of ascorbic acid on depressive-like behavior induced by CUS paradigm, serum corticosterone levels and markers of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Animals were submitted to CUS procedure during 14 days. From the 8th to the 14th day mice received ascorbic acid (10 mg/kg) or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, conventional antidepressant, positive control) once a day by oral route. On 15th day behavioral and biochemical parameters were analyzed. CUS exposure caused a depressive-like behavior evidenced by the increased immobility time in the tail suspension test and decreased time in which mice spent grooming in the splash test. Depressive-like behavior induced by CUS was accompanied by a significant increased lipid peroxidation (cerebral cortex and hippocampus), decreased catalase (CAT) (cerebral cortex and hippocampus) and glutathione reductase (GR) (hippocampus) activities and reduced levels of glutathione (cerebral cortex). Repeated ascorbic acid or fluoxetine administration significantly reversed CUS-induced depressive-like behavior and oxidative damage. No alteration was observed in locomotor activity, corticosterone levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. These findings indicate a rapid and robust effect of ascorbic acid in reversing behavioral and biochemical alterations induced by CUS in mice, suggesting that this vitamin may be an alternative approach for the management of depressive symptoms.

  4. Treatment of acute pediatric pain.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, F Wickham

    2010-12-01

    Pediatric neurologists frequently treat acute pain in children. A broad range of medication options is available including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and other analgesic adjuvants, such as antidepressants and antiepileptics. This article reviews the physiology underlying the experience of pain and compares the pharmacologic mechanisms and properties of these medications, providing a framework for developing effective multimodal medical treatment approaches to pain in children. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of MTHFR C677T and MS A2756G polymorphisms in major depressive disorder, and their impact on response to fluoxetine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mischoulon, David; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Selhub, Jacob; Katz, Judith; Papakostas, George I.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Yeung, Albert S.; Dording, Christina M.; Farabaugh, Amy H.; Clain, Alisabet J.; Baer, Lee; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Fava, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of the C677T polymorphism of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and the A2756G polymorphism of methionine synthase (MS), and their impact on antidepressant response. Methods We screened 224 subjects (52% female, mean age 39 ± 11 years) with SCID-diagnosed major depressive disorder (MDD), and obtained 194 genetic samples. 49 subjects (49% female, mean age 36 ± 11 years) participated in a 12-week open clinical trial of fluoxetine 20–60 mg/day. Association between clinical response and C677T and A2756G polymorphisms, folate, B12, and homocysteine was examined. Results Prevalence of the C677T and A2756G polymorphisms was consistent with previous reports (C/C=41%, C/T=47%, T/T=11%, A/A=66%, A/G=29%, G/G=4%). In the fluoxetine-treated subsample (n=49), intent-to-treat (ITT) response rates were 47% for C/C subjects and 46% for pooled C/T and T/T subjects (nonsignificant). ITT response rates were 38% for A/A subjects and 60% for A/G subjects (nonsignificant), with no subjects exhibiting the G/G homozygote. Mean baseline plasma B12 was significantly lower in A/G subjects compared to A/A, but folate and homocysteine levels were not affected by genetic status. Plasma folate was negatively associated with treatment response. Conclusion The C677T and A2756G polymorphisms did not significantly affect antidepressant response. These preliminary findings require replication in larger samples. PMID:22789065

  6. Chronic fluoxetine treatment in middle-aged rats induces changes in the expression of plasticity-related molecules and in neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antidepressants promote neuronal structural plasticity in young-adult rodents, but little is known of their effects on older animals. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) may mediate these structural changes through its anti-adhesive properties. PSA-NCAM is expressed in immature neurons and in a subpopulation of mature interneurons and its expression is modulated by antidepressants in the telencephalon of young-adult rodents. Results We have analyzed the effects of 14 days of fluoxetine treatment on the density of puncta expressing PSA-NCAM and different presynaptic markers in the medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of middle-aged (8 months old) rats. The density of puncta expressing PSA-NCAM increased in the dorsal cingulate cortex, as well as in different hippocampal and amygdaloid regions. In these later regions there were also increases in the density of puncta expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase 65/67 (GAD6), synaptophysin (SYN), PSA-NCAM/SYN and PSA-NCAM/GAD6, but a decrease of those expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1). Since there is controversy on the effects of antidepressants on neurogenesis during aging, we analyzed the number of proliferating cells expressing Ki67 and that of immature neurons expressing doublecortin or PSA-NCAM. No significant changes were found in the subgranular zone, but the number of proliferating cells decreased in the subventricular zone. Conclusions These results indicate that the effects of fluoxetine in middle-aged rats are different to those previously described in young-adult animals, being more restricted in the mPFC and even following an opposite direction in the amygdala or the subventricular zone. PMID:22221403

  7. The treatment of acute vertigo.

    PubMed

    Cesarani, A; Alpini, D; Monti, B; Raponi, G

    2004-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are very common symptoms in the general population. The aim of this paper is to describe the physical and pharmacological treatment of symptoms characterized by sudden onset of rotatory vertigo. Acute vertigo can be subdivided into two main groups: (1) spontaneous vertigo and (2) provoked vertigo, usually by postural changes, generally called paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV). Sudden onset of acute vertigo is usually due to acute spontaneous unilateral vestibular failure. It can be also fluctuant as, e.g., in recurrent attacks of Ménière's disease. Pharmacotherapy of acute spontaneous vertigo includes Levo-sulpiride i.v., 50 mg in 250 physiologic solution, once or twice a day, methoclopramide i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, or triethilperazine rectally, once or twice a day, to reduce neurovegetative symptoms; diazepam i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, to decrease internuclear inhibition, sulfate magnesium i.v., two ampoules in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, or piracetam i.v., one ampoule in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, to decrease vestibular damage. At the onset of the acute symptoms, patients must lie on their healthy side with the head and trunk raised 20 degrees. The room must be quiet but not darkened. If the patient is able to swallow without vomiting, it is important to reduce nystagmus and stabilize the visual field with gabapentine, per os, 300 mg twice or three times a day. The first step of the physical therapy of acute vertigo is vestibular electrical stimulation, that is to say, a superficial paravertebral electrical stimulation of neck muscles, aimed to reduce antigravitary failure and to increase proprioceptive cervical sensory substitution. PPV is a common complaint and represents one of the most common entities in peripheral vestibular pathology. While the clinical picture is well known and widely described, the etiopathogenesis of PPV is still a matter of debate. Despite the different

  8. Fluoxetine (Prozac) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the mother’s blood. There are several small studies and case reports regarding the use of fluoxetine during breastfeeding. ... in breastfed babies. In a small number of cases, irritability, vomiting, diarrhea, and less sleep, have been reported. One study also noted a chance for slightly less weight ...

  9. Fluoxetine (Prozac) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking fluoxetine during the third trimester until the time of delivery, your baby could have some problems. These symptoms or problems are called “neonatal adaptation syndrome” or NAS. The symptoms ... harder time breathing, altered sleep patterns, tremors (shivers) and/or ...

  10. Effects of trazodone and fluoxetine in the treatment of major depression: therapeutic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions through formation of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Westenberg, H; Vandoolaeghe, E; Demedts, P; Wauters, A; Neels, H; Meltzer, H Y

    1997-10-01

    It has been suggested that (1) the clinical efficacy of the heterocyclic antidepressant trazodone in depression may, in part, be attributed to its metabolite meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP); and (2) the enhancement of the efficacy of trazodone by the addition of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, may, in part, be ascribed to fluoxetine-induced plasma concentrations of trazodone. After a washout period of 10 days, 27 inpatients with major depression were treated with trazodone 100 mg/day (orally). One week later (T0), fluoxetine 20 mg/day, placebo, or pindolol 7.5 mg/day was added. Plasma concentrations of mCPP and trazodone were determined at T0 and 2 and 4 weeks later. Although placebo pindolol had no significant effect on the plasma concentrations of mCPP and trazodone, there was a significant increase of the concentrations of these compounds associated with the combination of trazodone + fluoxetine. The results suggest that fluoxetine-induced increases in plasma mCPP and trazodone concentrations contribute to the clinical efficacy of the combination of fluoxetine + trazodone. It is suggested that desensitization of 5-HT2C receptor function by mCPP as well as fluoxetine may contribute to the antidepressant effects of this combination.

  11. Fluoxetine Exerts Age-Dependent Effects on Behavior and Amygdala Neuroplasticity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Homberg, Judith R.; Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Blom, Tom; Arentsen, Tim; van Brunschot, Chantal; Schipper, Pieter; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac® (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereby may have harmful effects in adolescents. Here we treated adolescent and adult rats chronically with fluoxetine (12 mg/kg) at postnatal day (PND) 25 to 46 and from PND 67 to 88, respectively, and tested the animals 7–14 days after the last injection when (nor)fluoxetine in blood plasma had been washed out, as determined by HPLC. Plasma (nor)fluoxetine levels were also measured 5 hrs after the last fluoxetine injection, and matched clinical levels. Adolescent rats displayed increased behavioral despair in the forced swim test, which was not seen in adult fluoxetine treated rats. In addition, beneficial effects of fluoxetine on wakefulness as measured by electroencephalography in adults was not seen in adolescent rats, and age-dependent effects on the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition were observed. On the other hand, adolescent rats showed resilience to the anorexic effects of fluoxetine. Exploratory behavior in the open field test was not affected by fluoxetine treatment, but anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze test were increased in both adolescent and adult fluoxetine treated rats. Finally, in the amygdala, but not the dorsal raphe nucleus and medial prefrontal cortex, the number of PSA-NCAM (marker for synaptic remodeling) immunoreactive neurons was increased in adolescent rats, and decreased in adult rats, as a consequence of chronic fluoxetine treatment. No fluoxetine-induced changes in 5-HT1A receptor immunoreactivity were observed. In conclusion, we show that fluoxetine exerts both harmful and beneficial age-dependent effects on depressive behavior, body weight and wakefulness, which may relate, in part, to differential fluoxetine

  12. Fluoxetine and sertraline dosages in major depression.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, R; Gillespie, W; Altshuler, L

    1999-01-01

    In a retrospective study, we sought to determine medication dosages usually prescribed to obtain euthymia in 59 outpatients with a diagnosis of major depression treated with fluoxetine or sertraline. Charts of veterans admitted to the outpatient mental health clinic at the West Los Angeles Veterans Hospital with a diagnosis of major depression and treated with either fluoxetine or sertraline were reviewed. Progress notes were analyzed for a 6-month time period after the initiation of the medication treatment, and improvement was rated by a physician blind to the drug used for treatment. No significant differences were found in overall response rates between the fluoxetine (81% responders) and sertraline (76% responders) groups. Eighty-one percent of the fluoxetine responders compared to 32% of sertraline responders were at the manufacturer's recommended starting dose (MRSD) at the time of clinical response. One-third of patients receiving sertraline were started on or rapidly titrated to more than 50 mg/day. When only those patients receiving an adequate trial of sertraline at 50 mg were considered, 47% required a dose increase to achieve a remission. These data suggest that 50 mg of sertraline may be inadequate for some patients to achieve a resolution of symptoms of major depression and that many clinicians currently prescribe in a manner suggesting that they believe the MRSD is a suboptimal dosage.

  13. Treatment of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a rare, but potentially devastating disease. The treatment is initiated intravenously, but can be safely switched to oral after 2-4 days providing large doses of a well-absorbing antibiotic and, for time-dependent antibiotics, 4 times-a-day administration are used. Empiric treatment should always cover Staphylococcus aureus and common respiratory pathogens, whereas Kingella kingae and Salmonella are important only regionally. Studies conducted by our group have shown that a total course of 10 days may suffice for previously healthy children in a Western setting. Treatment of neonates, patients with immunodeficiency or cases caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus, may deserve a different approach.

  14. Intermittent amantadine for fluoxetine-induced anorgasmia.

    PubMed

    Balon, R

    1996-01-01

    Various drugs, including amantadine, have been reported in the successful treatment of antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction. Only a regular daily dosing schedule of amantadine has been used for the treatment of sexual dysfunction so far. This case demonstrates that an intermittent dose of amantadine at 100 mg five to six hours prior to coitus could be useful in the treatment of fluoxetine-induced anorgasmia.

  15. [Acute pancreatitis (protocols of diagnosis and treatment)].

    PubMed

    Tolstoĭ, A D; Bagnenko, S F; Krasnorogov, V B; Kurygin, A A; Grinev, M V; Lapshin, V N; Gol'tsov, V R

    2005-01-01

    Protocols of diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis are presented. Definition based on pathogenesis of the disease is given. Phases of acute pancreatitis, features of diagnosis and treatment in each phase are analyzed. Terms of surgical treatment, main principles of postoperative treatment are discussed.

  16. Fluoxetine attenuates alcohol intake and desire to drink.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, C A; Poulos, C X; Bremner, K E; Lanctot, K L

    1994-09-01

    Several serotonin uptake inhibitors, including the long-acting fluoxetine, have been found to decrease alcohol intake in moderately dependent alcoholics. While the mechanism of their effect is not fully elucidated, a previous study with citalopram indicated that decreased desire to drink may be an important factor. Therefore, we tested fluoxetine effects on alcohol intake and desire to drink in a placebo-controlled study. Subjects, recruited by advertisement, were mildly/moderately dependent alcoholics (12 male, four female, aged 19-59 years, healthy, non-depressed) who did not believe they had a drinking problem and were not requesting treatment. After a 1 week baseline they received, single-blind, 2 weeks placebo followed by 2 weeks fluoxetine 60 mg/day. As out-patients, subjects recorded daily standard drinks (13.6 g ethanol) and rated interest, desire, craving and liking for alcohol biweekly. Each out-patient period was immediately followed by a double-blind experimental drinking session. Out-patient daily drinks slightly decreased during fluoxetine to 6.6 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- S.E.M.) compared with during placebo (7.16 +/- 0.95, p = 0.07, N.S.) and baseline (7.18 +/- 1.0, p > 0.1, N.S.). Desire, interest and craving for alcohol decreased during fluoxetine vs placebo baseline (p < 0.05), but not vs placebo. Appetite loss and decrease in food intake (p < 0.01, fluoxetine vs placebo) correlated with each other (r = 0.91, p < 0.01) but neither correlated with decrease in alcohol intake (appetite: r = 0.26, N.S.; food intake: r = 0.22, N.S.). Weight loss occurred during fluoxetine (p < 0.05 vs placebo) but did not correlate with decrease in alcohol intake (r = 0.1, N.S.). In the experimental drinking sessions after placebo and fluoxetine treatments subjects rated their desire for each of 18 mini-drinks (each one-third of a standard drink) offered at 5 min intervals. Fluoxetine decreased desire to drink throughout the sessions; both mean and maximum desire ratings were

  17. Individualized Homeopathic Treatment and Fluoxetine for Moderate to Severe Depression in Peri- and Postmenopausal Women (HOMDEP-MENOP Study): A Randomized, Double-Dummy, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Macías-Cortés, Emma del Carmen; Llanes-González, Lidia; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background Perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women's menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depression. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of individualized homeopathic treatment versus placebo and fluoxetine versus placebo in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. Methods/Design A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, superiority, three-arm trial with a 6 week follow-up study was conducted. The study was performed in a public research hospital in Mexico City in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred thirty-three peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to DSM-IV (moderate to severe intensity) were included. The outcomes were: change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Beck Depression Inventory and Greene Scale, after 6 weeks of treatment, response and remission rates, and safety. Efficacy data were analyzed in the intention-to-treat population (ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc test). Results After a 6-week treatment, homeopathic group was more effective than placebo by 5 points in Hamilton Scale. Response rate was 54.5% and remission rate, 15.9%. There was a significant difference among groups in response rate definition only, but not in remission rate. Fluoxetine-placebo difference was 3.2 points. No differences were observed among groups in the Beck Depression Inventory. Homeopathic group was superior to placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale (8.6 points). Fluoxetine was not different from placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale. Conclusion Homeopathy and fluoxetine are effective and safe antidepressants for climacteric women. Homeopathy and fluoxetine were significantly different from placebo

  18. Duloxetine compared with fluoxetine and venlafaxine: use of meta-regression analysis for indirect comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Laurent; Lançon, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Background Data comparing duloxetine with existing antidepressant treatments is limited. A comparison of duloxetine with fluoxetine has been performed but no comparison with venlafaxine, the other antidepressant in the same therapeutic class with a significant market share, has been undertaken. In the absence of relevant data to assess the place that duloxetine should occupy in the therapeutic arsenal, indirect comparisons are the most rigorous way to go. We conducted a systematic review of the efficacy of duloxetine, fluoxetine and venlafaxine versus placebo in the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and performed indirect comparisons through meta-regressions. Methods The bibliography of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research and the CENTRAL, Medline, and Embase databases were interrogated using advanced search strategies based on a combination of text and index terms. The search focused on randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials involving adult patients treated for acute phase Major Depressive Disorder. All outcomes were derived to take account for varying placebo responses throughout studies. Primary outcome was treatment efficacy as measured by Hedge's g effect size. Secondary outcomes were response and dropout rates as measured by log odds ratios. Meta-regressions were run to indirectly compare the drugs. Sensitivity analysis, assessing the influence of individual studies over the results, and the influence of patients' characteristics were run. Results 22 studies involving fluoxetine, 9 involving duloxetine and 8 involving venlafaxine were selected. Using indirect comparison methodology, estimated effect sizes for efficacy compared with duloxetine were 0.11 [-0.14;0.36] for fluoxetine and 0.22 [0.06;0.38] for venlafaxine. Response log odds ratios were -0.21 [-0.44;0.03], 0.70 [0.26;1.14]. Dropout log odds ratios were -0.02 [-0.33;0.29], 0.21 [-0.13;0.55]. Sensitivity analyses showed that results were consistent. Conclusion Fluoxetine

  19. Photo-Fenton degradation of the pharmaceuticals ciprofloxacin and fluoxetine after anaerobic pre-treatment of hospital effluent.

    PubMed

    Perini, João A de Lima; Silva, Beatriz Costa E; Tonetti, Adriano L; Nogueira, Raquel F Pupo

    2017-03-01

    This work evaluated the photo-Fenton degradation of two pharmaceuticals extensively used in human medicine, ciprofloxacin (CIP), and fluoxetine (FLU) when present in an anaerobic pre-treated hospital effluent (HE) at low concentration (100 μg L(-1)). Operational parameters such as concentration of hydrogen peroxide, iron, and initial pH as well as the effect of iron citrate complex were evaluated considering the degradation of the pharmaceuticals. Iron citrate complex (Fecit) influenced significantly FLU degradation at pH 4.5 achieving 80 % after 20 min, while with iron nitrate only 36 % degradation was obtained after the same time. However, only a slight effect was observed on CIP degradation, achieving 86 % with Fecit and 75 % with Fe(NO3)3, after 20 min. Samples of HE used in this work were previously treated in an anaerobic reactor followed by sand filtration; however, the presence of pharmaceuticals was detected. Degradation of both FLU and CIP was significantly hindered when present in HE, due to the relatively high content of organic (39.6 mg L(-1)) and inorganic (12.5 mg L(-1)) carbon, which may have consumed (·)OH in side reactions. However, the iron cycle reduction was not affected by the matrix in the presence of citrate. Despite the recalcitrance of the matrix (no total organic carbon removal), it was possible to achieve over 50 % degradation of both pharmaceuticals after 90 min.

  20. Efficacy and acceptability of acute treatments for persistent depressive disorder: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kriston, Levente; von Wolff, Alessa; Westphal, Annika; Hölzel, Lars P; Härter, Martin

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to synthesize the available evidence on the relative efficacy and acceptability of specific treatments for persistent depressive disorder. We searched several databases up to January 2013 and included randomized controlled trials that compared acute pharmacological, psychotherapeutic, and combined interventions with each other or placebo. The outcome measures were the proportion of patients who responded to (efficacy) or dropped out from (acceptability) the allocated treatment. Data synthesis was performed with network meta-analysis. A network of 45 trials that tested 28 drugs included data from 5,806 and 5,348 patients concerning efficacy and acceptability, respectively. A second network of 15 trials that tested five psychotherapeutic and five combined interventions included data from 2,657 and 2,719 patients concerning efficacy and acceptability, respectively. Among sufficiently tested treatments, fluoxetine (odds ratio (OR) 2.94), paroxetine (3.79), sertraline (4.47), moclobemide (6.98), imipramine (4.53), ritanserin (2.35), amisulpride (5.63), and acetyl-l-carnitine (5.67) were significantly more effective than placebo. Pairwise comparisons showed advantages of moclobemide (2.38) and amisulpride (1.92) over fluoxetine. Sertraline (0.57) and amisulpride (0.53) showed a lower dropout rate than imipramine. Interpersonal psychotherapy with medication outperformed medication alone in chronic major depression but not in dysthymia. Evidence on cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy plus medication was partly inconclusive. Interpersonal psychotherapy was less effective than medication (0.48) and cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (0.45). Several other treatments were tested in single studies. Several evidence-based acute pharmacological, psychotherapeutic, and combined treatments for persistent depressive disorder are available with significant differences between them. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Role of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin in fluoxetine-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Myung, Chang-Seon; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Choi, Si Ho; Song, Gyu Yong; Lee, Seok Yong; Jahng, Jeong Won

    2005-06-01

    Fluoxetine is an anorexic agent known to reduce food intake and weight gain. However, the molecular mechanism by which fluoxetine induces anorexia has not been well-established. We examined mRNA expression levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the brain regions of rats using RT-PCR and in situ hybridization techniques after 2 weeks of administering fluoxetine daily. Fluoxetine persistently suppressed food intake and weight gain during the experimental period. The pair-fed group confirmed that the reduction in body weight in the fluoxetine treated rats resulted primarily from decreased food intake. RT-PCR analyses showed that mRNA expression levels of both NPY and POMC were markedly reduced by fluoxetine treatment in all parts of the brain examined, including the hypothalamus. POMC mRNA in situ signals were significantly decreased, NPY levels tended to increase in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of fluoxetine treated rats (compared to the vehicle controls). In the pair-fed group, NPY mRNA levels did not change, but the POMC levels decreased (compared with the vehicle controls). These results reveal that the chronic administration of fluoxetine decreases expression levels in both NPY and POMC in the brain, and suggests that fluoxetine-induced anorexia may not be mediated by changes in the ARC expression of either NPY or POMC. It is possible that a fluoxetine raised level of 5-HT play an inhibitory role in the orectic action caused by a reduced expression of ARC POMC (alpha-MSH).

  2. Predictors of Treatment Response to Fluoxetine in PTSD Following a Recent History of War Zone Stress Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are routinely prescribed for acute stress disorder and early PTSD...8 Supporting Data…………………………………………………………………. 4 INTRODUCTION: Although selective serotonin reuptake ... inhibitors (SSRIs) are routinely prescribed for acute stress disorder and early PTSD and recommended in the VA-DoD best practice guidelines, the efficacy

  3. Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of desloratadine and fluoxetine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir; Banfield, Christopher; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Flannery, Brian; Herron, Jerry

    2004-11-01

    The authors assessed the potential for a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interaction between desloratadine and fluoxetine. This randomized, placebo-controlled, open-label study was conducted in 54 healthy volunteers. Subjects received 1 of 3 treatments: desloratadine 5 mg plus fluoxetine 20 mg, desloratadine 5 mg plus placebo, or fluoxetine 20 mg plus placebo. Serial electrocardiograms (ECGs) were performed at baseline and day 35. Treatment effects on C(max) and AUC were assessed. During coadministration of desloratadine with fluoxetine, the ratio of the mean log-transformed C(max) and AUC values for desloratadine following concomitant fluoxetine therapy revealed a small increase in C(max) values of 15% (90% confidence interval [CI], 95%-139%) but no increase for AUC values (90% CI, 82%-123%). Corresponding values for 3-OH desloratadine demonstrated small increases in mean log-transformed C(max) and AUC ratios: 17% (90% CI, 100%-136%) and 13% (90% CI, 96%-132%), respectively. Statistical evaluation of the ratio of the mean C(max) and AUC values for fluoxetine following concomitant desloratadine therapy revealed small decreases of 9% (90% CI, 72%-115%) and 11% (90% CI, 69%-113%), respectively. Corresponding values for norfluoxetine demonstrated modest increases in mean log-transformed C(max) and AUC ratios: 22% (90% CI, 100%-139%) and 18% (90% CI, 101%-136%), respectively. Coadministration of desloratadine with a potent inhibitor of CYP2D6 did not result in clinically relevant changes in its pharmacokinetic parameters. Desloratadine administration was not associated with clinically important changes in the pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine, a drug metabolized by CYP2D6. The most common adverse event in all groups was headache (65%). Desloratadine plus fluoxetine caused no significant changes in ECGs or ventricular rate.

  4. Effect of fluoxetine and resveratrol on testicular functions and oxidative stress in a rat model of chronic mild stress-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Sakr, H F; Abbas, A M; Elsamanoudy, A Z; Ghoneim, F M

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effects of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) with or without selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine) and anti-oxidant (resveratrol) on testicular functions and oxidative stress in rats. Fifty male rats were divided into 2 groups; control and CUMS. CUMS group was further subdivided into 4 subgroups administered water, fluoxetine, resveratrol and both. Sucrose intake, body weight gain, serum corticosterone, serotonin and testosterone levels, sperm count and motility, testicular malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione (GSH), and gene expression of steroidogenic acute-regulatory (StAR) protein and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme were evaluated. CUMS decreased sucrose intake, weight gain, anti-oxidants (SOD, catalase, GSH), testosterone, serotonin, StAR and cytochrome P450scc gene expression, sperm count and motility and increased malondialdehyde and corticosterone. Fluoxetine increased malondialdehyde, sucrose intake, weight gain, serotonin and decreased anti-oxidants, StAR and cytochrome P450scc gene expression, sperm count and motility, testosterone, corticosterone in stressed rats. Administration of resveratrol increased anti-oxidants, sucrose intake, weight gain, serotonin, StAR and cytochrome P450scc gene expression, testosterone, sperm count and motility, and decreased malondialdehyde and corticosterone in stressed rats with or without fluoxetine. In conclusion, CUMS induces testicular dysfunctions and oxidative stress. While treatment of CUMS rats with fluoxetine decreases the depressive behavior, it causes further worsening of testicular dysfunctions and oxidative stress. Administration of resveratrol improves testicular dysfunctions and oxidative stress that are caused by CUMS and further worsened by fluoxetine treatment.

  5. Chronic Treatment with the IDO1 Inhibitor 1-Methyl-D-Tryptophan Minimizes the Behavioural and Biochemical Abnormalities Induced by Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress in Mice - Comparison with Fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Laugeray, Anthony; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Mutlu, Oguz; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Belzung, Catherine; Barone, Pascal R.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated that confronting mice to the Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress (UCMS) procedure—a validated model of stress-induced depression—results in behavioural alterations and biochemical changes in the kynurenine pathway (KP), suspected to modify the glutamatergic neurotransmission through the imbalance between downstream metabolites such as 3-hydroxykynurenine, quinolinic and kynurenic acids. We showed that daily treatment with the IDO1 inhibitor 1-methyl-D-tryptophan partially rescues UCMS-induced KP alterations as does the antidepressant fluoxetine. More importantly we demonstrated that 1-methyl-D-tryptophan was able to alleviate most of the behavioural changes resulting from UCMS exposure. We also showed that both fluoxetine and 1-methyl-D-tryptophan robustly reduced peripheral levels of proinflammatory cytokines in UCMS mice suggesting that their therapeutic effects might occur through anti-inflammatory processes. KP inhibition might be involved in the positive effects of fluoxetine on mice behaviour and could be a relevant strategy to counteract depressive-like symptoms. PMID:27828964

  6. Fluoxetine enhanced neurogenesis is not translated to functional outcome in stroke rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Sun, Xuan; Liu, Tingting; Zhao, Mei; Zhao, Shanshan; Xiao, Ting; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Zhao, Chuansheng

    2015-08-31

    Fluoxetine is widely used in clinical practice. It regulates hippocampal neurogenesis, however, the effect of fluoxetine on neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) remains controversial. We aimed to study the effect of fluoxetine on neurogenesis in the SVZ and subgranular zone (SGZ) of dentate gyrus (DG) in relation to behavioral recovery after stroke in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: sham-operated rats, sham-operated rats treated with fluoxetine, rats subjected to cerebral ischemia, and rats with ischemia treated with fluoxetine. Fluoxetine was orally administrated starting 1 week after ischemia, with a dose of 16mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by intracranial injection of vasoconstrictive peptide endothelin-1(ET-1). Behavioral recovery was evaluated on post-stroke days 29-31 after which the survival rate and fate of proliferating cells in the SVZ and DG were measured by immunohistochemistry. The production of neuroblasts in both the SVZ and DG was significantly increased after stroke. Chronic post-stroke fluoxetine treatment increased the dendritic complexity of newborn dentate granule cells. However, fluoxetine treatment did not influence the survival or differentiation of newly generated cells. Neither fluoxetine treatment improved sensorimotor recovery following focal cerebral ischemia.

  7. A comparison of fluoxetine, imipramine, and placebo in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Cohn, J B; Wilcox, C

    1985-03-01

    The efficacy and safety of fluoxetine were compared with those of imipramine and of placebo in a 6-week randomized double-blind parallel study of patients with major depressive illness. Mean values for all efficacy measurements were improved over baseline with fluoxetine and imipramine treatment (p less than .001). More fluoxetine patients completed the study than did imipramine or placebo patients. Predominant adverse experiences reported by imipramine patients were dry mouth and dizziness/lightheadedness. Predominant adverse experiences reported by fluoxetine patients were drowsiness/sedation and excessive sweating. In a subsequent 48-week open-label study, the predominant adverse experience in the fluoxetine group was excessive sweating and in the imipramine group was still dry mouth. In this study, fluoxetine relieved the symptoms of major depressive illness effectively and significantly better than placebo and was better tolerated than imipramine.

  8. Altered CB receptor-signaling in prefrontal cortex from an animal model of depression is reversed by chronic fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Rojo, M Luisa; Pazos, Angel; Díaz, Alvaro

    2009-03-01

    Bilateral olfactory bulbectomy in the rat (OBX) induces behavioral, neurochemical, and structural abnormalities similar to those observed in human depression that are normalized after chronic, but not acute, treatment with antidepressants. In our study, OBX animals exhibited significant increases in both CB(1) receptor density ([(3)H]CP55490 binding) and functionality (stimulation of [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding by the cannabinoid (CB) agonist WIN 55212-2) at the prefrontal cortex (PFC). After chronic treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day, 14 days, s.c.), OBX-induced hyperactivity in the open-field test was fully abolished. Interestingly, chronic fluoxetine fully reversed the enhanced CB(1)-receptor signaling in PFC observed following OBX. The CB agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (5 mg/kg, i.p., 1 day) did not produce any behavioral effect in sham-operated animals but returned locomotor activity to control values in OBX rats. As both acute administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and chronic fluoxetine elicited a similar behavioral effect in the OBX rat, it is not unlikely that the regionally selective enhancement of CB(1) receptor-signaling in the PFC could be related with the altered OBX behavior. Our findings reinforce the utility of this animal model to further investigating the implication of the endocannabinoid system in the modulation of emotional processes and its potential role in the adaptive responses to chronic antidepressants.

  9. Convergence of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and GR signaling in response to fluoxetine treatment in chronically stressed female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Mitic, Milos; Brkic, Zeljka; Lukic, Iva; Adzic, Miroslav

    2017-08-30

    Accumulating evidence strongly suggest that impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling is involved in stress-related mood disorders, and nominate GR as a potential target for antidepressants (ADs). It is known that different classes of ADs affects the GR action via modifying its phosphorylation, while the mechanism through which ADs alter GR phosphorylation targeted by GSK3β, a kinase modulated via serotonin neurotransmission, are unclear. On this basis, we investigated whether GSK3β-GR signaling could be a convergence point of fluoxetine action on brain function and behavior, by examining its effect on GSK3β targeted-GR phosphorylation on threonine 171 (pGR171), and expression of GR-regulated genes in the hippocampus of female and male rats exposed to chronic isolation stress. Stress induced sex-specific GSK3β-targeted phosphorylation of pGR171 in the nucleus of the hippocampus of stressed animals. Namely, while in females stress triggered coupled action of GSK3β-pGR171 signaling, in males changes in pGR171 levels did not correspond to GSK3β activity. On the other hand, fluoxetine managed to up-regulate this pathway in sex-unbiased manner. Furthermore, fluoxetine reverted stress-induced changes in most of the analyzed genes in males, CRH, 5-HT1a and p11, while in females its effect was limited to CRH. These data further suggest that pGR171 signaling affects cellular localization of GR in response to chronic stress and fluoxetine in both sexes. Collectively, our results describe a novel convergence point between GR signaling and GSK3β pathway in rat hippocampus in response to stress and fluoxetine in both sexes and its involvement in fluoxetine-regulated brain function in males. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the antidepressant activity of Moringa oleifera alone and in combination with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ginpreet; Invally, Mihir; Sanzagiri, Resham; Buttar, Harpal S

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of mental depression has increased in recent years, and has become a serious health problem in most countries of the world, including India. Due to the high cost of antidepressant synthetic drugs and their accompanying side effects, the discovery of safer antidepressant herbal remedies is on the rise. Moringa oleifera (MO) (drumstick) has been used in traditional folk medicine, and in Ayurveda, it is considered as a valuable remedy for treating nervous system disorders as well as memory enhancing agent. The present study was designed to evaluate the acute and chronic behavioral and antidepressant effects of alcoholic extracts of MO leaves in standardized mouse models of depression. Alcoholic extracts of MO (MOE) leaves were prepared, and phytoconstituents were determined using appropriate chemical analytical methods. Following preliminary dose-finding toxicity studies, the biological activity of MOE was tested in Swiss albino mice. Animals were divided into six groups: Groups 1 and 2 served as vehicle control and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) standard control, respectively. Groups 3 and 4 served as treatment groups and were orally administered ethanolic MOE at doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, respectively. Groups 5 and 6, respectively, received combination doses of MOE 100 mg/kg + 10 mg fluoxetine, and MOE 200 mg/kg + 10 mg/kg fluoxetine. Following acute and 14 days chronic treatments, all animals were tested using behavioral models of depression, such as forced swim test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and locomotor activity test (LAT). Significant changes in all tested activities (FST, TST, LAT) of chronically dosed mice were observed, especially in animals given simultaneously combined doses of 200 mg/kg/day MOE + 10 mg/kg/day fluoxetine for 14 days. The antidepressant effect of MOE may have been invoked through the noradrenergic-serotonergic neurotransmission pathway, which is the hallmark of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) class of

  11. Evaluation of the antidepressant activity of Moringa oleifera alone and in combination with fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ginpreet; Invally, Mihir; Sanzagiri, Resham; Buttar, Harpal S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of mental depression has increased in recent years, and has become a serious health problem in most countries of the world, including India. Due to the high cost of antidepressant synthetic drugs and their accompanying side effects, the discovery of safer antidepressant herbal remedies is on the rise. Moringa oleifera (MO) (drumstick) has been used in traditional folk medicine, and in Ayurveda, it is considered as a valuable remedy for treating nervous system disorders as well as memory enhancing agent. Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the acute and chronic behavioral and antidepressant effects of alcoholic extracts of MO leaves in standardized mouse models of depression. Materials and Methods: Alcoholic extracts of MO (MOE) leaves were prepared, and phytoconstituents were determined using appropriate chemical analytical methods. Following preliminary dose-finding toxicity studies, the biological activity of MOE was tested in Swiss albino mice. Animals were divided into six groups: Groups 1 and 2 served as vehicle control and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) standard control, respectively. Groups 3 and 4 served as treatment groups and were orally administered ethanolic MOE at doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, respectively. Groups 5 and 6, respectively, received combination doses of MOE 100 mg/kg + 10 mg fluoxetine, and MOE 200 mg/kg + 10 mg/kg fluoxetine. Following acute and 14 days chronic treatments, all animals were tested using behavioral models of depression, such as forced swim test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and locomotor activity test (LAT). Results: Significant changes in all tested activities (FST, TST, LAT) of chronically dosed mice were observed, especially in animals given simultaneously combined doses of 200 mg/kg/day MOE + 10 mg/kg/day fluoxetine for 14 days. The antidepressant effect of MOE may have been invoked through the noradrenergic-serotonergic neurotransmission pathway, which is the hallmark of

  12. [Pharmacological treatment of acute catatonia].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Delgado, Christian L

    2012-01-01

    Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome of psychomotor dysregulation that can be present in a broad spectrum of clinical situations. Advances made over the last decades have progressively contributed to its clinical differentiation and its conceptual delimitation. Both Benzodiazepines (BZD) and Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been consolidated as first-line therapy. In this regard, a BZD response rate ranging from 70 to 90 per cent has been reported in different case series. Furthermore, NMDA receptor antagonists represent an emerging strategy in the therapeutic approach to the disorder. Most of the evidence that supports the aforementioned treatment recommendations arises from descriptive observational studies. Traditionally, catatonia pathophysiological research focused on the study of subcortical brain structures. Currently there exists compelling evidence that supports a cortical origin of the syndrome, emphasizing the role of the prefrontal cortex. Neuropsychiatric catatonia models that integrate clinical, pathophysiological, and neurobiological findings have been postulated. The aim of the present review is to summarize up-to-date available evidence associated with the pharmacotherapeutic approach to acute catatonia as well as the neurochemical basis of its effectiveness. Likewise, general measures intended to prevent morbimortality are subject to discussion herein.

  13. Homeopathic Individualized Q-Potencies versus Fluoxetine for Moderate to Severe Depression: Double-Blind, Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Adler, U. C.; Paiva, N. M. P.; Cesar, A. T.; Adler, M. S.; Molina, A.; Padula, A. E.; Calil, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Homeopathy is a complementary and integrative medicine used in depression, The aim of this study is to investigate the non-inferiority and tolerability of individualized homeopathic medicines [Quinquagintamillesmial (Q-potencies)] in acute depression, using fluoxetine as active control. Ninety-one outpatients with moderate to severe depression were assigned to receive an individualized homeopathic medicine or fluoxetine 20 mg day−1 (up to 40 mg day−1) in a prospective, randomized, double-blind double-dummy 8-week, single-center trial. Primary efficacy measure was the analysis of the mean change in the Montgomery & Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) depression scores, using a non-inferiority test with margin of 1.45. Secondary efficacy outcomes were response and remission rates. Tolerability was assessed with the side effect rating scale of the Scandinavian Society of Psychopharmacology. Mean MADRS scores differences were not significant at the 4th (P = .654) and 8th weeks (P = .965) of treatment. Non-inferiority of homeopathy was indicated because the upper limit of the confidence interval (CI) for mean difference in MADRS change was less than the non-inferiority margin: mean differences (homeopathy-fluoxetine) were −3.04 (95% CI −6.95, 0.86) and −2.4 (95% CI −6.05, 0.77) at 4th and 8th week, respectively. There were no significant differences between the percentages of response or remission rates in both groups. Tolerability: there were no significant differences between the side effects rates, although a higher percentage of patients treated with fluoxetine reported troublesome side effects and there was a trend toward greater treatment interruption for adverse effects in the fluoxetine group. This study illustrates the feasibility of randomized controlled double-blind trials of homeopathy in depression and indicates the non-inferiority of individualized homeopathic Q-potencies as compared to fluoxetine in acute treatment of outpatients

  14. Fluoxetine versus other types of pharmacotherapy for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Brambilla, Paulo; Furukawa, Toshi A; Geddes, John; Gregis, Manuela; Hotopf, Matthew; Malvini, Lara; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is common in primary care and it is associated with marked personal, social and economic morbidity, and creates significant demands on service providers in terms of workload. Treatment is predominantly pharmaceutical or psychological. Fluoxetine, the first of a group of antidepressant (AD) agents known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), has been studied in many randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in comparison with tricyclic (TCA), heterocyclic and related ADs, and other SSRIs. These comparative studies provided contrasting findings. In addition, systematic reviews of RCTs have always considered the SSRIs as a group, and evidence applicable to this group of drugs might not be applicable to fluoxetine alone. The present systematic review assessed the efficacy and tolerability profile of fluoxetine in comparison with TCAs, SSRIs and newer agents. Objectives To determine the efficacy of fluoxetine, compared with other ADs, in alleviating the acute symptoms of depression, and to review its acceptability. Search methods Relevant studies were located by searching the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline (1966-2004) and Embase (1974-2004). Non-English language articles were included. Selection criteria Only RCTs were included. For trials which have a crossover design only results from the first randomisation period were considered. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers using a standard form. Responders to treatment were calculated on an intention-to-treat basis: drop-outs were always included in this analysis. When data on drop-outs were carried forward and included in the efficacy evaluation, they were analysed according to the primary studies; when dropouts were excluded from any assessment in the primary studies, they were considered as treatment failures. Scores from continuous outcomes were

  15. Dogs with separation-related problems show a "less pessimistic" cognitive bias during treatment with fluoxetine (Reconcile™) and a behaviour modification plan.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Christos I; Burman, Oliver Hp; Mills, Daniel S

    2015-03-28

    Canine separation-related problems (SRP) (also described as "separation anxiety" or "separation distress") are among the most common behavioural complaints of dog owners. Treatment with psychoactive medication in parallel with a behaviour modification plan is well documented in the literature, but it is unknown if this is associated with an improvement in underlying affective state (emotion and mood) or simply an inhibition of the behaviour. Cognitive judgement bias tasks have been proposed as a method for assessing underlying affective state and so we used this approach to identify if any change in clinical signs during treatment was associated with a consistent change in cognitive bias (affective state). Five dogs showing signs of SRP (vocalising - e.g. barking, howling-, destruction of property, and toileting - urination or defecation- when alone) were treated with fluoxetine chewable tablets (Reconcile™) and set on a standard behaviour modification plan for two months. Questionnaires and interviews of the owners were used to monitor the clinical progress of the dogs. Subjects were also evaluated using a spatial cognitive bias test to infer changes in underlying affect prior to, and during, treatment. Concurrently, seven other dogs without signs of SRP were tested in the same way to act as controls. Furthermore, possible correlations between cognitive bias and clinical measures were also assessed for dogs with SRP. Prior to treatment, the dogs with SRP responded to ambiguous positions in the cognitive bias test negatively (i.e. with slower running speeds) compared to control dogs (p < 0.05). On weeks 2 and 6 of treatment, SRP dogs displayed similar responses in the cognitive bias test to control dogs, consistent with the possible normalization of affect during treatment, with this effect more pronounced at week 6 (p > 0.05). Questionnaire based clinical measures were significantly correlated among themselves and with performance in the cognitive bias test

  16. Treatments for acute bipolar depression: meta-analyses of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of anticonvulsants, lithium and antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Selle, V; Schalkwijk, S; Vázquez, G H; Baldessarini, R J

    2014-03-01

    Optimal treatments for bipolar depression, and the relative value of specific drugs for that purpose, remain uncertain, including agents other than antidepressants. We searched for reports of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of mood-stabilizing anticonvulsants, second-generation antipsychotics, or lithium for acute major depressive episodes in patients diagnosed with type I or II bipolar disorder and applied random-effects meta-analysis to evaluate their efficacy, comparing outcomes based on standardized mean drug-placebo differences (SMD) in improvement, relative response rates (RR), and number-needed-to-treat (NNT). We identified 24 trials of 10 treatments (lasting 7.5 weeks, with ≥ 50 collaborating sites/trial) that met eligibility criteria: lamotrigine (5 trials), quetiapine (5), valproate (4), 2 each for aripiprazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone, and 1 each for carbamazepine, lithium, lurasidone, and olanzapine-fluoxetine. Overall, pooled drug-over-placebo responder-rate superiority (RR) was moderate (29% [CI: 19-40%]), and NNT was 8.2 (CI: 6.4-11). By SMD, apparent efficacy ranked: olanzapine + fluoxetine ≥ valproate > quetiapine > lurasidone > olanzapine, aripiprazole, and carbamazepine; ziprasidone was ineffective, and lithium remains inadequately studied. Notably, drugs were superior to placebo in only 11/24 trials (5/5 with quetiapine, 2/4 with valproate), and only lamotrigine, quetiapine and valproate had > 2 trials. Treatment-associated mania-like reactions were uncommon (drugs: 3.7%; placebo: 4.7%). Controlled trials of non-antidepressant treatments for bipolar depression remain scarce, but findings with olanzapine-fluoxetine, lurasidone, quetiapine, and perhaps carbamazepine and valproate were encouraging; lithium requires adequate testing. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. A Systematic Review of the Evidence for the Treatment of Acute Depression in Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cerullo, Michael A.; Strakowski, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we examined evidence for the acute treatment of depression in bipolar I disorder, focusing on double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with a definite primary outcome measure and published in peer review journals. Quetiapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine are currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of bipolar depression and a number of additional agents (including other atypical antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and novel compounds) have been studied with varying degrees of efficacy. The medication with the most evidence for efficacy in bipolar depression is quetiapine with five studies showing positive efficacy compared to placebo. In contrast five studies of lamotrigine were negative although meta-analyses of the pooled have found some treatment effects. Two studies of olanzapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine and three small studies of divalproex showed significant efficacy in treating bipolar depression. Two studies of aripiprazole found no differences compared to placebo. Early research on lithium in bipolar depression had significant methodological flaws and only one study of lithium met our primary search criteria. To better understand the role of anti-depressants we also examined studies of antidepressants as adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression in participants taking mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. These studies reported mixed results for a variety of antidepressants but the majority found no differences compared to placebo. Other studies of adjunctive treatment were also discussed. There has been one positive adjunctive study each of lamotrigine, omega-3 fatty acids, modafinil, and Armodafinil while there was one negative trial each of omega-3 fatty acids, ziprasidone, and levetiracetam. PMID:23507138

  18. A systematic review of the evidence for the treatment of acute depression in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Michael A; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we examined evidence for the acute treatment of depression in bipolar I disorder, focusing on double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with a definite primary outcome measure and published in peer review journals. Quetiapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine are currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of bipolar depression, and a number of additional agents (including other atypical antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and novel compounds) have been studied with varying degrees of efficacy. The medication with the most evidence for efficacy in bipolar depression is quetiapine, with five studies showing positive efficacy compared to placebo. In contrast, five studies of lamotrigine were negative, although meta-analyses of the pooled have found some treatment effects. Two studies of olanzapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine and three small studies of divalproex showed significant efficacy in treating bipolar depression. Two studies of aripiprazole found no differences compared to placebo. Early research on lithium in bipolar depression had significant methodological flaws, and only one study of lithium met our primary search criteria. To better understand the role of antidepressants, we also examined studies of antidepressants as adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression in participants taking mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. These studies reported mixed results for a variety of antidepressants, but the majority found no differences compared to placebo. Other studies of adjunctive treatment were also discussed. There has been one positive adjunctive study each of lamotrigine, omega-3 fatty acids, modafinil, and armodafinil, while there was one negative trial each of omega-3 fatty acids, ziprasidone, and levetiracetam.

  19. Remission and Recovery in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Acute and Long-term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Silva, Susan G.; Tonev, Simon; Rohde, Paul; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Curry, John F.; Emslie, Graham J.; Reinecke, Mark; March, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective We examine remission rate probabilities, recovery rates, and residual symptoms across 36 weeks in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method TADS, a multisite clinical trial, randomized 439 adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) to 12 weeks of treatment to fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or pill placebo (PBO). The PBO group, treated openly after week 12, was not included in the subsequent analyses. Treatment differences in remission rates and probabilities of remission over time are compared. Recovery rates in remitters at week 12 (acute phase remitters) and week 18 (continuation phase remitters) are summarized. We also examined whether residual symptoms at the end of 12 weeks of acute treatment predicted later remission. Results At Week 36, the estimated remission rates for intention-to-treat cases were: COMB: 60%, FLX: 55%; CBT: 64%; overall: 60%. Paired comparisons reveal that at week 24 all active treatments converge on remission outcomes. The recovery rate at Week 36 was 65% for acute phase remitters and 71% for continuation phase remitters, with no significant between-treatment differences in recovery rates. Residual symptoms at the end of acute treatment predicted failure to achieve remission at weeks 18 and 36. Conclusions The majority of depressed adolescents in all three treatment modalities achieved remission at the end of nine months of treatment. PMID:19127172

  20. Adjunctive treatment of brexpiprazole with fluoxetine shows a rapid antidepressant effect in social defeat stress model: Role of BDNF-TrkB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Min; Ren, Qian; Yang, Chun; Zhang, Ji-chun; Yao, Wei; Dong, Chao; Ohgi, Yuta; Futamura, Takashi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Addition of low doses of the atypical antipsychotic drug brexpiprazole with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) could promote antidepressant effect in patients with major depressive disorder although the precise mechanisms underlying the action of the combination are unknown. Combination of low dose of brexpiprazole (0.1 mg/kg) and SSRI fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) could promote a rapid antidepressant effect in social defeat stress model although brexpiprazole or fluoxetine alone did not show antidepressant effect. Furthermore, the combination significantly improved alterations in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) - TrkB signaling and dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens in the susceptible mice after social defeat stress. Interestingly, TrkB antagonist ANA-12 significantly blocked beneficial effects of combination of brexpiprazole and fluoxetine on depression-like phenotype. These results suggest that BDNF-TrkB signaling plays a role in the rapid antidepressant action of the combination of brexpiprazole and fluoxetine. PMID:27991542

  1. Decreased aggressive and locomotor behaviors in Betta splendens after exposure to fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Kohlert, Jess G; Mangan, Brian P; Kodra, Christine; Drako, Linsay; Long, Emily; Simpson, Holly

    2012-02-01

    The failure of sewage treatment plants to remove pharmaceuticals such as fluoxetine from waste water has become a concern given that these products are being detected in the surface waters of many countries of the world. The effects of fluoxetine in sub-lethal doses on the neural systems and behaviors of aquatic life are worthy of investigation. This study investigated the effects of sub-lethal amounts fluoxetine dissolved in water on the aggressive and locomotor behaviors of 44 male Betta splendens. Fish treated with 705 microg/l of fluoxetine and 350 microg/l of fluoxetine generally demonstrated significant decreases in locomotion and number of aggressive attacks compared to 0 microg/l of fluoxetine (controls) on Days 11 and 19 of drug exposure and persisted for at least 13 days after removal of fluoxetine. Consistent with decreases in the number of aggressive attacks, there was a significant increase in aggression-response time to a perceived intruder for treated males on Days 11 and 19 and persisted for 6 days following removal of fluoxetine. However, the differences in aggressive and locomotor behaviors seen in the fluoxetine-treated groups were indistinguishable from controls three weeks following drug removal.

  2. Fluoxetine and the dentate gyrus: memory, recovery of function, and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Keith, Julian R; Wu, Ying; Epp, Jonathon R; Sutherland, Robert J

    2007-09-01

    Chronic fluoxetine increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG). In view of the widespread clinical use of fluoxetine and the well-established role of the DG in memory, surprisingly few studies have examined the effects of fluoxetine on memory and hippocampal electrophysiology. Additionally, few studies have evaluated the potential for fluoxetine to promote recovery of function after DG damage. Therefore, we studied the effects of long-term administration of fluoxetine on both spatial-reference memory and working memory, recovery of function after intrahippocampal colchicine infusions, which can destroy 50-70% of DG granule cells, and electrophysiological responses in the DG to perforant path stimulation in freely moving rats. Chronic fluoxetine did not affect matching-to-place or reference-memory performance in intact rats in the Morris water-maze task. Surprisingly, in rats with DG damage, recovery of function on both tasks was adversely affected by chronic fluoxetine. Finally, unlike an earlier study that reported fluoxetine-induced increases in hippocampal population spike amplitudes and excitatory postsynaptic potential slopes in urethane-anesthetized rats, electrophysiological measures in DG of freely moving rats were not affected by chronic fluoxetine treatment.

  3. Fluoxetine and the dentate gyrus: memory, recovery of function, and electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Julian R.; Wu, Ying; Epp, Jonathon R.; Sutherland, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic fluoxetine increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG). In view of the widespread clinical use of fluoxetine and the well-established role of the DG in memory, surprisingly few studies have examined the effects of fluoxetine on memory and hippocampal electrophysiology. Additionally, few studies have evaluated the potential for fluoxetine to promote recovery of function after DG damage. Therefore, we studied the effects of long-term administration of fluoxetine on both spatial-reference memory and working memory, recovery of function after intrahippocampal colchicine infusions, which can destroy 50-70% of DG granule cells, and electrophysiological responses in the DG to perforant path stimulation in freely moving rats. Chronic fluoxetine did not affect matching-to-place or reference-memory performance in intact rats in the Morris watermaze task. Surprisingly, in rats with DG damage, recovery of function on both tasks was adversely affected by chronic fluoxetine. Finally, unlike an earlier study that reported fluoxetine-induced increases in hippocampal population spike amplitudes and excitatory postsynaptic potential slopes in urethane-anesthetized rats, electrophysiological measures in DG of freely moving rats were not affected by chronic fluoxetine treatment. PMID:17762521

  4. Influence of gasoline inhalation on the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine in rats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Juciane Lauren Cavalcanti; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Pereira, Maria Paula Marques; Capela, Jorge Manuel Vieira; Lepera, José Salvador

    2013-03-01

    Fluoxetine is used clinically as a racemic mixture of (+)-(S) and (-)-(R) enantiomers for the treatment of depression. CYP2D6 catalyzes the metabolism of both fluoxetine enantiomers. We aimed to evaluate whether exposure to gasoline results in CYP2D inhibition. Male Wistar rats exposed to filtered air (n = 36; control group) or to 600 ppm of gasoline (n = 36) in a nose-only inhalation exposure chamber for 6 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week) received a single oral 10-mg/kg dose of racemic fluoxetine. Fluoxetine enantiomers in plasma samples were analyzed by a validated analytical method using LC-MS/MS. The separation of fluoxetine enantiomers was performed in a Chirobiotic V column using as the mobile phase a mixture of ethanol:ammonium acetate 15 mM. Higher plasma concentrations of the (+)-(S)-fluoxetine enantiomer were found in the control group (enantiomeric ratio AUC((+)-(S)/(-)-(R)) = 1.68). In animals exposed to gasoline, we observed an increase in AUC(0-∞) for both enantiomers, with a sharper increase seen for the (-)-(R)-fluoxetine enantiomer (enantiomeric ratio AUC((+)-(S)/(-)-(R)) = 1.07), resulting in a loss of enantioselectivity. Exposure to gasoline was found to result in the loss of enantioselectivity of fluoxetine, with the predominant reduction occurring in the clearance of the (-)-(R)-fluoxetine enantiomer (55% vs. 30%). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Acute pyelonephritis: risk factors, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bethel, James

    Pyelonephritis is an acute urological condition that involves infection of one or both kidneys. The condition is not generally associated with high levels of mortality, but patients can become acutely ill and experience severe pain. Early recognition and treatment of pyelonephritis may limit morbidity. This article identifies patients at increased risk of pyelonephritis and discusses appropriate strategies to prevent serious complications.

  6. Psychoticism and paranoid ideation in patients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder: prevalence, response to treatment, and impact on short- and long-term treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Mischoulon, David; Goodness, Tracie M; Baer, Lee; Clain, Alisabet; Stewart, Jonathan W; Matthews, John D; McGrath, Patrick J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Fava, Maurizio; Papakostas, George I

    2010-08-01

    Objective/Introduction: We sought to characterize the impact of the 90-item Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) subscales for paranoid ideation (PI) and psychoticism (P) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), on acute antidepressant response and on relapse prevention. Subjects with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders-diagnosed nonpsychotic MDD were recruited into a clinical trial of open-label fluoxetine 10-60 mg/day for 12 weeks, followed by double-blind randomization of responders (n=262) to fluoxetine continuation or placebo for 12 months. PI and P were assessed with the patient-rated SCL-90. The association of these symptoms with response to treatment was assessed by logistic regression. We found significant decreases in PI and P during acute treatment phase for fluoxetine responders and nonresponders, although only 10.3% and 7.5% of patients experienced a >50% reduction in PI and P scores, respectively. Neither PI nor P scores significantly predicted time to relapse. P scores predicted a lower response rate to treatment with fluoxetine. The results of the present study suggest that there is a significant relationship between the presence of psychoticism in patients with nonpsychotic MDD, and the likelihood of overall depressive symptom improvement following a trial of monotherapy with fluoxetine. An increased burden of psychoticism in depressed subjects may confer poorer response to fluoxetine, but not increased risk of relapse among fluoxetine responders.

  7. The Use of Fluoxetine in a Patient With Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Suki K; Catalano, Maria C; Catalano, Glenn

    2016-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute coronary syndrome that is believed to be brought on by stress. Symptoms, which are similar to an acute myocardial infarction, include chest pain, shortness of breath, arrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock, and the electrocardiogram often shows ST and T wave changes. Left ventricular wall hypokinesis along with a significantly reduced ejection fraction are seen on echocardiogram. The great majority of these symptoms all occur in the absence of occlusive disease. Many cases have been reported in which the development of takotsubo cardiomyopathy was associated with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. However, no cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been reported involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This article presents the case of a 51-year-old woman receiving stable therapy with fluoxetine who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy after an acute stress. We also discuss the clinical presentation of takotsubo cardiomyopathy, review possible causes, and discuss the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients who are at increased risk of developing this illness.

  8. Fluoxetine, Smoking, and History of Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Bonnie; Doran, Neal; Pagoto, Sherry; McChargue, Dennis; Cook, Jessica Werth; Bailey, Katherine; Crayton, John; Hedeker, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial testing whether fluoxetine selectively enhances cessation for smokers with a history of depression. Euthymic smokers with (H+, n = 109) or without (H-, n = 138) a history of major depression received 60 mg fluoxetine or placebo plus group behavioral quit-smoking treatment for 12 weeks. Fluoxetine…

  9. Fluoxetine, Smoking, and History of Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Bonnie; Doran, Neal; Pagoto, Sherry; McChargue, Dennis; Cook, Jessica Werth; Bailey, Katherine; Crayton, John; Hedeker, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial testing whether fluoxetine selectively enhances cessation for smokers with a history of depression. Euthymic smokers with (H+, n = 109) or without (H-, n = 138) a history of major depression received 60 mg fluoxetine or placebo plus group behavioral quit-smoking treatment for 12 weeks. Fluoxetine…

  10. New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167596.html New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Vyxeos combines ... projections from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The new therapy is sanctioned for high-risk forms of ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  13. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  15. Conservative treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jason M; Maleski, Richard M

    2002-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common sports injuries. Although ankle sprains are treated conservatively at the present time, for years the treatment was based on acute repair of the ruptured ligaments. Several differing opinions currently exist as to the treatment of lateral ankle sprains. A review of the literature and explanation of the benefits and risks of each treatment protocol is undertaken.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency does not alter the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on central serotonin turnover or behavior in the forced swim test in female rats.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W

    2013-12-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90), and one half of each group was administered FLX (10mg/kg/day) for 30days (P60-P90) prior to testing. In adulthood (P90), regional brain serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) concentrations, presynaptic markers of 5-HT neurotransmission, behavioral responses in the forced swim test (FST), and plasma FLX and norfluoxetine (NFLX) concentrations were investigated. Peri-adolescent n-3 insufficiency led to significant reductions in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-25%, p≤0.0001) and DEF+FLX (-28%, p≤0.0001) rats. Untreated DEF rats exhibited significantly lower regional 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios compared with untreated CON rats, but exhibited similar behavioral responses in the FST. In both CON and DEF rats, chronic FLX treatment similarly and significantly decreased 5-HIAA concentrations and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, brainstem tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression, and immobility in the FST. While the FLX-induced reduction in 5-HIAA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex was significantly blunted in DEF rats, the reduction in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was similar to CON rats. Although plasma FLX and NFLX levels were not significantly different in DEF and CON rats, the NFLX/FLX ratio was significantly lower in DEF+FLX rats. These preclinical data demonstrate that n-3 fatty acid deficiency does not significantly reduce the effects of chronic

  17. Fluoxetine, desipramine, and the dual antidepressant milnacipran reduce alcohol self-administration and/or relapse in dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Simon O'Brien, Emmanuelle; Legastelois, Rémi; Houchi, Hakim; Vilpoux, Catherine; Alaux-Cantin, Stéphanie; Pierrefiche, Olivier; André, Etienne; Naassila, Mickaël

    2011-06-01

    A few clinical studies have shown that dual antidepressants (serotonergic (5-HT) and noradrenergic (NE) transporter inhibitors, SNRIs) may be effective in alcoholism treatment. We studied the effect of the dual antidepressant milnacipran on ethanol operant self-administration in acutely withdrawn ethanol-dependent and in -non-dependent Wistar rats, and used fluoxetine and desipramine to dissect both 5-HT and NE components, respectively, in the effect of milnacipran. Milnacipran was also tested for relapse after protracted abstinence and on ethanol-induced (1.0 g/kg) conditioned place preference in control rats and ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization in DBA/2J female mice. Milnacipran dose dependently (5-40 mg/kg) attenuated the increased ethanol self-administration observed during early withdrawal and was more potent in preventing reinstatement in dependent rats after protracted abstinence as compared with non-dependent rats. Desipramine and fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) blocked ethanol self-administration during early withdrawal, and recovery was delayed in dependent animals, indicating a potent effect. Ethanol self-administration was also reduced 1 day after treatment with desipramine and fluoxetine but not with milnacipran. Finally, milnacipran prevented ethanol-induced place preference in ethanol-naive rats and reduced the magnitude of ethanol-induced sensitization associated with a delayed induction in mice. Desipramine (20 mg/kg) countered sensitization development and reduced its expression at 1 week after treatment; fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) reduced sensitization expression. Thus, 5-HT and NE transmissions during sensitization expression may mediate the effect of milnacipran on sensitization induction. These results support that SNRIs may have a potential use in alcoholism treatment.

  18. Fluoxetine and sertraline attenuate postischemic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae Kyeong; Kang, Mi Sun; Lee, Ho Youn; Seo, Moo Sang; Kim, Si Geun; Kim, Chi Dae; Lee, Won Suk

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) attenuate brain injury and facilitate recovery following photothrombotic cortical ischemia in mice. Male ICR mice were anesthetized and systemically administered Rose Bengal. Permanent focal ischemia was induced in the medial frontal and somatosensory cortices by irradiating the skull with cold light laser. The animals were treated with fluoxetine or sertraline once a day for 14 d starting 1 h after ischemic insult. Treatment with fluoxetine and sertraline significantly reduced the infarct size. The Evans blue extravasation indices of the fluoxetine- and sertraline-treated groups were significantly lower than that of the vehicle group. Treatment with fluoxetine and sertraline shifted the lower limit of the mean arterial blood pressure for cerebral blood flow autoregulation toward normal, and significantly increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) proteins in the ischemic region. These results suggest that SSRIs, such as fluoxetine and sertraline, facilitate recovery following photothrombotic cortical ischemia via enhancement of HO-1 and HIF-1alpha proteins expression, thereby providing a benefit in therapy of cerebral ischemia.

  19. Examining the Saskatchewan health drug database for antidepressant use: the case of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Joffe, R T; Iskedjian, M; Einarson, T R; O'Brien, B J; Stang, M R

    2001-01-01

    To examine the use of fluoxetine in an adult population in Saskatchewan. All adults in the Saskatchewan health care databases who had begun fluoxetine therapy between January 1992 and June 1996 and had not received an antidepressant in the six months before the index fluoxetine prescription were identified. Fluoxetine use for the subsequent six-month period was examined. The rates of completion of six months of fluoxetine, rates of stopping, switching to another serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or other class of antidepressant, resumption of fluoxetine, as well as average dosages taken and mean duration of therapy were determined. Rates were summarized as means with standard deviation. Data were obtained for 11,322 subjects, of whom 68.2% were women; 17.4% were 65 years of age or older. The average prescribed daily dose of fluoxetine was 22.5 mg (SD=21.7) and the average duration was 88.1 days (SD=57.2). Only 18.9% of patients filled prescriptions for six months, 7049 (62.3%) stopped fluoxetine at least once for one month or more, and 17.3% were titrated to a higher dose, on average 71 days (SD=44) after the initiation of fluoxetine. The proportion of patients switching to another antidepressant was 13.6% (3.3% to another SSRI, 10.3% to other classes), after a mean of 69 days (SD=51) of fluoxetine treatment. The authors' data suggest that there is a potential underutilization of fluoxetine in the study population. Further research may be warranted to determine the proportion of depressed patients in this population and to better understand the stop-switch-resume pattern of antidepressant use.

  20. Treatment of acute gout: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Puja P; Gladue, Heather S; Singh, Manjit K; FitzGerald, John D; Bae, Sangmee; Prakash, Shraddha; Kaldas, Marian; Gogia, Maneesh; Berrocal, Veronica; Townsend, Whitney; Terkeltaub, Robert; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-08-01

    Acute gout is traditionally treated with NSAIDs, corticosteroids, and colchicine; however, subjects have multiple comorbidities that limit the use of some conventional therapies. We systematically reviewed the published data on the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic agents used for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. A systematic search was performed using PubMed and Cochrane database through May 2013. We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included NSAIDs, corticosteroids, colchicine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors, topical ice, or herbal supplements. Thirty articles were selected for systematic review. The results show that NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors are effective agents for the treatment of acute gout attacks. Systemic corticosteroids have similar efficacy to therapeutic doses of NSAIDs, with studies supporting oral and intramuscular use. ACTH is suggested to be efficacious in acute gout. Oral colchicine demonstrated to be effective, with low-dose colchicine demonstrating a comparable tolerability profile as placebo and a significantly lower side effect profile to high-dose colchicine. The IL-1β inhibitory antibody, canakinumab, was effective for the treatment of acute attacks in subjects refractory to and in those with contraindications to NSAIDs and/or colchicine. However, rilonacept was demonstrated to be not as effective, and there are no RCTs for the use of anakinra. NSAIDs, COX-2 selective inhibitors, corticosteroids, colchicine, ACTH, and canakinumab have evidence to suggest efficacy in treatment of acute gout. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Elevation of brain allopregnanolone rather than 5-HT release by short term, low dose fluoxetine treatment prevents the estrous cycle-linked increase in stress sensitivity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Devall, Adam J; Santos, Julia M; Fry, Jonathan P; Honour, John W; Brandão, Marcus L; Lovick, Thelma A

    2015-01-01

    Withdrawal from long-term dosing with exogenous progesterone precipitates increased anxiety-linked changes in behavior in animal models due to the abrupt decrease in brain concentration of allopregnanolone (ALLO), a neuroactive metabolite of progesterone. We show that a withdrawal-like effect also occurs during the late diestrus phase (LD) of the natural ovarian cycle in rats, when plasma progesterone and ALLO are declining but estrogen secretion maintains a stable low level. This effect at LD was prevented by short-term treatment with low dose fluoxetine. During LD, but not at other stages of the estrous cycle, exposure to anxiogenic stress induced by whole body vibration at 4 Hz for 5 min evoked a significant decrease in tail flick latency (stress-induced hyperalgesia) and a decrease in the number of Fos-positive neurons present in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). The threshold to evoke fear-like behaviors in response to electrical stimulation of the dorsal PAG was lower in the LD phase, indicating an increase in the intrinsic excitability of the PAG circuitry. All these effects were blocked by short-term administration of fluoxetine (2 × 1.75 mg kg(-1) i.p.) during LD. This dosage increased the whole brain concentration of ALLO, as determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, but was without effect on the extracellular concentration of 5-HT in the dorsal PAG, as measured by microdialysis. We suggest that fluoxetine-induced rise in brain ALLO concentration during LD offsets the sharp physiological decline, thus removing the trigger for the development of anxiogenic withdrawal effects.

  2. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  3. Acute scurvy during treatment with interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, D T; Dasanu, C A; Kauffman, C L

    2009-10-01

    The association of vitamin C deficiency with nutritional factors is commonly recognized. However, an acute form of scurvy can occur in patients with an acute systemic inflammatory response, which is produced by sepsis, medications, cancer or acute inflammation. The frequency of acute hypovitaminosis C in hospitalized patients is higher than previously recognized. We report the occurrence of acute signs and symptoms of scurvy (perifollicular petechiae, erythema, gingivitis and bleeding) in a patient hospitalized for treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma with high-dose interleukin-2. Concomitantly, serum vitamin C levels decreased to below normal. Better diets and longer lifespan may result a lower frequency of acute scurvy and a higher frequency of scurvy associated with systemic inflammatory responses. Therefore, increased awareness of this condition can lead to early recognition of the cutaneous signs of acute scurvy in hospitalized patients with acute illnesses or in receipt of biological agents, and prevent subsequent morbidity such as bleeding, anaemia, impaired immune defences, oedema or neurological symptoms.

  4. Treatment of acute lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Acute lower limb ischaemia poses a major threat to limb survival. For many years surgical thromboembolectomy was the mainstay of treatment. Recent years have brought an endovascular revolution in the management of acute lower limb ischaemia. A wide range of endovascular procedures can nowadays be employed, providing results at least as good as the traditional surgical approach. This paper is an overview of currently utilised endovascular options as well as recent modifications of standard surgical techniques.

  5. Acute antithrombotic treatment of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Alderazi, Yazan J; Grotta, James C

    2014-05-01

    Antithrombotic medication is a cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke treatment and secondary prevention. The efficacy of thrombolysis with alteplase in acute stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. This safe and costeffective therapy has transformed the practice of stroke care and has led to subsequent trials of other antithrombotic medications for treatment of ischemic stroke in the acute phase. These antithrombotics include thrombolytic, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents. While, no other medication has yet demonstrated adequate efficacy, our current and evolving understanding of infarct expansion, ischemic penumbra, collateral circulation and the blood brain barrier is allowing testing of antithrombotic medications tailored to individual patient pathophysiology in clinical trials. This understanding accompanies developments in neuroimaging and organization of stroke care that allow for wide-spread recruitment in these trials. Alteplase remains the mainstay treatment of arterial acute ischemic stroke; however, anticoagulation is the standard therapy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Antithrombotic use in acute stroke, arterial and venous, has demonstrated efficacy but leaves many questions unanswered. This patient population is a fertile ground for novel research, especially as it relates to; combination antithrombotic therapy, combination of pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis, and the transition to secondary prevention. Here we review the current antithrombotics in the acute phase of ischemic stroke highlighting the evidence-base and areas of uncertainty.

  6. 21 CFR 520.980 - Fluoxetine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fluoxetine. 520.980 Section 520.980 Food and Drugs..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.980 Fluoxetine. (a) Specifications. Each chewable tablet contains 8, 16, 32, or 64 milligrams (mg) fluoxetine hydrochloride. (b) Sponsor. See...

  7. Specific serotonergic reuptake inhibition impairs vigilance performance acutely and after subchronic treatment.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Wim J; Eikmans, Karin; Heldens, Annet; Schmitt, Jeroen A J

    2005-01-01

    Subchronic treatment with the selective serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) fluoxetine, venlafaxine and paroxetine, but not sertraline, were previously shown to specifically impair vigilance performance. The current study was designed to compare the vigilance effects of subchronic treatment with the SSRIs sertraline and citalopram in healthy volunteers, according to a placebo-controlled, double-blind, three-way cross-over design. Twenty-four healthy subjects, aged 30-50 years, of whom 21 completed the study, underwent three treatment periods of 2 weeks in which they received sertraline (50 mg on days 1-8, 100 mg on days 8-15), citalopram (20 mg on days 1-8, 40 mg on days 8-15) and placebo. Treatment periods were separated by 14 days washout periods. Vigilance performance was assessed through a 45-min Mackworth Clock Test at days 1, 8 and 15 of each treatment period. It was found that citalopram impaired vigilance performance acutely after the first 20 mg dose and subchronically after 40 mg daily doses. By contrast, no vigilance impairment was found during sertraline treatment. Sertraline is the only SSRI studied so far with no detrimental effects on vigilance. This may be due to the affinity of sertraline for the dopamine reuptake site. Because citalopram is the most specific SSRI showing this effect, it is concluded that the SSRI-induced decrement of vigilance performance is specifically associated with serotonergic reuptake inhibition.

  8. [OUTPATIENT ANTIMICROBIAL TREATMENT FOR ACUTE TONSILLOPHARYNGITIS].

    PubMed

    Beisenayeva, A; Muldaeva, G; Azizov, I; Kalbekov, Z; Kim, N; Litvinova, E; Ibysheva, A

    2016-05-01

    One of the most significant problems in antimicrobial therapy (AMT) is widespread administration of antimicrobial agents without relevant medical conditions. The aim of the research was the analysis of antimicrobial agent prescribing practices for outpatient treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis at the Karaganda Polyclinic №1 and Polyclinic №2. The analysis of antimicrobial agents prescribing practices for outpatient treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis was conducted; medical records of outpatients with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated in 2014 at Polyclinics №1 and №2 were analyzed. patients ranging in age from18 to 44, verified diagnosis - acute tonsillopharyngitis. It was found that in all cases antimicrobial agents have been prescribed speculatively, without previous bacteriological study or method of express diagnostics of Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS). In a majority of cases β-lactams were prescribed. Flemoxin Solutab was the most commonly prescribed β-lactam in Polyclinic №1; Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed β-lactam at Polyclinic №2; it associated with personal experience of administration of these agents rather than data of evidentiary medicine. Study of actual medicine administration showed that in half of the cases dosage regimen, rout of administration, dosage and treatment session duration have not been followed. For the development of clinical guidelines for rational treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis is necessary to study the local spectrum of the major pathogens and their antimicribial resistance.

  9. Effects of fluoxetine on the reproductive axis of female goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Jan A; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Crump, Kate; Xiong, Huiling; Zhao, E; Popesku, Jason; Anisman, Hymie; Cossins, Andrew R; Xia, Xuhua; Trudeau, Vance L

    2008-11-12

    We investigated the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on neuroendocrine function and the reproductive axis in female goldfish. Fish were given intraperitoneal injections of fluoxetine twice a week for 14 days, resulting in five injections of 5 microg fluoxetine/g body wt. We measured the monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine in addition to their metabolites with HPLC. Homovanillic acid, a metabolite in the dopaminergic pathway, increased significantly in the hypothalamus. Plasma estradiol levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and were significantly reduced approximately threefold after fluoxetine treatment. We found that fluoxetine also significantly reduced the expression of estrogen receptor (ER)beta1 mRNA by 4-fold in both the hypothalamus and the telencephalon and ERalpha mRNA by 1.7-fold in the telencephalon. Fluoxetine had no effect on the expression of ERbeta2 mRNA in the hypothalamus or telencephalon. Microarray analysis identified isotocin, a neuropeptide that stimulates reproductive behavior in fish, as a candidate gene affected by fluoxetine treatment. Real-time RT-PCR verified that isotocin mRNA was downregulated approximately sixfold in the hypothalamus and fivefold in the telencephalon. Intraperitoneal injection of isotocin (1 microg/g) increased plasma estradiol, providing a potential link between changes in isotocin gene expression and decreased circulating estrogen in fluoxetine-injected fish. Our results reveal targets of serotonergic modulation in the neuroendocrine brain and indicate that fluoxetine has the potential to affect sex hormones and modulate genes involved in reproductive function and behavior in the brain of female goldfish. We discuss these findings in the context of endocrine disruption because fluoxetine has been detected in the environment.

  10. [Treatment of acute appendicitis: Retrospective analysis].

    PubMed

    Menclová, K; Traboulsi, E; Nikov, A; Hána, L; Rousek, M; Ryska, M

    Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of intra-abdominal emergency surgery worldwide. The approach to its treatment keeps changing. The number of acute appendectomies has been decreasing. Many patients are treated conservatively with success. Our study compares conservative and surgical treatment of acute appendicitis, including its complications in our department. We retrospectively analyzed the group of 117 patients hospitalized with the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We distinguished patients with complicated and uncomplicated appendicitis, and patients operated and treated conservatively. We evaluated complication rates and recurrences of the disease, respectively, in 1-year follow-up. The Student t test and Fishers exact test were used for the statistical analysis. In 2012 we hospitalized 117 patients with acute appendicitis: 83 patients (71%) for uncomplicated and 34 (29%) for complicated appendicitis. 41% of patients with complicated and 13% with uncomplicated appendicitis (p=0.02) were treated conservatively. Conservative treatment or laparoscopic surgery, respectively, were used more often in women ( p0.001). There was no failure of conservative treatment. Perioperative morbidity was 13%. No patient died. 6 patients (24%) of the conservatively treated group were hospitalized in the subsequent year for recurrent problems. 4 (16%) were reoperated. The rate of negative appendectomy (negative pathological findings) was 11%. The hospitalization time was shorter in patients treated conservatively or using laparoscopy, respectively, compared to the group of patients undergoing appendectomy. In the modern era of available complementary examinations and a broad spectrum of antibiotics the conservative approach is favoured as a treatment of complicated appendicitis. Conservative treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis is an option, but not the method of choice. Routine elective appendectomy after successful conservative treatment is groundless

  11. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014.

  12. Complex movement disorders induced by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, K J; Sethi, K D

    1996-05-01

    We report two cases of complex movement disorders induced by fluoxetine. A 72-year-old woman developed rhythmic palatal movements, myoclonus, chorea, and possibly dystonia after 2 years of therapy with fluoxetine. On withdrawal of fluoxetine, the movements abated after 5 days and did not recur. The second patient, a 58-year-old man, developed myoclonic jerking and rapid, stereotypic movements of his toes after a year of fluoxetine therapy. These complex movements have not been reported previously as an adverse effect of fluoxetine.

  13. Fluoxetine may influence lordosis of rats through effects on midbrain 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP concentrations.

    PubMed

    Frye, Cheryl A; Petralia, Sandra M; Rhodes, Madeline E; Stein, Benjamin

    2003-12-01

    5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) mediates lordosis of rodents. If fluoxetine's effects on lordosis are mediated in part by midbrain 3alpha,5alpha-THP, then fluoxetine regimens that decrease and increase lordosis would be expected to respectively lower and elevate midbrain 3alpha,5-THP levels. Experiment 1: Ovariectomized (ovx) rats received estradiol benzoate (EB; 5 micro g, SC) at 0 and 24 h and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, IP) or vehicle 30 min before sex testing and tissue collection. Other rats received fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, IP) or vehicle for 15 days followed by EB-priming and testing. Systemic acute or chronic fluoxetine significantly decreased lordosis and midbrain 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels compared to vehicle. Experiment 2: Ovx rats with unilateral cannula to the VTA were primed with EB (5 micro g; 0, 24 h) and/or progesterone (0 or 100 micro g; 44 h, SC). At 47.5 h, fluoxetine (3.6 mM) or vehicle was infused to the VTA. At 48 h, rats were tested. Administering fluoxetine to the VTA significantly increased lordosis and midbrain 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels compared to vehicle infusions. Experiment 3: Ovx EB-primed rats were tested prior to, and 30 min after, treatmemt with acute fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, IP). Rats were then infused with 3alpha,5alpha-THP (100 ng) or vehicle to the VTA and were retested. 3alpha,5alpha-THP, but not vehicle, to the VTA reversed acute fluoxetine's inhibitory effects on lordosis. Together, these data suggest fluoxetine may alter lordosis in part through actions of 3alpha-THP in the midbrain.

  14. Fluoxetine induces changes in the testicle and testosterone in adult male rats exposed via placenta and lactation.

    PubMed

    Monteiro Filho, Waldo Oliveira; de Torres, Sandra Maria; Amorim, Marleyne José Afonso Accioly Lins; Andrade, Anderson Joel Martino; de Morais, Rosana Nogueira; Tenorio, Bruno Mendes; da Silva Junior, Valdemiro Amaro

    2014-10-01

    Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used to treat depression in pregnant and nursing women. However, recent studies have shown adverse effects in the male reproductive system after fluoxetine treatment. Aiming to analyze the extent of damage caused by fluoxetine in the testicle and safe doses for treatment during the perinatal period, the present study analyzed the effects of in utero exposure and exposure during lactation to fluoxetine in spermatogenesis of male rat offspring in adulthood. Wistar rat dams were orally treated with fluoxetine (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) from 13 days of gestation to lactation day 21 and their offspring were analyzed at 90 days old. Results showed a reduction in the weight of testes (16%), epididymis (28%), and seminal glands (18%) in animals exposed to fluoxetine 20 mg/kg compared to the control. Seminal gland weight was also reduced 25% and 30% in animals exposed to 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg fluoxetine, respectively. Body weight of animals exposed to 20 mg/kg fluoxetine was reduced from post-natal day 9 to 36 compared to controls but from the post-natal day 9 to 36 there was no statistical difference. The volume of seminiferous epithelium reduced 17% and the total volume of Leydig cells reduced 30% in the group exposed to fluoxetine at 20 mg/kg. Furthermore, Leydig cells volume reduced 29% in the 5 mg/kg group. The length of the seminiferous tubules reduced 17% and daily sperm production per testicle also reduced 18% in animals exposed to the highest dose of fluoxetine compared to controls. The individual area of Leydig cells increased 7% and plasma testosterone increased 49% in animals exposed to fluoxetine at 20 mg/kg. In conclusion, exposure to 20 mg/kg fluoxetine via the placenta and during lactation may change testosterone and testicular parameters important for sperm production and male fertility in adulthood.

  15. Fluoxetine administration to pregnant rats increases anxiety-related behavior in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Vallès, A; van Heesch, Floor; Afrasiab-Middelman, Anthonieke; Roelofs, Janneke J P M; Jonkers, Marloes; Peeters, Elke Joan; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Dederen, Jos P; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Martens, Gerard J; Schubert, Dirk; Homberg, Judith R

    2011-10-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac®) is the most frequently prescribed drug to battle depression in pregnant women, but its safety in the unborn child has not yet been established. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, crosses the placenta, leading to increased extracellular serotonin levels and potentially neurodevelopmental changes in the fetus. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the long-term consequences of prenatal fluoxetine in rats. Pregnant rats were injected daily with 12 mg/kg fluoxetine or vehicle from gestational day 11 until birth, and the behavior of the offspring was monitored. Plasma fluoxetine transfer from mother to pup was 83%, and high levels of fluoxetine (13.0 μg/g) were detected in the pup brain 5 h after the last injection. Fluoxetine-treated dams gave birth to litters 15% smaller than usual and to pups of reduced weight (until postnatal day 7). Furthermore, prenatal fluoxetine exposure significantly increased anxiety in the novelty-suppressed feeding test, the footshock-induced conditioned place aversion test, and the elevated plus maze test (following footshock pre-exposure) during adulthood, and also significantly decreased components of social play behavior at 4 weeks of age, and a strong tendency for increased self-grooming and making less contact in adults. Behavioral despair, anhedonia, and sexual behavior were not different between treatment groups. Finally, the hypothermic response to the 5-HT(1A) agonist flesinoxan was observed at a lower dose in prenatally fluoxetine-exposed rats than in controls. Prenatal fluoxetine exposure in rats leads to detrimental behavioral outcomes in later life, which may partly be due to altered 5-HT(1A) receptor signaling.

  16. Fluoxetin-induced pulmonary granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    de Kerviler, E; Trédaniel, J; Revlon, G; Groussard, O; Zalcman, G; Ortoli, J M; Espié, M; Hirsch, A; Frija, J

    1996-03-01

    A patient treated with fluoxetin for a manic depressive disorder developed pulmonary inflammatory nodules with noncaseating giant cell granulomas, interstitial pneumonia and non-necrotizing vasculitis, whilst remaining asymptomatic. A progressive resolution of pulmonary nodules occurred after withdrawal of the offending agent, and the chest radiograph returned to normal in 9 months. The diagnosis was assessed by an open lung biopsy.

  17. The gender difference of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine in adult rats with stress-induced gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sater, Khaled A; Abdel-Daiem, Wafaa M; Sayyed Bakheet, Mohamad

    2012-08-05

    We investigated the gender difference of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine in adult rats with stress-induced gastric ulcer. The rats were randomly divided into six groups: Group I, control males and group II, control females; group III, acute cold restraint stressed males and group IV, acute cold restraint stressed females; group V, fluoxetine-treated stressed males and group VI, fluoxetine-treated stressed females. Acute cold restraint stress was established by fixing the four limbs of the rat and placing it in a refrigerator at 4°C for 3h. Fluoxetine was given intraperitoneal in a single dose of 10mg/kg/day. After 2 weeks, stomach and brain tissues were collected for the assay of gastric malonaldehyde (MDA), catalase, nitric oxide (NO) and cortical gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Stressed animals exhibited increased total acidity in association with decreased gastric secretion volume. Gastric MDA was increased while gastric catalase, NO, and cortical GABA were decreased in stressed male rats when compared to stressed females. However, fluoxetine administration attenuated these stress-induced changes especially in stressed male animals. Stressed male rats were more responsive to the antiulcer effect of fluoxetine more than stressed females. However, fluoxetine might be considered to be the first-choice drug in depressive patients with gastric ulcers in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A treatment for the acute migraine attack.

    PubMed

    Adam, E I

    1987-01-01

    A compound analgesic/anti-emetic formulation was significantly effective in reducing the severity of acute attacks of migraine, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial of 34 patients referred to a migraine clinic. The preparation contained paracetamol (acetaminophen) 500 mg, codeine phosphate 8 mg, buclizine hydrochloride 6.25 mg and dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate 10 mg. The dosage was two tablets taken as early as possible in the acute attack. No specific factors could be identified which influenced response to treatment. Patients with a long history of migraine (more than 10 years) responded as well as those with a recent onset of the condition.

  19. Treatment of acute and remote symptomatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2009-07-01

    In principle, the use of anticonvulsant drugs does not differ between acute and remote symptomatic seizures, but control of acute symptomatic seizures requires simultaneous treatment of the underlying etiology. Prevention of remote seizures when the risk is known to be high has been the subject of intense efforts at antiepileptogenesis, but the optimal duration of treatment after an injury is not yet known. Appropriate evaluation of a seizure depends on individual circumstances, but findings on examination, laboratory tests (serum electrolytes, magnesium, glucose, assessment of hepatic and renal function), and brain imaging (CT scan or MRI) are necessary to determine the most likely cause. Lumbar puncture is always required when there is suspicion of meningitis or encephalitis. Preferred medications for treatment of acute symptomatic seizures or status epilepticus are those available for intravenous use, such as benzodiazepines, fosphenytoin or phenytoin, valproate, levetiracetam, and phenobarbital. Diazepam is also available as a gel for rectal administration. Seizures that occur in patients with epilepsy because of missed antiepileptic drugs or inadequate serum levels should be treated with additional doses of their regular medications; loading doses can be administered with minimal toxicity in tolerant patients. Surgery is rarely necessary in the acute setting except for intracerebral lesions with rapidly rising intracranial pressure and impending herniation. After seizures are controlled, the provoking condition must also be determined and treated.

  20. Long-term consequences of chronic fluoxetine exposure on the expression of myelination-related genes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kroeze, Y; Peeters, D; Boulle, F; Pawluski, J L; van den Hove, D L A; van Bokhoven, H; Zhou, H; Homberg, J R

    2015-09-22

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine is widely prescribed for the treatment of symptoms related to a variety of psychiatric disorders. After chronic SSRI treatment, some symptoms remediate on the long term, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet well understood. Here we studied the long-term consequences (40 days after treatment) of chronic fluoxetine exposure on genome-wide gene expression. During the treatment period, we measured body weight; and 1 week after treatment, cessation behavior in an SSRI-sensitive anxiety test was assessed. Gene expression was assessed in hippocampal tissue of adult rats using transcriptome analysis and several differentially expressed genes were validated in independent samples. Gene ontology analysis showed that upregulated genes induced by chronic fluoxetine exposure were significantly enriched for genes involved in myelination. We also investigated the expression of myelination-related genes in adult rats exposed to fluoxetine at early life and found two myelination-related genes (Transferrin (Tf) and Ciliary neurotrophic factor (Cntf)) that were downregulated by chronic fluoxetine exposure. Cntf, a neurotrophic factor involved in myelination, showed regulation in opposite direction in the adult versus neonatally fluoxetine-exposed groups. Expression of myelination-related genes correlated negatively with anxiety-like behavior in both adult and neonatally fluoxetine-exposed rats. In conclusion, our data reveal that chronic fluoxetine exposure causes on the long-term changes in expression of genes involved in myelination, a process that shapes brain connectivity and contributes to symptoms of psychiatric disorders.

  1. An evaluation of behavioural endpoints: The pharmaceutical pollutant fluoxetine decreases aggression across multiple contexts in round goby (Neogobius melanostomus).

    PubMed

    McCallum, Erin S; Bose, Aneesh P H; Warriner, Theresa R; Balshine, Sigal

    2017-05-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac™) is designed to alter human behaviour; however, because many physiological pathways are conserved across vertebrates, this drug may affect the behaviour of fish living in fluoxetine-polluted environments. Although a number of studies have used behaviour to document the sub-lethal effects of fluoxetine, the repeatability of these effects across experiments, across behavioural contexts, and over different exposure durations are rarely considered. Here, we conducted two experiments and assessed how fluoxetine exposure affected a range of fitness-related behaviours in wild round goby (Neogobius melanostomus). We found that fluoxetine impacts round goby behaviour at high (40 μg/l) doses, but not at environmentally relevant low doses (1 μg/l). In both experiments, an acute 3-day exposure to fluoxetine reduced round goby aggression in multiple behavioural contexts, but had no detectable effect on overall activity or social affiliative behaviour. While a chronic 28-day exposure to fluoxetine exposure still reduced aggression, this reduction was only detectable in one behavioural context. Our findings demonstrate the importance of repeated behavioural testing (both between and within experiments) and contribute to a growing body of literature evaluating the effects of fluoxetine and other pharmaceuticals on animal behaviour.

  2. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease.

  3. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  4. Polysomnographic sleep effects of fluoxetine and nefazodone on a seasonal affective disorder patient.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianhua; Shapiro, Colin

    2002-11-01

    This reported person met DSM-III-R criteria for seasonal affective disorder. In successive years she had two treatments with fluoxetine and one with nefazodone. Every year regular polysomnographic monitoring was carried out during the critical initial 8 weeks of treatment. The results indicate that on both occasions fluoxetine decreased the patient's sleep quality. Nefazodone had no sleep disturbing effects and on withdrawal no relapse has been seen for 3 years.

  5. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  7. Pycnogenol treatment of acute hemorrhoidal episodes.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Errichi, Bruno; Di Renzo, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna; Ricci, Andrea; Dugall, Mark; Cornelli, Umberto; Cacchio, Marisa; Rohdewald, Peter

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the efficacy of orally and topically applied Pycnogenol for the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks in a controlled, randomized study with 84 subjects. Within less than 48 h of onset of an acute attack, patients were enrolled and signs and symptoms were scored. This evaluation was repeated after seven days' treatment and again seven days following treatment cessation. The decrease in scores was significantly more pronounced in the Pycnogenol-treated groups than in the control group given placebo (p < 0.05), showing the efficacy of Pycnogenol for relieving signs and symptoms of acute external hemorrhoids. In a group of patients given topical (0.5%) Pycnogenol in addition to oral Pycnogenol the improvement in symptoms set in significantly faster and was more pronounced. The most prominent symptom, hemorrhoidal bleeding, was completely absent in all patients treated with Pycnogenol for seven days and also at the 14 days follow-up. In contrast, bleedings were still observed in the control group during the two weeks follow-up. This study indicates that Pycnogenol, both in oral and in topical form, is effective for controlling this common, disabling health problem. The application of Pycnogenol eases the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks and help avoid bleedings.

  8. Beneficial effects of fluoxetine, reboxetine, venlafaxine, and voluntary running exercise in stressed male rats with anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lapmanee, Sarawut; Charoenphandhu, Jantarima; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2013-08-01

    Rodents exposed to mild but repetitive stress may develop anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Whether this stress response could be alleviated by pharmacological treatments or exercise interventions, such as wheel running, was unknown. Herein, we determined anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in restraint stressed rats (2h/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks) subjected to acute diazepam treatment (30min prior to behavioral test), chronic treatment with fluoxetine, reboxetine or venlafaxine (10mg/kg/day for 4 weeks), and/or 4-week voluntary wheel running. In elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced swimming tests (FST), stressed rats spent less time in the open arms and had less swimming duration than the control rats, respectively, indicating the presence of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Stressed rats also developed learned fear as evaluated by elevated T-maze test (ETM). Although wheel running could reduce anxiety-like behaviors in both EPM and ETM, only diazepam was effective in the EPM, while fluoxetine, reboxetine, and venlafaxine were effective in the ETM. Fluoxetine, reboxetine, and wheel running, but not diazepam and venlafaxine, also reduced depression-like behavior in FST. Combined pharmacological treatment and exercise did not further reduce anxiety-like behavior in stressed rats. However, stressed rats treated with wheel running plus reboxetine or venlafaxine showed an increase in climbing duration in FST. In conclusion, regular exercise (voluntary wheel running) and pharmacological treatments, especially fluoxetine and reboxetine, could alleviate anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in stressed male rats.

  9. Increasing spinal 5-HT2A receptor responsiveness mediates anti-allodynic effect and potentiates fluoxetine efficacy in neuropathic rats. Evidence for GABA release.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Amandine; Wattiez, Anne-Sophie; Pinguet, Jérémy; Richard, Damien; Libert, Frédéric; Chalus, Maryse; Aissouni, Youssef; Sion, Benoit; Ardid, Denis; Marin, Philippe; Eschalier, Alain; Courteix, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Antidepressants are one of the first line treatments for neuropathic pain but their use is limited by the incidence and severity of side effects of tricyclics and the weak effectiveness of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Serotonin type 2A (5-HT2A) receptors interact with PDZ proteins that regulate their functionality and SSRI efficacy to alleviate pain. We investigated whether an interfering peptide (TAT-2ASCV) disrupting the interaction between 5-HT2A receptors and associated PDZ proteins would improve the treatment of traumatic neuropathic allodynia. Tactile allodynia was assessed in spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain in rats using von Frey filaments after acute treatment with TAT-2ASCV and/or 5-HT2A receptor agonist, alone or in combination with repeated treatment with fluoxetine. In vivo microdialysis was performed in order to examine the involvement of GABA in TAT-2ASCV/fluoxetine treatment-associated analgesia. TAT-2ASCV (100ng, single i.t. injection) improved SNL-induced tactile allodynia by increasing 5-HT2A receptor responsiveness to endogenous 5-HT. Fluoxetine alone (10mg/kg, five i.p. injections) slightly increased tactile thresholds and its co-administration with TAT-2ASCV (100ng, single i.t. injection) further enhanced the anti-allodynic effect. This effect depends on the integrity of descending serotonergic bulbospinal pathways and spinal release of GABA. The anti-allodynic effect of fluoxetine can be enhanced by disrupting 5-HT2A receptor-PDZ protein interactions. This enhancement depends on 5-HT2A receptor activation, spinal GABA release and GABAA receptor activation.

  10. A randomized, open-label comparison of venlafaxine and fluoxetine in depressed outpatients.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Martinez, A; Benassinni, O; Ontiveros, A; Gonzalez, S; Salin, R; Basquedano, G; Martinez, R A

    1998-01-01

    In this randomized, open-label, 8-week comparative study, the efficacy and safety of venlafaxine and fluoxetine were assessed in outpatients with major depression. One hundred forty-five patients were assigned to receive venlafaxine 37.5 mg twice daily or fluoxetine 20 mg once daily. On day 15, if clinically indicated to improve patient response, the dosage could be increased at the investigator's discretion to venlafaxine 75 mg twice daily or fluoxetine 40 mg once daily. One hundred forty-five patients were evaluated for safety and 110, for efficacy. The mean age was 37 years, and 70% of the patients were female. In both treatment groups, mean scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale decreased significantly between baseline (27.8, venlafaxine; 29.2, fluoxetine) and the end of the study (8.7, venlafaxine; 8.2, fluoxetine). Similarly, mean scores on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale decreased significantly between baseline (31.4, venlafaxine; 31.6, fluoxetine) and the end of the study (8.3, venlafaxine; 7.6, fluoxetine). In venlafaxine patients, the most common adverse events were nausea (44.3%), headache (40.0%), insomnia (31.4%), dizziness (30.0%), and dry mouth (22.9%); in fluoxetine patients, they were headache (32.0%), nausea (28.0%), insomnia (24.0%), anxiety (21.3%), sleepiness (20.0%), and generalized tremor (20.0%). The results of this study indicate that venlafaxine is effective and well tolerated for the treatment of major depression at doses of 37.5 or 75 mg twice daily and not significantly different from fluoxetine 20 or 40 mg once daily.

  11. Acute hepatitis C: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Resat; Tahan, Veysel

    2009-04-01

    HCV can cause acute or chronic hepatitis and is a health problem all over the world. It is one of the leading causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is a common indication for liver transplantation. Unrecognized patients with HCV infection may transmit the virus to uninfected people. The acute form of the disease leads to chronic hepatitis in the majority of cases. Since the success rate of treatment given in the chronic phase is much lower than that given in the acute phase, recognizing acute hepatitis is critical. Although HCV is less prevalent since 1990s in the Western world after improved blood-donor screening programs, needle-exchange facilities and education among intravenous drug users, it is still endemic in some regions, including African countries, Egypt, Taiwan, China and Japan. Acute HCV infection may be a challenge for the clinician; since it is often asymptomatic, detection and diagnosis are usually difficult. After an incubation period of 7 weeks (2-12 weeks), only a minority of patients (10-15%) report symptoms. The spontaneous clearance of the virus is more frequent primarily during the first 3 months of clinical onset of the disease, but may occur anytime during the 6 months of acute infection. This spontaneous resolution seems to be more frequent in symptomatic cases. Viremia persisting more than 6 months is accepted as chronic infection. The virus is transmitted more frequently through infected blood or body fluids. Detection of antibodies against HCV is not a reliable method of diagnosing acute HCV infection since the appearance of antibodies against HCV can be delayed in up to 30% of patients at the onset of symptoms. Thus, the diagnosis of acute hepatitis C relies on the qualitative detection of HCV RNA, which may appear as early as 1-2 weeks after exposure quickly followed by highly elevated alanine aminotransferase. After a follow-up period of 8-12 weeks for allowing spontaneous resolution, treatment should be initiated

  12. Acute Time to Response in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher; Emslie, Graham; Silva, Susan; McNulty, Steve; Walkup, John; Curry, John; Reinecke, Mark; Vitiello, Benedetto; Rohde, Paul; Feeny, Nora; Casat, Charles; Pathak, Sanjeev; Weller, Elizabeth; May, Diane; Mayes, Taryn; Robins, Michele; March, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the time to response for both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: Adolescents (N = 439, ages 12 to 17 years) with major depressive disorder were randomized to fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or pill placebo…

  13. Memory after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, J; Britton, P G; Morris, R G; Kernahan, J; Craft, A W

    1992-01-01

    Long term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) often experience cognitive difficulties, which may be related to impairment of memory function. Memory ability has been studied in a group of survivors of ALL along with sibling controls and in children who have received treatment for other forms of cancer. Children in the ALL group were found to have significant deficits in memory function in tasks which required the application of strategic planning behaviour. These deficits are potentially remediable by educational strategies. PMID:1575545

  14. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Disposition of Chiral and Racemic Fluoxetine and Norfluoxetine Across Childbearing

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Dorothy; Perel, James M.; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Helsel, Joseph C.; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To add to the limited data on the clinical pharmacology of antidepressants during pregnancy, we examined the dose-corrected chiral and racemic levels (level/dose) of fluoxetine (FLX) and norfluoxetine (NorFLX) during pregnancy and early postpartum. Methods The authors evaluated 17 pregnant women who received fluoxetine therapy. Doses were recorded weekly across gestation and postpartum. At 20, 30, and 36 weeks of gestation, during delivery, and 12 weeks after delivery, the depression level was assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRS-D), and plasma samples were analyzed for levels of S- and R-FLX and S- and R-NorFLX. Results The mean ratios of the chiral parent drug (S-FLX + R-FLX) to metabolite levels (S-NorFLX + R-NorFLX) decreased across pregnancy. The differences were significant between 20–36 weeks and 30–36 weeks. After delivery, the mean dose–corrected level of the active moiety S-FLX and the mean ratio of the chiral parent drug (S-FLX + R-FLX) to metabolite level (S-NorFLX + R-NorFLX) significantly increased between delivery and 12 weeks postpartum. Most of the fluoxetine-treated subjects experienced remitted depressive episodes and euthymic mood levels during pregnancy and postpartum. Conclusions The findings extend earlier reports of increased antidepressant metabolism during pregnancy and refractory metabolism after delivery. These data may inform treatment decisions related to dosing in patients who receive fluoxetine during pregnancy. PMID:20631556

  16. Protective Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Fluoxetine-Induced Hepatotoxicity: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Ahmet; Elbey, Bilal; Yazgan, Ümit Can; Dönder, Ahmet; Arslan, Necmi; Arslan, Serkan; Alabalık, Ulaş; Aslanhan, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Group I served as control. Group II received CAPE intraperitoneally. Group III received fluoxetine per orally. Group IV received fluoxetine and CAPE. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and liver enzymes including paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase levels were measured. Liver tissues were processed histopathologically for evaluation of liver injury and to validate the serum enzyme levels. Results. An increase in TOS and OSI and a decrease in TAC and PON-1 levels in serum and liver tissues of Group III were observed compared to Groups I and II. After treatment with CAPE, the level of TOS and OSI decreased while TAC and PON-1 increased in serum and liver in Group IV. Histopathological examination of the liver revealed hepatic injury after fluoxetine treatment and reduction of injury with CAPE treatment. Conclusion. Our results suggested that CAPE treatment provided protection against fluoxetine toxicity. Following CAPE treatment with fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity, TOS and OSI levels decreased, whereas PON-1 and TAC increased in the serum and liver.

  17. Protective Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Fluoxetine-Induced Hepatotoxicity: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Ahmet; Elbey, Bilal; Yazgan, Ümit Can; Dönder, Ahmet; Arslan, Necmi; Arslan, Serkan; Alabalık, Ulaş; Aslanhan, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Group I served as control. Group II received CAPE intraperitoneally. Group III received fluoxetine per orally. Group IV received fluoxetine and CAPE. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and liver enzymes including paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase levels were measured. Liver tissues were processed histopathologically for evaluation of liver injury and to validate the serum enzyme levels. Results. An increase in TOS and OSI and a decrease in TAC and PON-1 levels in serum and liver tissues of Group III were observed compared to Groups I and II. After treatment with CAPE, the level of TOS and OSI decreased while TAC and PON-1 increased in serum and liver in Group IV. Histopathological examination of the liver revealed hepatic injury after fluoxetine treatment and reduction of injury with CAPE treatment. Conclusion. Our results suggested that CAPE treatment provided protection against fluoxetine toxicity. Following CAPE treatment with fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity, TOS and OSI levels decreased, whereas PON-1 and TAC increased in the serum and liver. PMID:27144157

  18. Fluoxetine prevents oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Y; Kang, So R; Yune, Tae Y

    2015-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte cell death and axon demyelination after spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be important secondary injuries contributing to permanent neurological disability. Thus, blocking oligodendrocyte cell death should be considered for therapeutic intervention after SCI. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine, an antidepressant drug, alleviates oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after SCI. After injury at the T9 level with a Precision Systems and Instrumentation (Lexington, KY) device, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered once a day for the indicated time points. Immunostaining with CD11b (OX-42) antibody and quantification analysis showed that microglia activation was significantly inhibited by fluoxetine at 5 days after injury. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and expression of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF), which is known to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death through the p75 neurotrophin receptor after SCI. In addition, fluoxetine attenuated activation of Ras homolog gene family member A and decreased the level of phosphorylated c-Jun and, ultimately, alleviated caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced cell death of oligodendrocytes at 5 days after SCI. Further, the decrease of myelin basic protein, myelin loss, and axon loss in white matter was also significantly blocked by fluoxetine, as compared to vehicle control. These results suggest that fluoxetine inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation and p38-MAPK activation, followed by pro-NGF production after SCI, and provide a potential usage of fluoxetine for a therapeutic agent after acute SCI in humans.

  19. Treatment of acute bronchiolitis with Chinese herbs.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, X T; Fang, H T; Jiang, G Q; Zhai, S Z; O'Connell, D L; Brewster, D R

    1993-01-01

    In a randomised single blind trial the Chinese herbs Shuang Huang Lian were evaluated for the treatment of acute bronchiolitis. Children with acute bronchiolitis and serological evidence of recent respiratory syncytial virus infection were studied in a tertiary hospital in Harbin, China. The 96 children were randomised into three treatment groups: herbs, herbs with antibiotics, and antibiotics alone. The herbs were prepared by the medical school pharmacy and administered daily by intravenous infusion for seven days. The main outcomes, assessed blindly, were symptomatic improvement in cough, fever, wheezing, chest signs, and duration of stay in hospital. The mean duration of symptoms from the start of treatment was 6.2 (confidence interval 5.6 to 6.9) days in the two groups treated with herbs compared with 8.6 (confidence interval 7.5 to 9.8) days in the group treated with antibiotics alone. The mean reductions in duration of clinical manifestations for treatment with antibiotics alone compared with herbs were: from 3.1 to 1.5 days for fever, 9.1 to 6.1 days for cough, 6.5 to 4.1 days for wheezing, and 7.2 to 4.9 days for chest crackles. No adverse effect of Shuang Huang Lian herbal treatment was detected. In conclusion, this study confirms Chinese experience with Shuang Huang Lian that it is safe and effective, and warrants further study. PMID:8503668

  20. Long-term Ameliorative Effects of the Antidepressant Fluoxetine Exposure on Cognitive Deficits in 3 × TgAD Mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Gao, Li-Feng; Sun, Dong-Sheng; Wu, Hao; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Lei, Hao; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-06-21

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is neuroprotective; therefore, it has been applied to treat some neurodegenerative disorders. For instance, chronic fluoxetine exposure has short-term effects on Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the long-term ameliorative effects of fluoxetine exposure on AD have not been reported. In the present study, 6-month-old 3 × TgAD mice were treated with fluoxetine for 15 days, and then the influence of fluoxetine was detected at 20 days after the drug withdrawal. We found that chronic fluoxetine treatment ameliorated cognitive deficits of 3 × TgAD mice and increased the volume of the hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) with increased neuron number and dendritic spine density. Meanwhile, fluoxetine exposure also stimulated the long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal DG. The synaptic-related protein expression increased via activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway induced by fluoxetine exposure. Lastly, we found that fluoxetine treatment decreased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels. These results further certified that fluoxetine may be a potent effective drug for AD.

  1. Fluoxetine reverses the behavioral despair induced by neurogenic stress in mice: role of N-methyl-d-aspartate and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-01

    Opioid and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate different effects of fluoxetine. We investigated whether opioid and NMDA receptors are involved in the protective effect of fluoxetine against the behavioral despair induced by acute physical stress in male mice. We used the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and open-field test (OFT) for behavioral evaluation. We used fluoxetine, naltrexone (opioid receptor antagonist), MK-801 (NMDA receptor antagonist), morphine (opioid receptor agonist), and NMDA (NMDA receptor agonist). Acute foot-shock stress (FSS) significantly induced behavioral despair (depressive-like) and anxiety-like behaviors in tests. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) reversed the depressant-like effect of FSS, but it did not alter the locomotion and anxiety-like behavior in animals. Acute administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.3 mg/kg) or MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine, while subeffective doses of morphine (1 mg/kg) and NMDA (75 mg/kg) abolished this effect of fluoxetine. Also, co-administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.05 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.003 mg/kg) with fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) induced a significant decrease in the immobility time in FST and TST. Our results showed that opioid and NMDA receptors (alone or in combination) are involved in the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine against physical stress.

  2. Fluoxetine a novel anti-hepatitis C virus agent via ROS-, JNK-, and PPARβ/γ-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Young, Kung-Chia; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Su, Hui-Chen; Tsai, Pei-Ju; Pu, Chien-Yu; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Min; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Chong, Lee-Won; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2014-10-01

    More than 20% of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients receiving interferon-alpha (IFN-α)-based anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy experienced significant depression, which was relieved by treatment with fluoxetine. However, whether and how fluoxetine affected directly the anti-HCV therapy remained unclear. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine inhibited HCV infection and blocked the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid accumulation in Huh7.5 cells. Fluoxetine facilitated the IFN-α-mediated antiviral actions via activations of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK). Alternatively, fluoxetine elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) response element activity under HCV infection. The inhibitory effects of fluoxetine on HCV infection and lipid accumulation, but not production of ROS, were partially reversed by the PPAR-β, -γ, and JNK antagonists. Furthermore, fluoxetine intervention to the IFN-α-2b regimen facilitated to reduce HCV titer and alanine transaminase level for CHC patients. Therefore, fluoxetine intervention to the IFN-α-2b regimen improved the efficacy of anti-HCV treatment, which might be related to blockades of ROS generation and lipid accumulation and activation of host antiviral JNK/STAT-1 and PPARβ/γ signals.

  3. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors potentiate gene blunting induced by repeated methylphenidate treatment: Zif268 versus Homer1a.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Vandrevala, Malcolm; Beverley, Joel; Steiner, Heinz

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing use of psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin; dopamine re-uptake inhibitor), for medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy. Methylphenidate is known to produce some addiction-related gene regulation. Recent findings in animal models show that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including fluoxetine, can potentiate acute induction of gene expression by methylphenidate, thus indicating an acute facilitatory role for serotonin in dopamine-induced gene regulation. We investigated whether repeated exposure to fluoxetine, in conjunction with methylphenidate, in adolescent rats facilitated a gene regulation effect well established for repeated exposure to illicit psychostimulants such as cocaine-blunting (repression) of gene inducibility. We measured, by in situ hybridization histochemistry, the effects of a 5-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or a combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related genes (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced minimal gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine added to methylphenidate robustly potentiated methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was widespread throughout the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum, thus mimicking cocaine effects. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs, such as fluoxetine, may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate.

  4. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors potentiate gene blunting induced by repeated methylphenidate treatment: Zif268 vs. Homer1a

    PubMed Central

    Van Waes, Vincent; Vandrevala, Malcolm; Beverley, Joel; Steiner, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing use of psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin; dopamine reuptake inhibitor) for medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy. Methylphenidate is known to produce some addiction-related gene regulation. Recent findings in animal models show that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) including fluoxetine can potentiate acute induction of gene expression by methylphenidate, thus indicating an acute facilitatory role for serotonin in dopamine-induced gene regulation. We investigated whether repeated exposure to fluoxetine in conjunction with methylphenidate in adolescent rats facilitated a gene regulation effect well-established for repeated exposure to illicit psychostimulants such as cocaine - blunting (repression) of gene inducibility. We measured, by in situ hybridization histochemistry, the effects of a 5-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or a combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related genes (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced minimal gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine added to methylphenidate robustly potentiated methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was widespread throughout the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum, thus mimicking cocaine effects. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs such as fluoxetine may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate. PMID:23763573

  5. Treatment of Acute Ocular Chemical Burns.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namrata; Kaur, Manpreet; Agarwal, Tushar; Sangwan, Virender S; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2017-09-18

    Ocular chemical burns are an ophthalmic emergency and are responsible for 11.5% to 22.1% of ocular injuries. Immediate copious irrigation is universally recommended in acute ocular burns to remove the offending agent and minimize damage. Conventional medical therapy consists of the use of agents that promote epithelialization, minimize inflammation, and prevent cicatricial complications. Biological fluids such as autologous serum, umbilical cord blood serum, platelet-rich plasma, and amniotic membrane suspension are a rich source of growth factors and promote healing when used as adjuncts to conventional therapy. Surgical treatment of acute ocular burns includes the debridement of the necrotic tissue, application of tissue adhesives, tenoplasty, and tectonic keratoplasty. Amniotic membrane transplantation is a novel surgical treatment that is increasingly being used as an adjunct to conventional treatment to promote epithelial healing, minimize pain, and restore visual acuity. Various experimental treatments that aim to promote wound healing and minimize inflammation are being evaluated such as human mesenchymal and adipose stem cells, beta-1,3 glucan, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, cultivated fibroblasts, zinc desferrioxamine, anti-fibrinolytic agents, antioxidants, collagen cross-linking, and inhibitors of corneal neovascularization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcomes after treatment of acute aortic occlusion.

    PubMed

    de Varona Frolov, Serguei R; Acosta Silva, Marcela P; Volo Pérez, Guido; Fiuza Pérez, Maria D

    2015-11-01

    Acute aortic occlusion (AAO) is a rare disease with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to describe the results of surgical treatment of acute aortic occlusion and risk factors for mortality. Retrospective review of the clinical history of 29 patients diagnosed and operated on for AAO during 28 years. The following variables were analysed: age, sex, tabaco use, diabetes, chronic renal insufficiency, chronic heart failure, atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, 30-day mortality and long-term survival. A univariant analysis was performed of variables related to mortality. Twenty-nine patients were included (18 male) with a mean age of 66,2 years. The aetiology was: embolism (EM) in 11 cases and Thrombosis (TR) in 18 cases. The surgical procedures performed included bilateral transfemoral thrombectomy (14 cases), aorto-bifemoral by-pass (8 cases), axilo uni/bifemoral by-pass (5 cases) and aortoiliac and renal tromboendarterectomy (2 cases). Morbidity included: renal failure (14 cases), mesenteric ischemia (4 cases), cardiac complications (7 cases), respiratory complications (5 cases) and loss of extremity (2 cases). The in-hospital mortality was 21% (EM 0%, TR 21%). The estimated survival at 1.3 and 5 years was 60, 50 and 44% respectively. Age (p=0.032), arterial hypertension (p=0.039) and aetiology of the AAO (p=0.039) were related to mortality. Acute aortic occlusion is a medical emergency with high mortality rates. Acute renal failure is the most common postoperative complication. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of acute vivax malaria with tafenoquine.

    PubMed

    Nasveld, Peter; Kitchener, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Tafenoquine is an 8-aminoquiniline related to primaquine with pre-clinical activity against a range of malaria species. We treated two acute cases of vivax malaria with tafenoquine (800 mg over three days) alone, instead of conventional chloroquine (1500 mg over three days) and primaquine (420 mg over 14 days). In addition to the convenience of this regimen, the rapid parasite clearances observed, coupled with a good clinical response and lack of recrudescence or relapse, indicate that further investigation of tafenoquine in the treatment of vivax malaria is warranted.

  8. Effects of anti-depressant treatments on FADD and p-FADD protein in rat brain cortex: enhanced anti-apoptotic p-FADD/FADD ratio after chronic desipramine and fluoxetine administration.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2016-08-01

    Fas-associated death domain (FADD) is an adaptor of death receptors that can also induce anti-apoptotic actions through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Activation of monoamine receptors, indirect targets of classic anti-depressant drugs (ADs), reduced FADD and increased p-FADD and p-FADD/FADD ratio in brain. To ascertain whether ADs, which indirectly regulate monoamine receptors, modulate FADD protein forms to promote anti-apoptotic actions. The effects of selected norepinephrine transporter (NET), serotonin transporter (SERT), monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, atypical ADs, and electroconvulsive shock (ECS) or behavioral procedures (forced swim test, FST) on FADD forms and pro-survival FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-inhibitory protein (FLIP-L) and phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes of 15 kDa (p-PEA-15) contents were assessed in rat brain cortex by western blot analysis. Acute NET (e.g., nisoxetine) but not SERT (e.g., fluoxetine) inhibitors decreased cortical FADD (up to 37 %) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (up to 1.9-fold). Nisoxetine effects were prevented by α2-antagonist RX-821002, suggesting the involvement of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors. Immobility time in the FST correlated with increases of pro-apoptotic FADD and decreases of anti-apoptotic p-FADD. The MAO-A/B inhibitor phenelzine decreased FADD (up to 33 %) and increased p-FADD (up to 65 %) and p-FADD/FADD (up to 2.4-fold). Other MAO inhibitors (clorgyline, Ro 41-1049, rasagiline), atypical ADs (ketamine and mirtazapine), or ECS did not modulate cortical FADD. Chronic (14 days) desipramine and fluoxetine, but not phenelzine, increased p-FADD (up to 59 %), p-FADD/FADD ratio (up to 1.8-fold), and pro-survival p-PEA-15 (up to 46 %) in rat brain cortex. Multifunctional FADD protein, through an increased p-FADD/FADD ratio, could participate in the mechanisms of anti-apoptotic actions induced by ADs.

  9. Fluoxetine: clinical pharmacology and physiologic disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lemberger, L.; Bergstrom, R.F.; Wolen, R.L.; Farid, N.A.; Enas, G.G.; Aronoff, G.R.

    1985-03-01

    Fluoxetine (30 mg), administered for 7 days to normal volunteers, produced a 66% inhibition of tritiated serotonin uptake into platelets. Plasma concentrations of fluoxetine correlated positively with inhibition of serotonin uptake. Fluoxetine is well absorbed after oral administration in both the fed and fasted states and demonstrates dose proportionality. Fluoxetine disappears from plasma with a half-life of 1-3 days; its metabolite norfluoxetine has a plasma half-life of 7-15 days. After administration of /sup 14/C-fluoxetine, approximately 65% of the administered dose of radioactivity is recovered in urine and about 15% in feces. Fluoxetine, given as a single dose or in multiple doses over 8 days, did not produce significant effects on the plasma disappearance of warfarin, diazepam, tolbutamide, or chlorothiazide. Coadministration of fluoxetine and ethanol did not result in an increase from control values in the blood ethanol levels, nor did it produce significant changes in physiologic, psychometric, or psychomotor activity. Pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine in the elderly and normal volunteers appear to be similar. In addition, pharmacokinetic analyses in patients with varying degrees of renal impairment did not show significant differences from healthy subjects.

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of fluoxetine: A new potential pharmacological action for a classic antidepressant drug?

    PubMed

    Di Rosso, María Emilia; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used antidepressants. In particular, fluoxetine is usually chosen for the treatment of the symptoms of depression, obsessive-compulsive, panic attack and bulimia nervosa. Antidepressant therapy has been associated with immune dysfunction. However, there is contradictory evidence about the effect of fluoxetine on the immune system. Experimental findings indicate that lymphocytes express the serotonin transporter. Moreover it has been shown that fluoxetine is able to modulate the immune function through a serotonin-dependent pathway and through a novel independent mechanism. In addition, several studies have shown that fluoxetine can alter tumor cell viability. Thus, it was recently demonstrated in vivo that chronic fluoxetine treatment inhibits tumor growth by increasing antitumor T-cell activity. Here we briefly review some of the literature referring to how fluoxetine is able to modify, for better or worse, the functionality of the immune system. These results of our analysis point to the relevance of the novel pharmacological action of this drug as an immunomodulator helping to treat several pathologies in which immune deficiency and/or deregulation is present.

  11. [A comparative clinical evaluation of the antidepressive activity of fluoxetine and fluvoxamine].

    PubMed

    Lopukhov, I G

    1997-01-01

    Comparative study of the peculiarities of clinical action of fluoxetine and fluvoxamine in 65 patients with endogenous depressions revealed their high efficiency (in 74.3% and 64.3% respectively). Fluoxetine was characterised by predominance of a stimulating effect from the first days of treatment as well as by relatively late manifestation of very thymoleptic and tranquilizing impact (during 3-4 weeks). Fluvoxamin displayed relatively uniform occurrence of separate clinical effects together with predominance and early appearance of antidepressive influence. On the basis of the comparison of the peculiarities of either clinical action of fluoxetine and fluvoxamin or their side effects with those of traditional antidepressive drugs (amitryptilin and ludiomil) the preferable indications for their prescription were determined. Thus fluoxetine was very good in treatment of apathetic-adynamic depressions while fluvoxamin was recommended for therapy of anxious and melancholic depressions. Antidepressants studied were ranked in the following way in terms of decrease of sedative effect and increase of stimulating action: amitryptilin, fluvoxamin, ludiomil, fluoxetine. The proper thymoleptic effect of fluoxetine and fluvoxamin exceeded the same effect of amitryptilin and ludiomil.

  12. Classification of observational data with artificial neural networks versus discriminant analysis in pharmacoepidemiological studies--can outcome of fluoxetine treatment be predicted?

    PubMed

    Winterer, G; Ziller, M; Linden, M

    1998-11-01

    For several years, there has been an ongoing discussion about appropriate methodological tools to be applied to observational data in pharmacoepidemiological studies. It is now suggested by our research group that artificial neural networks (ANN) might be advantageous in some cases for classification purposes when compared with discriminant analysis. This is due to their inherent capability to detect complex linear and nonlinear functions in multivariate data sets, the possibility of including data on different scales in the same model, as well as their relative resistance to "noisy" input. In this paper, a short introduction is given to the basics of neural networks and possible applications. For demonstration, a comparison between artificial neural networks and discriminant analysis was performed on a multivariate data set, consisting of observational data of 19738 patients treated with fluoxetine. It was tested, which of the two statistical tools outperforms the two other in regard to the therapeutic response prediction from the clinical input data. Essentially, it was found that neither discriminant analysis nor ANN are able to predict the clinical outcome on the basis of the employed clinical variables. Applying ANN, we were able to rule out the possibility of undetected suppressor effects to a greater extent than would have been possible by the exclusive application of discriminant analysis.

  13. Efficacy of individualized homeopathic treatment and fluoxetine for moderate to severe depression in peri- and postmenopausal women (HOMDEP-MENOP): study protocol for a randomized, double-dummy, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women’s menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depressive symptoms. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. Previous trials suggest that individualized homeopathic treatments improve depression. In classical homeopathy, an individually selected homeopathic remedy is prescribed after a complete case history of the patient. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of the homeopathic individualized treatment versus placebo or fluoxetine in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. Methods/design A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, three-arm trial with a six-week follow-up study was designed. The study will be conducted in a public research hospital in Mexico City (Juárez de México Hospital) in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred eighty nine peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (moderate to severe intensity) will be included. The primary outcome is change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression after the fourth and sixth week of treatment. Secondary outcomes are: Beck Depression Inventory change in mean score, Greene’s Scale change in mean score, response and remission rates and safety. Efficacy data will be analyzed in the intention-to-treat population. To determine differences in the primary and secondary outcomes among groups at baseline and weeks four and six, data will be analyzed by analysis of variance for independent measures with the Bonferroni post-hoc test. Discussion This study is the first trial of classical homeopathy that will evaluate the efficacy of homeopathic individualized treatment

  14. Treatment of acute cyanide intoxication with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wesson, D E; Foley, R; Sabatini, S; Wharton, J; Kapusnik, J; Kurtzman, N A

    1985-01-01

    A dramatic response was noted in a patient at our hospital who received hemodialysis therapy for severe acidosis secondary to an unknown toxin, subsequently identified as cyanide. We were unable to find any information concerning the hemodialysis clearance and extraction ratio of cyanide; thus, we studied the effect of hemodialysis in dogs receiving a constant infusion of cyanide with and without a simultaneous infusion of thiosulfate. The hemodialysis clearance of cyanide in the presence of thiosulfate was 38.3 +/- 5.4 ml/min with an extraction ratio of 0.43 +/- 0.06 (n = 4). Hemodialysis was found to increase the lethal dose of cyanide without thiosulfate infusion, and a further increase was noted with the thiosulfate infusion. Thiosulfate promotes mitochondrial metabolism of cyanide to thiocyanate. The end product, thiocyanate, is quickly removed by hemodialysis. We believe that the demonstrated effectiveness of hemodialysis in the treatment of acute cyanide intoxication is related not only to the hemodialysis clearance of cyanide, but also to the removal of its metabolic end product, thiocyanate. Based on our observations, we feel that hemodialysis is an effective adjunct in the treatment of acute cyanide intoxication.

  15. [Surgical and therapeutic treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Sandakov, P Ia; Samartsev, V A; Mineev, D A

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the features of different forms of acute pancreatitis in 1001 patients including 324 cases with pancreatonecrosis and 245 patients with middle severity of disease. It was shown that monitoring of patients' condition and destructive process in pancreas by using of modified SOFA-scale and evaluation of sonographic signs of inflammation are advisable. Flow indicators including resistance index and the maximum flow velocity in celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery represented severity of gland's destruction. Sonographic investigation revealed small-focal pancreonecrosis. It allows to differentiate medical tactics. Surgical treatment was performed in 582 patients. Efficiency of surgical treatment is determined by diagnostic methods, timely sanation of destructive focuses of pancreas, abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal fiber, adequate drainage and mini-invasive techniques using in case of purulent complications. The main prognostic factors of development of complications and adverse outcomes are determined.

  16. [Treatment guidelines for acute and preventive treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping-Kun; Chen, Hsi-Ming; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yeng-Yu; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lee, Lian-Hui; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Kao-Chang; Tseng, Hung-Ping; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Wang, Po-Jen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Yang, Chun-Pai; Yiu, Chun-Hing; Wu, Zin-An

    2011-09-01

    The Treatment Guideline Subcommittee of the Taiwan Headache Society evaluated both the acute and the preventive treatments for cluster headache now being used in Taiwan, based on the principles of evidence- based medicine. We assessed the quality of clinical trials and levels of evidence, and referred to other treatment guidelines proposed by other countries. Throughout several panel discussions, we merged opinions from the subcommittee members and proposed a consensus on the major roles, recommended levels, clinical efficacy, adverse events and cautions of clinical practice regarding acute and preventive treatments of cluster headache. The majority of Taiwanese patients have episodic cluster headaches, because chronic clusters are very rare. Cluster headache is characterized by severe and excruciating pain which develops within a short time and is associated with ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. Therefore, emergency treatment for a cluster headache attack is extremely important. Within the group of acute medications currently available in Taiwan, the subcommittee determined that high-flow oxygen inhalation has the best evidence of effectiveness, followed by intranasal triptans. Both are recommended as first-line medical treatments for acute attacks. Oral triptans were determined to be second-line medications. For transitional prophylaxis, oral corticosteroids are recommended as the first-line medication, and ergotamine as the second-line choice. As for maintenance prophylaxis, verapamil has the best evidence and is recommended as the first-line medication. Lithium, melatonin, valproic acid, topiramate and gabapentin are suggested as the second-line preventive medications. Surgical interventions, including occipital nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, radiofrequency block of the sphenopalatine ganglion, percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy and trigeminal nerve section, are invasive and their long-term efficacy and adverse events are still not clear in

  17. Treatment and pathogenesis of acute hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Mushiyakh, Yelena; Dangaria, Harsh; Qavi, Shahbaz; Ali, Noorjahan; Pannone, John; Tompkins, David

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and various treatment modalities for acute hyperkalemia and presents a systematic approach to selecting a treatment strategy. Hyperkalemia, a life-threatening condition caused by extracellular potassium shift or decreased renal potassium excretion, usually presents with non-specific symptoms. Early recognition of moderate to severe hyperkalemia is vital in preventing fatal cardiac arrhythmias and muscle paralysis. Management of hyperkalemia includes the elimination of reversible causes (diet, medications), rapidly acting therapies that shift potassium into cells and block the cardiac membrane effects of hyperkalemia, and measures to facilitate removal of potassium from the body (saline diuresis, oral binding resins, and hemodialysis). Hyperkalemia with potassium level more than 6.5 mEq/L or EKG changes is a medical emergency and should be treated accordingly. Treatment should be started with calcium gluconate to stabilize cardiomyocyte membranes, followed by insulin injection, and b-agonists administration. Hemodialysis remains the most reliable method to remove potassium from the body and should be used in cases refractory to medical treatment. Prompt detection and proper treatment are crucial in preventing lethal outcomes. PMID:23882341

  18. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Demographic and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    n/a; n/a

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study is a multicenter, randomized clinical trial sponsored by the NIMH. This study is designed to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with major depressive disorder: fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and, acutely,…

  19. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Demographic and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    n/a; n/a

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study is a multicenter, randomized clinical trial sponsored by the NIMH. This study is designed to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with major depressive disorder: fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and, acutely,…

  20. Effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv1.1)

    PubMed Central

    Tytgat, J; Maertens, Ch; Daenens, P

    1997-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is widely used as an antidepressant drug and is assumed to be a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Claims that its beneficial psychotropic effects extend beyond those in treatment of depression have drawn clinical and popular attention to this compound, raising the question of whether there is anything exceptional about the supposed selective actions.We have used the voltage clamp technique to study the effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel (RCK1; Kv1.1), expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This channel subunit is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and K+ channels containing this subunit are involved in the repolarization process of many types of neurones.Blockade of the K+ currents by fluoxetine was found to be use- and dose-dependent. Wash-out of this compound could not be achieved. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of this K+ channel, as the reversal potential was unaltered.Slowing of both activation and deactivation kinetics of the channel by fluoxetine was observed, including tail current crossover upon repolarization.Hodgkin-Huxley type of models and more generalized Markov chain models were used to fit the kinetics of the data. Based upon a Markov kinetic scheme, our data can be interpreted to mean that blockade of fluoxetine consists of two components: a voltage-independent occurring in the last closed, but available state of the channel, and a voltage-dependent occurring in the open state.This study describes the first biophysical working model for the mechanism of action of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent K+ channel, RCK1. Although this channel is not very potently blocked by fluoxetine when expressed in oocytes, this study may help us to understand some of the clinical symptoms seen with elevated serum concentrations of this SSRI. PMID:9421290

  1. Effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv1.1).

    PubMed

    Tytgat, J; Maertens, C; Daenens, P

    1997-12-01

    1. Fluoxetine (Prozac) is widely used as an antidepressant drug and is assumed to be a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Claims that its beneficial psychotropic effects extend beyond those in treatment of depression have drawn clinical and popular attention to this compound, raising the question of whether there is anything exceptional about the supposed selective actions. 2. We have used the voltage clamp technique to study the effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel (RCK1; Kv1.1), expressed in p6nopus laevis oocytes. This channel subunit is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and K+ channels containing this subunit are involved in the repolarization process of many types of neurones. 3. Blockade of the K+ currents by fluoxetine was found to be use- and dose-dependent. Wash-out of this compound could not be achieved. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of this K+ channel, as the reversal potential was unaltered. 4. Slowing of both activation and deactivation kinetics of the channel by fluoxetine was observed, including tail current crossover upon repolarization. 5. Hodgkin-Huxley type of models and more generalized Markov chain models were used to fit the kinetics of the data. Based upon a Markov kinetic scheme, our data can be interpreted to mean that blockade of fluoxetine consists of two components: a voltage-independent occurring in the last closed, but available state of the channel, and a voltage-dependent occurring in the open state. 6. This study describes the first biophysical working model for the mechanism of action of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent K+ channel, RCK1. Although this channel is not very potently blocked by fluoxetine when expressed in oocytes, this study may help us to understand some of the clinical symptoms seen with elevated serum concentrations of this SSRI.

  2. Peer social interaction is facilitated in juvenile rhesus monkeys treated with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Bulleri, Alicia M

    2016-06-01

    Fluoxetine improves social interactions in children with autism, social anxiety and social phobia. It is not known whether this effect is mediated directly or indirectly by correcting the underlying pathology. Genetics may also influence the drug effect. Polymorphisms of the MAOA (monoamine oxidase A) gene interact with fluoxetine to influence metabolic profiles in juvenile monkeys. Juvenile nonhuman primates provide an appropriate model for studying fluoxetine effects and drug*gene interactions in children. Male rhesus monkeys 1-3 years of age living in permanent social pairs were treated daily with a therapeutic dose of fluoxetine or vehicle (n = 16/group). Both members of each social pair were assigned to the same treatment group. They were observed for social interactions with their familiar cagemate over a 2-year dosing period. Subjects were genotyped for MAOA variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphisms categorized for high or low transcription rates (hi-MAOA, low-MAOA). Fluoxetine-treated animals spent 30% more time in social interaction than vehicle controls. Fluoxetine significantly increased the duration of quiet interactions, the most common type of interaction, and also of immature sexual behavior typical of rhesus in this age group. Specific behaviors affected depended on MAOA genotype of the animal and its social partner. When given fluoxetine, hi-MOAO monkeys had more social invitation and initiation behaviors and low-MAOA subjects with low-MAOA partners had more grooming and an increased frequency of some facial and vocal expressive behaviors. Fluoxetine may facilitate social interaction in children independent of remediation of psychopathology. Common genetic variants may modify this effect.

  3. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia by retinoids.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, P; Wang, Z Z; Degos, L

    2007-01-01

    We review the role of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The combination of ATRA and conventional anthracycline-ARA-C chemotherapy (CT) has clearly demonstrated its superiority over CT alone (in terms of relapse and survival) in newly diagnosed APL. Combination treatment probably also reduces the incidence of initial failures, and complete remission (CR) rates greater than 90% are now regularly reported in large multicenter trials. Some randomized studies strongly suggest that prolonged maintenance treatment (for 1 or 2 years) with ATRA and low-dose CT, and possibly very early introduction of anthracycline CT during induction treatment, may reduce the incidence of relapse. With those treatments, the relapse risk appears to be only 10%-15%, although it remains greater in patients who initially have high white blood cell counts (often associated with variant M3 morphology, short bcr3 isoform, etc.) and patients with residual disease detectable by RT-PCR at the end of consolidation courses. In those patients, addition of arsenic derivatives to induction or consolidation treatment (or both treatments together) may prove useful and is currently being tested. ATRA syndrome (now generally called APL differentiation syndrome, as it is also seen with arsenic derivatives) remains the major side effect of ATRA treatment. It occurs in 10%-15% of patients and is currently fatal in at least 10% of them. Rapid onset of CT or high dose steroids (or both) should improve its outcome. A sizeable proportion of APL patients who relapse after ATRA and CT can be durably salvaged by the same treatment followed by allogeneic or autologous stem cell transplantation, provided the transplant (in the autologous setting) is RT-PCR-negative. However, in relapsing APL arsenic derivatives (mainly arsenic trioxide) are now considered to be the reference treatment. Some of the current issues with ATRA treatment in newly diagnosed APL include

  4. Effects of fluoxetine administration on regional galanin expression in obese Zucker rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, María P; Gutiérreza, Arantza; Casis, Luis; Macarulla, María Teresa; Zarate, Jon; Echevarría, Enrique

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the potential involvement of hypothalamic galanin system in the anorectic mechanism of fluoxetine in obese Zucker rats. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. The control group was given 0.9% NaCl solution. Significant decreases in food intake, final body weight and total body fat were observed after fluoxetine treatment. Although fluoxetine-treated rats showed a decrease in urine elimination, this effect was not enough to compensate decreased water intake, leading to dehydration, as showed by decreased body water content. Chronic fluoxetine administration increased the numbers of galanin positively immunostained neural cells in medial and lateral preoptic areas, lateral hypothalamic area and paraventricular nucleus (rostral and magnocellular regions), without changes in dorsomedial, ventromedial, supraoptic, suprachiasmatic and arcuate nuclei. Taken into account that galanin stimulates appetite, these results could represent rather a compensatory response against reduced food intake than a direct anorectic mechanism. Changes in the magnocellular region of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus suggest a role for galanin neural circuits at this level in fluoxetine-induced hydro-osmotic impairment.

  5. The antidepressant fluoxetine induces necrosis by energy depletion and mitochondrial calcium overload

    PubMed Central

    Kischel, Philippe; Delcroix, Vanessa; Demaurex, Nicolas; Castelbou, Cyril; Vacher, Anne-Marie; Devin, Anne; Ducret, Thomas; Nunes, Paula; Vacher, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor antidepressants, such as fluoxetine (Prozac), have been shown to induce cell death in cancer cells, paving the way for their potential use as cancer therapy. These compounds are able to increase cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), but the involved mechanisms and their physiological consequences are still not well understood. Here, we show that fluoxetine induces an increase in [Ca2+]cyt by emptying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the translocon, an ER Ca2+ leakage structure. Our data also show that fluoxetine inhibits oxygen consumption and lowers mitochondrial ATP. This latter is essential for Ca2+ reuptake into the ER, and we postulated therefore that the fluoxetine-induced decrease in mitochondrial ATP production results in the emptying of the ER, leading to capacitative calcium entry. Furthermore, Ca2+ quickly accumulated in the mitochondria, leading to mitochondrial Ca2+ overload and cell death. We found that fluoxetine could induce an early necrosis in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Jurkat cells, and could also induce late apoptosis, especially in the tumor cell line. These results shed light on fluoxetine-induced cell death and its potential use in cancer treatment. PMID:27911858

  6. Potentiation of opioid-induced conditioned place preference by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Subhan, F; Pache, D M; Sewell, R D

    2000-02-25

    The ability of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, to modify the effects of morphine, N-((S)-2-benzyl-3[(S) 2-amino-4-methylthio)butyldithio-]-1-oxopropyl)-L-alanine benzylester (RB 120; mixed inhibitor of enkephalin metabolism), and 4-¿[2-[[3-(1H-indol-3-yl))-2-methyl-1-oxo-2-[[(tricyclo[3,3,1,1] dec-2-yloxy) carbonyl] amino¿ propyl] amino]-1-phenylethyl] amino¿-4-oxo-[R-(R*,R*)]-butanoate N-methyl-D-glucamine (CI 988; cholecystokinin receptor subtype [CCK(2)] antagonist), was assessed using conditioned place preference. RB 120 and morphine both induced significant, dose-dependent conditioned place preference, whilst CI 988 failed to elicit conditioned place preference. A subthreshold dose of fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg) potentiated the morphine submaximal response. Notably, the combination of a subthreshold dose of fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg) with RB 120 (5 mg/kg) or CI 988 (3 mg/kg) was devoid of any significant conditioned place preference properties. Fluoxetine may act via enhanced serotonergic activity to modulate enkephalinergic tone. Agents that increase enkephalinergic tone more directly such as RB 120 and CI 988, at submaximal doses, did not induce conditioned place preference when co-administered with fluoxetine. These data suggest that fluoxetine, in combination with CI 988 or RB 120, might prove to be a beneficial treatment strategy for opioid drug addiction, though further studies are necessary.

  7. The antidepressant fluoxetine induces necrosis by energy depletion and mitochondrial calcium overload.

    PubMed

    Charles, Emilie; Hammadi, Mehdi; Kischel, Philippe; Delcroix, Vanessa; Demaurex, Nicolas; Castelbou, Cyril; Vacher, Anne-Marie; Devin, Anne; Ducret, Thomas; Nunes, Paula; Vacher, Pierre

    2017-01-10

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor antidepressants, such as fluoxetine (Prozac), have been shown to induce cell death in cancer cells, paving the way for their potential use as cancer therapy. These compounds are able to increase cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), but the involved mechanisms and their physiological consequences are still not well understood. Here, we show that fluoxetine induces an increase in [Ca2+]cyt by emptying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the translocon, an ER Ca2+ leakage structure. Our data also show that fluoxetine inhibits oxygen consumption and lowers mitochondrial ATP. This latter is essential for Ca2+ reuptake into the ER, and we postulated therefore that the fluoxetine-induced decrease in mitochondrial ATP production results in the emptying of the ER, leading to capacitative calcium entry. Furthermore, Ca2+ quickly accumulated in the mitochondria, leading to mitochondrial Ca2+ overload and cell death. We found that fluoxetine could induce an early necrosis in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Jurkat cells, and could also induce late apoptosis, especially in the tumor cell line. These results shed light on fluoxetine-induced cell death and its potential use in cancer treatment.

  8. Child development following exposure to tricyclic antidepressants or fluoxetine throughout fetal life: a prospective, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Nulman, Irena; Rovet, Joanne; Stewart, Donna E; Wolpin, Jacob; Pace-Asciak, Pia; Shuhaiber, Samar; Koren, Gideon

    2002-11-01

    Previous work suggested that first-trimester exposure to tricyclic antidepressants or fluoxetine does not affect adversely child IQ and language development. However, many women need antidepressants throughout pregnancy to avoid morbidity and suicide attempts. Little is known about the fetal safety of tricyclic antidepressants and fluoxetine when taken throughout pregnancy. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of tricyclic antidepressants and fluoxetine used throughout gestation on child IQ, language, and behavior. In a prospective study, mother-child pairs exposed throughout gestation to tricyclic antidepressants (N=46) or fluoxetine (N=40) and an unexposed, not depressed comparison group (N=36) were blindly assessed. The three groups were compared in terms of the children's IQ, language, behavior, and temperament between ages 15 and 71 months. The authors adjusted for independent variables such as duration and severity of maternal depression, duration of pharmacological treatment, number of depression episodes after delivery, maternal IQ, socioeconomic status, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use. Neither tricyclic antidepressants nor fluoxetine adversely affected the child's global IQ, language development, or behavior. IQ was significantly and negatively associated with duration of depression, whereas language was negatively associated with number of depression episodes after delivery. Exposure to tricyclic antidepressants or fluoxetine throughout gestation does not appear to adversely affect cognition, language development, or the temperament of preschool and early-school children. In contrast, mothers' depression is associated with less cognitive and language achievement by their children. When needed, adequate antidepressant therapy should be instituted and maintained during pregnancy and postpartum.

  9. A single dose of vortioxetine, but not ketamine or fluoxetine, increases plasticity-related gene expression in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers; Elfving, Betina

    2016-09-05

    Ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that has been shown to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in treatment-resistant patients. Vortioxetine is a multimodal-acting antidepressant that exert its therapeutic activity through serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibition and modulation of several 5-HT receptors. In clinical trials, vortioxetine improves depression symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. Neuroplasticity as well as serotonergic and glutamatergic signaling attain significant roles in depression pathophysiology and antidepressant responses. Here, we investigate the effects of ketamine and vortioxetine on gene expression related to serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission as well as neuroplasticity and compare them to those of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Rats were injected with fluoxetine (10mg/kg), ketamine (15mg/kg), or vortioxetine (10mg/kg) at 2, 8, 12, or 27h prior to harvesting of the frontal cortex and hippocampus. mRNA levels were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The main finding was that vortioxetine enhanced plasticity-related gene expression (Mtor, Mglur1, Pkcα, Homer3, Spinophilin, and Synapsin3) in the frontal cortex at 8h after a single dose. Ingenuity pathway analysis of this subset of data identified a biological network that was engaged by vortioxetine and is plausibly associated with neuroplasticity. Transcript levels had returned to baseline levels 12h after injection. Only minor effects on gene expression were found for ketamine or fluoxetine. In conclusion, acute vortioxetine, but not fluoxetine or ketamine, transiently increased plasticity-related gene expression in the frontal cortex. These effects may be ascribed to the direct 5-HT receptor activities of vortioxetine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluoxetine pretreatment effects pharmacokinetics of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ECSTASY) in rat.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Vijay V; Eddington, Natalie D

    2008-04-01

    Fluoxetine has been shown to provide protection from MDMA induced long term neurotoxicity. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the pharmacokinetic drug interaction between MDMA and fluoxetine and also to determine the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on mediating drug-drug interactions with MDMA. Bi-directional transport studies were conducted across MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 monolayers. MDMA brain and plasma levels were measured in P-gp deficient [mdr1a(-/-)] and normal [mdr1a(+/+)] mice after a 5 mg/kg i.p. dose of MDMA. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with fluoxetine (4 days, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline followed by MDMA (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and brain and plasma samples were collected over 10 h. MDMA and its active metabolite MDA were quantified using a HPLC method with fluorescence detection. In transport studies MDMA exhibited high permeability with essentially unpolarized transport. No significant difference in MDMA and MDA brain levels were seen in P-gp deficient versus normal mice. Pretreatment of rats with fluoxetine resulted in an increase in MDMA (1.4-fold) and MDA (1.5-fold) exposure in both brain and plasma. Elimination half-life was increased for MDMA (2.4 vs. 4.9 h) and MDA (1.8 vs. 8.2 h) with fluoxetine pretreatment. P-gp does not play a physiologically relevant role in absorption and distribution of MDMA, hence this transporter may not have a role in drug-drug interactions with MDMA. Fluoxetine pretreatment to provide protection from MDMA induced long term neurotoxicity decreases elimination of MDMA and MDA and may lead to enhanced risk of MDMA acute toxic effects. Overall, our results indicate that caution need to be practiced when recommending fluoxetine as an agent to provide protection from MDMA induced long term neurotoxicity.

  11. [Progress in treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Nan, Jiang; Xiang, Dayong; Yu, Bin

    2013-05-01

    To review the progress in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Recent literature about the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture was reviewed and analyzed. Treatments of acute Achilles tendon rupture include operative and non-operative treatments. Operative treatments include open surgery and percutaneous minimally invasive surgery. Compared with non-operative treatment, operative treatment can effectively reduce the re-rupture incidence, but it had higher complication incidences of wound infection and nerve injury. Although early functional rehabilitation during non-operative treatment could reduce the re-rutpture incidence, there is no consistent orthopaedic device and guideline for functional rehabilitation. Both operative and non-operative treatments have advantages and disadvantages for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. No consistent conclusion is arrived regarding functional recovery. Future studies should explore the strategy of early functional rehabilitation during non-operative treatment and its mechanism of promoting tendon healing.

  12. Fluoxetine Enhances Neurogenesis in Aged Rats with Cortical Infarcts, but This is not Reflected in a Behavioral Recovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Zhike; Liu, Tingting; Zhao, Mei; Zhao, Shanshan; Xiao, Ting; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Zhao, Chuansheng

    2016-02-01

    Age is associated with poor outcome and impaired functional recovery after stroke. Fluoxetine, which is widely used in clinical practice, can regulate hippocampal neurogenesis in young rodents. As the rate of neurogenesis is dramatically reduced during aging, we studied the effect of post-stroke fluoxetine treatment on neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of dentate gyrus (DG) and whether this would be associated with any behavioral recovery after the cortical infarct in aged rats. Aged rats were randomly assigned to four groups: sham-operated rats, sham-operated rats treated with fluoxetine, rats subjected to cerebral ischemia, and rats with ischemia treated with fluoxetine. Focal cortical ischemia was induced by intracranial injection of vasoconstrictive peptide, endothelin-1 (ET-1). Fluoxetine was administered in the drinking water for 3 weeks starting 1 week after ischemia at a dose of 18 mg/kg/day. Behavioral recovery was evaluated on post-stroke days 29 to 31 after which the survival rate and fate of proliferating cells in the SVZ and DG were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis was measured with the TUNEL assay. The results indicated that chronic fluoxetine treatment after stroke enhanced the proliferation of newborn neurons in the SVZ, but not in SGZ, and it suppressed perilesional apoptosis. Fluoxetine treatment did not affect the survival or differentiation of newly generated cells in the SVZ i.e., the enhanced neurogenesis was not translated into a behavioral outcome.

  13. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  14. Acute stroke endovascular treatment: tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Rajah, Gary B; Shakir, Hakeem J; Davies, Jason M; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Hopkins, L Nelson

    2016-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States, responsible for 1 of every 20 deaths. The efficacy of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) alone for recanalization of large-vessel occlusion (LVO) is low. Several randomized trials have now established endovascular treatment of LVO as a standard of care. Endovascular techniques continue to evolve at a rapid pace. This review seeks to report recent advances in endovascular technology, discuss the correlation between speed of reperfusion and patient outcomes, and present mobile stroke care, shortcoming of the recent technology (such as clot fragmentation), and potential solutions to overcome these drawbacks, as well as anesthetic considerations and cost-effectiveness.

  15. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  16. Fluoxetine and sertraline stimulate gastric acid secretion via a vagal pathway in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Salam, Omar M E

    2004-09-01

    The effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine and sertraline on basal, secretagogues (histamine or bethanechol)- and distention-stimulated gastric acid secretion was investigated in the urethane-anaesthetised acute gastric fistula rat. Gastric acid secretion was measured by flushing of the gastric contents with saline every 15 min. Fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) produced a dose-dependent increase in basal gastric acid secretion. These stimulatory effects were abolished by vagotomy. Intraperitoneally administered sertraline also stimulated gastric acid secretion. The stimulatory effect of lower doses (5 mg kg(-1)) of sertraline was similar to that of the higher (30 mg kg(-1)) doses. The gastric secretory response to i.p. sertraline was long lasting (greater than 60 min), and blocked by vagotomy. Intraperitoneally administered fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg kg(-1)) or sertraline (5 mg kg(-1)) also increased gastric secretion induced by histamine, bethanechol or distention. The fluoxetine or sertraline stimulatory effects of histamine-induced acid secretion were abolished by vagotomy. Data indicate a stimulatory effect for fluoxetine and sertraline mediated by vagal nerve on gastric acid secretion in urethane-anaesthetised rats.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine in rhesus macaques following multiple routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, E K; Howell, L L

    2011-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor currently used to treat depression and mood disorders. It has been widely studied clinically and preclinically, yet there is limited knowledge of its pharmacokinetics in nonhuman primates. The present study characterized the pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine and its active metabolite norfluoxetine in rhesus macaques following both acute (1, 3, 5.6 and 10 mg/kg) and chronic doses (5.6 and 10 mg/kg/day) via different routes of administration (intravenous, subcutaneous, intramuscular, and oral). Blood samples were collected at multiple time points following administration and analyzed using mass spectrometry. Fluoxetine had a half-life of 11-16 h and norfluoxetine had a half-life of 21-29 h. Potentially functionally significant serum concentrations of norfluoxetine were present at 24 h even after a single administration of fluoxetine. Similar to observations in humans under steady state conditions, norfluoxetine accounted for the greater percentage of active drug in the blood stream. A daily dose of 10 mg/kg administered orally maintained serum concentrations in the human clinical range over the course of 6 weeks. Given the long half-lives of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine observed in this study, precautions should be taken when designing preclinical studies to prevent accumulation of drug serum concentrations. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Rabinov, James; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular thrombectomy is an effective treatment for major acute ischemic stroke syndromes caused by major anterior circulation artery occlusions (commonly referred to as large vessel occlusion) and is superior to intravenous thrombolysis and medical management. Treatment should occur as quickly as is reasonably possible. All patients with moderate to severe symptoms (National Institutes of Health stroke scale >8) and a treatable occlusion should be considered. The use of neuroimaging is critical to exclude hemorrhage and large ischemic cores. Very shortly after stroke onset (<3 hours) computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography provide sufficient information to proceed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is less reliable during this early stage. After 3 hours from onset diffusion MRI is the most reliable method to define ischemic core size and should be used in centers that can offer it rapidly. Recanalization is highly effective with a stentriever or using a direct aspiration technique, with the patient awake or under conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, if it may be performed safely. After thrombectomy the patient should be admitted to an intensive care setting and inpatient rehabilitation undertaken as soon as feasible. Patient outcomes should be assessed at 3 months, preferably using the modified Rankin score. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute treatment of inversion ankle sprains: immobilization versus functional treatment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morgan H; Amendola, Annunziato S

    2007-02-01

    Inversion ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in sports. Although these injuries are often considered minor, they can lead to persistent disability in athletes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effect of immobilization versus early functional treatment on time to return to preinjury activity after inversion ankle sprain. Residual subjective instability, recurrent injury, and patient satisfaction were secondary outcomes. A systematic review identified 9 randomized controlled trials. Return to preinjury activity was less with early functional treatment in 4 of 5 studies that evaluated this outcome. Subjective instability was less in 3 of 5 studies. Similarly, reinjury rate was less in 5 of 6 studies. Patient satisfaction was not substantially different in the two studies that evaluated this outcome. Limitations of the identified trials included small sample size, heterogeneity of treatment methods, and lack of standardized outcome measures. However, based on our review the current best evidence suggests a trend favoring early functional treatment over immobilization for the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains.

  20. Effects of fluoxetine on memory under forced treadmill exercise conditions in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Jafary, Leila; Reisi, Parham; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies show inconsistent effects of forced exercise on cognitive processes. These differences are probably due to the stress of coercion in forced exercise. Because fluoxetine is used to treat complications caused by stress, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of fluoxetine on memory in rats under forced treadmill exercise. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups were the control, the control exercise, the fluoxetine, and the fluoxetine exercise. The exercise program was treadmill running at 22 m/min, 0° inclination for 50 min/day, 6 days/week, for 4 weeks. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) was injected 30 min before treadmill. Morris water maze and passive avoidance learning tests were used for evaluation of memory. Acquisition phase of both tests were performed before interventions and memory was evaluated 1-day and 1-week after the last session of exercise and treatments. Results: Our data showed that forced exercise impaired performance in passive avoidance learning test (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, 1-day and 1-week after the last session of exercise and treatments, respectively). Spatial memory was only impaired after 1-week in the exercise group. Fluoxetine improved spatial memory after 1-day in the control group. However, it had no significant effects on memory in the exercise group. Conclusion: The data correspond to the possibility that forced treadmill exercise can cause stress, and thereby cause damage to memory. The present results suggest that although fluoxetine may improve memory in intact rats but it cannot prevent damages that are caused by forced exercise. PMID:26645020

  1. Interaction of fluoxetine with phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Stevanato, Roberto

    2005-10-22

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is one of the latest of a new generation of antidepressants, approved by FDA in 2002. The interactions of fluoxetine with multilamellar liposomes of pure phosphatidylcholine (PC) or containing cholesterol 10% molar were studied as a function of the lipid chain lengths, using differential scanning calorimetry and spin labelling EPR techniques. The DSC profiles of the gel-to-fluid state transition of liposomes of DMPC (C14:0) are broadened and shifted towards lower temperatures at increasing dopant concentrations and, with less than 10% fluoxetine, any detectable transition is destroyed. The broadened profiles and the lowered transition temperatures demonstrate that both the size and the packing of the cooperative units undergoing the transition are modified by fluoxetine, leading to a looser and more flexible bilayer. No phase separation was observed. The effects of fluoxetine on the thermotropic phase behaviour of DPPC (C16:0) and, even more, of DSPC (C18:0) are different from that of DMPC. In fact, in the former cases, two peaks appeared at increasing dopant concentrations, suggesting the occurrence of a phase separation phenomenon, which is a sign of a binding of fluoxetine in the phosphate region. In cholesterol containing membranes, fluoxetine, even at low concentrations, leads to a general corruption of the membrane, both in terms of packing and cooperativity, and the formation of any new phase is no longer observable. EPR spectra reflect the disordered motion of acyl chains in the bilayer. It was found that fluoxetine lowers the order of the lipid chains mainly in correspondence of the fifth carbon position of SASL, indicating a possible accumulation near the interfacial region.

  2. Acute myeloid leukemia: update in diagnosis and treatment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Helman, Ricardo; Santos, Fabio Pires de Souza; Simões, Belinda; Atta, Elias Hallack; Callera, Fernando; Dobbin, Jane de Almeida; Mattos, Éderson Roberto; Atalla, Angelo; Maiolino, Angelo; Zanichelli, Maria Aparecida; Diefenbach, Cristiane Fração; Delamain, Marcia Torresan; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2011-06-01

    To identify how the Brazilian hematology centers treated and diagnosed cases of acute myeloid leukemia in 2009. An epidemiological observational multicenter study of 11 listed Brazilian centers that treat acute myeloid leukemia and perform bone marrow transplantation. Data were collected from clinical charts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated at the said centers between 2005 and 2009. The availability for immunophenotyping and cytogenetic tests was assessed. During 2009, a total of 345 new cases of acute myeloid leukemia were diagnosed. Differences were noted in the tests performed between patients who initiated treatment at the center and those referred for treatment. Of the participating centers, 72% conducted some type of molecular study in acute myeloid leukemia upon diagnosis. Treatment for acute myeloid leukemia in Brazil shows significantly inferior results when compared to other centers worldwide.

  3. Pulmonary embolism: treatment of the acute episode.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Franco; Roncon, Loris; Greco, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    The prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is mainly related to the clinical presentation and circulatory state of the patient: the therapeutic strategy is consequently different, ranging from an aggressive treatment in patients in life-threatening clinical conditions to a "stabilization" treatment in those hemodynamically stable. Since the majority of PE patients are clinically stable, a well conducted anticoagulant therapy, either with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparins together with a vitamin K antagonist, is sufficient to stop thrombus extension, to minimize the risk of recurrent embolism and prevent mortality. In about 15-20% of cases presenting with clinical instability of variable severity, prompt intravenous thrombolysis with a short-acting compound often represents a life-saving treatment and should be the first-line approach. In normotensive patients with right ventricular dysfunction at echocardiography, who represent about 30% of PE patients, the debate regarding the optimal therapy is still open and further studies are required to document a clinically relevant improvement in the benefit-risk ratio of thrombolytic agents over heparin alone: young people, with a very low risk of bleeding and a concomitant reduction of cardiopulmonary reserve might be the best candidates to systemic thrombolysis. In any case such patients should be admitted to an intensive care unit to monitor the clinical status for at least 48-72 hours and detect signs of possible hemodynamic worsening. Mechanical thrombectomy, either percutaneous or surgical, are ancillary procedures and should be reserved to a minority of highly compromised patients who are unable to receive thrombolysis.

  4. Fluoxetine during Development Reverses the Effects of Prenatal Stress on Depressive-Like Behavior and Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Rayen, Ine; van den Hove, Daniël L.; Prickaerts, Jos; Steinbusch, Harry W.; Pawluski, Jodi L.

    2011-01-01

    Depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period is a growing health problem, which affects up to 20% of women. Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) medications are commonly used for treatment of maternal depression. Unfortunately, there is very little research on the long-term effect of maternal depression and perinatal SSRI exposure on offspring development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of exposure to fluoxetine during development on affective-like behaviors and hippocampal neurogenesis in adolescent offspring in a rodent model of maternal depression. To do this, gestationally stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rat dams were treated with either fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle beginning on postnatal day 1 (P1). Adolescent male and female offspring were divided into 4 groups: 1) prenatal stress+fluoxetine exposure, 2) prenatal stress+vehicle, 3) fluoxetine exposure alone, and 4) vehicle alone. Adolescent offspring were assessed for anxiety-like behavior using the Open Field Test and depressive-like behavior using the Forced Swim Test. Brains were analyzed for endogenous markers of hippocampal neurogenesis via immunohistochemistry. Results demonstrate that maternal fluoxetine exposure reverses the reduction in immobility evident in prenatally stressed adolescent offspring. In addition, maternal fluoxetine exposure reverses the decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis in maternally stressed adolescent offspring. This research provides important evidence on the long-term effect of fluoxetine exposure during development in a model of maternal adversity. PMID:21912658

  5. New Framework To Diagnose the Direct Disposal of Prescribed Drugs in Wastewater - A Case Study of the Antidepressant Fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Bruce; Youdan, Jane; Barden, Ruth; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2016-04-05

    Intentional or accidental release (direct disposal) of high loads of unused pharmaceuticals into wastewater can go unnoticed. Here, direct disposal of a pharmaceutical drug via the sewer network was identified for the first time using wastewater analysis. An irregularly high load of the antidepressant fluoxetine in raw wastewater (10.5 ± 2.4 g d(-1)) was up to 11 times greater than any other day. National prescription data revealed a predicted daily fluoxetine load for the studied treatment works to be 0.4-1.6 g d(-1). Enantio-selective analysis showed the high load of fluoxetine was present as a racemic mixture, which is typical for fluoxetine in dispensed formulations. As fluoxetine undergoes stereoselective metabolism within the body, a racemic mixture in wastewater suggests a nonconsumed drug was the major contributor of the high load. This was confirmed by its major metabolite norfluoxetine whose load did not increase on this day. Considering the most commonly prescribed formulation of fluoxetine, this increased load accounts for the disposal of ∼915 capsules. Furthermore, as fluoxetine is prescribed as one capsule per day, disposal is unlikely to be at the patient level. It is postulated that direct disposal was from a facility which handles larger quantities of the drug (e.g., a pharmacy).

  6. Effects of PSA Removal from NCAM on the Critical Period Plasticity Triggered by the Antidepressant Fluoxetine in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Ramon; La Terra, Danilo; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Carceller, Hector; Umemori, Juzoh; Sipilä, Pia; Nacher, Juan; Castrén, Eero

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity peaks during critical periods of postnatal development and is reduced towards adulthood. Recent data suggests that windows of juvenile-like plasticity can be triggered in the adult brain by antidepressant drugs such as Fluoxetine. Although the exact mechanisms of how Fluoxetine promotes such plasticity remains unknown, several studies indicate that inhibitory circuits play an important role. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecules (PSA-NCAM) has been suggested to mediate the effects of Fluoxetine and it is expressed in the adult brain by mature interneurons. Moreover, the enzymatic removal of PSA by neuroaminidase-N not only affects the structure of interneurons but also has been shown to play a role in the onset of critical periods during development. We have here used ocular dominance plasticity in the mouse visual cortex as a model to investigate whether removal of PSA might influence the Fluoxetine-induced plasticity. We demonstrate that PSA removal in the adult visual cortex alters neither the baseline ocular dominance, nor the fluoxetine-induced shift in the ocular dominance. We also show that both chronic Fluoxetine treatment and PSA removal independently increase the basal FosB expression in parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in the primary visual cortex. Therefore, our data suggest that although PSA-NCAM regulates inhibitory circuitry, it is not required for the reactivation of juvenile-like plasticity triggered by Fluoxetine. PMID:26903807

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Male Rats Exhibit Abnormal Behavioral Activation in the Forced Swim Test Following Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment: Association with Altered 5-HT1A and Alpha2A Adrenergic Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n=34) or without (DEF, n=30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n=14) and DEF (n=12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (−26%, p=0.0001) and DEF+FLX (−32%, p=0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF+FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON+FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF+FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF+FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON+FLX rats. DEF+FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats. PMID:24360505

  8. [Acute acalculous cholecystitis. Results of surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    de la Garza Villaseñor, L

    1993-01-01

    During an 11 year period, 47 patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were operated on. Two to one male/female ratio was observed with a mean age of 55 age of 55 years. No one had a past history of biliary tract pathology but 70 per cent of the patients had risk factors, mainly diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular and collagenous diseases, some different of those reported in the world literature (sepsis, trauma, non biliary tract surgery, etc.). The ultrasound was the best diagnostic tool. Open cholecystectomy was performed in all patients and some sort of local complication was found in 85 per cent of patients (empyema, gangrene or perforation) in spite of the surgical procedure was done on emergency or early elective basis, a 31 per cent operative mortality rate was found and a 10.6% Operative mortality rates was observed. The bacterial cultures showed gram negative and anaerobic flora. This report shows that an early diagnosis and surgical treatment keeps a low morbidity and mortality rates but the gallbladder late complications have a high rates.

  9. Vortioxetine promotes early changes in dendritic morphology compared to fluoxetine in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenghua; du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Waller, Jessica A; Sanchez, Connie; Nyengaard, Jens R; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical studies reveal that the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine enhances long-term potentiation and dendritic branching compared to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). In the present study, we investigated vortioxetine׳s effects on spines and dendritic morphology in rat hippocampus at two time points compared to the SSRI, fluoxetine. Rats were dosed for 1 and 4 weeks with vortioxetine and fluoxetine at doses relevant for antidepressant activity. Dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons (i.e., dendritic length, dendritic branch, spine number and density, and Sholl analysis) was examined in Golgi-stained sections from hippocampal CA1. After 1 week of treatment, vortioxetine significantly increased spine number (apical and basal dendrites), spine density (only basal), dendritic length (only apical), and dendritic branch number (apical and basal), whereas fluoxetine had no effect. After 4 weeks of treatment, vortioxetine significantly increased all measures of dendritic spine morphology as did fluoxetine except for spine density of basal dendrites. The number of intersections in the apical and basal dendrites was also significantly increased for both treatments after 4 weeks compared to control. In addition, 4 weeks of vortioxetine treatment, but not fluoxetine, promoted a decrease in spine neck length. In conclusion, 1-week vortioxetine treatment induced changes in spine number and density and dendritic morphology, whereas an equivalent dose of fluoxetine had no effects. Decreased spine neck length following 4-week vortioxetine treatment suggests a transition to mature spine morphology. This implies that vortioxetine׳s effects on spine and dendritic morphology are mediated by mechanisms that go beyond serotonin reuptake inhibition.

  10. Serotonin and histamine mediate gastroprotective effect of fluoxetine against experimentally-induced ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Salem Sokar, Samia; Elsayed Elsayad, Mageda; Sabri Ali, Hend

    2016-09-01

    Research in the treatment of gastric ulcer has involved the investigation of new alternatives, such as anti-depressant drugs. The present study was designed to investigate the gastroprotective effects of fluoxetine against indomethacin and alcohol induced gastric ulcers in rats and the potential mechanisms of that effect. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) was administered IP for 14 days. For comparative purposes, other rats were treated with ranitidine (30 mg/kg). Thereafter, after 24 h of fasting, INDO (100 mg/kg) or absolute alcohol (5 ml/kg) was administered to all rats (saline was administered to naïve controls) and rats in each group were sacrificed 5 h (for INDO rats) or 1 h (for alcohol rats) later. Macroscopic examination revealed that both fluoxetine and ranitidine decreased ulcer scores in variable ratios, which was supported by microscopic histopathological examination. Biochemical analysis of fluoxetine- or ranitidine-pre-treated host tissues demonstrated reductions in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels and concomitant increases in gastric pH, nitric oxide (NO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents. Fluoxetine, more than ranitidine, also resulted in serotonin and histamine levels nearest to control values. Moreover, immuno-histochemical analysis showed that fluoxetine markedly enhanced expression of cyclo-oxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 in both models; in comparison, ranitidine did not affect COX-1 expression in either ulcer model but caused moderate increases in COX-2 expression in INDO-induced hosts and high expression in alcohol-induced hosts. The results here indicated fluoxetine exhibited better gastroprotective effects than ranitidine and this could be due to anti-secretory, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-histaminic effects of the drug, as well as a stabilization of gastric serotonin levels.

  11. Mice increased target biting behaviors 24 hours after co-administration of alcohol and fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Mamiya, Ping Chao; Matray-Devoti, Judith; Fisher, Hans; Wagner, George C

    2017-02-10

    Increased alcohol consumption has been linked to social isolation. Individuals showed heightened aggression following social isolation. Animals treated with alcohol following social separation showed higher aggression and lower serotonin transmission. Although reduced serotonin transmission in the brain may be related to alcohol induced heightened aggression, it remains unclear whether there are specific brain regions where changes in serotonin transmission are critical for animal aggression following alcohol treatment. In the present study, we isolated mice for 4 - 6 weeks and injected them with alcohol, fluoxetine and alcohol with fluoxetine. We studied their aggression by using two types of behavioral paradigms: isolation-induced attack behavior towards a naïve mouse in a neutral cage, or shock-induced target biting aggression. We observed that alcohol administered at 500 mg/kg significantly increased animal attack behaviors towards naïve mice 30 minutes after injections. This dose of alcohol co-administered with a low dose of fluoxetine (2 mg/kg) further increased the attack behaviors, but with higher doses of fluoxetine decreased the attack behaviors. Alcohol administered at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg significantly decreased the shock-induced target biting rates 24 hours after injections. Interestingly, we observed a significant increase in target biting rates when alcohol was co-administered with fluoxetine at a dose of 16 mg/kg 24 hours after injections. We also observed the same heightened target biting rates when animals were injected with fluoxetine alone. This heightened biting attack engendered by the fluoxetine (alone or in combination with the alcohol) occurred at a time when brain serotonin activity was reduced by these drugs in the frontal lobe and hypothalamus. These observations indicate that heightened biting attack behavior may be associated with reduced serotonergic activity in brain regions regulating aggression.

  12. An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Family Functioning on Treatment for Depression in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeny, Norah C.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; McNulty, Steven; Findling, Robert L.; Rohde, Paul; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Pathak, Sanjeev M.; May, Diane E.; Kennard, Betsy D.; Simons, Anne D.; Wells, Karen C.; Robins, Michele; Rosenberg, David; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores aspects of family environment and parent-child conflict that may predict or moderate response to acute treatments among depressed adolescents (N = 439) randomly assigned to fluoxetine, cognitive behavioral therapy, their combination, or placebo. Outcomes were Week 12 scores on measures of depression and global impairment. Of…

  13. An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Family Functioning on Treatment for Depression in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeny, Norah C.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; McNulty, Steven; Findling, Robert L.; Rohde, Paul; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Pathak, Sanjeev M.; May, Diane E.; Kennard, Betsy D.; Simons, Anne D.; Wells, Karen C.; Robins, Michele; Rosenberg, David; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores aspects of family environment and parent-child conflict that may predict or moderate response to acute treatments among depressed adolescents (N = 439) randomly assigned to fluoxetine, cognitive behavioral therapy, their combination, or placebo. Outcomes were Week 12 scores on measures of depression and global impairment. Of…

  14. Hopelessness as a predictor of non-response to fluoxetine in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, George I; Petersen, Timothy; Homberger, Caitlin H; Green, Cassandra H; Smith, Juliana; Alpert, Jonathan E; Fava, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study hopelessness as a predictor of response to fluoxetine in outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The degree of hopelessness was assessed during the baseline visit with the use of the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) in 312 patients with MDD (56.1% women; 39.8 +/- 10.3 years of age) who entered an 8-week, 20-mg, fixed-dose, open trial of fluoxetine. With the use of a logistic regression we tested whether BHS scores at baseline predicted clinical response, controlling for the severity of depression as reflected by the total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17). With the use of a multiple regression we also tested whether BHS scores at baseline predicted HAM-D-17 scores at endpoint, controlling for HAM-D-17 scores at baseline. After controlling for depression severity at baseline, a greater degree of hopelessness was found to significantly increase the risk of non-response to fluoxetine (p = 0.0413), as well as the risk of greater endpoint depression severity (p = 0.0305). Hopelessness appeared to be associated with poorer response to treatment with fluoxetine in MDD, and this was independent of depression severity. Similar studies involving treatment with higher doses of fluoxetine and for greater duration as well as a placebo comparator arm are needed to further explore the relationship between hopelessness, placebo response and drug response.

  15. Fluoxetine increases plasticity and modulates the proteomic profile in the adult mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Perera, L.; Muniz, M.; Vierci, G.; Bornia, N.; Baroncelli, L.; Sale, A.; Rossi, F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The scarce functional recovery of the adult CNS following injuries or diseases is largely due to its reduced potential for plasticity, the ability to reorganize neural connections as a function of experience. Recently, some new strategies restoring high levels of plasticity in the adult brain have been identified, especially in the paradigmatic model of the visual system. A chronic treatment with the anti-depressant fluoxetine reinstates plasticity in the adult rat primary visual cortex, inducing recovery of vision in amblyopic animals. The molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain largely unknown. Here, we explored fluoxetine effects on mouse visual cortical plasticity, and exploited a proteomic approach to identify possible candidates mediating the outcome of the antidepressant treatment on adult cortical plasticity. We showed that fluoxetine restores ocular dominance plasticity in the adult mouse visual cortex, and identified 31 differentially expressed protein spots in fluoxetine-treated animals vs. controls. MALDITOF/TOF mass spectrometry identification followed by bioinformatics analysis revealed that these proteins are involved in the control of cytoskeleton organization, endocytosis, molecular transport, intracellular signaling, redox cellular state, metabolism and protein degradation. Altogether, these results indicate a complex effect of fluoxetine on neuronal signaling mechanisms potentially involved in restoring plasticity in the adult brain. PMID:26205348

  16. Effects of psychological stress and fluoxetine on development of oral candidiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Núñez, María J; Novío, Silvia; Suárez, Juan Antonio; Balboa, José; Freire-Garabal, Manuel

    2010-04-01

    Psychological stress has been found to suppress cell-mediated immune responses that are important for limiting the proliferation of Candida albicans. Fluoxetine has been observed to reduce negative consequences of stress on the immune system in experimental and clinical models, but there are no data on its effects on oral candidiasis. We designed experiments to evaluate the effects of fluoxetine on the development of oral candidiasis in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to a chronic auditory stressor. Animals were submitted to surgical hyposalivation in order to facilitate the establishment and persistence of C. albicans infection. Stress application and treatment with drugs (placebo or fluoxetine) were initiated 7 days before C. albicans inoculation and lasted until the end of the experiments, on day 15 postinoculation. Establishment of C. albicans infection was evaluated on days 2 and 15 after inoculation. Tissue injury was determined by the quantification of the number and type (normal or abnormal) of papillae on the dorsal tongue per microscopic field. A semiquantitative scale was devised to assess the degree of colonization of the epithelium by fungal hyphae. Our results showed that stress exacerbates C. albicans infection in the tongues of rats. Significant increases in Candida counts, the percentage of the tongue's surface covered with clinical lesions, the percentage of abnormal papillae, and the colonization of the epithelium by hyphae were found in stressed rats compared to the nonstressed ones. Treatment with fluoxetine significantly reversed these adverse effects of stress. Besides the psychopharmacological properties of fluoxetine against stress, it has consequences for Candida infection.

  17. Effects of Sertraline and Fluoxetine on P-Glycoprotein at Barrier Sites: In Vivo and In Vitro Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amita; Iqbal, Majid; Petropoulos, Sophie; Ho, Hay Lam; Gibb, William; Matthews, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Retention of substances from systemic circulation in the brain and testes are limited due to high levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the luminal membranes of brain and testes capillary endothelial cells. From a clinical perspective, P-gp rapidly extrudes lipophilic therapeutic agents, which then fail to reach efficacious levels. Recent studies have demonstrated that acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) can affect P-gp function, in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known concerning the time-course of these effects or the effects of different SSRI in vivo. Experimental Approach The P-gp substrate, tritiated digoxin ([3H] digoxin), was co-administered with fluoxetine or sertraline to determine if either compound increased drug accumulation within the brains and testes of mice due to inhibition of P-gp activity. We undertook parallel studies in endothelial cells derived from brain microvessels to determine the dose-response and time-course of effects. Key Results In vitro, sertraline resulted in rapid and potent inhibition of P-gp function in brain endothelial cells, as determined by cellular calcein accumulation. In vivo, a biphasic effect was demonstrated. Brain accumulation of [3H] digoxin was increased 5 minutes after treatment with sertraline, but by 60 minutes after sertraline treatment, brain accumulation of digoxin was reduced compared to control. By 240 minutes after sertraline treatment brain digoxin accumulation was elevated compared to control. A similar pattern of results was obtained in the testes. There was no significant effect of fluoxetine on P-gp function, in vitro or in vivo. Conclusions and Implications Acute sertraline administration can modulate P-gp activity in the blood-brain barrier and blood-testes barrier. This clearly has implications for the ability of therapeutic agents that are P-gp substrates, to enter the brain when co-administered with SSRI. PMID:23468867

  18. Effects of sertraline and fluoxetine on p-glycoprotein at barrier sites: in vivo and in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amita; Iqbal, Majid; Petropoulos, Sophie; Ho, Hay Lam; Gibb, William; Matthews, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Retention of substances from systemic circulation in the brain and testes are limited due to high levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the luminal membranes of brain and testes capillary endothelial cells. From a clinical perspective, P-gp rapidly extrudes lipophilic therapeutic agents, which then fail to reach efficacious levels. Recent studies have demonstrated that acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) can affect P-gp function, in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known concerning the time-course of these effects or the effects of different SSRI in vivo. The P-gp substrate, tritiated digoxin ([(3)H] digoxin), was co-administered with fluoxetine or sertraline to determine if either compound increased drug accumulation within the brains and testes of mice due to inhibition of P-gp activity. We undertook parallel studies in endothelial cells derived from brain microvessels to determine the dose-response and time-course of effects. In vitro, sertraline resulted in rapid and potent inhibition of P-gp function in brain endothelial cells, as determined by cellular calcein accumulation. In vivo, a biphasic effect was demonstrated. Brain accumulation of [(3)H] digoxin was increased 5 minutes after treatment with sertraline, but by 60 minutes after sertraline treatment, brain accumulation of digoxin was reduced compared to control. By 240 minutes after sertraline treatment brain digoxin accumulation was elevated compared to control. A similar pattern of results was obtained in the testes. There was no significant effect of fluoxetine on P-gp function, in vitro or in vivo. Acute sertraline administration can modulate P-gp activity in the blood-brain barrier and blood-testes barrier. This clearly has implications for the ability of therapeutic agents that are P-gp substrates, to enter the brain when co-administered with SSRI.

  19. The administration of olanzapine and fluoxetine has synergistic effects on intracellular survival pathways in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Abelaira, Helena M; Agostinho, Fabiano R; Ribeiro, Karine F; Vitto, Marcelo F; Luciano, Thais F; Souza, Claúdio T de; Quevedo, João

    2012-08-01

    Recently, several studies have emerged suggesting a role of the intracellular survival pathways in the treatment of mood disorders. In addition, the beneficial effects of using a combination of antipsychotics and antidepressants have been shown. With this in mind, we evaluated the effects of the acute administration of fluoxetine (FLX), olanzapine (OLZ) and the combination of fluoxetine/olanzapine on the brain-derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), Protein Kinase B (PKB, Akt), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) in the rat brain. Adult Wistar rats received an acute injection of OLZ (3 or 6 mg/kg) and/or FLX (12.5 or 25 mg/kg), and were evaluated for Akt, BDNF, CREB, Bcl-2 and BAD protein levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Our results showed that treatment with FLX and OLZ alone or in combination increased the Akt, CREB, BDNF, Bcl-2 and BAD levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. However, the combination of FLX and OLZ at high doses was associated with a greater increase in the levels of Akt in the prefrontal cortex, and did not have an effect on the levels of BAD in any of the brain areas that we evaluated. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that treatment with FLX and OLZ alone or in combination exert neuroprotective effects, and that intracellular survival pathways could be involved in the therapeutic effects of combining antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs in mood disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Some aspects of the complex treatment of acute suppurative perionitis].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, M M; Roĭ, V P; Zaritskiĭ, I; Konovalenko, V V; Mellin, V M

    1976-10-01

    The authors present an analysis of the results of complex treatment in 4318 patients operated upon for acute peritonitis, caused by acute appendicitis, perforating gastric and duodenal ulcers, acute cholecystitis, ruptures and perforations of the intestine and other surgical and gynecological diseases. Patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis showed marked disorders in protein-aminoacid, nitrogen, and water electrolyte metabolism, acid-base balance, a reduced nonspecific immune responsiveness of the organism. Therpeutic tactics was delineated taking into account the revealed changes.

  1. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute unstable bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    Bradycardia is a slow heart rate that can lead to cardiac arrest or occur after initial resuscitation following cardiac arrest. This article provides information on acute unstable bradycardia and common arrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment of patients with acute bradycardia and how the presence or absence of adverse clinical features, in conjunction with an arrhythmia, dictates the necessity and choice of treatment.

  2. Fluoxetine Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in BALB/c Mice through Reducing Psychological Stress and Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanxi; Chen, Long; Du, Yehong; Huang, Daochao; Han, Huili; Dong, Zhifang

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder, and patients with AD suffer from severe psychological stress, which markedly increases the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety disorders in later life. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has recently been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. However, it is unclear whether fluoxetine is effective in the treatment of AD through reducing psychological stress and inflammatory reaction. Here, we reported that a BALB/c mouse model of AD was induced by application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) onto hairless dorsal skin. Chronic fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg per day, i.p.) significantly attenuated AD-like symptoms, as reflected by a dramatic decrease in scratching bouts, as well as a decrease in anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Furthermore, these behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in epidermal thickness, the number of mast cells in skin tissue, mRNA levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13 in the spleen, as well as serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the DNCB-treated mice by treatment with fluoxetine. Taken together, these results indicate that fluoxetine may suppress psychological stress and inflammatory response during AD development, and subsequently ameliorate AD symptoms, suggesting that fluoxetine may be a potential therapeutic agent against AD in clinic. PMID:27679577

  3. Effects of Fluoxetine and Visual Experience on Glutamatergic and GABAergic Synaptic Proteins in Adult Rat Visual Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Beshara, Simon; Beston, Brett R.; Pinto, Joshua G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fluoxetine has emerged as a novel treatment for persistent amblyopia because in adult animals it reinstates critical period-like ocular dominance plasticity and promotes recovery of visual acuity. Translation of these results from animal models to the clinic, however, has been challenging because of the lack of understanding of how this selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor affects glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic mechanisms that are essential for experience-dependent plasticity. An appealing hypothesis is that fluoxetine recreates a critical period (CP)-like state by shifting synaptic mechanisms to be more juvenile. To test this we studied the effect of fluoxetine treatment in adult rats, alone or in combination with visual deprivation [monocular deprivation (MD)], on a set of highly conserved presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins (synapsin, synaptophysin, VGLUT1, VGAT, PSD-95, gephyrin, GluN1, GluA2, GluN2B, GluN2A, GABAAα1, GABAAα3). We did not find evidence that fluoxetine shifted the protein amounts or balances to a CP-like state. Instead, it drove the balances in favor of the more mature subunits (GluN2A, GABAAα1). In addition, when fluoxetine was paired with MD it created a neuroprotective-like environment by normalizing the glutamatergic gain found in adult MDs. Together, our results suggest that fluoxetine treatment creates a novel synaptic environment dominated by GluN2A- and GABAAα1-dependent plasticity. PMID:26730408

  4. Effects of Fluoxetine and Visual Experience on Glutamatergic and GABAergic Synaptic Proteins in Adult Rat Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Beshara, Simon; Beston, Brett R; Pinto, Joshua G A; Murphy, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Fluoxetine has emerged as a novel treatment for persistent amblyopia because in adult animals it reinstates critical period-like ocular dominance plasticity and promotes recovery of visual acuity. Translation of these results from animal models to the clinic, however, has been challenging because of the lack of understanding of how this selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor affects glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic mechanisms that are essential for experience-dependent plasticity. An appealing hypothesis is that fluoxetine recreates a critical period (CP)-like state by shifting synaptic mechanisms to be more juvenile. To test this we studied the effect of fluoxetine treatment in adult rats, alone or in combination with visual deprivation [monocular deprivation (MD)], on a set of highly conserved presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins (synapsin, synaptophysin, VGLUT1, VGAT, PSD-95, gephyrin, GluN1, GluA2, GluN2B, GluN2A, GABAAα1, GABAAα3). We did not find evidence that fluoxetine shifted the protein amounts or balances to a CP-like state. Instead, it drove the balances in favor of the more mature subunits (GluN2A, GABAAα1). In addition, when fluoxetine was paired with MD it created a neuroprotective-like environment by normalizing the glutamatergic gain found in adult MDs. Together, our results suggest that fluoxetine treatment creates a novel synaptic environment dominated by GluN2A- and GABAAα1-dependent plasticity.

  5. Effect of fluoxetine on regional cerebral metabolism in autistic spectrum disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, M S; Hollander, E; Haznedar, M M; Tang, C; Spiegel-Cohen, J; Wei, T C; Solimando, A; Buchsbaum, B R; Robins, D; Bienstock, C; Cartwright, C; Mosovich, S

    2001-06-01

    The regional metabolic effects of fluoxetine were examined in patients with autism spectrum disorders. Six adult patients with DSM-IV and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) diagnoses of autism (n = 5) and Asperger's syndrome (n = 1), entered a 16-wk placebo-controlled cross-over trial of fluoxetine. The patients received (18)F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography with co-registered magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and at the end of the period of fluoxetine administration. After treatment, the patients showed significant improvement on the scores of the Yale--Brown Obsessive--Compulsive Scale -- Obsessions subscale and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale; Clinical Global Impressions -- Autism scores showed 3 of the patients much improved and 3 unchanged. Relative metabolic rates were significantly higher in the right frontal lobe following fluoxetine, especially in the anterior cingulate gyrus and the orbitofrontal cortex. Patients with higher metabolic rates in the medial frontal region and anterior cingulate when unmedicated were more likely to respond favourably to fluoxetine. These results are consistent with those in depression indicating that higher cingulate gyrus metabolic rates at baseline predict SRI response.

  6. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with a genetic predisposition to freezing reactions: the roles of types 1A and 2A serotonin receptors and the tph2 and SERT genes.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, M A; Alperina, E L; Tolstikova, T G; Bazovkina, D V; Di, V Y; Idova, G V; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2010-06-01

    ASC (Antidepressant-Sensitive Catalepsy) mice, bred for a high predisposition to catalepsy, are characterized by depression-like behavior and decreased immune responses. Chronic administration of fluoxetine, which is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant widely used in clinical practice, to mice of this strain weakened catalepsy and normalized the number of rosette-forming cells in the spleen. In mice of the parental cataleptic strain CBA/Lac, fluoxetine had no effect on the level of catalepsy or the immune response. Analysis of the effects of fluoxetine on the functional activity of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, and the expression of 5-HT(1A) receptor genes in the frontal cortex and midbrain and 5-HT(2A) receptors in the frontal cortex, as well as the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 and the serotonin transporter genes in the midbrain showed that the antidepressant had no effect on these parameters in ASC mice, but decreased the functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in CBA/Lac mice. The possibility that the actions of fluoxetine on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with depression-like states are mediated via other serotoninergic mechanisms is discussed.

  7. Acute aortic syndromes: definition, prognosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S W; Kodolitsch, Y V; Debus, E S; Wipper, S; Tsilimparis, N; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Diener, H; Kölbel, T

    2014-04-01

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) are life-threatening vascular conditions of the thoracic aorta presenting with acute pain as the leading symptom in most cases. The incidence is approximately 3-5/100,000 in western countries with increase during the past decades. Clinical suspicion for AAS requires immediate confirmation with advanced imaging modalities. Initial management of AAS addresses avoidance of progression by immediate medical therapy to reduce aortic shear stress. Proximal symptomatic lesions with involvement of the ascending aorta are surgically treated in the acute setting, whereas acute uncomplicated distal dissection should be treated by medical therapy in the acute period, followed by surveillance and repeated imaging studies. Acute complicated distal dissection requires urgent invasive treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair has become the treatment modality of choice because of favorable outcomes compared to open surgical repair. Intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcers, and traumatic aortic injuries of the descending aorta harbor specific challenges compared to aortic dissection and treatment strategies are not as uniformly defined as in aortic dissection. Moreover these lesions have a different prognosis. Once the acute period of aortic syndrome has been survived, a lifelong medical treatment and close surveillance with repeated imaging studies is essential to detect impending complications which might need invasive treatment within the short-, mid- or long-term.

  8. Fluoxetine-elicited changes in brain neurosteroid content measured by negative ion mass fragmentography.

    PubMed Central

    Uzunov, D P; Cooper, T B; Costa, E; Guidotti, A

    1996-01-01

    Fluoxetine administered intraperitoneally to sham-operated or adrenalectomized/castrated (ADX/CX) male rats dose-dependently (2.9-58 mumol/kg i.p.) increased the brain content of the neurosteroid 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone, 3 alpha, 5 alpha-TH PROG). The increase of brain 3 alpha, 5 alpha-TH PROG content elicited by 58 mumol/kg fluoxetine lasted more than 2 hr and the range of its extent was comparable in sham-operated (approximately 3-10 pmol/g) and ADX/CX rats (2-9 pmol/g) and was associated with a decrease (from 2.8 to 1.1 pmol/g) in the 5 alpha-pregnan-3,20-dione (5 alpha-dihydroprogesterone, 5 alpha-DH PROG) content. The pregnenolone, progesterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone content failed to change in rats receiving fluoxetine. The extent of 3 alpha, 5 alpha-TH PROG accumulation elicited by fluoxetine treatment differed in various brain regions, with the highest increase occurring in the olfactory bulb. Importantly, fluoxetine failed to change the 3 alpha, 5 alpha-TH PROG levels in plasma, which in ADX/CX rats were at least two orders of magnitude lower than in the brain. Two other serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, paroxetine and imipramine, in doses equipotent to those of fluoxetine in inhibiting brain serotonin uptake, were either significantly less potent than fluoxetine (paroxetine) or failed to increase (imipramine) 3 alpha, 5 alpha-TH PROG brain content. The addition of 10 microM of 5 alpha-DH PROG to brain slices of ADX/CX rats preincubated with fluoxetine (10 microM, 15 min) elicited an accumulation of 3 alpha, 5 alpha-TH PROG greater than in slices preincubated with vehicle. A fluoxetine stimulation of brain 3 alpha, 5 alpha-TH PROG biosynthesis might be operative in the anxiolytic and antidysphoric actions of this drug. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8901628

  9. Differential induction of FosB isoforms throughout the brain by fluoxetine and chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Vialou, Vincent; Thibault, Mackenzie; Kaska, Sophia; Cooper, Sarah; Gajewski, Paula; Eagle, Andrew; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Nestler, Eric J; Robison, A J

    2015-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is thought to arise in part from dysfunction of the brain's "reward circuitry", consisting of the mesolimbic dopamine system and the glutamatergic and neuromodulatory inputs onto this system. Both chronic stress and antidepressant treatment regulate gene transcription in many of the brain regions that make up these circuits, but the exact nature of the transcription factors and target genes involved in these processes remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate induction of the FosB family of transcription factors in ∼25 distinct regions of adult mouse brain, including many parts of the reward circuitry, by chronic exposure to the antidepressant fluoxetine. We further uncover specific patterns of FosB gene product expression (i.e., differential expression of full-length FosB, ΔFosB, and Δ2ΔFosB) in brain regions associated with depression--the nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus--in response to chronic fluoxetine treatment, and contrast these patterns with differential induction of FosB isoforms in the chronic social defeat stress model of depression with and without fluoxetine treatment. We find that chronic fluoxetine, in contrast to stress, causes induction of the unstable full-length FosB isoform in the NAc, PFC, and hippocampus even 24 h following the final injection, indicating that these brain regions may undergo chronic activation when fluoxetine is on board, even in the absence of stress. We also find that only the stable ΔFosB isoform correlates with behavioral responses to stress. These data suggest that NAc, PFC, and hippocampus may present useful targets for directed intervention in mood disorders (ie, brain stimulation or gene therapy), and that determining the gene targets of FosB-mediated transcription in these brain regions in response to fluoxetine may yield novel inroads for pharmaceutical intervention in depressive disorders.

  10. Differential induction of FosB isoforms throughout the brain by fluoxetine and chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Vialou, Vincent; Thibault, Mackenzie; Kaska, Sophia; Gajewski, Paula; Eagle, Andrew; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Nestler, Eric J.; Robison, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is thought to arise in part from dysfunction of the brain's “reward circuitry,” consisting of the mesolimbic dopamine system and the glutamatergic and neuromodulatory inputs onto this system. Both chronic stress and antidepressant treatment regulate gene transcription in many of the brain regions that make up these circuits, but the exact nature of the transcription factors and target genes involved in these processes remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate induction of the FosB family of transcription factors in ∼25 distinct regions of adult mouse brain, including many parts of the reward circuitry, by chronic exposure to the antidepressant fluoxetine. We further uncover specific patterns of FosB gene product expression (i.e., differential expression of full-length FosB, ΔFosB, and Δ2ΔFosB) in brain regions associated with depression – the nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus – in response to chronic fluoxetine treatment, and contrast these patterns with differential induction of FosB isoforms in the chronic social defeat stress model of depression with and without fluoxetine treatment. We find that chronic fluoxetine, in contrast to stress, causes induction of the unstable full-length FosB isoform in the NAc, PFC, and hippocampus even 24 hours following the final injection, indicating that these brain regions may undergo chronic activation when fluoxetine is on board, even in the absence of stress. We also find that only the stable ΔFosB isoform correlates with behavioral responses to stress. These data suggest that NAc, PFC, and hippocampus may present useful targets for directed intervention in mood disorders (ie, brain stimulation or gene therapy), and that determining the gene targets of FosB-mediated transcription in these brain regions in response to fluoxetine may yield novel inroads for pharmaceutical intervention in depressive disorders. PMID:26164345

  11. Antibiotic Treatment of Acute Bronchitis in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Jeffrey A; Sim, Ida

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Community physicians in the United States prescribe antibiotics to 80% to 90% of smokers with acute bronchitis. We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the efficacy of antibiotics for smokers with acute bronchitis. DESIGN A MEDLINE search was done using the keywords bronchitis, cough, and antibiotics to identify English language articles published from January 1966 to September 2001. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antibiotics in previously healthy smokers and nonsmokers with acute bronchitis were included. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS For each study, we abstracted information on design, size, inclusion criteria, patient characteristics, and outcomes. Of 2,029 articles in the original search, 109 relevant articles were retrieved and reviewed. There have been no studies specifically addressing antibiotic use in smokers with acute bronchitis. Nine randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antibiotics have included 774 patients and over 276 smokers. Lack of subgroup reporting for smokers precluded meta-analysis. In 7 trials, smoking status did not predict or alter patients' response to antibiotics. In one trial, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resulted in less-frequent cough overall, but not among smokers. In another trial, erythromycin reduced symptom scores only among nonsmokers while antibiotic-treated smokers had a trend toward higher symptom scores. CONCLUSION Although no trials have specifically addressed antibiotic use in smokers with acute bronchitis, existing data suggest that any benefit of antibiotics is the same or less for smokers than for nonsmokers. PMID:11929510

  12. [Fluoxetine: an update of its use in major depressive disorder in adults].

    PubMed

    Gourion, D; Perrin, E; Quintin, Ph

    2004-01-01

    which a SSRI exerts its anti-depressant activity remains uncertain. The therapeutic response in major depression for SSRIs (ie 15-20 days) maybe due to a progressive desensitization of somatodendritic 5-HT autoreceptors in the midbrain raphe nucleus. On the other hand, it has also been postulated that 5-HT is a modulator of several neurophysiological pathways, including dopamine, noradrenaline, but also neurotrophic factors, intra-cytoplasmic phosphorylations and nuclear genes expression. Therapeutic activity of SSRIs may finally results in a complex modulation and homeostasis between monoaminergic neurotransmisson and neuronal plasticity. In term of health-care, the introduction of fluoxetine and other SSRIs in the 1980s has radically changed the treatment of depressive disorder worldwide and they have emerged as the first line of treatment for depressive disorders. The efficacy of fluoxetine is now well established in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Indeed, this efficacy has been assessed in numerous clinical controlled trials involving patients with major depressive disorders. Meta-analysis were carried out and confirmed that fluoxetine was as effective as the tricyclic antidepressants, and appeared more effective than placebo in improving the symptoms of depression. However, there is no scientific evidence to suggest that any one SSRI is more effective than another, but not all patients respond to the same agent. Looking to the future, we need further comparative studies of the SSRIs with the next generation of antidepressants such as 5-HT noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs, Venlafaxine). Actually, it is interesting to note that, whereas the emphasis with the SSRIs has been on their selectivity, recent developments have tended to move towards less selective agents, and now to other neurobiological pathways (ie neurotrophic factors). Finally, fluoxetine, in common with other SSRIs, remains today a first-line treatment option for major depressive

  13. Malnutrition during brain growth spurt alters the effect of fluoxetine on aggressive behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Medeiros, J M; Feitoza, E G; Magalhaes, K; Cabral-Filho, J E; Manhaes-De-Castro, F M; De-Castro, C M; Manhaes-De-Castro, R

    2004-02-01

    Malnutrition effect during the suckling period on aggressive behavior was investigated in adult rats treated and not treated with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Sixty-four Wistar male rats were allocated in two groups, according to their mothers' diet during lactation. The well-nourished group was fed by mothers receiving a 23% protein diet; the malnourished one by mothers receiving a 8% protein diet. Following weaning, all rats received the 23% protein diet. On the 90th day after birth, each nutritional group was divided into two subgroups, one receiving a single daily injection of fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) and the other of a saline solution (0.9% NaCl) for 14 days. Treatment with Fluoxetine reduced aggressive response in well-nourished but not in malnourished rats. These findings suggest that the serotoninergic system was affected by malnutrition during the critical period of brain development, and persisted even after a long period of nutritional recovery.

  14. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of fluoxetine hydrochloride (Prozac), with or without vitamins A and C, in plant and animal model systems.

    PubMed

    Düsman, E; Almeida, I V; Mariucci, R G; Mantovani, M S; Vicentini, V E P

    2014-01-28

    Fluoxetine, commonly known as Prozac, is the first representative of the so-called new generation of antidepressants that promise efficacy, with few side effects, against deep depression, nervous bulimia, and anxiety. As there is a growing number of people suffering from anxiety and depression; consequently, the use of fluoxetine is also increasing. Verifying absence of drug effects such as cytotoxicity or mutagenicity is of great importance. Certain vitamins, such as vitamin A (retinol, retinoids) and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) protect and are extremely active against mutagens. We evaluated the cytotoxic and mutagenic activity of fluoxetine, with and without concomitant administration of vitamin A or C, in Allium cepa meristem cells and Wistar rat bone marrow cells. The A. cepa meristem cells showed fluoxetine cytotoxicity; concomitant treatment with vitamin A or C proved non-protective. Treatment of Wistar rats with fluoxetine intraperitoneally or via gavage did not affect cell division or cause clastogenic effects. Vitamin A and C did not affect the cytotoxicity or mutagenicity of fluoxetine in the rat cells.

  15. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals the effects of fluoxetine on lipid and amino acid metabolism in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shunjie; Zhou, Chanjuan; Cheng, Pengfei; Fu, Yuying; Fang, Liang; Huang, Wen; Yu, Jia; Shao, Weihua; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Meiling; Zhou, Jingjing; Xie, Peng

    2015-04-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a prescribed and effective antidepressant and generally used for the treatment of depression. Previous studies have revealed that the antidepressant mechanism of fluoxetine was related to astrocytes. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its mode of action in astrocytes remains largely unclear. In this study, primary astrocytes were exposed to 10 µM fluoxetine; 24 h post-treatment, a high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabolomic approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metabolic variations of intracellular metabolites. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) score plots of the spectra demonstrated that the fluoxetine-treated astrocytes were significantly distinguished from the untreated controls. In total, 17 differential metabolites were identified to discriminate the two groups. These key metabolites were mainly involved in lipids, lipid metabolism-related molecules and amino acids. This is the first study to indicate that fluoxetine may exert antidepressant action by regulating the astrocyte's lipid and amino acid metabolism. These findings should aid our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying fluoxetine therapy.

  16. Comparison of two main treatment modalities for acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Serkan; Durusu, Murat; Aliyev, Bahtiyar; Akpancar, Serkan; Ersen, Omer; Yasar, S Mehmet; Ardic, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    Acute ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in emergency departments. Immobilization is widely accepted as the basic treatment modality for acute ankle sprains; however, immobilization method remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to compare two treatment modalities: splint and elastic bandage for the management of acute ankle sprains. This prospective study was conducted in the emergency department. Fifty-one consecutive patients who were admitted to the emergency department owing to the complaint of ankle sprain and who were treated with an elastic bandage or a splint were included in the study. After bone injury was ruled out, treatment choice was left to the on-shift physicians' discretion. The extent of edema was evaluated before and after the treatment by using a small, graduated container filled with warm water. Volume differences were calculated by immersing both lower extremities in a container filled to a constant level. Pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. There were 25 patients in the elastic bandage group and 26 patients in the splint group. VAS scores of these groups before and after the treatment were similar. Although edema size before and after the treatment were similar between the groups, edema size reduction was significantly more in the elastic bandage group [p=0,025]. This study showed that treatment of acute ankle sprains with an elastic bandage was more effective than splint in reducing edema. Therefore, an elastic bandage could be preferred over a splint for the treatment of acute ankle sprains.

  17. Effects of Fluoxetine on Neural Functional Prognosis after Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Study in China.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Tao; Tang, Bing-Shan; Cai, Zhi-Li; Zeng, Si-Ling; Jiang, Xin; Guo, Yi

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the effects of fluoxetine on the short-term and long-term neural functional prognoses after ischemic stroke. In this prospective randomized controlled single-blind clinical study in China, eligible patients afflicted with ischemic stroke were randomized into control and treatment groups. Patients in the treatment group received fluoxetine in addition to the basic therapies in the control group over a period of 90 days. The follow-up period was 180 days. We evaluated the effects of fluoxetine on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and Barthel Index (BI) score after ischemic stroke through single- and multiple-factor analysis. The mean NIHSS score on day 180 after treatment was significantly lower in the treatment group than in the control group (P = .009). The mean BI scores on days 90 and 180 were significantly higher in the treatment group (P = .026) than in the control group (P = .011). The improvements in the NIHSS and BI scores on days 90 and 180 compared with baseline in the treatment group were all significantly greater than that in the control group (P = .033, P = .013, P = .013, P = .019, respectively). Treatment with fluoxetine was an independent factor affecting the NIHSS and BI scores on day 180 after treatment. Treatment with fluoxetine for 90 days after ischemic stroke can improve the long-term neural functional outcomes. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluoxetine up-regulates expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis in hippocampus-derived neural stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, S.-H. . E-mail: shchiou@vghtpe.gov.tw; Chen, S.-J. . E-mail: sjchen@vghtpe.gov.tw; Peng, C-H.; Chang, Y.-L.; Ku, H.-H.; Hsu, W.-M.; Ho, Larry L.-T.; Lee, C.-H.

    2006-05-05

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant compound which inhibits the reuptake of serotonin in the central nervous system. Recent studies have shown that fluoxetine can promote neurogenesis and improve the survival rate of neurons. However, whether fluoxetine modulates the proliferation or neuroprotection effects of neural stem cells (NSCs) needs to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that 20 {mu}M fluoxetine can increase the cell proliferation of NSCs derived from the hippocampus of adult rats by MTT test. The up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in fluoxetine-treated NSCs was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Our results further showed that fluoxetine protects the lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in NSCs, in part, by activating the expression of c-FLIP. Moreover, c-FLIP induction by fluoxetine requires the activation of the c-FLIP promoter region spanning nucleotides -414 to -133, including CREB and SP1 sites. This effect appeared to involve the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent pathway. Furthermore, fluoxetine treatment significantly inhibited the induction of proinflammatory factor IL-1{beta}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha} in the culture medium of LPS-treated NSCs (p < 0.01). The results of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection further confirmed that fluoxentine increased the functional production of serotonin in NSCs. Together, these data demonstrate the specific activation of c-FLIP by fluoxetine and indicate the novel role of fluoxetine for neuroprotection in the treatment of depression.

  19. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Experimental Approach Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Key Results Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Conclusions and Implications Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. PMID:25161074

  20. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase.

    PubMed

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-12-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Long-Term Fluoxetine Versus Lithium Monotherapy of Bipolar II Disorder: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Substitution Study

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Jay D.; Shults, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Objective The authors examined the safety and efficacy of long-term fluoxetine monotherapy, lithium monotherapy, and placebo therapy in preventing relapse and recurrence of bipolar type II major depressive episode. The authors hypothesized that fluoxetine monotherapy would be superior to lithium monotherapy with a similar hypomanic mood conversion rate. Method Patients at least 18 years old who recovered from their major depressive episode during initial open-label fluoxetine monotherapy were randomly assigned to receive 50 weeks of double-blind monotherapy with fluoxetine at 10–40 mg/day, lithium at 300–1200 mg/day, or placebo. The primary outcome measure was time to relapse or recurrence. Secondary outcome measures included the proportion of patients remaining well and the frequency of hypomanic symptoms. Results There were no significant differences in clinical or demographic characteristics among the fluoxetine (N=28), lithium (N=26), and placebo (N=27) groups. The mean time to relapse was 249.9 days for the fluoxetine group, 156.4 days for the lithium group, and 186.9 days for the placebo group. The hazard of relapse was significantly lower with fluoxetine compared with lithium, and the estimated hazard of relapse with lithium was 2.5 times greater than with fluoxetine. There were no statistically significant or clinically meaningful differences in hypomanic symptoms among treatment groups over time. One patient taking fluoxetine and one patient taking placebo discontinued treatment because of hypomania. Conclusion These findings suggest that long-term fluoxetine monotherapy may provide superior relapse-prevention benefit relative to lithium monotherapy after recovery from bipolar II major depressive episode without an increase in hypomanic mood conversion episodes. PMID:20360317

  2. Antagonistic interactions between dexamethasone and fluoxetine modulate morphodynamics and expression of cytokines in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Henkel, A W; Alali, H; Devassy, A; Alawadi, M M; Redzic, Z B

    2014-11-07

    The "plasticity hypothesis" proposes that major depression is caused by morphological and biochemical modifications in neurons and astrocytes and those beneficial pharmacological effects of selective-serotonin-reuptake-inhibitors (SSRI) are at least partially associated with modifications of cellular communications between these cells. In this study we examined effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine on cultured astrocytes that were, in some cases, pretreated with dexamethasone, a cortisol analog known to trigger depressive disorder. Primary rat astrocytes were purified and treated with dexamethasone and the SSRI fluoxetine in physiological concentrations so that both drugs did not affect cell viability. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and glia-derived-neurotrophic-factor (GDNF) were analyzed and monitored and cell viability, apoptosis, cluster formation, particle-removing capacity and cell mobility were also monitored. Pre-studies without any drugs on mixed neuron-astrocyte co-cultures suggested that astrocytes interacted with neurons and other brain cells in vitro by actively assembling them into clusters. Treatment of purified astrocytes with dexamethasone significantly decreased their mobility compared to controls but had no effect on cluster formation. Dexamethasone-treated cells removed fewer extracellular particles derived from dead cells and cell debris. Both effects were abolished by simultaneous application of fluoxetine. Intracellular IL-2 increased, while GDNF amount expression was diminished following dexamethasone treatment. Simultaneous administration of fluoxetine reversed dexamethasone-triggered IL-2 elevation but had no effect on decreased GDNF concentration. These results suggest that mobility and growth factor equilibrium of astrocytes are affected by dexamethasone and by fluoxetine and that fluoxetine could reverse some changes induced by dexamethasone.

  3. Prophylactic efficacy of fluoxetine, escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, and concomitant psychotherapy in major depressive disorder: outcome after long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Peselow, Eric D; Tobia, Gabriel; Karamians, Reneh; Pizano, Demetria; IsHak, Waguih William

    2015-02-28

    The acute efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) is well established; however their role in longer-term prevention of recurrence remains unconfirmed. This study aims at examining: the prophylactic efficacy of four commonly used SSRIs in MDD in a naturalistic setting with long-term follow-up, the effect of concomitant cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and the predictors of outcome. In a prospective cohort study, 387 patients who either remitted or responded following treatment with four different SSRIs-fluoxetine, escitalopram, sertraline and paroxetine-were followed up over several years. During an average follow-up period of 34.5 months, 76.5% of patients experienced MDD recurrence. Escitalopram and fluoxetine showed a numerically higher prophylactic efficacy than paroxetine and sertraline but the difference was statistically insignificant. The prophylactic efficacy for SSRI-only treatment was limited, with a recurrence rate of 82.0%, compared to 59.0% of patient recurrence rate in concomitant Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The relatively small size of the CBT group and the lack of randomization may undermine the extrapolation of its findings to clinical practice. Nevertheless, the study preliminary data may help in defining the clinical utility of antidepressants and CBT in the prophylaxis from MDD recurrence.

  4. Unifying acute stroke treatment guidelines for a Bayesian belief network.

    PubMed

    Love, Alexa; Arnold, Corey W; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S; Andrada, Lewellyn; Saver, Jeffrey; Bui, Alex A T

    2013-01-01

    With the large number of clinical practice guidelines available, there is an increasing need for a comprehensive unified model for acute ischemic stroke treatment to assist in clinical decision making. We present a unified treatment model derived through review of existing clinical practice guidelines, meta-analyses, and clinical trials. Using logic from the treatment model, a Bayesian belief network was defined and fitted to data from our institution's observational quality improvement database for acute stroke patients. The resulting network validates known relationships between variables, treatment decisions and outcomes, and enables the exploration of new correlative relationships not defined in current guidelines.

  5. Treatment for acute asthma in the Emergency Department: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Urso, D L

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the management of acute asthma exacerbation in the Emergency Department (ED). An asthma exacerbation can be defined as clinical worsening of disease or an asymptomatic decrease in peak flows. Acute exacerbations of asthma may represent reactions to airway irritants or failures of chronic treatment. Hospitalizations and ED visits account for a large proportion of the health-care cost burden of asthma. The assessment of an asthma exacerbation constitutes a process with two different dimensions: to determine the severity of attack, and to evaluate the response to treatment. The principal goals of managing an asthma acute exacerbation may be summarized as maintenance of adequate arterial oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airflow obstruction with repetitive administration of short acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids (CS) to prevent future relapses. SABA, oxygen, and CS form the basis of management of acute asthma exacerbation but a role is emerging for anthicolinergics.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Albert, Ross H

    2010-12-01

    Cough is the most common symptom bringing patients to the primary care physician's office, and acute bronchitis is usually the diagnosis in these patients. Acute bronchitis should be differentiated from other common diagnoses, such as pneumonia and asthma, because these conditions may need specific therapies not indicated for bronchitis. Symptoms of bronchitis typically last about three weeks. The presence or absence of colored (e.g., green) sputum does not reliably differentiate between bacterial and viral lower respiratory tract infections. Viruses are responsible for more than 90 percent of acute bronchitis infections. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for bronchitis, and should be used only if pertussis is suspected to reduce transmission or if the patient is at increased risk of developing pneumonia (e.g., patients 65 years or older). The typical therapies for managing acute bronchitis symptoms have been shown to be ineffective, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends against using cough and cold preparations in children younger than six years. The supplement pelargonium may help reduce symptom severity in adults. As patient expectations for antibiotics and therapies for symptom management differ from evidence-based recommendations, effective communication strategies are necessary to provide the safest therapies available while maintaining patient satisfaction.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n = 34) or without (DEF, n = 30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n = 14) and DEF (n = 12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-26%, p = 0.0001) and DEF + FLX (-32%, p = 0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF + FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON + FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF + FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF + FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON + FLX rats. DEF + FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats.

  8. The antidepressant drugs fluoxetine and duloxetine produce anxiolytic-like effects in a schedule-induced polydipsia paradigm in rats: enhancement of fluoxetine's effects by the α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Prus, Adam J; Mooney-Leber, Sean M; Berquist, Michael D; Pehrson, Alan L; Porter, Nicholas P; Porter, Joseph H

    2015-08-01

    Similar to the time-course for treating depression, several weeks of administration are required for serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors to produce anxiolytic effects. Previous studies with the schedule-induced polydipsia paradigm (a putative preclinical anxiety model) have shown that repeated administration of antidepressant drugs is necessary to produce a suppression of polydipsia, which is interpreted as an anxiolytic-like effect. The present study sought to expand past findings by evaluating the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine and the 5-HT-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine in the schedule-induced polydipsia paradigm with rats. Dose combinations of the α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine with fluoxetine were also explored to determine whether α2 adrenoceptor antagonism could enhance the anxiolytic-like effects produced by an SSRI. Fluoxetine and duloxetine significantly reduced water intake over the course of daily administrations. Daily treatment with the combination of fluoxetine and yohimbine produced a significantly greater reduction in water intake than fluoxetine alone. The present results confirmed previous findings that inhibition of 5-HT reuptake reduces water consumption in this paradigm. The results for the α2 antagonist yohimbine (in combination with fluoxetine) also indicate that α2 adrenoceptor antagonism may significantly enhance anxiolytic-like effects of SSRIs.

  9. Disruption of social approach by MK-801, amphetamine, and fluoxetine in adolescent C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Sheryl S.; Nonneman, Randal J.; Shafer, Geoffrey O.; Nikolova, Viktoriya D.; Riddick, Natallia V.; Agster, Kara L.; Baker, Lorinda K.; Knapp, Darin J.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder, diagnosed on the basis of core behavioral symptoms. Although the mechanistic basis for the disorder is not yet known, genetic analyses have suggested a role for abnormal excitatory/inhibitory signaling systems in brain, including dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In mice, the constitutive knockdown of NMDA receptors leads to social deficits, repetitive behavior, and self-injurious responses that reflect aspects of the autism clinical profile. However, social phenotypes differ with age: mice with reduced NMDA-receptor function exhibit hypersociability in adolescence, but markedly deficient sociability in adulthood. The present studies determined whether acute disruption of NMDA neurotransmission leads to exaggerated social approach, similar to that observed with constitutive disruption, in adolescent C57BL/6J mice. The effects of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, were compared with amphetamine, a dopamine agonist, and fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on performance in a three-chamber choice task. Results showed that acute treatment with MK-801 led to social approach deficits at doses without effects on entry numbers. Amphetamine also decreased social preference, but increased number of entries at every dose. Fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) had selective effects on social novelty preference. Withdrawal from a chronic ethanol regimen decreased activity, but did not attenuate sociability. Low doses of MK-801 and amphetamine were also evaluated in a marble-burying assay for repetitive behavior. MK-801, at a dose that did not disrupt sociability or alter entries, led to a profound reduction in marble-burying. Overall, these findings demonstrate that moderate alteration of NMDA, dopamine, or serotonin function can attenuate social preference in wild type mice. PMID:22898204

  10. Fluoxetine Prevents Aβ1-42-Induced Toxicity via a Paracrine Signaling Mediated by Transforming-Growth-Factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Tascedda, Fabio; Merlo, Sara; Benatti, Cristina; Spampinato, Simona F; Munafò, Antonio; Leggio, Gian Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Brunello, Nicoletta; Drago, Filippo; Sortino, Maria Angela; Copani, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine and sertraline, increase circulating Transforming-Growth-Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels in depressed patients, and are currently studied for their neuroprotective properties in Alzheimer's disease. TGF-β1 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that exerts neuroprotective effects against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration. In the present work, the SSRI, fluoxetine, was tested for the ability to protect cortical neurons against 1 μM oligomeric Aβ1-42-induced toxicity. At therapeutic concentrations (100 nM-1 μM), fluoxetine significantly prevented Aβ-induced toxicity in mixed glia-neuronal cultures, but not in pure neuronal cultures. Though to a lesser extent, also sertraline was neuroprotective in mixed cultures, whereas serotonin (10 nM-10 μM) did not mimick fluoxetine effects. Glia-conditioned medium collected from astrocytes challenged with fluoxetine protected pure cortical neurons against Aβ toxicity. The effect was lost in the presence of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-β1 in the conditioned medium, or when the specific inhibitor of type-1 TGF-β1 receptor, SB431542, was added to pure neuronal cultures. Accordingly, a 24 h treatment of cortical astrocytes with fluoxetine promoted the release of active TGF-β1 in the culture media through the conversion of latent TGF-β1 to mature TGF-β1. Unlike fluoxetine, both serotonin and sertraline did not stimulate the astrocyte release of active TGF-β1. We conclude that fluoxetine is neuroprotective against Aβ toxicity via a paracrine signaling mediated by TGF-β1, which does not result from a simplistic SERT blockade.

  11. Fluoxetine Prevents Aβ1-42-Induced Toxicity via a Paracrine Signaling Mediated by Transforming-Growth-Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Caraci, Filippo; Tascedda, Fabio; Merlo, Sara; Benatti, Cristina; Spampinato, Simona F.; Munafò, Antonio; Leggio, Gian Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Brunello, Nicoletta; Drago, Filippo; Sortino, Maria Angela; Copani, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine and sertraline, increase circulating Transforming-Growth-Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels in depressed patients, and are currently studied for their neuroprotective properties in Alzheimer’s disease. TGF-β1 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that exerts neuroprotective effects against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration. In the present work, the SSRI, fluoxetine, was tested for the ability to protect cortical neurons against 1 μM oligomeric Aβ1-42-induced toxicity. At therapeutic concentrations (100 nM–1 μM), fluoxetine significantly prevented Aβ-induced toxicity in mixed glia-neuronal cultures, but not in pure neuronal cultures. Though to a lesser extent, also sertraline was neuroprotective in mixed cultures, whereas serotonin (10 nM–10 μM) did not mimick fluoxetine effects. Glia-conditioned medium collected from astrocytes challenged with fluoxetine protected pure cortical neurons against Aβ toxicity. The effect was lost in the presence of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-β1 in the conditioned medium, or when the specific inhibitor of type-1 TGF-β1 receptor, SB431542, was added to pure neuronal cultures. Accordingly, a 24 h treatment of cortical astrocytes with fluoxetine promoted the release of active TGF-β1 in the culture media through the conversion of latent TGF-β1 to mature TGF-β1. Unlike fluoxetine, both serotonin and sertraline did not stimulate the astrocyte release of active TGF-β1. We conclude that fluoxetine is neuroprotective against Aβ toxicity via a paracrine signaling mediated by TGF-β1, which does not result from a simplistic SERT blockade. PMID:27826242

  12. Suicidality in a Placebo-Controlled Fluoxetine Study of Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Kelly, Megan M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives SRIs are considered the first-line medication for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). The relationship between SRI treatment and suicidality in BDD has been only minimally studied, despite high suicidality rates in BDD. Methods Sixty-seven adults with DSM-IV BDD participated in a 12-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study of fluoxetine. Suicidality was assessed with the HAM-D suicidal ideation item. Analyses examined group differences in worsening and emergence of suicidality, using standard definitions. Results Among the entire sample, when comparing study baseline to end of week 2 and study endpoint, no subject on fluoxetine had suicidality worsening; a higher proportion of placebo-treated subjects had suicidality worsening after two weeks of treatment (p = .014) and at study endpoint (p = .010). Among subjects age 18–24, one subject on placebo had suicidality worsening at the end of week 2, and none in either treatment group had suicidality worsening at study endpoint. Regarding emergence of suicidality at any point during the study, the treatment groups did not significantly differ. No suicide attempts or completed suicides occurred. Conclusions Fluoxetine and placebo did not significantly differ with regard to emergence of suicidality. Among the entire sample, fluoxetine appeared to exert a protective effect against suicidality worsening. PMID:19060721

  13. Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment Upregulates the Activity of the ERK1/2-NF-κB Signaling Pathway in the Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex of Rats Exposed to Forced-Swimming Stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jingqiu; Yang, Kun; Yu, Xue; Wang, Jing-Lan; Li, Jie; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hengfen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether or not the antidepressant actions of fluoxetine (FLX) are correlated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats. A total of 108 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 18 rats each. Group 1 was the control group, while group 2 comprised the depressed model in which rats were subjected to 28 days of forced-swimming stress (FST); groups 3-6 were also subjected to 28 days of FST and treated with FLX once a day for 1 day (group 3; F1d), 1 week (group 4; F1w), 2 weeks (group 5; F2w), or 4 weeks (group 6; F4w). The control group was not subjected to FST or treated with FLX. Behavior tests that included the Morris water maze (MWM) and saccharin preference were performed, and ERK1/2 and NF-κB proteins were assayed using Western blot. The rats in the control group and in groups 5 and 6 (F2w and F4w, respectively) had a significantly shorter average escape latency, needed more attempts in order to successfully cross the platform, and had a greater saccharin preference than those in the depressed group (p < 0.05). In the depressed group, the phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) and phosphorylated NF-κB (p-NF-κB) expression in the HC and PFC were lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). Treatment with FLX reversed the changes in the expression of p-ERK1/2 and p-NF-κB in rats in the F2w and F4w groups. In this study, FLX treatment for 2 weeks or longer reversed the impaired spatial learning, memory, and anhedonia observed in the depressed model rats and upregulated the activities of the ERK1/2-NF-κB signaling pathway. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N.; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effective when the PaO2/FiO2 improved by > 20%.
RESULTS—After initial surfactant administration the PaO2/FiO2 increased significantly in patients with systemic or pulmonary disease from 68 to 111, and the oxygenation index (OI) diminished significantly from 36.9 to 27.1. The PaO2/FiO2 and OI did not improve in children with cardiac disease. The improvement of the patients who survived was greater than that of those who died.
CONCLUSIONS—Surfactant moderately improves oxygenation in some children with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pulmonary or systemic disease.

 PMID:10325705

  15. Effects of pharmaceuticals on aquatic invertebrates. Part II: the antidepressant drug fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Nentwig, Gerrit

    2007-02-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant and high-prescription-volume drug, is excreted unchanged or as a glucuronide from the human organism. Little is known about its fate in sewage treatment plants. Effects of fluoxetine on life-cycle parameters of the midge Chironomus riparius, especially development (mean emergence time), emergence, sex ratio, and fecundity, were assessed, as well as effects on reproduction of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and of the freshwater mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum. Due to the moderate lipophilic properties of the compound with a log P (OW) of 4.05, C. riparius and L. variegatus were exposed to fluoxetine via spiked artificial sediment at a nominal concentration range between 0.15 and 5.86 mg/kg (dry weight). Additionally, a test was performed exposing P. antipodarum via water in a nominal concentration range between 0.64 and 400 mug/L. As endpoints, emergence rate and timing, sex ratio, clutch numbers and clutch size of the midges, the number of worms in the oligochaete test, as well as the number of embryos in the snail test were monitored. For C. riparius, no clear substance-related effects were observed; for L. variegatus, the results indicated a slight increase in reproduction, which was statistically significant at nominal fluoxetine concentrations of 0.94 and 2.34 mg/kg. In P. antipodarum, the antidepressant reduced reproduction significantly. No observed effect concentration (NOEC) and 10% effect concentration (EC(10)) were determined to be 0.47 and 0.81 mug/L, respectively, based on measured fluoxetine concentrations in water. These low values indicate that P. antipodarum and possibly other aquatic mollusks are sensitive to fluoxetine and that the drug might pose a risk to gastropod populations in the field.

  16. Systematic Review of Preventive and Acute Treatment of Menstrual Migraine.

    PubMed

    Nierenburg, Hida Del C; Ailani, Jessica; Malloy, Michele; Siavoshi, Sara; Hu, Nancy N; Yusuf, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to identify the efficacy of different categories of treatments for menstrual migraines as found in randomized controlled trials or open label studies with similar efficacy endpoints. Menstrual migraine is very common and approximately 50% of women have increased risk of developing migraines related to the menstrual cycle. Attacks of menstrual migraine are usually more debilitating, of longer duration, more prone to recurrence, and less responsive to acute treatment than nonmenstrual migraine attacks. Search for evidence was done in 4 databases that included PubMed, EMBASE, Science Direct, and Web of Science. Eighty-four articles were selected for full text review by 2 separate readers. Thirty-six of the 84 articles were selected for final inclusion. Articles included randomized controlled and open label trials that focused on efficacy of acute and preventative therapies for menstrual migraine. Secondary analyses where excluded because the initial study population was not women with menstrual migraine. After final screening, 11 articles were selected for acute and 25 for preventive treatment of menstrual migraine. These were further subdivided into treatment categories. For acute treatment: triptans, combination therapy, prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, and ergot alkaloids. For preventive treatment: triptans, combined therapy, oral contraceptives, estrogen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, phytoestrogen, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, dopamine agonist, vitamin, mineral, and nonpharmacological therapy were selected. Overall, triptans had strong evidence for treatment in both acute and short term prevention of menstrual migraine. Based on this literature search, of all categories of treatment for menstrual migraine, triptans have the most extensive research with strong evidence for both acute and preventive treatment of menstrual migraine. Further randomized controlled trials should be performed for other therapies

  17. Measurements of treatment response in childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Coustan-Smith, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Measuring response to chemotherapy is a backbone of the clinical management of patients with acute leukemia. This task has historically relied on the ability to identify leukemic cells among normal bone marrow cells by their morphology. However, more accurate ways to identify leukemic cells have been developed, which allow their detection even when they are present in small numbers that would be impossible to be recognized by microscopic inspection. The levels of such minimal residual disease (MRD) are now widely used as parameters for risk assignment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increasingly so in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, different MRD monitoring methods may produce discrepant results. Moreover, results of morphologic examination may be in stark contradiction to MRD measurements, thus creating confusion and complicating treatment decisions. This review focusses on the relation between results of different approaches to measure response to treatment and define relapse in childhood acute leukemia. PMID:23320002

  18. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  19. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  20. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  1. [The fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase of acute arterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Ballester, A; Donato di Paola, M; Saccà, A; Cappello, I; D'Addato, M

    1993-01-01

    We present our experiences on 86 patients with acute arterial thrombosis of the legs, undergoing a fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase. Results from the treatment are analyzed according to: the administration way (systemic, locoregional, intrathrombotic), the level of thrombosis (upper or lower legs), the associated morbidity and mortality.

  2. Painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kanemitu, Toshiyuki; Kamoto, Akihito; Satoh, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Kenichiro; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Itatani, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma. We report the case of a patient with painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. The patient was a 71-year-old man who had undergone surgery for left renal carcinoma and tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and right atrium (IVC-RA). After a follow-up period of 3 years, he developed right adrenal metastasis and received interferon (IFN)-alpha treatment. One year later, progression of the adrenal metastasis was observed, and he was admitted to a hospital for treatment with sorafenib, which was administered at a dose of 800 mg/day. Two weeks later, he developed painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. Thereafter, sorafenib treatment was discontinued, and he was treated with conservative therapy. Three weeks later, he was discharged. Even though painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment is rare, the possible development of painless acute pancreatitis in patients undergoing sorafenib treatment must be kept in mind.

  3. Maternal exposure to fluoxetine during gestation and lactation affects the DNA methylation programming of rat's offspring: modulation by folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Toffoli, L V; Rodrigues, G M; Oliveira, J F; Silva, A S; Moreira, E G; Pelosi, G G; Gomes, M V

    2014-05-15

    Fluoxetine is an antidepressant that has been largely used for treatment of depression in pregnancy. In the present study we evaluated the effects of the exposure to fluoxetine during gestation and lactation on DNA methylation of rat brain regions. Female Wistar rats were treated with 5mg/kg of fluoxetine during pregnancy and lactation. In order to assess the effects of fluoxetine in the context of maternal folic acid supplementation we performed an additional combined treatment composed by folic acid (8 mg/kg/day) and fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day). On the postnatal day 22, male rats were euthanized and hippocampus, cortex, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray area were removed. Global DNA methylation was quantified using a high-throughput ELISA-based method. Neurofunctional changes were addressed using validated behavioral tests: hot plate, elevated plus maze and open field. A decrease in the global DNA methylation profile of hippocampus was associated to the exposure to fluoxetine, whereas an increase in methylation was observed in cortex. The combined treatment induced an increase in the methylation of hippocampus indicating the potential of folic acid to modulate this epigenetic alteration. Increase in the latency to the thermal nociceptive response was observed in animals exposed to fluoxetine whereas this effect was abolished in animals from the combined treatment. In summary we demonstrated that exposure to fluoxetine during gestation and lactation affect the DNA methylation of brain and the nociceptive response of rats. Furthermore our data reveal the potential of folic acid to modulate epigenetic and functional changes induced by early exposure to fluoxetine.

  4. Pediatric Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Andrea; England, Jasmin; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) is a common complication of a simple upper respiratory infection. Acute bacterial sinusitis and an upper respiratory infection, however, have different management plans. This article will help clinicians establish when a diagnosis of ABS can be made based on the latest guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Also covered will be the pathophysiology of ABS, the role of diagnostic imaging, the recognition of complications of ABS, and treatment options.

  5. Acute appendicitis: What is the gold standard of treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Ruffolo, Cesare; Fiorot, Alain; Pagura, Giulia; Antoniutti, Michele; Massani, Marco; Caratozzolo, Ezio; Bonariol, Luca; Calia di Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, Nicolò

    2013-01-01

    McBurney’s procedure represented the gold-standard for acute appendicitis until 1981, but nowadays the number of laparoscopic appendectomies has progressively increased since it has been demonstrated to be a safe procedure, with excellent cosmetic results and it also allows a shorter hospitalization, a quicker and less painful postoperative recovery. The aim of this editorial was to perform a review of the literature in order to address controversial issues in the treatment of acute appendicitis. PMID:24379603

  6. 21 CFR 520.980 - Fluoxetine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fluoxetine. 520.980 Section 520.980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS.... 000986 in § 510.600 of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in dogs—(1) Amount. 1 to 2 mg per kilogram...

  7. 21 CFR 520.980 - Fluoxetine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fluoxetine. 520.980 Section 520.980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS.... 000986 in § 510.600 of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in dogs—(1) Amount. 1 to 2 mg per kilogram...

  8. 21 CFR 520.980 - Fluoxetine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.980 Fluoxetine. (a) Specifications. Each... conjunction with a behavior modification plan. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or...

  9. 21 CFR 520.980 - Fluoxetine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.980 Fluoxetine. (a) Specifications. Each... conjunction with a behavior modification plan. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or...

  10. Regulation of emotional response in juvenile monkeys treated with fluoxetine: MAOA interactions.

    PubMed

    Golub, M S; Hogrefe, C E; Bulleri, A M

    2016-12-01

    Juvenile male rhesus macaques received therapeutic doses of fluoxetine daily from one to three years of age and were compared to vehicle-treated controls (N=16/group). Genotyping for monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) polymorphisms was used to form subgroups (N=8) with high and low expression of the gene. Behavioral responses were scored during 30-second exposures to pictures differing in affective content. As expected from its therapeutic effect, fluoxetine decreased the behavioral response to emotionally evocative pictures. A 44% reduction in number of expressive behaviors was seen, but only in subjects with low expression MAOA polymorphisms. In general, this effect occurred for pictures of varying affective content and was not due to altered occurrence of one specific behavior or type of behavior. The drug*genotype interaction was seen after one and two years of treatment and did not reverse one year after discontinuation of dosing. Two potential translational implications are suggested: (1) MAOA genetic polymorphisms may be the source of some of the variability in response to fluoxetine treatment in children; (2) extended fluoxetine treatment during juvenile brain development may result in persistent effects on emotional regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluoxetine and imipramine: are there differences in cost-utility for depression in primary care?

    PubMed

    Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Suárez, David; Pinto-Meza, Alejandra; Peñarrubia, Maria T; Haro, Josep Maria

    2009-02-01

    Depressive disorders generate severe personal burden and high economic costs. Cost-utility analyses of the different therapeutical options are crucial to policy-makers and clinicians. Previous cost-utility studies, comparing selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants, have used modelling techniques or have not included indirect costs in the economic analyses. To determine the cost-utility of fluoxetine compared with imipramine for treating depressive disorders in primary care. A 6-month randomized prospective naturalistic study comparing fluoxetine with imipramine was conducted in three primary care centres in Spain. One hundred and three patients requiring antidepressant treatment for a DSM-IV depressive disorder were included in the study. Patients were randomized either to fluoxetine (53 patients) or to imipramine (50 patients) treatment. Patients were treated with antidepressants according to their general practitioner's usual clinical practice. Outcome measures were the quality of life tariff of the European Quality of Life Questionnaire: EuroQoL-5D (five domains), direct costs, indirect costs and total costs. Subjects were evaluated at the beginning of treatment and after 1, 3 and 6 months. Incremental cost-utility ratios (ICUR) were obtained. To address uncertainty in the ICUR's sampling distribution, non-parametric bootstrapping was carried out. Taking into account adjusted total costs and incremental quality of life gained, imipramine dominated fluoxetine with 81.5% of the bootstrap replications in the dominance quadrant. Imipramine seems to be a better cost-utility antidepressant option for treating depressive disorders in primary care.

  12. [Cerebrolysin in treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Zaleska, B

    1995-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is composed of low molecular peptides and free amino-acids and as a nootropic drug it administered in various diseases of central nervous system. In an open clinical trial patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the region of the middle cerebral artery, were treated. Cerebrolysin was administered as intravenous infusion in daily dose of 15 ml during 21 days. Recovery in 10 patients and improvement in 3 was obtained and only one patient died. The results were compared to the large group of 108 patients treated earlier with other drugs. Therapeutic effect was similar in all groups.

  13. Local antinociceptive action of fluoxetine in the rat formalin assay: Role of L-arginine-nitric oxide-cGMP-KATP channel pathway.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Alboghobeish, Soheila

    2017-08-08

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the local antinociceptive actions of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, and the possible involvement of the L-arginine/NO/cGMP/KATP channel pathway in this effect using formalin test in rats. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, animals were pre-treated with L-NAME, aminoguanidine, methylene blue, glibenclamide, L-arginine, sodium nitroprusside, or diazoxide. Local ipsilateral, but not contralateral, administration of fluoxetine (10-300 μg/paw) dose-dependently suppressed flinching number during both early and late phases of the test, and this was comparable to morphine also given peripherally. Pre-treatment with L-NAME, aminoguanidine, methylene blue or glibenclamide dose-dependently prevented fluoxetine (100 μg/paw)-induced antinociception in late phase. On the other hand, administration of L-arginine, sodium nitroprusside and diazoxide significantly enhanced the antinociception caused by fluoxetine in the late phase of the test. However, these treatments had no significant effect on the antinociceptive response of fluoxetine in the early phase of formalin test. Our data demonstrate that local peripheral antinociception of fluoxetine during the late phase of formalin test could be due to activation of L-arginine/NO/cGMP/KATP channel pathway. The peripheral action of fluoxetine raises the possibility that topical application of this drug (e.g. as a cream, ointment or jelly) may be a useful method for relieving the inflammatory pain states.

  14. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  15. Acute treatment of mania: an update on new medications.

    PubMed

    Gajwani, Prashant; Kemp, David E; Muzina, David J; Xia, Guohua; Gao, Keming; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2006-12-01

    Acute mania is frequently a medical emergency requiring hospitalization for behavioral control, rapid resolution of irritability, agitation, de-escalation of mood, and decreasing of risk-taking behavior. Lithium efficacy in the management of acute mania was reported in 1949 and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970. Chlorpromazine, from the class of typical antipsychotics, was approved for treatment of bipolar disorder in 1973. Typical antipsychotics were frequently used alone and as adjunct for the treatment of bipolar mania for the next 2 decades. Divalproex was approved by the FDA for the treatment of acute mania in 1994. Since the approval of olanzapine in 2000, all five atypical antipsychotics, namely risperidone (2003), quetiapine (2004), ziprasidone (2004), and aripiprazole (2004), have been approved by the FDA for the management of acute mania. Clozapine is the only atypical antipsychotic not FDA approved for any phase of bipolar disorder. This article will systematically review some of the major studies published, randomized controlled monotherapy, and adjunct therapy trials involving five atypical antipsychotics and newer anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar mania.

  16. Comparison of neurogenic effects of fluoxetine, duloxetine and running in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marlatt, Michael W.; Lucassen, Paul J.; van Praag, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated by extrinsic factors, such as exercise and antidepressants. While there is evidence that the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (Prozac) enhances neurogenesis, the new dual serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine has not been evaluated in this context. In addition, it is unclear whether effects of antidepressants and running on cell genesis and behavior are of similar magnitude in mice. Here,we assessed neurogenesis and open field behavior in 2 month old female C57Bl/6 mice after 28 days of treatment with either fluoxetine (18 mg/kg), duloxetine (2, 6 or 18 mg/kg) or exercise. New cell survival, as measured by 5-bromo-2´-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled cells, was enhanced by 200% in the running group only. Both running and fluoxetine, but not duloxetine, increased the percentage of new cells that became neurons. In the open field test, animals treated with either drug spent less time in the center than controls and runners. In addition, fluoxetine treatment resulted in reduced locomotor activity. Together, these data not only show that the neurogenic response to exercise is much stronger than to antidepressants, but also imply a low likelihood that reported effects of these two drugs on anxiety are mediated by adult neurogenesis in C57Bl/6 mice. PMID:20381469

  17. Differential Peripheral Proteomic Biosignature of Fluoxetine Response in a Mouse Model of Anxiety/Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-David, Indira; Boursier, Céline; Domergue, Valérie; Colle, Romain; Falissard, Bruno; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Gardier, Alain M.; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; David, Denis J.

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of peripheral biomarkers in the treatment of major depressive disorders (MDD) could improve the efficiency of treatments and increase remission rate. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) represent an attractive biological substrate allowing the identification of a drug response signature. Using a proteomic approach with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the present study aimed to identify a biosignature of antidepressant response (fluoxetine, a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) in PBMCs in a mouse model of anxiety/depression. Following determination of an emotionality score, using complementary behavioral analysis of anxiety/depression across three different tests (Elevated Plus Maze, Novelty Suppressed Feeding, Splash Test), we showed that a 4-week corticosterone treatment (35 μg/ml, CORT model) in C57BL/6NTac male mice induced an anxiety/depressive-like behavior. Then, chronic fluoxetine treatment (18 mg/kg/day for 28 days in the drinking water) reduced corticosterone-induced increase in emotional behavior. However, among 46 fluoxetine-treated mice, only 30 of them presented a 50% decrease in emotionality score, defining fluoxetine responders (CORT/Flx-R). To determine a peripheral biological signature of fluoxetine response, proteomic analysis was performed from PBMCs isolated from the “most” affected corticosterone/vehicle (CORT/V), corticosterone/fluoxetine responders and non-responders (CORT/Flx-NR) animals. In comparison to CORT/V, a total of 263 proteins were differently expressed after fluoxetine exposure. Expression profile of these proteins showed a strong similarity between CORT/Flx-R and CORT/Flx-NR (R = 0.827, p < 1e-7). Direct comparison of CORT/Flx-R and CORT/Flx-NR groups revealed 100 differently expressed proteins, representing a combination of markers associated either with the maintenance of animals in a refractory state, or associated with behavioral improvement. Finally, 19 proteins showed a differential

  18. [CONSERVATIVE THERAPY IN THE COMPLEX TREATMENT OF ACUTE NECROTIZING PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Khomyak, I V

    2015-07-01

    Developed and implemented a phased differentiated treatment tactics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, based on the theory of phase course of acute pancreatitis. Treatment started with conservative measures. Applications developed set of measures allowed us to achieve recovery of 39.53% patients without any instrumental interventions performans, including diapevtycal. Laparotomy reduced frequency performance of 57.14%--in the control group to 33.07%--in the main. Mortality in the main group was 6.72%; complication rate decreased 2.26 times; postoperative mortality was 9.83%.

  19. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's... an indication for the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS). This guidance finalizes...

  20. Effect of Fluoxetine on an Experimental Model of Diabetes-induced Neuropathic Pain Perception in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tembhurne, S. V.; Sakarkar, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to study the effect of chronic treatment (9 weeks) of fluoxetine (20 mg/kg p.o.) a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on blood glucose level and in prevention of diabetic neuropathic pain perception. Evaluation of diabetic neuropathy was performed after 9 weeks of single injection of streptozotocin (70 mg/kg i.v.) in rats. Blood glucose level, glycated haemoglobin, grip strength, pain sensitivity and threshold in diabetic rats were measured at the end of 9 weeks. The results of the present study indicate that the 9 weeks treatment of fluoxetine demonstrates hypoglycemic effect; it marked decreases the blood glucose level in diabetic treated animals. There was also decrease in the grip strength in diabetic rat indicates to induction of neuropathy or nerve damage. Fluoxetine increase the grip strength of diabetic rats. There was also found loss of pain perception in diabetes rats which measured using hot plate and tail flick methods. Fluoxetine increases the licking time and withdrawal latency in hot plate and tail flick test respectively indicates the presence of pain perception and prevention of nerve damage demonstrates its protective effect in diabetic neuropathy. Our study concludes the chronic treatment of fluoxetine significantly decreases the glycemic level as well as it protected from the development of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23112395

  1. Inverse Effect of Fluoxetine on Medial Prefrontal Cortex Activation During Reward Reversal in ADHD and Autism

    PubMed Central

    Chantiluke, Kaylita; Barrett, Nadia; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Simmons, Andrew; Murphy, Declan G.; Rubia, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) share brain function abnormalities during cognitive flexibility. Serotonin is involved in both disorders, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can modulate cognitive flexibility and improve behavior in both disorders. Thus, this study investigates shared and disorder-specific brain dysfunctions in these 2 disorders during reward reversal, and the acute effects of an SSRI on these. Age-matched boys with ADHD (15), ASD (18), and controls (21) were compared with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a reversal task. Patients were scanned twice, under either an acute dose of Fluoxetine or placebo in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized design. Repeated-measures analyses within patients assessed drug effects. Patients under each drug condition were compared with controls to assess normalization effects. fMRI data showed that, under placebo, ASD boys underactivated medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), compared with control and ADHD boys. Both patient groups shared decreased precuneus activation. Under Fluoxetine, mPFC activation was up-regulated and normalized in ASD boys relative to controls, but down-regulated in ADHD boys relative to placebo, which was concomitant with worse task performance in ADHD. Fluoxetine therefore has inverse effects on mPFC activation in ASD and ADHD during reversal learning, suggesting dissociated underlying serotonin abnormalities. PMID:24451919

  2. Treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L; Novitzky, N

    1990-01-01

    Eighty-five consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 24 years (range 10-69 years), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, Adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate and monthly intrathecal therapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, Adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was obtained in 59 patients (69%) and only the French-American-British (FAB) L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (P = 0.048). Twenty-three patients failed to achieve CR and of these 12 had primary drug resistance. Median follow-up is currently 260 weeks, median predicted survival of all patients is 58 weeks and for those who achieved CR it is 104 weeks. Median duration of CR is 70 weeks. Of the prognostic factors for survival, only FAB L1 subtype was significant. Bone marrow relapses occurred in 29 patients, and of these 9 (31%) achieved CR. There has been CNS relapse in two patients and both have died. Eleven patients continue in CR off therapy, with a median of 152 weeks. This regimen is effective, with acceptable toxicity, and a number of patients are potentially cured. The incidence of resistant and relapsing disease is an argument for further intensifying both induction and postinduction therapy.

  3. Changes in prescription habits with the introduction of generic fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert; Klinski, Angelica

    2008-01-01

    When the patent on fluoxetine expired in 2001, prices for it fell sharply and marketing decreased. We investigated how market share for fluoxetine changed with the introduction of the generic. Prescribing information was tracked at a military hospital where providers knew the cost of medication, but were not compelled to use the cheaper form. Market share for fluoxetine among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was observed for the 64 months surrounding the introduction, and changes were examined by linear regression analysis. Results showed that in the 32 months before the introduction of the generic, fluoxetine maintained a relatively steady share of prescriptions. After the introduction of the generic, fluoxetine steadily lost market share over time. No significant relationship could be seen between drug company visits and gains for their individual products. Examination of all Department of Defense prescriptions for the 16 months surrounding the introduction of generic fluoxetine showed a similar drop in its market share.

  4. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  5. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:26788851

  6. EFFECT OF FLUOXETINE AND BROMOCRIPTINE ON CRAVING OCCURRING DURING WITHDRAWAL FROM ALCOHOL

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sudipto; Isaac, Mohan K.

    1996-01-01

    Craving is an integral element in the understanding of alcohol dependence. Recent human and animal research implicates the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems in the mediation of excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, a cue-based approach was used to qualify and quantify craving occurring during acute withdrawal from alcohol. Fifty alcoholics were given either placebo, bromocriptine or fluoxetine in a randomised double-blind fashion and craving was sequentially measured over the next 15 days. Both fluoxetine and bromocriptine significantly attenuated total craving scores without similarly affecting withdrawal symptoms. The results suggest the importance of neurotransmitters in mediating craving. The significance of these data in the light of various behavioural and neurochemical models have been discussed. PMID:21584128

  7. Octreotide treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Mayo, A; Paran, D; Neufeld, D; Shwartz, I; Zissin, R; Singer, P; Kaplan, O; Skornik, Y; Freund, U

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the effect of octreotide in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a case-control study. Experimental and clinical studies on the effect of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis have shown controversial results. Since January 1992, we have been conducting a prospective randomized study on the effect of octreotide in severe acute pancreatitis, in three hospitals in Israel. The entering criteria included three or more of the Ranson prognostic signs and CT findings of severe pancreatitis. Patients were randomly assigned to conservative treatment either with or without octreotide (0.1 mg subcutaneously three times a day). The end points of the study included: complication rate (ARDS, sepsis, renal failure, pseudocyst, fistula, and abscess), length of hospital stay, and mortality. From January 1992 to December 1996, 60 patients entered the study. After evaluating the files, 10 patients were excluded due to failure to meet the entering criteria, incomplete data, or incorrect diagnosis. Of the remaining 50 patients, 25 were assigned to octreotide (treatment group) and 25 to conservative treatment only (control group). The two groups matched with regard to age, sex, etiology, and severity of the disease. The complication rate was lower in the treatment group with regard to sepsis (24% vs 76%, P = 0.0002) and ARDS (28% vs 56%, P = 0.04). The hospital stay was shorter in the treatment group (20.6 vs 33.1 days, P = 0.04). Two patients died in the treatment group and eight in the control group (P < 0.019). These results suggest that octreotide may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

  8. Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L

    1992-08-01

    Forty-six consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 23 years (range 14 to 64), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate, and monthly intrathecal chemotherapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 36 patients (78%) and only the FAB L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (Chi-squared = 3.91: p < 0.05). Eight of the 10 non-responders had significant drug resistance and 3 deaths were associated with marrow hypoplasia. Median follow-up is 52 months. Median duration of CR is 28 months, median survival of all patients is 16 months, and for those who achieved CR is 44 months. There was no difference between the two maintenance arms. Significant prognostic factors for survival are French-American-British (FAB) subtype, in which the L1 is better than L2 (p = 0.05), and age (p = 0.035). Nineteen patients have experienced medullary relapse and 7 (37%) achieved subsequent CR; this is durable in a single patient who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Eight patients (17%) had CNS disease at diagnosis; 5 achieved CR and 1 is alive and disease-free at 65+ months. There has been 1 CNS relapse. These results demonstrate that prolonged remissions and survival can be achieved with this protocol and many patients possibly cured. The level of toxicity is acceptable and the pattern of induction failure indicates that a margin exists for intensifying chemotherapy and thereby possibly further improving results.

  9. Impact of excipients in the chronic toxicity of fluoxetine on the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aurora; Santos, Lúcia H M L M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Figueiredo, Sónia A

    2014-01-01

    Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) widely used in the treatment of major depression. It has been detected in surface and wastewaters, being able to negatively affect aquatic organisms. Most of the ecotoxicity studies focused only in pharmaceuticals, though excipients can also pose a risk to non-target organisms. In this work the ecotoxicity of five medicines (three generic formulations and two brand labels) containing the same active substance (fluoxetine hydrochloride) was tested on the alga Chlorella vulgaris, in order to evaluate if excipients can influence their ecotoxicity. Effective concentrations that cause 50% of inhibition (EC50) ranging from 0.25 to 15 mg L⁻¹ were obtained in the growth inhibition test performed for the different medicines. The corresponding values for fluoxetine concentration are 10 times lower. Higher EC50 values had been published for the same alga considering only the toxicity of fluoxetine. Therefore, this increase in toxicity may be attributed to the presence of excipients. Thus more studies on ecotoxicological effects of excipients are required in order to assess the environmental risk they may pose to aquatic organisms.

  10. Effects of lobeline and reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion combination on depression-like behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Roni, Monzurul Amin; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that lobeline, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand, has antidepressant-like properties in mice. The present study investigated the possible additive or synergistic effects of lobeline in combination with commonly used antidepressants, such as reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion, using the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST) in C57BL/6J mice. Reboxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), fluoxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), or bupropion (2 or 4 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered 30 min before TST or FST. A fixed dose of lobeline (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 15 min prior to tests. Co-administration of lobeline and reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion significantly reduced immobility time in the TST and FST in comparison to the antidepressants used alone. The results suggest that lobeline enhanced the effects of reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion in mice. Therefore, lobeline or similar nicotinic receptor ligand may have therapeutic potential as an adjunct for the treatment of major depression.

  11. Early rehabilitative treatment for pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: case report.

    PubMed

    Carlisi, E; Pavese, C; Mandrini, S; Carenzio, G; Dalla Toffola, E

    2015-06-01

    Although the diagnosis of and therapy for acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) have been extensively investigated, the role of rehabilitation in modifying its functional outcome has received little attention in the literature so far. We report a case of pediatric ADEM who showed complete functional recovery following early rehabilitative treatment, started in the Intensive Care Unit.

  12. Acute Resective Surgery for the Treatment of Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Basha, Maysaa Merhi; Suchdev, Kushak; Dhakar, Monica; Kupsky, William J; Mittal, Sandeep; Shah, Aashit K

    2017-03-29

    To identify the role of acute surgical intervention in the treatment of refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Retrospective review of consecutive patients who underwent epilepsy surgery from 2006 to 2015 was done to identify cases where acute surgical intervention was employed for the treatment of RSE. In addition, the adult and pediatric RSE literature was reviewed for reports of surgical treatment of RSE. Nine patients, aged 20-68 years, with various etiologies were identified to have undergone acute surgical resection for the treatment of RSE, aided by electrocorticography. Patients required aggressive medical therapy with antiepileptic drugs and intravenous anesthetic drugs for 10-54 days and underwent extensive neurodiagnostic testing prior to resective surgery. Eight out of nine patients survived and five patients were seizure-free at the last follow-up. The literature revealed 13 adult and 48 pediatric cases where adequate historical detail was available for review and comparison. We present the largest cohort of consecutive adult patients who underwent resective surgery in the setting of RSE. We also reveal that surgery can be efficacious in aborting status and in some can lead to long-term seizure freedom. Acute surgical intervention is a viable option in prolonged RSE and proper evaluation for such intervention should be conducted, although the timing and type of surgical intervention remain poorly defined.

  13. Validity of Sudden Gains in Acute Phase Treatment of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the validity of sudden gains identified with T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis's (1999) method in 2 clinical data sets that involved treatment of major depressive disorder (N=227). Sudden gains replicated among self- and clinician reports of depressive symptoms and predicted better psychosocial functioning at the acute phase…

  14. Electro-acupuncture treatment of acute stage peripheral facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, X L; Fang, Q P

    1989-03-01

    The treatment of 100 cases of acute stage peripheral facial paralysis with electro-acupuncture has indicated that, with the stimulation intensity and time interval strictly controlled, electro-acupuncture is effective. Suitable wave forms and electric intensity, as well as proper needling techniques and controlled duration of the stimulation according to experimental experience have yielded high therapeutic effects without aggravation of symptoms.

  15. Pulmonary function after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Nysom, K.; Holm, K.; Olsen, J. H.; Hertz, H.; Hesse, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pulmonary function after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and identify risk factors for reduced pulmonary function. We studied a population-based cohort of 94 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood who were in first remission after treatment without spinal irradiation or bone marrow transplantation. Pulmonary function test results were compared with reference values for our laboratory, based on 348 healthy subjects who had never smoked from a local population study. A median of 8 years after cessation of therapy (range 1-18 years) the participants had a slight, subclinical, restrictive ventilatory insufficiency and reduced transfer factor and transfer coefficient. The changes in lung function were related to younger age at treatment and to more dose-intensive treatment protocols that specified more use of cranial irradiation and higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines, cytosine arabinoside and intravenous cyclophosphamide than previous protocols. We conclude that, 8 years after treatment without bone marrow transplantation or spinal irradiation, survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission were without pulmonary symptoms but had signs of slight restrictive pulmonary disease including reduced transfer factor. The increased dose intensity of many recent protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may lead to increased late pulmonary toxicity. PMID:9662245

  16. [Technical standards for the interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Möhlenbruch, M A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and its treatment is still a major challenge. For more than a decade, various mechanical devices have been developed for the recanalization of proximal artery occlusions in acute ischemic stroke but most of them have been approved for clinical use, only on the basis of uncontrolled case series. Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-specific plasminogen activator administered (iv rtPA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset is so far the only approved medicinal treatment in the acute phase of cerebral infarction. With the introduction of stent retrievers, mechanical thrombectomy has demonstrated substantial rates of partial or complete arterial recanalization and improved outcomes compared with iv rtPA and best medical treatment alone in multiple randomized clinical trials in select patients with acute ischemic stroke and proximal artery occlusions. This review discusses the evolution of endovascular stroke therapy followed by a discussion of the current technical standards of mechanical thrombectomy that have to be considered during endovascular stroke therapy and the updated treatment recommendations of the ESO Karolinska stroke update.

  17. Diagnosis, treatment, and nursing care of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Viele, Carol S

    2003-05-01

    To review the clinical presentation, current methods of diagnosis and classification, treatment modalities, and novel treatment approaches of acute myelogenous and lymphoblastic leukemia. Professional journals, web sites, and books. The incidence of acute leukemia is increasing. As the population ages, it is anticipated that an even greater number will be diagnosed with this malignancy. The development of monoclonal antibodies, the recognition of the benefit of graft versus leukemia effect, and targeted therapies have improved overall survival rates. Still, age remains a significant prognostic variable. More research is needed to improve both the quality and the quantity of life for these patients. Nurses must understand the rationale and implications of each phase of treatment to educate patients, administer treatments, manage side effects, and provide support throughout the continuum of care.

  18. Conservative treatment in uncomplicated acute appendicitis: reassessment of practice safety.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Zvi; Buklan, Genady; Stackievicz, Rodica; Gutermacher, Michael; Litmanovitz, Ita; Golani, Guy; Arnon, Shmuel

    2017-04-01

    The success rate of conservative treatment for children with uncomplicated appendicitis was prospectively evaluated among 197 children. All who received intravenous antibiotics for 3-5 days, and if symptoms resolved, were discharged home on oral antibiotics for 5 days. Failure rate, symptoms, laboratory signs, and sonographic findings were evaluated for prognostic markers of treatment failure. Children were followed for 18 months. The success rate of conservative treatment was 87%, with shorter hospital stays compared to children who eventually needed surgery (72 [60-84] vs. 84 h [72-126], P = 0.001). Vomiting and/or nausea and intraluminal fluid on sonography were the only prognostic signs of failed treatment (P = 0.028 and P = 0.0001, respectively). After multi-regression analysis, intraluminal fluid was the only prognostic sign for failed treatment (odds ratio = 10.2; 95% CI 3.3-31.8, P = 0.001). Patients who failed conservative treatment were successfully operated without significant morbidity. Pathology findings were compatible with acute or subacute inflammation in 94% of operated AA, with no perforated appendices. When applying rigorous criteria for children with uncomplicated appendicitis, a high success rate can be achieved with conservative treatment. Those who fail conservative treatment have a benign medical course without serious complications. Intraluminal fluid may increase risk for conservative treatment failure. What is Known: • Conservative treatment in uncomplicated acute appendicitis is a reasonable alternative to appendectomy. What is New: • Using rigorous criteria for conservative treatment in uncomplicated acute appendicitis is safe and feasible. • Intraluminal fluid should be considered a contraindication to conservative treatment.

  19. Comparative CYP3A4 inhibitory effects of venlafaxine, fluoxetine, sertraline, and nefazodone in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    DeVane, C Lindsay; Donovan, Jennifer L; Liston, Heidi L; Markowitz, John S; Cheng, Kenneth T; Risch, S Craig; Willard, Lauren

    2004-02-01

    An antidepressant for use in the patient receiving concomitant drug treatment, over-the-counter medications, or herbal products should lack cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 3A4 inductive or inhibitory activity to provide the least likelihood of a drug-drug interaction. This study addresses the potential of 4 diverse antidepressants (venlafaxine, nefazodone, sertraline, and fluoxetine) to inhibit or induce CYP3A4. In a 4-way crossover design, 16 subjects received clinically relevant doses of venlafaxine, nefazodone, or sertraline for 8 days or fluoxetine for 11 days. Treatments were separated by a 7- to 14-day washout period and fluoxetine was always the last antidepressant taken. CYP3A4 activity was evaluated for each subject at baseline and following each antidepressant using the erythromycin breath test (EBT) and by the pharmacokinetics of alprazolam (ALPZ) after 2-mg dose of oral ALPZ. Compared to baseline, venlafaxine, sertraline, and fluoxetine caused no apparent inhibition or induction of erythromycin metabolism (P > 0.05). For nefazodone, a statistically significant inhibition was observed (P < 0.0005). Nefazodone was also the only antidepressant that caused a significant change in ALPZ disposition, decreasing its area under the concentration-versus-time curve (AUC; P < 0.01), and increasing its elimination half-life (16.4 vs. 12.3 hours; P < 0.05) compared with values at baseline. No significant differences were found in the pharmacokinetics of ALPZ with any of the other antidepressants tested. These results demonstrate in vivo that, unlike nefazodone, venlafaxine, sertraline, and fluoxetine do not possess significant metabolic inductive or inhibitory effects on CYP3A4.

  20. Fluoxetine Regulates Neurogenesis In Vitro Through Modulation of GSK-3β/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Jiaojie; Zhang, Jianping; Kim, Hoon; Tong, Chang; Ying, Qilong; Li, Zaiwang; Mao, Xuqiang; Shi, Guofeng; Yan, Jie; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is generally accepted that chronic treatment with antidepressants increases hippocampal neurogenesis, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their effects are unknown. Recently, glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β)/β-catenin signaling was shown to be involved in the mechanism of how antidepressants might influence hippocampal neurogenesis. Methods: The aim of this study was to determine whether GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling is involved in the alteration of neurogenesis as a result of treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The mechanisms involved in fluoxetine’s regulation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway were also examined. Results: Our results demonstrated that fluoxetine increased the proliferation of embryonic neural precursor cells (NPCs) by up-regulating the phosphorylation of Ser9 on GSK-3β and increasing the level of nuclear β-catenin. The overexpression of a stabilized β-catenin protein (ΔN89 β-catenin) significantly increased NPC proliferation, while inhibition of β-catenin expression in NPCs led to a significant decrease in the proliferation and reduced the proliferative effects induced by fluoxetine. The effects of fluoxetine-induced up-regulation of both phosphorylation of Ser9 on GSK-3β and nuclear β-catenin were significantly prevented by the 5-hydroxytryptamine-1A (5-HT1A) receptor antagonist WAY-100635. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that fluoxetine may increase neurogenesis via the GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway that links postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor activation. PMID:25522429

  1. Fluoxetine induces input-specific hippocampal dendritic spine remodeling along the septotemporal axis in adulthood and middle age.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Kathleen; Russo, Craig; Kim, Shannen; Rankin, Genelle; Sahay, Amar

    2015-11-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is known to induce structural rearrangements and changes in synaptic transmission in hippocampal circuitry. In the adult hippocampus, structural changes include neurogenesis, dendritic, and axonal plasticity of pyramidal and dentate granule neurons, and dedifferentiation of dentate granule neurons. However, much less is known about how chronic fluoxetine affects these processes along the septotemporal axis and during the aging process. Importantly, studies documenting the effects of fluoxetine on density and distribution of spines along different dendritic segments of dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons along the septotemporal axis of hippocampus in adulthood and during aging are conspicuously absent. Here, we use a transgenic mouse line in which mature dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons are genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to investigate the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment (18 mg/kg/day) on input-specific spine remodeling and mossy fiber structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in adulthood and middle age. In addition, we examine levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, maturation state of dentate granule neurons, neuronal activity, and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in response to chronic fluoxetine in adulthood and middle age. Our studies reveal that while chronic fluoxetine fails to augment adult hippocampal neurogenesis in middle age, the middle-aged hippocampus retains high sensitivity to changes in the dentate gyrus (DG) such as dematuration, hypoactivation, and increased glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expression. Interestingly, the middle-aged hippocampus shows greater sensitivity to fluoxetine-induced input-specific synaptic remodeling than the hippocampus in adulthood with the stratum-oriens of CA1 exhibiting heightened structural plasticity. The input-specific changes and circuit

  2. Fluoxetine stimulates anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine production and attenuates sensory deficits in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; de Maistre, Sébastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Despite "gold standard" hyperbaric oxygen treatment, 30% of patients suffering from neurological decompression sickness still exhibit incomplete recovery, including sensory impairments. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory effects in the setting of cerebral ischemia. In this study, we focused on the assessment of sensory neurological deficits and measurement of circulating cytokines after decompression in rats treated or not with fluoxetine. Seventy-eight rats were divided into a clinical (n = 38) and a cytokine (n = 40) group. In both groups, the rats were treated with fluoxetine (30 mg/kg po, 6 h beforehand) or with a saccharine solution. All of the rats were exposed to 90 m seawater for 45 min before staged decompression. In the clinical group, paw withdrawal force after mechanical stimulation and paw withdrawal latency after thermal stimulation were evaluated before and 1 and 48 h after surfacing. At 48 h, a dynamic weight-bearing device was used to assess postural stability, depending on the time spent on three or four paws. For cytokine analysis, blood samples were collected from the vena cava 1 h after surfacing. Paw withdrawal force and latency were increased after surfacing in the controls, but not in the fluoxetine group. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment highlighted a better stability on three paws for the fluoxetine group. IL-10 levels were significantly decreased after decompression in the controls, but maintained at baseline level with fluoxetine. This study suggests that fluoxetine has a beneficial effect on sensory neurological recovery. We hypothesize that the observed effect is mediated through maintained anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production.

  3. Fluoxetine induces input-specific hippocampal dendritic spine remodeling along the septo-temporal axis in adulthood and middle age

    PubMed Central

    McAvoy, Kathleen; Russo, Craig; Kim, Shannen; Rankin, Genelle; Sahay, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is known to induce structural rearrangements and changes in synaptic transmission in hippocampal circuitry. In the adult hippocampus, structural changes include neurogenesis, dendritic and axonal plasticity of pyramidal and dentate granule neurons, and dedifferentiation of dentate granule neurons. However, much less is known about how chronic fluoxetine affects these processes along the septo-temporal axis and during the aging process. Importantly, studies documenting the effects of fluoxetine on density and distribution of spines along different dendritic segments of dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons along the septo-temporal axis of hippocampus in adulthood and during aging are conspicuously absent. Here, we use a transgenic mouse line in which mature dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons are genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to investigate the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment (18mg/kg/day) on input-specific spine remodeling and mossy fiber structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in adulthood and middle age. In addition, we examine levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, maturation state of dentate granule neurons, neuronal activity and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in response to chronic fluoxetine in adulthood and middle age. Our studies reveal that while chronic fluoxetine fails to augment adult hippocampal neurogenesis in middle age, the middle-aged hippocampus retains high sensitivity to changes in the dentate gyrus (DG) such as dematuration, hypoactivation, and increased glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expression. Interestingly, the middle-aged hippocampus shows greater sensitivity to fluoxetine-induced input-specific synaptic remodeling than the hippocampus in adulthood with the stratum-oriens of CA1 exhibiting heightened structural plasticity. The input-specific changes and circuit

  4. Acute and Chronic Urticaria: Evaluation and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Urticaria commonly presents with intensely pruritic wheals, sometimes with edema of the subcutaneous or interstitial tissue. It has a lifetime prevalence of about 20%. Although often self-limited and benign, it can cause significant discomfort, continue for months to years, and uncommonly represent a serious systemic disease or life-threatening allergic reaction. Urticaria is caused by immunoglobulin E- and non-immunoglobulin E-mediated release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators from mast cells and basophils. Diagnosis is made clinically; anaphylaxis must be ruled out. Chronic urticaria is idiopathic in 80% to 90% of cases. Only a limited nonspecific laboratory workup should be considered unless elements of the history or physical examination suggest specific underlying conditions. The mainstay of treatment is avoidance of triggers, if identified. The first-line pharmacotherapy is second-generation H1 antihistamines, which can be titrated to greater than standard doses. First-generation H1 antihistamines, H2 antihistamines, leukotriene receptor antagonists, high-potency antihistamines, and brief corticosteroid bursts may be used as adjunctive treatment. In refractory chronic urticaria, patients can be referred to subspecialists for additional treatments, such as omalizumab or cyclosporine. More than one-half of patients with chronic urticaria will have resolution or improvement of symptoms within a year.

  5. Acute behavioral interventions and outpatient treatment strategies with suicidal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Singer, Jonathan B.; LeCloux, Mary; Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among adolescents, there is limited knowledge of effective interventions to use with this population. This paper reviews the findings of studies on behavioral interventions for adolescents who are at acute suicide risk, as well as outpatient treatment and risk management strategies with suicidal adolescents. The importance of addressing comorbid behaviors and enhancing protective factors are discussed. Cultural considerations in working with suicidal adolescents and strategies for conducting culturally competent treatment are explored. PMID:26279646

  6. [Monitorering and complications by conservative treatment of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Novovic, Srdan; Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Møller Andersen, Anders; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Philipsen, Else; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2013-05-20

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with a high morbidity and a mortality risk of up to 20%. Although much progress has occurred during the latest couple of years, there are still some major controversies on important issues such as monitoring, fluid therapy, antibiotic treatment, and nutrition. In this article we describe the underlying, pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for organ failure in SAP, and the rationale for monitoring and conservative treatment of SAP.

  7. Antidepressant-like effects of the xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor allopurinol in rats. A comparison with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz Özgür, Börte; Aksu, Hatice; Birincioğlu, Mustafa; Dost, Turhan

    2015-11-01

    Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor that is widely used for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, which metabolizes tryptophan (TRP), is decreased by xanthine oxidase inhibitors, causing TRP levels in the body to be increased. Increases in TRP levels in the brain might have antidepressant effects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antidepressant effects of allopurinol compared to those of fluoxetine, which is a proven antidepressant. Thirty-two Wistar albino male rats were divided into four groups (control, 10mg/kg fluoxetine, 50mg/kg allopurinol, 50mg/kg allopurinol+10 mg/kg fluoxetine; n=8 per group), and forced swimming tests were performed before and after 14days of drug administration. Serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and uric acid levels were measured in blood samples after the final treatment. When allopurinol and fluoxetine were administered separately, a decrease in the duration of immobility and an increased duration of swimming were observed in the forced swimming test. The results showed similar antidepressant efficacies between allopurinol and fluoxetine. However, we found no statistically significant difference in the antidepressant effect of the combined therapy versus single drug therapy.

  8. Fluoxetine-induced regulation of heat shock protein 90 and 14-3-3ε in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Daeyoung; Choi, Mi Ran; Han, Dal Mu Ri; Chai, Young Gyu; Choi, Joonho

    2014-12-03

    Fluoxetine, a serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, exerts antidepressant and antianxiety effects on major depressive and anxiety disorders. Previous studies suggest that treatment with fluoxetine influences the expression of various proteins that are involved in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in the neuronal cells of the brain. However, many aspects of the molecular pathways that modulate antidepressant action are not well understood. Here, with the aim of identifying proteins involved in antidepressant action, we examined the protein expression profile of human embryonic carcinoma (NCCIT) cells in response to fluoxetine treatment using proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We found several upregulated and downregulated proteins in fluoxetine-treated NCCIT cells, and then biochemically confirmed the increased expression of heat shock protein 90 and 14-3-3ε, which play an essential role in many cellular mechanisms including cell cycle control and other signaling pathways. Our data suggest that the regulated expression of heat shock protein 90, 14-3-3ε, and other identified proteins may be associated with the therapeutic action of fluoxetine.

  9. Effects of fluoxetine on protein expression of potassium ion channels in the brain of chronic mild stress rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Ling; Rong, Xianfang; Wang, Weiping; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of major potassium channel subtypes in the brain of chronical mild stress (CMS) rats and reveal the effects of fluoxetine on the expression of these channels. Rats were exposed to a variety of unpredictable stress for three weeks and induced anhedonia, lower sucrose preference, locomotor activity and lower body weight. The protein expressions were determined by Western blot. CMS significantly increased the expression of Kv2.1 channel in frontal cortex but not in hippocampus, and the expression level was normalized after fluoxetine treatment. The expression of TREK-1 channel was also obviously increased in frontal cortex in CMS rats. Fluoxetine treatment might prevent this increase. However, the expression of Kv3.1 and Kv4.2 channels was considerably decreased in hippocampus after CMS, and was not affected by fluoxetine. These results suggest that different subtypes of potassium channels are associated with the pathophysiology of depression and that the therapeutical effects of fluoxetine may relate to Kv2.1 and TREK-1 potassium channels. PMID:26579425

  10. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  11. [State-of-the-art Treatment of Acute Stroke].

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Nordmeyer, H

    2015-11-01

    This article gives an overview about diagnostic imaging and treatment options of acute patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke with emphasis on evidence from relevant studies published in the last 2 years. A computed tomography of the brain with CT-angiography should be the minimal standard imaging modality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Diffusion-weighted/imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)-mismatch magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in patients with wake-up stroke to select patients for recanalisation therapies. Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA within 4.5 hours after symptom onset and mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers within 6 hours and proven occlusion of a large vessel in the anterior brain circulation are both evidence-based treatments. In contrast, there are no major therapeutic advances in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. The systolic blood pressure should be lowered < 140  mm Hg in these patients within one hour. Both acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and patients with a transient ischemic attack should be monitored and treated on a stroke unit due to an improved outcome. A prophylactic antibiotic treatment and very early mobilization during the first 24 hours is not recommended in acute stroke patients.

  12. [Treatment of patients with acute asthma exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Mose, Jakov

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population, so it remains a common problem with enormous medical and economic impacts. In majority of patients, asthma can be well controlled with simple regimens of inhaled anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating medications. However, some patients tend to suffer from poorly controlled disease in terms of chronic symptoms with episodic severe exacerbations. Major factors that may be related to the emergency department visits and hospitalisation include prior severe attacks, nonadherence to therapeutic regimens, inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids, poor self-management skills, frequent use of inhaled short-acting beta-agonists, cigarette smoking, poor socioeconomic status and age over 40 years. Severe exacerbations of asthma are life-threatening medical emergencies and require careful brief assesment, treatment according to current GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) guidelines with periodic reassesment of patient's response to therapy usually in an emergency department.

  13. Estradiol accelerates the effects of fluoxetine on serotonin 1A receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Sullivan, Nicole R; McAllister, Carrie E; Van de Kar, Louis D; Muma, Nancy A

    2013-07-01

    A major problem with current anti-depressant therapy is that it takes on average 6-7 weeks for remission. Since desensitization of serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor signaling contributes to the anti-depressive response, acceleration of the desensitization may reduce this delay in response to antidepressants. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that estradiol accelerates fluoxetine-induced desensitization of 5-HT1A receptor signaling in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of rats, via alterations in components of the 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathway. Ovariectomized rats were injected with estradiol and/or fluoxetine, then adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and oxytocin responses to a 5-HT1A receptor agonist (+)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) were examined to assess the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the PVN. Treatment with estradiol for either 2 or 7 days or fluoxetine for 2 days produced at most a partial desensitization of 5-HT1A receptor signaling, whereas 7 days of fluoxetine produced full desensitization. Combined treatment with estradiol and fluoxetine for 2 days produced nearly a full desensitization, demonstrating an accelerated response compared to either treatment alone. With two days of combined treatments, estradiol prevented the fluoxetine-induced increase in 5-HT1A receptor protein, which could contribute to the more rapid desensitization. Furthermore, EB treatment for 2 days decreased the abundance of the 35 kD Gαz protein which could contribute to the desensitization response. We found two isoforms of Gαz proteins with molecular mass of 35 and 33 kD, which differentially distributed in the detergent resistant microdomain (DRM) and in Triton X-100 soluble membrane region, respectively. The 35 kD Gαz proteins in the DRM can be sumoylated by SUMO1. Stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors with 8-OH-DPAT increases the sumoylation of Gαz proteins and reduces the 33 kD Gαz proteins, suggesting that these

  14. Treatment of acute experimental toxoplasmosis with investigational poloxamers.

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, J L; Fukutomi, Y; Gu, L

    1993-01-01

    Because of the limited chemotherapeutic approaches available to treat reactivated latent Toxoplasma gondii infection manifested as toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS patients, investigation of novel chemotherapeutic agents is warranted. Several poloxamers (nonionic block copolymers composed of a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene flanked by two hydrophilic chains of polyoxyethylene) were tested for their abilities to alter the course of acute infection with a highly virulent T. gondii in mice. The effect varied markedly with the length of the constituent chains of the copolymers. The most effective preparations were highly effective when administered after infection and afforded remarkable protection against 10 to 1,000 100% lethal doses of T. gondii. Protection was dose dependent, and multiple treatments were more effective than single treatment. These preliminary findings warrant additional studies to determine whether this novel form of antitoxoplasma chemotherapy may prove promising in the treatment or prevention of acute toxoplasmic encephalitis in humans. PMID:8285605

  15. Treatment of acute diarrhea with oral rehydration solutions containing glutamine.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Júnior, H; Ribeiro, T; Mattos, A; Palmeira, C; Fernandez, D; Sant'Ana, I; Rodrigues, I; Bendicho, M T; Fontaine, O

    1994-06-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial we compared the efficacy of adding 90 mmol/L L-glutamine to the standard World Health Organization oral rehydration salts (WHO-ORS). One hundred twenty male infants, > 1 month and < 1 year of age, with acute non-cholera diarrhea and dehydration were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment groups. Patients were kept in a metabolic unit where body weight, ORS, water and food intake, as well as stool, urine and vomitus output were recorded at 6-hour intervals. Laboratory evaluation, including blood gases and electrolytes, were monitored during hospitalization. Diarrheal stool output, duration of diarrhea and volume of ORS required to achieve and maintain hydration was not significantly different between the treatment groups. This study demonstrated that a glutamine-based ORS did not provide any additional therapeutic advantage over the standard WHO-ORS during treatment of dehydration in infants with acute non-cholera diarrhea.

  16. The acute and preventative treatment of episodic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Episodic migraine is a common debilitating condition with significant worldwide impact. An effective management plan must include acute treatment to relieve the pain and potential disability associated with the attacks and may also include preventative treatments with an aim of decreasing attack frequency and severity in the longer term. Acute treatments must be limited to a maximum of 2-3 days a week to prevent medication overuse headache and focus on simple analgesia, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans. Preventative treatments are numerous and should be considered when migraine attacks are frequent and or disabling, acute medication is failing, in special circumstances such as hemiplegic migraines or if the patient requests them. All preventative medications must be given at therapeutic doses for at least 6-8 weeks before an adequate trial can be judged ineffective. The most important factor in choosing drugs is the patient and the clinical features of their attack and treatment should be tailored to these. Relative co-morbidities will influence drug choice, as will the side effect profile and the efficacy of the drug. First line preventative drugs include ß-blockers, amitriptyline and anti-epileptic drugs such as topiramate and valproate. Drugs with lower efficacy or poorer side effect profiles include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), calcium channel antagonists, gabapentin and herbal medicines. PMID:23024562

  17. The acute and preventative treatment of episodic migraine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah

    2012-08-01

    Episodic migraine is a common debilitating condition with significant worldwide impact. An effective management plan must include acute treatment to relieve the pain and potential disability associated with the attacks and may also include preventative treatments with an aim of decreasing attack frequency and severity in the longer term. Acute treatments must be limited to a maximum of 2-3 days a week to prevent medication overuse headache and focus on simple analgesia, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans. Preventative treatments are numerous and should be considered when migraine attacks are frequent and or disabling, acute medication is failing, in special circumstances such as hemiplegic migraines or if the patient requests them. All preventative medications must be given at therapeutic doses for at least 6-8 weeks before an adequate trial can be judged ineffective. The most important factor in choosing drugs is the patient and the clinical features of their attack and treatment should be tailored to these. Relative co-morbidities will influence drug choice, as will the side effect profile and the efficacy of the drug. First line preventative drugs include ß-blockers, amitriptyline and anti-epileptic drugs such as topiramate and valproate. Drugs with lower efficacy or poorer side effect profiles include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), calcium channel antagonists, gabapentin and herbal medicines.

  18. Normobaric oxygen treatment in acute ischemic stroke: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-hai; Qi, Zhi-feng; Luo, Yu-min; Ji, Xun-ming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common and serious neurological disease. Oxygen therapy has been shown to increase oxygen supply to ischemic tissues and improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO), an easily applicable and non-invasive method, shows protective effects on acute ischemic stroke animals and patients in pilot studies. However, many critical scientific questions are still unclear, such as the therapeutic time window of NBO, the long-term effects and the benefits of NBO in large clinic trials. In this article, we review the current literatures on NBO treatment of acute ischemic stroke in preclinical and clinical studies and try to analyze and identify the key gaps or unknowns in our understanding about NBO. Based on these analyses, we provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:27867482

  19. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes.

  20. Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, considerable progress in technology and clinical research methods have led to advances in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of acute venous thromboembolism. Despite this, however, the diagnosis is still often missed and preventive methods are often ignored. Published guidelines are useful, but are limited by the existing evidence base so that controversies remain with regard to topics such as duration of anticoagulation, indications for placement and removal of inferior vena caval filters, and when and how to administer thrombolytic therapy. The morbidity and mortality of this disease remain high, particularly when undiagnosed. While preventive approaches remain crucial, the focus of this review is on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to acute venous thromboembolism, with an emphasis on acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:22619694

  1. New approaches for the treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Fantini, Lorenzo; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria

    2006-01-11

    In recent years, a number of articles have been published on the treatment of acute pancreatitis in experimental models and most of them were published about animals with mild disease. However, it is difficult to translate these results into clinical practice. For example, infliximab, a monoclonal TNF antibody, was experimentally tested in rats and it was able to significantly reduce the pathologic score and serum amylase activity, and also alleviate alveolar edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome; no studies are available in clinical human acute pancreatitis. Another substance, such as interleukin 10, was efficacious in decreasing the severity and mortality of lethal pancreatitis in rats, but seems to have no effect on human severe acute pancreatitis. Thus, the main problem in acute pancreatitis, especially in the severe form of the disease, is the difficulty of planning clinical studies capable of giving hard statistically significant answers regarding the benefits of the various proposed therapeutic agents previously tested in experimental settings. According to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis, we may re-evaluate the efficacy of the drugs already available, such as gabexate mesilate, lexipafant and somatostatin which should be probably administered in a different manner. Of course, also in this case, we need large studies to test this hypothesis. Another great problem is prevention of the infection of pancreatic necrosis. A randomized study has been published to test the hypothesis that probiotics and specific fibres used as supplements in early enteral nutrition may be effective in reducing pancreatic sepsis and the number of surgical interventions. A study named PROPATRIA (Probiotic Prophylaxis in Patients with Predicted Severe Acute Pancreatitis) has been planned to give a more robust confirmation to the previous study. Furthermore, the open question of the prevention of the fungal infection of necrosis is still being debated. Finally, the

  2. Hippocampal HDAC4 contributes to postnatal fluoxetine-evoked depression-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Ambalika; Chachra, Parul; Kennedy, Pamela; Pena, Catherine J; Desouza, Lynette A; Nestler, Eric J; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2014-08-01

    Fluoxetine treatment in adulthood evokes antidepressant and anxiolytic responses. Paradoxically, postnatal fluoxetine (PNFlx) induces persistent depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. The mechanistic underpinnings of this paradox remain poorly understood. Here, we examined specific molecular changes in the rat hippocampus that accompany perturbed emotionality observed across life following PNFlx. PNFlx-induced hippocampal gene regulation observed in microarray and quantitative PCR studies indicate functional enrichment of genes involved in response to organic substances, protein kinase pathways, DNA binding, and transcriptional repression. We noted specific transcripts (Hdac4, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Gnai1, protein kinase C gamma (Prkcc), and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (Hcn1)) that were consistently dysregulated across life, and selectively influenced by postnatal, but not adult, fluoxetine. Increased histone deacetylase-4 (HDAC4) recruitment, accompanied by decreased activating histone acetylation marks at the mTOR and Gnai1 promoters, indicate a role for HDAC4 in PNFlx-mediated gene dysregulation. Strikingly, coadministration of the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate with PNFlx prevented the dysregulation of Hdac4 and mTOR, and the emergence of depression- and anxiety-like behavior. Importantly, we also find that retreatment of PNFlx animals with fluoxetine in adulthood reversed the increased Hdac4 expression, prevented HDAC4 recruitment to the mTOR and Gnai1 promoters, and attenuated the decline in mTOR and Gnai1 expression, coincident with normalization of PNFlx-evoked depression- and anxiety-like behavior. Further, we show that viral-mediated hippocampal overexpression of Hdac4 was sufficient to induce depression-, but not anxiety-, like behavior in adulthood. Our results highlight the unique nature of molecular signatures evoked by PNFlx, and implicate HDAC4 in the dysregulated gene expression and emergence of

  3. Locus coeruleus activity in perinatally protein-deprived rats: effects of fluoxetine administration.

    PubMed

    Sodero, Alejandro O; Valdomero, Analía; Cuadra, Gabriel R; Ramírez, Oscar A; Orsingher, Otto A

    2004-10-25

    We have previously described an increased locus coeruleus activity in perinatally protein-deprived rats. Since locus coeruleus dysfunction has been involved in different types of anxiety disorders and considering the modulating action of serotonergic transmission on locus coeruleus activity, we assessed the effect of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on locus coeruleus activity as measured by the firing rate and the number of spontaneously active cells/track. Repeated fluoxetine administration reduced locus coeruleus activity in both control and protein-deprived rats, although the reduction was greater in protein-deprived rats. Dose-response curves for the inhibitory effect of clonidine showed subsensitivity of alpha2-adrenergic autoreceptors in protein-deprived rats, a phenomenon reversed by fluoxetine treatment. Dose-response curves for the inhibitory effect of 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) were similar in both groups of rats. Following fluoxetine administration, subsensitivity to this effect developed in control but not in protein-deprived rats. Extracellular noradrenaline level in the prefrontal cortex, as measured by microdialysis procedure, was higher in protein-deprived rats compared to controls, and this difference was reduced after fluoxetine administration. A challenge with yohimbine increased the extracellular noradrenaline level in control but not in protein-deprived rats, suggesting subsensitivity of alpha2-adrenergic autoreceptors in early protein malnourished animals. These results stress the complexity of plastic changes induced by early protein malnutrition and sustain the hypothesis that perinatally protein-deprived rats may represent a useful animal model for screening antipanic agents.

  4. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of first-generation and second-generation antidepressants in the acute treatment of major depression: protocol for a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salanti, Georgia; Atkinson, Lauren Z; Leucht, Stefan; Ruhe, Henricus G; Turner, Erick H; Chaimani, Anna; Ogawa, Yusuke; Takeshima, Nozomi; Hayasaka, Yu; Imai, Hissei; Shinohara, Kiyomi; Suganuma, Aya; Watanabe, Norio; Stockton, Sarah; Geddes, John R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many antidepressants are indicated for the treatment of major depression. Two network meta-analyses have provided the most comprehensive assessments to date, accounting for both direct and indirect comparisons; however, these reported conflicting interpretation of results. Here, we present a protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis aimed at updating the evidence base and comparing all second-generation as well as selected first-generation antidepressants in terms of efficacy and acceptability in the acute treatment of major depression. Methods and analysis We will include all randomised controlled trials reported as double-blind and comparing one active drug with another or with placebo in the acute phase treatment of major depression in adults. We are interested in comparing the following active agents: agomelatine, amitriptyline, bupropion, citalopram, clomipramine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, levomilnacipran, milnacipran, mirtazapine, nefazodone, paroxetine, reboxetine, sertraline, trazodone, venlafaxine, vilazodone and vortioxetine. The main outcomes will be the proportion of patients who responded to or dropped out of the allocated treatment. Published and unpublished studies will be sought through relevant database searches, trial registries and websites; all reference selection and data extraction will be conducted by at least two independent reviewers. We will conduct a random effects network meta-analysis to synthesise all evidence for each outcome and obtain a comprehensive ranking of all treatments. To rank the various treatments for each outcome, we will use the surface under the cumulative ranking curve and the mean ranks. We will employ local as well as global methods to evaluate consistency. We will fit our model in a Bayesian framework using OpenBUGS, and produce results and various checks in Stata and R. We will also assess the quality of evidence contributing to network

  5. The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Fluoxetine Directly Inhibits Osteoblast Differentiation and Mineralization During Fracture Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bradaschia-Correa, Vivian; Josephson, Anne M; Mehta, Devan; Mizrahi, Matthew; Neibart, Shane S; Liu, Chao; Kennedy, Oran D; Castillo, Alesha B; Egol, Kenneth A; Leucht, Philipp

    2016-11-21

    Chronic use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of depression has been linked to osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic SSRI use on fracture healing in two murine models of bone regeneration. First, we performed a comprehensive analysis of endochondral bone healing in a femur fracture model. C57/BL6 mice treated with fluoxetine, the most commonly prescribed SSRI, developed a normal cartilaginous soft-callus at 14 days after fracture and demonstrated a significantly smaller and biomechanically weaker bony hard-callus at 28 days. In order to further dissect the mechanism that resulted in a smaller bony regenerate, we used an intramembranous model of bone healing and revealed that fluoxetine treatment resulted in a significantly smaller bony callus at 7 and 14 days postinjury. In order to test whether the smaller bony regenerate following fluoxetine treatment was caused by an inhibition of osteogenic differentiation and/or mineralization, we employed in vitro experiments, which established that fluoxetine treatment decreases osteogenic differentiation and mineralization and that this effect is serotonin-independent. Finally, in a translational approach, we tested whether cessation of the medication would result in restoration of the regenerative potential. However, histologic and μCT analysis revealed non-union formation in these animals with fibrous tissue interposition within the callus. In conclusion, fluoxetine exerts a direct, inhibitory effect on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, shown in two disparate murine models of bone repair. Discontinuation of the drug did not result in restoration of the healing potential, but rather led to complete arrest of the repair process. Besides the well-established effect of SSRIs on bone homeostasis, our study provides strong evidence that fluoxetine use negatively impacts fracture healing. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Severe burn injuries: acute and long-term treatment.

    PubMed

    Spanholtz, Timo A; Theodorou, Panagiotis; Amini, Peymaneh; Spilker, Gerald

    2009-09-01

    The physician that initially sees a patient with an extensive and deep dermal burn injury must be able to provide initial acute treatment and to make a well-founded decision whether to have the patient transported to a burn care center (BCC). Physicians from a variety of specialities will be involved in the management of long-term sequelae. This article provides an overview of the treatment of severe burns and their commonest complications. Special attention is paid to initial emergency treatment (first aid) and to late complications, because physicians from multiple specialties are often involved in these phases of treatment. The data and guidelines that are summarized here were obtained through a selective Medline search and supplemented by the authors' experience in their own burn care center. Analgesia, careful fluid balance, and early intubation are important elements of the initial emergency treatment. Long-term complications of burns, such as disfiguring scars on exposed areas of skin and functionally significant contractures, often require surgical treatment. Early measures for scar care may improve the outcome. The effective treatment of severe burns is interdisciplinary, involving general practitioners and emergency physicians as well as plastic surgeons and physicians of other specialties. Knowledge of the basic principles of treatment enables physicians to care for patients with burns appropriately both in the acute setting and in the long term.

  7. The combination of olanzapine and fluoxetine in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Richard C

    2003-07-01

    Depression can occur either with or without alternation with periods of mania. Depression that alternates with mania (bipolar depression) is a particularly difficult problem in clinical practice. The evidence base of the treatment for this condition is not strong and the choices at best are limited. Furthermore, although there are a number of effective antidepressants for the non-cycling variety ('unipolar' major depression), > 50% of patients experience incomplete response to any given drug. Given the proportion of the population involved, these represent fairly sizeable markets. Studies over the last several years indicate that the combination of the novel antipsychotic olanzapine and the serotonin-selective re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine, may be effective for both conditions. One trial in 28 patients showed that this combination was an effective treatment, compared to the individual components with unipolar depressed patients who had not responded to two antidepressants of different chemical classes. Two subsequent large-scale attempts at replication have resulted in failed trials. Patients randomly assigned to antidepressant monotherapies showed a good response, indicating that the populations being studied were not actually treatment-resistant; therefore, more research is needed. Alternatively, a recent study showed that monotherapy with olanzapine produced a greater effect than placebo in bipolar depression and the combination of olanzapine and fluoxetine yielded an even more robust response. However, important questions remain, e.g., the issue of comparative effectiveness, that is to say, whether the same result could occur with combinations of other novel antipsychotics and SSRIs. In addition, there remain significant concerns regarding the safety and tolerability of olanzapine in these populations. Essential questions about the potential for substantial weight gain, Type II diabetes and for the development of tardive dyskinesia (a syndrome of

  8. Fluoxetine, but not tricyclic antidepressants, potentiates the 5-hydroxytryptophan-mediated increase in plasma cortisol and prolactin secretion in subjects with major depression or with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, H; Bastani, B; Jayathilake, K; Maes, M

    1997-07-01

    It has been suggested that the clinical efficacy of chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine and perhaps all antidepressants is due to their ability to enhance serotonergic activity. The effects of chronic treatment with fluoxetine or tricyclic antidepressants on the L-5-hydroxytryptophan (200 mg, L-5-HTP; PO)-induced increases in plasma cortisol and prolactin (PRL) concentrations were studied in patients with major depression or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Administration of L-5-HTP increased plasma cortisol and PRL levels in medicated and unmedicated patients with major depression or OCD. The L-5-HTP-induced cortisol and PRL responses were significantly higher in fluoxetine-treated than in tricyclic-treated or unmedicated major depressed patients. The latter two groups did not differ significantly in their cortisol or PRL responses to L-5-HTP. The L-5-HTP-induced increases in cortisol and PRL in fluoxetine-treated patients with major depression or OCD were not significantly different. The results suggest that fluoxetine, but not tricyclic antidepressants, potentiates 5-HT receptor-mediated stimulation of cortisol and PRL secretion in humans, consistent with available evidence that fluoxetine treatment, but not tricyclic antidepressants, increases central serotonergic activity in patients with MD or OCD by a presynaptic mechanism.

  9. The influence of microglia activation on the efficacy of amitriptyline, doxepin, milnacipran, venlafaxine and fluoxetine in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zychowska, Magdalena; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-02-15

    The analgesic properties of antidepressants are often used in the treatment of neuropathy; however their influence on glial cells in maintaining neuropathic pain is unknown. Our studies examined the neuropathic pain-relieving properties after intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, doxepin, milnacipran, venlafaxine and fluoxetine 7 days after sciatic nerve injury (CCI) in rats and its influence on microglia/macrophages (IBA-1) and astroglia (GFAP) activation in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) using Western blot. All tested antidepressants significantly reduced CCI-induced allodynia but hyperalgesia was only antagonised by fluoxetine, doxepine and venlafaxine. The strongest analgesia was observed after fluoxetine administration. Western blot analysis showed the upregulation of the IBA-1 in the lumbar spinal cord and DRG after amitriptyline or milnacipran administration in CCI-exposed rats, whereas after fluoxetine the downregulation was observed. The administration of doxepin did not change the IBA-1 protein level in both studied structures; however venlafaxine decreased the IBA-1 only in the DRG. No changes in the GFAP level in both structures were observed after any of listed above antidepressants administration. Chronic minocycline treatment enhanced amitriptyline and milnacipran, but did not fluoxetine analgesia under neuropathic pain in rats. Our results suggest that nerve injury-induced pain is related with the activation of microglia, which is diminished by fluoxetine treatment in the neuropathic pain model.

  10. Differentiation syndrome in acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Christin B; Roberts, Owen

    2015-11-01

    We report a case report of hyperleukocytosis, fever, hypotension, pulmonary and pericardial effusions, and acute kidney injury during initial treatment with azacitidine in a patient with AML-MRC. Collectively, the symptomatology resembled differentiation syndrome. Azacitidine has been previously associated with fever, peripheral edema, and hyperleukocytosis, but its side effect profile has never been described as similar to differentiation syndrome. The patient's deteriorating course quickly turned around after treatment with dexamethasone. This potential reaction, and potential treatment, is important for clinicians to be aware of.

  11. Fluoxetine Increases the Expression of miR-572 and miR-663a in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mundalil Vasu, Mahesh; Anitha, Ayyappan; Takahashi, Taro; Thanseem, Ismail; Iwata, Keiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on the developed neurons in the adult brain. In contrast, the drug may be deleterious to immature or undifferentiated neural cells, although the mechanism is unclear. Recent investigations have suggested that microRNAs (miRNA) may be critical for effectiveness of psychotropic drugs including SSRI. We investigated whether fluoxetine could modulate expressions of neurologically relevant miRNAs in two neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Initial screening results revealed that three (miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) and four (miR-320a, miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) miRNAs were up-regulated in SK-N-SH cells and SH-SY5Y cells, respectively, after 24 hours treatment of fluoxetine (1–25 μM). Cell viability was reduced according to the dose of fluoxetine. The upregulation of miR-572 and miR-663a was consistent in both the SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH cells, confirmed by a larger scale culture condition. Our data is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine could increase the expression of miRNAs in undifferentiated neural cells, and that putative target genes of those miRNAs have been shown to be involved in fundamental neurodevelopmental processes. PMID:27716787

  12. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite ‘normal’ (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury. In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration. In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  13. [Acute lithium poisoning: epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Burguera Vion, Víctor; Montes, José Manuel; Del Rey, José Manuel; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Rodao, José María; Tenorio, Maite; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Liaño, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Lithium continues to be the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder. Acute lithium poisoning is a potentially serious event. We present a retrospective observational significative study of episodes of acute lithium poisoning during a 52- month period. Poisoning was defined by a blood lithium concentration of 1.5 mEq/L or higher. We analyzed treatment and epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of 70 episodes were identified (incidence density among treated patients, 1.76 per 100 patient-years). The most frequent cause of lithium poisoning was a concurrent medical condition (46%). Most poisonings were mild (74.2%), but neurologic involvement was identified in 40.3%. Electrocardiographic abnormalities were found in 8 cases. Acute renal failure, found in 23 patients (37.1%), was mild in most cases, although 11 patients required hemodialysis. We concluded that acute lithium poisoning is an uncommon complication, but risk needs to be lowered. Patients should be warned to avoid dosage errors and to take special care during concurrent illnesses and while taking other medications.

  14. Treatment of acute diarrhea with Saccharomyces boulardii in infants.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Naflesia B O; Penna, Francisco J; Lima, Fátima M L S; Nicoli, Jacques R; Filho, Luciano A P

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether an oral treatment with a commercial pharmaceutical product containing Saccharomyces boulardii would reduce the duration of diarrhea in infants with acute diarrhea. In the present double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 186 infants, 6 to 48 months old and hospitalized within 72 hours after the onset of acute diarrhea in 2 hospitals in Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, were randomly assigned to receive twice per day for 5 days 200 mg of a commercial pharmaceutical product containing 4 × 10 viable cells of S boulardii or a placebo. Stool samples were submitted to search for rotavirus. Among the 176 infants who completed the trial, those treated with S boulardii (90) showed a reduction in diarrhea duration (P < 0.05) when compared with the placebo group (86). The present study shows a reduction in diarrhea duration when S boulardii was given to children within 72 hours after the onset of acute diarrhea. The present study suggests a complementary treatment of acute diarrhea in infants with daily oral doses of S boulardii.

  15. PROPER USE OF ANTIBIOTICS IN TREATMENT OF ACUTE OTITIS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Miriam H.

    1951-01-01

    The problem of preventing loss of hearing following acute otitis media has been made more complex by the use of penicillin and other antibiotic agents which may apparently cure yet leave dangerous residual disease. The causes of loss of hearing must be recognized early if remedial treatment is to be effective. In children particularly, loss of hearing may go unnoticed for some time. Physicians who treat otitis media should feel the responsibility not only of bringing an acutely ill child back to health but of preserving the function of the hearing mechanism. Careful examination of the ear after apparent subsidence of infection is mandatory. It is of the utmost importance to be able to recognize the ear drum in its normal state and its various pathological states and to be alert to the early signs of changes associated with loss of hearing. Antibiotics should not be expected to do more than help combat the acute infection in otitis media. Adequate follow-up demands strong suspicion of residual pathologic process in the ear. The prevention of loss of hearing still requires knowledge of the established clinical facts and therapeutic procedures and the application of this knowledge to treatment of acute infections of the middle ear. PMID:14848731

  16. [Potentials of phytotherapy in the complex treatment of acute pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, A I; Kablova, I V

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase the effectiveness of treatment of patients with acute pyelonephritis by incorporating of phytopreparation "Prolit Super Septo" in complex therapy. The study included 38 patients with acute primary pyelonephritis. All patients have received standard medical therapy, 21 of them (Group 2) have additionally received "Prolit Super Septo" 2 capsules 2 times a day for 1 month. Outcome measures included basic laboratory parameters, and results of bacteriological examination and immunological assessment of patients 12-14 and 28-30 days after initiation of therapy. Against the background of the therapy, positive dynamics of the level of leukocyturia and bacteriuria was detected in both groups; therapeutic effect, however, was more pronounced in the Group 2 treated with complex therapy: after the end of treatment, the proportion of sterile cultures was 85.7%, whereas in Group 1--70.6%. In addition, complex treatment had a positive effect on the immune status of patients, as evidenced by normalization of blood immunoglobulins, circulating immune complexes and C-reactive protein. The inclusion of "Prolit Super Septo" in the complex conservative treatment of patients with acute pyelonephritis promotes the development of an adequate immune response and the rapid elimination of the pathogens, thus preventing the development of purulent forms of the disease, or chronization of process.

  17. Psychogenic excoriation responding to fluoxetine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu

    2008-04-01

    Compulsive skin picking, 'acne excoriee', neurotic (psychogenic) excoriation, dermatotillomania, occurring in 2% dermatology patients mostly in women, is a result of excessive scratching, picking, gouging or squeezing of the skin using teeth, tweezers, nail files, pins and knives, etc. The lesions are usually found on face and also on upper limbs and upper back, areas patients can easily reach. They may occur in absence or in response to skin pathology or sensation of itching. A young female patient attended OPD with the complaints of multiple excoriated lesions over the face, arms and forearms. The diagnosis was psychogenic excoriation which is an uncommon psychodermatological condition. She was treated with fluoxetine and behaviour therapy. The patient recovered fully with above treatment at the end of 3 months. Psychogenic excoriation is an uncommon psychodermatological condition which responds well to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and behaviour therapy (habit reversal training).

  18. Effect of fluoxetine and adenosine receptor NECA agonist on G alpha q/11 protein of C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Kovárů, Hana; Kováru, Frantisek; Lisá, Vĕra

    2012-01-01

    Trimeric G-proteins play a crucial role in the transmembrane signalling to intracellular pathways via effector phospholipase C (1,4,5 IP3) or adenylylcyclase (cAMP). G-protein modulation is considered to participate in the antidepressant mode of action by neurotransmitter G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). Adenosine is naturally occured nucleoside and adenosine receptor belongs to GPCR family. Properties and functions of ubiquitous adenosine receptor were described with number of agonists and antagonists. In C6 glioma cells, we studied acute administration of SSRI antidepressants - fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram. We used immunochemical estimation (ELISA) of the main types of G-protein alpha subunits from isolated membranes of C6 glioma cells. We also estimated effect of NECA agonist on fluoxetine induced signalling via 1,4,5 IP3 and its levels. Results show involvement of the antidepressant drugs in the C6 glioma signal transduction cascades and their modulation in dependence on the antidepressant of SSRI type. We measured main G alpha protein profiles after fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram administration. We found significant changes as following: decreased G alpha Gq/11 for fluoxetine, low G alpha s for sertraline and both high G alpha q/11 and high G alpha s for citalopram. Furthermore the NECA (5´-N-ethylcarboxamido- adenosine) agonist of adenosine receptor alone evoked high decrease of G alpha q/11 levels. Whereas fluoxetine influenced G alpha q/11 decline was abolished by NECA in concentration manner, especially at 10-8 and 10-9 M concentrations. These results support abolishion NECA effect on fluoxetin influenced 1,4,5 IP3 signalling via PLC. Main G alpha profiles are dependent on SSRI type antidepressant. Abolishing both fluoxetine evoked G alpha q/11 and and 1,4,5 IP3 signalling can indicate parallel interference between G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and the cell response. Presented data are first findings about adenosine receptor

  19. [Investigation of diagnostic method and treatment on acute appendicitis with acute intestinal obstruction as presenting manifestation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohu; Li, Zhixia; An, Dali; Liu, Jing; Li, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Prevention of the misdiagnosis of acute appendicitis when it first manifested as acute intestinal obstruction, and to search proper way of diagnosis and treatment for such event to provide the reference. Clinical data of 33 acute appendicitis cases presented with acute intestinal obstruction in Beijing Tong Ren Hospital during January 2000 and December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. All 33 patients were admitted to the Emergency Department with symptoms of various degrees abdominal pain and abdominal distension. There was no passage of gas and feces. The mean time of onset was (62.2±25.0) hours. The imaging examination showedthat all patients had complete bowel obstruction. Twenty one patients(63.6%) had peritonitis, three of whom developed with septic shock. Abdominal CT was performed in 17 patients preoperatively, which showed retention of gas and fluid in the small intestine in all the patients and 13 were suggestive of acute appendicitis. All of these patients received surgical treatment, 12 patients underwent laparoscopic exploration, and the remaining 21 patients received exploratory laparotomy during which acute appendicitis was confirmed to be the cause of intestinal obstruction, of whom 14(42.4%) was identified as mechanical intestinal obstruction. Nine patients underwent appendectomy and lysis of adhesion, five appendectomy and partial excision of the greateromentum. Nineteenpatients(57.6%) were identified as paralytic ileus and underwent appendectomy only. Twelve patients required respiratory and circulatory support and were admitted to ICU postoperatively. The mean duration time in ICU was(8.8±5.2) days. Postoperative pathology showedgangrene accompanied with perforation in the appendix. All patients were discharged without any complication. The length of hospital stay was (15.4±4.6) days. All patients were followed up for 3 ~ 12 months. One patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease developed repeated pulmonary infection and died of

  20. The psychoactive pollutant fluoxetine compromises antipredator behaviour in fish.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jake M; Saaristo, Minna; Bertram, Michael G; Lewis, Phoebe J; Coggan, Timothy L; Clarke, Bradley O; Wong, Bob B M

    2017-03-01

    Pharmaceuticals are increasingly being detected in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Particularly concerning are pharmaceutical pollutants that can adversely impact exposed wildlife, even at extremely low concentrations. One such contaminant is the widely prescribed antidepressant fluoxetine, which can disrupt neurotransmission and behavioural pathways in wildlife. Despite this, relatively limited research has addressed the behavioural impacts of fluoxetine at ecologically realistic exposure concentrations. Here, we show that 28-day fluoxetine exposure at two ecologically relevant dosages-one representing low surface water concentrations and another representing high effluent flow concentrations-alters antipredator behaviour in Eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki). We found that fluoxetine exposure at the lower dosage resulted in increased activity levels irrespective of the presence or absence of a predatory dragonfly nymph (Hemianax papuensis). Additionally, irrespective of exposure concentration, fluoxetine-exposed fish entered the predator 'strike zone' more rapidly. In a separate experiment, fluoxetine exposure reduced mosquitofish freezing behaviour-a common antipredator strategy-following a simulated predator strike, although, in females, this reduction in behaviour was seen only at the lower dosage. Together, our findings suggest that fluoxetine can cause both non-monotonic and sex-dependent shifts in behaviour. Further, they demonstrate that exposure to fluoxetine at environmentally realistic concentrations can alter antipredator behaviour, with important repercussions for organismal fitness.

  1. Acute Treatment Therapies for Pediatric Migraine: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Patniyot, Irene R; Gelfand, Amy A

    2016-01-01

    We sought to conduct a qualitative systematic review to evaluate the safety and efficacy of available treatments for pediatric patients with migraine or benign primary headache in the emergency department, in an effort to inform future practice. Scopus, Medline, and PubMed databases were searched for randomized controlled trials retrospective reviews, review articles, and case studies discussing migraine or benign primary headache management that were conducted in the emergency room or outpatient acute care setting in pediatric patients (less than 18-years old). Meeting abstracts and cited references within articles were also evaluated. Multiple variables were recorded, including type of treatment, study design, dosing, primary outcome, and side effects. Therapeutic gain was calculated in studies with a placebo arm. Treatments were subjectively assessed based on methodology and number of trials for a particular therapy. Thirty-one studies were included in the final analysis. Of these, 17 were randomized controlled trials, 9 were retrospective reviews, and 5 were prospective chart review studies. One pertained to IV fluids, 2 to nonspecific analgesic use, 5 to dopamine receptor antagonists, 2 to valproic acid, 1 to propofol, 1 to magnesium, 1 to bupivicaine, 13 to triptan medications, and 3 to dihydroergotamine (DHE). Treatments considered effective for acute migraine or benign primary headache in the analgesic category include ibuprofen, and to a lesser degree acetaminophen. Ketorolac was not compared to other NSAIDs, but was found to be less effective than prochlorperazine. Of the phenothiazines, prochlorperazine was considered most effective. Of the triptan medications, almotriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan nasal spray, sumatriptan nasal spray, and combination sumatriptan/naproxen are effective agents for acute treatment. Treatments considered probably effective included IV fluids, chlorpromazine, valproate sodium, injectable sumatriptan, and IV DHE. Treatments

  2. The effect of combined administration of ethanol and sertraline, fluoxetine and citalopram on rabbit EEG.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Bogusława; Czarnecka, Elzbieta

    2003-06-01

    In this study we have decided to examine acute interaction of ethanol with some drugs that belong to selective serotonin inhibitor (SSRI) group. Therefore, the influence of sertraline, fluoxetine and citalopram on the effect of ethanol on EEG of rabbits (frontal cortex, hippocampus, MRF) was tested. Sertraline (10mg/kg i.p.), fluoxetine (10mg/kg i.p.) and citalopram (5mg/kg i.p.) were given 30min before ethanol injection in a dose 0.8g/kg i.v. Ethanol caused the increase of the slow frequencies (0.5-4cps) in the recording, as well as a marked decrease of the fastest frequencies (13-30 and 30-45cps). Sertraline, fluoxetine and citalopram (given before ethanol) prevented the increase in the slow frequencies (0.5-4cps) in the recordings from the frontal cortex and hippocampus, which indicates on antagonism inhibitory action of ethanol. These drugs administered together with ethanol may increase its influence on fast frequencies. This effect depends on brain structure and drug.

  3. Treatment of acute abscesses in the casualty department.

    PubMed Central

    Simms, M H; Curran, F; Johnson, R A; Oates, J; Givel, J C; Chabloz, R; ALexander-Williams, J

    1982-01-01

    In the treatment of acute pyogenic soft-tissue abscess incision, curettage, and primary suture was compared with incision and drainage alone in a randomised prospective trial. Operations were performed under antibiotic cover by casualty officers, and patients were reviewed by an independent observer in a septic dressing clinic. Altogether 114 patients were studied, of whom 54 were treated by curettage and primary suture and 60 by simple drainage. The mean healing time was 8.9 days in those treated by primary suture and 7.8 days in those treated by simple drainage (p less than 0.05). Primary healing failed to occur in 19 (35%) of the sutured wounds, but there were no other complications in either group. It is concluded that incision and drainage alone is adequate treatment for acute soft-tissue abscess. PMID:6805714

  4. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  5. Outpatient treatment of acute diverticulitis: rates and predictors of failure.

    PubMed

    Etzioni, David A; Chiu, Vicki Y; Cannom, Rebecca R; Burchette, Raoul J; Haigh, Philip I; Abbas, Maher A

    2010-06-01

    Many patients with acute diverticulitis can be managed as outpatients, but the success rate of this approach has not been thoroughly studied. We analyzed a large cohort of patients treated on an outpatient basis for an initial episode of acute diverticulitis to test our hypothesis that outpatient treatment of acute diverticulitis is highly effective. We analyzed patients within the Kaiser Permanente Southern California system (from 2006 to 2007) who were diagnosed with an initial episode of diverticulitis during an emergency room visit and subsequently discharged home. Each patient underwent a computed tomography (CT) scan for diagnosis or for confirmation of a diagnosis, and each radiologic report was evaluated regarding the presence of free fluid, phlegmon, perforation, and abscess. Treatment failure was defined as a return to the emergency room or an admission for diverticulitis within 60 days of the initial evaluation. Our study included 693 patients, of whom 54% were women, the average age was 58.5 years, and 6% failed treatment. In multivariate analysis, women (odds ratio, 3.08 [95% CI, 1.31-7.28]) and patients with free fluid on CT scan (odds ratio, 3.19 [95% CI, 1.45-7.05]) were at significantly higher risk for treatment failure. Age, white blood cell count, Charlson score, and duration of antibiotics were not significant predictive factors. In a retrospective analysis, among a cohort of patients who were referred for outpatient treatment, we found that such treatment was effective for the vast majority (94%) of patients. Women and those with free fluid on CT scan appear to be at higher risk for treatment failure.

  6. Differential interaction with the serotonin system by S-ketamine, vortioxetine, and fluoxetine in a genetic rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms mediating ketamine's antidepressant effect have only been partly resolved. Recent preclinical reports implicate serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in the antidepressant-like action of ketamine. Vortioxetine is a multimodal-acting antidepressant that is hypothesized to exert its therapeutic activity through 5-HT reuptake inhibition and modulation of several 5-HT receptors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic-like profiles of S-ketamine, vortioxetine, and the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine in response to manipulation of 5-HT tone. Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic model of depression, were depleted of 5-HT by repeated administration of 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester HCl (pCPA). Using pCPA-pretreated and control FSL rats, we investigated the acute and sustained effects of S-ketamine (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), or vortioxetine (10 mg/kg) on recognition memory and depression-like behavior in the object recognition task (ORT) and forced swim test (FST), respectively. The behavioral phenotype of FSL rats was unaffected by 5-HT depletion. Vortioxetine, but not fluoxetine or S-ketamine, acutely ameliorated the memory deficits of FSL rats in the ORT irrespective of 5-HT tone. No sustained effects were observed in the ORT. In the FST, all three drugs demonstrated acute antidepressant-like activity but only S-ketamine had sustained effects. Unlike vortioxetine, the antidepressant-like responses of fluoxetine and S-ketamine were abolished by 5-HT depletion. These observations suggest that the acute and sustained antidepressant-like effects of S-ketamine depend on endogenous stimulation of 5-HT receptors. In contrast, the acute therapeutic-like effects of vortioxetine on memory and depression-like behavior may be mediated by direct activity at 5-HT receptors.

  7. Furosemide in the treatment of phosgene induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

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