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Sample records for acute general hospital

  1. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  2. Effects of Medicare BBA spending reductions on the profitability of general acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sear, Alan M

    2004-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 was intended to reduce spending by about $115 billion from the Medicare Hospital Insurance trust fund over a five-year period. Several studies were funded by the hospital industry that indicated that the actual reductions would be far greater than $115 billion and that these reductions would have a devastating effect on U.S. hospital finances. In 1999, Congress passed the Balanced Budget Refinement Act, which added back about $11 billion in spending for fiscal years 2000 through 2002. In 2000, Congress passed the Benefits Improvement and Protection Act, which restored another $37 billion in spending over a five-year period. These cutbacks were going into effect at the same time as a cyclical decline in hospital operating margins occurred. This study was designed to determine if any separate effect of the Balanced Budget Act could be detected in the operating margins of general acute care hospitals in Tampa Bay, Florida. Operating margins were analyzed for 25 hospitals for a 12-year period (1990 through 2001), and a regression model was tested in which the dependent variable was the difference in mean operating margins for each hospital between the 1990 through 1997 period and the 1998 through 2001 period. The mean percentage of hospital revenue derived from Medicare, five other revenue source variables, and three hospital structural variables were used as the predictor variables. A statistically significant decline in operating margins was seen between these two periods, but Medicare revenue did not account for a significant amount of the variance. Thus, it was concluded that the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 did not significantly affect the operating margins of the study hospitals. Implications for Medicare policy are addressed. PMID:15074120

  3. Relationship between Psychiatric Nurse Work Environments and Nurse Burnout in Acute Care General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Aiken, Linda H.; McClaine, Lakeetra; Hanlon, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Following deinstitutionalization, inpatient psychiatric services moved from state institutions to general hospitals. Despite the magnitude of these changes, evaluations of the quality of inpatient care environments in general hospitals are limited. This study examined the extent to which organizational factors of the inpatient psychiatric environments are associated with psychiatric nurse burnout. Organizational factors were measured by an instrument endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Robust clustered regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between organizational factors in 67 hospitals and levels of burnout for 353 psychiatric nurses. Lower levels of psychiatric nurse burnout was significantly associated with inpatient environments that had better overall quality work environments, more effective managers, strong nurse-physician relationships, and higher psychiatric nurse-to-patient staffing ratios. These results suggest that adjustments in organizational management of inpatient psychiatric environments could have a positive effect on psychiatric nurses’ capacity to sustain safe and effective patient care environments. PMID:20144031

  4. A strategy for enhancing financial performance: a study of general acute care hospitals in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the determinants of hospital profitability were evaluated using a sample of 142 hospitals that had undergone hospital standardization inspections by the South Korea Hospital Association over the 4-year period from 1998 to 2001. The measures of profitability used as dependent variables in this study were pretax return on assets, after-tax return on assets, basic earning power, pretax operating margin, and after-tax operating margin. Among those determinants, it was found that ownership type, teaching status, inventory turnover, and the average charge per adjusted inpatient day positively and statistically significantly affected all 5 of these profitability measures. However, the labor expenses per adjusted inpatient day and administrative expenses per adjusted inpatient day negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures. The debt ratio negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures, with the exception of basic earning power. None of the market factors assessed were shown to significantly affect profitability. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the profitability of hospitals can be improved despite deteriorating external environmental conditions by facilitating the formation of sound financial structures with optimal capital supplies, optimizing the management of total assets with special emphasis placed on inventory management, and introducing efficient control of fixed costs including labor and administrative expenses.

  5. Designing sustainable acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cory, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    The need to provide sustainable hospitals lies in the fact that we have an obligation to act responsibly towards good stewardship of our environment and the world's precious resources, ensuring a healthy future for coming generations. As such, a sustainable hospital must sit squarely in a sustainable society, and the global and local context should be considered when designing a sustainable health facility.

  6. [Acute community-acquired pneumonia of moderate and grave severity investigated by bronchoscopy. Analysis of 193 cases hospitalized in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Vivès, L; Biel, P; Maler, G; Labonne, F; Lecoules, N; Dufour, M; Marignol, G; Vanche, J

    1996-01-01

    Between February 1989 and June 1994 193 cases of acute community acquired pneumonia (PAC) which were of intermediate or great severity were admitted to two hospitals in the South West of France. These patients were explored using bronchofibroscopy (FB) with a protected brush (BP) and alveolar microlavage (MLBA) and quantitative cultures were performed, also there were other specimens taken in a regular fashion. The percentage of positive examinations was 60% for brushings (BP), 59% for MLBA and 21% for blood cultures and 16% for serological tests. An aetiology was determined in 137 cases (70.9%). The organisms recovered were Streptococcus pneumoniae (49.6%), gram negative bacilli (17.4%), Haemophilus influenzae (11.7%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (4.4%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.6%), Chlamydia pneumoniae (2.2%), Legionella pneumophila (0.7%), and various 5.8%. The overall mortality was 15% despite immediate antibiotics based on the likely organism in 88% of cases. The study of prognostic factors confirmed the Fine score system (determined a posteriori) which constitutes a useful and practical index determining the management of PAC. On the other hand the role of bacteriological documentation in improving the vital prognosis remains to be confirmed. If bronchofibroscopy has appeared to us as a safe and useful means of investigation, the management of these disease remains to specified. We suggest that its use is reserved for subjects with life threatening disease (a Fine score equal to or greater than 3) or for those patients who are likely to have unusual germs: failure of previous antibiotics, diabetes, malnourishment, cancer, airflow obstruction and inhalation. PMID:8711237

  7. Differences in care between general medicine and respiratory specialists in the management of patients hospitalized for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wijayaratne, Kurugamage; Wilson, Jessica; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan; Sriram, Krishna B.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Hospitalized patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) may be managed by either respiratory specialists (RS) or general medicine physicians (GMP). While previous studies have audited the hospital AECOPD management of RS, only a small number of studies have evaluated the management of GMP. AIMS: The aims of this study were to firstly examine the differences in AECOPD management of GMP and RS and secondly compare their care to national COPD guidelines. METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of consecutive AECOPD patients admitted to two hospitals (one hospital where all AECOPD patients were managed by RS and another where all AECOPD patients were managed by GMP) over a 3-month period. Electronic medical records, medical case notes, pathology and radiology data for the admission were reviewed. RESULTS: There were 201 COPD exacerbations in 169 patients (49.7% male, mean age 72.3). GMP managed 84 (41.7%) exacerbations. In comparison to RS, GMP performed fewer spirometry tests, blood gas analysis and less frequently treated patients with guideline-recommended medications. Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation was poor for both groups of clinicians. Median length of stay was shorter in GMP patients versus RS patients (3 days vs. 5 days, P = 0.001). There were no differences in the 12-month re-admission (41.7% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.664) and mortality rates (10.7% vs. 6%, P = 0.292) between both groups of patients. CONCLUSION: Our study found differences in the hospital AECOPD management of GMP and RS, but these did not translate into different clinical outcomes between their patients. We also found suboptimal adherence to national COPD guidelines, suggesting that there is scope for improvement in the AECOPD management of both groups of clinicians. PMID:24250732

  8. Screening, detecting and enhancing the yield of previously undiagnosed hepatitis B and C in patients with acute medical admissions to hospital: A pilot project undertaken at the Vancouver General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kapeluto, Jordanna E; Kadatz, Matthew; Wormsbecker, Andrew; Sidhu, Kiran; Yoshida, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) represent an increasing health burden and morbidity in Canada. Viral hepatitis, specifically HCV, has high prevalence among persons born between 1945 and 1965, with 45% to 85% of infected adults asymptomatic and unaware of their infection. Screening has been shown to be cost effective in the detection and treatment of viral hepatitis. OBJECTIVE: To quantify incidence and identify undocumented HBV and HCV infection in hospitalized patients at a single centre with secondary analysis of risk factors as part of a quality improvement initiative. METHODS: A one-time antibody test was conducted in patients admitted to the acute medicine and gastroenterology services. RESULTS: Over a 12-week period, hospital screening for HBV and HCV was performed in 37.3% of 995 admitted patients. There was identification of 15 previously undiagnosed cases of HCV (4%) and 36 undocumented cases of occult (ie, antihepatitis B core antigen seropositive) or active (ie, hepatitis B surface antigen seropositive) HBV (9.7%). Among patients with positive screens, 60% of seropositive HCV patients had no identifiable risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among hospitalized patients in Vancouver was higher than that of the general population. Risk factors for contraction are often not identified. These results can be used as part of an ongoing discussion regarding a ‘seek and treat’ approach to the detection and treatment of chronic blood-borne viral illnesses. PMID:24945186

  9. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used.

  10. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  11. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  12. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  13. Epsom General Hospital orthopaedic theatre.

    PubMed

    1992-11-01

    The Surrey Section of the London Branch held a very successful meeting on Wednesday 9th September 1992 at which Mr Stephen Kirby BSc, CEng, Director of Estates, gave a talk and tour of the new Private Ward Unit and Ultra Clean Ventilation Theatre at Epsom General Hospital. The new Northey Ward, is a result of the refurbishment of what was a 31 bed section of the Hospital Surgical Block on the 5th floor. The new Ward provides a total of 18 single bed Wards, each complete with bathroom/WC, the Unit also accommodates a 5 bed Day Ward. All the facilities provided are of extremely high standard, which given the very tight building programme, detailed elsewhere, is indicative of the dedication of both the Designers and Contractors who are congratulated on their achievement. With regard to the UCV Theatre the following information was prepared by Aidan Hardy who is a Project Engineer with Epsom General Hospital. We are delighted to be able to print this report for our readers. PMID:10122458

  14. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  15. Ownership and financial sustainability of German acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Augurzky, Boris; Engel, Dirk; Schmidt, Christoph M; Schwierz, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    This paper considers the role of ownership form for the financial sustainability of German acute care hospitals over time. We measure financial sustainability by a hospital-specific yearly probability of default (PD) trying to mirror the ability of hospitals to survive in the market in the long run. The results show that private ownership is associated with significantly lower PDs than public ownership. Moreover, path dependence in the PD is substantial but far from 100%, indicating a large number of improvements and deteriorations in financial sustainability over time. Yet, the general public hospitals have the highest path dependence. Overall, this indicates that public hospitals, which are in a poor financial standing, remain in that state or even deteriorate over time, which may be conflicting with financial sustainability.

  16. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jacó Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  17. Delirium and dementia in acute hospitals: assessing the impact of RMN input.

    PubMed

    Law, Emma

    2008-11-01

    There is evidence that provision for the mental health needs of older people in acute hospitals is generally poor. This article describes a study undertaken over a nine-month period at Perth Royal Infirmary, a 317-bed district general hospital. The study sought to measure the impact of input from an RMN in an acute hospital setting and within a multidisciplinary liaison model. The article examines the implications, preparation, implementation and evaluation of RMN input, and the baseline knowledge and expectations of acute hospital staff when caring for patients with dementia and delirium.

  18. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  19. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  20. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. [Pericarditis in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Faintuch, J J; Friedmann, A A

    1996-01-01

    The authors studied 57 patients with pericarditis in the Ward of Internal Medicine of the University of São Paulo from January 1993 through May 1995. A comparison was made with the results of a similar study performed in the same hospital in 1989. Increasing frequency of pericarditis was verified. Tuberculosis, formerly the most frequent etiologic agent, decreased while neoplastic diseases became more common.

  2. A blueprint for smaller local acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    Giving his presentation as one of three speakers in a Architects for Health (AfH)-led session addressing the broader topic of "How to achieve excellence in an age of austerity" at last October's Healthcare Estates conference, Mungo Smith, a founding director and design lead at leading UK healthcare architects MAAP, discussed a booklet he recently co-authored with Andy Black, chair of international healthcare strategic consultancy Durrow, and Johannes Eggen, a partner at NSW Architects and Planners in Oslo. In it the authors argue that there is no reason why "gold standard" acute hospital care cannot be cost-effectively delivered from small, well-equipped local hospitals in the future, but that achieving this will require "a number of (current) NHS conventions to be defied".

  3. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  4. Contribution of general practitioner hospitals in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Grant, J A

    1984-05-01

    The results of a survey of 64 Scottish general practitioner hospitals showed that in 1980 these hospitals contained 3.3% of available staffed beds in Scotland; 13.6% of the resident population had access for initial hospital care, and 14.5% of Scottish general practitioners were on their staffs. During the year of the survey they discharged 1.8% of all non-surgical patients, treated almost 100 000 patients for accidents and emergencies and 140 000 outpatients, and 4.4% of all deliveries in Scotland were carried out in the hospitals surveyed. Most communities which are served by general practitioner hospitals in Scotland are rural and on average are more than 30 miles from their nearest district general hospital. The contribution that these small hospitals make to the overall hospital workload has not previously been estimated. It has been shown nationally to be small but not inconsiderable . In terms of the contribution to the health care of the communities they serve it cannot and should not be underestimated.

  5. General Practice Teaching--Within the Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, M.

    1976-01-01

    A program of integrated teaching by consultants and general practitioners is described. The teaching took place in the hospitals used for the purpose by the Medical Faculty of the University of Birmingham. (Author)

  6. Acute hepatic failure among hospitalized Thai children.

    PubMed

    Poovorawan, Yong; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Shafi, Fakrudeen; Boudville, Irving; Liu, Yanfang; Hutagalung, Yanee; Bock, Hans L

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based study from June 2002 to December 2006 of Thai children aged 1-15 years with acute hepatic failure (AHF) to determine the causes and outcomes. Eleven children were included in the study. Hepatitis B virus was the cause of AHF in one child, infection-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was the cause in 1 child, Wilson's disease was the cause in 1 child and dengue fever was suspected to be the cause in 2 children. In 6 children the cause of AHF was unknown. Jaundice was reported in 9 of 11 children. Ten of 11 children had mild to moderate encephalopathy on admission. Five of 11 children died due to AHF. No liver transplantations were performed among the children in this study. Further studies into the relationship between dengue infection and AHF are needed.

  7. [Pre-hospital management of acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Hugues; Fradin, Jordan; Blgnand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The medical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) follows the recommendations of international medical societies. The call to the emergency services by the patient triggers a race against the clock in pre-hospital care. It is essential to reduce the duration of the inadequate perfusion of the heart in order to limit its consequences. An effective reperfusion strategy must be planned in advance taking into account the logistical constraints. It is crucial that the general public is educated to recognise the signs of ACS and to call the emergency services immediately (such as 15, 112 or 991). PMID:26040140

  8. [Management of acute pain therapy: guidelines, recommendations and current practice in german hospitals].

    PubMed

    Erlenwein, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Organisational requirements and the education and training of stuff provide the basis for an adequate supply of quality in acute pain and should be the focus of efforts. Although organizational recommendations of the German guideline on "treatment of acute perioperative and post-traumatic pain" have been increasingly established in practice within the last few years, in many German hospitals there is still lagging far behind in the implementation of general supply conditions, such as regular pain measurement or the introduction of appropriate standardized treatment protocols for all areas of the hospital.As specialized care structures acute pain services have been implemented in 80% of the German hospitals, but only 45% of them meet quality criteria. Due to the heterogeneous realization of acute pain management in different hospitals, it comes apparent, that general guideline recommendations and binding definitions are required to achieve adequate supply conditions. PMID:26863643

  9. 3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking deck (former location of coating mill) showing north side of structures; view to southeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  10. [What should general hospital psychiatry do in a community?].

    PubMed

    Takehisa, Takahashi

    2003-01-01

    Some experiences in Nagano Red Cross hospital and Nagano Prefecture are presented, and the role of general hospital psychiatry (GHP) in a community is discussed. Psychiatric services in Nagano prefecture with population 2.21 million consist of four blocks. Our unit is in north block, providing treatment for acute phase and, in 2000, 1504 cases were new outpatients, daily outpatients were 198 cases and new inpatients were 604 cases including 146 emergency inpatients. In fiscal 2001, 25.6% of notifications of involuntary hospitalization from all psychiatric hospitals were submitted from GHP occupying 12.9% psychiatric beds, and 129 notifications from our unit were largest in Nagano prefecture. Total 7 GHPs with beds are presented by some data, suggesting two types as GHP. One type has relatively many new inpatients by small beds with short-term hospitalization like our GHP, and another type has relatively small new inpatients by large beds with long-term hospitalization like conventional mental hospital. It is necessary for GHP to pursue the former type, and to functionally differentiate from psychiatric hospital. Results of psychiatric emergency system in Nagano prefecture are presented. Designated hospitals are our GHP with 60 beds in north block, Prefectural Hospital with 310 beds in south block, National Sanatorium with 280 beds in east block and rotating 5 psychiatric hospitals with total 968 beds in west block. GHP with 60 beds hospitalized more emergency new cases than other psychiatric hospitals with large beds and discharged 84% of emergency inpatients to their home. Recently, short-term hospitalization of general hospital beds has rapidly progressed, and shared goal settings are needed, and treatment plans with teamwork by various types of experts have started from community-based home care. This teamwork will be expected throughout community psychiatric services. Although until today GHP's ward unit is financially disadvantageous, patients anticipate

  11. Perceived quality of an alternative to acute hospitalization: an analytical study at a community hospital in Hallingdal, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lappegard, Øystein; Hjortdahl, Per

    2014-10-01

    There is growing international interest in the geography of health care provision, with health care providers searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Norway, the government has recently legislated for municipal authorities to develop local health services for a selected group of patients, with a quality equal to or better than that provided by hospitals for emergency admissions. General practitioners in Hallingdal, a rural district in southern Norway, have for several years referred acutely somatically ill patients to a community hospital, Hallingdal sjukestugu (HSS). This article analyzes patients' perceived quality of HSS to demonstrate factors applicable nationally and internationally to aid in the development of local alternatives to general hospitals. We used a mixed-methods approach with questionnaires, individual interviews and a focus group interview. Sixty patients who were taking part in a randomized, controlled study of acute admissions at HSS answered the questionnaire. Selected patients were interviewed about their experiences and a focus group interview was conducted with representatives of local authorities, administrative personnel and health professionals. Patients admitted to HSS reported statistically significant greater satisfaction with several care aspects than those admitted to the general hospital. Factors highlighted by the patients were the quiet and homelike atmosphere; a small facility which allowed them a good overall view of the unit; close ties to the local community and continuity in the patient-staff relationship. The focus group members identified some overarching factors: an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, local ownership, proximity to local general practices and close cooperation with the specialist health services at the hospital. Most of these factors can be viewed as general elements relevant to the development of local alternatives to acute hospitalization both nationally and internationally. This

  12. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  13. [Hospital infections in general surgery wards].

    PubMed

    Skarzyńska, J; Cienciała, A; Madry, R; Barucha, P; Kwaśniak, M; Wojewoda, T; Sroga, J

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 the hospital infections programme was accepted by the National Association for Infectious Diseases (Polskie Towarzystwo Zakazeń Szpitalnych--PTZSz). About 100 hospitals from Poland participated in the surveillence system introducing nosocomial infection registration cards in their units. The results of the research were sent to the PTZSz. The results from general surgery departments in 1998 were analysed. This year 79 general surgery units took part in nosocomial infection programme of PTZSz, sending from 1 to 2259 questionnaires. The analysis included 48,964 nosocomial infection registration cards. Nosocomial infection developed in 1,031 cases in the general surgery departments what accounted for 2.11% of all treated patient in that period. Surgical site infections were the most often place of nosocomial infections (37.1%), next skin and soft tissue infections (20.1%), and finally respiratory tract infections (17.6%). The average duration of hospitalization in general surgery departments was 10.2 days. In case of nosocomial infection occurrence the time of treatment was extended three times. The most frequent aetiological pathogenes of nosocomial infections were as follows: Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:11349592

  14. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates; Corrections AGENCY: Centers...

  15. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free public access... CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et. al Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...

  16. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  17. Total quality in acute care hospitals: guidelines for hospital managers.

    PubMed

    Holthof, B

    1991-08-01

    Quality improvement can not focus exclusively on peer review and the scientific evaluation of medical care processes. These essential elements have to be complemented with a focus on individual patient needs and preferences. Only then will hospitals create the competitive advantage needed to survive in an increasingly market-driven hospital industry. Hospital managers can identify these patients' needs by 'living the patient experience' and should then set the hospital's quality objectives according to its target patients and their needs. Excellent quality program design, however, is not sufficient. Successful implementation of a quality improvement program further requires fundamental changes in pivotal jobholders' behavior and mindset and in the supporting organizational design elements.

  18. Paediatric surgery--a general hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Fahy, E; Ahmed, K; Lowery, A J; Khan, W; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2012-01-01

    Plans to centralise paediatric surgery in Ireland have potentially significant implications for service provision and surgical training. study assesses the workload of paediatric surgery in a district hospital over a five-year period. Paediatric surgical admissions and procedures at Mayo General Hospital from January 2006 - December 2010 were reviewed. Data was obtained from the Hospital inpatient enquiry (HIPE) systems and theatre logbooks. 4,255 surgical procedures were performed in 3981 paediatric patients, accounting for 7.4% of the total surgical workload. 2,578 (65%) of cases were elective and 1403 (35%) of paediatric surgery was performed in the emergency setting; paediatric appendicectomy was the most commonly performed procedure (n = 554) with a complication rate of 2.5%. There were no paediatric surgery related mortalities. Paediatric surgery represents a significant part of the surgical workload. There is a continued need for general paediatric surgical provision in this regional setting, supported by access to specialist centres for complicated paediatric surgery. PMID:23495544

  19. Predicting acute maxillary sinusitis in a general practice population.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J. G.; Schmidt, H.; Rosborg, J.; Lund, E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the diagnostic value of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C reactive protein for acute maxillary sinusitis. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study. SETTING--Danish general practice in cooperation with the otorhinolaryngology and neuroradiology department at Aalborg County Hospital. SUBJECTS--174 patients aged 18-65 years who were suspected by the general practitioner of having acute maxillary sinusitis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--The independent association of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and concentration of C reactive protein in patients with acute maxillary sinusitis defined as purulent or mucopurulent antral aspirate. RESULTS--Only raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.01) and raised C reactive protein (P = 0.007) were found to be independently associated with a diagnosis of acute maxillary sinusitis. The combination of the two variables had a sensitivity of 0.82 and a specificity of 0.57. CONCLUSION--Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein are useful diagnostic criteria for acute maxillary sinusitis. PMID:7627042

  20. Team clinical supervision in acute hospital wards: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Bev; Ockerby, Cherene M; Johnson, Susan; Smenda, Helen; Bucknall, Tracey K

    2013-03-01

    Clinical supervision provides a strategy to mitigate nurses' workplace stress and enhance retention, but the literature provides little guidance about its implementation beyond mental health nursing. This study explored the feasibility of implementing and evaluating ward-based team clinical supervision for general nurses on two separate wards at one public and one private hospital. Nurses completed the Work Environment Questionnaire pre- (n = 36) and postintervention (n = 27), and focus groups (n = 20) explored their perceptions of supervision. Staff were unfamiliar with clinical supervision, so information sessions were required. The questionnaire may not have been suitable to evaluate this type of intervention. Focus group findings revealed that team supervision improved communication, enhanced working relationships, and empowered nurses to challenge existing practices, which had a positive impact on their perceived stress. This study provides insights to guide implementation and evaluation of clinical supervision in acute settings. PMID:21531902

  1. Systematic review of antibiotic consumption in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, R; Hussein, K; Leibovici, L; Carmeli, Y; Paul, M

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic consumption is an easily quantifiable performance measure in hospitals and might be used for monitoring. We conducted a review of published studies and online surveillance reports reporting on antibiotic consumption in acute care hospitals between the years 1997 and 2013. A pooled estimate of antibiotic consumption was calculated using a random effects meta-analysis of rates with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity was assessed through subgroup analysis and metaregression. Eighty studies, comprising data from 3130 hospitals, met the inclusion criteria. The pooled rate of hospital-wide consumption was 586 (95% confidence interval 540 to 632) defined daily doses (DDD)/1000 hospital days (HD) for all antibacterials. However, consumption rates were highly heterogeneous. Antibacterial consumption was highest in intensive care units, at 1563 DDD/1000 HD (95% confidence interval 1472 to 1653). Hospital-wide antibacterial consumption was higher in Western Europe and in medium-sized, private and university-affiliated hospitals. The methods of data collection were significantly associated with consumption rates, including data sources, dispensing vs. purchase vs. usage data, counting admission and discharge days and inclusion of low-consumption departments. Heterogeneity remained in all subgroup analyses. Major heterogeneity currently precludes defining acceptable antibiotic consumption ranges in acute care hospitals. Guidelines on antibiotic consumption reporting that will account for case mix and a minimal set of hospital characteristics recommending standardized methods for monitoring and reporting are needed. PMID:26899826

  2. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Program. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486... errors. ] III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486), make the...-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  3. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR 53258), there were a... effective date requirements. ] IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  4. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  5. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  6. Overutilization of acute-care beds in Veterans Affairs hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, C B; Goldman, R L; Martin, D C; Williamson, J; Weir, C; Beauchamp, C; Ashcraft, M

    1996-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals would have substantial overutilization of acute care beds and services because of policies that emphasize inpatient care over ambulatory care. Reviewers from 24 randomly selected VA hospitals applied the InterQual ISD* (Intensity, Severity, Discharge) criteria for appropriateness concurrently to a random sample of 2,432 admissions to acute medical, surgical, and psychiatry services. Reliability of hospital reviewers in applying the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing their reviews with those of a small group of expert reviewers. Validity of the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing the assessments of master reviewers with the implicit judgments of panels of nine physicians. The physician panels validated the ISD* admission criteria for medicine and surgery (74% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.4), whereas the psychiatry criteria were not validated (66% agreement, kappa 0.29). Hospital reviewers reliably used all three criteria sets (> 83% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.6). Rates of nonacute admissions to acute medical and surgical services were > 38% as determined by the hospital and master reviewers and by the physician panels. Nonacute rates of continued stay were > 32% for both medicine and surgery services. Similar rates of nonacute admissions and continued stay were found for all 24 hospitals. Reasons for nonacute admissions and continued stay included lack of an ambulatory care alternative, conservative physician practices, delays in discharge planning, and social factors such as homelessness and long travel distances to the hospital. Using criteria that the authors showed to be reliable and valid, substantial overutilization of acute medicine and surgical beds was found in a representative sample of VA hospitals. Correcting this situation will require changes in physician practice patterns, development of ambulatory care alternatives to inpatient

  7. Therapy of Acute Hypertension in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Shatat, Ibrahim F.

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment target, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and propose treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios. PMID:24522943

  8. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Public General Hospital Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Luis R.; Gil, Rosa M.

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the interaction between psychiatric services in public general hospitals and in other institutional settings. A one-day census of patients in a New York general hospital showed the hospital was providing care to a large number of patients in need of other, less intensive institutional settings. (BH)

  9. 20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 2. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. 19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 1. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  12. Viral etiology in infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Azkur, Dilek; Özaydın, Eda; Dibek-Mısırlıoğlu, Emine; Vezir, Emine; Tombuloğlu, Duygu; Köse, Gülşen; Kocabaş, Can N

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is predominantly a viral disease. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most common agent, but other newly identified viruses have also been considered as causes. The aim of the present study is to determine the respiratory viruses causing acute bronchiolitis in hospitalized infants. Infants younger than 2 years of age who were hospitalized for acute viral bronchiolitis in a children's hospital between November 2011 and May 2012 were evaluated for the presence of viruses as etiologic agents using a realtime polymerase chain reaction method.A total of 55 infants were included in this study. The mean age of the children was 6.98±5.53 months, and 63.6% were male. In the 55 children, 63 viruses were detected. A single viral pathogen was detected in 47 (85.5%) patients, and two viruses were co-detected in 8 (14.6%) patients. Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified, accounting for 25 (45.5%) cases, followed by rhinovirus (n=9, 16.4%), and human metapneumovirus (n = 8, 14.5%).Although respiratory syncytial virus remains the major viral pathogen in infants hospitalized for acute broncholitis, more than half of bronchiolitis cases are associated with other respiratory viruses.

  13. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated with ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Grelck, Kurt; Stewart, Noelle; Rosen, Les; Sukal, Sean

    2015-10-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a potentially widespread, pustular, cutaneous eruption commonly associated with drug administration. We report a case of AGEP associated with the antianginal, anti-ischemic agent ranolazine. The patient, an 83-year-old man, had a validation score of 10 out of 12 in accordance with the EuroSCAR criteria (8-12 is considered definitive), although it may have been higher had blood work been performed prior to diagnosis and treatment. After ranolazine was discontinued and a course of tapered oral prednisone was prescribed, the rash resolved with subsequent desquamation. PMID:26682297

  14. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated with ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Grelck, Kurt; Stewart, Noelle; Rosen, Les; Sukal, Sean

    2015-10-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a potentially widespread, pustular, cutaneous eruption commonly associated with drug administration. We report a case of AGEP associated with the antianginal, anti-ischemic agent ranolazine. The patient, an 83-year-old man, had a validation score of 10 out of 12 in accordance with the EuroSCAR criteria (8-12 is considered definitive), although it may have been higher had blood work been performed prior to diagnosis and treatment. After ranolazine was discontinued and a course of tapered oral prednisone was prescribed, the rash resolved with subsequent desquamation.

  15. Contribution of a general practitioner hospital: a further study.

    PubMed Central

    Treasure, R A; Davies, J A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To audit the workload of a general practitioner hospital and to compare the results with an earlier study. DESIGN--Prospective recording of discharges from the general practitioner hospital plus outpatient and casualty attendances and of all outpatient referrals and discharges from other hospitals of patients from Brecon Medical Group Practice during one year (1 June 1986-31 May 1987). SETTING--A large rural general group practice which staffs a general practitioner hospital in Brecon, mid-Wales. PATIENTS--20,000 Patients living in the Brecon area. RESULTS--1540 Patients were discharged from the general practitioner hospital during the study period. The hospital accounted for 78% (1242 out of 1594) of all hospital admissions of patients of the practice. There were 5835 new attendances at the casualty department and 1896 new outpatient attendances at consultant clinics at the hospital. Of all new outpatient attendances by patients of the practice, 71% (1358 out of 1896) were at clinics held at the general practitioner hospital. Since the previous study in 1971 discharges from the hospital have increased 37% (from 1125 to 1540) and new attendances at consultant clinics 30% (from 1450 to 1896). The average cost per inpatient day is lower at this hospital than at the local district general hospital (pounds 71.07 v pounds 88.06 respectively). CONCLUSIONS--The general practitioner hospital deals with a considerably larger proportion of admissions and outpatient attendances of patients in the practice than in 1971 and eases the burden on the local district general hospital at a reasonable cost. IMPLICATIONS--General practitioner hospitals should have a future role in the NHS. PMID:2322703

  16. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings.

  17. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings. PMID:23159305

  18. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  20. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  1. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay. PMID:25824060

  2. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay.

  3. Psychological Evaluation of Acute Low Back Pain in Hospital Workers

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, Yves; Bousquet, Pierre; Elie, Robert; Courtois, Monique

    1983-01-01

    Personality, anxiety and depression were assessed in 62 hospital workers divided in three experimental groups: those with acute organic low back pain, those with acute functional low back pain, and asymptomatic control subjects. Results showed no statistical differences between groups in the evaluation of personality. Asymptomatic subjects had significantly lower scores for trait anxiety and depression than did patients suffering from low back pain. Patients with pain of organic origin were also more depressed than were patients with pain of functional origin. Anxiety and depression are two psychological variables which must be examined in acute back pain problems. Further studies should be conducted to develop more accurate psychological instruments to evaluate the large population of patients suffering from low back pain. PMID:21283394

  4. Central venous catheter infection in adults in acute hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clare A

    As well as the human cost, central venous catheter (CVC)-related bloodstream infections significantly inflate hospital costs, mainly through increased length of stay in hospital, particularly in intensive care. This literature review appraises recent research on measures used to minimize CVC-related infection and compares it with current best practice. Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews published on the subject between 2000 and 2005 were reviewed, concentrating on non-tunnelled, short-term CVCs in the acute hospital setting. The new evidence mainly backs up current best practice. However, skin disinfection could be improved by using alcoholic chlorhexidine followed by aqueous povidone-iodine before CVC insertion. Also, alcoholic chlorhexidine is the preferred solution for cleaning the hubs/connectors before accessing the CVC. Good hand hygiene and quality control and education programmes are vital to improve patient care. More research is needed to clarify the effectiveness of certain interventions and technologies, such as antimicrobial CVCs.

  5. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 412.22, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL...

  6. An analysis of catering options within NHS acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J L; Desombre, T; Eves, A; Kipps, M

    1999-01-01

    Reforms of the NHS's healthcare structure have placed additional pressure on all aspects of hospital management. Evaluation of the effects of these reforms is difficult without more information on current conditions. Hospital catering in acute care trusts has little contemporary background research available. With this in mind, a survey of all the acute care NHS trusts within the eight regions in England was undertaken to investigate the hospital meal service process. A mailed questionnaire asked for the meal production system, food service method and food delivery personnel used by each trust, and a copy of a weekly menu. Results, from an 80.7 per cent response rate, indicate that most trusts use batch cooking to prepare their meals, and plated meal service to deliver the food to the wards. Almost 75 per cent of the trusts use nurses, at least in part, to serve food. English foodstuffs dominate the menus. Most of the trusts have moved towards meeting the goals set by the Patients' Charter and other NHS recommendations. PMID:10724573

  7. An analysis of catering options within NHS acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J L; Desombre, T; Eves, A; Kipps, M

    1999-01-01

    Reforms of the NHS's healthcare structure have placed additional pressure on all aspects of hospital management. Evaluation of the effects of these reforms is difficult without more information on current conditions. Hospital catering in acute care trusts has little contemporary background research available. With this in mind, a survey of all the acute care NHS trusts within the eight regions in England was undertaken to investigate the hospital meal service process. A mailed questionnaire asked for the meal production system, food service method and food delivery personnel used by each trust, and a copy of a weekly menu. Results, from an 80.7 per cent response rate, indicate that most trusts use batch cooking to prepare their meals, and plated meal service to deliver the food to the wards. Almost 75 per cent of the trusts use nurses, at least in part, to serve food. English foodstuffs dominate the menus. Most of the trusts have moved towards meeting the goals set by the Patients' Charter and other NHS recommendations.

  8. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  9. Examining financial performance indicators for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jeffrey H; Wheeler, John R C

    2013-01-01

    Measuring financial performance in acute care hospitals is a challenge for those who work daily with financial information. Because of the many ways to measure financial performance, financial managers and researchers must decide which measures are most appropriate. The difficulty is compounded for the non-finance person. The purpose of this article is to clarify key financial concepts and describe the most common measures of financial performance so that researchers and managers alike may understand what is being measured by various financial ratios.

  10. [Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients in China].

    PubMed

    Lang, Xiabing; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disease spectrum ranging from minimal elevation of serum creatinine to complete renal failure. It is significantly associated with increased mortality, length of hospital stay and medical care cost. With the increasing awareness of the importance of AKI, several high quality and multicenter epidemiological studies have been published recently in China. However, the results differ a lot due to the differences in regional economic development, the selection of target population and testing indicators, the disease definition and study strategies. The reported incidence of AKI in China is much lower than that in the developed countries. This article will analyze the current status and the problems facing AKI epidemiological studies of hospitalized patients with our own data and those from literature. The article intends to clarify the burden of AKI,to increase the awareness of AKI among clinicians and policy makers for achieving the goal of "zero by 2025" in China. PMID:27273996

  11. [Investigation on acute stroke patients being admitted to hospital].

    PubMed

    Zi, X; Song, Z; Fan, X

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and twelve patients with acute stroke were studied. The results revealed that about 42 percent of 112 patients could get to hospital within 6 hours after onset, in which included 60.4 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 28.1 percent of the infarction group. Comparatively, among 30.3 percent of 112 patients CT scan was carried out within 6 hours, which included 41.7 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 21.8 percent of the infarction group. Linear correlation analysis was studied between admission time(AT) and the assessment of neural function defect(ANFD). The results showed that there was significant negative correlation between AT and ANFD in stroke patients. After analysing the serial reasons of delaying hospitalization, the authors have found that the key factor is the ignorance of the importance of stroke in early stage. PMID:12080684

  12. Adverse outcomes following hospitalization in acutely ill older patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Miller, William C

    2008-01-01

    Background The longitudinal outcomes of patients admitted to acute care for elders units (ACE) are mixed. We studied the associations between socio-demographic and functional measures with hospital length of stay (LOS), and which variables predicted adverse events (non-independent living, readmission, death) 3 and 6 months later. Methods Prospective cohort study of community-living, medical patients age 75 or over admitted to ACE at a teaching hospital. Results The population included 147 subjects, median LOS of 9 days (interquartile range 5–15 days). All returned home/community after hospitalization. Just prior to discharge, baseline timed up and go test (TUG, P < 0.001), bipedal stance balance (P = 0.001), and clinical frailty scale scores (P = 0.02) predicted LOS, with TUG as the only independent predictor (P < 0.001) in multiple regression analysis. By 3 months, 59.9% of subjects remained free of an adverse event, and by 6 months, 49.0% were event free. The 3 and 6-month mortality was 10.2% and 12.9% respectively. Almost one-third of subjects had developed an adverse event by 6 months, with the highest risk within the first 3 months post discharge. An abnormal TUG score was associated with increased adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.59, P = 0.03. A higher FMMSE score (adjusted HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.96, P = 0.003) and independent living before hospitalization (adjusted HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.84, P = 0.01) were associated with reduced risk of adverse outcome. Conclusion Some ACE patients demonstrate further functional decline following hospitalization, resulting in loss of independence, repeat hospitalization, or death. Abnormal TUG is associated with prolonged LOS and future adverse outcomes. PMID:18479512

  13. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  14. Pool area with mezzanine at rear Fitzsimons General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pool area with mezzanine at rear - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Interior view of pool facing southeast Fitzsimons General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of pool facing southeast - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Front (west side) entrance bay Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Front (west side) entrance bay - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. North side Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. South side Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Interior view of pool facing northwest Fitzsimons General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of pool facing northwest - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. East side facing west Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East side facing west - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Contextual view facing southeast Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view facing southeast - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. South side facing north Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side facing north - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. North side facing south Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side facing south - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Rear (east) side Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rear (east) side - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Swimming Pool, Southeast corner of East Nineteenth Place (formerly East McAfee Avenue) & Wheeling Street (formerly South Van Valzah Street), Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. East and north sides of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and north sides of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Golf Course Waiting Shelter, Southwest area of Golf Course, 700 feet Northeast of intersection of West Harlow Avenue & Peoria Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, North Hickey Street, west side, 75 feet north of intersection of West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. East and north sides. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. North side. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Front (east side) of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Front (east side) of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employees' Quarters, North Hickey Street, West side, 150 feet North of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Corridor in west wing Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Corridor in west wing - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, North Hickey Street, west side, 75 feet north of intersection of West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. North and west sides of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and west sides of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employees' Quarters, North Hickey Street, West side, 150 feet North of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Corridor in north wing Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Corridor in north wing - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, North Hickey Street, west side, 75 feet north of intersection of West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Front (south side) of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Front (south side) of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. West side of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. North side of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. East side of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East side of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Garage, North end of North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Garage, North end of North Hickey Street, 775 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  20. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Evan S.; Willis, Carla; Rencher, William C; Zhou, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Because most research on long-term acute care hospitals has focused on Medicare, the objective of this research is to describe the Georgia Medicaid population who received care at a long-term acute care hospital, the type and volume of services provided by these long-term acute care hospitals, and the costs and outcomes of these services. For those with select respiratory conditions, we descriptively compare costs and outcomes to those of patients who received care for the same services in acute care hospitals. Methods: We describe Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to a long-term acute care hospital between 2011 and 2012. We compare them to a population of Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to an acute care hospital for one of five respiratory diagnosis-related groups. Measurements used include patient descriptive information, admissions, diagnosis-related groups, length of stay, place of discharge, 90-day episode costs, readmissions, and patient risk scores. Results: We found that long-term acute care hospital admissions for Medicaid patients were fairly low (470 90-day episodes) and restricted to complex cases. We also found that the majority of long-term acute care hospital patients were blind or disabled (71.2%). Compared to patients who stayed at an acute care hospital, long-term acute care hospital patients had higher average risk scores (13.1 versus 9.0), lengths of stay (61 versus 38 days), costs (US$143,898 versus US$115,056), but fewer discharges to the community (28.4% versus 51.8%). Conclusion: We found that the Medicaid population seeking care at long-term acute care hospitals is markedly different than the Medicare populations described in other long-term acute care hospital studies. In addition, our study revealed that Medicaid patients receiving select respiratory care at a long-term acute care hospital were distinct from Medicaid patients receiving similar care at an acute care hospital. Our findings suggest that state Medicaid

  1. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  2. Surveillance for Hospitalized Acute Respiratory Infection in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Verani, Jennifer R.; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  3. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added.

  4. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. PMID:25128363

  5. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  6. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans. PMID:21944341

  7. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans.

  8. Pure tone audiometry: comparison of general practice and hospital services

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael C.F.; Cable, Hugh R.; Wilmot, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Pure tone audiometry was obtained for both ears of 32 children by a general practitioner using a simple audiometer in his surgery, and by audiometricians in a hospital department on the same day. Comparing the worst hearing threshold at any of the three tested frequencies, the general practitioner did not find any ears to hear more than 10 dB better than the hospital (no false negatives). However, there were six false positives (9%) where the general practitioner identified an apparent hearing loss of greater than 15 dB. It is concluded that pure tone audiometry could be carried out accurately in the practice. PMID:3267745

  9. A STUDY OF PROBLEM DRINKERS IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    Babu, R. Sateesh; Sengupta, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    349 new admissions in the wards of Medicine, General Surgery & Orthopedics in a general hospital were screened with MAST & AUDIT for problem use of alcohol. Problem drinking was present in 14.6% of the inpatients. The severity and the need for additional treatment were measured with Addiction Severity Index (ASI). Majority of the patients had problems in more than one ar?a. Nevertheless, only one fourth of the patients were referred for psychiatric treatment. The findings indicate the need to develop services towards the recognition and referrals of the problem drinkers in general hospitals PMID:21584037

  10. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  11. Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis in Hospitalized Children: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokrollahi, Mohammad Reza; Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Monavari, Hamid Reza; Ghavidel Darestani, Sahar; Vosoughi Motlagh, Ahmad; Javadi Nia, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Viral acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity in childhood and leads to hospitalization in developed countries, such as Iran. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and viral types (rotavirus, adenovirus, human parechoviruses-1, and human bocavirus) of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in hospitalized children. Patients and Materials: This was a across-sectional prospective study performed at the Pediatric Department of Rasoul Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2009-2011) on 80 hospitalized children with viral AGE. All Stool samples were collected on viral transport media. Human bocavirus (HBoV) was detected using the Real-time PCR TaqMan method. Molecular detection of human parechovirus type 1 (HPeV-1) RNA in stool samples was done using a specific nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Rota and adeno virus antigens were sought by rapid chromatographic tests. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Fever was determined in 47.5% of cases (38), nausea and vomiting in 42.5% (34), respiratory symptoms in 16.3% (13), abdominal pain in 76%. Duration of diarrhea was 1-30 days (mean = 6.3 + 4.3 days). No dehydration was observed in 43.5% of subjects, mild dehydration in 33.8%, moderate dehydration in 17.5% and severe dehydration in 5% of cases. Positive rotavirus was found in 48.8% of cases (39), adenovirus in 20% (16), HBoV in 8% (6) and HPeV-1 in 23.2% (19), and adeno and rotaviruses co-infection in 6% (4). The frequency of positive HBoV was significantly lower than adeno and rotaviruses infection (P value = 0.0001). Rotavirus was more frequent in males (P value = 0.003) and in young children (17.49 months vs. 21.44 months) [P value = 0.03, CI = -13.4, 5.5]. Rotavirus infection was related to the degree of dehydration (P value = 0.001) but was not related to the presence of vomiting or fever (P value > 0.5). Conclusions: This study indicates that viral agents, especially rotavirus (48

  12. The incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Karlson, T A; Klein, B E

    1986-10-01

    Little information is available on the incidence and severity of eye injuries despite the disfigurement and vision loss they cause. From a population-based study in Dane County, Wisconsin, the incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries was 423/100,000 residents in 1979. The most common causes of eye injuries were assaults, work-related events, sports and recreational activities, motor vehicle crashes, and falls. Consumer products were involved in almost 70% (9/13) of severe eye injuries classified as severe. Injuries from fireworks were not found at all in this population. Implementing known strategies for eye injury prevention would substantially reduce their incidence. These include requiring certified eye protectors at workplaces and in sports activities whenever possible rather than making their use voluntary. For the preponderance of eye injuries, however, modifying potentially hazardous consumer products, including the interior of passenger cars, will be necessary. PMID:3767676

  13. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin in acutely hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Steichen, O; Bouvard, E; Grateau, G; Bailleul, S; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin as an adjunct to diagnose bacterial infections in older patients. One hundred seventy-two patients admitted to an acute-care geriatric unit during a 6-month period were prospectively included, 39 of them with an invasive bacterial infection. The best cut-off value to rule in a bacterial infection was 0.51 microg/l with sensitivity 64% and specificity 94%. The best cut-off value to rule out a bacterial infection was 0.08 microg/l with sensitivity 97% and specificity 20%. Procalcitonin was inconclusive (between 0.08 and 0.51 microg/l) for 112 admissions. Procalcitonin over 0.51 microg/l was useless 22 times out of 33 (infection already ruled in on clinical grounds) and misleading in eight of the 11 remaining cases (no infection). Procalcitonin below 0.08 microg/l was useless 23 times out of 27 (infection already ruled out on clinical grounds) and misleading in one of the four remaining cases (infection). Despite a good overall diagnostic accuracy, the clinical usefulness of PCT to diagnose invasive bacterial infections in elderly patients hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward appears to be very limited. PMID:19727867

  14. [Training program for clinical psychologists in general hospital settings].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshifumi

    2011-01-01

    Physicians in hospitals are so exhausted that mental healthcare providers other than physicians, such as psychologists, might be necessary. A clinical education program for psychologists in general hospitals has been developed. Applicants should be at Level 2 of Stoltenberg & McNeil's IDM (Integrated Development Model) model. Seven domains of objectives are introduced. Core competencies are multi-dimensional knowledge, understanding dynamics and collaborating, and communication skills with challenging patients. Sustainable education strategies and evaluation methods are discussed. A TV-based education program is useful for the purpose of acquiring general medical knowledge.

  15. Barriers to Early Mobility of Hospitalized General Medicine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Erik H.; Brotman, Daniel J.; Chan, Kitty; Needham, Dale M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Functional status decline commonly accompanies hospitalization making patients vulnerable to complications. Such decline can be mitigated through hospital-based early mobility programs. Success in implementing patient mobility quality improvement processes requires evaluating providers’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Design A cross-sectional, self-administered survey in two different hospital settings was completed by 120 nurses and physical and occupational therapists (rehabilitation therapists, 38; nurses, 82) from six general medicine units. The survey was developed using published guidelines, literature review, and provider meetings and refined through pilot testing. Psychometric properties were assessed, and regression analyses were conducted to examine barriers to early mobility by hospital site, provider discipline, and years of experience. Results Internal consistency reliability, item consistency, and discriminant validity psychometric characteristics were acceptable. In multivariable regression analysis, overall perceived barriers were similar between the two hospitals (P = 0.25) and significantly higher for staff with less experience (P = 0.02) and for nurses vs. rehabilitation therapists (P < 0.001). The survey identified specific barriers common to both nurses and rehabilitation therapists and other barriers that were discipline specific. Conclusions This novel survey identified important barriers to mobilizing medical inpatients that were similar across two hospital settings. These results can assist with the implementation of quality improvement projects for increasing early hospital-based patient mobility. PMID:25133615

  16. Comparing apples to apples: the relative financial performance of Manitoba's acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Watson, Diane; Finlayson, Greg; Jacobs, Philip

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents comparative financial ratios that can be adopted by health system administrators and policy analysts to begin to evaluate the performance of acute care hospitals. We combined financial, statistical and clinical information for 73 acute care hospitals in Manitoba for fiscal 1997/98 to calculate 15 indicators of financial performance. Our findings suggest that there is variability between hospital types in their average costs per weighted case, cost structure and financial performance.

  17. Sex Differences in Clinical Characteristics, Hospital Management Practices, and In-Hospital Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized in a Vietnamese Hospital with a First Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoa L.; Ha, Duc Anh; Phan, Dat Tuan; Nguyen, Quang Ngoc; Nguyen, Viet Lan; Nguyen, Nguyen Hanh; Nguyen, Ha; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam. We conducted a pilot study of Hanoi residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at the Vietnam National Heart Institute in Hanoi. The objectives of this observational study were to examine sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospital management, in-hospital clinical complications, and mortality in patients hospitalized with an initial AMI. Methods The study population consisted of 302 Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the largest tertiary care medical center in Hanoi in 2010. Results The average age of study patients was 66 years and one third were women. Women were older (70 vs. 64 years) and were more likely than men to have had hyperlipidemia previously diagnosed (10% vs. 2%). During hospitalization, women were less likely to have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with men (57% vs. 74%), and women were more likely to have developed heart failure compared with men (19% vs. 10%). Women experienced higher in-hospital case-fatality rates (CFRs) than men (13% vs. 4%) and these differences were attenuated after adjustment for age and history of hyperlipidemia (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.01, 6.89), and receipt of PCI during hospitalization (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 0.77, 5.09). Conclusions Our pilot data suggest that among patients hospitalized with a first AMI in Hanoi, women experienced higher in-hospital CFRs than men. Full-scale surveillance of all Hanoi residents hospitalized with AMI at all Hanoi medical centers is needed to confirm these findings. More targeted and timely educational and treatment approaches for women appear warranted. PMID:24752383

  18. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  19. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  20. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  1. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and, Community Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M. Moss

    1973-01-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients. PMID:4725343

  2. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and community involvement.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, M M

    1973-07-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients.

  3. [Hospital information system--project of implementation of SAP information system at Sveti Duh General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Pale, Ivica

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, as medical and hospital institutions have been facing a growing need of a more efficient provision of healthcare services to patients, with simultaneous complete monitoring of the successfulness of business activities, integrated information systems appear as the logical choice for the support to hospital business processes. The integrated business information system implemented at Sveti Duh General Hospital is a comprehensive system that supports all hospital, clinical and administrative processes, while providing the basis for decision making regarding the patients and hospital management. The system also enables transfer of all data with specific medical business segments such as laboratory device management. The project for the implementation of the information system was realized in accordance with the requests from the Ministry of Health, applying the proven methodology for the execution of such complex projects. The project team consisted of a number of consultants from b4b Co. from Zagreb, as well as Hospital employees. The new information system is completely ready for going live; however, the necessary decisions have to be made first. The application of the system gives the medical staff more time for their professional work with patients, and through longterm collection and analysis of data on symptoms, illnesses and medical treatments, the information system becomes an important tool for the improvement of health and quality of healthcare system in general. PMID:16095196

  4. [Hospital information system--project of implementation of SAP information system at Sveti Duh General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Pale, Ivica

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, as medical and hospital institutions have been facing a growing need of a more efficient provision of healthcare services to patients, with simultaneous complete monitoring of the successfulness of business activities, integrated information systems appear as the logical choice for the support to hospital business processes. The integrated business information system implemented at Sveti Duh General Hospital is a comprehensive system that supports all hospital, clinical and administrative processes, while providing the basis for decision making regarding the patients and hospital management. The system also enables transfer of all data with specific medical business segments such as laboratory device management. The project for the implementation of the information system was realized in accordance with the requests from the Ministry of Health, applying the proven methodology for the execution of such complex projects. The project team consisted of a number of consultants from b4b Co. from Zagreb, as well as Hospital employees. The new information system is completely ready for going live; however, the necessary decisions have to be made first. The application of the system gives the medical staff more time for their professional work with patients, and through longterm collection and analysis of data on symptoms, illnesses and medical treatments, the information system becomes an important tool for the improvement of health and quality of healthcare system in general.

  5. Nursing sabbatical in the acute care hospital setting: a cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Schaar, Gina L; Swenty, Constance F; Phillips, Lori A; Embree, Jennifer L; McCool, Isabella A; Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    Practice-based acute care nurses experience a high incidence of burnout and dissatisfaction impacting retention and innovation and ultimately burdening the financial infrastructure of a hospital. Business, industry, and academia have successfully implemented professional sabbaticals to retain and revitalize valuable employees; however, the use is infrequent among acute care hospitals. This article expands upon the synthesis of evidence supporting nursing sabbaticals and suggests this option as a fiscally sound approach for nurses practicing in the acute care hospital setting. A cost-benefit analysis and human capital management strategies supporting nursing sabbaticals are identified. PMID:22617700

  6. Adverse Effects of Oral Nonselective and cyclooxygenase-2-Selective NSAIDs on Hospitalization for Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-I.; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Yung-Tai; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Chih-Yu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chu, Dachen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between the use of nonselective or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a general Asian population. We conducted an observational, nationwide, nested case–control cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database between 2010 and 2012. AKI cases were defined as hospitalization with a principle diagnosis of AKI. Each case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls based on age, sex, and the month and year of cohort entry. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to demonstrate the association between hospitalization for AKI and current, recent, or past use of an oral NSAID. During the study period, we identified 6199 patients with AKI and 24,796 matched controls. Overall, current users (adjusted OR 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.28–3.28) and recent users (adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01–1.35) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization for AKI. The risk was also similar for nonselective NSAIDs. However, neither current nor recent use of COX-2 inhibitors was significantly associated with AKI events. Our study supported that the initiation of nonselective NSAIDs rather than COX-2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of AKI requiring hospitalization. Future randomized trials are needed to elucidate these findings. PMID:26945352

  7. First 101 Robotic General Surgery Cases in a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jarrod C.; Alrajhi, Sharifah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The general surgeon's robotic learning curve may improve if the experience is classified into categories based on the complexity of the procedures in a small community hospital. The intraoperative time should decrease and the incidence of complications should be comparable to conventional laparoscopy. The learning curve of a single robotic general surgeon in a small community hospital using the da Vinci S platform was analyzed. Methods: Measured parameters were operative time, console time, conversion rates, complications, surgical site infections (SSIs), surgical site occurrences (SSOs), length of stay, and patient demographics. Results: Between March 2014 and August 2015, 101 robotic general surgery cases were performed by a single surgeon in a 266-bed community hospital, including laparoscopic cholecystectomies, inguinal hernia repairs; ventral, incisional, and umbilical hernia repairs; and colorectal, foregut, bariatric, and miscellaneous procedures. Ninety-nine of the cases were completed robotically. Seven patients were readmitted within 30 days. There were 8 complications (7.92%). There were no mortalities and all complications were resolved with good outcomes. The mean operative time was 233.0 minutes. The mean console operative time was 117.6 minutes. Conclusion: A robotic general surgery program can be safely implemented in a small community hospital with extensive training of the surgical team through basic robotic skills courses as well as supplemental educational experiences. Although the use of the robotic platform in general surgery could be limited to complex procedures such as foregut and colorectal surgery, it can also be safely used in a large variety of operations with results similar to those of conventional laparoscopy. PMID:27667913

  8. Comparative Quality Indicators for Hospital Choice: Do General Practitioners Care?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrua, Marie; Sicotte, Claude; Lalloué, Benoît; Minvielle, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Context The strategy of publicly reporting quality indicators is being widely promoted through public policies as a way to make health care delivery more efficient. Objective To assess general practitioners’ (GPs) use of the comparative hospital quality indicators made available by public services and the media, as well as GPs’ perceptions of their qualities and usefulness. Method A telephone survey of a random sample representing all self-employed GPs in private practice in France. Results A large majority (84.1%–88.5%) of respondents (n = 503; response rate of 56%) reported that they never used public comparative indicators, available in the mass media or on government and non-government Internet sites, to influence their patients’ hospital choices. The vast majority of GPs rely mostly on traditional sources of information when choosing a hospital. At the same time, this study highlights favourable opinions shared by a large proportion of GPs regarding several aspects of hospital quality indicators, such as their good qualities and usefulness for other purposes. In sum, the results show that GPs make very limited use of hospital quality indicators based on a consumer choice paradigm but, at the same time, see them as useful in ways corresponding more to the usual professional paradigms, including as a means to improve quality of care. PMID:26840429

  9. Exploring Reasons for Bed Pressures in Winnipeg Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menec, Verena H.; Bruce, Sharon; MacWilliam, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital overcrowding has plagued Winnipeg and other Canadian cities for years. This study explored factors related to overcrowding. Hospital files were used to examine patterns of hospital use from fiscal years 1996/1997 to 1999/2000. Chart reviews were conducted to examine appropriateness of admissions and hospital stays during one pressure…

  10. Proximal gastric vagotomy: a district general hospital experience.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, J. J.; Ryan, J. M.; Anders, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    A district general hospital experience with proximal gastric vagotomy over a nine-year period is reported. One hundred and eight patients undergoing the operation for chronic duodenal ulcer were assessed. The follow-up period was 1-9 years (mean 4 years and 7 months). The results were graded using a modification of the classification of Visick (1948). Over 85% of our patients were satisfied with their results. (Visick 1 and 2). Recurrent ulceration was noted in 3.9% of our series (4 cases). There were no deaths and few complications. The technique used by us is described briefly and the role of proximal gastric vagotomy in a district general hospital is discussed. PMID:6859783

  11. Pattern of alcoholism in the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Saroja, K I; Kyaw, O

    1993-06-01

    This study establishes the prevalence rate for alcoholism among the inpatients of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, as 11%, but as 25% among the drinking population. It also describes the demographic profile of the alcoholic as compared to the non-alcoholic drinker and the non-drinker and suggests that certain vulnerability factors could contribute to the development of alcoholism. A trend noted is also the changing racial trends in the use of alcohol.

  12. Understanding predictors of prolonged hospitalizations among general medicine patients: A guide and preliminary analysis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary E; Glasheen, Jeffrey J; Anoff, Debra; Pierce, Read; Capp, Roberta; Jones, Christine D

    2015-09-01

    Targeting patients with prolonged hospitalizations may represent an effective strategy for reducing average hospital length of stay (LOS). We sought to characterize predictors of prolonged hospitalizations among general medicine patients to guide future improvement efforts. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using administrative data of general medicine patients discharged from inpatient status from our academic medical center between 2012 and 2014. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to assess the association between sociodemographic and clinical variables with prolonged LOS, defined as >21 days. Of 18,363 discharges, 416 (2.3%) demonstrated prolonged LOS. Prolonged hospitalizations accounted for 18.6% of total inpatient days and contributed 0.8 days to an average LOS of 4.8 days during the study period. Prolonged hospitalizations were associated with younger age (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80 per 10-year increase in age, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73-0.87) and Medicaid insurance (OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.29-3.05, REF = Medicare). Compared to patients without prolonged LOS, prolonged LOS patients were more likely to have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia (OR: 8.83, 95% CI: 1.72-45.36); require a palliative care consult (OR: 4.63, 95% CI: 2.86-7.49), ICU stay (OR: 6.66, 95% CI: 5.22-8.50), or surgery (OR: 5.04, 95% CI: 3.90-6.52); and be discharged to a post-acute-care facility (OR: 10.37, 95% CI: 6.92-15.56). Prolonged hospitalizations in a small proportion of patients were an important contributor to overall LOS and particularly affected Medicaid enrollees with complex hospital stays who were not discharged home. Further studies are needed to determine the reasons for discharge delays in this population.

  13. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features. PMID:10436614

  14. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features.

  15. The severity of initial acute kidney injury at admission of geriatric patients significantly correlates with subsequent in-hospital complications.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shing; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-09-10

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with higher hospital mortality. However, the relationship between geriatric AKI and in-hospital complications is unclear. We prospectively enrolled elderly patients (≥65 years) from general medical wards of National Taiwan University Hospital, part of whom presented AKI at admission. We recorded subsequent in-hospital complications, including catastrophic events, incident gastrointestinal bleeding, hospital-associated infections, and new-onset electrolyte imbalances. Regression analyses were utilized to assess the associations between in-hospital complications and the initial AKI severity. A total of 163 elderly were recruited, with 39% presenting AKI (stage 1: 52%, stage 2: 23%, stage 3: 25%). The incidence of any in-hospital complication was significantly higher in the AKI group than in the non-AKI group (91% vs. 68%, p < 0.01). Multiple regression analyses indicated that elderly patients presenting with AKI had significantly higher risk of developing any complication (Odds ratio [OR] = 3.51, p = 0.01) and new-onset electrolyte imbalance (OR = 7.1, p < 0.01), and a trend toward more hospital-associated infections (OR = 1.99, p = 0.08). The risk of developing complications increased with higher AKI stage. In summary, our results indicate that initial AKI at admission in geriatric patients significantly increased the risk of in-hospital complications.

  16. Microbiology of acute mastoiditis and complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in the postvaccination era.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Polyvios; Chrysovergis, Aristeidis; Xirogianni, Athanasia; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Radiotis, Alexandros; Lebessi, Evangelia; Tsakanikos, Michail; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Tsolia, Maria N

    2014-01-01

    In the post-heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the leading cause of acute mastoiditis and other complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in our settings. Serotype 19A is predominant, invasive and multidrug resistant causing more than half of all mastoiditis cases, two-thirds of cases with subperiosteal abscess and all those requiring mastoidectomy. Continuous surveillance is required.

  17. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: atypical presentations and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulos, T C; Krishna, S M; Brinster, N K; Ortega-Loayza, A G

    2015-02-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an acute drug eruption characterized by erythematous plaques and papules studded with numerous, pinpoint pustules. Several atypical clinical presentations and triggers of AGEP have been described in the literature. These include systemic presentations similar to toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and localized presentations mimicking other medication reactions. We herein aim to review atypical presentations and medication triggers of AGEP to assist clinicians in recognizing this condition and making appropriate therapeutic interventions. PMID:25201706

  18. Do university hospitals perform better than general hospitals? A comparative analysis among Italian regions

    PubMed Central

    Grillo Ruggieri, Tommaso; Podetti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this research was to investigate how university hospitals (UHs) perform compared with general hospitals (GHs) in the Italian healthcare system. Design and setting 27 indicators of overall performance were selected and analysed for UHs and GHs in 10 Italian regions. The data refer to 2012 and 2013 and were selected from two performance evaluation systems based on hospital discharge administrative data: the Inter-Regional Performance Evaluation System developed by the Management and Health Laboratory of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna of Pisa and the Italian National Outcome Evaluation Programme developed by the National Agency for Healthcare Services. The study was conducted in 2 stages and by combining 2 statistical techniques. In stage 1, a non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was carried out to compare the performance of UHs and GHs on the selected set of indicators. In stage 2, a robust equal variance test between the 2 groups of hospitals was carried out to investigate differences in the amount of variability between them. Results The overall analysis gave heterogeneous results. In general, performance was not affected by being in the UH rather than the GH group. It is thus not possible to directly associate Italian UHs with better results in terms of appropriateness, efficiency, patient satisfaction and outcomes. Conclusions Policymakers and managers should further encourage hospital performance evaluations in order to stimulate wider competition aimed at assigning teaching status to those hospitals that are able to meet performance requirements. In addition, UH facilities could be integrated with other providers that are responsible for community, primary and outpatient services, thereby creating a joint accountability for more patient-centred and integrated care. PMID:27507233

  19. Undertaking capacity assessments for people with dementia in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Murray, Aileen

    2016-08-01

    Ensuring that older patients are discharged from hospital in a safe and appropriate manner is a fundamental aspect of nursing care. However, it is clear from the literature and clinical practice that determining people's capacity and whether they are able to decide where they live on discharge is a significant challenge. There is variation in practice despite the legal framework provided by the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005, covering England and Wales, which raises questions about adherence to the legislation. Using a case study, this article explores aspects of the MCA and clinical practice that affect older patients' outcomes on discharge from general hospital settings. It demonstrates how effective multidisciplinary working, using the legal frameworks available, can ensure that an individual's independence and well-being are maintained.

  20. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-01-01

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004–2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07–1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas. PMID:26580643

  1. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  2. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  3. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  4. Use of Acute Care Hospitals by Long-Stay Patients: Who, How Much, and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coster, Carolyn; Bruce, Sharon; Kozyrskyj, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The effects of long-term hospitalizations can be severe, especially among older adults. In Manitoba, between fiscal years 1991/1992 and 1999/2000, 40 per cent of acute care hospital days were used by the 5 per cent of patients who had long stays, defined as stays of more than 30 days. These proportions were remarkably stable, despite major changes…

  5. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism.

  6. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism. PMID:26072605

  7. Consultant input in acute medical admissions and patient outcomes in hospitals in England: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Derek; Lambourne, Adrian; Percival, Frances; Laverty, Anthony A; Ward, David K

    2013-01-01

    Recent recommendations for physicians in the UK outline key aspects of care that should improve patient outcomes and experience in acute hospital care. Included in these recommendations are Consultant patterns of work to improve timeliness of clinical review and improve continuity of care. This study used a contemporaneous validated survey compared with clinical outcomes derived from Hospital Episode Statistics, between April 2009 and March 2010 from 91 acute hospital sites in England to evaluate systems of consultant cover for acute medical admissions. Clinical outcomes studied included adjusted case fatality rates (aCFR), including the ratio of weekend to weekday mortality, length of stay and readmission rates. Hospitals that had an admitting Consultant presence within the Acute Medicine Unit (AMU, or equivalent) for a minimum of 4 hours per day (65% of study group) had a lower aCFR compared with hospitals that had Consultant presence for less than 4 hours per day (p<0.01) and also had a lower 28 day re-admission rate (p<0.01). An 'all inclusive' pattern of Consultant working, incorporating all the guideline recommendations and which included the minimum Consultant presence of 4 hours per day (29%) was associated with reduced excess weekend mortality (p<0.05). Hospitals with >40 acute medical admissions per day had a lower aCFR compared to hospitals with fewer than 40 admissions per day (p<0.03) and had a lower 7 day re-admission rate (p<0.02). This study is the first large study to explore the potential relationships between systems of providing acute medical care and clinical outcomes. The results show an association between well-designed systems of Consultant working practices, which promote increased patient contact, and improved patient outcomes in the acute hospital setting.

  8. Prehospitalization Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury during Hospitalization for Serious Infections in the REGARDS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Powell, T. Clark; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Griffin, Russell; Safford, Monika M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently occurs in hospitalized patients. In this study, we determined prehospitalization characteristics associated with AKI in community-dwelling adults hospitalized for a serious infection. Methods We used prospective data from 30,239 participants of the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a national cohort of community-dwelling adults ≥45 years old. We identified serious infection hospitalizations between 2003 and 2012. Using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria, we defined AKI as an increase in serum creatinine (sCr) ≥0.3 mg/dl from the first inpatient sCr measurement during the first 7 hospitalization days. We excluded individuals with a history of renal transplant or preexisting end-stage renal disease as well as individuals with <2 sCr measurements. We identified baseline characteristics (sociodemographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions, biomarkers, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, statin, or antihypertensive medication use) independently associated with AKI events using multivariable generalized estimating equations. Results Over a median follow-up of 4.5 years (interquartile range 2.4-6.3), we included 2,074 serious infection hospitalizations among 1,543 individuals. AKI occurred in 296 of 2,074 hospitalizations (16.5%). On multivariable analysis, prehospitalization characteristics independently associated with AKI among individuals hospitalized for a serious infection included a history of diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 1.38; 95% CI 1.02-1.89], increased cystatin C (OR 1.73 per SD; 95% CI 1.20-2.50), and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (OR 1.19 per SD; 95% CI 1.007-1.40). Sex, race, hypertension, myocardial infarction, estimated glomerular filtration rate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, statin, or antihypertensive medications were not associated with AKI. Conclusions

  9. Body Mass Index and Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Receiving Care in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Camprubi, Mercedes; Cabrera, Sandra; Sans, Jordi; Vidal, Georgina; Salvadó, Teresa; Bardají, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, some controversy has arisen with regard to its effect on hospital mortality in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Methods. Clinical and anthropometric variables were analyzed in patients consecutively admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital between 2009 and 2010, and the correlation of those variables with hospital mortality was examined. Results. A total of 824 patients with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina were analyzed. Body mass index was an independent factor in hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.739 (IC 95%: 0.597 − 0.916), P = 0.006). Mortality in normal weight (n = 218), overweight (n = 399), and obese (n = 172) subjects was 6.1%, 3.1%, and 4.1%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions. There is something of a paradox in the relationship between body mass index and hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in that the mortality rate decreases as body mass index increases. However, no statistically significant differences have been found in normal weight, overweight, or obese subjects. PMID:22900151

  10. The impact of dementia on length of stay in acute hospitals in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Sheelah; O'Shea, Eamon

    2015-09-01

    The outcomes for those with dementia admitted to acute hospitals are often poor, with higher mortality, increased risk of institutionalisation and longer length of stay. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dementia on length of stay and the associated cost of care in acute hospitals in Ireland. People with a recorded diagnosis of dementia were found to have a significantly longer length of stay than those with no recorded dementia. Multiplying the excess length of stay by the number of dementia-related admissions gave an estimate of 246,908 additional hospital days per annum due to dementia at an associated additional annual cost of over €199 million. Improving the experience of those with dementia in acute hospitals will likely lead to cost savings for the health service; however, it will require a number of measures including: earlier diagnosis, training for medical professionals and improvements in the built environment.

  11. Financial management challenges for general hospital psychiatry 2001.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatry programs are facing significant business and financial challenges. This paper provides an overview of these management challenges in five areas: departmental, hospital, payment system, general finance, and policy. Psychiatric leaders will require skills in a variety of business management areas to ensure their program success. Many programs will need to develop new compensation models with more of an emphasis on revenue collection and overhead management. Programs which cannot master these areas are likely to go out of business. For academic programs, incentive systems must address not only clinical productivity, but academic and teaching output as well. General hospital programs will need to develop increased sophistication in differential cost accounting in order to be able to advocate for their patients and program in the current management climate. Clinical leaders will need the skills (ranging from actuarial to negotiations) to be at the table with contract development, since those decisions are inseparable from clinical care issues. Strategic planning needs to consider the value of improving integration with primary care, along with the ability to understand the advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing models. Psychiatry leaders need to define and develop useful reports shared with clinical division leadership to track progress and identify problems and opportunities. Leaders should be responsible for a strategy for developing appropriate information system architecture and infrastructure. Finally, it is hoped that some leaders will emerge who can further our needs to address inequities in mental health fee schedules and parity issues which affect our program viability.

  12. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  13. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  14. What is the current state of care for older people with dementia in general hospitals? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Dewing, Jan; Dijk, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises a literature review focusing on the literature directly pertaining to the acute care of older people with dementia in general hospitals from 2007 onwards. Following thematic analysis, one overarching theme emerged: the consequences of being in hospital with seven related subthemes. Significantly, this review highlights that overall there remains mostly negative consequences and outcomes for people with dementia when they go into general hospitals. Although not admitted to hospital directly due to dementia, there are usually negative effects on the dementia condition from hospitalisation. The review suggests this is primarily because there is a tension between prioritisation of acute care for existing co-morbidities and person-centred dementia care. This is complicated by insufficient understanding of what constitutes person-centred care in an acute care context and a lack of the requisite knowledge and skills set in health care practitioners. The review also reveals a worrying lack of evidence for the effectiveness of mental health liaison posts and dementia care specialist posts in nursing. Finally, although specialist posts such as liaison and clinical nurse specialists and specialist units/shared care wards can enhance quality of care and reduce adverse consequences of hospitalisation (they do not significantly) impact on reducing length of stay or the cost of care.

  15. Psychological aspects of acute low back pain in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Iain C.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective controlled study of acute low back pain in general practice was carried out. The presence of psychiatric illness was measured by use of the general health questionnaire (GHQ), by clinical assessment, and personality factors by use of the Eysenck personality inventory (EPI). It was found that overall the amount of psychiatric illness did not differ between patients with back pain and their controls at the time of presentation, although there was a higher prevalence of previous psychiatric illness in the back-pain group. The only difference in the personality factors measured was a higher degree of extraversion in the back-pain patients. PMID:6224930

  16. Acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, M; Islambulchilar, Z; Kargar-Maher, M H

    2009-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the etiological and demographical characteristics of acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran. This retrospective study was performed on 1342 poisoning admissions to a university hospital from 2003 to 2005, by data collection from the medical records of patients. Poisonings were 5.40% of the total admissions. There was a predominance of female patients (55.7%) compared to male patients (44.3%) with a female-to-male ratio of 1.2:1. Most poisonings occurred in the age range of 11-20 years (38.9%). Drugs were the most common cause of poisonings (60.8%). Among the drug poisonings, benzodiazepines (40.31%) were the most frequent agents, followed by antidepressants (31.98%). The seasonal distribution in poisoning patients suggested a peak in spring (28%) and summer (27.5%). In 9.8% of cases accidental and in 90.2% intentional poisonings were evident. Most suicide attempts were made by women (58.51%) and unmarried people (51.4%).The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.02 +/- 2.8 days. There were 28 (2.3%) deaths; the majority (13 cases) was due to pesticides. This was a university hospital-based study, so these results may not be representative of the general population. Despite this drawback, these data still provide important information on the characteristics of the poisoning in this part of Iran. To prevent such poisonings, the community education about the danger of central nervous system-acting drugs and reducing the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. PMID:19734268

  17. Hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure: recognition, risk stratification, and treatment review.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2008-11-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has emerged as a major healthcare problem. It causes approximately 3% of all hospitalizations in the United States, with the direct medical cost of these hospitalizations estimated at $18.8 billion per year. Early recognition, risk stratification, and evidence-based treatment are crucial in reducing the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with this disorder. Classic signs and symptoms of ADHF, such as rales, dyspnea, and peripheral edema, may be absent at hospital presentation and, even when present, are not specific to this disorder. As a result, serum B-type natriuretic peptide level is now used to rapidly and accurately detect ADHF. Multivariate analyses have identified renal dysfunction, hypotension, advanced age, hyponatremia, and comorbidities as significant and independent mortality risk factors. Based on these factors, mortality risk can be stratified from very low to very high using published algorithms that have been validated in independent populations. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of ADHF are available from both the European Society of Cardiology and the Heart Failure Society of America. In general, an intravenous loop diuretic, either alone or in combination with a vasodilator, is recommended as initial therapy in patients with volume overload, depending on the patient's clinical status. Use of inotropic agents should be limited to the small subset of patients with low-output syndrome and significant hypotension. In any event, frequent monitoring of clinical response is essential, with subsequent therapy determined by this response. Finally, focused patient education during hospitalization may help reduce readmissions for ADHF.

  18. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-01-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance. PMID:1399656

  19. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-10-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance.

  20. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population.

  1. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  2. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated with spider bite*

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Laura de Mattos; Müller, Giana Paula; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Grill, Aline Barcellos; Rhoden, Deise Louise Bohn; Mello-da-Silva, Carlos Augusto; Vettorato, Gerson

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an acute febrile rash, usually induced by drugs, which recently has been linked to spider bite. We report a case of a male patient, 48 years old, with an erythematous rash accompanied by fever and small non-follicular pustules. He reported previous pain in the buttock with the onset of a necrotic plaque. The lesion was compatible with spider bite of the genus Loxosceles. According to the EuroSCAR group instrument, the patient scored +10 indicating definite diagnosis of AGEP. As the patient had a compatible lesion and had no other triggers of AGEP, in an Loxosceles endemic area, the AGEP would be associated with spider bite, as described in other publications. PMID:27579754

  3. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated with spider bite.

    PubMed

    Milman, Laura de Mattos; Müller, Giana Paula; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Grill, Aline Barcellos; Rhoden, Deise Louise Bohn; Mello-da-Silva, Carlos Augusto; Vettorato, Gerson

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an acute febrile rash, usually induced by drugs, which recently has been linked to spider bite. We report a case of a male patient, 48 years old, with an erythematous rash accompanied by fever and small non-follicular pustules. He reported previous pain in the buttock with the onset of a necrotic plaque. The lesion was compatible with spider bite of the genus Loxosceles. According to the EuroSCAR group instrument, the patient scored +10 indicating definite diagnosis of AGEP. As the patient had a compatible lesion and had no other triggers of AGEP, in an Loxosceles endemic area, the AGEP would be associated with spider bite, as described in other publications. PMID:27579754

  4. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  5. Development and validation of scales to measure organisational features of acute hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Adams, A; Bond, S; Arber, S

    1995-12-01

    In order to make comparisons between wards and explain variations in outcomes of nursing care, there is a growing need in nursing research for reliable and valid measures of the organisational features of acute hospital wards. This research developed The Ward Organisational Features Scales (WOFS); each set of six scales comprising 14 subscales which measure discrete dimensions of acute hospital wards. A study of a nationally representative sample of 825 nurses working in 119 acute wards in 17 hospitals, drawn from seven Regional Health Authorities in England provides evidence for the structure, reliability and validity of this comprehensive set of measures related to: the physical environment of the ward, professional nursing practice, ward leadership, professional working relationships, nurses' influence and job satisfaction. Implications for further research are discussed.

  6. General Surgical Services at an Urban Teaching Hospital in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Elizabeth; Amado, Vanda; Jacobe, Mário; Sacks, Greg D.; Bruzoni, Matias; Mapasse, Domingos; DeUgarte, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgery becomes incorporated into global health programs, it will be critical for clinicians to take into account already existing surgical care systems within low-income countries. In order to inform future efforts to expand the local system and systems in comparable regions of the developing world, we aimed to describe current patterns of surgical care at a major urban teaching hospital in Mozambique. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all general surgery patients treated between August 2012 and August 2013 at Hospital Central Maputo in Maputo, Mozambique. We reviewed emergency and elective surgical logbooks, inpatient discharge records, and death records to report case volume, disease etiology, and mortality. Results There were 1,598 operations (910 emergency, 688 elective) and 2,606 patient discharges during our study period. The most common emergent surgeries were for non-trauma laparotomy (22%) followed by all trauma procedures (18%), while the most common elective surgery was hernia repair (31%). The majority of lower extremity amputations were above knee (69%). The most common diagnostic categories for inpatients were infectious (31%), trauma (18%), hernia (12%), neoplasm (10%), and appendicitis (5%). The mortality rate was 5.6% (146 deaths), approximately half of which were related to sepsis. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the general surgery caseload of a large, academic, urban training and referral center in Mozambique. We describe resource limitations that impact operative capacity, trauma care, and management of amputations and cancer. These findings highlight challenges that are applicable to a broad range of global surgery efforts. PMID:25940163

  7. Variations and Determinants of Hospital Costs for Acute Stroke in China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jade W.; Heeley, Emma L.; Jan, Stephen; Huang, Yining; Huang, Qifang; Wang, Ji-Guang; Cheng, Yan; Xu, En; Yang, Qidong; Anderson, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The burden of stroke is high and increasing in China. We modelled variations in, and predictors of, the costs of hospital care for patients with acute stroke in China. Methods and Findings Baseline characteristics and hospital costs for 5,255 patients were collected using the prospective register-based ChinaQUEST study, conducted in 48 Level 3 and 14 Level 2 hospitals in China during 2006–2007. Ordinary least squares estimation was used to determine factors associated with hospital costs. Overall mean cost of hospitalisation was 11,216 Chinese Yuan Renminbi (CNY) (≈US$1,602) per patient, which equates to more than half the average annual wage in China. Variations in cost were largely attributable to stroke severity and length of hospital stay (LOS). Model forecasts showed that reducing LOS from the mean of 20 days for Level 3 and 18 days for Level 2 hospitals to a duration of 1 week, which is common among Western countries, afforded cost reductions of 49% and 19%, respectively. Other lesser determinants varied by hospital level: in Level 3 hospitals, health insurance and the occurrence of in-hospital complications were each associated with 10% and 18% increases in cost, respectively, whilst treatment in a teaching hospital was associated with approximately 39% decrease in cost on average. For Level 2 hospitals, stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage was associated with a 19% greater cost than for ischaemic stroke. Conclusions Changes to hospital policies to standardise resource use and reduce the variation in LOS could attenuate costs and improve efficiencies for acute stroke management in China. The success of these strategies will be enhanced by broader policy initiatives currently underway to reform hospital reimbursement systems. PMID:20927384

  8. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  9. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  10. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  11. Effects of outsourced nursing on quality outcomes in long-term acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Raymond; Kerr, Bernard J; Burtner, Joan; Ledlow, Gerald; Fulton, Larry V

    2011-03-01

    Use of outsourced nurses is often a stop-gap measure for unplanned vacancies in smaller healthcare facilities such as long-term acute-care hospitals (LTACHs). However, the relationship of utilization levels (low, medium, or high percentages) of nonemployees covering staff schedules often is perceived to have negative relationships with quality outcomes. To assess this issue, the authors discuss the outcomes of their national study of LTACH hospitals that indicated no relationship existed between variations in percentage of staffing by contracted nurses and selected outcomes in this post-acute-care setting.

  12. Utilisation of acute hospitals by age and sex in Australia, 1985.

    PubMed

    Mathers, C D; Moore, G

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides estimates of the utilisation rates of acute care (short-stay) hospitals, by age and sex, for the Australian population. Separation and bed-day rates per 1000 persons for public, Repatriation and private hospitals in 1985 have been estimated by age group, for each sex, in each State and Territory in Australia. The Australian Base Grant, negotiated between the Commonwealth, States and Territories in the new Medicare Agreements, distributes funds for the care and treatment of Medicare patients in public hospitals. The national bed-day utilisation rates reported in this article, have been used as the basis for population weights to allocate these funds. This paper presents the data and methods used to derive these weights, and examines the differences between them and the actual State and Territory utilisation patterns in 1985. The impact of population ageing on the overall utilisation rates for acute hospitals in Australia is examined.

  13. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  14. Study of acute transfusion reactions in a teaching hospital of Sikkim: A hemovigilance initiative

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dhruva Kumar; Datta, Supratim; Gupta, Amlan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusions are inherently associated with risks ranging in severity from minor to life-threatening. Continuous monitoring of transfusion related complications can promote understanding of factors contributing to transfusion reactions and help to formulate necessary remedial measures. This study was designed to analyze the frequency and nature of transfusion reactions reported to the blood bank of a remote North East Indian teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: All acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) reported to the blood bank over a period of 20 months (May 2013 to January 2015) were reviewed and analyzed. The risk of transfusion reactions associated with each individual component was assessed. Results: A total of 3455 units of whole blood and component transfusions were carried out of which a total of 32 (0.92%) ATRs were encountered. Packed red blood cells (PRBCs) (n = 15, P = 0.06) and whole blood (WB) (n = 13, P = 0.83) were most commonly implicated. Allergic reaction was the most frequent transfusion reaction encountered (65.6%), seen most commonly with PRBC (risk of 0.76%, P = 0.42), and WB (risk of 0.68%, P = 0.63) transfusions. This was followed by febrile reactions (28.1%), which were seen more commonly with PRBCs (risk of 0.57%, P = 0.016). No reactions were observed with platelet transfusions. Conclusion: The overall incidence of transfusion reactions in this hospital is slightly higher than those having more advanced transfusion facilities in India. The lack of leukoreduction facilities in our hospital could be a likely cause for the same. The use of leukoreduced WB and PRBCs could possibly reduce the overall incidence of ATRs in general and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in particular. PMID:26285707

  15. Development and internal validation of a pediatric acute asthma prediction rule for hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Moons, Karel GM; Harrell, Frank E; Hartert, Tina V

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinicians have difficulty predicting need for hospitalization in children with acute asthma exacerbations. Objective To develop and internally validate a multivariable Asthma Prediction Rule (APR) to inform hospitalization decision-making in children ages 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations. Methods Between April, 2008 and February, 2013 we enrolled a prospective cohort of patients ages 5-17 years with asthma who presented to our pediatric emergency department with acute exacerbations. Predictors for APR modeling included 15 demographic characteristics, asthma chronic control measures, and pulmonary examination findings in participants at the time of triage and before treatment. The primary outcome variable for APR modeling was need for hospitalization (length-of-stay > 24 hr for those admitted to hospital or relapse for those discharged). A secondary outcome was the hospitalization decision of the clinical team. We used penalized maximum likelihood multiple logistic regression modeling to examine the adjusted association of each predictor variable with the outcome. Backward step-down variable selection techniques were used to yield reduced-form models. Results Data from 928 of 933 participants was used for prediction rule modeling, with median [IQR] age 8.8 [6.9, 11.2] years, 61% male, and 59% African-American race. Both full (penalized) and reduced-form models for each outcome calibrated well, with bootstrap-corrected c-indices of 1.74 and 0.73 for need for hospitalization and 0.81 in each case for hospitalization decision. Conclusion The APR predicts the need for hospitalization of children with acute asthma exacerbations using predictor variables available at the time of presentation to an emergency department. PMID:25609324

  16. Acute pain services in Europe: a 17-nation survey of 105 hospitals. The EuroPain Acute Pain Working Party.

    PubMed

    Rawal, N; Allvin, R

    1998-05-01

    A 17-nation survey was undertaken with the aim of studying the availability of acute pain services (APS) and the use of newer analgesic techniques, such as epidural and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). A questionnaire was mailed to selected anaesthesiologists in 105 European hospitals from 17 countries. Depending on the population, between five and ten representative hospitals from each country were selected by a country coordinator. A total of 101 (96.2%) completed questionnaires were returned. A majority of respondents were dissatisfied with pain management on surgical wards. Pain management was better in post-anaesthesia care units (PACUs); however, 27% of participating hospitals did not have PACUs. There were no organized APS in 64% of hospitals, although anaesthesiologists from chronic pain centres were available for consultation. In the hospitals that had APS, the responsible person for the APS was either: (1) a junior anaesthesiologist (senior anaesthesiologist available for consultation); or (2) a specially trained nurse (supervised by consultant anaesthesiologists). Many anaesthesiologists were unable to introduce techniques such as PCA on wards because of the high equipment costs. Although 40% of hospitals used a visual analogue scale (VAS) or other methods for assessment of pain intensity, routine pain assessment and documenting on a vital sign chart was rarely practised. There was a great variation in routines for opioid prescription and documentation procedures. Nursing regulations regarding injection of drugs into epidural and intrathecal catheters also varied considerably between countries. This survey of 105 hospitals from 17 European countries showed that over 50% of anaesthesiologists were dissatisfied with post-operative pain management on surgical wards. Only 34% of hospitals had an organized APS, and very few hospitals used quality assurance measures such as frequent pain assessment and documentation. There is a need to establish organized

  17. Trajectories of Risk for Specific Readmission Diagnoses after Hospitalization for Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, or Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Krumholz, Harlan M.; Hsieh, Angela; Dreyer, Rachel P.; Welsh, John; Desai, Nihar R.; Dharmarajan, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of rehospitalization is elevated in the immediate post-discharge period and declines over time. It is not known if the extent and timing of risk vary across readmission diagnoses, suggesting that recovery and vulnerability after discharge differ by physiologic system. Objective We compared risk trajectories for major readmission diagnoses in the year after discharge among all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized with heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or pneumonia from 2008–2010. Methods We estimated the daily risk of rehospitalization for 12 major readmission diagnostic categories after accounting for the competing risk of death after discharge. For each diagnostic category, we identified (1) the time required for readmission risk to peak and then decline 50% from maximum values after discharge; (2) the time required for readmission risk to approach plateau periods of minimal day-to-day change; and (3) the extent to which hospitalization risks are higher among patients recently discharged from the hospital compared with the general elderly population. Results Among >3,000,000 hospitalizations, the yearly rate of rehospitalization was 67.0%, 49.5%, and 55.3% after hospitalization for HF, AMI, and pneumonia, respectively. The extent and timing of risk varied by readmission diagnosis and initial admitting condition. Risk of readmission for gastrointestinal bleeding/anemia peaked particularly late after hospital discharge, occurring 10, 6, and 7 days after hospitalization for HF, AMI, and pneumonia, respectively. Risk of readmission for trauma/injury declined particularly slowly, requiring 38, 20, and 38 days to decline by 50% after hospitalization for HF, AMI, and pneumonia, respectively. Conclusions Patterns of vulnerability to different conditions that cause rehospitalization vary by time after hospital discharge. This finding suggests that recovery of various physiologic systems occurs at different rates and

  18. Bereavement Support in an Acute Hospital: An Irish Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Trish; Foreman, Maeve; Curry, Philip; O'Driscoll, Siobhan; McCormack, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the first Irish study to examine a hospital-based bereavement care program, 1 year's cohort of bereaved people was surveyed. A response rate of over 40% provided 339 completed questionnaires from bereaved next-of-kin. The findings suggest that a tiered pyramid model of bereavement care (the Beaumont model) may be functional in a number of ways.…

  19. Improving acute eye consultations in general practice: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Teo, Michelle Ai Ling

    2014-01-01

    There is significant evidence that patients with acute eye symptoms are poorly assessed in primary care. There is a tendency to diagnose viral or bacterial conjunctivitis in any acutely red eye. This has led to delays in treatment and in some cases, permanent loss of sight. The aim of this project was to improve acute eye consultations within the Birchwood Medical Practice. The project focused on the "red flag" findings that would identify patients who require referral for same-day ophthalmology assessment. A retrospective baseline audit was carried out on all cases read-coded "conjunctivitis" over the period of one year. Initially, only 2.8% of consultations had documented all four findings. By considering the main factors that lead to poor eye assessments, two main areas for improvement were identified. These were education (reinforced with memory aids) and improving the availability of eye examination equipment within each consultation room. An "eye examination kit" was developed with the needs of the general practitioner in mind. The practice was re-audited six weeks following the intervention. Consultations where all four red flag findings were documented rose from 2.8% to 50%. This was found to be a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01). Pain was checked 63% of the time, compared to 26% prior to intervention. Visual acuity screening had increased to from 35% to 69%. Photophobia was the most significantly increased metric, from being documented only 6% of the time to now 63% of the time. Documentation of whether the symptoms were unilateral or bilateral had also increased from 88% to 94% of consultations. The initial audit indicated that general practitioners often diagnosed conjunctivitis without screening for symptoms of sight-threatening disease. However, it was clear from the results that the doctors had made a significant change to their approach to acute eye consultations. This shows that doctors are willing to make changes to their behaviour

  20. Antipsychotics for delirium in the general hospital setting in consecutive 2453 inpatients: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Kotaro; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Ken; Odawara, Toshinari; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shiganami, Takafumi; Tsuchida, Kazuo; Oshima, Yoshio; Uchimura, Naohisa; Akaho, Rie; Watanabe, Akira; Taira, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuji; Hashimoto, Naoko; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective Attention to risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium has been paid. A clinical question was whether risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium would exceed efficacy of those even in the general hospital setting. Methods A prospective observational study proceeded over a 1-year period at 33 general hospitals, where at least one psychiatrist worked full time. Subjects were patients who developed delirium during their admission due to acute somatic diseases or surgery, and who received antipsychotics for delirium. The primary outcome was rates and kinds of serious adverse events. Results Among 2834 patients who developed delirium, 2453 patients received antipsychotics, such as risperidone (34%), quetiapine (32%), and parenteral haloperidol (20%), for delirium. Out of 2453 patients, 22 serious adverse events (0.9%) were reported. Aspiration pneumonia was the most frequent (17 patients, 0.7%), followed by cardiovascular events (4 patients, 0.2%) and venous thromboembolism (1 patient, 0.0%). There was no patient with a fracture or intracranial injury due to a fall. No one died because of antipsychotic side effects. The mean Clinical Global Impressions—Improvement Scale score was 2.02 (SD 1.09). Delirium was resolved within 1 week in more than half of the patients (54%). Conclusions In the general hospital setting under management including fine dosage adjustment and early detection of side effects, risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium might be low, in contrast to antipsychotics for dementia in the nursing home or outpatient settings. A point may be not how to avoid using antipsychotics but how to monitor their risk. PMID:23801358

  1. 76 FR 19365 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... payments published in the FY 2011 IPPS final rule (75 FR 50042). Overall, all hospitals will experience an... exceptions policy (see the FY 2005 IPPS final rule, 69 FR 49105). ** This hospital has been assigned a wage... 2011 IPPS/LTCHPPS final rule) appeared in the August 16, 2010 Federal Register (75 FR 50042) and...

  2. 76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... care hospital quality measures. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective... requirements. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), make...

  3. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  4. Prehospital and in-hospital delays in acute stroke care.

    PubMed

    Evenson, K R; Rosamond, W D; Morris, D L

    2001-05-01

    Current guidelines emphasize the need for early stroke care. However, significant delays occur during both the prehospital and in-hospital phases of care, making many patients ineligible for stroke therapies. The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize the existing scientific literature reporting prehospital and in-hospital stroke delay times in order to assist future delivery of effective interventions to reduce delay time and to raise several key issues which future studies should consider. A comprehensive search was performed to find all published journal articles which reported on the prehospital or in-hospital delay time for stroke, including intervention studies. Since 1981, at least 48 unique reports of prehospital delay time for patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms were published from 17 different countries. In the majority of studies which reported median delay times, the median time from symptom onset to arrival in the emergency department was between 3 and 6 h. The in-hospital times from emergency department arrival to being seen by an emergency department physician, initiation and interpretation of a computed tomography (CT) scan, and being seen by a neurologist were consistently longer than recommended. However, prehospital delay comprised the majority of time from symptom onset to potential treatment. Definitions and methodologies differed across studies, making direct comparisons difficult. This review suggests that the majority of stroke patients are unlikely to arrive at the emergency department and receive a diagnostic evaluation in under 3 h. Further studies of stroke delay and corresponding interventions are needed, with careful attention to definitions and methodologies. PMID:11359072

  5. Comparing the stigma of mental illness in a general hospital with a state mental hospital: a Singapore study.

    PubMed

    Chee, Cornelia Y I; Ng, Tze Pin; Kua, Ee Heok

    2005-08-01

    The stigma faced by psychiatric patients associated with the type of psychiatric facilities is controversial. This study was conducted to compare the stigma faced by patients with schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia psychiatric disorders in the outpatient departments of a state mental hospital with those in a general hospital in Singapore. A cross-sectional study involving two groups of outpatients in a state mental hospital (n=300) and in a university general hospital (n=300) were assessed with a 12-item stigma scale. Components of the scale assessed included social rejection, negative media perception, shame and social discrimination. Among schizophrenia patients, state mental hospital patients had significantly lower stigma scores compared to their counterparts in the general hospital. For other mental illnesses, the reverse was true: state mental hospital patients had significantly higher stigma scores compared to their counterparts in the general hospital. Stigma was also associated with a younger age and being employed though not by gender. The stigma faced by psychiatric patients is complex and may have institutional and disorder-specific elements. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  6. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  7. [Ulcerative colitis in Taichung Veterans General Hospital: a clinical study].

    PubMed

    Chang, L M; Ho, K S; Chen, G H

    1995-11-01

    This report concerns 34 patients of ulcerative colitis admitted to Taichung Veterans General Hospital, from 1983 to 1994. Among them 26 were male and 8 were female. The age at onset were mostly from 50 to 60. The average duration between onset of symptoms and the date of definite diagnosis was 10 months. The most common presenting symptom was bloody diarrhea (64.7%). Most of our patients were in the moderately severe group of disease (67.6%), according to the severity defined by Truelove and Witts. The most frequent endoscopic findings of mucosa was classified as Grade III (38.2). Descending colon (91.2), rectum (85.3%), and sigmoid colon (88.2%) were the most frequently involved areas. The major clinical course were chronic intermittent and chronic continuous type (55.9%). Extraintestinal manifestations were found in 2 cases: one was found in the skin, and the other in the joint, respectively. Treatment of ulcerative colitis in our series was mainly medical (91.2%). However, 3 patients received emergent surgical intervention, and 10 patients finally underwent operation because of major complications or failure to respond to medical treatment.

  8. The pattern of spinal tuberculosis in Sarawak General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rasit, A H; Razak, M; Ting, F S

    2001-06-01

    This is a retrospective study of 53 patients with spinal tuberculosis treated in Sarawak General Hospital from 1994 until 1998. The study showed that the mean age in patients with spinal tuberculosis was 40.2 years, and was more common in male (70%) and in Iban population (50%). The clinical presentation included backache (94%); abscess (45%); neurological deficit (44%); and gibbus deformity (22%). The percentage of patient without BCG scar was 82% and 18% had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis. The most common vertebra involved was the ninth thoracic vertebra and the least common was the third cervical vertebra. The average number of vertebra affected per patient was three. The most common radiological type of lesion was paradiscal (47%). The percentage of patients diagnosed by histological examination was 44%. All patients were given chemotherapy for 12 months' duration; 57% were treated surgically and 43% were treated conservatively. Twenty-four of patients (40%) had an excellent and good results and 28 of patients had a fair result and only one patient had poor result. In 23 of patients treated conservatively showed increment of 8 degrees of kyphosis angle and 22 of patients had a fair result and only one patient had poor outcome after 6 months of treatment. In 30 of patients treated surgically showed correction of 4 degrees of kyphosis angle and 24 of them had excellent and good outcome, where 6 of them had fair outcome after 6 months of treatment. PMID:11771073

  9. A Most Unusual Patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    This year marks 200 years of patient care at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In celebration of this milestone, a unique Grand Rounds case is presented. A 450-year-old rotund man admitted 60 times presents with a classic triad of periumbilical pain, bilateral plantar burns, and a frozen scalp. Although this triad may at first strike a cord of familiarity among seasoned clinicians, the disease mechanism is truly noteworthy, being clarified only after a detailed occupational history. Ergo, the lessons hark back to the days of yesteryear, when the history and physical served as the cornerstone of Yuletide clinical diagnosis. A discussion of epidemiology and prognosis accompanies a detailed examination of the pathophysiholiday. Although some consider this patient uncouth, as you will see, he is quite a medical sleuth. The long-standing relationship between this patient and the MGH prompted his family to write a letter of appreciation, which will remind the reader of the meaning that our care brings to patients and their families. Harvey Cushing, who completed his internship at the MGH in 1895, professed “A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more even than the whole man—he must view the man in his world.” We hope this unusual Grand Rounds case intrigues you as it reminds you of Cushing’s lesson and wishes you a joyous holiday season. PMID:22107737

  10. A most unusual patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, Gregory W; Warshaw, Andrew L

    2011-12-01

    This year marks 200 years of patient care at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In celebration of this milestone, a unique Grand Rounds case is presented. A 450-year-old rotund man admitted 60 times presents with a classic triad of periumbilical pain, bilateral plantar burns, and a frozen scalp. Although this triad may at first strike a cord of familiarity among seasoned clinicians, the disease mechanism is truly noteworthy, being clarified only after a detailed occupational history. Ergo, the lessons hark back to the days of yesteryear, when the history and physical served as the cornerstone of Yuletide clinical diagnosis. A discussion of epidemiology and prognosis accompanies a detailed examination of the pathophysiholiday. Although some consider this patient uncouth, as you will see, he is quite a medical sleuth. The long-standing relationship between this patient and the MGH prompted his family to write a letter of appreciation, which will remind the reader of the meaning that our care brings to patients and their families. Harvey Cushing, who completed his internship at the MGH in 1895, professed "A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more even than the whole man-he must view the man in his world." We hope this unusual Grand Rounds case intrigues you as it reminds you of Cushing's lesson and wishes you a joyous holiday season. PMID:22107737

  11. Toshiba General Hospital PACS for routine in- and outpatient clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Akihiro; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kura, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Eitaro; Tsubura, Shinichi

    1996-05-01

    The Toshiba General Hospital introduced a departmental RIS/PACS (Radiology Information System/Picture Archiving and Communication System) in the radiology department in May, 1993. It has been used routinely since that time. In order to provide efficient means for clinicians to find and read many images, the system has been expanded to the neurosurgery and urology clinics and wards since May, 1995, and five image referring workstations now provide digital images to clinicians. In this paper we discuss an algorithm for image migration, one of the key issues to accomplish the expansion to outpatient clinics successfully, and propose the WYWIWYG (what you want is what you get) image transfer logic. This is the logic used to transfer images that physicians require refer without increasing the traffic between the image server and referring workstations. We accomplish the WYWIWYG logic by prioritizing exams the physicians have not yet viewed and by finding historical exams according to the modality, anatomy, and marking. Clinicians gave us comments from their first use of the system and suggested that the PACS enables clinicians to review images more efficiently compared to a film-based system. Our experience suggests that it is a key to the effective application of PACS in outpatient clinics to incorporate consideration patterns of clinicians on the migration algorithm.

  12. Predictors and in-hospital outcomes of preoperative acute kidney injury in patients with type A acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Ren, Hong-Mei; Hu, Chun-Yan; Que, Bin; Ai, Hui; Wang, Chun-Mei; Sun, Li-Zhong; Nie, Shao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after surgery for acute aortic dissection (AAD) and increases in-hospital and long-term mortality. However, few data exist on the clinical and prognostic relevance of early preoperative AKI in patients with type A AAD. We aimed to determine the incidence and predictors of preoperative AKI and the impact of AKI on in-hospital outcomes in patients with type A AAD. Methods From May 2009 to June 2014, we retrospectively enrolled 178 patients admitted to our hospital within 48 h from symptom onset and receiving open surgery for type A AAD. The patients were divided into no AKI and AKI groups and staged with AKI severity according to the KDIGO criteria before surgery. Results AKI occurred in 41 patients (23.0%). The incidence of in-hospital complications was significantly higher in patients with preoperative AKI compared to no AKI (41.5% vs. 9.5%, P < 0.001), including renal infarction (7.3% vs. 0, P = 0.012), and it increased with AKI severity (Ptrend < 0.001). Patients with AKI had higher in-hospital mortality compared with patients without AKI, although no significant difference was found (14.6% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.079). Multivariate analysis indicated that male gender, diastolic blood pressure on admission and bilateral renal artery involvement were independent predictors of preoperative AKI in patients with type A AAD. Conclusions Early AKI before surgery was common in patients with type A AAD, and was associated with increased in-hospital complications. Male gender, diastolic blood pressure on admission and bilateral renal artery involvement were major predictors for preoperative AKI. PMID:27781058

  13. Predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome in acute stroke due to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Melissa J; Tayal, Ashis H; Schlenk, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of acute ischemic stroke that results in severe neurological disability and death despite treatment with intravenous thrombolysis (intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]). We performed a retrospective review of a single-center registry of patients treated with intravenous rtPA for stroke. The purposes of this study were to compare intravenous rtPA treated patients with stroke with and without AF to examine independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome (in-hospital death or hospital discharge to a skilled nursing facility, long-term acute care facility, or hospice care). A univariate analysis was performed on 144 patients receiving intravenous rtPA for stroke secondary to AF and 190 patients without AF. Characteristics that were significantly different between the two groups were age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, length of hospital stay, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking status, presence of large cerebral infarct, and hospital discharge outcome. Bivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that patients with stroke secondary to AF with a poor hospital discharge outcome had a greater likelihood of older age, higher initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, longer length of hospital stay, intubation, and presence of large cerebral infarct compared with those with good hospital discharge outcome (discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation or signed oneself out against medical advice). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, longer length of hospital stay, and presence of large cerebral infarct were independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome. These predictors can guide nursing interventions, aid the multidisciplinary treating team with treatment decisions, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:25503541

  14. Measuring gain-sharing dividends in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barbusca, A; Cleek, M

    1994-01-01

    Hospitals have responded to industry consolidation by increasing productivity with nonmanagement, group-incentive compensation, known as gain sharing. A nationwide study conducted to obtain quantitative performance data for gain-sharing programs revealed that they are most successful during the initial stages of the program. Many variables affect the size of employee bonuses and the duration of employee support. Employers must identify how to appropriately install their gain-sharing program so that employee motivation, participation, and trust in management are maximized. PMID:8206759

  15. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  16. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients after hospitalization for acute exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, Mirjam; Leuppi, Jörg D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to sum up the literature regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation. Guidelines recommend a follow-up 4-6 weeks after hospitalization to assess coping strategies, inhaler technique, the need for long-term oxygen therapy and the measurement of FEV(1). This review discusses the follow-up of patients with exacerbations of COPD, the use and value of spirometry in their further management, the potential benefit of home monitoring, the value of long-term oxygen therapy, the value of self-management programs including the use of action plans, the potential benefit of noninvasive ventilation as well as the value of early rehabilitation. There is not enough literature to allow specific recommendations and to define components of a care plan after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation; however, early rehabilitation should be included.

  17. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  18. Initiation or maintenance of beta-blocker therapy in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Passos, Luiz Carlos; Oliveira, Márcio Galvão; Duraes, Andre Rodrigues; Trindade, Thiago Moreira; Barbosa, Andréa Cristina Costa

    2016-08-01

    Background Beta-blockers have been recommended for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction for their long-term benefits. However, the tolerance to betablockers in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure should be evaluated. Objective To estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure who can tolerate these agents in clinical practice and compare the clinical outcomes of patients who can and cannot tolerate treatment with beta-blockers. Setting Two reference hospitals in cardiology. Methods Retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients hospitalized for acute heart failure between September 2008 and May 2012. Population-based sample. During the study period, 325 patients were admitted consecutively, including 194 individuals with an acute heart failure diagnosis and systolic left ventricular dysfunction and ejection fraction ≤45 %, who were candidates for the initiation or continuation of beta-blockers. Main outcome measure The percentage of patients intolerant to beta-blockers and the clinical characteristics of patients. Results On admission, 61.8 % of patients were already using beta-blockers, and 73.2 % were using beta-blockers on discharge. During hospitalization, 85 % of patients used these agents for some period. The main reasons for not using betablockers were low cardiac output syndrome (24.4 %), bradycardia (24.4 %), severe hypotension or shock (17.8 %), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (13.3 %). Patients who were intolerant or did not use a beta-blocker had a longer hospital stay (18.3 vs. 11.0 days; p < .001), greater use of vasoactive drugs (41.5 vs. 16.3 %; p < .001, CI 1.80-7.35), sepsis and septic shock (RR = 3.02; CI 95 % 1.59-5.75), and higher mortality rate during hospitalization (22.6 vs. 2.9 %; p < .001; CI 3.05-32.26). Conclusion Beta-blockers could be used in 73.2 % of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. Patients who can not tolerate BB presented

  19. Managing Opioid Use Disorder During and After Acute Hospitalization: A Case-Based Review Clarifying Methadone Regulation for Acute Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Noska, Amanda; Mohan, Aron; Wakeman, Sarah; Rich, Josiah; Boutwell, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Treatment with an opioid agonist such as methadone or buprenorphine is the standard of care for opioid use disorder. Persons with opioid use disorder are frequently hospitalized, and may be undertreated due to provider misinformation regarding the legality of prescribing methadone for inpatients. Using a case-based review, this article aims to describe effective management of active opioid withdrawal and ongoing opioid use disorder using methadone or buprenorphine among acutely ill, hospitalized patients. Methods We reviewed pertinent medical and legal literature and consulted with national legal experts regarding methadone for opioid withdrawal and opioid maintenance therapy in hospitalized, general medical and surgical patients, and describe a real-life example of successful implementation of inpatient methadone for these purposes. Results Patients with opioid use disorders can be effectively and legally initiated on methadone maintenance therapy or buprenorphine during an inpatient hospitalization by clinical providers and successfully transitioned to an outpatient methadone maintenance or buprenorphine clinic after discharge for ongoing treatment. Conclusions Inpatient methadone or buprenorphine prescribing is safe and evidence-based, and can be used to effectively treat opioid withdrawal and also serves as a bridge to outpatient treatment of opioid use disorders. PMID:26258153

  20. Compliance with Evidence-Based Guidelines in Acute Pancreatitis: an Audit of Practices in University of Toronto Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J A; Hsu, J; Bawazeer, M; Marshall, J; Friedrich, J O; Nathens, A; Coburn, N; Huang, H; McLeod, R S

    2016-02-01

    Despite existing evidence-based practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, clinical compliance with recommendations is poor. We conducted a retrospective review of 248 patients admitted between 2010 and 2012 with acute pancreatitis at eight University of Toronto affiliated hospitals. We included all patients admitted to ICU (52) and 25 ward patients from each site (196). Management was compared with the most current evidence used in the Best Practice in General Surgery Management of Acute Pancreatitis Guideline. Fifty-six patients (22.6 %) had only serum lipase tested for biochemical diagnosis. Admission ultrasound was performed in 174 (70.2 %) patients, with 69 (27.8 %) undergoing ultrasound and CT. Of non-ICU patients, 158 (80.6 %) were maintained nil per os, and only 18 (34.6 %) ICU patients received enteral nutrition, commencing an average 7.5 days post-admission. Fifty (25.5 %) non-ICU patients and 25 (48.1 %) ICU patients received prophylactic antibiotics. Only 24 patients (22.6 %) with gallstone pancreatitis underwent index admission cholecystectomy. ERCP with sphincterotomy was under-utilized among patients with biliary obstruction (16 [31 %]) and candidates for prophylactic sphincterotomy (18 [22 %]). Discrepancies exist between the most current evidence and clinical practice within the University of Toronto hospitals. A guideline, knowledge translation strategy, and assessment of barriers to clinical uptake are required to change current clinical practice.

  1. [Task analysis of clinical laboratory physician in acute hospital].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junko

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate communications between clinical divisions and clinical laboratories are required to improve the quality of health care in hospitals. In this paper, the routine work of a clinical laboratory physician is presented. 1. In order to support attentive medical practice, we have established a consultation service system for handling questions from medical staff. The main clients are doctors and clinical laboratory technologists. 2. In order to improve the quality of infectious disease analysis, we have recommended obtaining two or more blood culture sets to achieve good sensitivity. The order rate of multiple blood culture sets increased 90% or more in 2011. 3. In order to provide appropriate blood transfusion, we intervene in inappropriate transfusion plans. 4. In order to support prompt decision making, we send E-mails to physicians regarding critical values. 5. We send reports on the morphology of cells(peripheral blood and bone marrow), IEP, flow cytometry, irregular antibodies, and so on. It has been realized that doctors want to know better solutions immediately rather than the best solution tomorrow morning. We would like to contribute to improving the quality of health care in Saitama Cooperative Hospital as clinical laboratory physicians.

  2. Hospitable archean climates simulated by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E T; Toon, O B

    2013-07-01

    Evidence from ancient sediments indicates that liquid water and primitive life were present during the Archean despite the faint young Sun. To date, studies of Archean climate typically utilize simplified one-dimensional models that ignore clouds and ice. Here, we use an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago when the Sun was 20% dimmer than it is today. Surface properties are assumed to be equal to those of the present day, while ocean heat transport varies as a function of sea ice extent. Present climate is duplicated with 0.06 bar of CO2 or alternatively with 0.02 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. Hot Archean climates, as implied by some isotopic reconstructions of ancient marine cherts, are unattainable even in our warmest simulation having 0.2 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. However, cooler climates with significant polar ice, but still dominated by open ocean, can be maintained with modest greenhouse gas amounts, posing no contradiction with CO2 constraints deduced from paleosols or with practical limitations on CH4 due to the formation of optically thick organic hazes. Our results indicate that a weak version of the faint young Sun paradox, requiring only that some portion of the planet's surface maintain liquid water, may be resolved with moderate greenhouse gas inventories. Thus, hospitable late Archean climates are easily obtained in our climate model.

  3. Hospitable archean climates simulated by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E T; Toon, O B

    2013-07-01

    Evidence from ancient sediments indicates that liquid water and primitive life were present during the Archean despite the faint young Sun. To date, studies of Archean climate typically utilize simplified one-dimensional models that ignore clouds and ice. Here, we use an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago when the Sun was 20% dimmer than it is today. Surface properties are assumed to be equal to those of the present day, while ocean heat transport varies as a function of sea ice extent. Present climate is duplicated with 0.06 bar of CO2 or alternatively with 0.02 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. Hot Archean climates, as implied by some isotopic reconstructions of ancient marine cherts, are unattainable even in our warmest simulation having 0.2 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. However, cooler climates with significant polar ice, but still dominated by open ocean, can be maintained with modest greenhouse gas amounts, posing no contradiction with CO2 constraints deduced from paleosols or with practical limitations on CH4 due to the formation of optically thick organic hazes. Our results indicate that a weak version of the faint young Sun paradox, requiring only that some portion of the planet's surface maintain liquid water, may be resolved with moderate greenhouse gas inventories. Thus, hospitable late Archean climates are easily obtained in our climate model. PMID:23808659

  4. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  5. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    PubMed

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  6. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Disease FR Federal Register HAI Healthcare-Associated Infection HBIPS Hospital-Based Inpatient Psychiatric... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), there were a number of....asp . III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), make the...

  7. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... FR 60315) included several corrections to figures and data for the Hospital Readmissions Reduction... August 31, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 53258), we published a final rule entitled ``Medicare Program... the October 3, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 60315); October 17, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR...

  8. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    .... Background In FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010 (75 FR 50042), there were a number of technical errors... FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010, make the following corrections: A. Corrections to the Preamble..., 485, and 489 RIN 0938-AP80; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective...

  9. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Hefter, (410) 786-4487. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2010-12563 of June 2, 2010... correction notice. III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2010-12563 of June 2, 2010, make the following... care hospital prospective payment system (FY 2010 IPPS/RY 2010 LTCH PPS) notice), there were...

  10. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Hospital Inpatient Services under Medicare Part A Issues. Susanne Seagrave, (410) 786-0044, Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Inpatient... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH...

  11. Readmissions due to traffic accidents at a general hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Luciana; Monteiro, Damiana Aparecida Trindade; Pompeo, Daniele Alcalá; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadotti; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to verify the occurrence and the causes of hospital readmissions within a year after discharge from hospitalizations due to traffic accidents. Methods: victims of multiple traumas due to traffic accidents were included, who were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. Sociodemographic data, accident circumstances, body regions affected and cause of readmission were collected from the patient histories. Results: among the 109 victims of traffic accidents, the majority were young and adult men. Most hospitalizations due to accidents involved motorcycle drivers (56.9%). The causes of the return to the hospital were: need to continue the surgical treatment (63.2%), surgical site infection (26.3%) and fall related to the physical sequelae of the trauma (10.5%). The rehospitalization rate corresponded to 174/1,000 people/year. Conclusion: the hospital readmission rate in the study population is similar to the rates found in other studies. Victims of severe limb traumas need multiple surgical procedures, lengthier hospitalizations and extended rehabilitation. PMID:26444172

  12. Junior doctor dementia champions in a district general hospital (innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Iain; Coates, Anna; Merrick, Sophie; Lee, Chooi

    2016-03-01

    Dementia is a common condition in the UK with around 25% of patients in acute hospitals having dementia. In the UK, there is national guidance on the assessment of cognitive impairment in acute hospitals. This article is a qualitative study of junior doctors' experiences as part of a dementia and delirium team involved in changing the care of patients with dementia in a hospital in the UK. It draws on data from a focus group and follow-up questionnaire in two hospital trusts. We examine what drives doctors to become involved in such projects and the effects of this experience upon them. We suggest a typology for getting junior doctors involved in projects generating change when working with patients with dementia. Being more actively involved in caring for and developing services for patients with dementia may represent the crossing of an educational threshold for these junior doctors.

  13. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  14. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Kim; van Zaane, Bas; Bosch, Els J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Peelen, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. Purpose In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring improves early diagnosis of patient deterioration and reduces critical incidents on hospital wards. Data Sources Studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library, searched from 1970 till October 25, 2014. Study Selection Electronic databases were searched using keywords and corresponding synonyms ‘ward’, ‘continuous’, ‘monitoring’ and ‘respiration’. Pediatric, fetal and animal studies were excluded. Data Extraction Since no validated tool is currently available for diagnostic or intervention studies with continuous monitoring, methodological quality was assessed with a modified tool based on modified STARD, CONSORT, and TREND statements. Data Synthesis Six intervention and five diagnostic studies were included, evaluating the use of eight different devices for continuous respiratory monitoring. Quantitative data synthesis was not possible because intervention, study design and outcomes differed considerably between studies. Outcomes estimates for the intervention studies ranged from RR 0.14 (0.03, 0.64) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation to RR 1.00 (0.41, 2.35) for unplanned ICU admission after introduction of continuous respiratory monitoring, Limitations The methodological quality of most studies was moderate, e.g. ‘before-after’ designs, incomplete reporting of primary outcomes, and incomplete clinical implementation of the monitoring system. Conclusions Based on the findings of this systematic review, implementation of routine continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring on general hospital wards cannot yet be advocated as results are inconclusive, and methodological quality of the studies needs improvement. Future

  15. [Prevalence and associated factors of hospital malnutrition in a general hospital; Perú, 2012].

    PubMed

    Veramendi-Espinoza, L E; Zafra-Tanaka, J H; Salazar-Saavedra, O; Basilio-Flores, J E; Millones-Sánchez, E; Pérez-Casquino, G A; Quispe-Moore, L M; Tapia-Vicente, M E; Ticona-Rebagliati, D I; Asato N, B; Quispe-Calderón, L; Ruiz García, H J; Chia-Gil, A; Rey-Rodríguez, D E; Surichaqui B, T; Whittembury, Á

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: La desnutrición hospitalaria es un problema prevalente que genera mayor morbi-mortalidad, peor respuesta al tratamiento, mayor estancia y costo hospitalario. Objetivos: Determinar la prevalencia y factores asociados a desnutrición hospitalaria en un hospital general peruano. Métodos: Estudio analítico transversal de 211 pacientes en servicios de Medicina y Cirugía. Se analizó variables demográficas, clínicas e indicadores antropométricos. El análisis multivariado fue de regresión logística binaria. El nivel de significancia fue 5% (p < 0,05). Resultados: La prevalencia de desnutrición hospitalaria fue 46.9% y las de desnutrición calórica y proteica fueron 21,3% y 37,5% respectivamente. En el análisis bivariado, estar hospitalizado en el servicio de Cirugía se asoció a un mayor riesgo de desnutrición calórica (OR = 4,41, IC 95% [1,65-11,78]) y proteica (OR = 2,52, IC 95% [1,30-4,90]). Hubo asociación significativa entre el número de comorbilidades del paciente y desnutrición calórica (p = 0,031), y el tiempo de cambio de ingesta alimentaria y presencia de desnutrición proteica (p = 0,031). El análisis multivariado mostró asociación significativa entre el diagnóstico de neoplasia y la presencia de desnutrición calórica (OR = 5,22, IC 95% [1,43-19,13]). Conclusiones: La prevalencia de desnutrición hospitalaria fue cerca del 50%, coincidiendo con estudios similares. Las prevalencias de desnutrición calórica/proteica halladas difieren de las de un estudio anterior en este hospital, explicándose por parámetros de diagnóstico diferentes y características particulares de las poblaciones, como el servicio de procedencia y comorbilidades. Se encontró asociación entre desnutrición proteica/calórica y estar hospitalizado en el servicio de Cirugía; las razones deben investigarse en estudios posteriores.

  16. [Evaluation of rapidly growing Mycobacteria isolates in a general hospital: reports from the hospital microbiology laboratory].

    PubMed

    Tazawa, S; Marumo, K; Nakamura, Y; Narushima, M; Higuchi, D

    2001-05-01

    groups, in spite of the fact that they rarely cause infection, have a significant risk of infecting aged patients in general hospitals with various underlying diseases attributable to infections. As only a few colonies were isolated from patients' specimens in the majority of cases, it took time to carry out these clinical examinations, and to improve this "laboratory's delay", it is needed to make faster report to clinicians. PMID:11449697

  17. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  18. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  19. 78 FR 28733 - Medical Devices; General Hospital and Personal Use Monitoring Devices; Classification of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 880 Medical Devices; General Hospital and... CFR part 880 is amended as follows: PART 880--GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES 0 1....

  20. The Economic Crisis and Acute Myocardial Infarction: New Evidence Using Hospital-Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Objective This research sought to assess whether and to what extent the ongoing economic crisis in Italy impacted hospitalizations, in-hospital mortality and expenditures associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The data were obtained from the hospital discharge database of the Italian Health Ministry and aggregated at the hospital level. Each hospital (n = 549) was observed for 4 years and was geographically located within a “Sistema Locale del Lavoro” (SLL, i.e., clusters of neighboring towns with a common economic structure). For each SLL, the intensity of the crisis was determined, defined as the 2012–2008 increase in the area-specific unemployment rate. A difference-in-differences (DiD) approach was employed to compare the increases in AMI-related outcomes across different quintiles of crisis intensity. Results Hospitals located in areas with the highest intensity of crisis (in the fifth quintile) had an increase of approximately 30 AMI cases annually (approximately 13%) compared with hospitals in area with lower crisis intensities (p<0.001). A significant increase in total hospital days was observed (13%, p<0.001) in addition to in-hospital mortality (17%, p<0.001). As a consequence, an increase of around €350.000 was incurred in annual hospital expenditures for AMI (approximately 36%, p<0.001). Conclusions More attention should be given to the increase in health needs associated with the financial crisis. Policies aimed to contrast unemployment in the community by keeping and reintegrating workers in jobs could also have positive impacts on adverse health outcomes, especially in areas of high crisis intensity. PMID:26574745

  1. Viral etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized young children in a children's referral hospital in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mahmoudi, Shima; Movahedi, Zahra; Halimi, Shahnaz; Momeni, Shervin; Hosseinpour-Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are considered major causes of acute respiratory tract infections among children under 5 years old. In this study we investigated the prevalence of three respiratory viruses--respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus (INF) and adenovirus (ADV)--among hospitalized children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under five who had been hospitalized for LRTIs. The clinical data, including demographic data (age and sex), vital symptoms and signs at admission, duration of fever, duration of hospitalization, chest X-ray findings and outcome were considered. All inpatient specimens were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV and the INF-A, INF-B and parainfluenza viruses and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ADV. Out of those from 232 patients, 58 (25%) specimens were positive for either RSV, INF or ADV. The most predominant pathogens were RSV (40 cases, 17.2%), followed by INF (10 cases, 4%; including 8 type A and 2 type B) and ADV (8 cases, 3.4%). A total of 32 (55.1%) viral cases were identified in the spring, followed by 19 (32.7%) in the autumn and 7 (12%) in the winter. There was no significant correlation between clinical symptoms and the individual virus detected. In our study, RSV and INF were the two most common causes of LRTIs. These data are helpful for guiding the development of further vaccines as well as the use of antiviral drugs. Further studies will be needed to investigate other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, human metapneumovirus and rhinovirus. PMID:25818953

  2. Hospital staff's perceptions of risk associated with the discharge of elderly people from acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, M S

    1994-02-01

    As part of the exploratory work for a project on discharge planning of elderly people (75+ years of age) from acute care, the concept of risk was discussed with a sample of consultants; ward sisters; staff nurses; a social worker; occupational therapist; pharmacist; and some physiotherapists. The factors which they identified as being relevant to 'risky discharges' were organized under seven headings: medical factors; mobility; social surroundings; personality; habits; social support; and external factors. These findings are presented within the context of a review of relevant literature and some conclusions are drawn.

  3. The costs and service implications of substituting intermediate care for acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Leslie; Lawrence, David

    2006-05-01

    Intermediate care is part of a package of initiatives introduced by the UK Government mainly to relieve pressure on acute hospital beds and reduce delayed discharge (bed blocking). Intermediate care involves caring for patients in a range of settings, such as in the home or community or in nursing and residential homes. This paper considers the scope of intermediate care and its role in relation to acute hospital services. In particular, it develops a framework that can be used to inform decisions about the most cost-effective care pathways for given clinical situations, and also for wider planning purposes. It does this by providing a model for evaluating the costs of intermediate care services provided by different agencies and techniques for calibrating the model locally. It finds that consistent application of the techniques over a period of time, coupled with sound planning and accounting, should result in savings to the health economy. PMID:16643707

  4. The costs and service implications of substituting intermediate care for acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Leslie; Lawrence, David

    2006-05-01

    Intermediate care is part of a package of initiatives introduced by the UK Government mainly to relieve pressure on acute hospital beds and reduce delayed discharge (bed blocking). Intermediate care involves caring for patients in a range of settings, such as in the home or community or in nursing and residential homes. This paper considers the scope of intermediate care and its role in relation to acute hospital services. In particular, it develops a framework that can be used to inform decisions about the most cost-effective care pathways for given clinical situations, and also for wider planning purposes. It does this by providing a model for evaluating the costs of intermediate care services provided by different agencies and techniques for calibrating the model locally. It finds that consistent application of the techniques over a period of time, coupled with sound planning and accounting, should result in savings to the health economy.

  5. Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ortego, Alexandra; Gaieski, David F.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Jones, Tiffanie; Halpern, Scott D.; Small, Dylan S.; Sante, S. Cham; Drumheller, Byron; Christie, Jason D.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septic shock is associated with increased long-term morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the use of hospital-based acute care in survivors after hospital discharge. The objectives of the study were to examine the frequency, timing, causes, and risk factors associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary, academic hospital in the United States. Patients Patients admitted with septic shock (serum lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L or refractory hypotension) and discharged alive to a non-hospice setting between 2007 and 2010. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The co-primary outcomes were all-cause hospital readmission and ED visits (treat-and-release encounters) within 30 days to any of the three health system hospitals. Of 269 at-risk survivors, 63 (23.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 18.2, 28.5) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge and another 12 (4.5%, 95% CI: 2.3, 7.7) returned to the ED for a treat-and-release visit. Readmissions occurred within 15 days of discharge in 75% of cases and were more likely in oncology patients (p=0.001) and patients with a longer hospital length of stay (p=0.04). Readmissions were frequently due to another life-threatening condition and resulted in death or discharge to hospice in 16% of cases. The reasons for readmission were deemed potentially related to the index septic shock hospitalization in 78% (49/63) of cases. The most common cause was infection-related, accounting for 46% of all 30-day readmissions, followed by cardiovascular or thromboembolic events (18%). Conclusions The use of hospital-based acute care appeared to be common in septic shock survivors. Encounters often led to readmission within 15 days of discharge, were frequently due to another acute condition, and appeared to result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Given the potential public health implications of

  6. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  7. Can We Humanize Dying in the General Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Stephen

    This paper reviews the literature on the behavior and attitudes of medical-nursing personnel toward the dying person and illustrates the frequent conflict between hospital staff and the needs of dying. Inner perturbation stemming from feelings of vicarious suffering, vicarious disintegration, or personal anxiety about death, education deficiencies…

  8. [Acute kidney insufficiency of obstetric origin. Experience at the Santo Tomas Hospital (1966-1981)].

    PubMed

    Díaz, J H; de Gordón, G; Hernández, L; Medina, R

    1990-01-01

    The authors review 24 cases of acute renal failure of obstetric etiology occurred in Hospital Santo Tomás, which represents a frequency of 1.375/10,000, with a bimodal distribution and the main causes were toxemia of pregnancy and sepsis. All cases were of the oliguric type and a kidney biopsy was performed in 17 cases, revealing an acute tubular necrosis in 16 and a diffuse cortical necrosis in the other case. Two patients (8.3%) died and one did not received nephrology treatment as the other 23 patients. The fetal mortality was 37.5% and the Apgar was good in 2, fair in one and bad in 2. A 50% of the complications were infections and nine patients tolerated different surgical procedures after the installation of the acute renal failure. The follow-up of 12 patients shows no evidence of renal failure.

  9. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  10. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  11. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  12. The Warrens and other pioneering clinician pathologists of the Massachusetts General Hospital during its early years: an appreciation on the 200th anniversary of the hospital founding.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert H; Louis, David N

    2011-10-01

    To celebrate the bicentennial of the 1811 charter to establish the Massachusetts General Hospital, we tell the stories of the physicians and surgeons of the hospital who practiced pathology until the discipline was more firmly established with the recruitment of James Homer Wright who became the first full-time pathologist at the hospital in 1896. One of the two co-founders of the hospital, John Collins Warren (famed primarily for being the surgeon at the first public demonstration of ether anesthesia) had a major interest in pathology; he published a book focused on gross pathology (1837) and began the important specimen collection subsequently known as the Warren Anatomical Museum at Harvard Medical School (HMS). An early physician, John Barnard Swett Jackson, became the first professor of pathology in the United States (1847) and was a noted collector whose specimens were added to the Warren Museum. Dr Jackson showed no interest in microscopy when it became available, but microscopy was promoted from circa the late 1840s at Harvard and likely at the hospital by Oliver Wendell Holmes, the famed essayist who was on the staff of the hospital and faculty at the medical school. Microscopy was probably first used at the Hospital with any frequency on examination of fluids by the first officially designated 'Microscopist,' John Bacon Jr, in 1851, and after the mid-1850s by Calvin Ellis on anatomic specimens; Ellis went on to pioneering reform of the HMS curriculum. Reginald Heber Fitz succeeded Ellis in 1871 and was the first to be officially designated as 'Pathologist' at the hospital. Fitz is remembered for two major contributions: his paper showing the nature of, and potential surgical cure for, the disease that he termed 'appendicitis'; and his description of acute pancreatitis. With the microscope now firmly entrenched and with the increase in surgery after Fitz's work on appendicitis, surgical pathology grew quickly. J Collins Warren, the grandson of the co

  13. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Induced by Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid: Report of a Case Presenting With Generalized Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Syrigou, Ekaterini; Grapsa, Dimitra; Charpidou, Andriani; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a rare pustular skin reaction, most commonly triggered by antibiotics. Although its diagnosis is based primarily on the presence of specific clinical and histopathologic features, additional in vivo (patch testing) or in vitro testing may be required, especially in atypical cases, to more accurately determine the causative agent. The authors report a histologically confirmed case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis that was induced by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, as documented by subsequent patch testing, and presented with generalized painful lymphadenopathy, mimicking an acute infectious process. This is a very rare and diagnostically challenging clinical presentation of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, which has been reported, to the best of our knowledge, only once previously.

  14. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  15. Plasma glucose, lactate, sodium, and potassium levels in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Tõnisson, Mailis; Tillmann, Vallo; Kuudeberg, Anne; Väli, Marika

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our research was to study prevalence of changes in plasma levels of lactate, potassium, glucose, and sodium in relation to alcohol concentration in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication (AAI). Data from 194 under 18-year-old children hospitalized to the two only children's hospital in Estonia over a 2-year period were analyzed. The pediatrician on call filled in a special form on the clinical symptoms of AAI; a blood sample was drawn for biochemical tests, and a urine sample taken to exclude narcotic intoxication. The most common finding was hyperlactinemia occurring in 66% of the patients (n=128) followed by hypokalemia (<3.5 mmol/L) in 50% (n=97), and glucose above of reference value (>6.1 mmol/L) in 40.2% of the children (n=78). Hypernatremia was present in five children. In conclusion, hyperlactinemia, hypokalemia, and glucose levels above of reference value are common biochemical findings in children hospitalized with acute AAI. PMID:20846615

  16. Acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after percutaneous coronary interventions Eptifibatide versus Abciximab

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Andrew E.; Waksman, Ron; Gruberg, Luis; Sharma, Arvind K.; Lew, Robert; Pinnow, Ellen; Canos, Daniel A.; Cheneau, Edouard; Castagna, Marco; Satler, Lowell; Pichard, Augusto; Kent, Kenneth M

    2003-03-01

    Background: Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists reduce peri-angioplasty ischemic complications and improve in-hospital outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Prior studies have demonstrated favorable results with both eptifibatide and abciximab. The purpose of this study was to assess whether there are any differences in rates of acute procedural complications and in-hospital events with the use of these two agents. Methods: A retrospective review of 359 elective PCIs from June 1998 to August 2000 identified 152 PCIs treated with eptifibatide (bolus 180 {mu}g/kg, infusion 2 {mu}g/kg/min for 12-48 h) and 205 PCIs treated with abciximab (bolus 0.25 mg/kg, infusion 10 {mu}g/min for 12 h). All patients received IIb/IIIa antagonists at the initiation of the intervention. Results: The clinical demographics, the angiographic morphology, the indications, and the procedural details were similar in both groups. In the eptifibatide group, the maximum ACT was lower (235{+-}45 vs. 253{+-}40, P<.0001). The incidence of major procedural and in-hospital events was compared. Eptifibatide and abciximab had similar rates of major complications (death or myocardial infarction) (1.4% vs. 2.9%), repeat PTCA (3.4% vs. 1.9%), and major bleeding (3.3% vs. 4.3%). Conclusions: Eptifibatide is comparable to abciximab in regards to acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after PCI.

  17. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  18. The Conscientious Practice Policy: a futility policy for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-08-01

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the conflict that may occur when patients or their families insist on a therapy that the physician feels would be futile. In 1999 the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association recommended that all health-care institutions adopt a policy on medical futility that follows a fair process. Development of such a policy has proved problematic for many hospitals. The Conscientious Practice Policy at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital was developed as a response to the AMA recommendation. It outlines a specific process to be followed in the event that a physician wishes to refuse to provide a requested therapy, whether that refusal is based on perceived futility or other concerns. The policy was subsequently modified slightly and adopted by two other Connecticut acute care hospitals.

  19. End-of-life care in an acute care hospital: linking policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-07-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be effective, health care professionals who provide hospital care will need to respond to its patient-centered purpose. Health services will also be called upon to train health care professionals to work with dying people in a more participatory way and to assist them to develop the clinical processes that support shared decision making. Health professionals who manage clinical workplaces become central in reshaping this practice environment by promoting patient-centered care policy objectives and restructuring health service systems to routinely incorporate patient and family preferences about care at key points in the patient's care episode.

  20. The effectiveness of wellness programs as a strategy for cost containment in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Gregory O

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of hospital-based wellness programs in lowering both the acuity of illness of patients and the total expenses of acute care hospitals from a strategic management perspective. The subjects for this cross-sectional study were 164 community hospitals in 27 urban areas of Texas. The findings show that, after controlling for size, the number of wellness programs was significantly and negatively related to both the acuity of illness and total expenses. Further, the number of wellness programs offered did not vary significantly by type of ownership. The study concludes that reimbursement policies designed to provide financial incentives to promote wellness have been effective and suggests future directions for the evolution of health care management. PMID:15816225

  1. [The Asahi Model-Regional Mental Health Services at Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The Asahi model, Psychiatric Services of Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital, is characterized by multiple dimensions of mental health services, such as multidisciplinary team approach, medical cooperation, specialized psychiatric treatment of acute care, clozapine and modified ECT, outreach services of home nursing and assertive community treatment, and the close and mutual coordination with housing services and social welfare services. The Asahi Model makes it possible to be deinstitutionalized, to improve patients satisfaction, to shorten hospitalization, to decrease psychiatric emergency visits and to be of service in a natural disaster. It also might prevent the relapse of schizophrenics within twelve months after discharge and improve the quality of mental health staffs trainings to support patients better. In the future, we will need to work on providing sectorized care, early psychosis intervention programs, to construct networking systems of clozapine and modified ECT, to strengthen growth of home nursing, and to take place mental health anti-stigma campaigns. PMID:26552318

  2. Young Hispanic Women Experience Higher In-Hospital Mortality Following an Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fátima; Foody, JoAnne M; Wang, Yun; López, Lenny

    2015-01-01

    Background Although mortality rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have declined for men and women, prior studies have reported a sex gap in mortality such that younger women were most likely to die after an AMI. Methods and Results We sought to explore the impact of race and ethnicity on the sex gap in AMI patterns of care and mortality for younger women in a contemporary patient cohort. We constructed multivariable hierarchical logistic regression models to examine trends in AMI hospitalizations, procedures, and in-hospital mortality by sex, age (<65 and ≥65 years), and race/ethnicity (white, black, and Hispanic). Analyses were derived from 194 071 patients who were hospitalized for an AMI with available race and ethnicity data from the 2009–2010 National Inpatient Sample. Hospitalization rates, procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary interventions, and cardiac bypass surgery), and inpatient mortality were analyzed across age, sex, and race/ethnic groups. There was significant variation in hospitalization rates by age and race/ethnicity. All racial/ethnic groups were less likely to undergo invasive procedures compared with white men (P<0.001). After adjustment for comorbidities, younger Hispanic women experienced higher in-hospital mortality compared with younger white men, with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.9), adjusted for age and comorbidities. Conclusion We found significant racial and sex disparities in AMI hospitalizations, care patterns, and mortality, with higher in-hospital mortality experienced by younger Hispanic women. Future studies are necessary to explore determinants of these significant racial and sex disparities in outcomes for AMI. PMID:26353998

  3. The Clinical Course of Cirrhosis Patients Hospitalized for Acute Hepatic Deterioration: A Prospective Bicentric Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Yan, Huadong; Zhou, Zhibo; Fang, Hong; Li, Jiawei; Ye, Honghua; Sun, Wenjie; Zhou, Wenhong; Ye, Jingfen; Yang, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Hu, Yaoren; Chen, Zhi; Sheng, Jifang

    2015-11-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are vulnerable to acute hepatic insults and are more likely to develop rapid hepatic deterioration. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical course of patients with cirrhosis and hospitalized for acute hepatic deterioration (AHD).This is a prospective study involving 163 patients with cirrhosis and AHD. The occurrence of organ failures, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and infections during hospital stay were recorded and the relationship between organ failure and death or SIRS/infection was subsequently analyzed.Of 163 patients, 35 did not develop any organ failure during in-hospital follow-ups (90-day mortality: 0%); 84 had intrahepatic organ failures (IH-OFs, defined by liver and/or coagulation failure) (90-day mortality: 22.0%); and 44 patients developed extra-hepatic organ failures (EH-OFs, defined by kidney, cerebral, circulation, and respiratory failure) on the basis of IH-OF with a 90-day mortality of 90.9%. On multivariable analysis by a Cox proportion hazard model, age, WBC, presence of IH-OF, and EH-OF all predicted 90-day death. A logistic regression analysis identified SIRS being associated with the development of EH-OF. Furthermore, IH-OF at admission and infections occurred during the hospital stay were shown to be another 2 potential risk factors.The clinical course of cirrhosis patients with acute hepatic injury was characterized by 3 consecutive stages (AHD, IH-OF, and EH-OF), which provided a clear risk stratification. The PIRO criteria provided an accurate frame for prognostication of those patients. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome may be a target for blocking the progression to the EH-OF stage.

  4. The Clinical Course of Cirrhosis Patients Hospitalized for Acute Hepatic Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; Yan, Huadong; Zhou, Zhibo; Fang, Hong; Li, Jiawei; Ye, Honghua; Sun, Wenjie; Zhou, Wenhong; Ye, Jingfen; Yang, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Hu, Yaoren; Chen, Zhi; Sheng, Jifang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with cirrhosis are vulnerable to acute hepatic insults and are more likely to develop rapid hepatic deterioration. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical course of patients with cirrhosis and hospitalized for acute hepatic deterioration (AHD). This is a prospective study involving 163 patients with cirrhosis and AHD. The occurrence of organ failures, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and infections during hospital stay were recorded and the relationship between organ failure and death or SIRS/infection was subsequently analyzed. Of 163 patients, 35 did not develop any organ failure during in-hospital follow-ups (90-day mortality: 0%); 84 had intrahepatic organ failures (IH-OFs, defined by liver and/or coagulation failure) (90-day mortality: 22.0%); and 44 patients developed extra-hepatic organ failures (EH-OFs, defined by kidney, cerebral, circulation, and respiratory failure) on the basis of IH-OF with a 90-day mortality of 90.9%. On multivariable analysis by a Cox proportion hazard model, age, WBC, presence of IH-OF, and EH-OF all predicted 90-day death. A logistic regression analysis identified SIRS being associated with the development of EH-OF. Furthermore, IH-OF at admission and infections occurred during the hospital stay were shown to be another 2 potential risk factors. The clinical course of cirrhosis patients with acute hepatic injury was characterized by 3 consecutive stages (AHD, IH-OF, and EH-OF), which provided a clear risk stratification. The PIRO criteria provided an accurate frame for prognostication of those patients. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome may be a target for blocking the progression to the EH-OF stage. PMID:26632701

  5. Precipitating Factors for Acute Heart Failure Hospitalization and Long-Term Survival.

    PubMed

    Berkovitch, Anat; Maor, Elad; Sabbag, Avi; Chernomordik, Fernando; Elis, Avishay; Arbel, Yaron; Goldenberg, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud; Klempfner, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients have frequent exacerbations leading to high consumption of medical services and recurrent hospitalizations.Different precipitating factors have various effects on long-term survival.We investigated 2212 patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of either acute HF or acute exacerbation of chronic HF. Patients were divided into 2 primary precipitant groups: ischemic (N = 979 [46%]) and nonischemic (N = 1233 [54%]). The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality.Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a nonischemic precipitant was associated with a favorable in-hospital outcome (OR 0.64; CI 0.43-0.94), but with a significant increase in the risk of 10-year mortality (HR 1.12; CI 1.01-1.21). Consistently, the cumulative probability of 10-year mortality was significantly higher among patients with a nonischemic versus ischemic precipitant (83% vs 90%, respectively; Log-rank P value <0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that among the nonischemic precipitant, the presence of renal dysfunction and infection were both associated with poor short-term outcomes (OR 1.56, [P < 0.001] and OR 1.35 [P < 0.001], respectively), as well as long-term (HR 1.59 [P < 0.001] and HR 1.24 [P < 0.001], respectively).Identification of precipitating factors for acute HF hospitalization has important short- and long-term implications that can be used for improved risk stratification and management. PMID:26717369

  6. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  7. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  8. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Fabio; De Brasi, Daniele; Siani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP) were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC) SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas) were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01), and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration) more frequently than "not at risk" population (p = 0.005). Conclusion

  9. Variations in Implementation of Acute Care Surgery: Results from a national survey of university-affiliated hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Santry, Heena P.; Madore, John C.; Collins, Courtney E.; Ayturk, M. Didem; Velmahos, George C.; Britt, LD; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To date, no studies have reported nationwide adoption of Acute Care Surgery (ACS) or identified structural and/or process variations for the care of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients within such models. METHODS We surveyed surgeons responsible for EGS coverage at University HealthSystems Consortium hospitals using an 8-page postal/email questionnaire querying respondents on hospital and EGS structure/process measures. Survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, univariate comparisons, and multivariable regression models. RESULTS 258 of 319 (81%) potential respondents completed surveys. 81 hospitals (31%) had implemented ACS while 134 (52%) had a traditional general surgeon on-call model (GSOC). 38 (15%) hospitals had another model (HYBRID). Larger bed, university-based, teaching hospitals with Level 1 trauma center verification status located in urban areas were more likely to have adopted ACS. In multivariable modeling, hospital type, setting, and trauma center verification predicted ACS implementation. EGS processes of care varied with 28% GSOC having block time vs 67% ACS (p<0.0001); 45% GSOC providing ICU care to EGS patients in a surgical/trauma ICU vs 93% ACS (p<0.0001); GSOC sharing call among 5.7 (+/− 3.2) surgeons vs 7.9 (+/−2.3) ACS surgeons (p<0.0001); and 13% GSOC taking in-house EGS call vs 75% ACS (p<0.0001). Among ACS hospitals there were variations in patient cohorting (25% EGS patients alone; 21% EGS+trauma; 17% EGS+elective; 30% EGS+trauma+elective), data collection (26% had prospective EGS registries), and patient handoffs (56% had attending surgeon presence), call responsibilities (averaging 4.8 (+/− 1.3) calls per month with 60% providing extra call stipend and 40% with no post-call clinical duties). CONCLUSION The potential of the ACS on the national crisis in access to EGS care is not fully met. Variations in EGS processes of care among adopters of ACS suggest that standardized criteria for ACS

  10. Non-administration of thrombolytic agents in acute myocardial infarction patients in Hajar hospital, Shahrekord, Iran: prevalence rate and causes

    PubMed Central

    Samieinasab, Mohammadreza; Shirani, Shahin; Hashemi, Sayyed Mohammad; Pourmoghaddas, Ali; Hekmat, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiovascular diseases are the major causes of mortality worldwide and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality among cardiovascular diseases. Thrombolytic therapies, especially during the first few hours after the disease onset, can significantly reduce AMI-related mortality. METHODS The current study aimed to determine the prevalence and causes of non-administration of thrombolytic therapy for AMI patients admitted to Hajar Hospital, Shahrekord, Iran, from May until November 2000. Non-probability convenient sampling method was used to select 106 subjects with Q-wave AMI. Data was collected by completing a questionnaire, reviewing medical records, and interviewing with patients. SPSS7.5 was for data analysis. RESULTS A total number of 106 AMI patients were studied among whom 62 (59%) individuals received thrombolytic therapy. Delayed referral to the hospital was the major cause of failure to provide thrombolytic therapy. The cause of non-treatment could not be identified in 15 (19.5%) subjects eligible to receive therapy. CONCLUSION Training general practitioners and individuals involved in this regard along with accelerating the process of patient referral to hospitals can reduce AMI-related mortality. PMID:23696767

  11. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  12. Risk-adjusted antibiotic consumption in 34 public acute hospitals in Ireland, 2006 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Ajay; Donohue, Fionnuala; Johnson, Howard; Cunney, Robert

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic consumption rates between hospitals can vary depending on the characteristics of the patients treated, risk-adjustment that compensates for the patient-based variation is required to assess the impact of any stewardship measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of patient-based administrative data variables for adjusting aggregate hospital antibiotic consumption rates. Data on total inpatient antibiotics and six broad subclasses were sourced from 34 acute hospitals from 2006 to 2014. Aggregate annual patient administration data were divided into explanatory variables, including major diagnostic categories, for each hospital. Multivariable regression models were used to identify factors affecting antibiotic consumption. Coefficient of variation of the root mean squared errors (CV-RMSE) for the total antibiotic usage model was very good (11%), however, the value for two of the models was poor (> 30%). The overall inpatient antibiotic consumption increased from 82.5 defined daily doses (DDD)/100 bed-days used in 2006 to 89.2 DDD/100 bed-days used in 2014; the increase was not significant after risk-adjustment. During the same period, consumption of carbapenems increased significantly, while usage of fluoroquinolones decreased. In conclusion, patient-based administrative data variables are useful for adjusting hospital antibiotic consumption rates, although additional variables should also be employed. PMID:27541730

  13. Risk-adjusted antibiotic consumption in 34 public acute hospitals in Ireland, 2006 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Oza, Ajay; Donohue, Fionnuala; Johnson, Howard; Cunney, Robert

    2016-08-11

    As antibiotic consumption rates between hospitals can vary depending on the characteristics of the patients treated, risk-adjustment that compensates for the patient-based variation is required to assess the impact of any stewardship measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of patient-based administrative data variables for adjusting aggregate hospital antibiotic consumption rates. Data on total inpatient antibiotics and six broad subclasses were sourced from 34 acute hospitals from 2006 to 2014. Aggregate annual patient administration data were divided into explanatory variables, including major diagnostic categories, for each hospital. Multivariable regression models were used to identify factors affecting antibiotic consumption. Coefficient of variation of the root mean squared errors (CV-RMSE) for the total antibiotic usage model was very good (11%), however, the value for two of the models was poor (> 30%). The overall inpatient antibiotic consumption increased from 82.5 defined daily doses (DDD)/100 bed-days used in 2006 to 89.2 DDD/100 bed-days used in 2014; the increase was not significant after risk-adjustment. During the same period, consumption of carbapenems increased significantly, while usage of fluoroquinolones decreased. In conclusion, patient-based administrative data variables are useful for adjusting hospital antibiotic consumption rates, although additional variables should also be employed. PMID:27541730

  14. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  15. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  16. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective. PMID:11708394

  17. Acute pain management services: a comparison between Air Force and U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rayos, C L; McDonough, J P

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of acute pain management services (APMS) in Air Force medical facilities. There are no published reports on the current status of Air Force pain programs. This study used a telephone survey to all facilities worldwide that house an anesthesia department. Anesthesia providers in charge of pain services or department chiefs were interviewed from December 1996 to May 1997. Respondents were asked questions related to the initiation of a formal APMS, components, and familiarity with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines on pain management. Data analysis described current practices and used chi 2 analysis to compare results with a national study of U.S. hospitals. Air Force anesthesia departments (45%) had established as many acute pain services as U.S. hospitals (42%). Formal pain programs are becoming more prevalent in Air Force hospitals. These findings suggest an increased awareness of the need for pain management and future establishment of pain programs.

  18. The use of acute hospital services by elderly residents of nursing and residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Godden, S; Pollock, A M

    2001-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare hospitalisation rates by cause of admission, hospital death rates and length of stay for residents from nursing and residential care homes with those in the community. This is a retrospective study of acute hospital emergency admissions in one health district, Merton, Sutton and Wandsworth between April 1996 and March 1997. Data linkage and manual look up were used to derive emergency hospital admissions for residents of care homes aged 65 and over. Admission rates were calculated for cause, length of stay and hospital death for residents of care homes and in the community with relative risks. The relative risk of emergency admission from a care home compared with the community was 1.39 for all diagnoses, 2.68 for all injuries, and 3.96 for fracture of neck of femur. The relative risk of dying in hospital for care home residents was 2.58 overall, and 3.64 in the first 48 hours of a hospital stay (all P-values <0.0001). Admission rates were higher from residential than from nursing homes. There was some increase in admissions from homes during holiday periods and over Christmas. In conclusion, there are major difficulties in monitoring admissions from nursing and residential care homes due to poor quality recording and inaccuracies in NHS coding. This was compounded by an absence of data on the age and sex profile and healthcare needs of the resident population in care homes. Prospective studies are required to ascertain when admission is avoidable and when it is appropriate. The information strategy needs to ensure that routine data sources are capable of monitoring the use of hospital services by residents of care homes.

  19. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  20. [Josephinism in medicine: the General Hospital in Vienna and the "Narrenturm" (insane asylum)].

    PubMed

    Sablik, K

    1991-01-01

    The spirit of enlightened absolutism was realized through the personal engagement of Emperor Joseph II in the foundation of the Vienna General Hospital, the asylum for the insane called "Narrenturm" and the maternity home.

  1. [Josephinism in medicine: the General Hospital in Vienna and the "Narrenturm" (insane asylum)].

    PubMed

    Sablik, K

    1991-01-01

    The spirit of enlightened absolutism was realized through the personal engagement of Emperor Joseph II in the foundation of the Vienna General Hospital, the asylum for the insane called "Narrenturm" and the maternity home. PMID:1949805

  2. Researches regarding the Morton ether inhaler at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Rajesh P; Mifflin, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-01

    The Morton ether inhaler in the possession of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, was traced back to 1906 when the earliest known photograph of it was published. The authors believe that the inhaler was given by William T. G. Morton, MD, to J. Mason Warren, MD, in January 1847. The inhaler was acquired by the Warren Anatomical Museum at an unknown date, loaned to Massachusetts General Hospital in October 1946, and placed on permanent loan to Massachusetts General Hospital in April 1948. Many documents relating to the inhaler have disappeared, and it was only identified in 2009 as the inhaler that probably belonged to J. Mason Warren, MD. The inhaler is not believed to be the one that Morton used on October 16, 1846, at Massachusetts General Hospital. It is the only known example of a Morton ether inhaler with valves (excluding replicas or reproduction inhalers) and is probably of similar design to the inhaler that Morton used on October 16, 1846.

  3. Acute Infections, Cost per Infection and Turnaround Time in Three United States Hospital Laboratories Using Fourth-Generation Antigen-Antibody Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Coombs, Robert W; Rosenberg, Eric; Ethridge, Steven F; Hutchinson, Angela B; Dragavon, Joan; Rychert, Jennifer; Nolte, Frederick S; Madory, James E; Werner, Barbara G

    2016-01-01

    Background.  To improve clinical and public health outcomes through early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection, fourth-generation antigen/antibody immunoassay (4IA) and supplemental testing results must be returned rapidly. Methods.  We examined HIV testing data at Harborview Medical Center (HMC), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), which used 4IA and supplemental antibody and nucleic acid tests (NATs). At MGH and MUSC, HIV-1 Western blot (WB) and HIV-2 testing were conducted at a reference laboratory. We compared time from specimen collection to laboratory result for established (positive WB) and acute infections (reactive 4IA, negative/indeterminate WB, detectable NAT), and we calculated testing cost per positive-test result. Results.  From 3731 (MUSC) to 19 774 (MGH) tests were conducted; 0.01% (MGH) to 0.05% (HMC) were acute infections. Each laboratory had reactive 4IA, WB-negative, or indeterminate specimens without NAT (ie, potential acute infections). Time to result was 1.5 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for acute and 1.0 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for established infections. Costs were $1054 (MGH) to $1521 (MUSC). Conclusions.  Conducting supplemental testing in-house lowered turnaround times, which may be further reduced with rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation tests. Hospitals may benefit from quantitative NATs not requiring physician orders, so all potential acute infections receive NAT.

  4. Acute Infections, Cost per Infection and Turnaround Time in Three United States Hospital Laboratories Using Fourth-Generation Antigen-Antibody Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Coombs, Robert W; Rosenberg, Eric; Ethridge, Steven F; Hutchinson, Angela B; Dragavon, Joan; Rychert, Jennifer; Nolte, Frederick S; Madory, James E; Werner, Barbara G

    2016-01-01

    Background.  To improve clinical and public health outcomes through early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection, fourth-generation antigen/antibody immunoassay (4IA) and supplemental testing results must be returned rapidly. Methods.  We examined HIV testing data at Harborview Medical Center (HMC), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), which used 4IA and supplemental antibody and nucleic acid tests (NATs). At MGH and MUSC, HIV-1 Western blot (WB) and HIV-2 testing were conducted at a reference laboratory. We compared time from specimen collection to laboratory result for established (positive WB) and acute infections (reactive 4IA, negative/indeterminate WB, detectable NAT), and we calculated testing cost per positive-test result. Results.  From 3731 (MUSC) to 19 774 (MGH) tests were conducted; 0.01% (MGH) to 0.05% (HMC) were acute infections. Each laboratory had reactive 4IA, WB-negative, or indeterminate specimens without NAT (ie, potential acute infections). Time to result was 1.5 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for acute and 1.0 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for established infections. Costs were $1054 (MGH) to $1521 (MUSC). Conclusions.  Conducting supplemental testing in-house lowered turnaround times, which may be further reduced with rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation tests. Hospitals may benefit from quantitative NATs not requiring physician orders, so all potential acute infections receive NAT. PMID:26798766

  5. Hepatic Dysfunction in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Thyrotoxicosis: A Decade of Experience

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Richard M.; Dean, Diana S.; Barsness, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid disease is a common condition, and thyroid hormone excess or deficiency is known to have wide-ranging effects on a variety of organ systems. Our objective is to describe the magnitude, biochemical features, and clinical characteristics of hepatic abnormalities in patients with acute thyrotoxicosis. We performed a retrospective review of all patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2008 with a discharge diagnosis of acute thyrotoxicosis excluding iatrogenic causes. The records of these patients were reviewed and data extracted regarding demographic, biochemical, and clinical data particularly relevant to liver function. Fourteen patients were identified of which eleven had liver studies performed. The majority (90.9%) had Graves disease. Nine of eleven patients (81.8%) had some degree of hepatic abnormality. Seven patients (63.6%) had an elevation in one or both transaminases, and two (18.2%) had isolated synthetic dysfunction as manifested as an elevated INR and/or decreased albumin without transaminitis. The mean magnitude of deviation from the normal range was greater in the transaminases as compared to bilirubin, INR, or albumin. Definitive treatment was radioiodine ablation in six cases (54.5%) and surgical thyroidectomy in two cases (18.2%). Noniatrogenic acute thyrotoxicosis requiring hospitalization is a rare condition which is most frequently caused by Graves disease. The majority of patients have disordered liver tests of a highly variable nature, making the recognition of this association important in the care of patients presenting with acute thyrotoxicosis. PMID:23251814

  6. Nutritional assessment of patients with acute leukemia during induction chemotherapy: association with hospital outcomes.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Ali; Ghoreishi, Zohreh; Abedi Miran, Mahdi; Sanaat, Zohreh; Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Eivazi Ziaei, Jamal; Ghayour Nahand, Mousa; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Sorusheh, Yashar; Esmaili, Heidarali

    2014-08-01

    Cancer-related malnutrition causes morbidity and reduced survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and inflammatory status of patients with acute leukemia in association with duration of neutropenic fever (DNF) and length of hospital stay (LHS) during induction chemotherapy. Fifty-five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 28) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 27) completed the study. There were significant differences between the two groups according to LHS and DNF (p = 0.022 and p = 0.012, respectively): both had a longer period in patients with AML. The patients were statistically different according to body mass index (BMI), pre-albumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) score (p = 0.049, p = 0.028, p < 0.001, p = 0.030). In patients with ALL, serum albumin and pre-albumin levels were associated with LHS and DNF, respectively. Moreover, PG-SGA score was associated with DNF. In patients with AML, BMI and second pre-albumin level < 10 mg/dL were associated with DNF. Pre-albumin was the common indicator for chemotherapy-related complications in patients with both ALL and AML. Early nutritional assessment can help to find patients with acute leukemia who need nutritional support, and it may contribute to better outcome and less toxicity.

  7. Acute Care For Elders Units Produced Shorter Hospital Stays At Lower Cost While Maintaining Patients’ Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Deborah E.; Palmer, Robert M.; Kresevic, Denise M.; Fortinsky, Richard H.; Kowal, Jerome; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Landefeld, C. Seth

    2013-01-01

    Acute Care for Elders Units offer enhanced care for older adults in specially designed hospital units. The care is delivered by interdisciplinary teams, which can include geriatricians, advanced practice nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and physical therapists. In a randomized controlled trial of 1,632 elderly patients, length-of-stay was significantly shorter—6.7 days per patient versus 7.3 days per patient—among those receiving care in the Acute Care for Elders Unit compared to usual care. This difference produced lower total inpatient costs—$9,477 per patient versus $10,451 per patient—while maintaining patients’ functional abilities and not increasing hospital readmission rates. The practices of Acute Care for Elders Units, and the principles they embody, can provide hospitals with effective strategies for lowering costs while preserving quality of care for hospitalized elders. PMID:22665834

  8. Innate immune cells express IL-17A/F in acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and generalized pustular psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kakeda, M; Schlapbach, Christoph; Danelon, G; Tang, M M; Cecchinato, V; Yawalkar, N; Uguccioni, M

    2014-12-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) are rare pustular skin disorders with systemic involvement. IL-17A/F is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in various neutrophilic inflammatory disorders. Here we show that IL-17A/F is highly expressed by innate immune cells such as neutrophils and mast cells in both AGEP and GPP.

  9. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  10. Evaluation of an electroconvulsive therapy service in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Barclay, Christopher; Wijeratne, Chanaka

    2011-06-01

    There has been much recent literature on the technical parameters of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with regard to improving efficacy and minimizing adverse effects, but relatively little on ECT service delivery. This paper will discuss the development and characteristics of an ECT service at a teaching hospital in metropolitan Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. A mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods, including a selective literature review and audit of ECT use were used. The results of the audit were compared with the 2007 revision of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists' clinical memorandum on ECT. We discuss issues, such as the optimal site for ECT delivery, ECT mental health nurse coordinator role, credentialing of psychiatrists, registrar supervision, and the development of an ECT committee. A significant finding of the audit was that the majority of patients were treated under the New South Wales Mental Health Act, and voluntary patients were more likely to have a diagnosis of a depressive disorder, whereas involuntary patients were more likely to have a non-mood disorder diagnosis. This study has shown that auditing of ECT practices and services by mental health nurses is essential for quality improvement processes. The audit highlighted areas of service delivery that should be subject to review and evaluation against professional standards.

  11. Injectional anthrax at a Scottish district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Inverarity, D J; Forrester, V M; Cumming, J G R; Paterson, P J; Campbell, R J; Brooks, T J G; Carson, G L; Ruddy, J P

    2015-04-01

    This retrospective, descriptive case-series reviews the clinical presentations and significant laboratory findings of patients diagnosed with and treated for injectional anthrax (IA) since December 2009 at Monklands Hospital in Central Scotland and represents the largest series of IA cases to be described from a single location. Twenty-one patients who fulfilled National Anthrax Control Team standardized case definitions of confirmed, probable or possible IA are reported. All cases survived and none required limb amputation in contrast to an overall mortality of 28% being experienced for this condition in Scotland. We document the spectrum of presentations of soft tissue infection ranging from mild cases which were managed predominantly with oral antibiotics to severe cases with significant oedema, organ failure and coagulopathy. We describe the surgical management, intensive care management and antibiotic management including the first description of daptomycin being used to treat human anthrax. It is noted that some people who had injected heroin infected with Bacillus anthracis did not develop evidence of IA. Also highlighted are biochemical and haematological parameters which proved useful in identifying deteriorating patients who required greater levels of support and surgical debridement.

  12. A methodology model for quality management in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Stern, Z; Naveh, E

    1997-01-01

    A reappraisal is made of the relevance of industrial modes of quality management to the issues of medical care. Analysis of the nature of medical care, which differentiates it from the supplier-client relationships of industry, presents the main intrinsic characteristics, which create problems in application of the industrial quality management approaches to medical care. Several examples are the complexity of the relationship between the medical action and the result obtained, the client's nonacceptance of economic profitability as a value in his medical care, and customer satisfaction biased by variable standards of knowledge. The real problems unique to hospitals are addressed, and a methodology model for their quality management is offered. Included is a sample of indicator vectors, measurements of quality care, cost of medical care, quality of service, and human resources. These are based on the trilogy of planning quality, quality control, and improving quality. The conclusions confirm the inadequacy of industrial quality management approaches for medical institutions and recommend investment in formulation of appropriate concepts. PMID:10169184

  13. Problems, solutions and actions: addressing barriers in acute hospital care for indigenous Australians and New Zealanders.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; MacIsaac, Andrew; Cameron, James; Jeremy, Richmond; Mahar, Leo; Anderson, Ian

    2012-10-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease for Indigenous people in Australia and New Zealand is high and reflects the failings of our health care system to meet their needs. Improving the hospital care for Indigenous people is critical in improving health outcomes. This paper provides the results from a facilitated discussion on the disparities in acute hospital care and workforce issues. The workshop was held in Alice Springs, Australia at the second Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference. Critical issues to be addressed include: addressing systemic racism; reconfiguring models of care to address the needs of Indigenous people; cultural competence training for all health professionals; increasing participation of Indigenous people in the health workforce; improving information systems and facilitating communication across the health care sector and with Indigenous communities.

  14. Geographic variation of failure-to-rescue in public acute hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Ou, Lixin; Chen, Jack; Hillman, Kenneth; Flabouris, Arthas; Hollis, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide acceptance of Failure-to-Rescue (FTR) as a patient safety indicator (defined as the deaths among surgical patients with treatable complications), no study has explored the geographic variation of FTR in a large health jurisdiction. Our study aimed to explore the spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across New South Wales (NSW), Australia. We conducted a population-based study using all admitted surgical patients in public acute hospitals during 2002-2009 in NSW, Australia. We developed a spatiotemporal Poisson model using Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) methods in a Bayesian framework to obtain area-specific adjusted relative risk. Local Government Area (LGA) was chosen as the areal unit. LGA-aggregated covariates included age, gender, socio-economic and remoteness index scores, distance between patient residential postcode and the treating hospital, and a quadratic time trend. We studied 4,285,494 elective surgical admissions in 82 acute public hospitals over eight years in NSW. Around 14% of patients who developed at least one of the six FTR-related complications (58,590) died during hospitalization. Of 153 LGAs, patients who lived in 31 LGAs, accommodating 48% of NSW patients at risk, were exposed to an excessive adjusted FTR risk (10% to 50%) compared to the state-average. They were mostly located in state's centre and western Sydney. Thirty LGAs with a lower adjusted FTR risk (10% to 30%), accommodating 8% of patients at risk, were mostly found in the southern parts of NSW and Sydney east and south. There were significant spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across NSW over an eight-year span. Areas identified with significantly high and low FTR risks provide potential opportunities for policy-makers, clinicians and researchers to learn from the success or failure of adopting the best care for surgical patients and build a self-learning organisation and health system. PMID:25310260

  15. Hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome: differences related to gender and use of percutaneous coronary procedures

    PubMed Central

    Aguado-Romeo, María J; Márquez-Calderón, Soledad; Buzón-Barrera, María L

    2007-01-01

    Background To identify differences among men and women with acute coronary syndrome in terms of in-hospital mortality, and to assess whether these differences are related to the use of percutaneous cardiovascular procedures. Methods Observational study based on the Minimum Basic Data Set. This encompassed all episodes of emergency hospital admissions (46,007 cases, including 16,391 women and 29,616 men) with a main diagnosis of either myocardial infarction or unstable angina at 32 hospitals within the Andalusian Public Health System over a four-year period (2000–2003). The relationship between gender and mortality was examined for the population as a whole and for stratified groups depending on the type of procedures used (diagnostic coronary catheterisation and/or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty). These combinations were then adjusted for age group, main diagnosis and co-morbidityharlson score). Results During hospitalisation, mortality was 9.6% (4,401 cases out of 46,007), with 11.8% for women and 8.3% for men. There were more deaths among older patients with acute myocardial infarction and greater co-morbidity. Lower mortality was shown in patients undergoing diagnostic catheterisation and/or PTCA. After adjusting for age, diagnosis and co-morbidity, mortality affected women more than men in the overall population (OR 1.14, 95% CI: 1.06–1.22) and in the subgroup of patients where no procedure was performed (OR 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07–1.24). Gender was not an explanatory variable in the subgroups of patients who underwent some kind of procedure. Conclusion Gender has not been associated to in-hospital mortality in patients who undergo some kind of percutaneous cardiovascular procedure. However, in the group of patients without either diagnostic catheterisation or angioplasty, mortality was higher in women than in men. PMID:17631037

  16. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  17. Human metapneumovirus in patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Annick; Manoha, Catherine; Bour, Jean-Baptiste; Abbas, Rachid; Fournel, Isabelle; Tiv, Michel; Pothier, Pierre; Astruc, Karine; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig Serge

    2016-08-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the prevalence of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in patients hospitalized for acute respiratory infection (ARI) and to study factors associated with this prevalence. Medline and ScienceDirect databases were searched for prospective observational studies that screened hospitalized patients with ARI for hMPV by RT-PCR, with data available at December 27, 2014. The risk of bias was assessed regarding participation rate, definition of ARI, description of diagnostic technique, method of inclusion identical for all subjects, standardized and identical sampling method for all subjects, analysis performed according to the relevant subgroups, and presentation of data sources. Random-effect meta-analysis with arcsine transformation and meta-regressions was used. In the 75 articles included, the prevalence of hMPV among hospitalized ARI was 6.24% (95% CI 5.25-7.30). An effect of the duration of the inclusion period was observed (p=0.0114), with a higher prevalence of hMPV in studies conducted during periods of 7-11 months (10.56%, 95% CI 5.97-16.27) or complete years (7.55%, 95% CI 5.90-9.38) than in periods of 6 months or less (5.36%, 95% CI 4.29-6.54). A significant increase in the incidence with increasing distance from the equator was observed (p=0.0384). hMPV should be taken into account as a possible etiology in hospitalized ARI.

  18. [Hospital outcome in acute coronary syndrome in the period 1987-2001 in West-Herzegovina canton--retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Vasilj, Ivan; Ostojić, Zdenko; Ostojić, Ljerka; Zelenika, D; Misković, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective of the study is to show prevalence of hospital mortality of acute coronary syndrome in pre-war (1987-1991), war (1992-1996) and after war period (1997-2001) among inhabitants of West-Herzegovina canton living in the following municipalities: Siroki Brijeg, Posusje, Grude and Ljubuski (88,992 inhabitants). Collected were data on patients who were admitted in the hospital due to acute coronar syndrome (category I 20, 21, 22- X revision, ICD) in the above period in Mostar. Data were analyzed in regard to sex, age and disease output. Hospital morality in 15 year period for both sex were 15.0 %, men 12.1 %, and women 20.2 %. Statistically it was not found significant differences in the period 1987-2001 in regards to total hospital mortality of men and women and separate hospital mortality of men. Differences were found in women where considerable larger number was in pre-war and post-war period in comparison with war period. The largest hospital mortality was in total and for women in the pre-war period and for men was during the war period. The smallest hospital mortality was in total and for women during the war and for men in pre-war period. We find that lower hospital mortality in women was caused by lower hospital admission because of war time and problems with transport and that larger number of women deceased before admission to the hospital.

  19. Acute Q fever in Portugal. Epidemiological and clinical features of 32 hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Carolina; Badura, Robert; Valadas, Emília

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The main characteristic of acute Q fever is its clinical polymorphism, usually presenting as a febrile illness with varying degrees of hepatitis and/or pneumonia. Q fever is endemic in Portugal, and it is an obligatory notifiable disease since 1999. However, its epidemiological and clinical characteristics are still incompletely described. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 32 cases admitted in the Infectious Diseases Department, Santa Maria’s University Hospital, from January 2001 to December 2010, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetii antigens associated with a compatible clinical syndrome. Results Out of the 32 cases recorded, 29 (91%) were male, with a male:female ratio of 9.7:1. Individuals at productive age were mainly affected (88%, n=28, with ages between 25 and 64 years). Clinically, the most common manifestation of acute Q fever was hepatic involvement (84%, n=27), which occurred isolated in 53% (n=17) of the cases. Hepatitis was more severe, presenting with higher values of liver function tests, in patients presenting both pulmonary and hepatic involvement. Additionally, we report one case of myocarditis and another one with neurological involvement. Empiric but appropriate antibiotic therapy was given in 66% (n=21) of the cases. There was a complete recovery in 94% (n=30) of the patients, and one death. We confirmed the sub-notification of this disease in Portugal, with only 47% (n=15) of the cases notified. Conclusion In Portugal further studies are needed to confirm our results. From the 32 cases studied, acute Q fever presented more frequently as a febrile disease with hepatic involvement affecting mainly young male individuals. Furthermore, acute Q fever is clearly underdiagnosed and underreported in Portugal, which suggests that an increased awareness of the disease is needed, together with a broader use

  20. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection. PMID:22490115

  1. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  2. Admission avoidance and early discharge of acute hospital admissions: an accident and emergency based scheme

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, C; Whitwell, D; Sarsfield, B; Maimaris, C

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To validate an accident and emergency (A&E) based approach to assisting early discharge or avoiding admission to acute hospital beds by means of two separate teams, one in hospital and the other in the community, working closely together at the interface between primary and secondary health care. Design—A purpose designed admission avoidance (AA) team was established in the A&E department, and a target group of patients identified whose admissions might be avoided or curtailed. A rapid response community team (RRCT) based in Cambridge was also established to provide basic health care to patients in their homes after discharge from hospital. The key elements of the project were rapid assessment, careful selection of patients, early decision making at senior level, and close liaison with the community team. Results—During the first year (1999) of the project the AA team assessed 785 patients and 257 patients were eventually discharged home to the care of the RRCT. Of these, 149 patients (58%) were comparable to a historical control group (from 1997/98), with regard to their demographic and clinical characteristics and care needs, and had an average length of hospital stay of 1.7 days compared with 6.3 days for the control group. The remaining 108 patients were not directly comparable but were supported by the teams because the benefits were clear and exclusion would have been unethical. These patients had an average length of stay of seven days. The readmission rate was 3 of 257(1.2%) for the intervention group and 8 of 531(1.5%) for the control group. A limited patient satisfaction survey among patients cared for at home revealed that 97% of patients were "satisfied to very satisfied" with the care provided. The RRCT had also looked after an additional 194 patients from other sources (total = 451), including postoperative orthopaedic early discharges from an adjacent hospital. The average length of care at home by the RRCT for all 451 patients was 6

  3. General Information about Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Frequency of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dawn Marie; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; McNulty, Rita; Click, Elizabeth R; Glembocki, Margaret M

    2012-03-01

    A new culture bolstering collaborative behavior among nurses and physicians is needed to merge the unique strengths of both professions into opportunities to improve patient outcomes. To meet this challenge it is fundamental to comprehend the current uses of collaborative behaviors among nurses and physicians. The purpose of this descriptive study was to delineate frequently used from infrequently used collaborative behaviors of nurses and physicians in order to generate data to support specific interventions for improving collaborative behavior. The setting was an acute care hospital, and participants included 114 registered nurses and 33 physicians with active privileges. The Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale was used to measure the frequency of use of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors self-reported by nurses and physicians. The background variables of gender, age, education, ethnicity, years of experience, years practiced at the current acute care hospital, practice setting and professional certification were accessed. In addition to analyzing the frequency of collaborative behaviors, this study compares levels of collaborative behavior reported by nurses and physicians. PMID:22145999

  5. Simple In-Hospital Interventions to Reduce Door-to-CT Time in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheraghdam, Aliakbar; Rikhtegar, Reza; Mehrvar, Kaveh; Mehrara, Mehrdad; Hassasi, Rogayyeh; Aliyar, Hannane; Farzi, Mohammadamin; Hasaneh Tamar, Somayyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, a time dependent therapy, can reduce the morbidity and mortality of acute ischemic stroke. This study was designed to assess the effect of simple in-hospital interventions on reducing door-to-CT (DTC) time and reaching door-to-needle (DTN) time of less than 60 minutes. Methods. Before any intervention, DTC time was recorded for 213 patients over a one-year period at our center. Five simple quality-improvement interventions were implemented, namely, call notification, prioritizing patients for CT scan, prioritizing patients for lab analysis, specifying a bed for acute stroke patients, and staff education. After intervention, over a course of 44 months, DTC time was recorded for 276 patients with the stroke code. Furthermore DTN time was recorded for 106 patients who were treated with IV thrombolytic therapy. Results. The median DTC time significantly decreased in the postintervention period comparing to the preintervention period [median (IQR); 20 (12–30) versus 75 (52.5–105), P < 0.001]. At the postintervention period, the median (IQR) DTN time was 55 (40–73) minutes and proportion of patients with DTN time less than 60 minutes was 62.4% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Our interventions significantly reduced DTC time and resulted in an acceptable DTN time. These interventions are feasible in most hospitals and should be considered. PMID:27478641

  6. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas.

  7. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  8. Hospital transfer for primary coronary angioplasty in high risk patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Straumann, E; Yoon, S; Naegeli, B; Frielingsdorf, J; Gerber, A; Schuiki, E; Bertel, O

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the feasibility, safety, and associated time delays of interhospital transfer in patients with acute myocardial infarction for primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA).
DESIGN AND PATIENTS—Prospective observational study with group comparison in a single centre. 68 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction transferred for primary PTCA from other hospitals (group A) were compared with 78 patients admitted directly to the referral centre (group B).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Patient groups were analysed with regard to baseline characteristics, time intervals from onset of chest pain to balloon angioplasty, hospital stay, and follow up outcome.
RESULTS—Patients in group A presented with a higher rate of cardiogenic shock initially than patients in group B (25% v 6%, p = 0.01) and had been resuscitated more frequently before PTCA (22% v 5%, p = 0.01). No deaths or other serious complications occurred during interhospital transfer. Median transfer time was 63 (range 40-115) minutes for helicopter transport (median 42 (28-122) km, n = 14), and 50 (18-110) minutes by ground ambulance (median 8 (5-68) km, n = 54). The median time interval from the decision to perform coronary arteriography to balloon inflation was 96 (45-243) minutes in group A and 52 (17-214) minutes in group B (p = 0.0001). In transferred patients (group A) the transportation associated delay and the longer in-hospital median decision time (50 (10-1120) minutes in group A v 15 (0-210) minutes in group B, p = 0.002) concurred with a longer total period of ischaemia (239 (114-1307) minutes in group A v 182 (75-1025) minutes in group B, p = 0.02) since the beginning of chest pain. Success of PTCA (TIMI 3 flow in 95% of all patients), in-hospital mortality (7% v 9%, mortality for patients not in cardiogenic shock 0% v 4%), and follow up after median 235 days was similarly favourable in groups A and B

  9. A randomised controlled trial of extended brief intervention for alcohol dependent patients in an acute hospital setting (ADPAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence affects approximately 3% of the English population, and accounts for significant medical and psychiatric morbidity. Only 5.6% of alcohol-dependent individuals ever access specialist treatment and only a small percentage ever seek treatment. As people who are alcohol dependent are more likely to have experienced health problems leading to frequent attendance at acute hospitals it would seem both sensible and practical to ensure that this setting is utilised as a major access point for treatment, and to test the effectiveness of these treatments. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial with a primary hypothesis that extended brief interventions (EBI) delivered to alcohol-dependent patients in a hospital setting by an Alcohol Specialist Nurse (ASN) will be effective when compared to usual care in reducing overall alcohol consumption and improving on the standard measures of alcohol dependence. Consecutive patients will be screened for alcohol misuse in the Emergency Department (ED) of a district general hospital. On identification of an alcohol-related problem, following informed written consent, we aim to randomize 130 patients per group. The ASN will discharge to usual clinical care all control group patients, and plan a programme of EBI for treatment group patients. Follow-up interview will be undertaken by a researcher blinded to the intervention at 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome measure is level of alcohol dependence as determined by the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ) score. Secondary outcome measures include; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) score, quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, health-related quality of life measures, service utilisation, and patient experience. The trial will also allow an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of EBI in an acute hospital setting. In addition, patient experience will be assessed using qualitative methods. Discussion This paper

  10. Wischnewski ulcers and acute pancreatitis in two hospitalized patients with cirrhosis, portal vein thrombosis, and hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D A; Aronson, J F; Rajaraman, S; Veasey, S P

    1999-09-01

    Accidental hypothermia has been described in the forensic literature but reports of occurrence in hospitalized patients are rare. Associated anatomic lesions include acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis and characteristic acute gastric ulcers termed Wischnewski ulcers. We report here two patients with cirrhosis and ascites; one also had hepatocellular carcinoma. Portal vein thrombosis, acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis and Wischnewski ulcers were present in both. The clinical records documented hypothermia that progressed over several days. Temperature nadirs of 31.0 degrees C (87.8 degrees F) and 32.2 degrees C (90.0 degrees F) were recorded in each patient, respectively, one day before death, although each transiently reached temperatures that did not register on standard monitoring devices. This is the first report that chronicles antemortem body temperatures in hypothermic patients with Wischnewski ulcers and pancreatitis at autopsy. Also, the association of these findings with portal vein thrombosis and cirrhosis has not been previously described. We discuss this constellation of findings with regard to possible mechanistic interrelations. PMID:10486964

  11. Sources of work-related acute fatigue in United States hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Daraiseh, Nancy M; Davis, Kermit G; Pan, Wei

    2014-03-01

    This study identified the nursing work activities that could be the primary sources of work-related acute fatigue in US hospital nurses. Continuous recording of working heart rate and random observations of nursing activities were applied to collect data from eight nurses during two consecutive 12 h day shifts. Using descriptive statistics and random-effect analysis of variance, the contributions of individual nursing work activities to acute fatigue were compared based on the activity frequencies and nurses' corresponding heart rate elevations. Of 860 observed nursing-related work activities, manual patient-handling, bedside-care, care-coordinating, and walking/standing activities accounted for 5%, 16%, 38%, and 41%, respectively. After controlling for the differences of participant and shift, the percentage of working heart rate to maximal heart rate of manual patient-handling (64.3%), bedside-care (59.7%), and walking/standing (57.4%) activities were significantly higher than that of care-coordinating activities (52.3%, F[3, 38.0]  = 7.5, P < 0.001). These findings suggest that bedside care and walking/standing, other than manual patient handling, contributed most to the level of acute fatigue.

  12. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  13. Characteristics and determinants of adult patients with acute poisoning attending the accident and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Khudair, I F; Jassim, Z; Hanssens, Y; Alsaad, W A

    2013-09-01

    Data about etiologic and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar are lacking. This prospective observational study was undertaken to analyze characteristics and possible determinants of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar. During 2010, 18,073 patients attended the emergency department of Hamad General Hospital, a teaching hospital in Qatar. Out of them, 599 (3.3%) patients were diagnosed as "poisoning case" with either chemical or pharmaceutical substances. The prevalence rate of poisoning incidence was 35.3/100,000 population. Seven patients died, corresponding with a case-fatality rate of 0.39/1000. The majority were male (65%) and the mean age was 34 years. The poisons involved were mainly chemicals (61.6%) and pharmaceuticals (38.4%). Female, mainly single, suffered more intentional poisoning compared to male. Of the patients aged 60 years and above (7.2%), the majority (95.3%) suffered unintentional poisoning with pharmaceuticals; 56% with warfarin, 12% with digoxin and 7% with insulin. Multivariate analysis shows that female gender, single status, younger than 35 years of age, being poisoned by pharmaceutical products, and the need for hospitalization are significant determinants for acute intentional poisoning after adjusting all other possible covariates. The findings of this study can be used to establish awareness and prophylactic campaigns in Qatar.

  14. Is use of mechanical ventilation a reasonable proxy indicator for coma among Medicare patients hospitalized for acute stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R D; Sloane, R J; Kahn, K L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether use of mechanical ventilation on admission to the hospital is a proxy indicator of coma (i.e., very severe stroke) among acute stroke patients. METHODS: A secondary analysis of data from a medical record review on a nationally representative sample of 2,824 Medicare patients, ages 65 years or older, who were hospitalized for stroke in 1982-1983 or 1985-1986 in 297 acute care hospitals in 30 areas within five geographically dispersed states. RESULTS: Use of mechanical ventilation on the first day of hospitalization was significantly associated with level of consciousness on admission: < 2 percent of noncomatose patients versus 17.5 percent of comatose (p < .001). With a high specificity and high likelihood ratio for a positive test, use of mechanical ventilation on the first day of hospitalization ruled-in coma. It was also significantly associated with severity of illness, prognostic indicators (i.e., admission through the emergency room, admission to intensive care, and having a "do-not-resuscitate" order written during the hospital stay), and with in-hospital death. Adjusting for patient demographics, stroke type, comorbidity, and process of care, early initiation of mechanical ventilation remained significantly associated with both coma and in-hospital death. CONCLUSIONS: A stroke patient's use of mechanical ventilation on the first day of hospitalization is a valid proxy indicator of level of consciousness. PMID:9460489

  15. Clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated acute kidney injury patients at the university of port harcourt teaching hospital, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Emem-Chioma, Pedro Chimezie; Alasia, Datonye Dennis; Wokoma, Friday Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury in adults is a common cause of hospitalization, associated with high morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. In spite of RRT the in-hospital mortality rates remain high even in the developed countries. Though a proportion of our patients receive renal replacement therapy as part of their management, data on outcomes are sparse. Study Objective. To determine the clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated AKI in our hospital. Methods. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of all adult AKI patients treated with haemodialysis at the University of Teaching Hospital during an interrupted six-year period was conducted. Analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. Results. 34 males and 28 females with mean age of 41.3 ± 18.5 years were studied. The leading causes of AKI were sepsis (22.7%), acute glomerulonephritis (20.5%), acute gastroenteritis (15.9%), and toxic nephropathies (11.4%) and presented with mean e-GFR of 14.7 ± 5.8 mls/min/1.73 m(2). Of the 62 patients, 29 (46.8%) were discharged from the hospital, 27 (43.5%) died in hospital, while 6 (9.7%) absconded from treatment. Survivors had better Rifle grade than those who died (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Hospital mortality rate of dialysis-treated AKI patients is high and the severity of renal damage at presentation may be an important factor.

  16. Prevalence of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection in Patients With Out-Of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Sakata, Kenji; Sakurai, Yasuo; Yoshimuta, Tsuyoshi; Morishita, Yuka; Nara, Satoshi; Takahashi, Isao; Hirokami, Mitsugu; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    Postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) has been recently reported to be useful for detecting causes of death in the emergency department. In this study, the incidence and causes of death of type A acute aortic dissection (AAD) were investigated in patients who experienced out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA) using PMCT. PMCT or enhanced computed tomography was performed in 311 of 528 consecutive patients experiencing OHCPA. A total of 23 (7%) of 311 patients were diagnosed with type A AAD based on clinical courses and CT findings. Eighteen consecutive patients who did not experience OHCPA were diagnosed with type A AAD during the same period. Pre-hospital death was observed in 21 (51%) of 41 patients with type A AAD. Bloody pericardial effusion was observed more frequently in patients who experienced OHCPA with type A AAD than in those who did not experience OHCPA with type A AAD (91% vs 28%, respectively; p <0.05). In conclusion, the incidence of type A AAD was common (7%) in patients who experienced OHCPA, with a high rate of pre-hospital death. Aortic rupture to the intrapericardial space was considered the major cause of death in patients who experienced OHCPA with type A AAD. PMID:27067619

  17. Hospital environment fungal contamination and aspergillosis risk in acute leukaemia patients in Sousse (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Gheith, Soukeina; Ranque, Stéphane; Bannour, Wadiaa; Ben Youssef, Yosra; Khelif, Abderrahim; Ben Said, Moncef; Njah, Mansour; Saghrouni, Fatma

    2015-06-01

    Hospital environment is considered the main source of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in leukemic patients. This study aimed to describe Aspergillus colonisation in leukemic patients and their hospital environment and to test whether Aspergillus environmental contamination was associated with IA. For a 2-year period including 14-month renovation work, 91 acute leukaemia inpatients at the hematology department of University hospital in Sousse (Tunisia) were prospectively included. The incidence of probable IA (EORTC/MSG criteria) was 9.9%. Fifty-six Aspergillus were isolated from 53 (6.5%) of 811 sputa collected from 35 (38.5%) patients. Aspergillus spp. were isolated in 59.7% of 494 air samples and in 52.8% of 1579 surface samples taken in the patients' room. Aspergillus section Nigri (72.7%) was the most frequent. Aspergillus contamination peaked in autumn and winter on surface and in summer and autumn in air samples and was higher (P = 0.03) during the renovation work period. Multivariate analysis showed that for each Aspergillus section Nigri CFU airborne contamination IA risk increased by 1.05 (P = 0.04). In Tunisia, Aspergillus section Nigri and Flavi, but not Fumigati, are chiefly involved in IA. Our findings support swift implementation of airborne fungal contamination control measures in areas where immunocompromised patient are hospitalised.

  18. A Pediatric Case of Acute Generalized Pustular Eruption without Streptococcal Infection.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Nobuko; Yoshizawa, Hideka

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular lesions characterized by acute onset with fever occur in pustulosis acuta generalisata, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and generalized pustular psoriasis. In the present report, we describe a pediatric case of generalized pustular eruption that was not completely consistent with clinical features. Our patient had no evidence of a post-streptococcal infection. We observed scattered symmetric eruption of discrete pustules with an inflammatory halo on normal skin. The eruption was absent on her palms and soles of the feet. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports in the English literature of cases with clinical features similar to those of our patient. PMID:27462226

  19. The Influence of Prehospital Systemic Corticosteroid Use on Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Hospital Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Lee, Augustine S.; Gajic, Ognjen; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of systemic corticosteroids in pathophysiology and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is controversial. Use of prehospital systemic corticosteroid therapy may prevent the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome and improve hospital outcomes. Design This is a preplanned retrospective subgroup analysis of the prospectively identified cohort from a trial by the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group designed to validate the Lung Injury Prediction Score. Setting Twenty-two acute care hospitals. Patients Five thousand eighty-nine patients with at least one risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome at the time of hospitalization. Intervention Propensity-based analysis of previously recorded data. Measurements and Main Results Three hundred sixty-four patients were on systemic corticosteroids. Prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 7.7% and 6.9% (odds ratio, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.8–1.7]; p = 0.54) for patients on systemic corticosteroid and not on systemic corticosteroids, respectively. A propensity for being on systemic corticosteroids was derived through logistic regression by using all available covariates. Subsequently, 354 patients (97%) on systemic corticosteroids were matched to 1,093 not on systemic corticosteroids by their propensity score for a total of 1,447 patients in the matched set. Adjusted risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.54–1.38]), invasive ventilation (odds ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.62–1.12]), and inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.63–1.49]) was then calculated from the propensity-matched sample using conditional logistic regression model. No significant associations were present. Conclusions Prehospital use of systemic corticosteroids neither decreased the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome among patients hospitalized with at one least risk factor, nor affected the need for mechanical ventilation or hospital

  20. Incidence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Community-Acquired and Hospital-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lee, Chien-Te; Su, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The disease burden and outcomes of community-acquired (CA-) and hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) are not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of AKI in a large Taiwanese adult cohort. This retrospective cohort study examined 734,340 hospital admissions from a group of hospitals within an organization in Taiwan between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. Patients with AKI at discharge were classified as either CA- or HA-AKI based on the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end stage of kidney disease) classification criteria. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, dialysis, recovery of renal function, and length of stay. Risks of developing AKI were determined using multivariate logistic regression based on demographic and baseline clinical characteristics and nephrotoxin use before admission. AKI occurred in 1.68% to 2% hospital discharges among adults without and with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD), respectively. The incidence of CA-AKI was 17.25 and HA-AKI was 8.14 per 1000 admissions. The annual rate of CA-AKI increased from 12.43 to 19.96 per 1000 people, but the change in HA-AKI was insignificant. Comparing to CA-AKI, those with HA-AKI had higher levels of in-hospital mortality (26.07% vs 51.58%), mean length of stay (21.25 ± 22.35 vs 35.84 ± 34.62 days), and dialysis during hospitalization (1.45% vs 2.06%). Preexisting systemic diseases, including CKD were associated with increased risks of CA-AKI, and nephrotoxic polypharmacy increased risk of both CA- and HA-AKI. Patients with HA-AKI had more severe outcomes than patients with CA-AKI, and demonstrated different spectrum of risk factors. Although patients with CA-AKI with better outcomes, the incidence increased over time. It is also clear that optimal preventive and management strategies of HA- and CA-AKI are urgently needed to limit the risks in susceptible individuals. PMID:27175701

  1. [Analysis of a complex health division at the Modena General Hospital by means of DRG indicators].

    PubMed

    Vecchi, Elena; Righi, Elena; Cavazzuti, Lucia; Bicocchi, Marco; Aggazzotti, Gabriella

    2003-01-01

    The authors have assessed the activity of a complex division (three wards) at the Modena General Hospital. The parameters used were DRG indicators: Case-Mix Index; Performance Index and Resources Index. It is a in-house hospital analysis, since the benchmark is based on the three units average figures. The analysis covers 1479 patients hospitalized during the first 6 months of the year 2000. The authors have taken into account overall DGRs, surgical DGRs and recurrent DGRs. Making allowance for the limits of such comparison, the study shows some differences as regards efficiency and cost-curbing policies, with the surgical unit having the largest and most diversified number of cases.

  2. Is there a link between the hospital-acquired injurious fall rates in US acute care hospitals and these institutions' implementation levels of computerized systems?

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Hu, Hsou Mei; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2011-12-01

    Medicare no longer reimburses acute care hospitals for the costs of additional care required due to hospital-acquired injuries. Consequently, this study explored the effective computerized systems to inform practice for better interventions to reduce fall risk. It provided a correlation between type of computerized system and hospital-acquired injurious fall rates at acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York. It used multiple publicly available data sets, with the hospital as the unit of analysis. Descriptive and Pearson correlation analyses were used. The analysis included 462 hospitals. Significant correlations could be categorized into two groups: (1) meaningful computerized systems that were associated with lower injurious fall rates: the decision support systems for drug allergy alerts, drug-drug interaction alerts, and drug-laboratory interaction alerts; and (2) computerized systems that were associated with higher injurious fall rates: the decision support system for drug-drug interaction alerts and the computerized provider order entry system for radiology tests. Future research may include additional states, multiple years of data, and patient-level data to validate this study's findings. This effort may further inform policy makers and the public about effective clinical computerized systems provided to clinicians to improve their practice decisions and care outcomes.

  3. The general practitioner and the hospital. An experiment in in-patient care.

    PubMed

    Brocklehurst, J C

    1975-01-01

    A 3-year rotating programme for three general practitioners as clinica assistants involved in in-patient care is described in the three associated departments of medicine, geriatric medicine and psychiatry in a district general hospital. The appointments were for three sessions a week each. The effectiveness of such rotating appointments is analysed including both the service contribution to the hospital and the educational content from the general practioner's point of view and also the way in which such appointments fit in with the timetable of work in general practice. Such a rotating scheme is most successful in geriatric medicine and psychiatry. Involvement in in-patient care in general medicine proved more difficult. Future schemes might include only 6 months in general medicine, together with 6 months in another specialty.

  4. Mechanical ventilation in patients in the intensive care unit of a general university hospital in southern Brazil: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Farenzena, Maurício; Wawrzeniak, Iuri Christmann; Brauner, Janete Salles; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios; Vigo, Alvaro; Bozzetti, Mary Clarisse

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics, the frequency and the mortality rates of patients needing mechanical ventilation and to identify the risk factors associated with mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a general university hospital in southern Brazil. METHOD: Prospective cohort study in patients admitted to the ICU who needed mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours between March 2004 and April 2007. RESULTS: A total of 1,115 patients admitted to the ICU needed mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 51%. The mean age (± standard deviation) was 57±18 years, and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 22.6±8.3. The variables independently associated with mortality were (i) conditions present at the beginning of mechanical ventilation, age (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.001); the APACHE II score (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.005); acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.38; p=0.009), sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.33; p=0.003), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio: 0.58; p=0.042), and pneumonia (hazard ratio: 0.78; p=0.013) as causes of mechanical ventilation; and renal (hazard ratio: 1.29; p=0.011) and neurological (hazard ratio: 1.25; p=0.024) failure, and (ii) conditions occurring during the course of mechanical ventilation, acute lung injuri/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.31; p<0.010); sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.53; p<0.001); and renal (hazard ratio: 1.75; p<0.001), cardiovascular (hazard ratio: 1.32; p≤0.009), and hepatic (hazard ratio: 1.67; p≤0.001) failure. CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study provides a comprehensive profile of mechanical ventilation patients in South America. The mortality rate of patients who required mechanical ventilation was higher, which may have been related to the severity of illness of the patients admitted to our ICU. Risk factors for hospital mortality included conditions present at the start of mechanical

  5. From acute care to home care: the evolution of hospital responsibility and rationale for increased vertical integration.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    The responsibility of hospitals is changing. Those activities that were once confined within the walls of the medical facility have largely shifted outside them, yet the requirements for hospitals have only grown in scope. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the development of accountable care organizations, financial incentives are focused on care coordination, and a hospital's responsibility now includes postdischarge outcomes. As a result, hospitals need to adjust their business model to accommodate their increased need to impact post-acute care settings. A home care service line can fulfill this role for hospitals, serving as an effective conduit to the postdischarge realm-serving as both a potential profit center and a risk mitigation offering. An alliance between home care agencies and hospitals can help improve clinical outcomes, provide the necessary care for communities, and establish a potentially profitable product line.

  6. The impact of new national HIV testing guidelines at a district general hospital in an area of high HIV seroprevalence.

    PubMed

    Page, I; Phillips, M; Flegg, P; Palmer, R

    2011-03-01

    The latest UK national human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing guidelines, released in September 2008, state that HIV testing should be offered to all patients with indicator conditions and considered in all general medical admissions in high-prevalence areas. We audited testing rates at Blackpool Victoria Hospital, a high-prevalence area, one year before and one year after the publication of the new guidelines. In the year after publication the rate of HIV testing in patients with indicator diseases was as follows: hepatitis B 6%, hepatitis C 28%, tuberculosis 9% and lymphoma 14%. The overall rate of HIV testing in acute medical admissions was 0.5%. Our results demonstrate that traditional methods of guideline dissemination did not lead to implementation. We are now assessing alternative methods such as marking all positive laboratory results for indicator diseases with the phrase 'HIV testing should be considered' and implementing universal opt-out screening in our Clinical Decisions Unit.

  7. Using decision trees to manage hospital readmission risk for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, John P; Zasadil, Scott; Keyser, Donna J; Peele, Pamela B

    2014-12-01

    To improve healthcare quality and reduce costs, the Affordable Care Act places hospitals at financial risk for excessive readmissions associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Although predictive analytics is increasingly looked to as a means for measuring, comparing, and managing this risk, many modeling tools require data inputs that are not readily available and/or additional resources to yield actionable information. This article demonstrates how hospitals and clinicians can use their own structured discharge data to create decision trees that produce highly transparent, clinically relevant decision rules for better managing readmission risk associated with AMI, HF, and PN. For illustrative purposes, basic decision trees are trained and tested using publically available data from the California State Inpatient Databases and an open-source statistical package. As expected, these simple models perform less well than other more sophisticated tools, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (or AUC) of 0.612, 0.583, and 0.650, respectively, but achieve a lift of at least 1.5 or greater for higher-risk patients with any of the three conditions. More importantly, they are shown to offer substantial advantages in terms of transparency and interpretability, comprehensiveness, and adaptability. By enabling hospitals and clinicians to identify important factors associated with readmissions, target subgroups of patients at both high and low risk, and design and implement interventions that are appropriate to the risk levels observed, decision trees serve as an ideal application for addressing the challenge of reducing hospital readmissions.

  8. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  9. Influenza Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native People and in the United States General Population

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Prabhu P.; Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Cheng, Po-Yung; Bruce, Michael G.; Redd, John T.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bresee, Joseph; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Historically, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have experienced a disproportionate burden of infectious disease morbidity compared with the general US population. We evaluated whether a disparity in influenza hospitalizations exists between AI/AN people and the general US population. Methods.  We used Indian Health Service hospital discharge data (2001–2011) for AI/AN people and 13 State Inpatient Databases (2001–2008) to provide a comparison to the US population. Hospitalization rates were calculated by respiratory year (July–June). Influenza-specific hospitalizations were defined as discharges with any influenza diagnoses. Influenza-associated hospitalizations were calculated using negative binomial regression models that incorporated hospitalization and influenza laboratory surveillance data. Results.  The mean influenza-specific hospitalization rate/100 000 persons/year during the 2001–2002 to 2007–2008 respiratory years was 18.6 for AI/AN people and 15.6 for the comparison US population. The age-adjusted influenza-associated hospitalization rate for AI/AN people (98.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51.6–317.8) was similar to the comparison US population (58.2; CI, 34.7–172.2). By age, influenza-associated hospitalization rates were significantly higher among AI/AN infants (<1 year) (1070.7; CI, 640.7–2969.5) than the comparison US infant population (210.2; CI, 153.5–478.5). Conclusions.  American Indian/Alaska Native people had higher influenza-specific hospitalization rates than the comparison US population; a significant influenza-associated hospitalization rate disparity was detected only among AI/AN infants because of the wide CIs inherent to the model. Taken together, the influenza-specific and influenza-associated hospitalization rates suggest that AI/AN people might suffer disproportionately from influenza illness compared with the general US population. PMID:25734102

  10. Domain-specific versus generalized cognitive screening in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Demeyere, Nele; Riddoch, M J; Slavkova, E D; Jones, K; Reckless, I; Mathieson, P; Humphreys, G W

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive assessments after stroke are typically short form tests developed for dementia that generates pass/fail classifications (e.g. the MoCA). The Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS) provides a domain-specific cognitive profile designed for stroke survivors. This study compared the use of the MoCA and the OCS in acute stroke with respect to symptom specificity and aspects of clinical utility. A cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 200 stroke patients within 3 weeks of stroke completing MoCA and OCS. Demographic data, lesion side and Barthel scores were recorded. Inclusivity was assessed in terms of completion rates and reasons for non-completion were evaluated. The incidence of cognitive impairments on both the MoCA and OCS sub-domains was calculated and differences in stroke specificity, cognitive profiles and independence of the measures were addressed. The incidence of acute cognitive impairment was high: 76% of patients were impaired on MoCA, and 86% demonstrated at least one impairment on the cognitive domains assessed in the OCS. OCS was more sensitive than MoCA overall (87 vs 78% sensitivity) and OCS alone provided domain-specific information on prevalent post-stroke cognitive impairments (neglect, apraxia and reading/writing ability). Unlike the MOCA, the OCS was not dominated by left hemisphere impairments but gave differentiated profiles across the contrasting domains. The OCS detects important cognitive deficits after stroke not assessed in the MoCA, it is inclusive for patients with aphasia and neglect and it is less confounded by co-occurring difficulties in these domains. PMID:26588918

  11. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356) gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298). Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented through survey method is

  12. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in a dental hospital; report of a case with severe gingival hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Misirlioglu, M; Adisen, M Z; Yilmaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) are aggressive hematopoietic neoplasms that, if untreated, can lead to death within days. Owing to its high morbidity rate, early diagnosis and appropriate medical therapy is essential. Oral lesions may be the presenting feature of acute leukemias and are, therefore, important diagnostic indicators of the disease. Erythematous or cyanotic gingival hyperplasia with or without necrosis is reported to be the most consistent symptom leading to a diagnosis of acute leukemia that directs the patient to seek early dental consultation. This report refers to a patient with AML that was provisionally diagnosed in the dental hospital due to severe gingival enlargements.

  13. Vitamin D Plasma Levels and In-Hospital and 1-Year Outcomes in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    De Metrio, Monica; Milazzo, Valentina; Rubino, Mara; Cabiati, Angelo; Moltrasio, Marco; Marana, Ivana; Campodonico, Jeness; Cosentino, Nicola; Veglia, Fabrizio; Bonomi, Alice; Camera, Marina; Tremoli, Elena; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Deficiency in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), the main circulating form of vitamin D in blood, could be involved in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). To date, however, the possible prognostic relevance of 25 (OH)D deficiency in ACS patients remains poorly defined. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the association between 25 (OH)D levels, at hospital admission, with in-hospital and 1-year morbidity and mortality in an unselected cohort of ACS patients. We measured 25 (OH)D in 814 ACS patients at hospital presentation. Vitamin D serum levels >30 ng/mL were considered as normal; levels between 29 and 21 ng/mL were classified as insufficiency, and levels < 20 ng/mL as deficiency. In-hospital and 1-year outcomes were evaluated according to 25 (OH)D level quartiles, using the lowest quartile as a reference. Ninety-three (11%) patients had normal 25 (OH)D levels, whereas 155 (19%) and 566 (70%) had vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, respectively. The median 25 (OH)D level was similar in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients (14.1 [IQR 9.0–21.9] ng/mL and 14.05 [IQR 9.1–22.05] ng/mL, respectively; P = .88). The lowest quartile of 25 (OH)D was associated with a higher risk for several in-hospital complications, including mortality. At a median follow-up of 366 (IQR 364–379) days, the lowest quartile of 25 (OH)D, after adjustment for the main confounding factors, remained significantly associated to 1-year mortality (P < .01). Similar results were obtained when STEMI and NSTEMI patients were considered separately. In ACS patients, severe vitamin D deficiency is independently associated with poor in-hospital and 1-year outcomes. Whether low vitamin D levels represent a risk marker or a risk factor in ACS remains to be elucidated. PMID:25984675

  14. PSYCHIATRIC ASPECTS OF CLINICAL PRACTICE IN GENERAL HOSPITALS: A SURVEY OF NON-PSYCHIATRIC CLINICIANS

    PubMed Central

    Chadda, R.K.; Shome, S.

    1996-01-01

    The present work was carried out to study the awareness of non-psychiatric clinicians working in a teaching general hospital about the frequency of psychiatric morbidity in their clinical practice, their utilization of psychiatric consultation services, and opinion about utility of liaison psychiatry in general hospitals. A substantial proportion of doctors underestimated the psychiatric morbidity especially about unexplained physical symptoms and specific depressive symptoms in their patients. Psychiatric consultation services were not sufficiently utilised by a large number of clinicians. Most ofthemfelt the need to improve upon undergraduate medical education in psychiatry in India as well as a desire to have consultation - liaison psychiatric units in India. PMID:21584151

  15. Acute myocardial infarction: a comparison of the risk between physicians and the general population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-ting; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Lin, Hung-Jung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Juan, Chi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Physicians in Taiwan have a heavy workload and a stressful workplace, both of which may contribute to cardiovascular disease. However, the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in physicians is not clear. This population-based cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 28,062 physicians as the case group and randomly selected 84,186 nonmedical staff patients as the control group. We used a conditional logistic regression to compare the AMI risk between physicians and controls. Subgroup analyses of physician specialty, age, gender, comorbidities, area, and hospital level were also done. Physicians have a higher prevalence of HTN (23.59% versus 19.06%, P < 0.0001) and hyperlipidemia (21.36% versus 12.93%, P < 0.0001) but a lower risk of AMI than did the controls (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46-0.72) after adjusting for DM, HTN, hyperlipidemia, and area. Between medical specialty, age, and area subgroups, differences in the risk for having an AMI were nonsignificant. Medical center physicians had a lower risk (AOR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.20-0.85) than did local clinic physicians. Taiwan's physicians had higher prevalences of HTN and hyperlipidemia, but a lower risk of AMI than did the general population. Medical center physicians had a lower risk than did local clinic physicians. Physicians are not necessary healthier than the general public, but physicians, especially in medical centers, have a greater awareness of disease and greater access to medical care, which permits timely treatment and may prevent critical conditions such as AMI induced by delayed treatment.

  16. Acute myocardial infarction: a comparison of the risk between physicians and the general population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-ting; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Lin, Hung-Jung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Juan, Chi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Physicians in Taiwan have a heavy workload and a stressful workplace, both of which may contribute to cardiovascular disease. However, the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in physicians is not clear. This population-based cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 28,062 physicians as the case group and randomly selected 84,186 nonmedical staff patients as the control group. We used a conditional logistic regression to compare the AMI risk between physicians and controls. Subgroup analyses of physician specialty, age, gender, comorbidities, area, and hospital level were also done. Physicians have a higher prevalence of HTN (23.59% versus 19.06%, P < 0.0001) and hyperlipidemia (21.36% versus 12.93%, P < 0.0001) but a lower risk of AMI than did the controls (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46-0.72) after adjusting for DM, HTN, hyperlipidemia, and area. Between medical specialty, age, and area subgroups, differences in the risk for having an AMI were nonsignificant. Medical center physicians had a lower risk (AOR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.20-0.85) than did local clinic physicians. Taiwan's physicians had higher prevalences of HTN and hyperlipidemia, but a lower risk of AMI than did the general population. Medical center physicians had a lower risk than did local clinic physicians. Physicians are not necessary healthier than the general public, but physicians, especially in medical centers, have a greater awareness of disease and greater access to medical care, which permits timely treatment and may prevent critical conditions such as AMI induced by delayed treatment. PMID:25802869

  17. Decontamination of multiple casualties who are chemically contaminated: a challenge for acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Simon F J; Chilcott, Rob P; Wilson, James C; Kamanyire, Robie; Baker, David J; Hallett, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Patients who have been contaminated by chemical compounds present a number of difficulties to emergency departments, in particular, the risk of secondary contamination of healthcare staff and facilities. The Department of Health in the United Kingdom has provided equipment to decontaminate chemically contaminated casualties who present at emergency departments. The capacity of this equipment is limited, and although both the ambulance and fire services have equipment to cope with mass casualties at the scene of a chemical incident, there is still the possibility that acute hospitals will be overwhelmed by large numbers of self-presenting patients. The risks and potential consequences of this gap in resilience are discussed and a number of possible practical solutions are proposed.

  18. First year's experience with an acute pain service--University Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, R; Delilkan, A E

    1994-12-01

    An Acute Pain Service (APS) was started in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur by the Department of Anaesthesiology in October 1992 for more effective control of postoperative pain. The main modalities of treatment included patient controlled analgesia (PCA) using morphine or pethidine with PCA devises, epidural opiate analgesia (EOA) using tramadol or fentanyl/bupivacaine mixture and subcutaneous administration of morphine or pethidine. Five hundred and fifty-one patients were managed in the first year, with an overall patient satisfaction score of 83%. The majority (98.5%) of them were after abdominal or major orthopaedic surgery. Eighty per cent of patients scored < 3 on the verbal numeric pain scale, where 0 is no pain and 10 is the worst imaginable pain, on the first postoperative day. Nausea and vomiting was an unpleasant side effect in 20% of patients.

  19. Pharmacist-initiated prior authorization process to improve patient care in a psychiatric acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Shari N; Ojong-Salako, Mebanga

    2015-02-01

    A prior authorization (PA) is a requirement implemented by managed care organizations to help provide medications to consumers in a cost-effective manner. The PA process may be seen as a barrier by prescribers, pharmacists, pharmaceutical companies, and consumers. The lack of a standardized PA process, implemented prior to a patient's discharge from a health care facility, may increase nonadherence to inpatient prescribed medications. Pharmacists and other health care professionals can implement a PA process specific to their institution. This article describes a pharmacist-initiated PA process implemented at an acute care psychiatric hospital. This process was initiated secondary to a need for a standardized process at the facility. To date, the process has been seen as a valuable aspect to patient care. Plans to expand this process include collecting data with regards to adherence and readmissions as well as applying for a grant to help develop a program to automate the PA program at this facility.

  20. Readmissions after hospital discharge with acute exacerbation of COPD: are we missing something?

    PubMed

    Gaurav, Kumar; Vaid, Urvashi; Sexauer, William; Kavuru, Mani S

    2014-04-01

    Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is an important part of the disease's morbidity, mortality, and progression, and is associated with increasing utilization of health care resources. The concept of integrated care based on a chronic care model is relatively new to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but has proved successful in improving clinical outcomes and probably in decreasing health care utilization in other chronic conditions. A comprehensive approach is needed to target a change in behavioral patterns in patients, increase physician's awareness and adherence to evidence-based recommendations, and address system related issues. This article discusses the evidence for various facets of nonpharmacological management of AECOPD and proposes a model of care that might be the missing link for reducing hospital readmissions for AECOPD. This model may decrease the morbidity, slow disease progression, and curb the increasing health care resource utilization without compromising patient care.

  1. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Methods Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. Results There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1%) were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures) 276 (60.9%) were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4%) required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%). Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range) number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3–17) and 6 (1–22). Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0–11) and 8 (1–39). Conclusion There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient with trauma

  2. [Collaboration of the general practitioner and the psychiatrist with the psychiatric hospital. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Spiessl, H; Cording, C

    2000-05-01

    Co-operation of physicians in private practice with psychiatric hospitals was investigated in Germany scarcely until now, although evaluation of consumer satisfaction is of great importance to quality assurance in psychiatry. In this paper, findings from previous studies are presented together with data from interviews with general practitioners and psychiatrists, evaluating their expectations regarding psychiatric hospitals. Substantial problem area in collaboration is referral to the psychiatric hospital. Apart from sociodemographic and disease-related variables, referral practice depends on referring physician's attitudes and competence in psychiatry, and provider influences like delay of admission, communication with referring physician, and competence of the hospital. As conclusion, constructive collaboration must be developed at the interface of outpatient and inpatient care. On account of increasing diversification of psychiatric services, functional network should be an ongoing goal to improve treatment continuity of patients with mental disorders. PMID:10858945

  3. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  4. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia.

  5. Acute unilateral parotid gland swelling after lateral decubitus position under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Postaci, Aysun; Aytac, Ismail; Oztekin, Cetin Volkan; Dikmen, Bayazit

    2012-07-01

    Acute swelling of the parotid gland after general anesthesia (commonly known as anesthesia mumps or acute postoperative sialadenitis) is a rare but declared complication of anesthesia. The etiology is not clear, but some possible causes such as obstruction of glandular excretory ducts caused by patient position and increase in the viscosity of the saliva because of acute dehydratation and/or medications like atropin have been proposed. We report a swelling in the left preauricular and postauricular region extending to the angle of the mandibule in a 35-year-old patient after left lateral decubitus position for laparoscopic nephrectomy.

  6. Acute unilateral parotid gland swelling after lateral decubitus position under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Postaci, Aysun; Aytac, Ismail; Oztekin, Cetin Volkan; Dikmen, Bayazit

    2012-01-01

    Acute swelling of the parotid gland after general anesthesia (commonly known as anesthesia mumps or acute postoperative sialadenitis) is a rare but declared complication of anesthesia. The etiology is not clear, but some possible causes such as obstruction of glandular excretory ducts caused by patient position and increase in the viscosity of the saliva because of acute dehydratation and/or medications like atropin have been proposed. We report a swelling in the left preauricular and postauricular region extending to the angle of the mandibule in a 35-year-old patient after left lateral decubitus position for laparoscopic nephrectomy. PMID:23162409

  7. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased.

  8. The association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khiavi, Farzad Faraji; Dashti, Rezvan; Zergani, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Job satisfaction is one of the most challenging organizational concepts, and it is the basis of management policies to increase productivity and efficiency of the organization. The general health rate may affect job satisfaction in several ways. This study aimed to determine the association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. Methods The study population of this cross-sectional research included 100 employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. The data collection instruments were the General Health Questionnaire (28-GHQ) and the Job Descriptive Index (JDI) questionnaire. The data were analyzed using Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient, independent samples t-test, and ANOVA statistical tests in SPSS software. Results The mean general health was calculated as 26.19 ± 11.04, which indicated a positive psychiatric condition. Job satisfaction with a mean score of 89.67 ± 23.3 was deemed to be relatively dissatisfied. A medium negative and significant association was observed between job satisfaction and general health and its subscales (physical health, anxiety, social, and depression). Conclusions General health subscales and job satisfaction are associated. Some actions must be planned to cope with the negative factors in general health in order to increase employees’ satisfaction in university educational hospitals. PMID:27280002

  9. Preliminary survey report: control technology for ethylene oxide sterilization at Selby General Hospital, Marietta, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, S.L.; Mortimer, V.D.; Todd, W.F.

    1985-08-01

    A survey of control technology for reducing exposure during ethylene oxide sterilization was conducted at Selby General Hospital, Marietta, Ohio on August 30, 1984. The Central Services Department performed ethylene oxide sterilization for obstetrics, neonatal care, respiratory therapy, cytology, isolation cases, and surgery. Engineering controls consisted of isolation of the sterilizer and aerators, local exhaust ventilation, a continuous fresh air purge on the sterilization cycle, in chamber aeration of the sterilizers, and general exhaust ventilation of the Central Services Department and the sterilizer room. The author concludes that the Central Services Department has instituted control technology that minimizes employee exposure to ethylene-oxide. The hospital should be considered a candidate for an in-depth survey in a NIOSH study of control technology for ethylene oxide sterilization in hospitals.

  10. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  11. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  12. A Comparison of Free-Standing versus Co-Located Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Barnato, Amber E.; Lave, Judith R.; Pike, Francis; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Le, Tri Q.; Angus, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term acute care hospitals (LTACs) provide specialized treatment for patients with chronic critical illness. Increasingly LTACs are co-located within traditional short-stay hospitals rather than operated as free-standing facilities, which may affect LTAC utilization patterns and outcomes. Methods We compared free-standing and co-located LTACs using 2005 data from the United States Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. We used bivariate analyses to examine patient characteristics and timing of LTAC transfer, and used propensity matching and multivariable regression to examine mortality, readmissions, and costs after transfer. Results Of 379 LTACs in our sample, 192 (50.7%) were free-standing and 187 (49.3%) were co-located in a short-stay hospital. Co-located LTACs were smaller (median bed size: 34 vs. 66, p <0.001) and more likely to be for-profit (72.2% v. 68.8%, p = 0.001) than freestanding LTACs. Co-located LTACs admitted patients later in their hospital course (average time prior to transfer: 15.5 days vs. 14.0 days) and were more likely to admit patients for ventilator weaning (15.9% vs. 12.4%). In the multivariate propensity-matched analysis, patients in co-located LTACs experienced higher 180-day mortality (adjusted relative risk: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00–1.11, p = 0.04) but lower readmission rates (adjusted relative risk: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.75–0.98, p = 0.02). Costs were similar between the two hospital types (mean difference in costs within 180 days of transfer: -$3,580, 95% CI: -$8,720 –$1,550, p = 0.17). Conclusions Compared to patients in free-standing LTACs, patients in co-located LTACs experience slightly higher mortality but lower readmission rates, with no change in overall resource use as measured by 180 day costs. PMID:26440102

  13. The Toronto General Hospital Transitional Pain Service: development and implementation of a multidisciplinary program to prevent chronic postsurgical pain.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joel; Weinrib, Aliza; Fashler, Samantha R; Katznelzon, Rita; Shah, Bansi R; Ladak, Salima Sj; Jiang, Jiao; Li, Qing; McMillan, Kayla; Mina, Daniel Santa; Wentlandt, Kirsten; McRae, Karen; Tamir, Diana; Lyn, Sheldon; de Perrot, Marc; Rao, Vivek; Grant, David; Roche-Nagle, Graham; Cleary, Sean P; Hofer, Stefan Op; Gilbert, Ralph; Wijeysundera, Duminda; Ritvo, Paul; Janmohamed, Tahir; O'Leary, Gerald; Clarke, Hance

    2015-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), an often unanticipated result of necessary and even life-saving procedures, develops in 5-10% of patients one-year after major surgery. Substantial advances have been made in identifying patients at elevated risk of developing CPSP based on perioperative pain, opioid use, and negative affect, including depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and posttraumatic stress disorder-like symptoms. The Transitional Pain Service (TPS) at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) is the first to comprehensively address the problem of CPSP at three stages: 1) preoperatively, 2) postoperatively in hospital, and 3) postoperatively in an outpatient setting for up to 6 months after surgery. Patients at high risk for CPSP are identified early and offered coordinated and comprehensive care by the multidisciplinary team consisting of pain physicians, advanced practice nurses, psychologists, and physiotherapists. Access to expert intervention through the Transitional Pain Service bypasses typically long wait times for surgical patients to be referred and seen in chronic pain clinics. This affords the opportunity to impact patients' pain trajectories, preventing the transition from acute to chronic pain, and reducing suffering, disability, and health care costs. In this report, we describe the workings of the Transitional Pain Service at Toronto General Hospital, including the clinical algorithm used to identify patients, and clinical services offered to patients as they transition through the stages of surgical recovery. We describe the role of the psychological treatment, which draws on innovations in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that allow for brief and effective behavioral interventions to be applied transdiagnostically and preventatively. Finally, we describe our vision for future growth. PMID:26508886

  14. The Toronto General Hospital Transitional Pain Service: development and implementation of a multidisciplinary program to prevent chronic postsurgical pain.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joel; Weinrib, Aliza; Fashler, Samantha R; Katznelzon, Rita; Shah, Bansi R; Ladak, Salima Sj; Jiang, Jiao; Li, Qing; McMillan, Kayla; Mina, Daniel Santa; Wentlandt, Kirsten; McRae, Karen; Tamir, Diana; Lyn, Sheldon; de Perrot, Marc; Rao, Vivek; Grant, David; Roche-Nagle, Graham; Cleary, Sean P; Hofer, Stefan Op; Gilbert, Ralph; Wijeysundera, Duminda; Ritvo, Paul; Janmohamed, Tahir; O'Leary, Gerald; Clarke, Hance

    2015-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), an often unanticipated result of necessary and even life-saving procedures, develops in 5-10% of patients one-year after major surgery. Substantial advances have been made in identifying patients at elevated risk of developing CPSP based on perioperative pain, opioid use, and negative affect, including depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and posttraumatic stress disorder-like symptoms. The Transitional Pain Service (TPS) at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) is the first to comprehensively address the problem of CPSP at three stages: 1) preoperatively, 2) postoperatively in hospital, and 3) postoperatively in an outpatient setting for up to 6 months after surgery. Patients at high risk for CPSP are identified early and offered coordinated and comprehensive care by the multidisciplinary team consisting of pain physicians, advanced practice nurses, psychologists, and physiotherapists. Access to expert intervention through the Transitional Pain Service bypasses typically long wait times for surgical patients to be referred and seen in chronic pain clinics. This affords the opportunity to impact patients' pain trajectories, preventing the transition from acute to chronic pain, and reducing suffering, disability, and health care costs. In this report, we describe the workings of the Transitional Pain Service at Toronto General Hospital, including the clinical algorithm used to identify patients, and clinical services offered to patients as they transition through the stages of surgical recovery. We describe the role of the psychological treatment, which draws on innovations in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that allow for brief and effective behavioral interventions to be applied transdiagnostically and preventatively. Finally, we describe our vision for future growth.

  15. Outcomes associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder requiring hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S; Rajesh, BP; Chaudhury, Alisha; Hattiholi, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (AECOPD) are known to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality and have a significant socioeconomic impact. The factors that determine frequent hospital readmissions for AECOPD are poorly understood. The present study was done to ascertain failures rates following AECOPD and to evaluate factors associated with frequent readmissions. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 186 patients with COPD with one or more admissions for acute exacerbations in a tertiary care hospital. Frequency of previous re-admissions for AECOPD in the past year, and clinical characteristics, including spirometry were ascertained in the stable state both before discharge and at 6-month post-discharge. Failure rates following treatment were ascertained during the follow-up period. All the patients were followed up for a period of 2 years after discharge to evaluate re-admissions for the AECOPD. Results: Of 186 COPD patients admitted for AECOPD, 54% had one or more readmission, and another 45% had two or more readmissions over a period of 2 years. There was a high prevalence of current or ex-heavy smokers, associated co-morbidity, underweight patients, low vaccination prevalence and use of domiciliary oxygen therapy among COPD patients. A total of 12% mortality was observed in the present study. Immediate failure rates after first exacerbation was observed to be 34.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that duration >20 years (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), use of Tiotropium (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12-4.69) and use of co-amoxiclav during first admission (OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.21-4.79) were significantly associated with higher immediate failure rates. The multivariate analysis for repeated admissions revealed that disease duration >10 years (OR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.27-0.93), low usage of inhaled ICS + LABA (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.08-4.54), and MRC dyspnea grade >3 (OR = 2.51; 95% CI: 1.08-5.82) were

  16. 6-PACK programme to decrease fall injuries in acute hospitals: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Renata T; Wolfe, Rory; Brand, Caroline A; Haines, Terry P; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Botti, Mari; Cumming, Robert G; Livingston, Patricia M; Sherrington, Catherine; Zavarsek, Silva; Lindley, Richard I; Kamar, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the 6-PACK programme on falls and fall injuries in acute wards. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Six Australian hospitals. Participants All patients admitted to 24 acute wards during the trial period. Interventions Participating wards were randomly assigned to receive either the nurse led 6-PACK programme or usual care over 12 months. The 6-PACK programme included a fall risk tool and individualised use of one or more of six interventions: “falls alert” sign, supervision of patients in the bathroom, ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach, a toileting regimen, use of a low-low bed, and use of a bed/chair alarm. Main outcome measures The co-primary outcomes were falls and fall injuries per 1000 occupied bed days. Results During the trial, 46 245 admissions to 16 medical and eight surgical wards occurred. As many people were admitted more than once, this represented 31 411 individual patients. Patients’ characteristics and length of stay were similar for intervention and control wards. Use of 6-PACK programme components was higher on intervention wards than on control wards (incidence rate ratio 3.05, 95% confidence interval 2.14 to 4.34; P<0.001). In all, 1831 falls and 613 fall injuries occurred, and the rates of falls (incidence rate ratio 1.04, 0.78 to 1.37; P=0.796) and fall injuries (0.96, 0.72 to 1.27; P=0.766) were similar in intervention and control wards. Conclusions Positive changes in falls prevention practice occurred following the introduction of the 6-PACK programme. However, no difference was seen in falls or fall injuries between groups. High quality evidence showing the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in acute wards remains absent. Novel solutions to the problem of in-hospital falls are urgently needed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000332921. PMID:26813674

  17. Validation of the DECAF score to predict hospital mortality in acute exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, C; Steer, J; Heslop-Marshall, K; Stenton, SC; Hickey, PM; Hughes, R; Wijesinghe, M; Harrison, RN; Steen, N; Simpson, AJ; Gibson, GJ; Bourke, SC

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalisation due to acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is common, and subsequent mortality high. The DECAF score was derived for accurate prediction of mortality and risk stratification to inform patient care. We aimed to validate the DECAF score, internally and externally, and to compare its performance to other predictive tools. Methods The study took place in the two hospitals within the derivation study (internal validation) and in four additional hospitals (external validation) between January 2012 and May 2014. Consecutive admissions were identified by screening admissions and searching coding records. Admission clinical data, including DECAF indices, and mortality were recorded. The prognostic value of DECAF and other scores were assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUROC) curve. Results In the internal and external validation cohorts, 880 and 845 patients were recruited. Mean age was 73.1 (SD 10.3) years, 54.3% were female, and mean (SD) FEV1 45.5 (18.3) per cent predicted. Overall mortality was 7.7%. The DECAF AUROC curve for inhospital mortality was 0.83 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.87) in the internal cohort and 0.82 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.87) in the external cohort, and was superior to other prognostic scores for inhospital or 30-day mortality. Conclusions DECAF is a robust predictor of mortality, using indices routinely available on admission. Its generalisability is supported by consistent strong performance; it can identify low-risk patients (DECAF 0–1) potentially suitable for Hospital at Home or early supported discharge services, and high-risk patients (DECAF 3–6) for escalation planning or appropriate early palliation. Trial registration number UKCRN ID 14214. PMID:26769015

  18. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  19. Legal Outcomes of Sexually Abused Children Evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugue-Castillo, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the legal outcomes and factors associated with case reaching court and conviction for sexual abuse of children seen at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (PGH-CPU) from 1997 to 2000. Methods: Mixed transdisciplinary research design combined longitudinal cohort with qualitative methods. Data were obtained…

  20. Internal Revenue Service General Counsel's Memorandum threatens tax exemption for charitable hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ball, D W

    1992-01-01

    A recent memorandum from the General Counsel of the Internal Revenue Service changes the standard against which tax exempt entities will be measured, which change can adversely affect charitable hospitals' tax exempt status. In addition, the memorandum makes clear that a violation of the Anti-Kickback statute, discussed in Mr. Aaron's article, is inconsistent with tax exempt status.

  1. The evolution of a vascular surgeon at a district general hospital: is sub-specialisation inevitable?

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, C. D.; Gilmour, J. P.; Berry, D. P.; Lewis, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We report a 15-year retrospective audit to evaluate the change in arterial surgical commitment on general surgical case mix of a single surgeon with a vascular interest at a district general hospital. There was a 409% increase in the number of arterial procedures performed combined with a fall of 52% in the total number of operations over the study period. We conclude that, with such a rapidly growing arterial caseload, sub-specialisation to vascular surgery is inevitable. PMID:10932663

  2. Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS). Diagnosis and treatment of adults in general practice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jens Georg

    2014-02-01

    The idea behind this thesis is to present how ARS and especially acute maxillary sinusitis in adults is diagnosed and treated in general practice. The study extends over many years, beginning with the first survey in 1991. Based on doctors' answers, we then investigated the diagnostic values ​​of the symptoms, signs and examinations which the doctors reported using. All patients over 18 years suspected of acute maxillary sinusitis were included consecutively and only once and, after a clinical examination with the GP, they were offered the opportunity to enter into the prospective study referred to acute CT scan and by changes in the CT, immediately referred to sinus puncture. Both examinations were conducted at Aalborg Hospital. The disease was found most frequently in younger and 2/3 were women. The reason for this gender difference is unknown. We have assessed the diagnostic values of the symptoms, objective findings and investigations ​​using 3 different reference standards: sinus puncture, microbiological diagnosis and CT scan described in three articles. In all examinations, it appeared that the usual signs and symptoms of acute maxillary sinusitis occur almost equally often and with a few exceptions in patients, with and without pus in the sinus cavities. Pain in the sinus cavities occurring in 95% of patients, and only elevated levels of CRP and ESR are significantly and independently associated with pus in the sinus cavities. This finding is surprising, because they are two nonspecific markers. CRP tested by near-patient testing has, within the investigations period, been introduced in general practice, and from 1999 the doctors also get reimbursed for performing the test. We have on this background originally defined a clinical criterion with pain over the sinuses accompanied by elevated values ​​of CRP and/or ESR giving a sensitivity of 0.82, specificity 0.57, ppv 0.68 and npv 0.74. But looking at the ROC curve we suggest that a more clinical

  3. The Impact of Hospital/Surgeon Volume on Acute Renal Failure and Mortality in Liver Transplantation: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lin, Jr-Rung; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the case volume of surgeons and hospitals affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2938 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. They were divided into two groups, according to the cumulative case volume of their operating surgeons and the case volume of their hospitals. The duration of intensive care unit stay and post-transplantation hospitalization, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. The results showed that, in the low and high case volume surgeons groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred at the rate of 14.11% and 5.86% (p<0.0001), and the overall mortality rates were 19.61% and 12.44% (p<0.0001). In the low and high case volume hospital groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred in 11% and 7.11% of the recipients (p = 0.0004), and the overall mortality was 18.44% and 12.86% (p<0.0001). These findings suggest that liver transplantation recipients operated on higher case volume surgeons or in higher case volume hospitals have a lower rate of acute renal failure and mortality. PMID:27706183

  4. Acute adverse effects of radiation therapy on HIV-positive patients in Japan: study of 31 cases at Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kaminuma, Takuya; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Hanyu, Nahoko; Chang, Ta-Chen; Kuga, Gencho; Okano, Naoko; Kubo, Nobuteru; Okuma, Yusuke; Nagata, Yasunobu; Maeda, Yoshiharu; Ajisawa, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients has increased in Japan. HIV-positive patients are at a higher risk of cancer than the general population. This paper retrospectively reports the acute adverse effects of radiation therapy on HIV-positive patients who were treated at Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious diseases Center Komagome Hospital (TMCICK). Thirty-one cases involving 24 HIV-positive cancer patients who were treated at TMCICK from January 1997 to March 2009 were included in this study. All acute adverse effects of radiation therapy were examined during, and one month after, the last radiation therapy session. Acute adverse effects were classified according to the site of radiation therapy treatment and analyzed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0. Grade 3 acute adverse effects were seen in 17% of cases, and Grade 2 toxicities were found in 23% of patients. Damage to the skin and mucosa, including stomatitis or diarrhea, tended to occur after low-dose radiation therapy; however, no severe acute adverse effects were seen in other organs, such as the brain, lung, and bone. Acute adverse effects tended to occur earlier in HIV-positive patients and became severe more frequently than in the general population. In particular, disorders of the mucosa, such as those of the oral cavity, pharynx, and intestine, tended to occur rapidly. It was shown that radiation therapy is safe when treatment is performed carefully and that it is a very useful treatment for cancer in HIV-positive patients.

  5. General paediatric surgery for patients aged under 5 years: a 5-year experience at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Kwok, C-S; Gordon, A C

    2016-09-01

    Introduction The gradual shift of general paediatric surgery (GPS) provision from district general hospitals (DGH) to specialised units is well recognised in the UK. The consequences of centralisation include a reduction in exposure to GPS for current surgical trainees. The GPS practice of a DGH is examined here. Methods All operations performed on children aged under 5 years over a 5-year period were identified using the local electronic operation database. Electronic hospital records and clinic letters were accessed to collect data on demographics, operations performed and outcome measures. Results 472 GPS operations were performed on children between the age of 22 days and 5 years between 2009 and 2014, of which 43 were on an emergency basis and 105 were performed on patients aged less than 1 year. Three patients were admitted following day case surgery. Six patients were readmitted within 30 days. Complication rates for all procedures and the four most common procedures were similar to those found in published literature. Conclusions GPS for patients aged less than 5 years is comparatively safe in the DGH setting. The training opportunities available at DGHs are invaluable to surgical trainees and vital for sustaining the future provision of GPS by such hospitals. PMID:27269243

  6. Case management in an acute-care hospital: collaborating for quality, cost-effective patient care.

    PubMed

    Grootveld, Kim; Wen, Victoria; Bather, Michelle; Park, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Case management has recently been advanced as a valuable component in achieving quality patient care that is also cost-effective. At St. Michael's Hospital, in Toronto, Ontario, case managers from a variety of professional backgrounds are central to a new care initiative--Rapid Assessment and Planning to Inform Disposition (RAPID)--in the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Unit that is designed to improve patient care and reconcile high emergency department volumes through "smart bed spacing." Involved in both planning and RAPID, GIM's case managers are the link between patient care and utilization management. These stewards of finite resources strive to make the best use of dollars spent while maintaining a commitment to quality care. Collaborating closely with physicians and others across the hospital, GIM's case managers have been instrumental in bringing about significant improvements in care coordination, utilization management and process redesign. PMID:24844723

  7. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  8. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    PubMed

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  9. Stakeholder perspectives on handovers between hospital staff and general practitioners: an evaluation through the microsystems lens

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Beryl; Zwart, Dorien; Hesselink, Gijs; Pijnenborg, Loes; Barach, Paul; Kalkman, Cor; Johnson, Julie K

    2012-01-01

    Background Much of the research on improving patient handovers has focused on enhancing communication within the hospital system, but there have been relatively few efforts aimed at addressing the challenges at the interface between the hospital and the primary care setting. Methods A qualitative thematic analysis using a clinical microsystems lens applied to 28 semi-structured key stakeholder interviews in the Netherlands. Data were organised into seven ‘virtual’ clinical microsystem datasets composed of patients, hospital-based physicians, hospital-based nurses and community-based general practitioners. Results Five themes that contributed to effective or ineffective handovers emerged from our analysis: (1) lack of adequate information; (2) healthcare professionals’ availability and opportunity for personal contact; (3) feedback, teaching and protocols related to handovers; (4) information technology facilitated communication solutions; and (5) the role and responsibility of patients. Our analysis suggests that each healthcare professional attempted to provide the best care possible, but did this largely in isolation, and without the benefit of the knowledge and expertise of the other members of the microsystem. Conclusions The microsystem approach offers an innovative organisational construct and approach to assess the gaps in ‘hospital to community’ patient handovers, by viewing the hospital to the community interface as a clinical microsystem continuum. Our application of the microsystem approach confirms and extends earlier findings about the impact of barriers on the continuity and safety of patient transitions and their impact on the quality of patient care. PMID:23118408

  10. Clinical outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms that underwent endovascular repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) in patients at a district general hospital. Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted using data on 16 patients with elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and nine patients with consecutive rAAA treated with EVAR from January 2010 to December 2014 in a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The preoperative characteristics of the two groups are listed. Thirty-six percent (9/25) of the patients were referred from other hospitals that did not offer surgical services. The percentage of patients with rAAA that were transferred from other hospitals was 55.5% (5/9). The stay durations in the intensive care unit for elective EVAR cases were shorter than those for emergent EVAR (1.75±1 d elective vs. 10±13.37 d emergent; P<0.019). The hospitalization days (11.06±4.07 d elective vs. 21.89±18.36 d emergent; P<0.031), operative time (183.63±57.24 min elective vs. 227.11±59.92 min emergent; P<0.009), and blood loss volumes (115.63±80.41 mL elective vs. 422.22±276.26 mL emergent; P<0.005) are shown; statistics for use of Perclose ProGlide® (7 cases elective vs. 0 case emergent; P<0.024) are compared. The overall 30-d mortality rate was 11.11% (1/9). Conclusions The results confirm that EVAR surgery can be safely performed in a district general hospital with an integrated health care system. Using Perclose ProGlide® for selected cases may reduce blood loss and operative time. PMID:27499945

  11. Knowledge translation lessons from an audit of Aboriginal Australians with acute coronary syndrome presenting to a regional hospital

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Emma; Hohnen, Harry; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Scalley, Benjamin D; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Translation of evidence into practice by health systems can be slow and incomplete and may disproportionately impact disadvantaged populations. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death among Aboriginal Australians. Timely access to effective medical care for acute coronary syndrome substantially improves survival. A quality-of-care audit conducted at a regional Western Australian hospital in 2011–2012 compared the Emergency Department management of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal acute coronary syndrome patients. This audit is used as a case study of translating knowledge processes in order to identify the factors that support equity-oriented knowledge translation. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of the audit team and further key stakeholders with interest/experience in knowledge translation in the context of Aboriginal health. Interviews were analysed for alignment of the knowledge translation process with the thematic steps outlined in Tugwell’s cascade for equity-oriented knowledge translation framework. Results: In preparing the audit, groundwork helped shape management support to ensure receptivity to targeting Aboriginal cardiovascular outcomes. Reporting of audit findings and resulting advocacy were undertaken by the audit team with awareness of the institutional hierarchy, appropriate timing, personal relationships and recognising the importance of tailoring messages to specific audiences. These strategies were also acknowledged as important in the key stakeholder interviews. A follow-up audit documented a general improvement in treatment guideline adherence and a reduction in treatment inequalities for Aboriginal presentations. Conclusion: As well as identifying outcomes such as practice changes, a useful evaluation increases understanding of why and how an intervention worked. Case studies such as this enrich our understanding of the complex human factors, including individual attributes

  12. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor-II Antagonist Prescribing and Hospital Admissions with Acute Kidney Injury: A Longitudinal Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Abel, Gary A.; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tomson, Charles R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Roland, Martin O.; Payne, Rupert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background ACE Inhibitors (ACE-I) and Angiotensin-Receptor Antagonists (ARAs) are commonly prescribed but can cause acute kidney injury (AKI) during intercurrent illness. Rates of hospitalization with AKI are increasing. We aimed to determine whether hospital AKI admission rates are associated with increased ACE-I/ARA prescribing. Methods and Findings English NHS prescribing data for ACE-I/ARA prescriptions were matched at the level of the general practice to numbers of hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of AKI. Numbers of prescriptions were weighted for the demographic characteristics of general practices by expressing prescribing as rates where the denominator is Age, Sex, and Temporary Resident Originated Prescribing Units (ASTRO-PUs). We performed a mixed-effect Poisson regression to model the number of admissions for AKI occurring in each practice for each of 4 years from 1/4/2007. From 2007/8-2010/11, crude AKI admission rates increased from 0.38 to 0.57 per 1000 patients (51.6% increase), and national annual ACE-I/ARA prescribing rates increased by 0.032 from 0.202 to 0.234 (15.8% increase). There was strong evidence (p<0.001) that increases in practice-level prescribing of ACE-I/ARA over the study period were associated with an increase in AKI admission rates. The increase in prescribing seen in a typical practice corresponded to an increase in admissions of approximately 5.1% (rate ratio = 1.051 for a 0.03 per ASTRO-PU increase in annual prescribing rate, 95%CI 1.047-1.055). Using the regression model we predict that 1,636 (95%CI 1,540-1,780) AKI admissions would have been avoided if prescribing rates were at the 2007/8 level, equivalent to 14.8% of the total increase in AKI admissions. Conclusion In this ecological analysis, up to 15% of the increase in AKI admissions in England over a 4-year time period is potentially attributable to increased prescribing of ACE-I and ARAs. However, these findings are limited by the lack of patient level

  13. Admission of Hb S heterozygotes to a general hospital is relatively reduced in malarial areas.

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, B; Felicetti, L

    1985-01-01

    A comparison between the frequency of Hb S heterozygotes in blood donors, outpatients, and inpatients of a general hospital carried out at the Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique, where Plasmodium falciparum malaria is endemic, showed a statistically significant lower percentage of Hb S heterozygotes in the inpatient group. Evidence is thus provided that the protection given by Hb S to heterozygotes concerns not only malarial infection itself, but probably a wide spectrum of diseases to which persons who have a special resistance to P falciparum infection are less prone. PMID:4045956

  14. [Participatory planning in health organizations: the case of the Bonsucesso General Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lima, Juliano de Carvalho; Faveret, Ana Cecília; Grabois, Victor

    2006-03-01

    This article presents the experience with participatory planning in the Bonsucesso General Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 2003 to 2004. The participatory and communicative characteristics and the resulting institutional format are identified for guaranteeing the implementation of collective decisions from the planning workshops. The limits of implementation in participatory planning and management proposals are argued from the perspective of change and power relations in these institutions. The results support the notion that projects involving changes in hospitals and failing to take into account the different internal rationalities and power relations end up having reduced potential for implementation.

  15. Single baseline serum creatinine measurements predict mortality in critically ill patients hospitalized for acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schefold, Joerg C.; Hodoscek, Lea Majc; Blöchlinger, Stefan; Doehner, Wolfram; von Haehling, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute heart failure (AHF) is a leading cause of death in critically ill patients and is often accompanied by significant renal dysfunction. Few data exist on the predictive value of measures of renal dysfunction in large cohorts of patients hospitalized for AHF. Methods Six hundred and eighteen patients hospitalized for AHF (300 male, aged 73.3 ± 10.3 years, 73% New York Heart Association Class 4, mean hospital length of stay 12.9 ± 7.7 days, 97% non‐ischaemic AHF) were included in a retrospective single‐centre data analysis. Echocardiographic data, serum creatinine/urea levels, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and clinical/laboratory markers were recorded. Mean follow‐up time was 2.9 ± 2.1 years. All‐cause mortality was recorded, and univariate/multivariate analyses were performed. Results Normal renal function defined as eGFR > 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 was noted in only 3% of AHF patients at baseline. A significant correlation of left ventricular ejection fraction with serum creatinine levels and eGFR (all P < 0.002) was noted. All‐cause mortality rates were 12% (90 days) and 40% (at 2 years), respectively. In a multivariate model, increased age, higher New York Heart Association class at admission, higher total cholesterol levels, and lower eGFR independently predicted death. Patients with baseline eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 had an exceptionally high risk of death (odds ratio 2.80, 95% confidence interval 1.52–5.15, P = 0.001). Conclusions In a large cohort of patients with mostly non‐ischaemic AHF, enhanced serum creatinine levels and reduced eGFR independently predict death. It appears that patients with eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 have poorest survival rates. Our data add to mounting data indicating that impaired renal function is an important risk factor for non‐survival in patients hospitalized for AHF.

  16. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  17. Effectiveness of Chest Physiotherapy in Infants Hospitalized with Acute Bronchiolitis: A Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gajdos, Vincent; Katsahian, Sandrine; Beydon, Nicole; Abadie, Véronique; de Pontual, Loïc; Larrar, Sophie; Epaud, Ralph; Chevallier, Bertrand; Bailleux, Sylvain; Mollet-Boudjemline, Alix; Bouyer, Jean; Chevret, Sylvie; Labrune, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute bronchiolitis treatment in children and infants is largely supportive, but chest physiotherapy is routinely performed in some countries. In France, national guidelines recommend a specific type of physiotherapy combining the increased exhalation technique (IET) and assisted cough (AC). Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy (IET + AC) in previously healthy infants hospitalized for a first episode of acute bronchiolitis. Methods and Findings We conducted a multicenter, randomized, outcome assessor-blind and parent-blind trial in seven French pediatric departments. We recruited 496 infants hospitalized for first-episode acute bronchiolitis between October 2004 and January 2008. Patients were randomly allocated to receive from physiotherapists three times a day, either IET + AC (intervention group, n = 246) or nasal suction (NS, control group, n = 250). Only physiotherapists were aware of the allocation group of the infant. The primary outcome was time to recovery, defined as 8 hours without oxygen supplementation associated with minimal or no chest recession, and ingesting more than two-thirds of daily food requirements. Secondary outcomes were intensive care unit admissions, artificial ventilation, antibiotic treatment, description of side effects during procedures, and parental perception of comfort. Statistical analysis was performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Median time to recovery was 2.31 days, (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.97–2.73) for the control group and 2.02 days (95% CI 1.96–2.34) for the intervention group, indicating no significant effect of physiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR]  = 1.09, 95% CI 0.91–1.31, p = 0.33). No treatment by age interaction was found (p = 0.97). Frequency of vomiting and transient respiratory destabilization was higher in the IET + AC group during the procedure (relative risk [RR]  = 10.2, 95% CI 1.3–78.8, p = 0.005 and RR  = 5.4, 95% CI 1.6–18

  18. Intraoperative hypotension - a neglected causative factor in hospital-acquired acute kidney injury; a Mayo Clinic Health System experience revisited.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a relatively common complication of cardiothoracic surgery and has both short- and long-term survival implications, even when AKI does not progress to severe renal failure. Given that currently, there are no active effective treatments for AKI, other than renal replacement therapy when indicated, the focus of clinicians ought to be on prevention and risk factor management. In the AKI-surgery literature, there exists this general consensus that intraoperative hypotension (IH) following hypotensive anesthesia (HA) or controlled hypotension (CH) in the operating room has no significant short-term and long-term impacts on renal function. In this review, we examine the basis for this consensus, exposing some of the flaws of the clinical study data upon which this prevailing consensus is based. We then describe our experiences in the last decade at the Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, in Northwestern Wisconsin, USA, with two selected case presentations to highlight the contribution of IH as a potent yet preventable cause of post-operative AKI. We further highlight the causative although neglected role of IH in precipitating postoperative AKI in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We show additional risk factors associated with this syndrome and further make a strong case for the elimination of IH as an achievable mechanism to reduce overall, the incidence of hospital acquired AKI. We finally posit that as the old saying goes, prevention is indeed better than cure. PMID:26468476

  19. Intraoperative hypotension - a neglected causative factor in hospital-acquired acute kidney injury; a Mayo Clinic Health System experience revisited

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a relatively common complication of cardiothoracic surgery and has both short- and long-term survival implications, even when AKI does not progress to severe renal failure. Given that currently, there are no active effective treatments for AKI, other than renal replacement therapy when indicated, the focus of clinicians ought to be on prevention and risk factor management. In the AKI-surgery literature, there exists this general consensus that intraoperative hypotension (IH) following hypotensive anesthesia (HA) or controlled hypotension (CH) in the operating room has no significant short-term and long-term impacts on renal function. In this review, we examine the basis for this consensus, exposing some of the flaws of the clinical study data upon which this prevailing consensus is based. We then describe our experiences in the last decade at the Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, in Northwestern Wisconsin, USA, with two selected case presentations to highlight the contribution of IH as a potent yet preventable cause of post-operative AKI. We further highlight the causative although neglected role of IH in precipitating postoperative AKI in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We show additional risk factors associated with this syndrome and further make a strong case for the elimination of IH as an achievable mechanism to reduce overall, the incidence of hospital acquired AKI. We finally posit that as the old saying goes, prevention is indeed better than cure. PMID:26468476

  20. Traffic related air pollution and acute hospital admission for respiratory diseases in Drammen, Norway 1995-2000.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Bente; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per; Bjørkly, Sonja; Skrondal, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the associations between seven ambient air pollutants [particulate matter (PM10), nitrous dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), benzene, formaldehyde and toluene] and acute hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Drammen, Norway 1995-2000. Time-series analysis of counts was performed by means of generalized additive models with log link and Poisson distribution. The results showed that benzene was the pollutant having the strongest association with respiratory diseases for the total study period, the relative risk of an interquartile increase of benzene was 1.095 with 95% confidence interval: 1.031-1.163. The corresponding results were 1.049 (0.990-1.112) for formaldehyde, 1.044 (1.000-1.090) for toluene, 1.064 (1.019-1.111) for NO2, 1.043 (1.011-1.075) for SO2, 0.990 (0.936-1.049) for O3 and 1.022 (0.990-1.055) for PM10. Dividing the total study period into two 3-year periods, there was a substantial reduction in the exposure levels of the volatile organic compounds (benzene, formaldehyde and toluene) from the first to the second period. Separate analyses for the second time period showed weaker association between these pollutants and the health outcome. This study provides further evidence for short-term respiratory health effects of traffic related air pollution.

  1. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  2. Prediction of Hospital Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure 30-Day Mortality Rates Using Publicly Reported Performance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, David S.; Bardach, Naomi S.; Lin, Grace A.; Chattopadhyay, Arpita; Goldman, L. Elizabeth; Dudley, R. Adams

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify an approach to summarizing publicly reported hospital performance data for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure (HF) that best predicts current year hospital mortality rates. Setting A total of 1,868 U.S. hospitals reporting process and outcome measures for AMI and HF to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from July 2005 to June 2006 (Year 0) and July 2006 to June 2007 (Year 1). Design Observational cohort study measuring the percentage variation in Year 1 hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate explained by denominator-based weighted composite scores summarizing hospital Year 0 performance. Data Collection Data were prospectively collected from hospitalcompare.gov. Results Percentage variation in Year 1 mortality was best explained by mortality rate alone in Year 0 over other composites including process performance. If only Year 0 mortality rates were reported, and consumers using hospitals in the highest decile of mortality instead chose hospitals in the lowest decile of mortality rate, the number of deaths at 30 days that potentially could have been avoided was 1.31 per 100 patients for AMI and 2.12 for HF (p < .001). Conclusion Public reports focused on 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate may more directly address policymakers’ goals of facilitating consumer identification of hospitals with better outcomes. PMID:22093186

  3. Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial)

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Sarah E; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Kearney, Fiona C; Russell, Catherine; Whittamore, Kathy H; Foster, Pippa E R; Mamza, Jil; Gladman, John R F; Jones, Rob G; Lewis, Sarah A; Porock, Davina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a best practice model of general hospital acute medical care for older people with cognitive impairment. Design Randomised controlled trial, adapted to take account of constraints imposed by a busy acute medical admission system. Setting Large acute general hospital in the United Kingdom. Participants 600 patients aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified as “confused” on admission. Interventions Participants were randomised to a specialist medical and mental health unit, designed to deliver best practice care for people with delirium or dementia, or to standard care (acute geriatric or general medical wards). Features of the specialist unit included joint staffing by medical and mental health professionals; enhanced staff training in delirium, dementia, and person centred dementia care; provision of organised purposeful activity; environmental modification to meet the needs of those with cognitive impairment; delirium prevention; and a proactive and inclusive approach to family carers. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: number of days spent at home over the 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes: structured non-participant observations to ascertain patients’ experiences; satisfaction of family carers with hospital care. When possible, outcome assessment was blind to allocation. Results There was no significant difference in days spent at home between the specialist unit and standard care groups (median 51 v 45 days, 95% confidence interval for difference −12 to 24; P=0.3). Median index hospital stay was 11 versus 11 days, mortality 22% versus 25% (−9% to 4%), readmission 32% versus 35% (−10% to 5%), and new admission to care home 20% versus 28% (−16% to 0) for the specialist unit and standard care groups, respectively. Patients returning home spent a median of 70.5 versus 71.0 days at home (−6.0 to 6.5). Patients on the specialist unit spent significantly more time with positive mood or

  4. Apparent temperature and acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions in Copenhagen, Denmark: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The influence of temperature on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been investigated as extensively as the effects of broader outcomes of morbidity and mortality. Sixteen studies reported inconsistent results and two considered confounding by air pollution. We addressed some of the methodological limitations of the previous studies in this study. Methods This is the first study of the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) and AMI hospital admissions in Copenhagen. The study period covered 1 January 1999-31 December 2006, stratified in warm (April - September) and cold (October - March) periods. A case-crossover epidemiology study design was applied. Models were adjusted for public holidays and influenza, confounding by PM10, NO2 and CO was investigated, the lag and non-linear effects of Tappmax was examined, effect modification by age, sex and SES was explored, and the results of the case-crossover models were compared to those of the generalised additive Poisson time-series and generalised estimating equation models. Results 14 456 AMI hospital admissions (12 995 people) occurred during the study period. For an inter-quartile range (6 or 7°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax, a 4% (95% CI:-2%; 10%) and 9% (95% CI: 3%; 14%) decrease in the AMI admission rate was observed in the warm and cold periods, respectively. The 19-65 year old group, men and highest SES group seemed to be more susceptible in the cold period. Conclusion An increase in Tappmax is associated with a decrease in AMI admissions during the colder months. PMID:22463704

  5. Screening for Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Isolation Strategies in Children Hospitalized With acute Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pfeil, Johannes; Tabatabai, Julia; Sander, Anja; Ries, Markus; Grulich-Henn, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nosocomial infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important health risk in pediatric care but is largely preventable by efficient infection control measures. Commonly applied rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) miss a considerable number of RSV-infected patients. The objective of our analysis was to evaluate whether readily available host parameters are associated with false-negative RADT, and to assess how these parameters could be applied in an optimized RSV isolation strategy. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 242 children under the age of 2 years hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection to identify host parameters associated with false-negative RADT test result. We subsequently simulated the outcome of different isolation strategies based on RADT result and host parameters in view of the overall isolation efficacy. Out of 242 hospitalized patients, 134 (55%) patients were found RSV-positive by RT-PCR, whereas 108 (45%) patients were tested negative. The performance of the RADT was compared with the result obtained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on the identical nasopharyngeal wash. Overall, we found that 85 patients (35%) were tested true positive, 108 (45%) were tested true negative, whereas a false-negative test result was obtained in 49 patients (20%). Duration of respiratory symptoms for >3 days and a respiratory admission diagnosis are associated with false-negative RADT result. In comparison with RADT alone, consideration of these clinical parameters and RADT result can decrease the rate of nonisolated RSV-infected patients from approximately 24% to 8% (65% RSV pretest probability). Consideration of both RADT and clinical parameters associated with false-negative RADT can result in an optimized RSV infection control policy. PMID:25437026

  6. Prognostic Value of Rising Serum Albumin During Hospitalization in Patients With Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Satoshi; Kuragaichi, Takashi; Shiba, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Takatsu, Yoshiki; Sato, Yukihito

    2016-04-15

    Hypoalbuminemia is an important predictor of a poor long-term prognosis in acute heart failure (AHF). However, changes in serum albumin levels in AHF have not been described to date. Therefore, we investigated the changes in serum albumin levels in patients hospitalized for AHF. This observational study included 115 consecutive patients admitted with AHF. Serum albumin was measured on days 1, 2, 4, and 7 of their hospitalization, and the changes in its levels were assessed. Cox multivariate analysis was used to compare the long-term mortality and readmission rate between 2 groups defined according to whether their serum albumin changes showed a rising pattern (serum albumin level increased from day 2 to day 7) or not. The mean serum albumin levels were 3.51 mg/dl on day 1, 3.21 mg/dl on day 2, 3.23 mg/dl on day 4, and 3.35 mg/dl on day 7 (p <0.001 by multivariate analysis of variance). The rising pattern group including 66 patients (60.6%) was independently associated with a lower mortality and readmission rate (hazard ratios 0.450 and 0.522; p = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). Furthermore, based on multiple linear regression analysis, the changes in hemoglobin and C-reactive protein levels during days 1 to 7 were independently correlated with the changes in serum albumin levels over the same period. In conclusion, a rising pattern of serum albumin change in a patient with AHF was correlated with a good long-term prognosis. Furthermore, the change in serum albumin levels was also associated with changes in cachectic factors. PMID:27020611

  7. B-type natriuretic peptide-directed ultrafiltration improves care in acutely hospitalized dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tapolyai, Mihály; Uysal, Aşkin; Maeweathers, Gail; Bahta, Elias; Dossabhoy, Neville R

    2009-01-01

    In an observational study in 19 consecutive acutely hospitalized dialysis patients, ultrafiltration (UF) volume was determined by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Patients were ultrafiltrated daily until they achieved a target BNP level <500 pg/mL. The UF volumes ranged from 2 to 5 L per session. All patients were male veterans aged 68+/-11 years (mean +/- SD), 74% were diabetic, 47% were African Americans, 58% underwent prevalent dialysis, and 53% had an arteriovenous fistula. Left ventricular ejection fraction on 2-dimensional echocardiography was 43.8%+/-27.9% (n=16). The admission BNP was 2412+/-1479 pg/mL (range, 561-5000 pg/mL) and BNP at hospital discharge was 1245+/-1173 pg/mL (range, 345-5000 pg/mL) (nonparametric Wilcoxon P=.0013). Admission weight was 88.9+/-27.9 kg and at discharge was 78.1+/-25.6 kg (P=.0002). The number of antihypertensive medications taken was 3.8+/-2.0 at admission and 2.3+/-1.7 at discharge (P=.0005). The number of patients with >2 blood pressure medications decreased from 14 to 6 (Fisher exact test, P=.02). The systolic/diastolic/mean arterial blood pressure decreased from admission to discharge (153.6+/-43.8/80.6+/-21.8/102.4+/-27.3 to 132.1+/-27.9/68.9+/-14.6/89.9+/-16.5 mm Hg; P=.0222/.0139/.0329, respectively). Although all patients were volume-overloaded at admission according to BNP criteria (>500), only 42% were identified as having heart failure. BNP-directed UF is safe because it minimizes symptomatic hypotension, identifies occult congestive heart failure in a large number of patients, and significantly reduces blood pressure in addition to reducing body weight and number of medications used. PMID:19522962

  8. Detection of rotavirus and other enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Havana, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Ribas, María de Los Angeles; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; de Los Angeles León, María; Rodriguez, Misladys; Perez-Lastre, Jorge; Triana, Thelma; Guerra, Mabel; Ayllón, Lucía; Escalante, Gladys; Hadad, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to diagnose infections with rotavirus and other enteric pathogens in children under five years old with acute gastroenteritis and to identify the most common epidemiological and clinical characteristics of these pathogens. The study was conducted using 110 stool samples from the same number of children under five years old who were inpatients at three paediatric hospitals in Havana, Cuba, between October and December 2011. The samples were tested for rotavirus and other enteric pathogens using traditional and molecular microbiological methods. Pathogens were detected in 85 (77.3 %) of the children. Rotavirus was the most commonly found, appearing in 54.5 % of the children, followed by bacteria (29 %) and parasites (10.9 %). Other viral pathogens detected included adenovirus (6.4 %) and astrovirus (3.6 %). In rotavirus-positives cases, at least one other pathogen was detected, usually a bacterium (26.6 %). More than three episodes of watery diarrhea in 24 hours were observed in 78.3 % of the cases. Dehydration was found in 30 (50 %) rotavirus-positive children, of whom seven (11.6 %) were transferred to an intensive care unit due to complications of metabolic acidosis. Rotavirus was most commonly observed among children under 12 months old (65 %). The highest incidence of infection occurred in children who were under the care of a relative at home (78.3 %), had not been breastfed (65 %), or had been breastfed for less than six months (28.3 %). The genotype combinations most frequently found were G9P8 (28.3 %) and G1P8 (10 %). This study demonstrates the presence of rotavirus and other enteric pathogens as causes of gastroenteritis in hospitalized infants and young children in Cuba.

  9. Ethical dilemmas in general hospitals: social workers' contribution to ethical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Landau, R

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-two hospital social workers, fourteen of them directors of social work services and eighteen direct practitioners, were interviewed about their perception of the factors influencing social workers' contribution to the resolution of ethical dilemmas in general hospitals in Israel. Findings revealed that while ethical decision-making in hospitals is an interdisciplinary process, social workers' contribution to the process is affected by rivalry between social workers and other members of the health team, personality differences, type of ward and the nature of the ethical dilemma. Participants of the study had quite a clear perception of their role and of the unique knowledge-base social work can offer, including knowledge of the individual and family life course, understanding and skills in coping with diseases, and systems thinking. In order to increase their influence in ethical decision-making, the hospital social workers felt they must put more effort into developing their relationships with the other professionals involved in ethical decision-making both by making themselves more indispensable and by making their contribution explicit through greater documentation of their activities. The findings also implied that in order to gain more power and be accepted as equal partners in multidisciplinary teams, hospital social workers should improve their communication skills when interacting with representatives of other heath care professions.

  10. The business case for a diabetes self-management intervention in a community general hospital.

    PubMed

    Micklethwaite, Ashley; Brownson, Carol A; O'Toole, Mary L; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing and increasingly compelling body of evidence that self-management interventions for persons with type 2 diabetes can be both effective and cost-effective from a societal perspective. Yet, the evidence is elusive that these interventions can produce a positive business case for a sponsoring provider organization in the short term. The lack of a business case limits the enthusiasm for provider organizations to implement these proven quality-enhancing interventions more widely. This article provides a case example of a self-management intervention in a community general hospital targeting an underserved population who have significant barriers to receiving regular health care. The 3-component program sought to improve meaningful access to care, increase health literacy related to type 2 diabetes, and partner with the enrollees to make long-term lifestyle changes. The intervention not only resulted in significant improvements in HbA1c levels (-0.77%) but saved the hospital an average of $551 per active patient per year, primarily by reducing hospital visits. With only 255 actively enrolled patients, the hospital can recover fully its total direct annual personnel and operating costs for the program. Because the program serves patients who would have been seen at other hospitals, it also enhanced care quality and reduced costs for the broader community in which the program is embedded.

  11. Child and adolescent psychiatry in general children's hospitals. A survey of chairs of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Campo, J V; Kingsley, R S; Bridge, J; Mrazek, D

    2000-01-01

    This article characterizes the academic, administrative, clinical service, and fiscal characteristics of departments of psychiatry in traditional children's hospitals to determine the characteristics of fiscally successful programs. A survey of chairs of psychiatry from short-term general children's hospitals was conducted based on 38 questions addressing the descriptive characteristics of their respective departments. The characteristics of psychiatry programs identified as fiscally successful were compared to those of programs that required subsidy. Nine of 45 eligible children's hospitals (20%) did not have a department or section of psychiatry, and surveys were returned by 35 of 36 department chairs (97% response). Considerable variation exists in the academic, administrative, clinical services, and fiscal characteristics of programs, although over half are operating at a deficit. Fiscal success was associated with availability of inpatient and intermediate levels of psychiatric care, better integration of the psychiatry program within the children's hospital, and adequate fiscal information being provided to the psychiatry chair. Additional research regarding the potential of psychiatric services to generate clinical success and cost savings is warranted. Pediatric health care professionals and third-party payers should be educated regarding the relevance of psychiatric services within children's hospitals and in physically ill children.

  12. [Past and present issues of the pulmonary circulation in the General University Hospital in Prague].

    PubMed

    Jansa, Pavel; Ambrož, David; Lindner, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    The development of right heart catheterization is closely connected not only with its pioneer Werner Forssmann but also with the University Hospital in Prague. Shortly after Forssmann´s pioneering performance of catheterization, Dr. Otto Klein measured cardiac output using the Fick´s principle in 11 patients in University Hospital. In the 60s and 70s of last century, there was established an research group represented by Severin Daum, Frantisek Boudik, Vlastimil Jezek, Alois Ourednik and Zdenek Suso at 2nd Internal Clinic of General Cardiopulmonary Hospital. After 1999, the issue of pulmonary hypertension has been re-emerged by Professor Michal Aschermann and this had significant clinical implications. The highly specialized centre for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was found at the clinic and in Cardio Centre of General University Hospital it has been initiated a successful program of pulmonary endarterectomy in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) since 2004. Surgical treatment is also provided to patients from Slovakia. The number of patients, wide range of therapy and its results, including the excellent results of surgical treatment situates the centre among the most important centres in Europe dealing with pulmonary hypertension.

  13. Radionuclide radiologist directed nuclear medicine services in district general hospitals in the South Thames Region.

    PubMed

    Conry, B G; Burwood, R J

    2001-08-01

    The equipment, staffing levels and imaging workload of all 14 radiologist directed nuclear medicine services in district general hospitals in the South Thames Region are presented. These are generally single camera departments providing a broad range of imaging procedures, including cardiac studies and white cell labelling, as well as the more usual renal, lung, thyroid and bone examinations. All departments have a high throughput, averaging 2358 examinations per year. Departmental staffing levels are variable, with some institutions having inadequate consultant radiology sessions free of other commitments as well as inadequate physics support. Potentially, these are important quality and legal issues that departments may need to address with hospital Trusts and Commissioning Agencies. Four small departments provided a service without any formally contracted radiologist sessions for nuclear medicine in the radiologists' job plans. The three medium sized departments have a closer match between sessions contracted and those actually worked, but in only one of these did the contracted sessional commitment equal the recommendation of the Nuclear Medicine Committee of the Royal College of Physicians. There is a disparity between the number of contracted consultant sessions and those actually worked in most institutions (86%), being at least two sessions in eight hospitals. Recommendations are made regarding the adequacy of some of the elements of provision in South Thames and the legal and safety implications for hospital Trust management and Commissioning Agencies. PMID:11511496

  14. Hydroxychloroquine-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis with positive patch-testing

    PubMed Central

    Charfi, Ons; Kastalli, Sarrah; Sahnoun, Rym; Lakhoua, Ghozlane

    2015-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction, mostly induced by drugs. Hydroxychloroquine have been rarely reported in literature as a causative drug of this reaction. We report a case of AGEP induced by hydroxychloroquine with systemic involvement and confirmed by positive patch testing. PMID:26729969

  15. The Difference in the Online Medical Information Searching Behaviors of Hospital Patients and Their Relatives versus the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hung-Yuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: to explore the differences in online medical information searching behaviors, including evaluative standards and search strategies, of the general public (general group) and those of hospital patients and their relatives (hospital group); and to compare the predictive relationship between the evaluative…

  16. [Investigation into drinking problem of patients who visited a general hospital in central and northern Okinawa].

    PubMed

    Nakai, Minori; Hotta, Hiroshi; Ootsuru, Taku; Hiejima, Shigeto; Murakami, Masaru; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2013-04-01

    In Japan, many problems related to alcohol are pointed out from before. We believe that there is a unique drinking culture in Okinawa, such as a large amount of alcohol. Therefore, we estimate many people in Okinawa have a drinking problem. We conducted a survey of patients who visited general hospital (medical or surgical or orthopedic) in 2007. The purpose of this study is to collect basic data for introducing alcoholics to specialized treatment as early as possible, detecting the person who drink large amounts of alcohol, performing early intervention for people who drink large amount of alcohol, and advancing cooperation with specialized medical agencies of alcohol. As a result, Among the patients who visited general hospital in Okinawa, many problem drinkers are concentrated in the young age. and they have strong fears of health. The possibility of early intervention with intervention techniques, such as brief intervention, has been suggested.

  17. Noise at night in hospital general wards: a mapping of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fillary, Julie; Chaplin, Hema; Jones, Gill; Thompson, Angela; Holme, Anita; Wilson, Patricia

    English NHS inpatient surveys consistently identify that noise at night in hospitals and its impact on patients' sleep is a persisting problem that needs addressing. To identify how noise at night in hospital affects patients on general wards and the range of interventions aimed at reducing the problem, a systematic mapping of the literature was undertaken. All primary studies and relevant literature published January 2003-July 2013 were included. Key issues identified in the literature included noise levels and causes, impact on patient experience, and lack of staff awareness. Interventions to reduce noise were targeted at staff education, behaviour modification, care organisation and environmental solutions. The scoping suggested that when compared with specialist units, there is little evidence on effective interventions reducing disturbance from night-time noise on general wards. The available evidence suggests a whole systems approach should be adopted to aid quality sleep and promote recovery.

  18. Noise at night in hospital general wards: a mapping of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fillary, Julie; Chaplin, Hema; Jones, Gill; Thompson, Angela; Holme, Anita; Wilson, Patricia

    English NHS inpatient surveys consistently identify that noise at night in hospitals and its impact on patients' sleep is a persisting problem that needs addressing. To identify how noise at night in hospital affects patients on general wards and the range of interventions aimed at reducing the problem, a systematic mapping of the literature was undertaken. All primary studies and relevant literature published January 2003-July 2013 were included. Key issues identified in the literature included noise levels and causes, impact on patient experience, and lack of staff awareness. Interventions to reduce noise were targeted at staff education, behaviour modification, care organisation and environmental solutions. The scoping suggested that when compared with specialist units, there is little evidence on effective interventions reducing disturbance from night-time noise on general wards. The available evidence suggests a whole systems approach should be adopted to aid quality sleep and promote recovery. PMID:26018021

  19. Burden of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in London acute hospitals: retrospective on a voluntary surveillance programme.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, S; Bishop, L A; Wright, A L; Kanfoudi, L; Duckworth, G; Fraser, G G

    2011-12-01

    Although meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is recognized as an important cause of hospital and community healthcare-associated morbidity, and colonization as a precursor to infection, few studies have attempted to assess the burden of both colonization and infection across acute healthcare providers within a defined health economy. This study describes the prevalence and incidence of MRSA colonization and infection in acute London hospital Trusts participating in a voluntary surveillance programme in 2000-2001. Hospital infection control staff completed a weekly return including details on incident and prevalent colonizations, bacteraemias and other significant infections due to MRSA. Incidence and prevalence rates were calculated for hospitals with sufficient participation across both years. Colonizations accounted for 79% of incident MRSA cases reported; 4% were bacteraemias, and 17% other significant infections. There was no change in incidence of colonization of hospital patients between 2000 and 2001. By contrast, there was an unexplained 49% increase in prevalence of colonizations over this period. For any given month, prevalent colonizations outnumbered incident colonizations at least twofold. This MRSA surveillance programme was unusual for prospective ascertainment of incident and prevalent cases of both colonization and infection within an English regional health economy. Consistent with other studies, the incidence and prevalence of colonization substantially exceeded infection. Given the small contribution of bacteraemias to the overall MRSA burden, and the surveillance, screening and control interventions of recent years, it may be appropriate to review the present reliance on bacteraemia surveillance.

  20. Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Krista A; Gerace, Adam; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2010-06-01

    Absconding is increasingly being recognized as a problem within mental health settings with significant risks for consumers. This study examines absconding behaviours across three acute care wards within an Australian psychiatric hospital campus over a 12-month period. A descriptive statistical analysis determined the rate of absconding from 49 consumers who absconded 64 times. The absconding rate was 13.33% (absconding events), with most absconding events arising from males diagnosed with schizophrenia (57.14%) aged between 20 and 29 years, and with 62.50% of absconding events occurring whilst consumers were on their first 21-day detention order. Nearly half of all absconding events were by consumers who had absconded previously, with the highest proportion of events occurring during nursing handover. A profile of people who abscond, time of day of absconding, legal status and repeated absconding behaviours are described. The emergent profile of consumers who absconded within this study bears some similarities to that described in overseas research, although in this study consumers were slightly older and 25% of absconders were female. Of particular interest are findings that identify the timings of absconding events in relation to a consumer's legal status. Implications for practice, including assessment of risk of absconding and management, are considered.

  1. Outpatient mental health service use by older adults after acute psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    This study described outpatient mental health service used by elderly patients discharged from acute inpatient psychiatric treatment for depression, assessed services barriers, and identified factors related to the use of outpatient mental health services. The sample consisted of 199 elderly patients discharged home from a geropsychiatric unit of an urban midwestern hospital. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with use of various mental health services. Almost three quarters of the elderly patients saw a psychiatrist within 6 weeks postdischarge, but few used other outpatient mental health services. The most frequently reported barriers to use included (1) cost of services, (2) personal belief that depression would improve on its own, and (3) lack of awareness of available services. The use of various outpatient services was differentially related to predisposing, need, and enabling factors. Female patients, those residing in rural areas, and those who wanted to solve their problems on their own were less likely to use outpatient mental health services. Patients who reported greater levels of functional impairment, resided in rural areas, and perceived that getting services required too much time were less likely to see a psychiatrist in the postacute period. African American patients were more likely than whites to use day treatment programs. This may be related to the fact that most day treatment centers were located in areas where the majority of residents were African Americans.

  2. [THE MODES OF EVALUATION OF TYPE OF DEHYDRATION IN CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED BECAUSE OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Krieger, E A; Samodova, O V; Gulakova, N N; Aruiev, A B; Krylova, L A; Titova, L V

    2015-11-01

    Every year about 800,000 cases of intestinal infections end in lethal outcome due to dehydration. The different types of dehydration acquire differential approach to correction. Everywhere there is no application of routine detection of osmolarity of blood plasma under exicosis in children in view of absence of possibility of instrumental measurement. The search of techniques is needed to make it possible to indirectly detect types of dehydration in children hospitalized because of acute intestinal infection with purpose to apply rationale therapy of water-electrolyte disorders. The sampling of 32 patients with intestinal infections accompanied with signs of exicosis degree I-III was examined. The detection of osmolarity of blood was implemented by instrumental technique using gas analyzer ABL 800 Flex (Radiometer; Denmark) and five estimate techniques according to results of biochemical analysis of blood. The differences in precision of measurement of osmolarity of blood plasma by instrumental and estimate techniques were compared using Bland-Altman graphic technique. It is established that formula: 2x[Na+kp] + [glucosekp] (mmol/l) is the most recise. Its application provided results comparable with values detected by instrumental mode. PMID:26999860

  3. Rotavirus associated acute diarrhoea in hospitalized children in Dibrugarh, north-east India.

    PubMed

    Phukan, Anil C; Patgiri, Dilip K; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2003-04-01

    Faecal specimens from 202 children below 5 years with acute diarrhoea hospitalized in Assam Medical College from April, 1999 to March, 2000 were examined in Regional Medical Research Centre (ICMR), Dibrugarh to know the prevalence of rotavirus diarrhoea and molecular pattern of viral strains from different localities of Dibrugarh using double antibody sandwich ELISA and SDS-PAGE analysis. Human group A rotaviruses were detected in 47 (23.27%) specimens and 33 of 41 (80.49%) positive specimens were electropherotyped where 16 were "long" (48.48%) and 17 "short" (51.52%) types. Rotavirus diarrhoea was significantly high (p<0.01) in children between 11 to 20 months (37.75%). Children from families of upper middle socioeconomic status (61.59%) suffer most (p<0.001). Peak incidence of rotavirus diarrhoea was in winter (38.37%) and showed inverse relation with temperature, humidity and rainfall. Besides diarrhoea, vomiting was a significant clinical manifestation. "Short" electropherotype were common during winter months and in tea garden localities. PMID:15022939

  4. Patients' lived seclusion experience in acute psychiatric hospital in the United States: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ezeobele, I E; Malecha, A T; Mock, A; Mackey-Godine, A; Hughes, M

    2014-05-01

    The findings revealed that the patients perceived seclusion as an intervention that is punitive and a means used by the staff to exert control. Patients perceived that staff incitements and lack of communication skills led to their being secluded. The findings provided recommendations and strategies for seclusion reduction that were based on the patients' first-hand seclusion experiences. This phenomenological study used Husserlian's philosophy to explore and describe the lived experiences of psychiatric patients who were secluded at a free-standing acute care hospital located in South-western United States (US). The study is crucial because very few studies have been conducted in this area in the US. The study examined a purposive sample of 20 patients, 3 days post-seclusion. Data were generated through face-to-face, semi-structured interviews incorporating open-ended questions and probes to facilitate discussion until saturation was reached. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data analysed using Colaizzi's seven steps method. Results were described according to the themes and subthemes identified. Findings uncovered four themes: (1) alone in the world; (2) staff exert power and control; (3) resentment towards staff; and (4) time for meditation. The findings from this study illuminated the views surrounding patients' seclusion experience. It provided first-hand information on the patients' seclusion experience that might be helpful to the mental health professionals in the seclusion reduction process.

  5. Posttraumatic Stress and Myocardial Infarction Risk Perceptions in Hospitalized Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Donald; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Denton, Ellen-Ge; Shimbo, Daichi; Clemow, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS; i.e., myocardial infarction or unstable angina) recurrence and poor post-ACS adherence to medical advice. Since risk perceptions are a primary motivator of adherence behaviors, we assessed the relationship of probable PTSD to ACS risk perceptions in hospitalized ACS patients (n = 420). Participants completed a brief PTSD screen 3–7 days post-ACS, and rated their 1-year ACS recurrence risk relative to other men or women their age. Most participants exhibited optimistic bias (mean recurrence risk estimate between “average” and “below average”). Further, participants who screened positive for current PTSD (n = 15) showed significantly greater optimistic bias than those who screened negative (p < 0.05), after adjustment for demographics, ACS severity, medical comorbidities, depression, and self-confidence in their ability to control their heart disease. Clinicians should be aware that psychosocial factors, and PTSD in particular, may be associated with poor adherence to medical advice due to exaggerated optimistic bias in recurrence risk perceptions. PMID:22593749

  6. Detection of Rotavirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Zagazig University Hospitals in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salwa Badrelsabbah; El-Bialy, Abdallah Abdelkader; Mohammed, Mervat Soliman; El-Sheikh, Azza Omar; Elhewala, Ahmed; Bahgat, Shereen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and young children all over the world. The objective of the study was to compare different methods for detecting rotavirus and to assess the burden of rotavirus as a causative agent for AGE in children younger than five. Methods: This case control study included 65 children with AGE and 35 healthy control children. They were chosen from the Pediatric Department of Zagazig University Hospitals from October 2014 to March 2015. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus by the immunochromatography test (ICT), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qr RT-PCR). Results: Fifty out of the 65 patients (76.9%) were positive for qr RT-PCR. Forty-five (69.2%) and 44 (67.7%) were positive for ICT and ELISA, respectively. There was a significant association between the severity of the disease as determined by the Vesikari score and rotavirus infection. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that ICT is a useful method for the rapid screening of group A rotavirus in fecal specimens, because it is rapid, inexpensive, easy to perform, and requires very little equipment. In addition, this study highlights the substantial health burden of rotavirus AGE among children less than five. PMID:26435821

  7. [Quality indicators in the acute coronary syndrome for the analysis of the pre- and in-hospital care process].

    PubMed

    Felices-Abad, F; Latour-Pérez, J; Fuset-Cabanes, M P; Ruano-Marco, M; Cuñat-de la Hoz, J; del Nogal-Sáez, F

    2010-01-01

    We present a map of 27 indicators to measure the care quality given to patients with acute coronary syndrome attended in the pre- and hospital area. This includes technical process indicators (registration of care intervals, performance of electrocardiogram, monitoring and vein access, assessment of prognostic risk, hemorrhage and in-hospital mortality, use of reperfusion techniques and performance of echocardiograph), pharmacological process indicators (platelet receptors inhibition, anticoagulation, thrombolysis, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting inhibitors and lipid lowering drugs) and outcomes indicators (quality scales of the care given and mortality).

  8. Has competition increased hospital technical efficiency?

    PubMed

    Lee, Keon-Hyung; Park, Jungwon; Lim, Seunghoo; Park, Sang-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Hospital competition and managed care have affected the hospital industry in various ways including technical efficiency. Hospital efficiency has become an important topic, and it is important to properly measure hospital efficiency in order to evaluate the impact of policies on the hospital industry. The primary independent variable is hospital competition. By using the 2001-2004 inpatient discharge data from Florida, we calculate the degree of hospital competition in Florida for 4 years. Hospital efficiency scores are developed using the Data Envelopment Analysis and by using the selected input and output variables from the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey of Hospitals for those acute care general hospitals in Florida. By using the hospital efficiency score as a dependent variable, we analyze the effects of hospital competition on hospital efficiency from 2001 to 2004 and find that when a hospital was located in a less competitive market in 2003, its technical efficiency score was lower than those in a more competitive market.

  9. Comparison of the process of care of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital before and 1 yr after the publication of national guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1996-10-01

    This study set out to assess the effect of publication of the British Guidelines on Asthma Management on the processes and outcomes of the inpatient care of acute severe asthma in the U.K. A criterion-based audit of all acute asthma admissions during August and September 1990 (immediately before) and in 1991 (1 yr after publication of the Guidelines) using eight criteria of process and outcome was performed. Thirty-six teaching and district general hospitals in England, Scotland and Wales took part. In total, 766 patients admitted in 1990, and 900 patients admitted in 1991, were studied. The 1990 and 1991 cohorts were very similar demographically and had asthma of comparable severity. Respiratory physicians achieved similar high performance rates of between 75 and 91% for seven of the eight criteria for both years. Respiratory physicians were significantly more likely to provide patients with a written management plan in 1991. General physicians' performance was significantly lower in both years, but overall there was a very small, but just significant, improvement in their performance in 1991. Some hospitals performed consistently well in both years. It is concluded that respiratory physicians consistently provide better asthma care than general physicians. Though statistically significant, the small degree of improvement was disappointing. Possible reasons include: insufficient time for the Guidelines to be incorporated into practice; inaccessibility of the Guidelines to general physicians; failure to accept responsibility for implementing the good practice reflected in the Guidelines; and an explicit need for strategies to implement the Guidelines beyond publication in a widely-read general medical journal.

  10. Adverse Effects of Oral Nonselective and cyclooxygenase-2-Selective NSAIDs on Hospitalization for Acute Kidney Injury: A Nested Case-Control Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-I; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Yung-Tai; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Chih-Yu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chu, Dachen

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the association between the use of nonselective or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a general Asian population. We conducted an observational, nationwide, nested case-control cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database between 2010 and 2012. AKI cases were defined as hospitalization with a principle diagnosis of AKI. Each case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls based on age, sex, and the month and year of cohort entry. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to demonstrate the association between hospitalization for AKI and current, recent, or past use of an oral NSAID. During the study period, we identified 6199 patients with AKI and 24,796 matched controls. Overall, current users (adjusted OR 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.28-3.28) and recent users (adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.35) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization for AKI. The risk was also similar for nonselective NSAIDs. However, neither current nor recent use of COX-2 inhibitors was significantly associated with AKI events. Our study supported that the initiation of nonselective NSAIDs rather than COX-2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of AKI requiring hospitalization. Future randomized trials are needed to elucidate these findings. PMID:26945352

  11. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    PubMed

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  12. Mortality Trends in Patients Hospitalized with the Initial Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Middle Eastern Country over 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlBinali, Hajar A. H.; Gehani, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the temporal trend in the initial Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) management and outcome during the last two decades in a Middle Eastern country. A total of 10,915 patients were admitted with initial AMI with mean age of 53 ± 11.8 years. Comparing the two decades (1991–2000) to (2001–2010), the use of antiplatelet drugs increased from 84% to 95%, β-blockers increased from 38% to 56%, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) increased from 12% to 36% (P < 0.001 for all). The rates of PCI increased from 2.5% to 14.6% and thrombolytic therapy decreased from 71% to 65% (P < 0.001 for all). While the rate of hospitalization with Initial MI increased from 34% to 66%, and the average length of hospital stay decreased from 6.4 ± 3 to 4.6 ± 3, all hospital outcomes parameters improved significantly including a 39% reduction in in-hospital Mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that higher utilization of antiplatelet drugs, β-blockers, and ACEI were the main contributors to better hospital outcomes. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the hospitalization rate in patients presenting with initial AMI. Evidence-based medical therapies appear to be associated with a substantial improvement in outcome and in-hospital mortality. PMID:24868481

  13. [Cost of hospital-based management of acute myeloid leukemia: from analytical to procedure-based tarification].

    PubMed

    Fagnoni, Philippe; Limat, Samuel; Hintzy-Fein, Estelle; Martin, Frédéric; Deconinck, Eric; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Arveux, Patrick; Dussaucy, Alain; Woronoff-Lemsi, Marie-Christine

    2006-08-01

    The confrontation of the macro- and micro-economic approaches of hospital costs is a recurrent question, in particular for pathologies where length of stay is highly variable, like acute myeloid leukemias (AML). This monocentric and retrospective study compares direct hospital medical costs of induction and relapse treatment sequences for AML, valued according to four different approaches: the analytic accounting system of our hospital, the French Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) cost databases of hospital discharges (readjusted, or not, to actual hospital stay duration), and official tariffs from the new French DRG prospective payment system. The average cost of hospital AML care valued by the analytic accounting system of our hospital is 61,248 euros for the induction phase and 91,702 euros for the relapse phase. All other national valuation methods result in a two- to four-fold underestimation of these costs. Even though AMLs are now individualized in the 10th version of the French diagnosis related group (DRG) classification, the impact of this issue in other pathologies is going to increase with the gradual implementation of the French DRG prospective payment system. That is why it must be assessed before the progressive extension of this financing system. PMID:16935786

  14. Rotavirus genotypes in sewage treatment plants and in children hospitalized with acute diarrhea in Italy in 2010 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Franco M; Bonomo, Paolo; Ianiro, Giovanni; Battistone, Andrea; Delogu, Roberto; Germinario, Cinzia; Chironna, Maria; Triassi, Maria; Campagnuolo, Rosalba; Cicala, Antonella; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Castiglia, Paolo; Serra, Caterina; Gaggioli, Andrea; Fiore, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular surveillance network RotaNet-Italy provides useful nationwide data on rotaviruses causing severe acute gastroenteritis in children in Italy, scarce information is available on rotavirus circulation in the general Italian population, including adults with mild or asymptomatic infection. We investigated the genotypes of rotaviruses present in urban wastewaters and compared them with those of viral strains from clinical pediatric cases. During 2010 and 2011, 285 sewage samples from 4 Italian cities were tested by reverse transcription-PCRs (RT-PCRs) specific for rotavirus VP7 and VP4 genes. Rotavirus was detected in 172 (60.4%) samples, 26 of which contained multiple rotavirus G (VP7 gene) genotypes, for a total of 198 G types. Thirty-two samples also contained multiple P (VP4 gene) genotypes, yielding 204 P types in 172 samples. Genotype G1 accounted for 65.6% of rotaviruses typed, followed by genotypes G2 (20.2%), G9 (7.6%), G4 (4.6%), G6 (1.0%), G3 (0.5%), and G26 (0.5%). VP4 genotype P[8] accounted for 75.0% of strains, genotype P[4] accounted for 23.0% of strains, and the uncommon genotypes P[6], P[9], P[14], and P[19] accounted for 2.0% of strains altogether. These rotavirus genotypes were also found in pediatric patients hospitalized in the same areas and years but in different proportions. Specifically, genotypes G2, G9, and P[4] were more prevalent in sewage samples than among samples from patients, which suggests either a larger circulation of the latter strains through the general population not requiring medical care or their greater survival in wastewaters. A high level of nucleotide identity in the G1, G2, and G6 VP7 sequences was observed between strains from the environment and those from patients. PMID:25344240

  15. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]). The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006. PMID:20205960

  16. [Case of the month. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to an iodinated contrast radiodiagnostic agent].

    PubMed

    Paquet, P; Vandenbossche, G; Nikkels, A F; Henry, F; Piérard, G E

    2009-12-01

    Iodinated contrast agents are frequently involved in delayed polymorphic adverse skin reactions. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis following administration of iodinated contrast agents is a rare but severe form of such reactions. The disease is characterized by the sudden occurrence of an erosive and pustular erythroderma with fever, leukocytosis and sometimes peripheral adenopathies and liver involvement. This condition is considered as an immunologic reaction, primarily involving T lymphocytes. The overall mortality reaches about 1%. Elucidating the differential diagnosis with other acute paroxysmal drug eruptions (toxic epidermal necrolysis, Steven-Johnson syndrome and drug hypersensitivity syndrome) is of paramount importance for establishing the adequate treatment of PEAG.

  17. Perceived Transcultural Self-Efficacy of Nurses in General Hospitals in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; He, Zhuang; Luo, Yong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicts arising from cultural diversity among patients and hospital staff in China have become intense. Hospitals have an urgent need to improve transcultural self-efficacy of nurses for providing effective transcultural nursing. Objective The purpose of the research was to (a) evaluate the current status of perceived transcultural self-efficacy of nurses in general hospitals in Guangzhou, China; (b) explore associations between demographic characteristics of nurses and their perceived transcultural self-efficacy; and (c) assess the reliability and validity of scores on the Chinese version of the Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool (TSET). Methods A cross-sectional survey of registered nurses from three general hospitals was conducted. Quota and convenience sampling were used. Participants provided demographic information and answered questions on the TSET. Results A total of 1,156 registered nurses took part. Most nurses had a moderate level of self-efficacy on the Cognitive (87.9%), Practical (87%), and Affective (89.2%) TSET subscales. Nurses who were older; who had more years of work experience, higher professional titles, higher incomes, and a minority background; and who were officially employed (not temporary positions) had higher perceived transcultural self-efficacy. Reliability estimated using Cronbach’s alpha was .99 for the total TSET score; reliability for the three subscales ranged from .97 to .98. Confirmatory factor analysis of TSET scores showed good fit with a three-factor model. Conclusion The results of this study can provide insights and guidelines for hospital nursing management to facilitate design of in-service education systems to improve transcultural self-efficacy of nurses. PMID:27454552

  18. IRS General Counsel Memorandum threatens some hospital-physician joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, T L; Schieble, M T

    1992-03-01

    To defend against the heightened scrutiny of hospital-physician relations expected from the IRS, hospital management should closely examine any activities now conducted with physicians to determine whether each activity, as organized and operated, furthers the hospital's charitable mission of promoting the health of its community, rather than merely enhancing the financial health of the institution itself. Any arrangements that do not appear to satisfy the principles enunciated in GCM 39862 should be examined to see if they should be restructured or dissolved. In structuring new transactions and examining existing arrangements, the following principles should be kept in mind: 1. Transactions should not be premised upon increased utilization or physician referrals. Enhancing or protecting market share, even for the purpose of preserving an institution's presence in the community, will likely no longer be accepted as a justification for pursuing joint venture arrangements. In justifying such ventures, management must distinguish between benefit to the community and benefit to the institution. 2. Transactions whereby existing services or equipment are "spun off" to a hospital-physician joint venture run a serious risk of enhanced IRS scrutiny. 3. Transactions creating or providing new facilities or services should be more favorably perceived, particularly where participants other than the hospital take an active role in managing the venture. Where the hospital is the sole general partner and merely manages what it would have managed had there been no physician investors, the question of why physicians are involved will likely be of greater concern than it has been in the past.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Incidence and survival of hospitalized acute decompensated heart failure in four US communities (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study).

    PubMed

    Chang, Patricia P; Chambless, Lloyd E; Shahar, Eyal; Bertoni, Alain G; Russell, Stuart D; Ni, Hanyu; He, Max; Mosley, Thomas H; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Samdarshi, Tandaw E; Wruck, Lisa M; Rosamond, Wayne D

    2014-02-01

    Most population-based estimates of incident hospitalized heart failure (HF) have not differentiated acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) from chronic stable HF nor included racially diverse populations. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study conducted surveillance of hospitalized HF events (age ≥55 years) in 4 US communities. We estimated hospitalized ADHF incidence and survival by race and gender. Potential 2005 to 2009 HF hospitalizations were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes; 6,168 records were reviewed to validate ADHF cases. Population estimates were derived from US Census data; 50% of eligible hospitalizations were classified as ADHF, of which 63.6% were incident ADHF and 36.4% were recurrent ADHF. The average incidence of hospitalized ADHF was 11.6 per 1,000 persons, aged ≥55 years, per year, and recurrent hospitalized ADHF was 6.6 per 1,000 persons/yr. Age-adjusted annual ADHF incidence was highest for black men (15.7 per 1,000), followed by black women (13.3 per 1,000), white men (12.3 per 1,000), and white women (9.9 per 1,000). Of incident ADHF events with heart function assessment (89%), 53% had reduced the ejection fraction (heart failure with reduced ejection fraction [HFrEF]) and 47% had preserved ejection fraction (heart failure with preserved ejection fraction [HFpEF]). Black men had the highest proportion of acute HFrEF events (70%); white women had the highest proportion of acute HFpEF (59%). Age-adjusted 28-day and 1-year case fatality after an incident ADHF was 10.4% and 29.5%, respectively. Survival did not differ by race or gender. In conclusion, ADHF hospitalization and HF type varied by both race and gender, but case fatality rates did not. Further studies are needed to explain why black men are at higher risk of hospitalized ADHF and HFrEF.

  20. Audit of acute asthma management at the Paediatric Emergency Department at Wad Madani Children’s Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Haroun, Huda M.; Ali, Hassan M.; Tag Eldeen, Imad Eldeen M.

    2012-01-01

    This audit of hospital care of acute wheeze and asthma aimed to assess the degree of adherence of the acute care of the asthma patients to the published international guidelines. Information was collected in six key areas: patient demographics; initial asthma severity assessment; in-hospital treatment; asthma prophylaxis; asthma education and emergency planning; and follow-up arrangements. The area of initial asthma severity assessment showed defciencies in the clinical measures currently used to verify case severity. In- hospital treatment on the other hand was consistent with recommendations in the use of the inhaled β-2 agonist salbutamol as bronchodilator, the discrete use of aminophylline and the small number of patients ordered chest X-ray. However, the treatment was incoherent with recommendations in the delivery method used for inhaled bronchodilator in relation to the age group of treated patients, absence of ipratropium bromide as a bronchodilator in the management and the large use of antibiotics. Assessment of the areas of asthma prophylaxis, asthma education and emergency- planning and follow-up arrangements illustrated that little efforts were made to assure safe discharge, although these measures have been shown to reduce morbidity after the exacerbation and reduce relapse rates and signifcantly reduce hospitalizations, unscheduled acute visits, missed work days, as well as improving quality of life. This audit emphasizes the need for the adoption of a management protocol for acute asthma care in the emergency department based on published international guidelines and the assurance of its implementation, monitoring and evaluation using the right tools to improve patient care. PMID:27493337

  1. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Ma, Hongkun; Qiao, Hong; Hao, Yanhua; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%). Results A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients’ relatives (62.3%), followed by the patient (22.6%); 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60) resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%). Most respondents (62.8%) did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting) with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats) was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc.). Conclusions Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue. PMID:26571388

  2. Evaluation of D-Dimer in Screening Deep Vein Thrombosis in Hospitalized Japanese Patients with Acute Medical Diseases/Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoshie; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Mo, Makoto; Tazaki, Junichi; Doi, Takahiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Suzuki, Takeo; Nakajima, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the usefulness of D-dimer as a screening method as well as to explore potent predictors of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized Japanese patients with acute medical diseases/episodes. Methods and Subjects: This study was a multi-center, prospective, observational study. The inclusion criteria were hospitalized patients at high risk of developing venous thromboembolism with; (1) congestive heart failure, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infectious diseases, or inflammatory diseases, (2) bed rest ≥4 days, and (3) ≥60 years old. D-dimer was measured on the same day as ultrasonography. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate predictors associated with the presence of DVT. Results: Sixty-nine patients were enrolled. The prevalence of DVT was 33.3% (23/69; 95% C.I., 19.4% to 47.3%). D-dimer was measured in 42 patients and the sensitivity and negative predictive value reached 100%, while the specificity (13.3%) and positive predictive value (31.6%) were low (cut-off value: 0.9 or 1.0 µg/mL). Statistically significant predictor was not assigned. Conclusion: As the sensitivity and negative predictive value of D-dimer reached 100%, D-dimer have a role in excluding patients who might otherwise undergo diagnostic imaging for DVT in hospitalized Japanese patients with acute medical diseases/episodes. PMID:27738461

  3. Enhancing patient safety through the management of Clostridium difficile at Toronto East General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tomiczek, Arladeen; Stumpo, C; Downey, James F

    2006-01-01

    In 2005 Toronto East General Hospital experienced a steady increase in the number of C. difficile cases diagnosed within the hospital. This was identified as a patient safety issue, and several areas of the hospital came together to address the problem. Pharmacy immediately started a medication review of past cases. Environmental services took the lead on the environmental cleaning, and a process was put into place with Infection Control so that housekeeping knew of every room that contained a patient with C. difficile and enhanced cleaning could be practised. Staff, including nursing, housekeeping and porters, were educated on C. difficile and the methods of transmission. A business case was developed for a disposable bedpan system, and this was approved by the senior team. A new washable product was tried out with success for the overhead patient light pulls and bathroom call bell systems. Infection rates were shared with staff through a variety of venues. As a result of the initiatives, the hospital has seen a decrease of 50% in the rates of C. difficile. A bonus was that our MRSA rates dropped as well. PMID:17087168

  4. Analysis of 1,000 consecutive cases of acute poisoning in the suburb of Tokyo leading to hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Matsuo, H; Tanaka, J; Yamashita, M

    1996-02-01

    We have analyzed retrospectively 1,000 consecutive admissions due to acute poisonings over 13 years. Total mortality was 27%. Acute poisonings due to pesticides, therapeutic drugs and other substances were 518, 332 and 150 cases with mortalities of 51, 1 and 5%, respectively. The most frequent cause of acute poisoning was paraquat/diquat products, whose mortality reached 76% (220 deaths/291 cases). The second most frequent cause was organophosphate/carbamate products with a mortality of 24% (37/155). When these 2 pesticides are excluded, the mortality was only 3% (15/554). To reduce instances of paraquat/diquat poisoning, dilution of the available product or formulation in other than liquid form would be desirable, because no effective treatment is currently available. In cases of organophosphate/carbamate poisoning, early hospitalization and stabilization is crucial.

  5. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms.

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  7. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Agustín; Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  8. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412... system for inpatient hospital capital-related costs....

  9. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412... system for inpatient hospital capital-related costs....

  10. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412... system for inpatient hospital capital-related costs....

  11. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412... system for inpatient hospital capital-related costs....

  12. Clinical and functional outcomes of acute lower extremity compartment syndrome at a Major Trauma Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Loreto; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lower extremity compartment syndrome (CS) is a condition that untreated causes irreversible nerve and muscle ischemia. Treatment by decompression fasciotomy without delay prevents permanent disability. The use of intracompartmental pressure (iCP) measurement in uncertain situations aids in diagnosis of severe leg pain. As an infrequent complication of lower extremity trauma, consequences of CS include chronic pain, nerve injury, and contractures. The purpose of this study was to observe the clinical and functional outcomes for patients with lower extremity CS after fasciotomy. Methods: Retrospective chart analysis for patients with a discharge diagnosis of CS was performed. Physical demographics, employment status, activity at time of injury, injury severity score, fracture types, pain scores, hours to fasciotomy, iCP, serum creatine kinase levels, wound treatment regimen, length of hospital stay, and discharge facility were collected. Lower extremity neurologic examination, pain scores, orthopedic complications, and employment status at 30 days and 12 months after discharge were noted. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and eight patients were assessed at 12 months. Eighty-one percent were male. Motorized vehicles caused 51% of injuries in males. Forty-one percent of injuries were tibia fractures. Acute kidney injury occurred in 2.4%. Mean peak serum creatine kinase levels were 58,600 units/ml. Gauze dressing was used in 78.9% of nonfracture patients and negative pressure wound vacuum therapy in 78.2% of fracture patients. About 21.6% of patients with CS had prior surgery. Nearly 12.9% of patients required leg amputation. Around 81.8% of amputees were male. Sixty-seven percent of amputees had associated vascular injuries. Foot numbness occurred in 20.5% of patients and drop foot palsy in 18.2%. Osteomyelitis developed in 10.2% of patients and fracture nonunion in 6.8%. About 14.7% of patients

  13. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Hyland, Andrew; Bianco, Eduardo; Glantz, Stanton A; Cummings, K Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Stimulated by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, many countries in Latin America adopted comprehensive smoke-free policies. In March 2006, Uruguay became the first Latin American country to adopt 100% smoke-free national legislation, which ended smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease 2 years before and 2 years after the policy was implemented in Uruguay. Methods Reports of hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (International Classification of Disease-10 I21) from 37 hospitals (79% of all hospital admissions in the country), representing the period 2 years before and 2 years after the adoption of a nationwide smoke-free policy in Uruguay (between 1 March 2004 and 29 February 2008), were reviewed. A time series analysis was undertaken to compare the average monthly number of events of hospital admission for AMI before and after the smoke-free law. Results A total of 7949 hospital admissions for AMI were identified during the 4-year study period. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22%. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women and people aged 40–65 years and older than 65 years. Conclusions The national smoke-free policy implemented in Uruguay in 2006 was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for AMI. PMID:22337557

  14. Direct Medical Cost of Influenza-Related Hospitalizations among Severe Acute Respiratory Infections Cases in Three Provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Lidong; Li, Zhong; Feng, Ao; Jin, Hui; Wang, Shiyuan; Su, Qiru; Xu, Zhen; Feng, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza-related hospitalizations impose a considerable economic and social burden. This study aimed to better understand the economic burden of influenza-related hospitalizations among patients in China in different age and risk categories. Methods Laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations between December 2009 and June 2011 from three hospitals participating in the Chinese Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) sentinel surveillance system were included in this study. Hospital billing data were collected from each hospital’s Hospital Information System (HIS) and divided into five cost categories. Demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records. Mean (range) and median (interquartile range [IQR]) costs were calculated and compared among children (≤15 years), adults (16–64 years) and elderly (≥65 years) groups. Factors influencing cost were analyzed. Results A total of 106 laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations were identified, 60% of which were children. The mean (range) direct medical cost was $1,797 ($80–$27,545) for all hospitalizations, and the median (IQR) direct medical cost was $231 ($164), $854 ($890), and $2,263 ($7,803) for children, adults, and elderly, respectively. Therapeutics and diagnostics were the two largest components of direct medical cost, comprising 57% and 23%, respectively. Cost of physician services was the lowest at less than 1%. Conclusion Direct medical cost of influenza-related hospitalizations imposes a heavy burden on patients and their families in China. Further study is needed to provide more comprehensive evidence on the economic burden of influenza. Our study highlights the need to increase vaccination rate and develop targeted national preventive strategies. PMID:23717485

  15. Health Care Insurance, Financial Concerns, and Delays to Hospital Presentation in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Smolderen, Kim G.; Spertus, John A.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Tang, Fengming; Ross, Joseph S.; Ting, Henry H.; Alexander, Karen P.; Rathore, Saif S.; Chan, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Context Little is known about how health insurance status affects decisions to seek care during emergency medical conditions like acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Objective To examine the association between lack of health insurance and financial concerns about accessing care among those with health insurance, and the time from symptom onset to hospital presentation (prehospital delays) during AMI. Design, Setting and Patients Multicenter, prospective registry of 3721 AMI patients enrolled between April, 2005 and December, 2008 from 24 U.S. hospitals. Health insurance status was categorized as uninsured, insured with financial concerns about accessing care, and insured without financial concerns. Insurance information was determined from medical records while financial concerns among those with health insurance were determined from structured interviews. Main Outcome Measure Prehospital delay times (≤2 hours, >2 to 6 hours, >6 hours), adjusted for demographic, clinical, social and psychological factors using hierarchical ordinal regression models. Results Of 3,721 patients, 738 (19.8%) were uninsured, and 689 (18.5%) were insured with financial concerns, and 2294 (61.7%) were insured without financial concerns. Uninsured and insured patients with financial concerns were more likely to delay seeking care during AMI, with prehospital delays >6 hours among 48.6% of uninsured patients, 44.6% of insured patients with financial concerns, and 39.3% of insured patients without financial concerns, as compared with prehospital delays of <2 hours among 27.5%, 33.5%, and 36.6% of those who were uninsured, insured with financial concerns, and insured without financial concerns, respectively (P <.001). After adjusting for potential confounders, both insurance with financial concerns and lack of insurance were associated with prehospital delays: insurance without financial concerns (reference); insurance with financial concerns, adjusted odds ratio [OR)], 1.21; 95% confidence

  16. Human bocavirus in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Russia from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Tymentsev, Alexander; Tikunov, Artem; Zhirakovskaia, Elena; Kurilschikov, Alexander; Babkin, Igor; Klemesheva, Vera; Netesov, Sergei; Tikunova, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) can cause respiratory diseases and is detectable in the stool samples of patients with gastroenteritis. To assess the prevalence of HBoV in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Novosibirsk, Russia, as well as its genetic diversity and the potential role in the etiology of gastroenteritis in this region, a total of 5502 stool samples from children hospitalized with gastroenteritis from 2010 to 2012, n=5250, and healthy children, n=252, were assayed for the presence of HBoV DNA by semi-nested PCR. The HBoV DNA was found in 1.2% of stool samples from children, with gastroenteritis varying from 0.5% in 2012 to 1.7% in 2011. The prevalence of HBoV in healthy children was 0.3%. HBoV strains were detected throughout the year with an increase in the fall-winter season. In 87% of cases, HBoV was detected in children before 1 year of age. All known HBoV genetic variants have been detected in Novosibirsk, although with different prevalences: HBoV2>HBoV1>HBoV4>HBoV3. At the beginning of 2011, HBoV2 replaced HBoV1 as the most prevalent variant. The median age of children with detected HBoV1 was 8.3months, and that with HBoV2 was 8.0 months. All HBoV-positive samples were assayed for the presence of the rotaviruses A and C, norovirus GII, astrovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus F, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Shigella spp., and EIEC. HBoV1 and HBoV2 as single agents were found in 45.8% and 60% samples, respectively, although this difference was not statistically significant. In the case of co-infections, HBoV was most frequently recorded with rotavirus A and norovirus GII. This study demonstrated that the detection rate of HBoV in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis was low, although both HBoV1 and HBoV2 could be found as the sole agents in children with gastroenteritis in Novosibirsk.

  17. Dose-response characteristics of nebulized albuterol in the treatment of acutely ill, hospitalized asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Ciccolella, D E; Brennan, K; Kelsen, S G; Criner, G J

    1999-09-01

    We investigated the bronchodilator dose-response to nebulized albuterol and the dose of albuterol which produces maximal bronchodilation in the acutely ill, hospitalized asthmatic. Consecutively admitted patients from the emergency room in status asthmaticus who fulfilled the inclusion criteria (age <41 years old and <12 pack-years of smoking) were studied. Albuterol was administered by nebulizer (Puritan-Bennett Raindrop) in repeated 2.5-mg treatments up to a total dose of 10 mg and the bronchodilator response was measured by a computerized spirometer. Twenty-two patients were studied. Baseline spirometry showed a (mean +/- SE) forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) of 1.26 +/- 0.14 L (42 +/- 4.0% predicted), which increased significantly (p < 0.05) during albuterol titration to a maximum FEV1 of 1.70 +/- 0.19 L (57 +/- 5% of predicted). After cumulative doses of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mg of nebulized albuterol, 27%, 45%, 72%, and 77% of patients, respectively, attained maximum bronchodilation. The remaining 23% of patients did not respond to doses up to 10 mg of albuterol. The maximum FEV1 response to albuterol did not correlate with the initial severity of airflow obstruction (r = 0.36, p > 0.05). Pulse rate and arterial oxygen saturation were not significantly affected by nebulized albuterol up to a total dose of 10 mg. No arrhythmias were noted. In summary, most hospitalized asthmatics (72%) required a cumulative dose of 7.5 mg of nebulized albuterol to achieve maximum bronchodilation and a large fraction (50%) required higher albuterol doses than the standard 2.5 mg. The bronchodilatory response to nebulized albuterol varied widely among patients in status asthmaticus and could not be predicted from the initial severity of airflow obstruction. Because side effects were minimal, it would be reasonable to use 7.5 mg of nebulized albuterol as initial therapy. Alternatively, dose-response titration with albuterol would be advantageous.

  18. The influence of insurance status on waiting times in German acute care hospitals: an empirical analysis of new data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate in Germany about the assumption that patients with private health insurance (PHI) benefit from better access to medical care, including shorter waiting times (Lüngen et al. 2008), compared to patients with statutory health insurance (SHI). Problem Existing analyses of the determinants for waiting times in Germany are a) based on patient self-reports and b) do not cover the inpatient sector. This paper aims to fill both gaps by (i) generating new primary data and (ii) analyzing waiting times in German hospitals. Methods We requested individual appointments from 485 hospitals within an experimental study design, allowing us to analyze the impact of PHI versus SHI on waiting times (Asplin et al. 2005). Results In German acute care hospitals patients with PHI have significantly shorter waiting times than patients with SHI. Conclusion Discrimination in waiting times by insurance status does occur in the German acute hospital sector. Since there is very little transparency in treatment quality in Germany, we do not know whether discrimination in waiting times leads to discrimination in the quality of treatment. This is an important issue for future research. PMID:20025744

  19. Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction, Angina, Stroke, and Asthma After Implementation of Arizona's Comprehensive Statewide Smoking Ban

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michele E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of Arizona's May 2007 comprehensive statewide smoking ban on hospital admissions for diagnoses for which there is evidence of a causal relationship with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], angina, stroke, and asthma). Methods. We compared monthly hospital admissions from January 2004 through May 2008 for these primary diagnoses and 4 diagnoses not associated with SHS (appendicitis, kidney stones, acute cholecystitis, and ulcers) for Arizona counties with preexisting county or municipal smoking bans and counties with no previous bans. We attributed reductions in admissions to the statewide ban if they occurred only in diagnoses associated with SHS and if they were larger in counties with no previous bans. We analyzed the data with Poisson regressions, controlling for seasonality and admissions trends. We also estimated cost savings. Results. Statistically significant reductions in hospital admissions were seen for AMI, angina, stroke, and asthma in counties with no previous bans over what was seen in counties with previous bans. No ban variable coefficients were statistically significant for diagnoses not associated with SHS. Conclusions. Arizona's statewide smoking ban decreased hospital admissions for AMI, stroke, asthma, and angina. PMID:20466955

  20. [Suicidality at the general hospital – perspective of consultation and liaison psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Imboden, Christian; Hatzinger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Suicidality is a common problem in the general hospital. Patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders or during a psychosocial crisis can develop suicidal ideation during their stay at the general hospital, especially if they suffer from chronic disease. Some somatic disorders, such as cancer, epilepsy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, stroke and chronic pain conditions are associated with an increased risk of suicide. The fact that (1) a major part of patients are treated in the emergency room (ER) after a suicide attempt and (2) a suicide attempt is the strongest predictor for later completed suicide emphasizes the importance of expertise in dealing with suicidal patients in the ER. In order to improve prevention of suicides and suicide attempts within the general hospital and after discharge it is important to educate staff concerning suicidality and enhance detection of suicidal patients. A consultation and liaison psychiatrist should always be involved when there are suicidal patients on wards and in the ER. Assessment of suicidal patients has always to include clear recommendations concerning patient safety and treatment of the underlying condition as well as specific approaches in dealing with suicidal thoughts. Safety measures can include close monitoring, constant observation, restriction to means of suicide, referral to a psychiatric clinic and treatment with sedatives, generally benzodiazepines. Psychiatric disorders are ideally treated according to guidelines and clear recommendations should be given concerning treatment after discharge. Specific psychotherapy for suicidal behaviour possibly reduces the risk of future suicides. A special situation is created by assisted suicides which attribute to suicides in the elderly with a recent increase in the Swiss population. In some cases, undiagnosed depression may contribute to the decision making process, hence, underlining the importance of improved detection and treatment of depression in

  1. Clinical Presentation of General Paralysis of the Insane in a Dutch Psychiatric Hospital, 1924-1954.

    PubMed

    Daey Ouwens, Ingrid M; Lens, C Elisabeth; Fiolet, Aernoud T L; Ott, Alewijn; Koehler, Peter J; Verhoeven, Willem M A

    2015-01-01

    General paralysis of the insane (GPI) or dementia paralytica was once a fatal complication of syphilitic infection and a major reason for psychiatric hospitalization. Nowadays, physicians consider GPI to be exceptional. It should be noted, however, that syphilis re-emerged worldwide at the turn of the 20th to 21st century and a revival of GPI can, therefore, be expected. Advanced diagnosis is crucial in that treatment in the early, inflammatory phase is warranted before irreversible tissue damage occurs. Therefore, a renewed clinical awareness of the broad spectrum of psychiatric and neurologic signs and symptoms of GPI is needed. In this historical cohort study, comprising 105 patients with GPI admitted to the Dutch Vincent van Gogh Psychiatric Hospital in the period 1924-1954, the clinical presentation of this invalidating disorder is investigated and described in detail.

  2. The social worker as primary psychiatric consultant to the general hospital emergency room.

    PubMed

    Wallace, S R; Ward, J T; Goldberg, R J; Slaby, A E

    1985-01-01

    Providing coverage for the increasing number of psychiatric and social crises presenting in general hospital emergency rooms presents a challenge during this era of economic contraction. A model is presented for the development of a crisis team without additional funding, utilizing half-day shifts contributed by clinical social workers who hold full-time positions elsewhere in the hospital. Effective and efficient emergency clinical work required that the social workers be taught about biomedical issues pertinent to presentations, along with instruction as to why and when to seek consultation from backup psychiatrists. Quality of care and continued skill development are addressed through the use of a systematic data base and interdisciplinary case conferences using the psychiatrist as a consultant regarding psychopharmacological and diagnostic issues.

  3. [Latent tuberculosis infection in healthcare personnel at a primary level general hospital in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Sol Vidiella, Josep; Catalán Gómez, Teresa; Callau Casanova, Cristina; Lejeune, Marylène

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors in healthcare personnel at the Hospital de Tortosa Verge de la Cinta (Tarragona, Spain). This was a cross-sectional study of 398 workers at this hospital who underwent tuberculin skin testing for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) between 2001 and 2012.We also analyzed the relationship between LTBI and age, sex, job and work area according to their risk of exposure to tuberculosis(high, low, uncertain). The total prevalence of LTBI in our sample was 11.1% (95%CI 8.3%-14.5%). LBTI was associated with age and work area. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of LTBI increased by 6.4% per 1 year increase in age. The prevalence of LTBI in this population approximates that of the general population in Spain.

  4. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. Purpose: This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46–60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6–10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6–10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. Conclusion: IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness. PMID:27365916

  5. Gut Microbiota in Children Hospitalized with Oedematous and Non-Oedematous Severe Acute Malnutrition in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Kia Hee Schultz; Wiese, Maria; Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov; Özçam, Mustafa; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Namusoke, Hanifa; Friis, Henrik; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) among children remains a major health problem in many developing countries. SAM manifests in both an oedematous and a non-oedematous form, with oedematous malnutrition in its most severe form also known as kwashiorkor. The pathogenesis of both types of malnutrition in children remains largely unknown, but gut microbiota (GM) dysbiosis has recently been linked to oedematous malnutrition. In the present study we aimed to assess whether GM composition differed between Ugandan children suffering from either oedematous or non-oedematous malnutrition. Methodology/Principal Findings As part of an observational study among children hospitalized with SAM aged 6–24 months in Uganda, fecal samples were collected at admission. Total genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples, and PCR amplification was performed followed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and tag-encoded 16S rRNA gene-targeted high throughput amplicon sequencing. Alpha and beta diversity measures were determined along with ANOVA mean relative abundance and G-test of independence followed by comparisons between groups. Of the 87 SAM children included, 62% suffered from oedematous malnutrition, 66% were boys and the mean age was 16.1 months. GM composition was found to differ between the two groups of children as determined by DGGE (p = 0.0317) and by high-throughput sequencing, with non-oedematous children having lower GM alpha diversity (p = 0.036). However, beta diversity analysis did not reveal larger differences between the GM of children with oedematous and non-oedematous SAM (ANOSIM analysis, weighted UniFrac, R = -0.0085, p = 0.584; unweighted UniFrac, R = 0.0719, p = 0.011). Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that non-oedematous SAM children have lower GM diversity compared to oedematous SAM children, however no clear compositional differences were identified. PMID:26771456

  6. Implementation of Hospital's Antibiotic Policy Decreases Antimicrobial Use in the General Pediatric Ward.

    PubMed

    Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Kuchar, E; Życińska, K; Gyrczuk, E; Miśkiewicz, K; Korzeniewski, K

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalized children are often treated with antibiotics. However, 30-75% of antibiotic treatment in pediatric hospitals is administrated incorrectly or unreasonably. Implementation of Hospital's Antibiotic Policy (HAP) should improve antibiotic consumption patterns in pediatric wards. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of HAP by assessing antibiotic consumption in the General Pediatric Ward of an academic hospital in the city of Warsaw, Poland before and after this policy was introduced in the years 2012 and 2013, respectively. Antibiotic use was calculated in daily-defined doses (DDDs) per 100 patient-days and DDDs per 100 admissions. Antibiotics were ranked by the volume of DDDs and the number of antibiotics which accounted for 90% and 100% of the total volume: DU90% and DU100% (where DU stands for drug use). The total antibiotic consumption and significantly decreased after the implementation of HAP; DDDs were 2,177.5 before and 1,335.4 after implementation of HAP. The number of DDDs/100 patient-days was also lower; 36.3 vs. 24.9 before and after HAP, respectively. After implementation of HAP a decreased use of ceftriaxone and cefuroxime was observed. The most commonly used antibiotic was amoxicillin with clavulanic acid. The DU100% rates remained the same (8 antibiotics) and DU90% increased (from 3 in 2012 to 5 in 2013). We conclude that implementation of HAP resulted a decreased consumption of antibiotics in the General Pediatric Ward, despite the hardly changed number of children treated with antibiotics. PMID:25905696

  7. Nosocomial acute-onset postoperative endophthalmitis at a university teaching hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Zhang, W; Liu, Y; Wang, L; Ding, Y; Wu, X; Shi, Y; Sun, L; Li, Y

    2011-12-01

    A retrospective study of all intra-ocular operations performed at Zhongshan Ophthalmic Centre, China between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2009 was conducted to gain further knowledge about nosocomial acute-onset postoperative endophthalmitis. In total, 147,244 intra-ocular operations were performed during this period. Acute-onset postoperative endophthalmitis was diagnosed in 29 cases, giving a frequency of 0.020%. The frequency remained low and did not increase over the 10-year period. The highest rate of endophthalmitis was found following secondary intra-ocular lens implantation (0.129%). Cataract surgery had a rate of 0.01%, which is on the lower end of estimates from other large-scale studies. Gram-positive bacteria were the most commonly isolated organisms (71%), with the majority being Staphylococcus epidermidis (64%). However, no S. epidermidis was identified in the cases following cataract extraction; these patients received intracameral vancomycin at the end of the procedure. Visual outcomes of patients with postoperative endophthalmitis were generally poor. Three (10%) patients had visual acuity (VA) ≥20/40 at the final follow-up visit (all had undergone cataract surgery) and 15 (52%) patients had VA ≤20/400 at the final follow-up visit (10 had undergone pars plana vitrectomy). Factors associated with poor visual outcomes included initial VA of hand motions or worse, and positive culture results. The results of this 10-year study may serve as a source of comparison for other centres and future studies.

  8. General uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    Many district general hospitals are likely to lose services, and some may close, as a result of the pressure to centralise specialist services, improve patient outcomes and cope with funding cuts. Nurses are increasingly willing to support intelligent reconfiguration if it will improve patient care, but changes in acute services have to be supported by improvements in the community.

  9. Watchdog gets touch on Medicare fraud. Inspector general has strong-armed nearly $10 million in hospital settlements.

    PubMed

    Burda, D

    1991-04-01

    The HHS investigative branch has wrested $10 million in settlements from 43 hospitals or hospital systems since the start of Medicare's prospective payment system in 1983. The federal government is hurling its resources at hospitals, which have found it more cost-effective to work out a discreet deal rather than fight allegations in court. Some charge that the inspector general's office is more interested in being punitive with providers than prudent with taxpayer's money.

  10. Socioeconomic Status and in-hospital Mortality of Acute Coronary Syndrome: Can Education and Occupation Serve as Preventive Measures?

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; De Leon, Antonio Ponce; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Karimi, Abbasali; Sundin, Örjan; Jalali, Arash; Soares, Joaquim; Macassa, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Socioeconomic status (SES) can greatly affect the clinical outcome of medical problems. We sought to assess the in-hospital mortality of patients with the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) according to their SES. Methods: All patients admitted to Tehran Heart Center due to 1st-time ACS between March 2004 and August 2011 were assessed. The patients who were illiterate/lowly educated (≤5 years attained education) and were unemployed were considered low-SES patients and those who were employed and had high educational levels (>5 years attained education) were regarded as high-SES patients. Demographic, clinical, paraclinical, and in-hospital medical progress data were recorded. Death during the course of hospitalization was considered the end point, and the impact of SES on in-hospital mortality was evaluated. Results: A total of 6246 hospitalized patients (3290 low SES and 2956 high SES) were included (mean age = 60.3 ± 12.1 years, male = 2772 [44.4%]). Among them, 79 (1.26%) patients died. Univariable analysis showed a significantly higher mortality rate in the low-SES group (1.9% vs. 0.6%; P < 0.001). After adjustment for possible cofounders, SES still showed a significant effect on the in-hospital mortality of the ACS patients in that the high-SES patients had a lower in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio: 0.304, 95% confidence interval: 0.094–0.980; P = 0.046). Conclusions: This study found that patients with low SES were at a higher risk of in-hospital mortality due to the ACS. Furthermore, the results suggest the need for increased availability of jobs as well as improved levels of education as preventive measures to curb the unfolding deaths owing to coronary artery syndrome. PMID:25984286

  11. Value of a centralised approach in the management of haematemesis and melaena: experience in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Holman, R A; Davis, M; Gough, K R; Gartell, P; Britton, D C; Smith, R B

    1990-01-01

    All patients presenting with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding between November 1986 and April 1988 were admitted to a centralised joint medical/surgical unit, with a policy of early clinical and endoscopic assessment and rapid surgical intervention in those at high risk. Of the 430 patients admitted 69.5% were over the age of 60 and 30% had significant additional medical conditions. 50.4% were bleeding from peptic ulcers and one third had been taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Fifty five patients underwent surgery, which in two thirds was carried out within 24 hours of admission, usually for continued bleeding. In patients with peptic ulcer the operation rate was 21.6%. Overall mortality was 3.7%, and in those with bleeding gastric or duodenal ulcers 5.5%; surgical mortality in the later group was 15.2%. All patients who died had serious concomitant pathology and 87% were over 70 years of age. Adoption of a centralised approach to management of haematemasis and melaena is feasible in a District General Hospital and associated with an improved survival. PMID:2351300

  12. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  13. Risk of Care Home Placement following Acute Hospital Admission: Effects of a Pay-for-Performance Scheme for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kasteridis, Panagiotis; Goddard, Maria; Jacobs, Rowena; Santos, Rita; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Beatriz; McGonigal, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Quality and Outcomes Framework, or QOF, rewards primary care doctors (GPs) in the UK for providing certain types of care. Since 2006, GPs have been paid to identify patients with dementia and to conduct an annual review of their mental and physical health. During the review, the GP also assesses the carer’s support needs, including impact of caring, and ensures that services are co-ordinated across care settings. In principle, this type of care should reduce the risk of admission to long-term residential care directly from an acute hospital ward, a phenomenon considered to be indicative of poor quality care. However, this potential effect has not previously been tested. Methods Using English data from 2006/07 to 2010/11, we ran multilevel logit models to assess the impact of the QOF review on the risk of care home placement following emergency admission to acute hospital. Emergency admissions were defined for (a) people with a primary diagnosis of dementia and (b) people with dementia admitted for treatment of an ambulatory care sensitive condition. We adjusted for a wide range of potential confounding factors. Results Over the study period, 19% of individuals admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of dementia (N = 31,120) were discharged to a care home; of those admitted for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (N = 139,267), the corresponding figure was 14%. Risk factors for subsequent care home placement included older age, female gender, vascular dementia, incontinence, fall, hip fracture, and number of comorbidities. Better performance on the QOF review was associated with a lower risk of care home placement but only when the admission was for an ambulatory care sensitive condition. Conclusions The QOF dementia review may help to reduce the risk of long-term care home placement following acute hospital admission. PMID:27227403

  14. Monitoring the impact of the DRG payment system on nursing service context factors in Swiss acute care hospitals: Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Spirig, Rebecca; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Martin, Jacqueline S.; Frei, Irena Anna; Müller, Marianne; Kleinknecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims: With this study protocol, a research program is introduced. Its overall aim is to prepare the instruments and to conduct the first monitoring of nursing service context factors at three university and two cantonal hospitals in Switzerland prior to the introduction of the reimbursement system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) and to further develop a theoretical model as well as a methodology for future monitoring following the introduction of DRGs. Background: DRG was introduced to all acute care hospitals in Switzerland in 2012. In other countries, DRG introduction led to rationing and subsequently to a reduction in nursing care. As result, nursing-sensitive patient outcomes were seriously jeopardised. Switzerland has the opportunity to learn from the consequences experienced by other countries when they introduced DRGs. Their experiences highlight that DRGs influence nursing service context factors such as complexity of nursing care or leadership, which in turn influence nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. For this reason, the monitoring of nursing service context factors needs to be an integral part of the introduction of DRGs. However, most acute care hospitals in Switzerland do not monitor nursing service context data. Nursing managers and hospital executive boards will be in need of this data in the future, in order to distribute resources effectively. Methods/Design: A mixed methods design in the form of a sequential explanatory strategy was chosen. During the preparation phase, starting in spring 2011, instruments were selected and prepared, and the access to patient and nursing data in the hospitals was organized. Following this, online collection of quantitative data was conducted in fall 2011. In summer 2012, qualitative data was gathered using focus group interviews, which helped to describe the processes in more detail. During 2013 and 2014, an integration process is being conducted involving complementing, comparing and contrasting

  15. Factors associated with mortality in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalized in General Medicine departments.

    PubMed

    Roca, Bernardino; Almagro, Pedro; López, Francisco; Cabrera, Francisco J; Montero, Lorena; Morchón, David; Díez, Jesús; de la Iglesia, Fernando; Fernández, Mario; Castiella, Jesús; Zubillaga, Elena; Recio, Jesús; Soriano, Joan B

    2011-02-01

    We aim to improve knowledge on risk factors that relate to mortality in subjects with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are hospitalized in General Medicine departments. In a cross-sectional multicenter study, by means of a logistic regression analysis, we assessed the possible association of death during hospitalization with the following groups of variables of participating patients: sociodemographic features, treatment received prior to admission and during hospitalization, COPD-related clinical features recorded prior to admission, comorbidity diagnosed prior to admission, clinical data recorded during hospitalization, laboratory results recorded during hospitalization, and electrocardiographic findings recorded during hospitalization. A total of 398 patients was included; 353 (88.7%) were male, and the median age of the patients was 75 years. Of these patients, 21 (5.3%) died during hospitalization. Only 270 (67.8%) received inhaled β(2) agonists during hospitalization, while 162 (40.7%) received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. The median of predicted FEV(1) prior to admission was 42%. A total of 350 patients (87.9%) had been diagnosed with two or more comorbid conditions prior to admission. An association was found between increased risk of death during hospitalization and the previous diagnoses of pneumonia, coronary heart disease, and stroke. In conclusion, comorbidity is an important contributor to mortality among patients hospitalized in General Medicine departments because of COPD exacerbation.

  16. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of “suicide” events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  17. Characteristics of psychiatric admissions and aspects of overcrowding at the general Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Chin, C N; Kadir, A B; Jeyarajah, S

    1993-06-01

    This study examined admissions, final diagnoses and mean duration of stay of patients in the Psychiatric Wards at the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. The male ward was severely overcrowded by 125% over the maximum bed capacity. The majority were psychotic, mainly schizophrenic. The female ward had 76% occupancy, also mainly psychotic. Neurotics, alcohol dependents and personality disorders formed less than 5% of the admissions. There was no difference in the mean duration of stay of patients of both UKM and GHKL Units stratified for diagnosis and disposal except for newly diagnosed schizophrenics. There is an urgent need for more male psychiatric beds/wards.

  18. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael

    2015-04-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of "suicide" events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  19. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed.

  20. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  1. [Grade III general hospital grade assessment as an opportunity to improve the management level of medical equipment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qian, Jianguo

    2012-11-01

    In the grade III general hospital reassessment, The department of hospital equipment accords its demand to find the problems and gaps in the actual work, gives modification opinions and programs, and clarifies continuous improved contents in next step, so to improve the management level of medical equipment.

  2. Prevalence, causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions after acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Geng, Na; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Zhenguang; Cao, Lili

    2016-08-01

    Acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a great burden not only during hospitalization but also after hospital discharge. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the hospital readmissions, causes and risk factors after survival of acute stroke and TIA. Pubmed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, OVID and EMBASE databases were searched to identify studies reporting hospital readmissions after acute stroke and TIA. The primary outcomes were hospital readmission rates during 30 days and 1 year after discharge. The primary causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions were also identified. Ten studies with 253,680 patients were eligible for inclusion. The pooled 30-day and 1-year hospital readmission rates were 17.4 % (95 % CI, 12.7-23.5 %) and 42.5 % (95 % CI, 34.1-51.3 %), respectively. The three major causes of 30-day hospital readmissions were infection (19.9 %), coronary artery disease (CAD) (17.8 %) and recurrent stroke (16.0 %) successively, while the three major causes were recurrent stroke (19.4 %), infection (19.3 %) and CAD (16.3 %) during 1 year's follow-up. There were more patients with CAD in readmits group than that in control group (p = 0.030). The length of index admission, defined as any eligible admission to an acute care hospital assessed in the measure for the outcome, was longer (p = 0.000) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) was higher (p = 0.002) in readmits group than these in control group. In conclusion, there is high risk of early and long-term hospital readmissions after survival of acute stroke and TIA. These patients with coronary artery disease, longer length of index admission and higher NIHSS deserve deep attention after hospital discharge.

  3. Prevalence, causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions after acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Geng, Na; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Zhenguang; Cao, Lili

    2016-08-01

    Acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a great burden not only during hospitalization but also after hospital discharge. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the hospital readmissions, causes and risk factors after survival of acute stroke and TIA. Pubmed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, OVID and EMBASE databases were searched to identify studies reporting hospital readmissions after acute stroke and TIA. The primary outcomes were hospital readmission rates during 30 days and 1 year after discharge. The primary causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions were also identified. Ten studies with 253,680 patients were eligible for inclusion. The pooled 30-day and 1-year hospital readmission rates were 17.4 % (95 % CI, 12.7-23.5 %) and 42.5 % (95 % CI, 34.1-51.3 %), respectively. The three major causes of 30-day hospital readmissions were infection (19.9 %), coronary artery disease (CAD) (17.8 %) and recurrent stroke (16.0 %) successively, while the three major causes were recurrent stroke (19.4 %), infection (19.3 %) and CAD (16.3 %) during 1 year's follow-up. There were more patients with CAD in readmits group than that in control group (p = 0.030). The length of index admission, defined as any eligible admission to an acute care hospital assessed in the measure for the outcome, was longer (p = 0.000) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) was higher (p = 0.002) in readmits group than these in control group. In conclusion, there is high risk of early and long-term hospital readmissions after survival of acute stroke and TIA. These patients with coronary artery disease, longer length of index admission and higher NIHSS deserve deep attention after hospital discharge. PMID:27129874

  4. A prospective study of patients absconding from a general hospital psychiatry unit in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Khisty, N; Raval, N; Dhadphale, M; Kale, K; Javadekar, A

    2008-08-01

    Characteristics of patients absconding from an open psychiatry ward in a developing country may be different from both those in developed countries and a mental hospital setting. The aim of this paper is to study the incidence and characteristics of patients absconding from an open psychiatric ward in a general hospital-based psychiatric unit in India. We studied patients consecutively admitted to an open psychiatric ward over a 2-month period. We compared those who absconded with those who did not. Out of 231 patients admitted, 33 absconded. Among those who absconded, 15 had bipolar disorder, 11 had schizophrenia and five had substance-related disorders. Nine had indicated their intention to do so at admission. Ten patients had absconded by the second day. The treatment cost was the likely influencing factor for seven patients who absconded after deemed fit for discharge on clinical grounds. Only 10 patients were readmitted to the hospital within 2 weeks of absconding. The risk of absconding is highest in the early days following. Absconding patients did not differ significantly from others in many socio-demographic and clinical features. Treatment costs are an important consideration in India. PMID:18638205

  5. [The department budget, in the context of the hospital global budget. Initial results in general medicine].

    PubMed

    Besançon, F

    1984-02-23

    In a general hospital (Hôtel-Dieu, in the center of Paris), run with a global budget, budgets determined for each unit were introduced as an experiment in 1980. Physicians were in charge of certain expenses, mainly: linen, drugs, transportation of patients to and from other hospitals within Paris, and blood fractions. The whole does not exceed 4% of the turnover (FF 20 millions in 1980) of a 67 bed internal medicine unit. Other accounts deal with the stays, admissions, prescriptions of technical acts, laboratory analyses, and X-rays. In 1980, expenses were 11% more than budgeted, but the increase in stays and particularly in admissions was significantly greater. The resulting savings were 8.8% and 18.7% for stays and admissions respectively. Psychic reactions were variable. The subsequent budgets followed the fluctuations of recorded expenses, which were fairly important in both directions. The unit budget may be an advance or a regression, in a restrictive and past-perpetuating context. The coherence between the unit budget and the global hospital budget is questionable. Physicians were willing to take part in accounting and saving. They have good reason for not enlarging their financial responsibilities. Conversely, they may give more attention to diseases of public opinion.

  6. [The department budget, in the context of the hospital global budget. Initial results in general medicine].

    PubMed

    Besançon, F

    1984-02-23

    In a general hospital (Hôtel-Dieu, in the center of Paris), run with a global budget, budgets determined for each unit were introduced as an experiment in 1980. Physicians were in charge of certain expenses, mainly: linen, drugs, transportation of patients to and from other hospitals within Paris, and blood fractions. The whole does not exceed 4% of the turnover (FF 20 millions in 1980) of a 67 bed internal medicine unit. Other accounts deal with the stays, admissions, prescriptions of technical acts, laboratory analyses, and X-rays. In 1980, expenses were 11% more than budgeted, but the increase in stays and particularly in admissions was significantly greater. The resulting savings were 8.8% and 18.7% for stays and admissions respectively. Psychic reactions were variable. The subsequent budgets followed the fluctuations of recorded expenses, which were fairly important in both directions. The unit budget may be an advance or a regression, in a restrictive and past-perpetuating context. The coherence between the unit budget and the global hospital budget is questionable. Physicians were willing to take part in accounting and saving. They have good reason for not enlarging their financial responsibilities. Conversely, they may give more attention to diseases of public opinion. PMID:6324373

  7. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  8. Acute care hospital strategic priorities: perceptions of challenges, control, competition and collaboration in Ontario's evolving healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adalsteinn D; Alikhan, L Miin; Sandoval, Guillermo A; Seeman, Neil; Baker, G Ross; Pink, George H

    2005-01-01

    To explore the current and pending strategic agenda of Ontario hospitals (the largest consumers of the provincial healthcare budget), a survey of Ontario acute care hospital CEOs was conducted in January 2004. The survey, with an 82% response rate, identifies 29 strategic priorities under seven key strategic themes consistent across different hospital types. These themes include (1) human resources cultivation, (2) service integration and partnerships, (3) consumer engagement, (4) corporate governance and management, (5) organizational efficiency and redesign, (6) improved information use for decision-making, (7) patient care management. The extent to which an individual hospital's control over strategic resolutions is perceived may affect multilevel strategic priority-setting and action-planning. In addition to supporting ongoing development of meaningful performance measures and information critical to strategic decision-making, this study's findings may facilitate a better understanding of hospitals' key resource commitments, the extent of competition and collaboration for key resources, the perceived degree of individual control over strategic issue resolution and where systemic resolutions may be required. PMID:16078398

  9. Association of Indoor Smoke-Free Air Laws with Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Three States

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Brett R.; Juster, Harlan R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether comprehensive smoke-free air laws enacted in Florida, New York, and Oregon are associated with reductions in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. Methods. Analyzed trends in county-level, age-adjusted, hospital admission rates for AMI and stroke from 1990 to 2006 (quarterly) for Florida, 1995 to 2006 (monthly) for New York, and 1998 to 2006 (monthly) for Oregon to identify any association between admission rates and passage of comprehensive smoke-free air laws. Interrupted time series analysis was used to adjust for the effects of preexisting moderate local-level laws, seasonal variation in hospital admissions, differences across counties, and a secular time trend. Results. More than 3 years after passage of statewide comprehensive smoke-free air laws, rates of hospitalization for AMI were reduced by 18.4% (95% CI: 8.8–28.0%) in Florida and 15.5% (95% CI: 11.0–20.1%) in New York. Rates of hospitalization for stroke were reduced by 18.1% (95% CI: 9.3–30.0%) in Florida. The few local comprehensive laws in Oregon were not associated with reductions in AMI or stroke statewide. Conclusion. Comprehensive smoke-free air laws are an effective policy tool for reducing the burden of AMI and stroke. PMID:22778759

  10. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed. PMID:26317762

  11. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed.

  12. The long term prognosis in patients following thrombolysis for acute myocardial infarction: a view from a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Brophy, J M; Boulerice, M; Kerouac, M

    1996-08-01

    Thrombolysis in patients with acute myocardial infarction has been established to improve hospital survival. Less information is available about the long term evolution of unselected patients seen in community hospitals. Consequently, consecutive patients treated with thrombolysis for acute myocardial infarction and surviving until hospital discharge (n = 129) were followed for an average of 22 months. Mortality, recurrent ischemic events, coronary angiography and re-vascularizations were recorded for all patients. Two-year total and cardiovascular survival rates of 95 and 98% respectively were obtained with a conservative approach to early re-vascularization (n = 17, 13%). A history of prior myocardial infarction and early recurrent myocardial ischemia were significant predictors of increased cardiac events, while thallium stress testing provided no incremental value. Angiography and re-vascularizations were more frequently performed in younger patients (under 65 years old), anterior vs. inferior infarction and those with early residual ischemia. Women received less aggressive investigation and therapy then men and this may represent a gender bias, unmeasured residual confounding or the play of chance in a small sample size. Further studies are needed to confirm or refute these findings.

  13. Non-emergency attenders at a district general hospital accident and emergency department.

    PubMed

    Thomson, H; Kohli, H S; Brookes, M

    1995-12-01

    Following concern about long waiting times, a survey was carried out in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department of Monklands District General Hospital over 5 consecutive days to investigate factors related to the bypassing of general practitioners (GPs) by 'self-referred' patients and inappropriate use of the department. Two hundred and forty-five (90.7%) of 270 non-emergency patients who attended the department during GP surgery hours completed a self-administered questionnaire. Variables measured included recent use of health services, perceptions of the GP service and the A&E service and reasons for bypassing the GP. Of the 245 patients, 49 (20%) were defined as inappropriate and 152 (62%) were self-referred. Self-referred patients were no more likely to use the A&E department inappropriately than those who were referred.

  14. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD). Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk. Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28–2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007). In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  15. A retrospective analysis of treatment-related hospitalization costs of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Korgenski, Ernest Kent; Ying, Jian; Ng, Christi F; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Nelson, Richard E; Andrews, Seth; Raetz, Elizabeth; Fluchel, Mark; Lemons, Richard; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study examined the longitudinal hospital outcomes (costs adjusted for inflation, hospital days, and admissions) associated with the treatment of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients between one and 26 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL, who were treated at Primary Children's Hospital (PCH) in Salt Lake City, Utah were included. Treatment and hospitalization data were retrieved from system-wide cancer registry and enterprise data warehouse. PCH is a member of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and patients were treated on, or according to, active COG protocols. Treatment-related hospital costs of ALL were examined by computing the average annual growth rates (AAGR). Longitudinal regressions identified patient characteristics associated with costs. A total of 505 patients (46.9% female) were included. The majority of patients had B-cell lineage ALL, 6.7% had T-ALL, and the median age at diagnosis was 4 years. Per-patient, first-year ALL hospitalization costs at PCH rose from $24,197 in 1998 to $37,924 in 2012. The AAGRs were 6.1, 13.0, and 7.6% for total, pharmacy, and room and care costs, respectively. Average days (AAGR = 5.2%) and admissions (AAGR = 3.8%) also demonstrated an increasing trend. High-risk patients had 47% higher costs per 6-month period in the first 5 years from diagnosis than standard-risk patients (P < 0.001). Similarly, relapsed ALL and stem cell transplantations were associated with significantly higher costs than nonrelapsed and no transplantations, respectively (P < 0.001). Increasing treatment-related costs of ALL demonstrate an area for further investigation. Value-based interventions such as identifying low-risk fever and neutropenia patients and managing them in outpatient settings should be evaluated for reducing the hospital burden of ALL.

  16. A retrospective analysis of treatment-related hospitalization costs of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Korgenski, Ernest Kent; Ying, Jian; Ng, Christi F; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Nelson, Richard E; Andrews, Seth; Raetz, Elizabeth; Fluchel, Mark; Lemons, Richard; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study examined the longitudinal hospital outcomes (costs adjusted for inflation, hospital days, and admissions) associated with the treatment of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients between one and 26 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL, who were treated at Primary Children's Hospital (PCH) in Salt Lake City, Utah were included. Treatment and hospitalization data were retrieved from system-wide cancer registry and enterprise data warehouse. PCH is a member of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and patients were treated on, or according to, active COG protocols. Treatment-related hospital costs of ALL were examined by computing the average annual growth rates (AAGR). Longitudinal regressions identified patient characteristics associated with costs. A total of 505 patients (46.9% female) were included. The majority of patients had B-cell lineage ALL, 6.7% had T-ALL, and the median age at diagnosis was 4 years. Per-patient, first-year ALL hospitalization costs at PCH rose from $24,197 in 1998 to $37,924 in 2012. The AAGRs were 6.1, 13.0, and 7.6% for total, pharmacy, and room and care costs, respectively. Average days (AAGR = 5.2%) and admissions (AAGR = 3.8%) also demonstrated an increasing trend. High-risk patients had 47% higher costs per 6-month period in the first 5 years from diagnosis than standard-risk patients (P < 0.001). Similarly, relapsed ALL and stem cell transplantations were associated with significantly higher costs than nonrelapsed and no transplantations, respectively (P < 0.001). Increasing treatment-related costs of ALL demonstrate an area for further investigation. Value-based interventions such as identifying low-risk fever and neutropenia patients and managing them in outpatient settings should be evaluated for reducing the hospital burden of ALL. PMID:26714675

  17. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD).Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk.Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007).In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  18. Antimicrobial resistance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in a British district general hospital: the international connection.

    PubMed

    Birtles, Andrew; Virgincar, Nilangi; Sheppard, Carmen L; Walker, Rachel A; Johnson, Alan P; Warner, Marina; Edwards-Jones, Valerie; George, Robert C

    2004-12-01

    Between January 2000 and March 2001, Streptococcus pneumoniae were isolated from the blood of 56 patients admitted to a single district general hospital in the South-East of England. The serotype and antibiotic susceptibility were determined for all isolates and, for those resistant to erythromycin, the presence or absence of the mef(A) and erm(B) genes was determined by PCR. Multi-locus sequence typing, along with PFGE, was undertaken on all isolates resistant to penicillin or erythromycin and a group of antibiotic-susceptible isolates, to identify whether globally distributed pneumococcal clones, as described by the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), were present in the study population. Three serotype 9V penicillin-resistant isolates were identified as belonging to the Spain9V-3 clone, while 14 erythromycin-resistant isolates of serotype 14 belonged to the England14-9 clone. A single multi-resistant isolate of serotype 6B, was found to be a single-locus variant of the Spain6B-2 clone. All 14 erythromycin-resistant serotype 14 isolates possessed the mef(A) gene, while the single multi-resistant isolate possessed the erm(B) gene. These findings confirm the wide distribution and clinical impact of PMEN clones, which accounted for all of the penicillin and erythromycin resistance observed amongst invasive isolates in a district general hospital over a 15-month period. PMID:15585504

  19. E. coli outbreak in a neonate intensive care unit in a general hospital in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Casas, Erika Margarita; Suástegui-Urquijo, Zaydy; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Moncada-Barrón, David; Hernández-Delgado, Lorena; Méndez-Sánchez, José Luis; Delgado-Sapién, Gabriela; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Manjarrez-Hernández, Ángel; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2013-05-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aim of this paper was to describe an outbreak of Escherichia coli among infants admitted to the NICU of the General Hospital "Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez" in May of 2008. The isolated E. coli strains were identified using standard biochemical methods. The susceptibilities of these strains were analysed by determining their minimal inhibitory concentrations. Following this, their molecular relationships to each other were assessed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis and corroborated by serology. Twelve E. coli strains were isolated from blood, urine, or indwelling catheter samples from five cases of preterm infants within a 3-day period. Patients were admitted to the NICU of the general hospital and, during the outbreak, developed sepsis caused by E. coli. For four of the patients, the average age was 23 days, while one patient was a 3-month-old infant. Prior to sepsis, the infants had received assisted ventilation and hyperalimentation through a central venous catheter. Two profiles were observed by PFGE; profile A was identified as the outbreak's cause and an outcome of cross-infection, while profile B showed genetic differences but serologically it was identified as part of the same serotype. We conclude that E. coli colonised the patients through horizontal transmission. A focal source of the microorganism in this outbreak was not identified, but cross-transmission through handling was the most probable route.

  20. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in

  1. Canada acute coronary syndrome score was a stronger baseline predictor than age ≥75 years of in-hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome patients in western Romania

    PubMed Central

    Pogorevici, Antoanela; Citu, Ioana Mihaela; Bordejevic, Diana Aurora; Caruntu, Florina; Tomescu, Mirela Cleopatra

    2016-01-01

    Background Several risk scores were developed for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, but their use is limited by their complexity. Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify predictors at admission for in-hospital mortality in ACS patients in western Romania, using a simple risk-assessment tool – the new Canada acute coronary syndrome (C-ACS) risk score. Patients and methods The baseline risk of patients admitted with ACS was retrospectively assessed using the C-ACS risk score. The score ranged from 0 to 4; 1 point was assigned for the presence of each of the following parameters: age ≥75 years, Killip class >1, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, and heart rate >100 bpm. Results A total of 960 patients with ACS were included, 409 (43%) with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 551 (57%) with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). The C-ACS score predicted in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93–0.96), in STEMI patients with a C-statistic of 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89–0.94), and in NSTE-ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95–0.98). Of the 960 patients, 218 (22.7%) were aged ≥75 years. The proportion of patients aged ≥75 years was 21.7% in the STEMI subgroup and 23.4% in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (P>0.05). Age ≥75 years was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in ACS patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.25, 95% CI: 1.24–8.25) and in the STEMI subgroup (OR >3.99, 95% CI: 1.28–12.44). Female sex was strongly associated with mortality in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (OR: 27.72, 95% CI: 1.83–39.99). Conclusion We conclude that C-ACS score was the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients while age ≥75 years predicted the mortality well in the STEMI subgroup. PMID:27217732

  2. Acute Targeting of General Transcription Factor IIB Restricts Cardiac Hypertrophy via Selective Inhibition of Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Danish; Yang, Zhi; He, Minzhen; Pfleger, Jessica M.; Abdellatif, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported that specialized and housekeeping genes are differentially regulated via de novo recruitment and pause-release of RNA polymerase II (pol II), respectively, during cardiac hypertrophy. However, the significance of this finding remains to be examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms that differentially regulate these gene groups and exploit them for therapeutic targeting. Methods and Results Here we show that general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) and cyclin-dependent kinase 9 are upregulated during hypertrophy, both targeted by miR-1, and play preferential roles in regulating those two groups of genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing reveals that TFIIB is constitutively bound to all paused, housekeeping, promoters, whereas, de novo recruitment of TFIIB and pol II is required for specialized genes that are induced during hypertrophy. We exploited this dichotomy to acutely inhibit induction of the latter set, which encompasses cardiomyopathy, immune reaction, and extracellular matrix genes, using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified antisense TFIIB oligonucleotide treatment. This resulted in suppression of all specialized genes, while sparing the housekeeping ones, and, thus, attenuated pathological hypertrophy. Conclusions The data for the first time reveal distinct general transcription factor IIB dynamics that regulate specialized vs. housekeeping genes during cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, by acutely targeting TFIIB we were able to selectively inhibit the former set of genes and ameliorate pressure overload hypertrophy. We also demonstrate the feasibility of acutely and reversibly targeting cardiac mRNA for therapeutic purposes using LNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:25398966

  3. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea.

  4. A multilevel intervention to increase community hospital use of alteplase for acute stroke (INSTINCT): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Phillip A; Meurer, William J; Frederiksen, Shirley M; Kalbfleisch, John D; Xu, Zhenzhen; Haan, Mary N; Silbergleit, Robert; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Use of alteplase improves outcome in some patients with stroke. Several types of barrier frequently prevent its use. We assessed whether a standardised, barrier-assessment, multicomponent intervention could increase alteplase use in community hospitals in Michigan, USA. Methods In a cluster-randomised controlled trial, we selected adult, non-specialty, acute-care community hospitals in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Eligible hospitals discharged at least 100 patients who had had a stroke per year, had less than 100 000 visits to the emergency department per year, and were not academic comprehensive stroke centres. Using a computer-generated randomisation sequence, we selected 12 matched pairs of eligible hospitals. Within pairs, the hospitals were allocated to intervention or control groups with restricted randomisation in January, 2007. Between January, 2007, and December, 2007, intervention hospitals implemented a multicomponent intervention that included qualitative and quantitative assessment of barriers to alteplase use and ways to address the findings, and provided additional support. The primary outcome was change in alteplase use in patients with stroke in emergency departments between the pre-intervention period (January, 2005, to December, 2006) and the post-intervention period (January, 2008, to January, 2010). Physicians in participating hospitals and the coordinating centre could not be masked to group assignment, but were masked to progress made in paired control hospitals. External medical reviewers who were masked to group assignment assessed outcomes. We did intention-to-treat (ITT) and target-population (without one pair that was excluded after randomisation) analyses. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00349479. Findings All 24 hospitals completed the study. Overall, 745 of 40 823 patients with stroke received intravenous alteplase treatment. In the ITT analysis, the proportion of patients with

  5. The Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative education program for acute care nurses and staff.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Janice L; Lach, Helen W; McGillick, Janis; Murphy-White, Maggie; Carroll, Maria B; Armstrong, Johanna L

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias have 3.2 million hospital stays annually, which is significantly more than older individuals without dementia. Hospitalized patients with dementia are at greater risk of delirium, falls, overwhelming functional decline that may extend the hospital stay, and prolonged or complicated rehabilitation. These risks highlight the need for staff education on the special care needs of this vulnerable population. This article describes a one-day education program, the Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative, designed to teach staff how to provide the specialized care required by patients with dementia. Participants (N = 355) from five different hospitals, including 221 nurses, completed a pretest-posttest evaluation for the program. Changes in participants attitudes and practices, confidence, and knowledge were evaluated. Scores indicated significant improvement on the posttest. The evaluation provides further evidence for recommending dissemination of the Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative. PMID:25299008

  6. Using path analysis to examine causal relationships among balanced scorecard performance indicators for general hospitals: the case of a public hospital system in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chin; Tung, Yu-Chi

    2006-01-01

    Examining whether the causal relationships among the performance indicators of the balanced scorecard (BSC) framework exist in hospitals is the aim of this article. Data were collected from all twenty-one general hospitals in a public hospital system and their supervising agency for the 3-year period, 2000-2002. The results of the path analyses identified significant causal relationships among four perspectives in the BSC model. We also verified the relationships among indicators within each perspective, some of which varied as time changed. We conclude that hospital administrators can use path analysis to help them identify and manage leading indicators when adopting the BSC model. However, they should also validate causal relationships between leading and lagging indicators periodically because the management environment changes constantly.

  7. Using path analysis to examine causal relationships among balanced scorecard performance indicators for general hospitals: the case of a public hospital system in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chin; Tung, Yu-Chi

    2006-01-01

    Examining whether the causal relationships among the performance indicators of the balanced scorecard (BSC) framework exist in hospitals is the aim of this article. Data were collected from all twenty-one general hospitals in a public hospital system and their supervising agency for the 3-year period, 2000-2002. The results of the path analyses identified significant causal relationships among four perspectives in the BSC model. We also verified the relationships among indicators within each perspective, some of which varied as time changed. We conclude that hospital administrators can use path analysis to help them identify and manage leading indicators when adopting the BSC model. However, they should also validate causal relationships between leading and lagging indicators periodically because the management environment changes constantly. PMID:17077702

  8. [Assisting a hospitalized preschool child's stress from acute lymphocyte leukemia through play].

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Wen; Chin, Chi-Chun

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to help one preschool leukemia child to face the stress of hospitalization by using play. The child, facing stress of hospitalization, used coping behaviors that included regression and escapism. The cognitive theories for entertainment, role-play and talking-story play were adopted to release the child's stress and anxiety. Clinical workers may like to use the findings of this article to promoter children's maturation and ability to cope with stress during hospitalization.

  9. Surveillance of hospital-acquired infections in Liguria, Italy: results from a regional prevalence study in adult and paediatric acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Durando, P; Icardi, G; Ansaldi, F; Crimi, P; Sticchi, C; Compagnino, F; Fabbri, P; Baldelli, I; Bellina, D; Sacco, R; Assensi, M; Cenderello, N; Orengo, G; Oreste, P; Nannini, M; Olivari, C; Campora, O; Vizio, M

    2009-01-01

    A multi-hospital prevalence study of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) was carried out between 19 March and 6 April 2007 in Liguria, Italy, being the first to be performed in this region. Of the 29 existing public acute hospitals, 25 took part in the investigation (86.2%). In total, 3176 patients were enrolled in the study, representing a regional average bed-occupancy rate of nearly 70%. Three-hundred and ten HAIs were diagnosed from 283 patients, with an overall prevalence of infections and cases of 9.8% and 8.9%, respectively. Prevalence varied considerably between hospitals, ranging from 0 to 24.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.53-33.27]. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) (30.0%) and respiratory tract infections (RTIs) (26.1%) presented the highest relative frequency, followed by bloodstream infections (BSIs) (14.8%), surgical site infections (11.6%) and gastrointestinal infections (6.5%). Intensive care units (ICUs) and haemato-oncological units showed the highest specific prevalence of HAI, respectively 42.5% (95% CI: 34.48-50.52) and 13.3% (6.28-20.32), with RTI and BSI as the predominant infections. Spinal units (33.3%; 13.14-53.46) and functional-rehabilitation units (18.9%; 17.75-24.06) demonstrated a high rate of urinary tract infections. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the main risk factors and conditions associated with HAI, both overall and by site. Our study provides an overall picture of the epidemiology of HAI in Liguria, which may be usefully employed as a starting point to plan and organise future surveillance and control programmes.

  10. [Acute edematous encephalopathy presenting with refractory generalized status epilepticus: an autopsy case].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Yamamoto, T; Yasuda, T

    2001-11-01

    A previously healthy, 29-year-old man developed generalized convulsion with disturbed consciousness 3 days after the flu-like symptoms. On the next day, his convulsion evolved into generalized status epilepticus (GSE) that was unresponsive to administration of various anticonvulsants. Then, intravenous anesthetic agents, including midazolam, propofol and vecuronium sodium, were continuously infused. During the following 9 days, despite of high-dose infusion of these anesthetic agents, his GSE could not be suppressed, and complex partial seizure with secondary generalization frequently occurred. The patient was comatose and mechanically ventilated, whereas the brainstem reflexes were preserved. Electroencephalogram revealed a diffuse slowing of the background activity and occasional focal spike and wave complexes with secondary generalization. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein concentration. Cranial CT scans obtained on day 8 demonstrated brain edema. On day 10, his GSE ceased with abolition of the brainstem reflexes, and he lapsed into brain death resulting from the progressive brain edema. Over the following six days, his systemic circulation gradually worsened, and he died on day 16. On postmortem examination, the brain was markedly edematous and showed the findings consistent with acute anoxic encephalopathy with extensive circulatory stasis. Mild gliosis was observed in the insular cortex, yet no evidence of inflammatory disease was found throughout the brain. This patient was characterized by acutely progressive severe brain edema without inflammatory changes, suggesting that his primary disease was acute toxic encephalopathy presumably induced by viral infection. His GSE was refractory and unresponsive to the intensive treatment with the intravenous anesthetic agents. This case epitomizes the difficulties in controlling refractory seizures in some patients with encephalopathy or encephalitis.

  11. Clinical review: the hospital of the future - building intelligent environments to facilitate safe and effective acute care delivery.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Brian W; Litell, John M; Herasevich, Vitaly; Gajic, Ognjen

    2012-12-12

    The translation of knowledge into rational care is as essential and pressing a task as the development of new diagnostic or therapeutic devices, and is arguably more important. The emerging science of health care delivery has identified the central role of human factor ergonomics in the prevention of medical error, omission, and waste. Novel informatics and systems engineering strategies provide an excellent opportunity to improve the design of acute care delivery. In this article, future hospitals are envisioned as organizations built around smart environments that facilitate consistent delivery of effective, equitable, and error-free care focused on patient-centered rather than provider-centered outcomes.

  12. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM. PMID:27168257

  13. Barriers to the Adoption of Safety-Engineered Needles Following a Regulatory Standard: Lessons Learned from Three Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrea; Mustard, Cameron A.; Holness, D. Linn; Nichol, Kathryn; Breslin, F. Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of jurisdictions have introduced regulation to accelerate the adoption of safety-engineered needles (SENs). This study examined the transition to SENs in three acute care hospitals prior to and following the implementation of a regulatory standard in Ontario. This paper focuses on the ongoing barriers to the prevention of needlestick injuries among healthcare workers. Methods: Information from document review and 30 informant interviews were used to prepare three case studies detailing each organization's implementation activities and outcomes. Results: All three hospitals responded to the regulatory requirements with integrity and needlestick injuries declined. However, needlestick injuries continued to occur during the activation of safety devices, during procedures and during instrument disposal. The study documented substantial barriers to further progress in needlestick injury prevention. Conclusions: Healthcare organizations should focus on understanding their site-specific challenges that contribute to ongoing injury risk to better understand issues related to product limitations, practice constraints and the work environment. PMID:26571471

  14. The pattern and clinical manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis in Sarawak General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Teh, C L; Wong, J S

    2008-11-01

    The aim of our study is to describe the pattern, clinical features, treatment regimes, and disease activity among the patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Sarawak General Hospital. We performed a cross-sectional study of all patients with a diagnosis of RA who received treatment at the General Medical Clinic and the Rheumatology Clinic in Sarawak General Hospital over a 1-year period from 1st June 2006 to 31st May 2007. Demographic data, clinical features, and disease activity of all 154 patients were collected for statistical analysis. Rheumatoid arthritis afflicts all the major racial groups in Sarawak including the native population. Our patients have a mean disease duration of 5.4 years (SD 5.69) and a mean duration of delay in diagnosis RA and initiation of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment of 42.9 months (SD 60.1). They have a low rate of interstitial lung disease (6.5%) and rheumatoid nodules (4.5%). Rheumatoid factor was positive in 65.5% of our patients. They have a mean Disease Activity Score (DAS) 28 score of 4.28 (SD 1.33). Only 12.5% of our patients are in remission with DAS 28 < 2.6 and 30.9% of our patients are having high disease activity with DAS 28 > 5.1. Despite the high usage of DMARDs in Sarawak (>80%), our patients have severe disease with high disease activity indices. This is most likely due to delay in diagnosis and initiating DMARDs in RA patients in Sarawak.

  15. [Maternal mortality rate in the Aurelio Valdivieso General Hospital: a ten years follow up].

    PubMed

    Noguera-Sánchez, Marcelo Fidias; Arenas-Gómez, Susana; Rabadán-Martínez, Cesar Esli; Antonio-Sánchez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: en México, la mortalidad materna ha disminuido en las últimas décadas. En Oaxaca esto no se ha manifestado porque se incrementó la tasa de mortalidad materna. Este estado se ubica entre las entidades con más muertes maternas. Objetivo: analizar 10 años de mortalidad materna en el Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso de los Servicios de Salud de Oaxaca, para conocer el comportamiento epidemiológico y caracterización de los decesos. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo, transversal y descriptivo efectuado mediante la revisión de expedientes clínicos de mortalidad materna en la División de Gineco-Obstetricia. Se consideraron variables sociales, obstétricas y circunstanciales y las comprobaciones se efectuaron con estadística general y descriptiva. Resultados: entre el 1 de enero de 2000 y el 31 de diciembre de 2009 se registraron 109 muertes maternas, excluidas dos que no fueron obstétricas; es decir, que hubo 107 muertes maternas: 75 directas y 32 indirectas. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue de 172.14 × 100,000 nacidos vivos. De las muertes maternas revisadas 89 pudieron evitarse (83%) y 18 no (17%), esto con base en el dictamen del Comité ad hoc del Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso. La enfermedad hipertensiva aguda del embarazo fue la de mayor mortalidad; la escolaridad y el puerperio ueron el mayor riesgo. Conclusiones: las variables atribuibles a bajo índice de desarrollo humano, como: baja escolaridad y paridad elevada incrementaron el riesgo de mortalidad materna, que fue intrahospitalaria y durante el puerperio. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue la mayor encontrada en publicaciones nacionales con respecto a este referente.

  16. [Burnout syndrome in medical residents at the General Hospital of Durango, México].

    PubMed

    Terrones-Rodríguez, Jovany Francisco; Cisneros-Pérez, Vicente; Arreola-Rocha, José Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el síndrome de burnout es frecuente en los trabajadores de la salud y educación debido a que se sienten presionados por las excesivas demandas en su espacio de trabajo. Se evalúan tres esferas: despersonalización, agotamiento emocional y realización personal. Métodos: para determinar la prevalencia del síndrome de burnout en los médicos residentes del Hospital General de Durango SSD, se diseñó un estudio descriptivo, transversal, prolectivo y se aplicó el cuestionario Maslach Burnout Inventory a los residentes de las diferentes especialidades del Hospital General de Durango SSD que aceptaron participar. Resultados: se encuestó a 116 residentes, el 43.1 % (50) mujeres y el 56.89 % (66) hombres. La prevalencia general fue de 89.66 % (IC 95 %: 82.63-94.54). Afectados en una esfera el 48.28 % (IC 95 %: 38.90-57.74), en dos esferas el 35.34 % (IC 95 %: 26.69-44.76) y en las tres esferas el 6.03 % (IC 95 %: 2.46-12.04). En las tres esferas, el agotamiento emocional alto fue del 41.38 % (IC 95 %: 32.31-50.90), alta despersonalización en el 54.31 % (IC 95 %: 44.81-63.59) y baja realización personal en el 41.38 % (IC 95 %: 32.31-50.90). Conclusiones: la prevalencia se encuentra por arriba de la reportada. La mayor frecuencia de afectados fue la de despersonalización, seguida por agotamiento emocional y al final la de realización personal. En las especialidades de ginecología y obstetricia, medicina interna, pediatría y ortopedia los residentes se encuentran afectados en el 100 % de su población.

  17. Ethnic and sex differences in the incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction: British Columbia, Canada 1995-2002

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As populations in Western countries continue to change in their ethnic composition, there is a need for regular surveillance of diseases that have previously shown some health disparities. Earlier data have already demonstrated high rates of cardiovascular mortality among South Asians and relatively lower rates among people of Chinese descent. The aim of this study was to describe the differences in the incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among the three largest ethnic groups in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods Using hospital administrative data, we identified all patients with incident AMI in BC between April 1, 1995, and March 31, 2002. Census data from 2001 provided the denominator for the entire BC population. Ethnicity was determined using validated surname analysis and applied to the census and hospital administrative datasets. Direct age standardization was used to compare incidence rates. Results A total of 34,848 AMI cases were identified. Among men, South Asians had the highest age standardized rate of AMI hospitalization at 4.97/1000 population/year, followed by Whites at 3.29, and then Chinese at 0.98. Young South Asian men, in particular, showed incidence rates that were double that of young Whites and ten times that of young Chinese men. South Asian women also had the highest age-standardized rate of AMI hospitalization at 2.35/1000 population/year, followed by White women (1.53) and Chinese women (0.49). Conclusions South Asians continue to have a higher incidence of hospitalized AMI while incidence rates among Chinese remain low. Ethnic differences are most notable among younger men. PMID:20723259

  18. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  19. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  20. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  1. The incidence of S. aureus bacteraemia in acute hospitals of the Mid-Western Area, Ireland, 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    Whyte, D; Monahan, R; Boyle, L; Slevin, B; FitzGerald, R; Barron, D; De Freitas, J; Kelleher, K

    2005-05-01

    Concerns about healthcare-associated infections and the global crisis in antimicrobial resistance has combined to accentuate the fears around so-called "superbugs". In Ireland there is no single agreed indicator regarded as a true measure of the level of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals. The objective of this study was to compare two crude measures of MRSA--the percentage of bacteraemia caused by MRSA and the incidence rate (per 1000 bed days used) of MRSA bacteraemia in six acute hospitals. We examined all blood cultures positive for S. aureus (methicillin sensitive and resistant) from 2002 to 2004 in the Health Service Executive (HSE) Mid-Western Area of Ireland. Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) data was used to determine monthly in-patient bed days used. Of 245 patient episodes of bacteraemia, 119 were MRSA. The trends in the percentage of isolates that were MRSA and the incidence rate calculated were compared. The incidence rate appears to be a more reliable and robust indicator of MRSA in hospitals than the percentage. Despite many difficulties in interpreting indicators of MRSA they should not preclude the regular publication of data at least at regional level in Ireland. PMID:16077206

  2. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste

  3. Minor surgery in general practice and effects on referrals to hospital care: Observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Strengthening primary care is the focus of many countries, as national healthcare systems with a strong primary care sector tend to have lower healthcare costs. However, it is unknown to what extent general practitioners (GPs) that perform more services generate fewer hospital referrals. The objective of this study was to examine the association between the number of surgical interventions and hospital referrals. Methods Data were derived from electronic medical records of 48 practices that participated in the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH) in 2006-2007. For each care-episode of benign neoplasm skin/nevus, sebaceous cyst or laceration/cut it was determined whether the patient was referred to a medical specialist and/or minor surgery was performed. Multilevel multinomial regression analyses were used to determine the relation between minor surgery and hospital referrals on the level of the GP-practice. Results Referral rates differed between diagnoses, with 1.0% of referrals for a laceration/cut, 8.2% for a sebaceous cyst and 10.2% for benign neoplasm skin/nevus. The GP practices performed minor surgery for a laceration/cut in 8.9% (SD:14.6) of the care-episodes, for a benign neoplasm skin/nevus in 27.4% (SD:14.4) of cases and for a sebaceous cyst in 26.4% (SD:13.8). GP practices that performed more minor surgery interventions had a lower referral rate for patients with a laceration/cut (-0.38; 95%CI:-0.60- -0.11) and those with a sebaceous cyst (-0.42; 95%CI:-0.63- -0.16), but not for people with benign neoplasm skin/nevus (-0.26; 95%CI:-0.51-0.03). However, the absolute difference in referral rate appeared to be relevant only for sebaceous cysts. Conclusions The effects of minor surgery vary between diagnoses. Minor surgery in general practice appears to be a substitute for specialist medical care only in relation to sebaceous cysts. Measures to stimulate minor surgery for sebaceous cysts may induce substitution. PMID

  4. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the 'Sepsis Six' recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  5. Training Opportunities in the Management of Paediatric Fractures: A District General Hospital Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, WY; Zenios, M

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Increasing subspecialisation, the introduction of reforms to surgical training, centralisation of hospitals and the reduction of working hours brought about by the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) has direct implications on the training of surgeons in the UK. The aim of this study was to determine the range and number of procedures performed for paediatric orthopaedic fractures, degree of supervision and possible implications for training. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective review of procedures for paediatric orthopaedic fractures performed in a district general hospital in a year was conducted. RESULTS A total of 210 paediatric fracture procedures were performed, including 99 distal radius/ulna procedures, 28 shaft radius/ulna, 25 supracondylar procedures, 15 hand fracture procedures, 14 tibial shaft procedures. Middle grade/registrars and senior house officers performed 188 (89.5%) of all procedures. Consultant supervision was documented in 29 (13.8%) of all procedures performed. The number and type of common, as well as unusual, injuries was documented. The educational value of a training post may only be confirmed by reliable data which would provide an indication of operative opportunities and degree of supervision available to a trainee. CONCLUSIONS This study provided a model upon which all operative training opportunities in the orthopaedic department is documented. It is suggested that such data should form the basis of the establishment of training posts within a region. To maintain the high standard of orthopaedic training in the UK, the maintenance of such posts, number of trainees and seniority of trainees appointed to any hospital within a training region should be on the basis of data such as reported in this study. PMID:17002846

  6. Recruitment maneuvers in acute respiratory distress syndrome and during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chiumello, Davide; Algieri, Ilaria; Grasso, Salvatore; Terragni, Pierpaolo; Pelosi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The use of low tidal volume ventilation and low to moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels is a widespread strategy to ventilate patients with non-injured lungs during general anesthesia and in intensive care as well with mild to moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Higher PEEP levels have been recommended in severe ARDS. Due to the presence of alveolar collapse, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) by causing a transient elevation in airway pressure (i.e. transpulmonary pressure) have been suggested to improve lung inflation in non-inflated and poorly-inflated lung regions. Various types of RMs such as sustained inflation at high pressure, intermittent sighs and stepwise increases of PEEP and/or airway plateau inspiratory pressure have been proposed. The use of RMs has been associated with mixed results in terms of physiological and clinical outcomes. The optimal method for RMs has not yet been identified. The use of RMs is not standardized and left to the individual physician based on his/her experience. Based on the same grounds, RMs have been proposed to improve lung aeration during general anesthesia. The aim of this review was to present the clinical evidence supporting the use of RMs in patients with ARDS and during general anesthesia and as well their potential biological effects in experimental models of acute lung injury.

  7. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands1

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Elmer; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte counts. However, a large overlap was found. In patients with an indication for prophylaxis, chronic Q fever did not develop after patients received prophylaxis but did develop in 50% of patients who did not receive prophylaxis. Differentiating acute Q fever from other respiratory infections, fever, or hepatitis is not possible without serologic testing or PCR. If risk factors for chronic Q fever are present, prophylactic treatment is advised. PMID:26196955

  8. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. Material and Method: In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients’ satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Results: Among 600 patients, 239 (n = 38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75 ± .35, 3.03 ± .53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p = .018, p = .029

  9. Large-eddy simulation of airflow and heat transfer in a general ward of hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Farhad; Himika, Taasnim Ahmed; Molla, Md. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a very popular alternative computational technique, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been used for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of airflow and heat transfer in general ward of hospital. Different Reynolds numbers have been used to study the airflow pattern. In LES, Smagorinsky turbulence model has been considered and a discussion has been conducted in brief. A code validation has been performed comparing the present results with benchmark results for lid-driven cavity problem and the results are found to agree very well. LBM is demonstrated through simulation in forced convection inside hospital ward with six beds with a partition in the middle, which acted like a wall. Changes in average rate of heat transfer in terms of average Nusselt numbers have also been recorded in tabular format and necessary comparison has been showed. It was found that partition narrowed the path for airflow and once the air overcame this barrier, it got free space and turbulence appeared. For higher turbulence, the average rate of heat transfer increased and patients near the turbulence zone released maximum heat and felt more comfortable.

  10. Child abuse and neglect as seen in General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur--a two year study.

    PubMed

    Kassim, M S; George, R; Kassim, K; Begum, M; Cherian, M P; Tajudin, A K; Chandran, V; Anan, A; Reddy, R; Singh, J

    1989-06-01

    Eighty-six children diagnosed as child abuse and/or neglect were admitted to the Paediatric wards of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur during 1985 and 1986. Of these cases, 62 were of physical abuse, six of sexual abuse, one case of both physical and sexual abuse and 17 of neglect. There were 25 boys and 61 girls. Thirty-four of these children were Malays, 16 Chinese, 26 Indians, three mixed and seven illegal immigrants. Twenty-one were below the age of one year, 24 from one to four years, 25 from five to nine years and 16 were ten years and above. The abusers were mainly close members of the family. Of these children, 24 were sent back to their parents and 11 to their relatives home. Twenty-seven were taken into care by the Ministry of Social Welfare and the remaining seven children who were illegal immigrants, were deported with their parents. Only one child was successfully fostered. Eleven children were taken away from the hospital by their parents or guardians without the knowledge of the health staff. There were five deaths in the series.

  11. Education to improve the triage of mental health patients in general hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Diana E; Brown, Anne-Marie; Hughes, Linda; Motluk, Lori

    2006-10-01

    General hospital emergency departments (EDs) are obvious places for individuals in distress or in a mental health crisis to seek assistance. However, triage nurses admit to a lack of expertise and confidence in psychiatric assessment which can result in less accurate assessments than for medical or trauma presentations. The objectives of a collaborative project between an Adult Mental Health Program and an Adult Emergency Program in a Canadian regional health authority were to: provide education and training to triage nurses regarding mental health and illness; monitor the transit of mental health patients through the ED; monitor wait times; and determine the adequacy of the Canadian Triage Acuity and Assessment Scale in the triage of psychiatric presentations. Although the percentages of patients triaged as "emergent" did not change as a result of the education, the percentage of patients who were triaged as "not urgent" but required hospitalization was significantly reduced. Although average lengths of stay in the ED were also reduced after the education, this may or may not have been related to the educational sessions. The project was successful in increasing collaboration between the two departments and has resulted in enhanced, on-going mental health education for ED nurses.

  12. The pattern of femoral diaphyseal fractures in children admitted in Sarawak General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rasit, A H; Mohammad, A W; Pan, K L

    2006-02-01

    Trend towards changing the face of management for pediatric femoral fractures tends to advocate operative treatment. This study was undertaken to review our current practice in the wake of recent progress in the management of pediatric femoral fractures. Fifty patients with femoral diaphyseal fracture treated in Sarawak General Hospital were reviewed retrospectively after an average follow-up of 2.6 years. There were 36 boys and 14 girls, with a mean age of 6.2 years (range five months to 14 years). Children under six years of age constituted the majority of the patients. Half of the fractures were caused by road traffic accident. Nine patients had associated injuries. The most common site of fracture was at the middle third (N=31). The treatment regimens were delayed hip spica (DHS) in 16, immediate hip spica (IHS) in 24, plate osteosynthesis (PO) in five, titanium elastic nailing (TEN) in five, and external fixation (EF) in one. The minimum hospital stay was two days, and the maximum 33 days (mean, 9.7 days). Malunion was the commonest complication. Conservative treatment is the preferred option for children under six years of age. It is cost-effective with minimal complication. The other treatment options are reserved for specific indication in older children. Diaphyseal fractures of the femur in children can be adequately managed non-operatively.

  13. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  14. Automatic coding of reasons for hospital referral from general medicine free-text reports.

    PubMed Central

    Letrilliart, L.; Viboud, C.; Boëlle, P. Y.; Flahault, A.

    2000-01-01

    Although the coding of medical data is expected to benefit both patients and the health care system, its implementation as a manual process often represents a poorly attractive workload for the physician. For epidemiological purpose, we developed a simple automatic coding system based on string matching, which was designed to process free-text sentences stating reasons for hospital referral, as collected from general practitioners (GPs). This system relied on a look-up table, built up from 2590 reports giving a single reason for referral, which were coded manually according to the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC). We tested the system by entering 797 new reasons for referral. The match rate was estimated at 77%, and the accuracy rate, at 80% at code level and 92% at chapter level. This simple system is now routinely used by a national epidemiological network of sentinel physicians. PMID:11079931

  15. [Professional practice of nurses who care for cancer patients in general hospitals].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josiane Travençolo; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses a qualitative study which aimed to understand the typical of nurses' professional practice caring for patient with cancer in general hospitals. In order to find out the reasons that motivate nurse's action, and to put in evidence what is original, significant, specific and typical about this phenomenon, we have taken into consideration the premises of the philosopher Alfred Schütz, which provide us with subsidies to unveil them. The data collected through semi-structured interviews reported that nurses admit not having the required theoretical knowledge and experience or enough practice to take care of a cancer patient. Thus, they don't feel capable of developing actions which may positively influence care on patients and their family members. PMID:23032337

  16. Accuracy of early estimation of maturity at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Brindle, M J

    1981-12-12

    The accuracy of routine sonar scanning of patients attending the antenatal clinic of a general hospital before the 19th week of pregnancy was calculated and compared with the potential accuracy of the techniques used. Out of 200 patients who went into labour spontaneously, 164 delivered within nine days of the sonar prediction, and 152 delivered within nine days of the date estimated from the menstrual history. The discrepancy between the mean of the expected date of delivery from the sonar examination and that derived from the menstrual history was 2.24 days. When the two estimations differed by a week or more the sonar estimation was more accurate, and all 44 patients in this group delivered by the sixth day after the sonar prediction. These findings emphasise the need for those providing a similar service to review the accuracy of their own work.

  17. [Anxiety and depression in the general population: normal values in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale].

    PubMed

    Hinz, A; Schwarz, R

    2001-05-01

    For the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) psychometric properties were tested and standardised values were calculated on the basis of a representative sample of the German adult population with 2037 persons. The main result was the evidence of age and gender differences for anxiety and depression. Females were more anxious than males. For both dimensions of the HADS a nearly linear age dependency was found which was more pronounced for depression (r = 0.36) than for anxiety (r = 0.14). Standardised values are given for different age and gender groups, and the results of regression analyses are presented. The psychometric properties were satisfying or good, the two-dimensional factorial structure could be replicated. By means of the standardised values and regression coefficients it is now possible to compare patient groups of different age and gender distributions with the general population. PMID:11417357

  18. Warfarin for non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation: five year experience in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Z R; Tandy, S C; Tudor, V; Jishi, F; Trent, R J; Watson, D K; Cowell, R P W

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the long term efficacy of and risks associated with computer aided oral anticoagulation for non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation (NRAF) in a district hospital setting. Design: Retrospective, age stratified, event driven clinical database analysis. Setting: District general hospital. Participants: 739 patients receiving warfarin for NRAF between 1996 and 2001. Patients were selected from an anticoagulation database through appropriate filter settings. Main outcome measures: Anticoagulation control (international normalised ratio (INR)) and hospitalisations for bleeding complications, thromboembolic events, and stroke. Results: Over 1484 patient-years, computer assisted anticoagulation was uncontrolled in 38.3% of patients (INR < 2.0 or > 3.0). No significant differences in INR control were observed with respect to patient age (< 65, 65–75, and > 75 years), although to achieve adequate control of anticoagulation, the frequency of testing increased significantly with age. Annual risks of bleeding complications, thromboembolism, and stroke were 0.76%, 0.35%, and 0.84%, respectively. No significant differences in these events were observed between the three age groups studied. Patients who had thromboembolic events and haemorrhagic complications were significantly more likely to have been under-anticoagulated (INR < 2.0) and over-anticoagulated (INR > 3.0), respectively, at the time of their clinical event. Conclusions: Computerised long term oral anticoagulation for NRAF in a community setting of elderly and diverse patients is safe and effective. Anticoagulation control, bleeding events, thromboembolic episodes, and stroke rates are directly comparable with those reported in major clinical trials. The authors therefore support the strategy of rate control with long term oral anticoagulation for NRAF in general clinical practice. PMID:15486116

  19. Prevalence trends of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Mexico City’s General Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Guerrero, Juan C.; Jacinto-Alemán, Luís F.; Jiménez-Farfán, María D.; Macario-Hernández, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Florentino

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recent reports suggest an increase in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) frequency. To improve programs in public health, it is necessary to understand the epidemiological conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the trend in gender, age, anatomic zone and OSCC stage from Mexico City’s General Hospital patients from 1990 to 2008. Study design: A retrospective review of all OSCC cases diagnosed by the Pathology Department of the Mexico City General Hospital was performed. Demographic data, in addition to anatomic zone and histological degree of differentiation were obtained. Central tendency, dispersion and prevalence rate per 100,000 individuals were determined. Results: A total of 531 patients were diagnosed with OSCC; 58.4% were men, giving a male:female ratio of 1.4:1, and the mean age was 62.5 ± 14.9 years. The predominant anatomic zone was the tongue (44.7%), followed by the lips (21.2%) and gums (20.5%). The most frequent histological degree was moderately differentiated in 325 cases (61.2%). The rates of OSCC prevalence showed similar patterns in terms across time. A significant correlation (P = 0.007) between anatomic zone and age was observed. Conclusion: According to our results, the prevalence of OSCC does not show important variations; however, a relationship between age and anatomic zone was observed. These data could be used as parameters for the diagnosis of OSCC as well as for the development and dissemination of preventive programs for the early detection of oral cancer. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, prevalence, histology degree and anatomic zone. PMID:23385493