Science.gov

Sample records for acute geriatric medical

  1. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  2. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four…

  3. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  4. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  5. Geriatric medical education: developments since the American Geriatrics Society Conferences on Geriatric Education, 1976-77.

    PubMed

    Reichel, W

    1981-01-01

    This is a Report presented to and endorsed by the Board of Directors of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). It deals with developments since the AGS Conferences on Geriatric Education, 1976-77. Summarized is the position adopted by various medical organizations and associations, including the Institute of Medicine, Federated Council for Internal Medicine, American Society of Internal Medicine, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. Their stances essentially agree with that described in the Proceedings of the 1976-77 Conferences (JAGS, November 1977). The consensus arising from discussions by organized medical groups is that creation of a new practice specialty is unnecessary, although development and maintenance of an academic cadre of teachers and researchers is essential. Called for is greater commitment at the medical school level to incorporate geriatrics into the curriculum. The Report also deals with the question of merited recognition for those with special competency or expanded training in geriatrics. Finally, the Report provides support for the Medical Director concept, and looks to the Society's new Section for Long-Term Care Physicians to provide leadership in emphasizing the role of the physician in long-term care. The AGS intends, through future reports, publications, conferences, and liaison relationships with other organizations, to continue this advance, seeking solutions designed to improve and extend the health care of the aging population. PMID:6778906

  6. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  7. Positioning Medical Students for the Geriatric Imperative: Using Geriatrics to Effectively Teach Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Annie L.; Duthie, Elizabeth A.; Denson, Kathryn M.; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on…

  8. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  9. Medical Student Attitudes toward Geriatric Medicine and Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrotta, Peter; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The influence of factual knowledge about the aged, general attitudes toward the aged, and personal contact with the aged on first-year medical students' attitudes toward geriatric patients and geriatric medicine was examined. Entering medical students indicated a preference for working with younger patients rather than aged patients. (Author/MLW)

  10. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  11. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Antonio; Montoya, Mariano J; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Serrano, Andrés; Molina, Joaquín; Parrilla, Pascual

    2005-05-01

    Age is a risk factor in acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages (LGIH). The objectives here were to analyze: (1) diagnostic and therapeutic handling, (2) related morbidity and mortality, (3) the indications for surgery, and (4) the evolution of acute LGIH in patients > or =80 years. Forty-three patients >80 years with acute LGIH were reviewed retrospectively. In 86% (n = 37) related comorbidities were found, in 9% (n = 4) there had been prior colorectal surgery, 19% (n = 8) were antiaggregated, and 7% (n = 3) were anticoagulated. One hundred thirty-two cases of acute LGIH in patients <80 years were used as a control group. Student's t test and the chi-square test were applied. On arrival at the emergency ward 11 cases (26%) had hemodynamic instability and 8 of these were stabilized using conservative measures. In 39 cases an endoscopy was performed, allowing for an etiological diagnosis in 59% (n = 23) of cases, above all in those carried out in an urgent or semiurgent way. The arteriography permitted an etiological diagnosis in two of the four cases in which it was carried out. In seven patients (16%) urgent surgery was indicated: three were hemorrhoidectomies, three were subtotal colectomies, and one was a resection of the small intestine. The morbidity rate was 10% (n = 4) in the patients who were not treated and 14% (n = 1) in those treated, with a mortality rate of 8% (n = 3) and 14% (n = 1), respectively. The rate of relapse of bleeding after discharge from hospital was 42% (n = 18), with nine of these needing to be readmitted into hospital. In comparison with the control group, they present a different bleeding etiology (diverticulosis as opposed to the benign anal-rectal and small intestinal pathology in the younger population; P = 0.017), surgery is indicated with less frequency (9 versus 33%; P = 0.007), and there is a higher relapse rate (42 versus 26%; P = 0.045). Acute LGIH in geriatric patients relents in most cases with the use of conservative

  12. Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education in Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Alan S.; Beck, John C.

    1982-01-01

    Performance objectives, core content, training experiences, and clinical exposure and program evaluations are described for geriatric fellows and house staff members in internal medicine, family practice, neurology, and psychiatry. A modified Delphi study was used. (Author/MLW)

  13. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  14. Geriatric Patients With Fractures Below the Hip are Medically Similar to Geriatric Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Harmeeth S.; Copeland, Marilyn E.; Crist, Brett D.; Volgas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated fractures below the hip to a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated hip fractures. All patients greater than 59 years of age admitted to our institution for surgical care of an isolated lower extremity fracture during a 3-year period were included. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: BTH (fracture below the subtrochanteric region of the femur) and HIP (proximal femoral fracture at subtrochanteric region or proximal). We identified 141 patients included in cohort BTH and 205 patients included in cohort HIP. HIP patients were older (P < .01) and less obese (P < .01) but were otherwise very similar. An extensive comorbidity review revealed that the 2 cohorts were similar, with the exception of an increased incidence of dementia (P = .012) or glaucoma (P = .04) in HIP patients and of peripheral neuropathy (P = .014) in BTH patients. HIP patients were more likely to be under active antiosteoporotic medication management and were more likely to be receiving pharmacological anticoagulation at the time of admission. HIP patients and BTH patients were similar with regard to necessity of assistance with ambulation preinjury, but HIP patients were less likely to reside independently at home than were BTH patients (P < .001). HIP patients were also less likely to be discharged directly home from the hospital (P < .001). Geriatric patients with fractures below the hip are medically similar to geriatric patients with hip fracture. Medical comanagement protocols have been extensively published that improve care of geriatric patients with hip fracture; consideration should be given to similar protocol-driven medical comanagement programs for geriatric patients with fractures below the hip. PMID:26246950

  15. Effectiveness of three types of geriatric medical services: lessons for geriatric psychiatric services.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of geriatric medical services, to identify the types of patients who would benefit from such services, to determine the service components related to positive outcomes and to apply pertinent findings to geriatric psychiatric services. DATA SOURCES: Two databases, MEDLINE and Health Planning and Administration, were searched for relevant articles published from January 1975 to February 1990. The bibliographies of identified articles were searched for additional references. STUDY SELECTION: Seventeen reports were located that met the following three inclusion criteria: original research, published in English or French and controlled trial (nonrandomized or randomized) of a geriatric medical service. Fifteen met the validity criteria for intervention studies established by McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about study design, patient selection, interventions, outcome measures and results was systematically abstracted from each report. DATA SYNTHESIS: Abstracted data were compared and contrasted. Most of the external services and some of the hospital units were effective in reducing the number of hospital days an deaths. Consultation services were ineffective. Continuing care appeared to be related to positive outcomes. CONCLUSION: In applying these findings to geriatric psychiatric services priority should be given to the development of external services and the organization of continuing care. PMID:2025818

  16. The Geriatrics in Primary Care Demonstration: Integrating Comprehensive Geriatric Care into the Medical Home: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Engel, Peter A; Spencer, Jacqueline; Paul, Todd; Boardman, Judith B

    2016-04-01

    Three thousand nine hundred thirty-one veterans aged 75 and older receive primary care (PC) in two large practices of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Boston Healthcare System. Cognitive and functional disabilities are endemic in this group, creating needs that predictably exceed available or appropriate resources. To address this problem, Geriatrics in Primary Care (GPC) embeds geriatric services directly into primary care. An on-site consulting geriatrician and geriatric nurse care manager work directly with PC colleagues in medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, and mental health within the VA medical home. This design delivers interdisciplinary geriatric care within PC that emphasizes comprehensive evaluations, care management, planned transitions, informed resource use, and a shift in care focus from multiple subspecialties to PC. Four hundred thirty-five veterans enrolled during the project's 4-year course. Complex, fragmented care was evident in a series of 50 individuals (aged 82 ± 7) enrolled during Months 1 to 6. The year before, these individuals made 372 medical or surgical subspecialty clinic visits (7.4 ± 9.8); 34% attended five or more subspecialty clinics, 48% had dementia, and 18% lacked family caregivers. During the first year after enrollment the mean number of subspecialty clinic visits declined significantly (4.7 ± 5.0, P = .01), whereas the number of PC-based visits remained stable (3.1 ± 1.5 and 3.3 ± 1.5, respectively, P = .50). Telephone contact by GPC (2.3 ± 2.0) and collaboration with PC clinicians replaced routine follow-up geriatric care. GPC facilitated planned transitions to rehabilitation centers (n = 5), home hospice (n = 2), dementia units (n = 3), and home care (n = 37). GPC provides efficient, comprehensive geriatric care and case management while preserving established relationships between patients and the PC team. Preliminary results suggest "care defragmentation," as reflected by a

  17. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  18. Quality of Care Delivered Before versus After A Quality Improvement Intervention for Acute Geriatric Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lillian; Cryer, Henry; Chan, Chiao-Li; Roth, Carol; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    Background Older trauma injury patients had improved recovery after we implemented routine geriatric consultation for patients ≥ age 65 at a level-1 academic trauma center. The intervention aimed to improve quality of geriatric care. However, the specific care processes that improved are unknown. Study Design Prospective observation comparing medical care after (December 2007-November 2009) versus before (December 2006-November 2007) implementation of the geriatric consult-based intervention. To measure quality-of-care (QOC) we used 33 previously-validated care-process quality indicators (QIs) from the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) study, measured by review of medical records for 76 Geriatric Consult [GC] versus 71 control group patients. As pre-specified subgroup analyses, we aggregated QIs by type: geriatric (e.g., delirium screening) versus non-geriatric condition-based care (e.g., thrombosis prophylaxis) and compared QI scores by type of care. Last, we aggregated QI scores into overall, geriatric, and non-geriatric QOC scores for each patient (# QIs passed/# QIs eligible), and compared patient-level QOC for the GC versus control group, adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, comorbidity, and injury severity. Results 63% of the GC versus 11% of the control group patients received a geriatric consultation. We evaluated 2505 QIs overall (1664 geriatric-type and 841 non-geriatric QIs). In general, fewer geriatric-type QIs were passed than non-geriatric QIs (71% vs 81%, p<.001). We provided better overall-QOC to the GC (77%) than control group patients (73%, p<.05). However, the difference was not statistically significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.08). We improved geriatric-QOC for the GC (74%) compared to the control group (68%, p<.01), a difference that was significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.01). Conclusion Geriatricians and surgeons can collaboratively improve geriatric QOC for older trauma patients. PMID:25840534

  19. Geriatric Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Perera, Thomas; Cortijo-Brown, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The geriatric population makes up a large portion of the emergency patient population. Geriatric patients have less reserve and more comorbid diseases. They are frequently on multiple medications and are more likely to require aggressive treatment during acute illness. Although it may not be obvious, it is important to recognize the signs of shock as early as possible. Special care and monitoring should be used when resuscitating the elderly. The use of bedside ultrasound and monitoring for coagulopathies are discussed. Clinicians should be constantly vigilant and reassess throughout diagnosis and treatment. Ethical considerations in this population need to be considered on an individual basis. PMID:27475009

  20. A Community-Based Approach for Integrating Geriatrics and Gerontology into Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Iveris L.; Mora, Jorge Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Medical school accreditation requirements require educational opportunities in geriatrics. Twenty-six minimum graduating competencies in geriatrics have recently been identified for medical students. The authors describe how these competencies are being integrated into a new medical curriculum through coursework and community-based experiences.…

  1. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  2. Medical Student and Senior Participants' Perceptions of a Mentoring Program Designed to Enhance Geriatric Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Sara J.; Frahm, Kathryn; Ochs, Leslie A.; Rheaume, Carol E.; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Senior Mentor Program was implemented as an innovative, instructional method in the University of South Carolina's medical school curriculum designed to enhance and strengthen student training in geriatrics. This study qualitatively analyzed second-year medical students' and senior participants' perceptions of and attitudes towards…

  3. The prevalence of drivers in acute geriatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; Turnbull, C. J.; King, D.

    1995-01-01

    An audit of 150 patients on five acute geriatric wards found that 28 (19%) still drove. Forty-three (28%) used to drive but had given up, whilst 79 (53%) (76 of whom were female) had never driven. Former drivers gave the main reason for stopping as cost. No driver could recall being advised about driving by a doctor. Twenty-two drivers (79%) had a significant clinical condition that could affect driving, ranging from blackouts to arthritis. It is recommended that all elderly patients should be asked if they drive and any clinical conditions they might have that would adversely affect their driving be sought. Appropriate advice should be given by doctors to their elderly patients in order to safeguard them and the public from road traffic accidents. PMID:8545286

  4. First Year Medical Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interest in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Wei-Hsin; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Gray, M. Peggy; Zweig, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an extracurricular geriatric program on medical students' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the elderly and their interest in studying geriatric medicine. The participants were first-year medical students (n = 137) who joined the Senior Teacher Education Partnership (STEP) program that…

  5. Integrating Geriatrics into Medical School: Student Journaling as an Innovative Strategy for Evaluating Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shield, Renee R.; Farrell, Timothy W.; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer…

  6. Some of My Best Friends Are Old: A Qualitative Exploration of Medical Students' Interest in Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schigelone, Amy Schiller; Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the reasons underlying medical students' interest in geriatrics. Semi-structured interviews, informed by attitude theory, were conducted with first-year medical students who indicated that they were not interested in geriatric medicine and those who indicated that they were moderately to very interested in…

  7. Some of My Best Friends Are Old: A Qualitative Exploration of Medical Students' Interest in Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schigelone, Amy Schiller; Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the reasons underlying medical students' interest in geriatrics. Semi-structured interviews, informed by attitude theory, were conducted with first-year medical students who indicated that they were not interested in geriatric medicine ( n =10) and those who indicated that they were moderately to very interested in…

  8. Relating Medical Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experience to an Interest in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, James T.; Wray, Linda A.; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Williams, Brent C.; Supiano, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined medical students' interest in geriatrics: Are knowledge, positive attitudes, and prior experience with older adults associated with an interest in geriatric medicine? Design and Methods: Entering University of Michigan medical students completed three surveys: the Revised Facts on Aging Quiz, the University of…

  9. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Academic Career in Geriatrics: Medical Students’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Maureen A.; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Iglewicz, Alana; Reichstadt, Jennifer; Palinkas, Lawrence; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is a growing concern about a shortage of physician scientists. This problem is particularly severe in certain subspecialties such as geriatrics in general and geriatric psychiatry in particular. This study sought to obtain medical students’ perspectives on barriers and facilitators toward pursuing a career in academics and/or in geriatric psychiatry or medicine. Methods The study surveyed 27 first-year medical students from six US medical schools, who had demonstrated a clear interest in academic geriatrics by completing a mentored summer research training program in geriatric medicine or geriatric psychiatry, funded by the National Institute on Aging. The survey included open-ended and close-ended questions about likely career choice and factors affecting it. Results Sixty percent of students reported they were likely to pursue an academic career, 44% a career in geriatric psychiatry or medicine, and only 36% a career in academic geriatrics. The most frequently perceived barriers were a lack of knowledge about academic careers and lack of exposure to geriatrics, financial concerns due to loan debts and low compensation, and negative impressions of research and of working with older adults. Facilitators included positive experiences with or positive impressions of research and research mentors and of older adults, and the growing demand for geriatric care. Conclusions Attracting capable and motivated medical students to academic careers in fields such as geriatric psychiatry or medicine should be a priority in seeking to expand the numbers of physician scientists and to add to the healthcare workforce in underserved subspecialty areas. Necessary approaches should include opportunities to work in academic settings, availability of sustained and dedicated mentorship, early, consistent, and positive exposure to older adults, and financial incentives. PMID:25080223

  10. [The geriatric university clinic].

    PubMed

    Stähelin, H B

    1995-01-01

    The very old are the fastest growing population group. Medical progress allows more autonomy and better quality of life for the elderly. Traditional medical concepts are, however, only partly suited for dealing with age-associated problems. Medical education responds to these new requirements in a limited way. Interdisciplinary teamwork is a prerequisite in treating the multimorbid, acutely ill elderly patient. The task of the university is not only the development and implementation of high-tech medicine, but first of all a comprehensive training in medicine, including geriatrics. The Geriatric University Clinic therefore offers pre- and postgraduate training in geriatrics, but also in related disciplines by promoting teaching and research. In order to attain these goals, the geriatric acute ward was created for acutely ill, very old, multimorbid, frail elderly patients. A geriatric ward for rehabilitation complements this ward. A consultation service offers geriatric know-how to all other services. A special task is the early diagnosis and treatment of dementia in an outpatient service. The aim is to prevent chronification by early intervention and to reestablish satisfactory function and autonomy. PMID:7780809

  11. Geriatric education centers address medication issues affecting older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, A; Blandford, D H; Krueger, K; Zwick, D I

    1992-01-01

    Serious problems have been identified in the prescribing of medications for elderly patients and use of prescription and nonprescription drugs by older persons. Overuse, underuse, and inappropriate use of drugs by the elderly have been widely documented, and the harmful consequences have been described. This paper reviews information concerning the need for action to improve health professionals' knowledge and skills with respect to drugs and the elderly and activities being undertaken by geriatric education centers (GECs) to enhance these capacities. Grant support for the centers from the Health Resources and Services Administration, a Public Health Service component agency, began in 1983. In fiscal year 1992 there are 31 centers operating in 26 States. The centers are multi-institutional and conduct four types of educational activities. These include review of pharmacological issues for multidisciplinary groups, specialized training for pharmacists, discipline-specific programs focusing on medication issues, and activities aimed at educating the public. Examples of the GECs' educational activities are given. PMID:1738807

  12. Curricular Strategies for Geriatrics Education in a Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A.; Moreno-Macias, Carlos H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the following: barriers to geriatrics education, teaching strategies (such as communication with patients, acceptance of one's own aging, interdisciplinary teamwork), and curriculum design for undergraduate and graduate study. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  13. Professional development and exposure to geriatrics: medical student perspectives from narrative journals.

    PubMed

    Shield, Renée R; Farrell, Timothy W; Campbell, Susan E; Nanda, Aman; Wetle, Terrie

    2015-01-01

    Teaching professionalism is an important goal in American medical education. With the aging of the U.S. population, it is critical to understand how medical students develop professional behaviors when caring for older adults. Exposure to geriatrics and older patients can enhance students' professional development with patients of all ages and across different specialties. Medical students learn explicit and implicit messages during their education. In addition to helping to evaluate curricula, reflective journaling encourages individual development and helps in revealing how medical students become professionals. In this study, medical student volunteers described their responses to new geriatrics content in their curriculum, encounters with older patients in clinical settings, and their evolving physician identities. Multidisciplinary team analysis elicited 10 themes regarding: evaluation of geriatrics within the curriculum, recognition of geriatrics principles, and attitudes regarding aging and professional development over time. This article focuses on the impact of geriatrics exposure on students' professional development, revealing ways that students think about professionalism and older patients. Medical educators should consider journaling to help foster and gauge students' professional development. PMID:25152977

  14. Detection and documentation of dementia and delirium in acute geriatric wards.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jouko V; Pitkala, Kaisu H; Strandberg, Timo E; Tilvis, Reijo S

    2004-01-01

    Detection of cognitive impairment among hospitalized older individuals has shown to be insufficient. A point prevalence study in two geriatric hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, was performed among 219 acutely ill individuals over 70 years to assess the detection of dementia and delirium. Documentation of dementia and delirium in medical records, and recordings of confusional symptoms in nurses' notes were compared with the researchers' diagnosis made after a detailed assessment of cognitive status. The cognitive decline was mentioned in medical records in 70/88 (79.5%) of the cases. Cognitive testing was performed on 42/88 (47.7%) of the dementia patients, and the diagnosis of dementia was recorded in 47/88 (53.4%) of them. A specific etiological diagnosis was recorded in only 4/88 (4.5%) cases. Cognitive impairment in at least one of these four means was recorded in 80/88 (90.9%) of cases (sensitivity 0.93). Eight patients had a false-positive diagnosis of dementia (specificity 0.94). Delirium was diagnosed in 77 (35.2%) patients by the researchers, but it was recorded in only 31/77 (40.3%) in medical records. In 64/77 (83.1%) cases signs of confusion were recorded in nurses' notes. Poor detection and documentation may lead to undertreatment of both disorders. PMID:14757300

  15. The Impact of Curricular Changes on the Geriatrics Knowledge, Attitudes and Skills of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagoshi, Michael H.; Tanabe, Marianne K. G.; Sakai, Damon H.; Masaki, Kamal H.; Kasuya, Richard T.; Blanchette, Patricia L.

    2008-01-01

    We redesigned our medical school's Problem-Based Learning (PBL) curriculum to include a substantial increase in required geriatrics content. Innovations included new PBL health care problems and standardized patients (SPs) throughout the first three years and a new required four-week, fourth-year rotation. We used data from the AAMC Medical School…

  16. Using a Geriatric Mentoring Narrative Program to Improve Medical Student Attitudes towards the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Pamela; Cohen, Diane; Novack, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    This study examined first-year medical student attitudes concerning the elderly before and after instituting a geriatric mentoring program. The program began and ended with a survey designed to assess students' attitudes toward the elderly. During the mentoring program, students visited the same senior for four visits throughout the academic year.…

  17. Integrating Geriatric Content into a Medical School Curriculum: Description of a Successful Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Debra A.; Raji, Mukaila; Lieberman, Steven; Beach, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Most medical school curricula do not equip students with adequate attitudes, knowledge and skills to care for elderly populations. We describe an effective geriatric curricular infusion model compatible with preserving the overall curricula schema. Course and clerkship directors, staff and faculty from the Office of Educational Development, Center…

  18. Hazards of Hospitalization: Hospitalists and Geriatricians Educating Medical Students about Delirium and Falls in Geriatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Valerie J.; Clark, Nancy S.; Medina-Walpole, Annette; McCann, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Geriatric patients are at increased risk for complications from delirium or falls during hospitalization. Medical education, however, generally places little emphasis on the hazards of hospitalization for older inpatients. Geriatricians conducted a faculty development workshop for hospitalists about the hazards of hospitalization for geriatric…

  19. A user's guide to enhancing geriatrics in an undergraduate medical school curriculum: the ten-step model to winning the "geriatric game".

    PubMed

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Clark, Nancy S; Heppard, Brian; Dannefer, Elaine; Hall, William; McCann, Robert

    2004-05-01

    In 1999, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry committed to major restructuring of its undergraduate medical school curriculum. A distinguishing feature of this reform was the planned emphasis on and integration of several core topics or themes throughout the 4 years of the curriculum. One of these curricular themes was aging. The faculty in geriatrics was presented with an unparalleled opportunity to develop a geriatrics curriculum of major proportions through the development of an aging theme. Through a user's guide approach based on the authors' experience to date, this article identifies the 10 steps necessary to "win the geriatric game" successfully integrating an aging theme into an undergraduate medical school curriculum. Since the initiation of the aging theme, several new courses, cases, and conferences have been added or enhanced, affecting all 4 years of the curriculum. Key operational challenges included successful engagement of course directors, tracking the actual experience of the aging theme, and evaluation of students' attainment of learning objectives and eventual career choices. The authors' experience suggests that an aging theme can successfully enhance the geriatrics curricular content of undergraduate education and strongly affect students across all 4 years. This 10-step approach may serve as a model for other universities committed to integrating geriatrics across the full undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:15086668

  20. BRIEF REPORT: Brief Instrument to Assess Geriatrics Knowledge of Surgical and Medical Subspecialty House Officers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brent C; Fitzgerald, James T

    2006-01-01

    PROBLEM Initiatives are underway to increase geriatrics training in nonprimary care disciplines. However, no validated instrument exists to measure geriatrics knowledge of house officers in surgical specialties and medical subspecialties. METHODS A 23-item multiple-choice test emphasizing inpatient care and common geriatric syndromes was developed through expert panels and pilot testing, and administered to 305 residents and fellows at 4 institutions in surgical disciplines (25% of respondents), emergency medicine (29%), medicine subspecialties (19%), internal medicine (12%), and other disciplines (15%). RESULTS Three items decreased internal reliability. The remaining 20 items covered 17 topic areas. Residents averaged 62% correct on the test. Internal consistency was appropriate (Cronbach's α coefficient = 0.60). Validity was supported by the use of expert panels to develop content, and by overall differences in scores by level of training (P<.0001) and graded improvement in test performance, with 58%, 63%, 62%, and 69% correct responses among HO1, HO2, HO3, and HO4s, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This reliable, valid measure of clinical geriatrics knowledge can be used by a wide variety of surgical and medical graduate medical education programs to guide curriculum reform or evaluate program performance to meet certification requirements. The instrument is now available on the web. PMID:16704394

  1. Seniors' perceptions of their medical care. Before admission to a geriatric rehabilitation program.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Su, Charles; Knott, T. Christine

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review older patients' perceptions of their medical care before hospital admission and to determine whether there are common perceptions family physicians should address after discharge. DESIGN: Semistructured interviews with qualitative analysis. SETTING: Inpatient geriatric rehabilitation and assessment unit. PARTICIPANTS: Community-living seniors admitted from home or transferred from acute care hospitals. METHOD: Consecutively admitted patients were interviewed within a week of admission. Participants were asked open-ended and Likert-type questions. Responses were analyzed to uncover recurrent themes and descriptive statistics. MAIN FINDINGS: Patients thought physicians' personalities and ability to communicate were important factors in their satisfaction with care received. Loyalty to a physician was an important theme and might have made patients minimize their concerns about care. Most patients were confident in being discharged back into the care of their family physicians. CONCLUSION: Physicians' personalities and communication skills affected whether patients were satisfied with care. Older patients are loyal to their family physicians; they did not identify any issues for family physicians to address with them after discharge. PMID:14649988

  2. The pre-travel medical evaluation: the traveler with chronic illness and the geriatric traveler.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    The pre-travel medical evaluation of elderly patients and patients with chronic illness requires special assessment and advice. Screening and special precautions are reviewed for traveling patients with respiratory disease, cardiac disease, sinusitis, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, and other chronic medical conditions. Current guidelines for empiric therapy and prophylaxis of travelers' diarrhea are reviewed, with emphasis on concerns in geriatric or chronically ill travelers. Special considerations such as potential drug-drug interactions and insurance coverage are also discussed. PMID:1290273

  3. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    PubMed Central

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia. Methods A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services. Results Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%), followed by transcription errors (15%), dispensing errors (14%), and prescribing errors (7%). Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant. Conclusion Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors. PMID:24940067

  4. Medical Problems Referred to a Care of the Elderly Physician: Insight for Future Geriatrics CME

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Robert; Gallinaro, Anna; Adleman, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Family physicians provide the majority of elderly patient care in Canada. Many experience significant challenges in serving this cohort. This study aimed to examine the medical problems of patients referred to a care of the elderly physician, to better understand the geriatric continuing medical education (CME) needs of family doctors. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients assessed at an urban outpatient seniors’ clinic between 2003 and 2008 was conducted. Data from 104 charts were analyzed and survey follow-up with 28 of the referring family physicians was undertaken. Main outcomes include the type and frequency of medical problems actually referred to a care of the elderly physician. Clarification of future geriatric CME topics of need was also assessed. Results Preventive care issues were addressed with 67 patients. Twenty-four required discussion of advance directives. The most common medical problems encountered were osteoarthritis (42), hypertension (34), osteoporosis (32), and depression or anxiety (23). Other common problems encountered that have not been highly cited as being a target of CME included musculoskeletal and joint pain (41), diabetes (23), neck and back pain (20), obesity (11), insomnia (11), and neuropathic, fibromyalgia and “leg cramps” pain (10). The referring family physicians surveyed agreed that these were topics of need for future CME. Conclusions The findings support geriatric CME for the common medical problems encountered. Chronic pain, diabetes, obesity and insomnia continue to be important unresolved issues previously unacknowledged by physicians as CME topics of need. Future CME focusing more on process of geriatric care may also be relevant. PMID:23983827

  5. Attitude adjustment: shaping medical students' perceptions of older patients with a geriatrics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bensadon, Benjamin A; Teasdale, Thomas A; Odenheimer, Germaine L

    2013-11-01

    For more than half a century, scientific research has documented widespread avoidance and even denial of aging. Though nothing new, aversive reactions to the elderly are not only unfortunate but dangerous today, as increasing life expectancy and consequent demand for specialized geriatric medical care vastly outpace the supply of qualified clinicians equipped to provide it. This discrepancy has led to a crisis that is not easily resolved. At the same time, geriatrics reports the highest level of physician satisfaction among medical specialties. How can this apparent disconnect be explained, and what can be done about it? Citing evidence from medicine and other health care disciplines, the authors address these questions by emphasizing the role of aging-related attitudes, a complex but theoretically modifiable construct. Successful educational interventions are described, including the authors' experience at the helm of a monthlong geriatrics clerkship for fourth-year medical students. Novel suggestions are provided to combat the daunting challenges to achieving a workforce that is sufficient both in number and training to effectively meet the needs of the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population. As patients continue to age across most medical specialties, the importance of geriatric curricula, particularly those sensitizing learners to the need for a systems-based, biopsychosocial (i.e., interdisciplinary) model of care, cannot be overemphasized. Such training, it is argued, should be a standard component of medical education, and future research should focus on identifying specific curricular content and teaching methods that most effectively achieve this end. PMID:24072114

  6. Social Learning: Medical Student Perceptions of Geriatric House Calls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Linda; Willett, Rita; Selby-Penczak, Rachel; McKnight, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Bandura's social learning theory provides a useful conceptual framework to understand medical students' perceptions of a house calls experience at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. Social learning and role modeling reflect Liaison Committee on Medical Education guidelines for "Medical schools (to) ensure that the learning…

  7. C-reactive protein and the acute phase reaction in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Thomas; Triebel, Jakob; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Christ, Michael; Sieber, Cornel; Fassbender, Klaus; Heppner, Hans Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The C-reactive protein (CRP), first described as a serum component capable of precipitating the C-polysaccharide of pneumococci, is one of the most important proteins because the serum concentration rises in the acute phase reaction. The acute phase reaction is the nonspecific reaction of the body to noxious stimuli of the most varied kinds, such as infections, burns, neoplasms and tissue trauma. The CRP is synthesized in liver parenchymal cells by cytokines which are derived from stimulated leucocytes and released into the circulation. Because of its molecular structure and in synergy with the complement system, it is able to precipitate and/or lyse microorganisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Measurement of the serum CRP concentration can provide important information with respect to the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Due to immunosenescence in geriatric patients the synthesis of CRP appears to be limited to inflammatory stimuli; however, this phenomenon does not appear to be of major clinical relevance. Despite the introduction of new parameters of the acute phase reaction, sometimes with better performance, such as interleukin-6, procalcitonin and the soluble endotoxin receptor sCD14, measurement of CRP for diagnosis and treatment monitoring is still justified even in geriatric patients as testing is rapid, economic and nearly ubiquitously available round the clock. Biochemical markers of the acute phase reaction should always be interpreted together with the clinical picture and their specific limitations. PMID:26334841

  8. Implementing Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders Team Care in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center: Lessons Learned and Effects Observed.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Cathy C; Myers, Laura J; Allen, Katie; Counsell, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE), a model of care that works in collaboration with primary care providers (PCPs) and patient-centered medical homes to provide home-based geriatric care management focusing on geriatric syndromes and psychosocial problems commonly found in older adults, improved care quality and reduced acute care use for high-risk, low-income older adults. To assess the effect of GRACE at a Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center (VAMC), veterans aged 65 and older from Marion County, Indiana, with PCPs from four of five VAMC clinics who were not on hospice or dialysis were enrolled in GRACE after discharge home from an acute hospitalization. After an initial home-based transition visit to GRACE enrollees, the GRACE team returned to conduct a geriatric assessment. Guided by 12 protocols and input from an interdisciplinary panel and the PCP, the GRACE team developed and implemented a veteran-centric care plan. Hospitalized veterans from the fifth clinic, who otherwise met enrollment criteria, served as a usual-care comparison group. Demographic, comorbidity, and usage data were drawn from VA databases. The GRACE and comparison groups were similar in age, sex, and burden of comorbidity, although predicted risk of 1-year mortality in GRACE veterans was higher. Even so, GRACE enrollment was associated with 7.1% fewer emergency department visits, 14.8% fewer 30-day readmissions, 37.9% fewer hospital admissions, and 28.5% fewer total bed days of care, saving the VAMC an estimated $200,000 per year after program costs during the study for the 179 veterans enrolled in GRACE. Having engaged, enthusiastic VA leadership and GRACE staff; aligning closely with the medical home; and accommodating patient acuity were among the important lessons learned during implementation. PMID:27305428

  9. Age-related geriatric medicine: relevance of special skills of geriatric medicine to elderly people admitted to hospital as medical emergencies.

    PubMed Central

    Kafetz, K; O'Farrell, J; Parry, A; Wijesuriya, V; McElligott, G; Rossiter, B; Lugon, M

    1995-01-01

    This study was carried out to find out how many patients aged 75 and over admitted to hospital as medical emergencies had features appropriate to care by physicians in geriatric medicine and to examine the extent of use of specialist facilities by these patients. The purpose was to examine criticisms of age-related admission policies which have focused on misplacement of patients with single diagnoses and lack of access to specialist care. An analysis was made of admission, process and discharge characteristics relevant to the special skills of geriatric medicine, multiple pathology and use of specialist services by 554 patients aged 75 and over. These were collected prospectively, consecutively admitted as medical emergencies via the accident and emergency department of a large district general hospital with an age-related (75 and over) medical admissions policy. 84 patients (15%) had single pathology and no characteristics suggesting the need for specialist geriatric care. 177 (32%) had single pathology and one or more specialized characteristics. 66 (12%) had multiple pathology alone. 227 (41%) had multiple pathology and specialized characteristics. There were 142 specialist referrals in 121 patients (22% of the whole sample). We concluded that the special skills of general physicians specializing in the medical and associated community problems of elderly people are highly relevant to patients aged 75 and over presenting as medical emergencies. There was no evidence of lack of involvement of specialists in their care. PMID:8544147

  10. Current Trends in Geriatric Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Joseph H; Magauran, Brendan G; Olshaker, Jonathan S; Shankar, Kalpana N

    2016-08-01

    The number of geriatric visits to United States emergency departments continues to rise. This article reviews demographics, statistics, and future projections in geriatric emergency medicine. Included are discussions of US health care spending, geriatric emergency departments, prehospital care, frailty of geriatric patients, delirium, geriatric trauma, geriatric screening and prediction tools, medication safety, long-term care, and palliative care. PMID:27475008

  11. Experiential Learning about the Elderly: The Geriatric Medication Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Carol H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    An active learning simulation game designed to increase pharmacy students' awareness of the physical, psychological, and financial difficulties of the ambulatory elderly in handling their medication is described. Questionnaires before and after the game, including a semantic differential tool, indicate that the program is successful in increasing…

  12. An Update on Geriatric Medication Safety and Challenges Specific to the Care of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Koronkowski, Michael; Eisenhower, Christine; Marcum, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    The prescribing of drug therapies in older adults presents a number of safety challenges. The increased complexity of chronic care for older adults has led to polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medication use, which can contribute to drug-induced diseases, adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, cognitive impairment, falls, hospitalization, and mortality. In this review, the authors discuss recent medication safety literature pertaining to the classes of medications commonly prescribed to older adults: anticholinergics, psychiatric medications, and antibiotics. Safety concerns associated with the use of these medications and the implications for long-term care practitioners are reviewed. The information provided can be used to inform and improve geriatric care delivered by practitioners across health care environments. PMID:27340375

  13. Automated Assessment of Medical Students’ Clinical Exposures according to AAMC Geriatric Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yukun; Wrenn, Jesse; Xu, Hua; Spickard, Anderson; Habermann, Ralf; Powers, James; Denny, Joshua C.

    2014-01-01

    Competence is essential for health care professionals. Current methods to assess competency, however, do not efficiently capture medical students’ experience. In this preliminary study, we used machine learning and natural language processing (NLP) to identify geriatric competency exposures from students’ clinical notes. The system applied NLP to generate the concepts and related features from notes. We extracted a refined list of concepts associated with corresponding competencies. This system was evaluated through 10-fold cross validation for six geriatric competency domains: “medication management (MedMgmt)”, “cognitive and behavioral disorders (CBD)”, “falls, balance, gait disorders (Falls)”, “self-care capacity (SCC)”, “palliative care (PC)”, “hospital care for elders (HCE)” – each an American Association of Medical Colleges competency for medical students. The systems could accurately assess MedMgmt, SCC, HCE, and Falls competencies with F-measures of 0.94, 0.86, 0.85, and 0.84, respectively, but did not attain good performance for PC and CBD (0.69 and 0.62 in F-measure, respectively). PMID:25954341

  14. The Effect of Training on Medical Students' Responses to Geriatric Patient Concerns: Results of a Linguistic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Lynne S.; Wolf, Fredric M.

    1989-01-01

    Found that experience-based educational intervention in which medical students interview volunteer nursing home residents significantly changed medical students' responses to two geriatric patient vignettes. Concluded that use of elderly volunteers in practice interviews helped to sensitize students to problems of aging and taught them empathic…

  15. Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Medzon, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Within the next 15 years, 1 in 5 Americans will be over age 65. $34 billion will be spent yearly on trauma care of this age group. This section covers situations in trauma unique to the geriatric population, who are often under-triaged and have significant injuries underestimated. Topics covered include age-related pathophysiological changes, underlying existing medical conditions and certain daily medications that increase the risk of serious injury in elderly trauma patients. Diagnostic evaluation of this group requires liberal testing, imaging, and a multidisciplinary team approach. Topics germane to geriatric trauma including hypothermia, elder abuse, and depression and suicide are also covered. PMID:27475011

  16. [Geriatric dentistry: medical problems as well as disease- and therapy-induced oral disorders].

    PubMed

    Koller, M M

    1994-03-01

    As in pediatric dentistry, management of the oral problems in elderly patients does not depend on the development of new technical skills, but rather on the knowledge of: biological, psychological and social aspects of primary (physiological or age-related) and secondary (pathological or disease-related) aging; atypical presentations of disease; multiple pathological conditions (polymorbidity, polypathophysiology, polypharmacy); an underreporting of disease; the importance of functional status; the role of an interdisciplinary team; Geriatric medicine refers to social, psychological and clinical aspects of disease in older adults. Geriatric dentistry deals with the respective aspects concerning oral diseases. Chronic conditions as well as their treatment (e.g. medication) are more common with advancing age. They may have major implications for dental practice, leading to changes in oral health behavior and attitudes of the elderly patient with sometimes detrimental effects on oral health. Therefore, different concepts in prevention, diagnosis and therapy of oral diseases are required for the oral care of older adults. Two important consequences must be considered: Firstly, the medical education of the dentist and the dental team must be improved. The dental team must become a member of the group of health-care professionals caring for an aging population (geriatric medicine) to meet the heterogeneous needs of as much as 75% of our future patients. Secondly, there is great need for education of all health-care professionals dealing with elderly patients about possible negative impacts medicine can have on oral health. Identification and diagnosis of oral disease as well as preventive measures must be stressed. PMID:8153504

  17. A Multi-Method Study of the Geriatric Learning Needs of Acute Care Hospital Nurses in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mary T; Butler, Jeffrey I; Persaud, Malini; Tregunno, Deborah; Sidani, Souraya; McCague, Hugh

    2016-02-01

    Older people are at risk of experiencing functional decline and related complications during hospitalization. In countries with projected increases in age demographics, preventing these adverse consequences is a priority. Because most Canadian nurses have received little geriatrics content in their basic education, understanding their learning needs is fundamental to preparing them to respond to this priority. This two-phased multi-method study identified the geriatrics learning needs and strategies to address the learning needs of acute care registered nurses (RNs) and registered practical nurses (RPNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. In Phase I, a survey that included a geriatric nursing knowledge scale was completed by a random sample of 2005 Ontario RNs and RPNs. Average scores on the geriatric nursing knowledge scale were in the "neither good nor bad" range, with RNs demonstrating slightly higher scores than RPNs. In Phase II, 33 RN and 24 RPN survey respondents participated in 13 focus group interviews to help confirm and expand survey findings. In thematic analysis, three major themes were identified that were the same in RNs and RPNs: (a) geriatric nursing is generally regarded as simple and custodial, (b) older people's care is more complex than is generally appreciated, and (c) in the current context, older people's care is best learned experientially and in brief on-site educational sessions. Healthcare providers, policy-makers, and educators can use the findings to develop educational initiatives to prepare RNs and RPNs to respond to the needs of an aging hospital population. PMID:26471253

  18. Drug-related problems (DRPs) identified from geriatric medication safety review clinics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ding-Cheng; Chen, Jen-Hau; Kuo, Hsu-Ko; We, Chiung-Jung; Lu, I-Shu; Chiu, Lee-Shu; Wu, Shwu-Chong

    2012-01-01

    Drug-related problems (DRPs) were identified from baseline data of 193 Medication Safety Review Clinic (MSRC) patients. MSRCs enroll older adults (≥ 65 years) with either (1) prescriptions of ≥ 8 chronic medications (drugs prescribed for ≥ 28 days) or (2) a visit to ≥ 3 different physicians at the two participating hospitals in Taipei, Taiwan from August to October 2007. The Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe (PCNE) Classification Version 5.01 was used to report DRPs. Mean age was 76.2 ± 6.2 years and 53% of participants were male. Participants had, on average, 9.0 ± 2.6 chronic conditions and took 8.9 ± 3.1 chronic medications and 1.7 ± 1.8 dietary supplements. Eighty-seven percent had at least one DRP. Being older, having orthostatic hypotension and taking more chronic medications were associated with higher likelihood of having at least one DRP. For the 1713 medications and 331 diet supplements reviewed, 427 DRPs were found, 490 causes (1.1 ± 0.4 per problem) identified and 1067 interventions proposed (2.5 ± 0.6 per problem). The most common DRP category was "drug not taken/administered" (35%), and the most common offending drug category was cardiovascular agents (33%). Prevalence of DRPs was high among geriatric outpatients prescribed multiple medications. Careful medication review is needed in routine clinical practice to improve prescription quality. PMID:21353318

  19. Geriatric syndromes are potential determinants of the medication adherence status in prevalent dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Geriatric syndromes (GS) exhibit high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under chronic dialysis irrespective of age. We sought to determine whether GS influences medication adherence in ESRD patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of chronic dialysis patients was assembled. The presence of GS components, including frailty/prefrailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition, were ascertained through a validated questionnaire, electronic records and chart abstraction, and laboratory tests. The severity of medication non-adherence was defined using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed targeting MMAS results and incorporating relevant clinical features and GS. Results. The prevalence of frailty/pre-frailty, polypharmacy, and hypoalbuminemia/ malnutrition among the enrolled participants was 66.7%, 94%, and 14%, respectively. The average MMAS scores in these dialysis patients were 2 ± 1.7 (range, 0–6), with only 15.7% exhibiting high medication adherence. Multiple regression analyses showed that the absence of frailty/pre-frailty (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with poorer medication adherence, while the presence of polypharmacy (P = 0.02) and lower serum albumin, a potential sign of malnutrition (P = 0.03), were associated with poor adherence in another model. Conclusion. This study is among the very few reports addressing GS and medication adherence, especially in ESRD patients. Interventions targeting frailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition might potentially improve the medication non-adherence and symptom control in these pill-burdened patients. PMID:27326380

  20. [Urosepsis in Geriatric Patients].

    PubMed

    Heppner, H J; Yapan, F; Wiedemann, A

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demographic shift, increasing numbers of geriatric patients are admitted to acute care hospitals of all levels of care. This means that special challenges must be met in the medical care and management of these patients.Immunosenescence and multimorbidity make elderly patients vulnerable to infectious diseases. Urinary tract infections range from "simple" cystitis to pyelonephritis and urosepsis and, at 25%, are the second most common form of infection in geriatric patients. It is often difficult to make a diagnosis because typical symptoms do not always occur. Urosepsis, a hyperactive and uncontrolled immune response of the organism due to exogenous damage, is based on bacterial infection of the urogenital tract. Urinary retention, immunosuppressive medication, malignancy, diabetes mellitus and renal or prostatic processes promote the risk for urosepsis. Complicated urosepsis additionally comprises a structural or functional abnormality, including ureteral obstruction. Risk factors for urosepsis are urinary incontinence, an indwelling urinary catheter, hydronephrosis or ureteral calculi. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus are also at a higher risk for urosepsis. When diagnosing elderly patients, one has to consider that the classic symptoms can be masked by multimorbidity, or septic encephalopathy and acute confusion (delirium) may be the only symptoms. Body temperature is lower in elderly patients and does not necessarily rise to 38°C or more in the acute phase. In patients older than 75 years who are suspicious for sepsis, temperatures as low as 37.4°C should be rated as fever. Treatment of urosepsis basically includes clearing the focus, antimicrobial treatment, stabilisation of circulation and replacement of failed organ functions. Initial empiric antibiotic treatment, depending on local resistance, should be done with acylaminopenicilline and beta-lactamase inhibitors (e. g. piperacillin/combactam or tazobactam or group 3 cephalosporins

  1. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria are presented. Like the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria, they include lists of potentially inappropriate medications to be avoided in older adults. New to the criteria are lists of select drugs that should be avoided or have their dose adjusted based on the individual's kidney function and select drug-drug interactions documented to be associated with harms in older adults. The specific aim was to have a 13-member interdisciplinary panel of experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy update the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria using a modified Delphi method to systematically review and grade the evidence and reach a consensus on each existing and new criterion. The process followed an evidence-based approach using Institute of Medicine standards. The 2015 AGS Beers Criteria are applicable to all older adults with the exclusion of those in palliative and hospice care. Careful application of the criteria by health professionals, consumers, payors, and health systems should lead to closer monitoring of drug use in older adults. PMID:26446832

  2. An international model for geriatrics program development in China: the Johns Hopkins-Peking Union Medical College experience.

    PubMed

    Leng, Sean X; Tian, Xinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Lazarus, Gerald; Bellantoni, Michele; Greenough, William; Fried, Linda P; Shen, Ti; Durso, Samuel C

    2010-07-01

    China has the world's largest and most rapidly growing older adult population. Recent dramatic socioeconomic changes, including a large number of migrating workers leaving their elderly parents and grandparents behind and the 4:2:1 family structure caused by the one-child policy, have greatly compromised the traditional Chinese family support for older adults. These demographic and socioeconomic factors, the improved living standards, and the quest for higher quality of life are creating human economic pressures. The plight of senior citizens is leading to an unprecedented need for geriatrics expertise in China. To begin to address this need, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHU) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) have developed a joint international project aimed at establishing a leadership program at the PUMC Hospital that will promote quality geriatrics care, education, and aging research for China. Important components of this initiative include geriatrics competency training for PUMC physicians and nurses in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at JHU, establishing a geriatrics demonstration ward at the PUMC Hospital, faculty exchange between JHU and PUMC, and on-site consultation by JHU geriatrics faculty. This article describes the context and history of this ongoing collaboration and important components, progress, challenges, and future prospects, focusing on the JHU experience. Specific and practical recommendations are made for those who plan such international joint ventures. With such unique experiences, it is hoped that this will serve as a useful model for international geriatrics program development for colleagues in the United States and abroad. PMID:20533962

  3. Academic geriatrics in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chek Hooi; Landefeld, C Seth

    2011-11-01

    Singapore is one of the fastest-aging countries in the world. The proportion of adults aged 65 and older is projected to increase from 8.7% to 20% over the next 20 years. The country has developed various strategies to meet the needs of this increase in older adults. There is an acute shortage of geriatricians and a need to train more healthcare workers to care for older adults. Geriatric medicine is a relatively new specialty, and a small number of geriatricians have been tasked with providing an increasing load of clinical service, education, and research. Hence, there is a need to develop a cohesive structure of support for faculty development and retention, advanced specialty trainee recruitment, leadership in medical education, research, and clinical service to care for the rapidly aging population. In addition, geriatric medicine is primarily a hospital-based specialty in Singapore. There is still opportunity to collaborate and improve the academic and practice integration of geriatric medicine into primary care and intermediate and long-term care where it is most needed. PMID:22091794

  4. Geriatric Expertise among Medical School Faculty: Preparing for the Challenges of an Aging Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Jenkins, Carol L.; Eleazer, G. Paul; Kelsey, Susan G.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined non-geriatrician physicians' experiences in a geriatrics-focused faculty development program, and effects of the program on their geriatrics knowledge and their teaching and practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with all physicians (n = 26) participating in the Dean's Faculty Scholars in Aging program. Most participants…

  5. Shared medical appointments to screen for geriatric syndromes: preliminary data from a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    May, Suepattra G; Cheng, Peter H; Tietbohl, Caroline K; Trujillo, Laurel; Reilly, Kelly; Frosch, Dominick L; Lin, Grace A

    2014-12-01

    Older adults are at greater risk of developing conditions that affect health outcomes, quality of life, and costs of care. Screening for geriatric conditions such as memory loss, fall risk, and depression may contribute to the prevention of adverse physical and mental comorbidities, unnecessary hospitalizations, and premature nursing home admissions. Because screening is not consistently performed in primary care settings, a shared medical appointment (SMA) program was developed to fill this gap in care. The goals of the program were to improve early identification of at-risk individuals and ensure appropriate follow-up for memory loss, fall risk, and depression; facilitate discussion about prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these conditions; implement strategies to reduce risks for these conditions; and increase access to screening and expand preventive health services for older adults. Between August 2011 and May 2013, 136 individuals aged 60 and older participated in the program. Three case studies highlighting the psychosocial and physiological findings of participation in the program are presented. Preliminary data suggest that SMAs are an effective model of regularly screening at-risk older adults that augments primary care practice by facilitating early detection and referral for syndromes that may otherwise be missed or delayed. PMID:25440111

  6. [Geriatrics - an interdisciplinary challenge].

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Wappler, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The care of elderly patients will continue to challenge the healthcare system over the next decades. As a rule geriatric patients suffer from multimorbidities with complex disease patterns, and the ability to cope with everyday life is severely reduced. Treatment is provided by a multiprofessional geriatric team, and the primary goal is improvement of functional status, quality of life in the social environment and autonomy by employing a holistic approach. In Germany geriatric care is provided by physicians from various medical specialties (e.g. general practitioners, internists, neurologists and psychiatrists). In the training for the subspecialty clinical geriatrics, these specialties enjoy equal rights. Recent efforts to establish a qualification as physician for internal medicine and geriatrics have initiated a discussion to make the suitability for qualification as a geriatrician dependent on the medical specialty. Geriatric patients benefit from multidisciplinary cooperation. Neurologists possess great expertise in the treatment of patients with dementia, depression, delirium, consequences of degenerative spinal cord diseases and vertebral bone fractures, stroke, Parkinson's syndrome, epileptic seizures, vertigo and dizziness, neuropathies, lesions of peripheral nerves and in the multimodal therapy of pain. To function in a position of responsibility in a geriatric department, neurologists need skills in general internal medicine. These are acquired either on a geriatric ward or during specialization as a neurologist by full time secondment to large neurological or interdisciplinary intensive care units. PMID:27167886

  7. IMPACT OF THE GERIATRIC MEDICATION GAME® ON NURSING STUDENTS EMPATHY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Kiersma, Mary E.; Yehle, Karen S.; Plake, Kimberly S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses should be well-prepared to improve and address health-related needs of older adults, but students may have difficulty understanding and empathizing, as they may not yet have personally experienced aging-related challenges. Simulation games can be used to help students understand the experiences of others, but limited information is available on the impact of simulation experiences on student empathy. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the impact of participation in an aging simulation game on nursing students’ empathy and attitudes toward older adults as well as their understanding of patients’ experiences in the healthcare system. Design This study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design. Setting A school of nursing in the Midwestern United States. Participants The convenience sample included 58 sophomore-level baccalaureate nursing students. Methods Students played the role of an older adult during a 3-hour laboratory aging simulation game, the Geriatric Medication Game® (GMG). Students completed the (1) Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale (KCES, 15 items, 7-point Likert-type), (2) Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Professions Students (JSE-HPS, 20 items, 7-point Likert-type), and (3) Aging Simulation Experience Survey (13 items, 7-point Likert-type) pre- and post-game to assess study objectives. Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests (were performed in SPSS v.21.0, as the data were normally distributed. Results Students’ empathy (N=58) toward older adults significantly improved overall (KCES p=0.015, JSE-HPS p<0.001). Improvements also were seen on seven out of 13 questions related to attitudes and healthcare understanding (p<0.05). In the post-test, students agreed that they experienced frustration and impatience during the GMG. Conclusions Students may not be aware of older adults’ feelings and experiences prior to experiencing aging-related changes themselves. Simulation activities, such as the GMG, can be

  8. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  9. Effect of automated drug distribution systems on medication error rates in a short-stay geriatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Cousein, Etienne; Mareville, Julie; Lerooy, Alexandre; Caillau, Antoine; Labreuche, Julien; Dambre, Delphine; Odou, Pascal; Bonte, Jean-Paul; Puisieux, François; Decaudin, Bertrand; Coupé, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives To assess the impact of an automated drug distribution system on medication errors (MEs). Methods Before-after observational study in a 40-bed short stay geriatric unit within a 1800 bed general hospital in Valenciennes, France. Researchers attended nurse medication administration rounds and compared administered to prescribed drugs, before and after the drug distribution system changed from a ward stock system (WSS) to a unit dose dispensing system (UDDS), integrating a unit dose dispensing robot and automated medication dispensing cabinet (AMDC). Results A total of 615 opportunities of errors (OEs) were observed among 148 patients treated during the WSS period, and 783 OEs were observed among 166 patients treated during the UDDS period. ME [medication administration error (MAE)] rates were calculated and compared between the two periods. Secondary measures included type of errors, seriousness of errors and risk reduction for the patients. The implementation of an automated drug dispensing system resulted in a 53% reduction in MAEs. All error types were reduced in the UDDS period compared with the WSS period (P < 0.001). Wrong dose and wrong drug errors were reduced by 79.1% (2.4% versus 0.5%, P = 0.005) and 93.7% (1.9% versus 0.01%, P = 0.009), respectively. Conclusion An automated UDDS combining a unit dose dispensing robot and AMDCs could reduce discrepancies between ordered and administered drugs, thus improving medication safety among the elderly. PMID:24917185

  10. Acute liver failure and self-medication

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, André Vitorio Câmara; ROCHA, Frederico Theobaldo Ramos; ABREU, Sílvio Romero de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Not responsible self-medication refers to drug use in high doses without rational indication and often associated with alcohol abuse. It can lead to liver damage and drug interactions, and may cause liver failure. Aim To warn about how the practice of self-medication can be responsible for acute liver failure. Method Were used the Medline via PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Lilacs, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings acute liver failure [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; acute liver failure [tiab] AND dietary supplements [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND liver failure [tiab] and self-medication [tiab] AND green tea [tiab]. In Lilacs and SciELO used the descriptor self medication in Portuguese and Spanish. From total surveyed were selected 27 articles and five sites specifically related to the purpose of this review. Conclusions Legislation and supervision disabled and information inaccessible to people, favors the emergence of cases of liver failure drug in many countries. In the list of released drugs that deserve more attention and care, are some herbal medicines used for the purpose of weight loss, and acetaminophen. It is recommended that institutes of health intensify supervision and better orient their populations on drug seemingly harmless, limiting the sale of products or requiring a prescription for release them. PMID:25626943

  11. Vital links. Hospital's geriatric program integrates the spectrum of care.

    PubMed

    Holt, T

    1989-06-01

    In July 1988 St. Mary Medical Center (SMMC), Long Beach, CA, established Older Adult Services (OAS) to help the elderly of the community. At the time, SMMC was already providing a number of services for the elderly, but OAS enables it to provide a continuum of care. In addition, the medical staff committee developing the geriatric program recommended establishing a geriatric assessment team headed by a fellowship-trained geriatrician, having that geriatrician serve as medical director of the inpatient skilled nursing facility (SNF), having the geriatric team develop treatment protocols in various aspects of care, and extending OAS within the community. The categories of service within the continuum are extended care, acute care, ambulatory care, home care, outreach, wellness, and housing. SMMC does not directly provide all services; rather, through integrating mechanisms, it uses community-based services or services provided by other institutions to meet some patient needs. A key element to integrating the continuum is the involvement of OAS in the SNF. The SNF medical director can bring the expertise of the geriatric assessment team to a wide sphere of the medical community. This sphere of influence quickly spreads to the hospital's entire medical community. Through direct participation in utilization review and quality assurance in the SNF, the OAS director can influence the quality of care. PMID:10293329

  12. Geriatric forensics - Part 2 “Prevalence of elder abuse and their potential forensic markers among medical and dental patients”

    PubMed Central

    Mattoo, Khurshid A.; Garg, Rishabh; Kumar, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Context: This study is a continuation of the earlier studies and has been extended to investigate the potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Aims: To determine the prevalence of elder abuse in various outpatient departments (OPDs). To study the associated parameters related to the abuser and the abused. To determine the existence of potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Settings and Design: The subjects were randomly selected from the medical and the dental OPDs of the university. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and thirty two elderly subjects in the age range 40-60 years were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine the existence of elder abuse. The subjects were investigated and examined for weight, nutrition and hydration, vital signs, habits, existing visual and auditory capabilities, medications, disclosure of wills/deeds, signs of depression, and documented cleanliness. The mini-mental state examination, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Clock drawing test, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale were used to determine the potential forensic markers. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean values in percentage were determined by dividing the number of determined subjects by the total number of subjects for that parameter. Results: About 37% in medical and 41% in dental OPDs were found to have suffered from abuse, mostly in the age group 60-70 years. Females received more abuse and a combination of son and daughter-in-law constituted most abusers. Various potential markers of elder abuse and neglect investigated among the elder abuse victims included depression (89%), signs of improper feeding (83%), changes in personal hygiene (69%), need for medical/dental treatment (78%), medication misuse (67%), changes in wills/deeds (26%), decubiti (10%), bruises (17%), skin tears (27%), and confusion (23%). Conclusions: Elder abuse exists in one or more forms in both medical and dental OPDs among both males and females in all age groups. PMID:26816460

  13. Frailty in patients with acute coronary syndrome: comparison between tools for comprehensive geriatric assessment and the Tilburg Frailty Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Lisiak, Magdalena; Wontor, Radosław; Łoboz-Grudzień, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is a known fact that age is a strong predictor of adverse events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this context, the main risk factor in elderly patients, ie, frailty syndrome, gains special importance. The availability of tools to identify frail people is relevant for both research and clinical purposes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of a scale for assessing frailty – the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) and its domains (mental and physical) – with other research tools commonly used for comprehensive geriatric assessment in patients with ACS. Patients and methods The study covered 135 people and was carried out in the cardiology ward at T Marciniak Lower Silesian Specialist Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. The patients were admitted with ACS. ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction were defined by the presence of certain conditions in reference to the literature. The Polish adaptation of the TFI was used for the frailty syndrome assessment, which was compared to other single measures used in geriatric assessment: the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Katz Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). Results The mean TFI value in the studied group amounted to 7.13±2.81 (median: 7, interquartile range: 5–9, range [0, 14]). Significant correlations were demonstrated between the values of the TFI and other scales: positive for HADS (r=0.602, P<0.001) and the reverse for MMSE (r=−0.603, P<0.001) and IADL (r=−0.462, P<0.001). Patients with a TFI score ≥5 revealed considerably higher values on HADS (P<0.001) and considerably lower values on the MMSE (P<0.001) and IADL scales (P=0.001). Conclusion The results for the TFI comply with the results of other scales (MMSE, HADS, ADL, IADL), which confirm the credibility of the Polish adaptation of the tool. Stronger correlations were observed for

  14. [Advances in geriatric cardiology].

    PubMed

    Gómez Sánchez, Miguel A; Bañuelos de Lucas, Camino; Ribera Casado, José M; Pérez Casar, Feliciano

    2006-01-01

    The continued aging of the population is an acknowledged fact. The proportion of individuals in the European Union aged over 65 years will reach 29.9% by 2050, almost double the present figure of 16.4%. Approximately one third of people in this age-group has clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Physicians dealing with cardiology in older patients have to be aware of the specific clinical and prognostic features of cardiovascular disease in the elderly, and with its treatment. Consequently, it is clear that continuing medical education in geriatric cardiology is essential, and that is one of the tasks of the Working Group on Geriatric Cardiology. This special issue provides a magnificent opportunity for presenting an update on important topics in geriatric cardiology, such as the aging of the cardiovascular system, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. PMID:16540026

  15. The economic impact of medical complications in geriatric patients with hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Khasraghi, Fardin A; Lee, Eu Jin; Christmas, Colleen; Wenz, James F

    2003-01-01

    The records of 510 elderly patients with hip fractures admitted to our institution between January 1995 and December 2000 were retrospectively reviewed to determine the incidence and type of developed medical complications and their economic implications. Of those 510 patients, 217 (43%) developed at least 1 medical complication, most frequently electrolyte imbalance (11%), urinary tract infection (10%), respiratory failure (10%), and delirium (9%). Patients who developed medical complications had significantly longer mean hospital stays (10 days) and higher mean hospital costs ($16,203) than patients without such complications (5 days and $10,284, respectively) (P<.001). PMID:12555834

  16. Geriatrics: Profiles in Geriatrics

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the field. more info Todd Semla, Pharm D. Department of Veterans Affairs "I always liked working ... Rice University, a decade earlier. more info Marc D. Rothman, MD Chief Medical Officer, Kindred Healthcare Nursing ...

  17. [Medication in infectious acute diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Cézard, J-P; Bellaiche, M; Viala, J; Hugot, J-P

    2007-10-01

    Acute infectious diarrhea in children remain still a frequent cause of morbidity. 50 % of them are due to rotavirus. Oral rehydration therapy and early realimentation have drastically reduced their mortality and morbidity. Beside oral or eventually IV rehydration therapy no medication has proven its efficacy based on the main HMO criteria (reduction of over 30 % of the stool output) except racecadotril and loperamide which is contre-indicated for the last one in children less than 2 years old. Other medications such as silicates or some probiotics have shown efficacy on diarrhea duration or stool consistency but not on stool output. They have so no formal indication in infectious diarrhea and should be considered as "comfort" treatment. Antibiotics, beside their indication in shigella, cholera and amibiasis could be used in invasive diarrhea in some debilating conditions or infants less than 3 months. PMID:17961811

  18. A Competency-Based Medical Student Curriculum Targeting Key Geriatric Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zuilen, Maria H.; Rodriguez, Osvaldo; Mintzer, Michael J.; Paniagua, Miguel A.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Kaiser, Robert M.; Roos, Bernard A.

    2008-01-01

    The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM) has developed and implemented a competency-based undergraduate medical education (UME) curriculum that targets 61 learning objectives for three geriattic syndromes: dementia, falls, and delirium. This curriculum redesign changed the educational focus from what is taught to what is learned.…

  19. Integrating and Evaluating Geriatrics in Medical School: A Novel Approach for the Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besdine, Richard W.; Shield, Renee R.; McNicoll, Lynn; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    Brown Medical School developed a comprehensive curriculum in which enriched aging content increased from 22 to 80 hours in preclerkship courses and was also added for clerkships, residencies, and nongeriatrician physicians. Innovative evaluation strategies are also described. Highlights include "treasure hunts" in the anatomy laboratory, a…

  20. The Importance of "High Valence" Events in a Successful Program for Teaching Geriatrics to Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boling, Peter A.; Willett, Rita M.; Gentili, Angela; Abbey, Linda J.; Lawson, Sonya R.; Schlesinger, Jeanne B.; Meyers, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Commonwealth University developed an enhanced medical student geriattic curriculum that includes required home visits and nursing home visits for second year students (180 per year), an annual Forum on Aging for all first and second year students, and small group exercises. We added 30 hours of basic science material to pre-clinical…

  1. Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury in Geriatric Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Vishal; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; sehgal, Rinku; Eagan, Jeremiah; Reddy, Praveen; Lesko, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have focused on patients’ characteristics that affects acute kidney injury (AKI) after total knee replacement surgery (TKR). Objectives: The primary objective of this retrospective study was to identify patients’ characteristics associated with AKI after TKR. Patients and Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2009, 659 patients with a mean age of 67.1 years (range, 39-99) underwent TKA at Regional Hospital Knee and Hip Institute. Retrospective chart review was done to identify patients’ characteristics that were associated with AKI after TKR. Logistic regression was used to evaluate AKI. Results: AKI occurred in 21.9% of patients. AKI risk decreased between 2008 and 2009 (odds ratio, 0.55; 95% CI, -0.37 to 0.82) but increased with age (P < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (DM), and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) use (OR, -1.6; 95% CI, -1.0 to 2.5; and OR, -1.5, 95% CI, -1.0 to 2.3, respectively). However, the effects of DM and ACEI/ARB use were not independent; when both were included in the regression model, neither was statistically significant, and both ORs were smaller than combined OR. Conclusions: When examined separately, both DM and preoperative ACEI/ARB use increased the risk of AKI; however these factors were correlated and were not independent predictors of significantly increased risk. Patients with DM have higher tendency to develop AKI and hence, preoperative renal risk stratification should be done in all patients with DM. PMID:25237322

  2. American Geriatrics Society/Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs curricular milestones for graduating geriatric fellows.

    PubMed

    Parks, Susan M; Harper, G Michael; Fernandez, Helen; Sauvigne, Karen; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2014-05-01

    This article describes the curricular milestones for geriatric fellows and the process used to develop them. The curricular milestones were developed to determine what every graduating geriatric fellow should be able to demonstrate to ensure that they will be able to practice effectively and safely in all care settings and with different older adult populations. Three major domains were identified: Caring for the Elderly Patient, Systems-Based Care for Elder Patients, and Geriatric Syndromes. Six hundred thirty-five geriatricians each reviewed and commented on one domain. These geriatricians represented important stakeholder groups: geriatric fellowship program directors; Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs (ADGAP) members, who are primarily geriatric program and fellowship directors; the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and ADGAP Education Committee; the AGS Teacher's Section; Geriatric Academic Career Award awardees; and through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Family Medicine, board-certified geriatricians who spend more than 50% of their time in clinical practice. The AGS and ADGAP boards approved the final set of 76 Geriatric Curricular Milestones, which were posted on the Portal of Geriatric Online Education in December 2012. These curricular milestones are intended to assist geriatric fellowship directors as they develop curricula and assessments to inform program director reporting to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Next Accreditation System, which begins in July 2014. PMID:24749808

  3. When Patients Teach Their Doctors: A Curriculum for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkowiak, John; Gunderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In response to aging patient demographics and a call for increased formal geriatric training in medical schools, a community volunteer geriatric mentor program, Bridging Generations, was developed to shape attitudes of medical students caring for the elderly. The geriatric mentor experience provided students with unique insight into the challenges…

  4. Effective Teaching Methods for Geriatric Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strano-Paul, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses how effective classroom sessions are at teaching geriatric competencies to medical students. At Stony Brook Medical School, most geriatric competencies are taught in the Ambulatory Care Clerkship during small-group educational sessions. Clinical exposure to reinforce these specialized skills varies with preceptor assignment. A…

  5. Nutraceuticals for geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2015-01-01

    Geriatrics is a medical practice that addresses the complex needs of older patients and emphasizes maintaining functional independence even in the presence of chronic disease. Treatment of geriatric patients requires a different strategy and is very complex. Geriatric medicines aim to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. Development of effective dietary interventions for promoting healthy aging is an active but challenging area of research because aging is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, disability, and death. Aging populations are a global phenomenon. The most widespread conditions affecting older people are hypertension, congestive heart failure, dementia, osteoporosis, breathing problems, cataract, and diabetes to name a few. Decreased immunity is also partially responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infectious agents in the elderly. Nutritional status is one of the chief variables that explains differences in both the incidence and pathology of infection. Elderly people are at increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to a variety of factors including social, physical, economic, and emotional obstacles to eating. Thus there is an urgent need to shift priorities to increase our attention on ways to prevent chronic illnesses associated with aging. Individually, people must put increased efforts into establishing healthy lifestyle practices, including consuming a more healthful diet. The present review thus focuses on the phytochemicals of nutraceutical importance for the geriatric population. PMID:26151003

  6. Nutraceuticals for geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-01-01

    Geriatrics is a medical practice that addresses the complex needs of older patients and emphasizes maintaining functional independence even in the presence of chronic disease. Treatment of geriatric patients requires a different strategy and is very complex. Geriatric medicines aim to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. Development of effective dietary interventions for promoting healthy aging is an active but challenging area of research because aging is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, disability, and death. Aging populations are a global phenomenon. The most widespread conditions affecting older people are hypertension, congestive heart failure, dementia, osteoporosis, breathing problems, cataract, and diabetes to name a few. Decreased immunity is also partially responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infectious agents in the elderly. Nutritional status is one of the chief variables that explains differences in both the incidence and pathology of infection. Elderly people are at increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to a variety of factors including social, physical, economic, and emotional obstacles to eating. Thus there is an urgent need to shift priorities to increase our attention on ways to prevent chronic illnesses associated with aging. Individually, people must put increased efforts into establishing healthy lifestyle practices, including consuming a more healthful diet. The present review thus focuses on the phytochemicals of nutraceutical importance for the geriatric population. PMID:26151003

  7. Geriatric Issues in Older Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Geriatric syndrome is common among older patients on dialysis. Basic knowledge about its prevalence and management is crucial for nephrologists to provide standard patient care. In busy clinical settings, up-to-date and holistic medical care can be delivered to elderly dialysis patients by collaboration of nephrology and geriatrics teams, or in part by training nephrology fellows the basics of geriatrics. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27379352

  8. Geriatric Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seton Hill Coll., Greensburg, PA.

    This curriculum for training geriatric technicians is geared toward developing an understanding of, as well as the skills to assist with, the visually or hearing impaired older adult. The curriculum is organized in four modules. Each module is assigned a time frame and a credit unit base. The modules are divided into four major areas: knowledge,…

  9. Geriatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Markham, R W; Hodgkins, E M

    1989-01-01

    In recent decades, veterinary medicine has become more successful in prolonging the healthy, useful lives of pets. As a result, the practitioner spends a greater part of each practice day caring for the geriatric animal, both healthy and unhealthy. Because of their longevity, older pets are typically regular family members, with owners who seek the finest health care possible for their pets. The practice of geriatric medicine most properly should begin not when the dog or cat reaches some specific "golden" age, but rather when the wiggly, robust puppy or kitten receives its first examination. Like all parts of a sound preventive program, geriatric nutrition best follows from a well-considered juvenile and adult nutrition program. Furthermore, once it becomes senior, the "well" geriatric is as much a candidate for a diet designed especially to accommodate old age changes as is his unhealthy contemporary. In fact, evidence suggests that appropriate dietary management of the healthy, but often subclinical, patient may help postpone the signs of dysfunction and increase quality and length of life. A knowledge of the most significant nutrients and the impact of each on aging systems is now, and will become increasingly more, important to the progressive, skillful veterinarian. PMID:2646815

  10. [Cases from the area between geriatrics and trauma surgery. Examples from the medical arbitration board].

    PubMed

    Lucke, C; Westermann, K; Lucke, M; Schellmann, W D; Wohlers, C

    2010-06-01

    Medical arbitration boards ("Schlichtungsstellen", expert panels for extrajudicial malpractice claim resolution) try to settle claims of suspected malpractice between patients and their physicians and to avoid court trials. Numerous studies found an increasing incidence of adverse events with rising age. Injuries that occur in the hospital are frequently beyond the specialty of the treating physician. Therefore, the physician has to broaden his diagnostic view beyond the borders of his own specialty to recognize injuries in his patients and to prevent malpractice claims.In this paper, we report on adverse events in elderly patients where the geriatrician/internist was accused of negligence for not having promptly recognized a fracture after a fall or having chosen an inadequate operative procedure. For example, the importance of weight bearing osteosynthesis, mandatory in hip fractures in the elderly population to prevent long-term immobilization, is discussed.Adverse events due to negligence are more frequent among the elderly; the reasons are discussed. They will never be entirely preventable. The data presented in this report may be helpful to recognize fractures in time and to ensure adequate treatment, in order to reduce the number of court claims. PMID:19802515

  11. Reduction of Behavioral Psychological Symptoms of Dementia by Multimodal Comprehensive Care for Vulnerable Geriatric Patients in an Acute Care Hospital: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Miwako; Ito, Mio; Ishikawa, Shogo; Takebayashi, Yoichi; Tierney, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a key challenge in geriatric dementia care. A multimodal comprehensive care methodology, Humanitude, with eye contact, verbal communication, and touch as its elements, was provided to three geriatric dementia patients for whom conventional nursing care failed in an acute care hospital. Each episode was evaluated by video analysis. All patients had advanced dementia with BPSD. Failure of care was identified by patient's shouting, screaming, or abrupt movements of limbs. In this case series, conventional care failed for all three patients. Each element of care communication was much shorter than in Humanitude care, which was accepted by the patients. The average of the elements performed during the care was eye contact 0.6%, verbal communication 15.7%, and touch 0.1% in conventional care and 12.5%, 54.8%, and 44.5% in Humanitude care, respectively. The duration of aggressive behavior of each patient during care was 25.0%, 25.4%, and 66.3% in conventional care and 0%, 0%, and 0.3% in Humanitude, respectively. In our case series, conventional care was provided by less eye contact, verbal communication, and touch. The multimodal comprehensive care approach, Humanitude, decreased BPSD and showed success by patients' acceptance of care. PMID:27069478

  12. Geriatrics Educational Outreach: A Tale of Three GRECCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, James T.; Griffith, Jennifer; Weir, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    Current geriatrics workforce projections indicate that clinicians who care for adults will need basic geriatrics knowledge and skills to address the geriatric syndromes and issues that limit functional independence and complicate medical management. This is most evident for the clinicians caring for veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs…

  13. [Diagnosing the cause of acute dyspnea in elderly patients: role of biomarkers in emergencies].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Legrain, Sylvie; Ray, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Acute dyspnea is one of the leading causes of emergency hospitalization of elderly patients. Clinical diagnostic procedures are difficult in this geriatric population. Acute heart failure is the most frequent cause of acute dyspnea in geriatric patients. The use of plasma B natriuretic peptide (BNP) assays in the general population has profoundly improved its medical management. There has also been progress recently for other frequent causes of dyspnea in the elderly, including infection and venous thromboembolic disease. Procalcitonin assays may be useful as a prognostic factor for infectious disease. Nevertheless, the real value of BNP assays in geriatric populations must be clarified by interventional studies. PMID:19297125

  14. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  15. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% (n = 34) of cases, stroke in 29.8% (n = 28), metabolic in 12.8% (n = 12), toxic in 10.6% (n = 10), and other causes in 10.6% (n = 10). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one. PMID:26904280

  16. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  17. Usefulness of Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index for Assessing Nutritional Status and Its Prognostic Impact in Patients Aged ≥65 Years With Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yasuyuki; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Iwakami, Naotsugu; Sugano, Yasuo; Honda, Satoshi; Okada, Atsushi; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Aiba, Takeshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Kusano, Kengo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    Malnutrition is becoming one of the most important determinants of worse clinical outcomes in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). However, appropriate tools for evaluating the nutritional status in patients aged ≥65 years with AHF remain unclear. We examined 490 consecutive patients aged ≥65 years with AHF. They were divided into 2 groups according to Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI; cut-off value = 92). During a median period of 189 days, the mortality rate was significantly higher in the lower GNRI group than the higher GNRI group (p <0.001). In multivariate analyses, lower GNRI was an independent determinant of adverse events (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.95, p <0.001). The GNRI showed the best prognostic value (C-statistic: 0.70) among other nutritional indexes. Adding GNRI to an existing outcome prediction model for mortality in AHF significantly increased the C-statistic from 0.68 to 0.74 (p = 0.017). The net reclassification improvement afforded by GNRI was 60% overall, 27% for events, and 33% for nonevents (p <0.001). In conclusion, lower GNRI on admission was independently associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients aged ≥65 years with AHF, and it was superior to other nutritional parameters. Furthermore, the assessment of nutritional status using GNRI is very helpful for risk stratification. PMID:27324158

  18. Seroprevalence of acute dengue in a Malaysian tertiary medical centre

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chuan Hun; Rashid, Zetti Zainol; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Khang, NanFeng; Low, Wan Ngor; Hussin, Nurabrar; Marzuki, Melissa Iqlima; Jaafar, Alyaa Nadhira; Roslan, Nurul Ain’ Nabilla; Chandrasekaran, Terukumar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of acute dengue in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) Medical Centre and its correlation with selected haematological and biochemical parameters. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to June 2015. A patient was serologically diagnosed with acute dengue if the dengue virus IgG, IgM or NS-1 antigen was reactive. Results: Out of 1,774 patients suspected to have acute dengue, 1,153 were serologically diagnosed with the infection, resulting in a seroprevalence of 64.9%. Dengue-positive patients had a lower mean platelet count (89 × 109/L) compared to the dengue-negative patients (171 × 109/L) (p<0.0001). The mean total white cell count was also lower in the dengue-positive cases (4.7 × 109/L vs. 7.2 × 109/L; p<0.0001). The mean haematocrit was higher in patients with acute dengue (42.5% vs. 40.0%; p<0.0001). Likewise, the serum alanine transaminase level was also higher in patients with acute dengue (108 U/L vs. 54 U/L; p<0.0001). Conclusions: Dengue is very prevalent in UKM Medical Centre as most patients suspected to have acute dengue had serological evidence of the infection. The platelet count was the single most likely parameter to be abnormal (i.e. low) in patients with acute dengue. PMID:27182269

  19. Neuromodulation therapies for geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Verònica; Ho, Kerrie-Anne; Alonzo, Angelo; Martin, Donel; George, Duncan; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-07-01

    Depression is frequent in old age and its prognosis is poorer than in younger populations. The use of pharmacological treatments in geriatric depression is limited by specific pharmacodynamic age-related factors that can diminish tolerability and increase the risk of drug interactions. The possibility of modulating cerebral activity using brain stimulation techniques could result in treating geriatric depression more effectively while reducing systemic side effects and medication interactions. This may subsequently improve treatment adherence and overall prognosis in the older patient. Among clinically available neuromodulatory techniques, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the gold standard for the treatment of severe depression in the elderly. Studies have proven that ECT is more effective and has a faster onset of action than antidepressants in the treatment of severe, unipolar, geriatric depression and that older age is a predictor of rapid ECT response and remission. The application of novel and more tolerable forms of ECT for geriatric depression is currently being examined. Preliminary results suggest that right unilateral ultrabrief ECT (RUL-UB ECT) is a promising intervention, with similar efficacy to brief-pulse ECT and fewer adverse cognitive effects. Overall findings in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) suggest that it is a safe intervention in geriatric depression. Higher rTMS stimulation intensity and more treatments may need to be given in the elderly to achieve optimal results. There is no specific data on vagus nerve stimulation in the elderly. Transcranial direct current stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy and deep brain stimulation are currently experimental, and more data from geriatric samples is needed. PMID:25995098

  20. Change in cognitive performance is associated with functional recovery during post-acute stroke rehabilitation: a multi-centric study from intermediate care geriatric rehabilitation units of Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Laura Mónica; Inzitari, Marco; Roqué, Marta; Duarte, Esther; Vallés, Elisabeth; Rodó, Montserrat; Gallofré, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Recovery after a stroke is determined by a broad range of neurological, functional and psychosocial factors. Evidence regarding these factors is not well established, in particular influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate whether selective characteristics, including cognitive performance and its change over time, modulate functional recovery with home discharge in stroke survivors admitted to post-acute rehabilitation units. We undertook a multicenter cohort study, including all patients discharged from acute wards to any geriatric rehabilitation unit in Catalonia-Spain during 2008. Patients were assessed for demographics, clinical and functional variables using Conjunt Mínim Bàsic de Dades dels Recursos Sociosanitaris (CMBD-RSS), which adapts the Minimum Data Set tool used in America's nursing homes. Baseline-to-discharge change in cognition was calculated on repeated assessments using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS, range 0-6, best-worst cognition). The multivariable effect of these factors was analyzed in relation to the outcome. 879 post-stroke patients were included (mean age 77.48 ± 10.18 years, 52.6% women). A worse initial CPS [OR (95% CI) = 0.851 (0.774-0.935)] and prevalent fecal incontinence [OR (95% CI) = 0.560 (0.454-0.691)] reduced the likelihood of returning home with functional improvement; whereas improvement of CPS, baseline to discharge, [OR (95% CI) = 1.348 (1.144-1.588)], more rehabilitation days within the first 2 weeks [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] and a longer hospital stay [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] were associated with the outcome. In our sample, different clinical characteristics, including cognitive function and its improvement over time, are associated with functional improvement in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. Our results might provide information to further studies aimed at exploring the influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation. PMID:26050232

  1. [Antipsychotics in geriatric institutions].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The present paper approaches the use of antipsychotics in elder people in general, and particularly in geriatric institutions. During the last few years, prescription of antipsychotics in geriatric institutions increased, especially because of the availability of the atypicals, and their use was extended beyond the indications these drugs had been approved for. In dementia they are suggested for treatment of behavioral symptoms, despite having been approved only for cases of aggressiveness and risk of damage. There is a common tendency of perpetuating antipsychotic medication in elder people, with its consequent collateral effects as well. Few years ago, the increase of both risk of cerebrovascular events and of mortality in dementia patients treated with atypical agents was noticed. This generated controversy regarding their use in those kind of patients. Diverse factors associated to caregivers affect the decision of prescribing an antipsychotic in elder people. Non-pharmacological interventions are the first choice when treating behavioral symptoms; pharmacological interventions must take place with the lowest doses possible, with limited durations. PMID:18273435

  2. Medical mitigation strategies for acute radiation exposure during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2006-02-01

    The United States Government has recently refocused their space program on manned missions to the Moon by 2018 and later to Mars. While there are many potential risks associated with exploration-class missions, one of the most serious and unpredictable is the effect of acute space radiation exposure, and the space program must make every reasonable effort to mitigate this risk. The two cosmic sources of radiation that could impact a mission outside the Earth's magnetic field are solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). Either can cause acute and chronic medical illness. Numerous researchers are currently examining the ability of GCR exposure to induce the development of genetic changes that lead to malignancies and other delayed effects. However, relatively little has been published on the medical management of an acute SPE event and the potential impact on the mission and crew. This review paper will provide the readers with medical management options for an acute radiation event based on recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and evidence-based critical analysis of the scientific literature. It is the goal of this paper to stimulate debate regarding the definition of safety parameters for exploration-class missions to determine the level of medical care necessary to provide for the crew that will undertake such missions. PMID:16491581

  3. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  4. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC “usability”. To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found “easy to use” (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post

  5. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in the Office

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, Laurie R.M.; Boyle, Neil G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Because of their increased incidence of illness and disability, geriatric patients require extra time and diligence to assess and track medical problems. This article describes a comprehensive geriatirc assessment, organized on a one-page, easily updated checklist, that can be used to generate a medical and functional problem list and a risk assessment. Imagesp2190-a PMID:21229091

  6. Medical prevention of recurrent acute otitis media: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Paola; Nazzari, Erica; Torretta, Sara; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common pediatric diseases; almost all children experience at least one episode, and a third have two or more episodes in the first three years of life. The disease burden of AOM has important medical, social and economic effects. AOM requires considerable financial assistance due to needing at least one doctor visit and a prescription for antipyretics and/or antibiotics. AOM is also associated with high indirect costs, which are mostly related to lost days of work for one parent. Moreover, due to its acute symptoms and frequent recurrences, AOM considerably impacts both the child and family's quality of life. AOM prevention, particularly recurrent AOM (rAOM), is a primary goal of pediatric practice. In this paper, we review current evidence regarding the efficacy of medical treatments and vaccines for preventing rAOM and suggest the best approaches for AOM-prone children. PMID:24678887

  7. [Geriatric day hospital: what evidence? A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Petermans, Jean; Velghe, Anja; Gillain, Daniel; Boman, Xavier; Van Den Noortgate, Nele

    2011-09-01

    A systematic review of the international literature concerning the organisation of the Geriatric Day Hospital (GDH) was performed. From 1987 till now, few papers were found describing the activity and the effectiveness of the GDH. All the studies comparing specific geriatric approaches to regular medicine demonstrate the efficiency of geriatric care, particularly the geriatric assessment. So, with a degree of evidence 1a, a better outcome is found for patients undergoing a geriatric assessment and intervention, compared to patients having no geriatric assessment at all. However, there is no evidence of benefit for the geriatric day hospital compared to patients treated in a geriatric ward or other location of geriatric care. Moreover, there is no clear consensus on the settings and activities of a geriatric day hospital. Terms as day unit, day hospital, day care, are used interchangeably and are not always covering the same activity. The same remark can be made on the exact composition of the geriatric multidisciplinary team and its role. However nurses and paramedical workers are always mentioned as all performing geriatric assessment. The diagnostic activities on the GDH are seldom described and studied. More information is available on rehabilitation activity, often developed in specific patient populations such as stroke patients, dementia patients, cardiac patients or patients with other chronic diseases. In this selected patient populations positive effects on outcome are shown in the GDH (level of evidence 1a). Another problem is the heterogeneity of the population. For scientific reason the GDH should focus on organising care for specific medical problems. Diseases as dementia, stroke, cardiac insufficiency, could be good models to investigate the efficiency of geriatric assessment and interventions within the setting of a GDH. PMID:21896433

  8. Pharmacists' Perceptions of Major Difficulties in Geriatric Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Clara Collette; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Pharmacists (N=233) responded to the question "What is the most difficult aspect of geriatric pharmacy practice?" Most commonly cited problems were (1) inadequate professional skills or knowledge in geriatrics; (2) patient compliance; (3) physician functioning (including overprescribing of medications); (4) communication with the elderly; (5) lack…

  9. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  10. Emerging geriatric challenge.

    PubMed

    Dhar, H L

    2005-10-01

    India is a vast country with diversity, both physical and cultural. 72% of World's second largest population live in rural experiencing varying degrees of socioeconomic change. However, there is no nationwide registry of older people and exact statistics about elderly population is not available. Community-based data on morbidity and disability are also not available. India is one of the few countries in the world where men out number women at all ages till about 70 years and only in very old age (80+) there are more women than men. One of the main social effect of extension of life in later years is the extended period of widowhood for women mainly due to cultural practice of men marrying younger women and widow marriage as well as divorce are uncommon. Much progress has been made in the health care services in the last 50 years giving much emphasis to mother and child programme with special emphasis on controlling population. But elderly population has been neglected, there is no separate ward for elderly in hospitals, no specialized courses in the Universities for training doctors and nurses for elderly care. Recently, Indian Medical Association has organized an ambitious project for rural elderly with emphasis on Geriatric care. Still recently, emphasis has been given for developing infrastructural facilities including creating training, courses on Geriatric Medicine and integrating with alternative system for better care of elderly. However, due to increasing awareness of policy makers to multiple issues related to aging, some progress has been made like old age pension scheme, income tax rebate for elderly, old homes and day care centers and law to help retired citizens in evicting tenants etc. but environment is not as elderly-friendly as in European countries, as the State is not likely to have adequate resources in the presence of other priorities in the country. PMID:16459531

  11. [Palliative care - also in geriatrics?].

    PubMed

    Sandgathe Husebø, B; Husebø, S

    2001-10-01

    Red Cross Clinic is the largest geriatric center in Norway (240 beds). Major parts of the center are: long time geriatric ward (215 beds), rehabilitation and acute ward (25 beds), day clinic (45 patients) and a teaching and research unit. A palliative care unit (10 beds) will be opened in spring 2000. In mai 1998 a national project: Palliative care for the elderly was opened at our center. The projects main goal is to develop and support proper palliative care to all severe ill and dying patients in Norway. In a prospective study we examined 179 consecutive deaths between 1998 and 1999. Average age was 84.5. Major symptom problems were pain, dyspnoea, death-rattle and anxiety. In the last 24 hours 83% of the patients received opioids, 67% of the cases morphine (mean daily dosage 31.8 mg). 37% of the patients received scopolamine (mean daily dosage 0.8 mg), 12% benzodiazepines and 3% of the patients haloperidol. 152 (85%) of the deaths were expected, 27 (15%) unexpected. In 137 patients (77%) open, honest, frank communication with patient or their nearest kin regarding the imminent death was possible. In our experience it is a myth that the relatives want doctors to practise "maximal therapy". All old patients in geriatric clinics and nursing homes need palliative care. We have found no international textbooks of geriatrics with chapters on palliative care or textbooks on palliative care with chapters on the elderly. They need doctors and nurses who are properly trained and educated in palliative care. In most countries in Europe this training and education is not provided. PMID:11810376

  12. Homocysteine and disability in hospitalized geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Cossi, Stefania; De Martinis, Monica; Calabrese, Paolo A; Orini, Stefania; Grassi, Vittorio

    2004-08-01

    Elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations have been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease and dementia in old age. The present study was performed to identify the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and to analyze the association between tHcy concentration and sociodemographic characteristics, nutritional parameters, and cognitive and functional status in this sample of hospitalized geriatric patients. A total of 214 patients (77% females) 65+ years old admitted into an acute care geriatric ward of an internal medical department in the Northern Italy were studied. tHcy concentration was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-F). Information about nutrition (body mass index [BMI], serum albumin, cholesterol, and transferrin) was collected on admission. Functional status was investigated with the Basic Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL) and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale (IADL); cognitive and affective status were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The mean tHcy concentration was 18.4 +/- 13.1 micromol/L; 74.2% of males and 68.9% of females had HHcy (> 12 micromol/L). Sixty-four percent of patients with normal serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations had HHcy. Elevated tHcy concentrations were associated with older age, male gender, increasing serum creatinine, lower MMSE score, and disability. The mean tHcy concentration depended on the occurrence of different diseases. Patients affected by atherosclerotic diseases, such as ischemic heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and dementia had higher mean tHcy concentration than those without diagnosed vascular diseases. In multivariate analysis, vitamin B12, folate, serum albumin, creatinine, and disability emerged as factors associated with tHcy, adjusted for age, gender, education, MMSE score, and atherosclerotic diseases. Our results suggest that the

  13. [Interprofessionalism in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Mennel, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    A system for the coordinated care of elderly people in geriatrics was set up at Luxembourg general hospital. The creation of the short-stay geriatric unit resulted in a reorganisation which questioned the notions of team, cohesion and skill. This article describes the successful experience and the benefit it has brought patients. PMID:25137960

  14. [Geriatrics: an absolute necessity].

    PubMed

    Oostvogel, F J

    1982-02-01

    The medical care for elderly people could be greatly improved. If no specific attention is paid immediately, namely through the various training courses and by way of further and part-time schooling, then this medical care will remain unsatisfactory. This situation worsens continually due to the growing number of elderly people and, within this group, a much higher rate of very aged people. Increasing the care in institutions is altogether unsatisfactory. The problem should be dealt with structurally and the emphasis placed upon prevention and early-diagnosis. There is an urgent need for an integrated method, keeping in mind the limits of the elderly person, from the physical, psychological and social aspects. This demands teamwork in a multidisciplinary system inside as well as outside the institutions. It demands a thorough knowledge of geriatrics based upon gerontology. Geriatricians are urgently needed in this development together with doctors in nursing homes, general practitioners and specialists, so that the necessary care may be established as quickly as possible. PMID:7101393

  15. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Effiong Ekong; Ekrikpo, Udeme E

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30-35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes "holy water" green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango), shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew), Carica papaya (paw-paw) leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree), and Azadirachta indica (Neem) trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for "body cleansing" and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission. PMID:26199625

  16. Improving acute care through use of medical device data.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, R J

    1998-02-01

    The Medical Information Bus (MIB) is a data communications standard for bedside patient connected medical devices. It is formally titled IEEE 1073 Standard for Medical Device Communications. MIB defines a complete seven layer communications stack for devices in acute care settings. All of the design trade-offs in writing the standard were taken to optimize performance in acute care settings. The key clinician based constraints on network performance are: (1) the network must be able to withstand multiple daily reconfigurations due to patient movement and condition changes; (2) the network must be 'plug-and-play' to allow clinicians to set up the network by simply plugging in a connector, taking no other actions; (3) the network must allow for unambiguous associations of devices with specific patients. A network of this type will be used by clinicians, thus giving complete, accurate, real time data from patient connected devices. This capability leads to many possible improvements in patient care and hospital cost reduction. The possible uses for comprehensive automatic data capture are only limited by imagination and creativity of clinicians adapting to the new hospital business paradigm. PMID:9600414

  17. Humanities and Geriatric Education: a Strategy for Recruitment?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Martin, Ruth Elwood

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a common subject in arts and literature as it is a universal experience. The use of the humanities in medical education may have a positive effect on trainees’ attitude to caring for seniors and on geriatrics as a career choice. This paper summarizes the role of humanities in medical education and provides some examples and thoughts on how humanities curriculum can be used in geriatric teaching. PMID:25825611

  18. Integrating behavior change theory into geriatric case management practice.

    PubMed

    Enguidanos, S

    2001-01-01

    Case management practices have continued to grow despite a lack of clear evidence of their efficacy. With the expanding segment of the elderly population, there is a critical need to develop and identify programs that will address the many needs of the aging. Geriatric Case Management has been the avenue selected by many health care providers to address these issues, focusing on maintaining health status and improving linkages with medical and community resources. Studies testing the effectiveness of these models have failed to demonstrate their effectiveness in reducing depression, reducing acute care service use, and improving or maintaining health status. The Geriatric Case Management models presented in these lack an evidence-based, theoretical framework that provides definition and direction for case management practice. This article introduces behavior change theories as a method of structuring and delineating the case management intervention. The Transtheoretical Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior are discussed and methods of integrating these theories into practice are discussed. PMID:11878076

  19. Acute mountain sickness: medical problems associated with acute and subacute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C

    2006-11-01

    This article summarises the medical problems of travel to altitudes above 3000 m. These are caused by chronic hypoxia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS), a self limiting common illness is almost part of normal acclimatisation--a transient condition lasting for several days. However, in <2% of people staying above 4000 m, serious illnesses related to hypoxia develop--high altitude pulmonary oedema and cerebral oedema. These are potentially fatal but can be largely avoided by gradual ascent. Short vacations, pressure from travel companies and peer groups often encourage ascent to 4000 m more rapidly than is prudent. Sensible guidelines for ascent are outlined, clinical features, management and treatment of these conditions. PMID:17099095

  20. [Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute medical care: myths versus reality].

    PubMed

    von Düring, Stephan; Bruchez, Stéphanie; Suppan, Laurent; Niquille, Marc

    2015-08-12

    Oxygen adiministration for both medical and traumatic emergencies is regarded as an essential component of resuscitation. However, many recent studies suggest that the use of oxygen should be more restrictive. Detrimental effects of normobaric oxygen therapy in patients suffering from hypercapnic respiratory diseases have been demonstrated, especially because of the suppression of the hypoxic drive. Apart from this particular situation, correction of hypoxemia is still a widely accepted treatment target, although there is growing evidence that hyperoxemia could be harmful in acute coronary syndromes and cardio-respiratory arrests. In other pathologies, such as stroke or hemorragic shock, the situation is still unclear, and further studies are needed to clarify the situation. Generally speaking, oxygen therapy should from now on be goal-directed, and early monitoring of both pulse oximetry and arterial blood gases is advised. PMID:26449100

  1. Hemangiosarcoma in a geriatric Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diya

    2012-08-01

    A geriatric Labrador retriever dog was presented for acute collapse. The dog was conscious but lethargic, tachypneic, tachycardic with weak femoral pulses, occasional pulse deficits, and pale mucous membranes. Radiography, ultrasonography, quick assessment tests, and a complete blood (cell) count (CBC)/biochemistry panel indicated internal hemorrhage and potential problems with hemostasis. The dog was euthanized. A necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Factor VIII-related antigen cell markers supported a diagnosis of splenic hemangiosarcoma. PMID:23372199

  2. Telepsychiatry and geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N

    2001-02-01

    The use of telecommunications--telephone, computer, videoconferencing equipment--to provide mental health services at a distance has grown rapidly. This review encompasses reports from programs that provide telepsychiatry services, including telephone- and computer- based education and support services, telephone screening for dementia, and the use of videoconferencing to provide psychiatric consultations, health education, and administrative support. The extensive experience to date supports the value of telepsychiatry. Applications in geriatric settings and research involving geriatric subjects are reviewed. Cost analyses and economic evaluations of telepsychiatry are preliminary at this time and need further refinement. There is great potential for using telecommunications to expand access to mental health services to underserved geriatric populations. PMID:11177756

  3. Geriatric consultation services-are wards more effective than teams?

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ian D; Kurrle, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Geriatric consultation teams are one of the models for bringing comprehensive geriatric assessment to vulnerable and frail older people in the acute care hospital setting. While ward-based comprehensive geriatric assessment has been established as effective with reference to improving functional status and other outcomes, the team-based variant remains unproven for outcomes other than mortality in the medium term, as shown in a recent study published in BMC Medicine by Deschodt and colleagues. Further research might establish the effectiveness of the team-based model but, for current clinical practice, the emphasis should be on streaming older people with complex problems needing multidisciplinary assessment and treatment to ward-based models of comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:23433506

  4. Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Elderly: New Findings in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Geduldig, Emma T; Kellner, Charles H

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in elderly depressed patients. The PubMed database was searched for literature published within the past 4 years, using the search terms: "electroconvulsive elderly," "electroconvulsive geriatric," "ECT and elderly," and "ECT elderly cognition." The studies in this review indicate excellent efficacy for ECT in geriatric patients. Adverse cognitive effects of ECT in this population are usually transient and not typically severe. In addition, continuation/maintenance ECT (C/M-ECT) may be a favorable strategy for relapse prevention in the elderly after a successful acute course of ECT. ECT is an important treatment option for depressed geriatric patients with severe and/or treatment-resistant illness. New data add to the evidence demonstrating that ECT is a highly effective, safe, and well-tolerated antidepressant treatment option for geriatric patients. PMID:26909702

  5. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Immunoprophylaxis by Antiradiation Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: Traditionally, the treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) includes supportive therapy, cytokine therapy, blood component transfusions and even stem cell transplantation. Recommendations for ARS treatment are based on clinical symptoms, laboratory results, radiation exposure doses and information received from medical examinations. However, the current medical management of ARS does not include immune prophylaxis based on antiradiation vaccines or immune therapy with hyperimmune antiradiation serum. Immuneprophylaxis of ARS could result from stimulating the immune system via immunization with small doses of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants-SRD) that possess significant immuno-stimulatory properties. Methods: Principles of immuno-toxicology were used to derive this method of immune prophylaxis. An antiradiation vaccine containing a mixture of Hematotoxic, Neurotoxic and Non-bacterial (GI) radiation toxins, underwent modification into a toxoid forms of the original SRD radiation toxins. The vaccine was administered to animals at different times prior to irradiation. The animals were subjected to lethal doses of radiation that induced different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. Survival rates and clinical symptoms were observed in both control and vaccine-treated animals. Results: Vaccination with non-toxic doses of Radiation toxoids induced immunity from the elaborated Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD) toxins. Neutralization of radiation toxins by specific antiradiation antibodies resulted in significantly improved clinical symptoms in the severe forms of ARS and observed survival rates of 60-80% in animals subjected to lethal doses of radiation expected to induce different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. The most effective vaccination schedule for the antiradiation vaccine consisted of repeated injections 24 and 34 days before irradiation. The vaccine remained effective for the next two years, although the specific immune memory probably

  6. Impact of Frailty and Other Geriatric Syndromes on Clinical Management and Outcomes in Elderly Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: Rationale and Design of the LONGEVO-SCA Registry.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Oriol; Ariza-Solé, Albert; Vidán, María T; Formiga, Francesc; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Bueno, Héctor; Sanchís, Juan; López-Palop, Ramón; Abu-Assi, Emad; Cequier, Àngel

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is high in the elderly. Despite a high prevalence of frailty and other aging-related variables, little information exists about the optimal clinical management in patients with coexisting geriatric syndromes. The aim of the LONGEVO-SCA registry (Impacto de la Fragilidad y Otros Síndromes Geriátricos en el Manejo y Pronóstico Vital del Anciano con Síndrome Coronario Agudo sin Elevación de Segmento ST) is to assess the impact of aging-related variables on clinical management, prognosis, and functional status in elderly patients with ACS. A series of 500 consecutive octogenarian patients with non-ST-segment elevation ACS from 57 centers in Spain will be included. A comprehensive geriatric assessment will be performed during the admission, assessing functional status (Barthel Index, Lawton-Brody Index), frailty (FRAIL scale, Short Physical Performance Battery), comorbidity (Charlson Index), nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form), and quality of life (Seattle Angina Questionnaire). Patients will be managed according to current recommendations. The primary outcome will be the description of mortality and its causes at 6 months. Secondary outcomes will be changes in functional status and quality of life. Results from this study might significantly improve the knowledge about the impact of aging-related variables on management and outcomes of elderly patients with ACS. Clinical management of these patients has become a major health care problem due to the growing incidence of ACS in the elderly and its particularities. PMID:27362592

  7. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  8. American Geriatrics Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Membership Contact Us Site Map About Us Health Care Professionals Advocacy Public Policy Public Education Featured "If you were asked to describe geriatrics using just three words, what would they be?" Now you can wear your words with ... Shop today! New Editorial & Virtual ...

  9. [The need for training in gerontology and geriatrics among the staff providing services at a geriatric care institution].

    PubMed

    Baerga Duperoy, Rachel; Castro Rojas, Nydia; Orta Rodríguez, Brenda; González Caraballo, Enid; Cruz González, Angel; Vázquez Fernández, José; Oliver Vázquez, Marlén

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and identify the basic training needs of nursing home staff, in terms of attitudes, knowledge and skills required to work effectively with geriatric patients. Three focus groups were performed, two groups of employees, and a group of elderly residents of the institution, in order to explore issues pertaining to the following topics: personal attributes required to work with geriatric patients, basic knowledge and skills needed to provide effective services. Group discussions were transcribed and themes were extracted through consensus reached by the investigators. Results indicated that the interviewed staff lack of formal preparation or continuing education in gerontology or geriatrics. Needs identified were the following: the aging process, caring behaviors, management of common health conditions, administration of medications, transference and mobility of residents, among others. Finding were use to design an educational program aimed in assisting nursing home staff in providing an effective service to their geriatric patients. PMID:12572242

  10. [COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT SCALES].

    PubMed

    Casado Verdejo, Inés; Postigo Mota, Salvador; Muñoz Bermejo, Laura; Vallejo Villalobos, José Ramón; Arrabal Léon, Nazaret; Pinto Montealegre, Jose Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The process of comprehensive geriatric assessment is one of the key elements of geriatric care management aimed at the population. it includes evaluating the clinical, functional, mental and social aspects of aging result and/or pathological processes that appear at this stage of the life cycle. For their achievement, as well as other tools, professionals have a large number of validated rating scales specifically designed in the assessment of the different areas or fields. Its use can be very useful, especially for the objectification of evaluation results. The future of research in this area goes through deepening the adequacy of the scales to the characteristics and needs of older people in each care level or place of care. PMID:26996044

  11. Use of Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults in the Oncology Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geriatric assessment is a multidisciplinary diagnostic process that evaluates the older adult’s medical, psychological, social, and functional capacity. No systematic review of the use of geriatric assessment in oncology has been conducted. The goals of this systematic review were: 1) to provide an overview of all geriatric assessment instruments used in the oncology setting; 2) to examine the feasibility and psychometric properties of those instruments; and 3) to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of geriatric assessment in predicting or modifying outcomes (including the impact on treatment decision making, toxicity of treatment, and mortality). Methods We searched Medline, Embase, Psychinfo, Cinahl, and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English, French, Dutch, or German between January 1, 1996, and November 16, 2010, reporting on cross-sectional, longitudinal, interventional, or observational studies that assessed the feasibility or effectiveness of geriatric assessment instruments. The quality of articles was evaluated using relevant quality assessment frameworks. Results We identified 83 articles that reported on 73 studies. The quality of most studies was poor to moderate. Eleven studies examined psychometric properties or diagnostic accuracy of the geriatric assessment instruments used. The assessment generally took 10–45min. Geriatric assessment was most often completed to describe a patient’s health and functional status. Specific domains of geriatric assessment were associated with treatment toxicity in 6 of 9 studies and with mortality in 8 of 16 studies. Of the four studies that examined the impact of geriatric assessment on the cancer treatment decision, two found that geriatric assessment impacted 40%–50% of treatment decisions. Conclusion Geriatric assessment in the oncology setting is feasible, and some domains are associated with adverse outcomes. However, there is limited evidence that geriatric assessment

  12. Presentation and Management Outcomes of Corneal and Scleral Perforations in Geriatric Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Ying Fong, Yoly Yeuk; Yu, Marco; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compared the clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of corneal and scleral perforations in geriatric nursing home residents, geriatric community residents, and non-geriatric population. The medical records of patients who were treated for corneal and scleral perforations at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong between January 1, 2004 and May 1, 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Of 144 cases, 53 (37%) occurred in the geriatric population, of which 16 (11%) lived in nursing homes, and 37 (26%) were community residents. There were 91 (63%) patients in the non-geriatric group. The mean age of the patients in nursing home geriatric group was 86.5 years (87.5% females). The most common etiology of perforation was trauma. Rupture due to fall was more common in geriatric patients (P < 0.001) whereas laceration due to penetrating eye injury was more common in non-geriatric patients (P < 0.001). There were more cases of infection leading to spontaneous perforation in geriatric nursing home group compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). In the geriatric nursing home group, visual acuity at presentation (P < 0.001) and postoperative visual acuity (P = 0.012) was worse compared to the other groups. Our study showed that corneal and scleral perforations in the geriatric nursing home residents carry a poor visual prognosis. The causes and anatomical outcomes of such events in geriatric age group differ from those in the general population. In our study, geriatric patients residing in nursing homes had worse baseline as well as posttreatment visual acuity, compared to community residents. PMID:26356724

  13. Origins of British geriatrics.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    We may see from the foregoing account that British physicians have played a major part in the history of geriatric medicine. Other countries have no counterpart to J H Sheldon of Wolverhampton, whose work on the social medicine of old age was so fundamental, or George Adams of Belfast, to whom we owe such a debt of knowledge about cerebrovascular disease in the aged, or to Marjory Warren and the other pioneers mentioned above. Long may this tradition continue. PMID:785477

  14. Cognitive Deficits in Geriatric Depression: Clinical Correlates and Implications for Current and Future Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The purpose of this article is to identify the cognitive deficits commonly associated with geriatric depression, and describe their clinical significance. We then summarize the complex relationship between geriatric depression and dementia and discuss possible shared mechanisms. Last, we present evidence regarding whether the cognitive deficits in depression may be mitigated with medication or with computerized cognitive remediation. PMID:24229654

  15. Successful Implementation of a Faculty Development Program in Geriatrics for Non-Primary Care Physician Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brent C.; Schigelone, Amy R.; Fitzgerald, James T.; Halter, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-year faculty development program to enhance geriatrics learning among house officers in seven surgical and related disciplines and five medical subspecialties at a large academic institution resulted in changes in attitudes and knowledge of faculty participants, expanded curricula and teaching activities in geriatrics, and enhanced and…

  16. Geriatric care in a provincial hospital.

    PubMed

    De V Meiring, P

    1977-03-26

    Much of the work of the public medical wards at Grey's Hospital is concerned with the care of aged persons. In the absence of separate geriatric facilities, this work forms an integral part of internal medicine. During the last decade two surveys, and experience gained, have determined a comprehensive approach to the social and medical problems encountered. While team work can accomplish much, the responsibility for care of the aged currently remains divided among a number of government and private agencies. Without a unified policy and further expenditure of a certain amount of money, many of our senior citizens will continue to be denied easy access to health care facilities. PMID:857323

  17. The portal of geriatrics online education: a 21st-century resource for teaching geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Leipzig, Rosanne M; Howe, Carol L; Sauvigne, Karen; Usiak, Craig; Soriano, Rainier P

    2015-02-01

    The way students are taught and evaluated is changing, with greater emphasis on flexible, individualized, learner-centered education, including the use of technology. The goal of assessment is also shifting from what students know to how they perform in practice settings. Developing educational materials for teaching in these ways is time-consuming and can be expensive. The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education (POGOe) was developed to aid educators in meeting these needs and become quicker, better-prepared teachers of geriatrics. POGOe contains more than 950 geriatrics educational materials that faculty at 45% of allopathic and 7% of osteopathic U.S. medical schools and the Centers for Geriatric Nursing Excellence have created. These materials include various instructional and assessment methodologies, including virtual and standardized patients, games, tutorials, case-based teaching, self-directed learning, and traditional lectures. Materials with common goals and resource types are available as selected educational series. Learner assessments comprise approximately 10% of the educational materials. POGOe also includes libraries of videos, images, and questions extracted from its educational materials to encourage educators to repurpose content components to create new resources and to align their teaching better with their learners' needs. Web-Geriatric Education Modules, a peer-reviewed online modular curriculum for medical students, is a prime example of this repurposing. The existence of a robust compendium of instructional and assessment materials allows educators to concentrate more on improving learner performance in practice and not simply on knowledge acquisition. It also makes it easier for nongeriatricians to teach the care of older adults in their respective disciplines. PMID:25644187

  18. Multiple medication use in older patients in post-acute transitional care: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Runganga, Maureen; Peel, Nancye M; Hubbard, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults with a range of comorbidities are often prescribed multiple medications, which may impact on their function and cognition and increase the potential for drug interactions and adverse events. Aims This study investigated the extent of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications in patients receiving post-discharge transitional home care and explored the associations of polypharmacy with patient characteristics, functional outcomes, and frailty. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted of 351 patients discharged home from hospital with support from six Transition Care Program (TCP) sites in two states of Australia. A comprehensive geriatric assessment was conducted at TCP admission and discharge using the interRAI Home Care assessment tool, with frailty measured using an index of 57 accumulated deficits. Medications from hospital discharge summaries were coded using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Results Polypharmacy (5–9 drugs) was observed in 46.7% and hyperpolypharmacy (≥10 drugs) in 39.2% of patients. Increasing numbers of medications were associated with greater number of comorbid conditions, a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dizziness, and dyspnea and increased frailty. At discharge from the program, the non-polypharmacy group (<5 drugs) had improved outcomes in Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and fewer falls, which was mediated because of lower levels of frailty. The commonest drugs were analgesics (56.8%) and antiulcer drugs (52.7%). The commonest potentially inappropriate medications were tertiary tricyclic antidepressants. Conclusion Polypharmacy is common in older patients discharged from hospital. It is associated with frailty, falls, and poor functional outcomes. Efforts should be made to encourage regular medication reviews and

  19. Geriatric Telemedicine: Background and Evidence for Telemedicine as a Way to Address the Challenges of Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The global population of elderly people is increasing at a remarkable rate, which may be expected to continue for some time. Older patients require more care, and with the current model of care delivery, the costs may be expected to rise, although higher cost is unsustainable. For this reason, a new pattern of practice is needed. Telemedicine will be presented as a highly effective and necessary tool in geriatrics. Methods This review will present some of the background and evidence for telemedicine as a way to address the challenges of geriatrics through geriatric telemedicine. Some of the evidence for the value of telemedicine as a tool for physicians and healthcare systems is presented. Results Telemedicine offers many means to address the problems of geriatric care in creative ways. The use of electronic medicine, telecommunications, and information management has now found its way into the very fabric of health care. The use of telemedicine is a fait accompli in much of the world, and it continues to have an increasing role deeply imbedded in our electronic practices coupled with social media. Conclusions The evidence for successful incorporation of telemedicine into practice is abundant and continues to accrue. This is a great opportunity for medical practice to evolve to new levels of engagement with patients and new levels of attainment in terms of quality care. PMID:26618027

  20. Do Geriatricians Stay in Geriatrics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolfklein, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice…

  1. Pre-Clerkship Observerships to Increase Early Exposure to Geriatric Medicine

    PubMed Central

    You, Peng; Leung, Marie; Xu, Victoria Y. Y.; Astell, Alexander; Gill, Sudeep S.; Gibson, Michelle; Frank, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose To foster interest in geriatric care, the Queen’s Geriatrics Interest Group (QGIG) collaborated with the Division of Geriatric Medicine to arrange a Geriatrics Pre-Clerkship Observership Program. Methods Forty-two pre-clerkship medical students participated in the program between October 2013 and May 2014. Participants were paired with a resident and/or attending physician for a four-hour weekend observership on an inpatient geriatric rehabilitation unit. The program was assessed using: (1) internally developed Likert scales assessing student’s experiences and interest in geriatric medicine before and after the observership; (2) University of California Los Angeles–Geriatric Attitudes Scale (UCLA-GAS); and (3) narrative feedback. Results All participants found the process of setting up the observership easy. Some 72.7% described the observership experience as leading to positive changes in their attitude toward geriatric medicine and 54.5% felt that it stimulated their interest in the specialty. No statistically significant change in UCLA–GAS scores was detected (mean score pre- versus post-observership: 3.5 ± 0.5 versus 3.7 ± 0.4; p=.35). All participants agreed that the program should continue, and 90% stated that they would participate again. Conclusions The observership program was positively received by students. Structured pre-clerkship observerships may be a feasible method for increasing exposure to geriatric medicine. PMID:26740831

  2. Geriatric assessment teams.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L J; Cole, K D

    1987-02-01

    In geriatric care, a form of teamwork is the recommended modality because of the complex biopsychosocial needs of the patient. The goal of geriatric assessment programs is to establish an intensive assessment of older adults which requires the competencies of several coordinated disciplines. Not only do teams have the capacity to assess patients in much greater depth but also patients share different information with different providers. The composition of the team is dictated by the needs of the patient population in accordance with resources available. Next, one must identify a method of team practice in order for interactions to take place. The method of functioning determines what kind of team it is, ranging from independent functioning with minimal formal interfacing to interdependent activity interspersed with formal and informal interactions. In initiating a geriatric assessment program, one needs to determine which tasks demand interdisciplinary collaboration, which require interdisciplinary consultation, and which can be performed using a matrix or extended team model. In this model, the core team is supplemented by other disciplines as determined by the team, predicated on patient problems. Teams can profit from training, which can help with choosing an appropriate model, establishing a manual of procedure, and managing interactive issues and problems. This can occur early in the team's formation, or when a team takes on new members. The minimal level of team development would include establishing program goals, delineating professional responsibilities and roles, and implementing a system for exchanging and documenting information about patient plans. Saving input to share only in team meeting is inefficient, so health care teams need to recognize the importance of informal interchanges. It is still a matter of conjecture about what team works best with which patients under what circumstances or conditions. Multiple randomized clinical trials with teams

  3. Redefining the Economics of Geriatric Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Christopher; Paller, David; Daniels, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The heath care system in the United States is in the midst of a transition, in large part to help accommodate an older and more medically complex population. Central to the current evolution is the reassessment of value based on the cost utility of a particular procedure compared to alternatives. The existing contribution of geriatric orthopedics to the societal burden of disease is substantial, and literature focusing on the economic value of treating elderly populations with musculoskeletal injuries is growing. Materials and Methods: A literature review of peer-reviewed publications and abstracts related to the cost-effectiveness of treating geriatric patients with orthopedic injuries was carried out. Results: In our review, we demonstrate that while cost-utility studies generally demonstrate net society savings for most orthopedic procedures, geriatric populations often contribute to negative net society savings due to decreased working years and lower salaries while in the workforce. However, the incremental cost-effective ratio for operative intervention has been shown to be below the financial willingness to treat threshold for common procedures including joint replacement surgery of the knee (ICER US$8551), hip (ICER US$17 115), and shoulder (CE US$957) as well as for spinal procedures and repair of torn rotator cuffs (ICER US$12 024). We also discuss the current trends directed toward improving institutional value and highlight important complementary next steps to help overcome the growing demands of an older, more active society. Conclusion: The geriatric population places a significant burden on the health care system. However, studies have shown that treating this demographic for orthopedic-related injuries is cost effective and profitable for providers under certain scenarios. PMID:26246943

  4. Basic Geriatrics Knowledge Among Internal Medicine Trainees in a Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Aama, Tareef

    2016-06-01

    To assess the basic knowledge of medical trainees, in the absence of a structured geriatrics curriculum, around a variety of geriatric medicine components that are considered essential for the care of the rapidly increasing elderly population. Eighty-three trainees at different levels of training in internal medicine were asked about a variety of common geriatric conditions. Those included: delirium, falls, geriatric syndromes, pain, cognitive impairment, and medications. The trainees' knowledge about common geriatric condition was overall poor. The most pronounced deficits included: the lack of familiarity in diagnosing geriatric syndromes (63 %) or managing them (67 %), the underestimation of the prevalence of delirium (49 %), and the tendency to undertreat pain (64 %). Poor familiarity with polypharmacy and its impact, as well as inappropriate prescription practices in the elderly were also observed. In the absence of a structured geriatric medicine curriculum, internal medicine trainees' knowledge about important geriatric conditions is poor, even if their internal medicine knowledge is overall adequate. This would translate into suboptimal care for this vulnerable and rapidly expanding segment of the population. PMID:27033085

  5. [The organizational technologies of quality support of emergency and acute medical care in megalopolis: Moscow case].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the issues of emergency medical care in conditions of megalopolis on the example of the Moscow A.S. Putchkov emergency and acute medical care station. The analysis is applied to such new organizational technologies as the automatic navigational dispatcher system of field brigades 'management, the zoning of transport mains according accessibility of emergency medical are stations, the organization of emergency medical posts on the most conducive to accident areas of megalopolis, the integrated municipal inter-warning system in case of road accidents. PMID:22279806

  6. E-Learning Virtual Patients for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Eric; Mulhausen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based virtual patients (VPs) are an emerging medium for medical education that addresses barriers faced by geriatrics educators. Research has shown VPs to be as effective in changing knowledge and behavior as more traditional forms of teaching. This paper presents a descriptive study of the development of the University of Iowa's…

  7. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.…

  8. Geriatric Knowledge and Educational Needs among Rural Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Gainor, Sara Jane; Pollard, Cecil; Spencer, S. Melinda

    2003-01-01

    In a needs assessment of 84 rural health care professionals (44.1% physicians, 15.5% pharmacists, 14.3% nurses, 26.1% other), 39% considered their geriatrics knowledge above average. They were interested in learning more about Alzheimer's/dementia, medication use, and adverse effects. Preferred methods were videotapes, CD-ROM, and an…

  9. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training…

  10. Thyroid disorders in the geriatric veterinary patient.

    PubMed

    Scott-Moncrieff, J Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The effects of age, concurrent illness, and administered medications complicate diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction in geriatric patients. Interpretation of thyroid hormone testing should take these factors into account. The most common thyroid disorder in dogs is acquired hypothyroidism. Therapeutic monitoring should be utilized for monitoring treatment of canine hypothyroidism. The most common thyroid disorder in cats is benign hyperthyroidism. Diagnosis is most often complicated by the presence of concurrent illness. Treatment should be individualized based on individual case characteristics and presence of concurrent illness. Some older cats have a palpable goiter months to years before development of clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. PMID:22720810

  11. Geriatric Small Bowel Obstruction: An Analysis of Treatment and Outcomes Compared to a Younger Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Krause, William R.; Webb, Travis P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common condition, but little is known about its presentation, management, and outcomes in geriatric patients. Methods A retrospective review was performed comparing geriatric (≥65 years of age) and non-geriatric patients admitted with SBO. Admission characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were compared. Data analysis included Student’s t test and chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results Among 80 geriatric and 136 non-geriatric patients no difference was observed between admission characteristics, treatment, time to or type of surgery, length of post-op stay, or overall complications. Cardiac complications (15% vs 0%, p=0.0082) and sub-acute care facility discharge (29% vs 5%, p<0.001) were more common for geriatric patients. Conclusions Compared to younger adults, elderly patients with SBO have similar presentations and overall outcomes with the exception of cardiac morbidity and discharge disposition. Pre-operative attention to cardiac risk profile and discharge disposition discussion should be encouraged. Summary This study analyzes geriatric patients presenting with small bowel obstruction when cared for by an Acute Care Surgery service. Compared to younger adults, the presentation, treatment response, and outcomes are similar with the exception of cardiac complications and discharge destination. PMID:25048569

  12. [Electrolyte disturbances in geriatric patients with focus on hyponatremia].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, F

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances of water and electrolyte balance are commonly encountered in older patients due to a multitude of physiological changes and preexisting morbidities with hyponatremia being the most common disorder. Even mild chronic hyponatremia can lead to cognitive deficits and gait instability and is associated with an increased rate of falls and fractures. Additionally, experimental and epidemiological data suggest that hyponatremia promotes bone resorption and therefore increases the risk of osteoporosis. Furthermore, osteoporosis and sarcopenia can be stimulated by hypomagnesemia. Hypernatremia often only results in unspecific symptoms but the condition is associated with a clearly increased mortality. As electrolyte disturbances have a high prevalence in the geriatric population and can contribute to geriatric syndromes and frailty, relevant electrolyte alterations should be excluded in all geriatric patients, in particular after a change in medication schedules. PMID:27464739

  13. Standpoints of traditional Persian physicians on geriatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Emami, Morteza; Nazarinia, Mohammad Ali; Rezaeizadeh, Hussein; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2014-10-01

    The present article aimed to compile information on the nutritional management for geriatric people. Popular textbooks of Persian medicine from 10th to 18th century were studied to derive relative viewpoints and considerations. The temperament, which is defined as the combination of 4 main elements (fire, air, water, and soil) and 4 humors made subsequently (black bile, yellow bile, phlegm, and blood), changes during age periods. Imbalance in proportional amounts of humors in elderly should be corrected with food and medicaments having opposite nature to the current condition. Traditional foods included mostly well-cooked soups, pottages, and porridges containing fresh sheep or chicken meat. Mono-ingredient foods were also administered according to their medical properties. Nutritional recommendations were also concerned with geriatrics' physiological conditions such as constipation, sleep disorders, and memory deficits. Many of traditional geriatric nutritional requirements are relevant in the present day. However, there are still notes that may be beneficial for consideration. PMID:25053755

  14. Spirituality in geriatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Christina M

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an overview of spirituality as an essential domain of geriatrics palliative care, and provides guidelines for clinicians to diagnose spiritual distress and to integrate spirituality into their clinical practice. PMID:25920059

  15. Teaching Programs in Geriatric Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Albert A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey of U.S. and Canadian optometry programs concerning curriculum design, clinical and residency training programs, continuing education, and research projects planned or under way in geriatric optometry are presented and discussed. (MSE)

  16. Trauma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Cathy A

    2015-06-01

    Injury in older adults is a looming public health crisis. This article provides a broad overview of geriatric trauma across the continuum of care. After a review of the epidemiology of geriatric trauma, optimal approaches to patient care are presented for triage and transport, trauma team activation and initial assessment, inpatient management, and injury prevention. Special emphasis is given to assessment of frailty, advanced care planning, and transitions of care. PMID:25981722

  17. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  18. Delirium in the elderly: current problems with increasing geriatric age

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Deepti; Günther, Ulf; Popp, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition seen relatively commonly in people aged 65 yr or older. The prevalence is estimated to be between 11 and 42 per cent for elderly patients on medical wards. The prevalence is also high in nursing homes and long term care (LTC) facilities. The consequences of delirium could be significant such as an increase in mortality in the hospital, long-term cognitive decline, loss of autonomy and increased risk to be institutionalized. Despite being a common condition, it remains under-recognised, poorly understood and not adequately managed. Advanced age and dementia are the most important risk factors. Pain, dehydration, infections, stroke and metabolic disturbances, and surgery are the most common triggering factors. Delirium is preventable in a large proportion of cases and therefore, it is also important from a public health perspective for interventions to reduce further complications and the substantial costs associated with these. Since the aetiology is, in most cases, multfactorial, it is important to consider a multi-component approach to management, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Detection and treatment of triggering causes must have high priority in case of delirium. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of delirium in the elderly population, given the increasing numbers of ageing people as well as increasing geriatric age. PMID:26831414

  19. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. PMID:27021702

  20. Characteristics and Acute Care Use Patterns of Patients in a Senior Living Community Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Ryan; Gillespie, Suzanne M.; Nelson, Dallas; Newman, Calvin; Shah, Manish N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Primary care medical practices dedicated to the needs of older adults who dwell in independent and assisted living residences in senior living communities (SLCs) have been developed. To date, the demographic and acute medical care use patterns of patients in these practices have not been described. Design A descriptive study using a six-month retrospective record review of adults enrolled in a medical primary care practice that provides on-site primary medical care in SLCs. Setting Greater Rochester, New York. Participants 681 patients residing in 19 SLCs. Measurements Demographic and clinical data were collected. Use of acute medical care by patients in the SLC program including phone consultation, provider emergent/urgent in-home visit, emergency department (ED) visit, and hospital admissions were recorded. ED visit and hospital admissions at the two primary referral hospitals for the practice were reviewed for chief complaint and discharge plan. Results 635/681 (93%) of records were available. The median age was 85 years (interquartile range (IQR) 77, 89). Patients were predominantly female (447, 70%) and white (465, 73%). Selected chronic medical diseases included: dementia/cognitive impairment (367, 58%); cardiac disease (271, 43%); depression (246, 39%); diabetes (173, 27%); pulmonary disease (146, 23%); renal disease (118, 19%); cancer (115, 18%); stroke/TIA (93,15%). The median MMSE score was 25 (IQR 19, 28; n=446). Patients took a median of 10 medications (IQR 7, 12). Important medication classes included: cardiovascular (512 (81%); hypoglycemics (117, 18%); benzodiazepines (71, 11%); dementia (194, 31%); and anticoagulants (51, 8%). Patients received acute care 1,876 times (median frequency 3, IQR 2, 6) for 1,504 unique medical issues. Falls were the most common complaint (399, 20%). Of these 1,876 episodes, patients accessed acute care via telephone (1071, 57%), provider visit at the SLC (417, 22%), and ED visit (388, 21%). Of the cases

  1. Physician and Nurse Acceptance of Technicians to Screen for Geriatric Syndromes in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Griffey, Richard T; Stark, Susan; Coopersmith, Craig M; Gage, Brian F

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to evaluate emergency medicine physician and nurse acceptance of nonnurse, nonphysician screening for geriatric syndromes. Methods This was a single-center emergency department (ED) survey of physicians and nurses after an 8-month project. Geriatric technicians were paid medical student research assistants evaluating consenting ED patients older than 65 years for cognitive dysfunction, fall risk, or functional decline. The primary objective of this anonymous survey was to evaluate ED nurse and physician perceptions about the geriatric screener feasibility and barriers to implementation. In addition, as a secondary objective, respondents reported ongoing geriatric screening efforts independent of the research screeners. Results The survey was completed by 72% of physicians and 33% of nurses. Most nurses and physicians identified geriatric technicians as beneficial to patients without impeding ED throughput. Fewer than 25% of physicians routinely screen for any geriatric syndromes. Nurses evaluated for fall risk significantly more often than physicians, but no other significant differences were noted in ongoing screening efforts. Conclusion Dedicated geriatric technicians are perceived by nurses and physicians as beneficial to patients with the potential to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. Most nurses and physicians are not currently screening for any geriatric syndromes. PMID:22224145

  2. [Geriatric rehabilitation from the perspective of Book 9 of the German social code, SGB IX].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, H

    2007-10-01

    The legal foundations for provision and realization of geriatric rehabilitation benefits are contained in particular in Book 9 of the German social code, SGB IX (covering rehabilitation and participation of people with disabilities). This paper discusses claims foundations and benefit prerequisites of geriatric rehabilitation taking into consideration the relations between Book 5 (on health insurance) and Book 9 of the social code. The article includes a definition of "geriatric rehabilitation" in light of the SGB IX, describes the benefit carriers' obligations as well as the procedure in place for determining geriatric rehab need, in this context appraising the designation as "geriatric patient" in terms of its appropriateness as an identifying criterion in determining need. Provision of geriatric rehab benefits is contingent on a potential for attaining rehab goals as specified by SGB IX as well as on fulfillment of the benefit prerequisites. Responsibility for the content, extent and quality of geriatric rehabilitation lies with the benefit carriers, as is the case for the obligation to secure availability of the required numbers and quality of rehabilitation facilities and services. The article specifies the legal foundations of the various benefit types (ambulatory, mobile rehab, under a Personal Budget, integrated benefit provision, or early rehab), and discusses geriatric rehabilitation in the framework of an insurance-based medical care system as well as of activating care. PMID:17955397

  3. The blood-brain barrier: geriatric relevance of a critical brain-body interface.

    PubMed

    Zeevi, Neer; Pachter, Joel; McCullough, Louise D; Wolfson, Leslie; Kuchel, George A

    2010-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents the interface between the brain and other body tissues. Its ability to protect the brain from harmful compounds has attracted the attention of clinicians and investigators, but far from being a simple physical barrier, the BBB is a complex, heterogeneous, and dynamic tissue. The integrated function of the cerebral microvasculature, tight junction proteins, brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), cellular transport pathways, and enzymatic machinery jointly contribute to normal BBB integrity. Aging, systemic diseases, and ischemic injury can disrupt these processes, resulting in a decline in overall BBB function and integrity. Based on the published literature, this study proposes that age- and disease-related BBB alterations play a key role in diminishing the ability of older patients to recover from acute ischemic stroke. Evidence linking deficits in the cerebral microvasculature and BBB integrity to dementia, medication-related cognitive decline, white matter disease (WMD or leukoaraiosis), and related geriatric syndromes including delirium, gait disorders, and urinary incontinence is also reviewed. Priority areas for a future research agenda include strategies to improve clinicians' ability to diagnose, prevent, and manage BBB abnormalities. In future years, in vivo measures such as functional and contrast-enhanced neuroimaging will be used to evaluate BBB integrity in older adults while also assessing the effectiveness of interventions, some targeting inflammatory pathways known to disrupt the BBB, for their ability to prevent or slow the progression of these complex multifactorial geriatric syndromes. PMID:20863334

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) Experience for a Geriatric Medicine Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struck, Bryan D.; Teasdale, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The DWR Department of Geriatric Medicine at OUHSC and the OKC VA Medical Center began a mandatory third-year geriatric medicine clerkship in 2003. As part of the didactic sessions, the Department created a longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) experience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CBL experience, report student satisfaction…

  5. Geriatric dentistry education in European dental schools.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, P M; Mohammad, A R

    2005-05-01

    As the numbers of elderly adults continue to grow within European populations, the need for dental students to be trained in the management of geriatric patients becomes increasingly important. Many dental schools have developed training programmes in geriatric dentistry in response to the changing oral health needs of older adults. The purpose of this on-line survey was to identify the current status of geriatric dentistry education in European dental schools. A questionnaire relating to the teaching of geriatric dentistry was posted on the Internet, and 194 dental schools in 34 European countries were invited to participate. Data from completed questionnaires were submitted to the investigators via email from 82 schools in 27 countries (42% response rate). Thirty-six percent of schools offered a specific geriatric dentistry course that included didactic teaching or seminar groups, 21% taught geriatric dentistry by means of organised presentations in the curriculum, and 36% taught the subject by occasional lectures. 7% of schools did not teach geriatric dentistry at all. A clinical component to the geriatric dentistry curriculum was reported by 61% of schools and 18% reported operating a specific geriatric dentistry clinic within the school. Of those providing clinical geriatric dentistry training, it was provided within the school in 45% of cases, with a further 29% of schools providing training both within the school and at a remote location. Seven percent of schools operated a mobile dental clinic for treating geriatric patients. Twenty-eight percent of schools had a geriatric programme director or a chairman of a geriatric section and 39% indicated that they plan to extend the teaching of geriatric dentistry in the future. Geriatric dental education has clearly established itself in the curricula of European dental schools although the format of teaching the subject varies widely. It is of concern that geriatric dentistry was not taught at all in 7% of schools

  6. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  7. Geriatric pharmacology and pharmacotherapy education for health professionals and students: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; van Hensbergen, Larissa; Jacobs, Lotte; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; de Wildt, Dick J; ten Cate, Olle Th J; Jansen, Paul A F

    2012-01-01

    AIMS Given the reported high rates of medication errors, especially in elderly patients, we hypothesized that current curricula do not devote enough time to the teaching of geriatric pharmacology. This review explores the quantity and nature of geriatric pharmacology education in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula for health professionals. METHODS Pubmed, Embase and PsycINFO databases were searched (from 1 January 2000 to 11 January 2011), using the terms ‘pharmacology’ and ‘education’ in combination. Articles describing content or evaluation of pharmacology education for health professionals were included. Education in general and geriatric pharmacology was compared. RESULTS Articles on general pharmacology education (252) and geriatric pharmacology education (39) were included. The number of publications on education in general pharmacology, but not geriatric pharmacology, has increased over the last 10 years. Articles on undergraduate and postgraduate education for 12 different health disciplines were identified. A median of 24 h (from 15 min to 4956 h) devoted to pharmacology education and 2 h (1–935 h) devoted to geriatric pharmacology were reported. Of the articles on education in geriatric pharmacology, 61.5% evaluated the teaching provided, mostly student satisfaction with the course. The strength of findings was low. Similar educational interventions were not identified, and evaluation studies were not replicated. CONCLUSIONS Recently, interest in pharmacology education has increased, possibly because of the high rate of medication errors and the recognized importance of evidence-based medical education. Nevertheless, courses on geriatric pharmacology have not been evaluated thoroughly and none can be recommended for use in training programmes. Suggestions for improvements in education in general and geriatric pharmacology are given. PMID:22416832

  8. Pharmacological Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients With Acute Medical Illness: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with acute medical illness have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). American College of Chest Physicians guidelines list various chronic illnesses, sepsis, advanced age, history of VTE, and immobility as risk factors and recommend prophylactic anticoagulation using fondaparinux, low-molecular weight heparin, or low-dose unfractionated heparin. The objectives of this study were to examine pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE among hospitalized medically ill patients and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. A retrospective (1999-2010) electronic medical records study included patients aged 40 years and older hospitalized for at least 3 days, with significant medical illness or with a VTE hospitalization 30-365 days before admission. Each patient's first qualifying hospitalization was analyzed. Exclusions were if VTE treatment was started within 1 day of admission, or if warfarin (and not heparin or enoxaparin) was used. Prophylaxis was defined if the first inpatient dose of subcutaneous heparin or enoxaparin was at prophylaxis levels (lower than treatment levels). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with VTE prophylaxis. Among 12,980 patients, 22.1% received prophylaxis (11.8% with enoxaparin, 10.3% with heparin). VTE prophylaxis was positively associated with year of hospitalization, subcutaneous heparin in the month before admission, aspirin, self-pay status, age, and sepsis. VTE prophylaxis was negatively associated with smoking, alcohol, warfarin in the past 30 days, and primary diagnoses of stroke, infectious disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. Pharmacological VTE prophylaxis has increased significantly over the past 12 years but is still largely underused in patients hospitalized with acute medical illness. Multiple demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors are associated with inpatient VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26720163

  9. Geriatric Trauma: A Radiologist's Guide to Imaging Trauma Patients Aged 65 Years and Older.

    PubMed

    Sadro, Claudia T; Sandstrom, Claire K; Verma, Nupur; Gunn, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Radiologists play an important role in evaluation of geriatric trauma patients. Geriatric patients have injury patterns that differ markedly from those seen in younger adults and are susceptible to serious injury from minor trauma. The spectrum of trauma in geriatric patients includes head and spine injury, chest and rib trauma, blunt abdominal injury, pelvic fractures, and extremity fractures. Clinical evaluation of geriatric trauma patients is difficult because of overall frailty, comorbid illness, and medication effects. Specific attention should be focused on the effects of medications in this population, including anticoagulants, steroids, and bisphosphonates. Radiologists should use age-appropriate algorithms for radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging of geriatric trauma patients and follow guidelines for intravenous contrast agent administration in elderly patients with impaired renal function. Because there is less concern about risk for cancer with use of ionizing radiation in this age group, CT is the primary imaging modality used in the setting of geriatric trauma. Clinical examples are provided from the authors' experience at a trauma center where geriatric patients who have sustained major and minor injuries are treated daily. PMID:26065932

  10. [Patient satisfaction and geriatric care - an empirical study].

    PubMed

    Clausen, G; Borchelt, M; Janssen, C; Loos, S; Mull, L; Pfaff, H

    2006-02-01

    Patients' satisfaction has become a central concept in quality assurance. Despite progress in research in this area is still a lack of data for geriatric patients. Referring to the consumer model, satisfaction can be described as a difference between expectations and assessed performance. The aim of this study is to analyze satisfaction among geriatric patients in an in-patient setting. A personal interview was performed 1-2 days before discharge. Patients suffering for dementia or with problems to communicate were excluded. 124 of 268 geriatric patients who were discharged in 2003 were included (inclusion rate 46.3%). 119 were willing to participate (response rate 96.0%). Respondents were between 61 and 96 years old, 39% were male and 42% had serious functional limitations at time of admission. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed three significant predictors of a combined index of satisfaction and expectations: a) quality of hotel services; b) experience of neglect; c) provision of medical information and skills. In summary, standardized personal questionnaires can provide valid and reliable data of geriatric patients. Satisfaction of elderly patients is negatively affected by neglect and positively influenced by provision of medical information and a good hotel services. PMID:16502227

  11. Novel ethical dilemmas arising in geriatric clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Calleja-Sordo, Elisa Constanza; de Hoyos, Adalberto; Méndez-Jiménez, Jorge; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Valderrama, Alejandro; García-Peña, Carmen; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine empirically the state of the art of the medical care, when healthcare personal is confronted with ethical dilemmas related with the care they give to the geriatric population. An observational, longitudinal, prospective and qualitative study was conducted by analyzing the correlation between healthcare personnel-patient relationship, and ethical judgments regarding dilemmas that arise in daily clinical practice with geriatric patients. Mexican healthcare personnel with current active practices were asked to write up an ethical dilemma that arose frequently or that had impacted their medical practice. From the narrative input, we were able to draw up a database with 421 dilemmas, and those corresponding to patients 60 years and older were selected (n = 54, 12.8 %). The axiological analysis of the narrative dilemmas of geriatric patients was made using dialectical empiricism. The axiological analysis values found most frequently were classified into three groups: the impact of healthcare, the roles of the physician, and refusal of therapy; the healthcare role of educator, caring for the patients' life and the risk of imminent death where the values found more often. The persistence and universality of certain dilemmas in geriatrics calls for awareness and requires a good training in the ethical discernment of these dilemmas. This would help to improve substantially the care and the life quality of this population. PMID:25185872

  12. Models of Care in Geriatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, A.; Dale, W.; Mohile, S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is common in older adults and the approach to cancer treatment and supportive measures in this age group is continuously evolving. Incorporating geriatric assessment (GA) into the care of the older patient with cancer has been shown to be feasible and predictive of outcomes, and there are unique aspects of the traditional geriatric domains that can be considered in this population. Geriatric assessment-guided interventions can also be developed to support patients during their treatment course. There are several existing models of incorporating geriatrics into oncology care, including a consultative geriatric assessment, geriatrician “embedded” within an oncology clinic and primary management by a dual-trained geriatric oncologist. Although a geriatrician or geriatric oncologist leads the geriatric assessment, is it truly a multidisciplinary assessment, and often includes evaluation by a physical therapist, occupational therapist, pharmacist, social worker and nutritionist. PMID:25587518

  13. Financing geriatric programs in community health centers.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, D E; Ray, S; List, N; Duggar, B

    1991-01-01

    There are approximately 600 Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) providing preventive and primary health care services principally to medically underserved rural and urban areas across the United States. The need to develop geriatric programs within C/MHCs is clear. Less clear is how and under what circumstances a comprehensive geriatric program can be adequately financed. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the Public Health Service contracted with La Jolla Management Corporation and Duke University Center on Aging to identify successful techniques for obtaining funding by examining 10 "good practice" C/MHC geriatric programs. The results from this study indicated that effective techniques included using a variety of funding sources, maintaining accurate cost-per-user information, developing a marketing strategy and user incentives, collaborating with the area agency on aging and other community organizations, and developing special services for the elderly. Developing cost-per-user information allowed for identifying appropriate "drawing card" services, negotiating sound reimbursement rates and contracts with other providers, and assessing the financial impact of changing service mixes. A marketing strategy was used to enhance the ability of the centers to provide a comprehensive package of services. Collaboration with the area agency on aging and other community organizations and volunteers in the aging network was found to help establish referral networks and subsequently increase the number of elderly patients served. Finally, development of special services for the elderly, such as adult day care, case management, and health education, was found to increase program visibility, opportunities to work with the network of services for the aging, and clinical utilization. PMID:1908588

  14. Incorporating Geriatric Medicine Providers into the Care of the Older Adult with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Allison; Canin, Beverly; van Londen, G J; Edwards, Beatrice; Bakalarski, Pamela; Parker, Ira

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients and survivors are age 65 and over. Older adults with cancer often have more complex medical and social needs than their younger counterparts. Geriatric medicine providers (GMPs) such as geriatricians, geriatric-trained advanced practice providers, and geriatric certified registered nurses have expertise in caring for older adults, managing complex medical situations, and optimizing function and independence for this population. GMPs are not routinely incorporated into cancer care for older adults; however, their particular skill set may add benefit at many points along the cancer care continuum. In this article, we review the role of geriatric assessment in the care of older cancer patients, highlight specific case scenarios in which GMPs may offer additional understanding and insight in the care of older adults with cancer, and discuss specific mechanisms for incorporating GMPs into oncology care. PMID:27613166

  15. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  16. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  17. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  18. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  19. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  20. Medical neglect death due to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Sameshima, Naomi; Tsuji, Akiko; Kudo, Keiko; Nishida, Naoki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of 2-year-old girl who died of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. She had no remarkable medical history. She was transferred to a hospital because of respiratory distress and died 4 hours after arrival. Two weeks before death, she had a fever of 39 degrees C, which subsided after the administration of a naturopathic herbal remedy. She developed jaundice 1 week before death, and her condition worsened on the day of death. Laboratory test results on admission showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count. Accordingly, the cause of death was suspected to be acute leukaemia. Forensic autopsy revealed the cause of death to be precursor B-cell ALL. With advancements in medical technology, the 5-year survival rate of children with ALL is nearly 90%. However, in this case, the deceased's parents preferred complementary and alternative medicine (i.e., naturopathy) to evidence-based medicine and had not taken her to a hospital for a medical check-up or immunisation since she was an infant. Thus, if she had received routine medical care, she would have a more than 60% chance of being alive 5 years after diagnosis. Therefore, we conclude that the parents should be accused of medical neglect regardless of their motives. PMID:25895240

  1. Geriatric assessment for oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Holmes, Holly M.; Shahrokni, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The world is experiencing aging of its population. Age-specific incidence rates of cancer are higher and cancer is now recognized as a part of aging. Treating older patients can be challenging. The clinical behavior of some tumors changes with age and the aging process itself brings physiological changes leading to decline in the function of organs. It is essential to identify those patients with longer life expectancy, potentially more likely to benefit from aggressive treatment vs. those that are more vulnerable to adverse outcomes. A primary determination when considering therapy for an older cancer patient is a patient’s physiologic, rather than chronologic age. In order to differentiate amongst patients of the same age, it is useful to determine if a patient is fit or frail. Frail older adults have multiple chronic conditions and difficulties maintaining independence. They may be more vulnerable to therapy toxicities, and may not have substantial lasting benefits from therapy. Geriatric assessment (GA) may be used as a tool to determine reversible deficits and devise treatment strategies to mitigate such deficits. GA is also used in treatment decision making by clinicians, helping to risk stratify patients prior to potentially high-risk therapy. An important practical aspect of GA is the feasibility of incorporating it into a busy oncology practice. Key considerations in performing the GA include: available resources, patient population, GA tools to use, and who will be responsible for using the GA results and develop care plans. Challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice will be discussed. PMID:26779363

  2. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William R; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Remote Environments published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(1):41-49. PMID:25498266

  3. Risk factors for early readmission to acute care for persons with schizophrenia taking antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Timothy L; Becker, Marion Ann; Andel, Ross; Van Dorn, Richard A; Choi, Jiyoon; Sikirica, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The study examined risk factors for readmission to acute care among Florida Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. METHODS Medicaid and service use data for 2004 to 2008 were used to identify adults with schizophrenia discharged from hospitals and crisis units who were taking antipsychotics. Data were extracted on demographic characteristics, service use before admission, psychopharmacologic treatment after discharge, and readmission to acute behavioral health care. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated readmission risk in the 30 days after discharge and in the period after 30 days for participants not readmitted in the first 30 days. RESULTS The mean±SD age of the 3,563 participants was 43.4±11.1; 61% were male, and 38% were white. Participants had 6,633 inpatient episodes; duration of hospitalization was 10.6±7.0 days. Readmission occurred for 84% of episodes, 23% within 30 days. Variables associated with an increased readmission risk in the first 30 days were shorter hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.27, p<.001), shorter time on medication before discharge (HR=1.19, CI=1.06-1.35, p=.003), greater prehospitalization use of acute care (HR=2.64, CI=2.29-3.05, p<.001), serious general medical comorbidity (HR=1.21, CI=1.06-1.38, p=.005), and prior substance abuse treatment (HR=1.58, CI=1.37-1.83, p<.001). After 30 days, hospitalization duration and time on medication were not significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS Short hospital stays for persons with schizophrenia may be associated with risk of early readmission, possibly because the person is insufficiently stabilized. More chronic risk factors include prior acute care, general medical comorbidity, and substance abuse. PMID:23945797

  4. [Clinical practice guideline: a complete geriatric evaluation].

    PubMed

    Medina-Chávez, Juan Humberto; Torres-Arreola, Laura Del Pilar; Cortés-González, Rosa María; Durán-Gómez, Verónica; Martínez-Hernández, Fernando; Esquivel-Romero, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The care of elderly patients requires an evaluation that deserves a host of special considerations, such as biological aspects of aging, those related to activities of daily living and functionality, neuro-psychological conceptions, family dynamics and economic conditions. The growth of the aging population in our country is accompanied by an increase in chronic diseases and more individuals have greater vulnerability, requiring a more consumption of resources because of the high demand for services. This requires the incorporation of specialized care in the institutional system, which has caused serious consequences in the current health system, benefiting specialization and technology, but with a loss of an integrated and horizontal view of the patient. Therefore it is necessary to develop a practical tool that allows the family physician to identify and differentiate the geriatric population that requires specialized care from who does not, identifying problems that may improve and allow the design of strategies to improve health status and maintain functional autonomy of the elderly. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a fundamental tool for clinical practice of any medical care to the elderly. PMID:22176832

  5. Early Walking of Geriatric Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Devas, M. B.

    1971-01-01

    After amputation geriatric patients have been enabled to get up and walk with the help of a prosthesis, an “early walking aid.” The physiotherapist measures the patient, fits the early walking aid, and instructs him in walking. The prosthesis is simple to make, easy to apply, and allows early walking with the use of a walking frame or sticks. Thus the geriatric amputee can walk as soon after operation as his general condition allows and the surgeon wishes. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:5100378

  6. Medication Literacy in a Cohort of Chinese Patients Discharged with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhuqing; Zheng, Feng; Guo, Yuna; Luo, Aijing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at investigating medication literacy of discharged patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in China, and the important determinants of medication literacy among them. For this purpose, we conducted a prospective cohort study. Patient's demographic and clinical data were retrieved from hospital charts and medication literacy was measured by instructed interview using the Chinese version of Medication Literacy Questionnaire on Discharged Patient between 7 and 30 days after the patient was discharged from the hospital. The results show that medication literacy for the surveyed patients was insufficient: >20% did not have adequate knowledge on the types of drugs and the frequency that they need to take the drugs, >30% did not know the name of and the dosage of the drugs they are taking, and >70% did not have adequate knowledge on the effects and side effects of the drugs they are taking. Our research indicated that medication literacy scores decreased with age but increased with education. The number of medicines the discharged patient took with them and days between discharge and interview were not associated with medication literacy levels. PMID:27428990

  7. Medication Literacy in a Cohort of Chinese Patients Discharged with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhuqing; Zheng, Feng; Guo, Yuna; Luo, Aijing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at investigating medication literacy of discharged patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in China, and the important determinants of medication literacy among them. For this purpose, we conducted a prospective cohort study. Patient’s demographic and clinical data were retrieved from hospital charts and medication literacy was measured by instructed interview using the Chinese version of Medication Literacy Questionnaire on Discharged Patient between 7 and 30 days after the patient was discharged from the hospital. The results show that medication literacy for the surveyed patients was insufficient: >20% did not have adequate knowledge on the types of drugs and the frequency that they need to take the drugs, >30% did not know the name of and the dosage of the drugs they are taking, and >70% did not have adequate knowledge on the effects and side effects of the drugs they are taking. Our research indicated that medication literacy scores decreased with age but increased with education. The number of medicines the discharged patient took with them and days between discharge and interview were not associated with medication literacy levels. PMID:27428990

  8. Utstein-Style Template for Uniform Data Reporting of Acute Medical Response in Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Debacker, Michel; Hubloue, Ives; Dhondt, Erwin; Rockenschaub, Gerald; Rüter, Anders; Codreanu, Tudor; Koenig, Kristi L.; Schultz, Carl; Peleg, Kobi; Halpern, Pinchas; Stratton, Samuel; Della Corte, Francesco; Delooz, Herman; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Colombo, Davide; Castrèn, Maaret

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Task Force on Quality Control of Disaster Management (WADEM) published guidelines for evaluation and research on health disaster management and recommended the development of a uniform data reporting tool. Standardized and complete reporting of data related to disaster medical response activities will facilitate the interpretation of results, comparisons between medical response systems and quality improvement in the management of disaster victims. Methods: Over a two-year period, a group of 16 experts in the fields of research, education, ethics and operational aspects of disaster medical management from 8 countries carried out a consensus process based on a modified Delphi method and Utstein-style technique. Results: The EMDM Academy Consensus Group produced an Utstein-style template for uniform data reporting of acute disaster medical response, including 15 data elements with indicators, that can be used for both research and quality improvement. Conclusion: It is anticipated that the Utstein-style template will enable better and more accurate completion of reports on disaster medical response and contribute to further scientific evidence and knowledge related to disaster medical management in order to optimize medical response system interventions and to improve outcomes of disaster victims. PMID:23066513

  9. Geriatrics in Brazil: a big country with big opportunities.

    PubMed

    Garcez-Leme, Luiz E; Leme, Mariana Deckers; Espino, David V

    2005-11-01

    Brazil has approximately 180 million inhabitants, of whom 15.2 million are aged 60 and older and 1.9 million are aged 80 and older. By 2025, the Brazilian elderly population is expected to grow to more than 32 million. Brazil has many problems related to its geographic and population size. Great distances between major cities, marked cultural and racial heterogeneity between the various geographic regions, high poverty levels, and decreasing family size all combine to put pressure on the medical and social services that can be made available to the elder population. Less than 500 Brazilian physicians are certified as geriatricians, translating into one geriatrician for every 37,000 elderly Brazilians. Beside 15 geriatric medicine residencies a larger number of fellowship programs exist, and these programs are in high demand, with more than 20 candidates per position, indicating new opportunities for growth in elder care. In addition, geriatric initiatives such as the annual elder vaccination program and the elder statute, recently approved by the Brazilian Congress, indicate that geriatric care in Brazil is entering a new era of growth and development. Although the challenges remain great, there are opportunities for Brazilian geriatrics and gerontology. PMID:16274389

  10. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  11. History of geriatric medicine: from Hippocrates to Marjory Warren.

    PubMed

    Ritch, A

    2012-01-01

    It is widely assumed that geriatric medicine was an invention of the twentieth century. However, from the time of Hippocrates, there has been interest in the prolongation of the lifespan, the maintenance of health in old age and agerelated disease patterns. The debate about whether old age was a natural phenomenon or a disease state was not resolved until the nineteenth century. Calls for medicine relating to old age to be recognised as a discrete entity at the time when medical specialisation was developing were disregarded until the second half of the twentieth century. This review discusses the history of the theories of ageing and of disease and the practice of medicine for older people from the classical period up to Marjory Warren's initiative in London in 1935 and the development of geriatrics as a medical specialty. PMID:23240126

  12. Cutaneous oncologic and cosmetic surgery in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah; Yu, Thomas; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Gordon, Marsha; Silapunt, Sirunya; Norman, Robert A; Alam, Murad

    2004-01-01

    A wide array of surgical procedures is available to geriatric patients. These interventions can enhance the appearance of patients and facilitate the removal of skin cancers. Pre-existing medical conditions of geriatric patients must be considered comprehensively when selecting and performing cutaneous surgical procedures. Many older patients suffer from a variety of diseases and take a variety of medications and herbal supplements to ameliorate the consequences of such diseases. In general, skin surgery can be performed safely on even very old patients, provided precautions are followed. The biopsychosocial well-being and essence of patients must also be addressed when performing dermatologic surgery. If patients are treated holistically and comprehensively, their surgical experience can be enhanced and their health and appearance improved. PMID:15018014

  13. Geriatric Optometry Programs of Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Satya B.

    1985-01-01

    The curriculum design, philosophy, and innovation of four programs in geriatric optometry are described: the Pennsylvania College of Optometry and the colleges of Optometry at the State University of New York, University of Alabama at Birmingham, and University of Houston. (MSE)

  14. Interactive Algorithms for Teaching and Learning Acute Medicine in the Network of Medical Faculties MEFANET

    PubMed Central

    Štourač, Petr; Komenda, Martin; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina; Gregor, Jakub; Hůlek, Richard; Smékalová, Olga; Křikava, Ivo; Štoudek, Roman; Dušek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical Faculties Network (MEFANET) has established itself as the authority for setting standards for medical educators in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, 2 independent countries with similar languages that once comprised a federation and that still retain the same curricular structure for medical education. One of the basic goals of the network is to advance medical teaching and learning with the use of modern information and communication technologies. Objective We present the education portal AKUTNE.CZ as an important part of the MEFANET’s content. Our focus is primarily on simulation-based tools for teaching and learning acute medicine issues. Methods Three fundamental elements of the MEFANET e-publishing system are described: (1) medical disciplines linker, (2) authentication/authorization framework, and (3) multidimensional quality assessment. A new set of tools for technology-enhanced learning have been introduced recently: Sandbox (works in progress), WikiLectures (collaborative content authoring), Moodle-MEFANET (central learning management system), and Serious Games (virtual casuistics and interactive algorithms). The latest development in MEFANET is designed for indexing metadata about simulation-based learning objects, also known as electronic virtual patients or virtual clinical cases. The simulations assume the form of interactive algorithms for teaching and learning acute medicine. An anonymous questionnaire of 10 items was used to explore students’ attitudes and interests in using the interactive algorithms as part of their medical or health care studies. Data collection was conducted over 10 days in February 2013. Results In total, 25 interactive algorithms in the Czech and English languages have been developed and published on the AKUTNE.CZ education portal to allow the users to test and improve their knowledge and skills in the field of acute medicine. In the feedback survey, 62 participants completed the online questionnaire (13

  15. [Successful aging: what can neurology and geriatrics contribute?].

    PubMed

    Synofzik, M; Maetzler, W

    2015-04-01

    The relative proportion of elderly persons in Western societies is rapidly growing, leading to an increasing frequency of age-related neurological diseases (e.g. dementia) and functional impairments (e.g. immobility). This article argues that this development should prompt a new focus in medical care. The key questions should not only be how can we improve treatment of age-related disorders but also how can we prevent age-related disorders in the first place or at least substantially delay their onset? These questions touch on an even more profound question: how can successful aging be accomplished? That is, which factors and processes characterize successful aging both on a system and on a molecular level? Thus, the crucial societal, scientific and medical challenges for Western societies are to develop and implement measures of primary prevention of dysfunctional aging. The disease-centered framework which currently determines most clinical thinking, scientific research and third party funding has to be supplemented by a novel framework of successful aging. This article defines dysfunctional aging as a convergent downstream result of multiple interacting system processes. Each of these detrimental system processes must be targeted by specific measures of geriatric primary prevention. This, in turn, implies that geriatrics does not start in the elderly or with the onset of particular geriatric disorders. Instead, it starts in the daily practice of neurology and other medical disciplines taking care of persons aged 20-40 years who are largely healthy and in the middle of their professional and personal career. Or, in a nutshell, geriatrics starts right in the middle of medical care. PMID:25801949

  16. Applying comprehensive geriatric assessment to investigate falls.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Geraldine

    2016-04-01

    This is the second article in a short series that presents case study examples of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic assessment model designed to determine frail older people's medical and mental health status, as well as functional, social and environmental issues. When applied by nurses, it can enable individualised planning for health, safety and wellbeing. This article presents the case of an older man who had a three-month history of falls. After his most recent fall he was admitted to an emergency department, where examination identified no significant abnormal pathology, and subsequently to a nurse-led older person's clinic. The article describes how a CGA approach was adopted to assess the man, establish an underlying diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, and develop a personalised care plan to address immediate falls risk and long-term planning. PMID:27029990

  17. GRAMPS: An Automated Ambulatory Geriatric Record

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Kenric W.; King, Carol A.; Date, Vishvanath V.; Prather, Robert J.; Loo, Lawrence; Siddiqui, Khwaja

    1988-01-01

    GRAMPS (Geriatric Record and Multidisciplinary Planning System) is an interactive MUMPS system developed for VA outpatient use. It allows physicians to effectively document care in problem-oriented format with structured narrative and free text, eliminating handwritten input. We evaluated the system in a one-year controlled cohort study. When the computer, was used, appointment times averaged 8.2 minutes longer (32.6 vs. 24.4 minutes) compared to control visits with the same physicians. Computer use was associated with better quality of care as measured in the management of a common problem, hypertension, as well as decreased overall costs of care. When a faster computer was installed, data entry times improved, suggesting that slower processing had accounted for a substantial portion of the observed difference in appointment lengths. The GRAMPS system was well-accepted by providers. The modular design used in GRAMPS has been extended to medical-care applications in Nursing and Mental Health.

  18. The Geriatric Day Hospital: A Canadian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wolochow, Michael; Ham, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    As geriatric day hospitals (GDHs) and assessment units (GAUs) become increasingly established as part of the Canadian medical scene, a closer definition is emerging both of the role of the family physician working in their programs and also of the role of the family physician whose patient is being assessed in their units. This paper briefly summarizes the development of GDHs and GAUs in Canada, their rationale and their objectives. A detailed account is given of such a functioning program, the Short Term Assessment and Treatment (STAT) Centre at Vancouver General Hospital. The relationships of the family physician working there as a team member are described, and the role of the community family physician whose patient is being assessed in such a program is clarified. PMID:20469452

  19. The Effectiveness of a Geriatric Hip Fracture Clinical Pathway in Reducing Hospital and Rehabilitation Length of Stay and Improving Short-Term Mortality Rates

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tak-Wing; Fang, Christian; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Background: A geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway, led by an orthopedic surgeon, was developed in 2007. This clinical pathway team is multidisciplinary and consists of surgeons, physicians, anesthetists, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, medical social workers, dieticians as well as voluntary support groups. Methods: From early 2007 onward, all patients older than 65 years with acute isolated hip fractures were included. During the whole inpatient treatment, all relevant data were captured prospectively. The data in 2006, before the implementation of the clinical pathway, were collected retrospectively through computer record system. A study of the length of stay in acute and rehabilitation hospital and also the short-term mortality rate was carried out to compare the difference before and after the implementation of the pathway. Results: From 2007 onward, more than 1300 hip fractures were treated. After the implementation of the pathway, the preoperative length of stay was markedly shortened by 4 days, from an average of 6.1 days in 2006 to 1.5 days in 2011 (P < .05). The postoperative length of stay and the overall acute hospital length of stay also improved significantly. The length of stay in rehabilitation hospital was also significantly shorter in the 4-year period. Although the number of hip fractures increased annually with increased age and number of comorbidities each year, the inpatient mortality rate showed a gradual decrease from 2.7% in 2006 to 1.25% in 2010. The 30 days mortality rate also showed a decrease from 3.65% in 2006 to 2.75% in 2010. Conclusion: Geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway is an excellent approach to the geriatric hip fracture service. The most significant improvement is the dramatic shortening of the length of hospital stay. Our success in the past 5 years has proven its value and sustainability. PMID:23936733

  20. Perspectives of patients on factors relating to adherence to post-acute coronary syndrome medical regimens

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Kerzner, Anne; Havranek, Edward P; Plomondon, Mary E; Fagan, Katherine M; McCreight, Marina S; Fehling, Kelty B; Williams, David J; Hamilton, Alison B; Albright, Karen; Blatchford, Patrick J; Mihalko-Corbitt, Renee; Bryson, Chris L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Kirshner, Miriam A; Giacco, Eric J Del; Ho, P Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to cardioprotective medications after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalization is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and mortality. Clinical trials of multifaceted interventions have improved medication adherence with varying results. Patients’ perspectives on interventions could help researchers interpret inconsistent outcomes. Identifying factors that patients believe would improve adherence might inform the design of future interventions and make them more parsimonious and sustainable. The objective of this study was to obtain patients’ perspectives on adherence to medical regimens after experiencing an ACS event and their participation in a medication adherence randomized control trial following their hospitalization. Patients and methods Sixty-four in-depth interviews were conducted with ACS patients who participated in an efficacious, multifaceted, medication adherence randomized control trial. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative approach. Results Participants described their post-ACS event experiences and how they affected their adherence behaviors. Patients reported that adherence decisions were facilitated by mutually respectful and collaborative provider–patient treatment planning. Frequent interactions with providers and medication refill reminder calls supported improved adherence. Additional facilitators included having social support, adherence routines, and positive attitudes toward an ACS event. The majority of patients expressed that being active participants in health care decision-making contributed to their health. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that respectful collaborative communication can contribute to medication adherence after ACS hospitalization. These results suggest a potential role for training health-care providers, including pharmacists, social workers, registered nurses, etc, to elicit and acknowledge the patients’ views regarding medication

  1. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children. PMID:25352538

  2. The New Zealand national junior doctors' strike: implications for the provision of acute hospital medical services.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Geoffrey; McCann, Kieran; Freeman, Peter; Beasley, Richard

    2008-06-01

    The New Zealand junior doctors' strike provided an opportunity to consider strategies that might be employed to overcome the international shortage of junior doctors. This article reports the experience of the emergency department (ED) and internal medicine (IM) services at Wellington Hospital during the national strike, in which medical services were primarily provided by specialist consultants in addition to, or as part of, their routine work. During the strike, elective admissions and outpatient clinics were mostly cancelled. In the ED, the waiting times and length of stay were markedly reduced. In IM, the proportion of patients admitted to the short stay unit rather than the general medical wards increased. Notwithstanding the different work circumstances, in both services one senior doctor carried the workload of at least two junior doctors. The deployment of additional senior medical staff to acute hospital services could greatly reduce the total number of doctors required. This strategy would have implications in terms of supporting acute medicine specialty initiatives, training, quality of care and funding. PMID:18624033

  3. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  4. [Rhabdomyolysis in a medical student induced by body-building exercise (rhabdomyolysis following acute muscular exertion)].

    PubMed

    Arányi, J; Radó, J

    1992-08-01

    A medical student sportsman had been admitted to the hospital because of weakness and painful swelling of the muscle as well as dark urine appearing after carrying out an excessive body-building performance. On the basis of indirect evidences pigmenturia "per exclusionem" was a manifestation of urinary myoglobin excretion. The development of an "acute exertional rhabdomyolysis" was confirmed by the increased serum enzyme levels and myoglobinuria. The outcome of the illness was fortunate, as acute renal failure could be avoided. On the basis of survey of the literature it can be stated, that this presumably frequently occurring, but rarely recognized disease may have importance from clinical, sporting medicine and pathophysiological point of view. PMID:1495807

  5. Medication safety in acute care in Australia: where are we now? Part 2: a review of strategies and activities for improving medication safety 2002-2008

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Susan J; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper presents Part 2 of a literature review examining medication safety in the Australian acute care setting. This review was undertaken for the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, updating the 2002 national report on medication safety. Part 2 of the review examined the Australian evidence base for approaches to build safer medication systems in acute care. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify Australian studies and programs published from 2002 to 2008 which examined strategies and activities for improving medication safety in acute care. Results and conclusion Since 2002 there has been significant progress in strategies to improve prescription writing in hospitals with the introduction of a National Inpatient Medication Chart. There are also systems in place to ensure a nationally coordinated approach to the ongoing optimisation of the chart. Progress has been made with Australian research examining the implementation of computerised prescribing systems with clinical decision support. These studies have highlighted barriers and facilitators to the introduction of such systems that can inform wider implementation. However, Australian studies assessing outcomes of this strategy on medication incidents or patient outcomes are still lacking. In studies assessing education for reducing medication errors, academic detailing has been demonstrated to reduce errors in prescriptions for Schedule 8 medicines and a program was shown to be effective in reducing error prone prescribing abbreviations. Published studies continue to support the role of clinical pharmacist services in improving medication safety. Studies on strategies to improve communication between different care settings, such as liaison pharmacist services, have focussed on implementation issues now that funding is available for community-based services. Double checking versus single-checking by nurses and patient self-administration in hospital has been

  6. High-Energy Proximal Femur Fractures in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hahnhaussen, Jens; Hak, David J; Weckbach, Sebastian; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stahel, Philip F

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is limited information in the literature on the outcomes and complications in elderly patients who sustain high-energy hip fractures. As the population ages, the incidence of high-energy geriatric hip fractures is expected to increase. The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcomes and complications in patients aged 65 years or older, who sustained a high-energy proximal femur fracture. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospective trauma database from January 2000 to April 2011 at a single US academic level-1 trauma center. Inclusion criteria consisted of all patients of age 65 years or older, who sustained a proximal femur fracture related to a high-energy trauma mechanism. Details concerning injury, acute treatment, and clinical course and outcome were obtained from medical records and radiographs. Results: We identified 509 proximal femur fractures in patients older than 65 years of age, of which 32 (6.3%) were related to a high-energy trauma mechanism. The mean age in the study group was 72.2 years (range 65-87), with a mean injury severity score of 20 points (range 9-57). Three patients died before discharge (9.4%), and 22 of 32 patients sustained at least one complication (68.8%). Blunt chest trauma represented the most frequently associated injury, and the main root cause of pulmonary complications. The patients' age and comorbidities did not significantly correlate with the rate of complications and the 1-year mortality. Conclusions: High-energy proximal femur fractures in elderly patients are not very common and are associated with a low in-hospital mortality rate of less than 10%, despite high rate of complications of nearly 70%. This selective cohort of patients requires a particular attention to respiratory management due to the high incidence of associated chest trauma. PMID:23569690

  7. Overview of Geriatric Distance Education for Academic Courses and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen Arleen

    2004-01-01

    Distance education technologies may be applied to academic settings, continuing education/continuing medical education settings or in combination to both. This article provides an overview of what we have learned about academic and continuing education/continuing medical education in geriatrics and gerontology. It includes information on the scope…

  8. Exploring the Realities of Curriculum-by-Random-Opportunity: The Case of Geriatrics on the Internal Medicine Clerkship Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Diachun, Laura; Charise, Andrea; Goldszmidt, Mark; Hui, Yin; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    Background While major clerkship blocks may have objectives related to specialized areas such as geriatrics, gay and lesbian bisexual transgender health, and palliative care, there is concern that teaching activities may not attend sufficiently to these objectives. Rather, these objectives are assumed to be met “by random opportunity”.(1) This study explored the case of geriatric learning opportunities on internal medicine clinical teaching units, to better understand the affordances and limitations of curriculum by random opportunity. Methods Using audio-recordings of morning case review discussions of 13 patients > 65 years old and the Canadian geriatric core competencies for medical students, we conducted a content analysis of each case for potential geriatric and non-geriatric learning opportunities. These learning opportunities were compared with attendings’ case review teaching discussions. The 13 cases contained 40 geriatric-related and 110 non-geriatric-related issues. While many of the geriatric issues (e.g., delirium, falls) were directly relevant to the presenting illness, attendings’ teaching discussions focused almost exclusively on non-geriatric medical issues, such as management of diabetes and anemia, many of which were less directly relevant to the reason for presenting to hospital. Results The authors found that the general medicine rotation provides opportunities to acquire geriatric competencies. However, the rare uptake of opportunities in this study suggests that, in curriculum-by-random-opportunity, presence of an opportunity does not justify the assumption that learning objectives will be met. Conclusions More studies are required to investigate whether these findings are transferrable to other vulnerable populations about which undergraduate students are expected to learn through curriculum by random opportunity. PMID:25452825

  9. Treatment of acute diarrhoea: update of guidelines based on a critical interuniversity assessment of medications and current practices.

    PubMed

    Urbain, D; Belaiche, J; De Vos, M; Fiasse, R; Hiele, M; Huijghebaert, S; Jacobs, F; Malonne, H; Speelman, P; Van Gompel, A; Van Gossum, A; Van Wijngaerden, E

    2003-01-01

    Further to a thorough analysis of the problem of acute diarrhoea and the therapeutic options, recommendations were defined following a multidisciplinary approach. These guidelines take into account the reality of frequent self-medication. They further differ as a function of age (children, primarily treated by ORS and for whom self-medication is not advised versus adults who can self-medicate), symptoms (uncomplicated diarrhoea versus dysentery) and location where the diarrhoea is contracted (at home or when travelling). PMID:14618952

  10. Secure Internet video conferencing for assessing acute medical problems in a nursing facility.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, M.; Schadow, G.; Lindbergh, D.; Warvel, J.; Abernathy, G.; Dexter, P.; McDonald, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Although video-based teleconferencing is becoming more widespread in the medical profession, especially for scheduled consultations, applications for rapid assessment of acute medical problems are rare. Use of such a video system in a nursing facility may be especially beneficial, because physicians are often not immediately available to evaluate patients. We have assembled and tested a portable, wireless conferencing system to prepare for a randomized trial of the system s influence on resource utilization and satisfaction. The system includes a rolling cart with video conferencing hardware and software, a remotely controllable digital camera, light, wireless network, and battery. A semi-automated paging system informs physicians of patient s study status and indications for conferencing. Data transmission occurs wirelessly in the nursing home and then through Internet cables to the physician s home. This provides sufficient bandwidth to support quality motion images. IPsec secures communications. Despite human and technical challenges, this system is affordable and functional. Images Figure 1 PMID:11825286

  11. ETHICS IN GERIATRIC MEDICINE RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    İlgili, Önder; Arda, Berna; Munir, Kerim

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the research process in geriatrics from the ethical point of view. The elderly population is increasing rapidly, but there is no parallel in the amount of research concerning this demographic. On the other hand, in the light of research ethics, this group mainly represents vulnerable people and requires more sensitivity. Taking into account all these features, fundamental principles in research ethics are first considered: the soundness of the scientific project, qualifications of the investigators, ethics committee approval, informed consent, confidentiality and privacy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice are evaluated. Special ethical issues in geriatric research such as ageism and research inclusion, paucity of research involving elderly people, vulnerability of elderly subjects, and cognitive impairments are discussed separately. PMID:25489272

  12. Exercise Promotion in Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of the benefits of exercise for people with cancer from diagnosis through survivorship is growing. However, most cancers occur in older adults and little exercise advice is available for making specific recommendations for older adults with cancer. Individualized exercise prescriptions are safe, feasible, and beneficial for the geriatric oncology population. Oncology providers must be equipped to discuss the short- and long-term benefits of exercise and assist older patients in obtaining appropriate exercise prescriptions. This review provides detailed information about professionals and their roles as it relates to functional assessment, intervention, and evaluation of the geriatric oncology population. This review addresses the importance of functional status assessment and appropriate referrals to other oncology professionals. PMID:27484061

  13. Rhinitis in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The current geriatric population in the United States accounts for approximately 12% of the total population and is projected to reach nearly 20% (71.5 million people) by 2030[1]. With this expansion of the number of older adults, physicians will face the common complaint of rhinitis with increasing frequency. Nasal symptoms pose a significant burden on the health of older people and require attention to improve quality of life. Several mechanisms likely underlie the pathogenesis of rhinitis in these patients, including inflammatory conditions and the influence of aging on nasal physiology, with the potential for interaction between the two. Various treatments have been proposed to manage this condition; however, more work is needed to enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of the various forms of geriatric rhinitis and to develop more effective therapies for this important patient population. PMID:20465792

  14. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  15. Bloodless surgery in geriatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Salvatore; Di Matteo, Filippo; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Greco, Roberto; Nardi, Matteo; Favoriti, Pasqualino; De Antoni, Enrico; Filippini, Angelo; Catania, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In bloodless surgery a series of measures has to be implemented to reduce the perioperative need for transfusion of whole blood or its components. Jehovah's Witness are the most representative group of patients opting for bloodless surgery as their faith follows strict believes that prohibits receiving blood. Geriatric patients requiring bloodless surgery are even more delicate and represent a challenge for surgeons. The physiological response of the over 65 year population to decreased hemoglobin level is slower and less effective than in young and adult patients. Herby we describe the perioperative protocol implemented in our surgical Department offered to geriatric Jehovah's Witness patients. Preoperative optimization of the patients is the key step in the preparation period. Intraoperative anesthetic and surgical measures are also required along with a strict postoperative follow-up. From our experience, bloodless surgery is feasible in the geriatric population as long as it is performed in specialized centers where a multidisciplinary team is prepared to specifically manage this scenario. Rigorous patients selection and preparation are mandatory. PMID:25183638

  16. E-learning virtual patients for geriatric education.

    PubMed

    Orton, Eric; Mulhausen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based virtual patients (VPs) are an emerging medium for medical education that addresses barriers faced by geriatrics educators. Research has shown VPs to be as effective in changing knowledge and behavior as more traditional forms of teaching. This paper presents a descriptive study of the development of the University of Iowa's GeriaSims VP programs and their effectiveness as tools for geriatric education. More than 85% of the responses to an evaluation survey of GeriaSims users indicated favorable perceptions of instructional effectiveness, efficiency, and ease of use. GeriaSims VP programs were used effectively by multiple levels of learners and provide flexibility to these learners in scheduling their learning. PMID:18215989

  17. Geriatric Rehabilitation ('Alters-Rehabilitation'): The New Challenge for Social Medicine and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barolin, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    This discussion of geriatric rehabilitation stresses the importance of holistic and permanent rehabilitation with a fluent transition from the acute phase to the rehabilitation phase under one specialist's care and in one institution. Recommendations include mixed age groups in one ward; systematic education of relatives; follow-up rehabilitation…

  18. Potential drug interactions in an ambulatory geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Costa, A J

    1991-09-01

    Drug interactions are a common cause of iatrogenic disease in geriatric patients. Computer programs now exist which allow one to analyse groups of drugs for potential interactions. In an audit of charts of 100 geriatric patients seen in the Family Practice Center at Barberton Citizens Hospital, a computer printout was obtained, listing all patients aged 60 years and over who were seen at the Center during 1989. Names were selected randomly from this list by the head nurse and their charts were obtained for review, generating information on patient identification number, age, sex, diagnoses, medications, and allergies. The medications were analysed using the Hansten Drug Interaction Knowledge Base Program, which identified 27 patients as being on a combination of medications which had one or more potential drug interactions. A total of 37 potential drug interactions were identified in this group of 27 patients. Relative risk ratios were determined using the computer program, 'Epi Info,' for sex (female versus male), age (greater than or equal to 75 vs. 60-75 years), number of diagnoses greater than or equal to 3 vs. 0-2), and number of medications (greater than or equal to 4 vs. 0-3). The five medications, or groups of medications, which were most likely to be involved in potential drug interactions were digoxin, beta-blockers, oestrogen, oral hypoglycaemic agents, and diuretics. PMID:1822974

  19. Effects of a geriatric nurse practitioner on process and outcome of nursing home care.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, R L; Garrard, J; Skay, C L; Radosevich, D M; Buchanan, J L; McDermott, S M; Arnold, S B; Kepferle, L

    1989-01-01

    We compared measures of quality of care and health services utilization in 30 nursing homes employing geriatric nurse practitioners with those in 30 matched control homes. Information for this analysis came from reviews of samples of patient records drawn at comparable periods before and after the geriatric NPs were employed. The measures of geriatric nurse practitioner impact were based on comparisons of changes from pre-NP to post-NP periods. Separate analyses were done for newly admitted and long-stay residents; a subgroup of homes judged to be best case examples was analyzed separately as well as the whole sample. Favorable changes were seen in two out of eight activity of daily living (ADL) measures: five of 18 nursing therapies; two of six drug therapies; six of eight tracers. There was some reduction in hospital admissions and total days in geriatric NP homes. Overall measures of medical attention showed a mixed pattern with some evidence of geriatric NP care substituted for physician care. These findings suggest that the geriatric NP has a useful role in nursing home care. PMID:2504064

  20. Geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schiphorst, A H W; Ten Bokkel Huinink, D; Breumelhof, R; Burgmans, J P J; Pronk, A; Hamaker, M E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients can be challenging. A geriatric assessment may identify unknown medical conditions, give insight on patients' ability to tolerate treatment and guide treatment decisions. Our aim was to study the value of a geriatric consultation in oncological decision-making. Data on cancer patients referred for geriatric consultation for clinical optimisation or due to uncertainty regarding their optimal treatment strategy were prospectively analysed. Outcome of geriatric evaluations, non-oncological interventions and suggested adaptations of oncological treatment proposals were evaluated. Seventy-two patients were referred for consultation, over half of which in a curative treatment setting. Prevalence of geriatric syndromes was 93%, previously undiagnosed conditions were identified in 49% of patients and non-oncological interventions were initiated in 56%. Time was spent discussing patients' priorities (53% of consultations), expectations on treatment (50%) and advance care planning (14%). For 82% of patients, suggestions were made regarding the optimal treatment decision: a more intensive treatment was recommended in 39%, a less intensive therapy for 42% and in 19% only supportive care was suggested. The results demonstrate that a geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions and may allow for a reduction in over- and undertreatment of elderly cancer patients. PMID:26211484

  1. Diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation followed by phacotrabeculectomy on medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure eyes: the long-term result

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To explore the intraocular pressure-lowering effect and complications of diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (DLTSC) followed by phacotrabeculectomy on medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure eyes. Methods Nine eyes of nine medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure patients were enrolled. All the patients underwent cyclophotocoagulation followed by phacotrabeculectomy to control the prolonged acute attack. Data were recorded prospectively and then analyzed retrospectively. The reduction in intraocular pressure, improvement of vision and the complications were evaluated. Results After DLTSC, the IOP of all the patients were reduced, but all were above 21 mmHg under topical anti-glaucoma medications. After phacotrabeculectomy, the IOP of all the patients was decreased. At the final visit, the vision of all the patients was improved and the IOP of all the patients was below 21 mmHg without anti-glaucoma medications. There were no complications during the DLTSC and phacotrabeculectomy. Uveitis was the common complications after the both procedures, which were resolved by medication treatment. Conclusion Diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation followed by phacotrabeculectomy is an alternative procedure to control the intraocular pressure of medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure eyes with few complications. PMID:24606842

  2. Poor oral health, a potential new geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Baat, Cees; De Visschere, Luc; Schols, Jos

    2014-02-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to the medical aspects of ageing and age-related diseases, and to some geriatric syndromes, followed by a discussion on their impact on general and oral healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people. Recent investigations suggest that inflammation constitutes a biological foundation of ageing and the onset of age-related diseases. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy, together with alterations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, make older people at risk of adverse medication reactions. A side effect of several medications is causing xerostomia and hyposalivation, and both the type and number of medications used are relevant. New options of general healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people are the use of mobility aids and assistive technology devices, domiciliary health care, respite care and telecare. Their oral health status may be jeopardised by frailty, disability, care dependency and limited access to professional oral health care. Recommendations for improvement are the following: better integrating oral health care into general health care, developing and implementing an oral healthcare guideline, providing customised oral hygiene care aids, domiciliary oral healthcare provision, visiting dental hygienists and/or nurses, oral hygiene telecare, easily and safely accessible dental offices, transforming dentistry into medical oral health care and upgrading dentists to oral physicians. In case oral healthcare providers do not take the responsibility of persuading society of the importance of adequate oral health, weakened oral health of community-dwelling older people will become a potential new geriatric syndrome. PMID:24446975

  3. Implications of Research on the Geriatric Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Barbaranne J.

    Noting that the progressive aging of the American population has created a need for a body of knowledge about the vocal characteristics associated with aging, this paper provides information on geriatric voice. The first section of the paper contains a selected bibliography of materials concerning geriatric voice, including literature on the need…

  4. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  5. A medical cost estimation with fuzzy neural network of acute hepatitis patients in emergency room.

    PubMed

    Kuo, R J; Cheng, W C; Lien, W C; Yang, T J

    2015-10-01

    Taiwan is an area where chronic hepatitis is endemic. Liver cancer is so common that it has been ranked first among cancer mortality rates since the early 1980s in Taiwan. Besides, liver cirrhosis and chronic liver diseases are the sixth or seventh in the causes of death. Therefore, as shown by the active research on hepatitis, it is not only a health threat, but also a huge medical cost for the government. The estimated total number of hepatitis B carriers in the general population aged more than 20 years old is 3,067,307. Thus, a case record review was conducted from all patients with diagnosis of acute hepatitis admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) of a well-known teaching-oriented hospital in Taipei. The cost of medical resource utilization is defined as the total medical fee. In this study, a fuzzy neural network is employed to develop the cost forecasting model. A total of 110 patients met the inclusion criteria. The computational results indicate that the FNN model can provide more accurate forecasts than the support vector regression (SVR) or artificial neural network (ANN). In addition, unlike SVR and ANN, FNN can also provide fuzzy IF-THEN rules for interpretation. PMID:26153643

  6. Medical costs of treatment and survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, A L; Beutels, P; Smits, E L; Van Tendeloo, V F; Nijs, G; Anguille, S; Verlinden, A; Gadisseur, A P; Schroyens, W A; Dom, S; Cornille, I; Goossens, H; Berneman, Z N

    2016-07-01

    The advent of new cell-based immunotherapies for leukemia offers treatment possibilities for certain leukemia subgroups. The wider acceptability of these new technologies in clinical practice will depend on its impact on survival and costs. Due to the small patient groups who have received it, these aspects have remained understudied. This non-randomized single-center study evaluated medical costs and survival for acute myeloid leukemia between 2005 and 2010 in 50 patients: patients treated with induction and consolidation chemotherapy (ICT) alone; patients treated with ICT plus allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT), which is the current preferred post-remission therapy in patients with intermediate- and poor-risk AML with few co-morbidities, and patients treated with ICT plus immunotherapy using autologous dendritic cells (DC) engineered to express the Wilms' tumor protein (WT1). Total costs including post- consolidation costs on medical care at the hematology ward and outpatient clinic, pharmaceutical prescriptions, intensive care ward, laboratory tests and medical imaging were analyzed. Survival was markedly better in HCT and DC. HCT and DC were more costly than ICT. The median total costs for HCT and DC were similar. These results need to be confirmed to enable more thorough cost-effectiveness analyses, based on observations from multicenter, randomized clinical trials and preferably using quality-adjusted life-years as an outcome measure. PMID:27111858

  7. New lessons of nurturing life for geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Butler, James P; Fujii, Masahiko; Sasaki, Hidetada

    2012-01-01

    Our new lessons of nurturing life to make happiness and well-being of geriatric patients suggest comprise several important steps. First, geriatric patient care should not be delegated to specialists who focus on individual organ system. Instead, we should respond to the patient's condition based on comprehensive assessment to identify the single pathogenesis. Second, we should appreciate that the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) often reflect the behavioral and psychological symptoms of the caregiver (BPSC), and in particular the caregiver's attitude. Third, pleasant stimulations to the limbic system should receive more emphasis than attempting brain training in atrophied portions of the neocortex. Fourth, we should aim not for "successful aging," but for "balanced aging." Fifth, we should rely less on drug-based therapy and utilize more non-pharmacologic approaches to appropriate therapy. Geriatric patients should be cared for based on our new lessons of nurturing life rather than the heavily medicalized treatment modalities that are in wide use today. PMID:22790875

  8. Neurology of the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Fenner, W R

    1988-05-01

    Owing to improvements in health care, more animals are living to advanced ages. Many abnormal neurologic conditions can affect these patients, but those most commonly associated with advancing years include degenerative, neoplastic, and idiopathic processes. An understanding of the "normal" age-related changes seen on a neurologic examination must be kept in mind when evaluating geriatric patients. Special care and consideration of the patient and client are often required in managing these cases, especially because treatment protocols are often unsuccessful or do not exist, resulting in a prognosis that is often poor at best. PMID:3289252

  9. 'The time it takes…' How doctors spend their time admitting a patient during the acute medical take.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Jodie; Khan, Waleed; Subbe, Christian P; Franklin, Marc; Abulela, Iman; Khan, Anwar; Mohammed, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Patient safety depends on adequate staffing but the number of doctors required for safe staffing for medical emergencies is not known. We measured the duration of the admission process for patients seen by medical teams in emergency departments (EDs) and acute medical units. History taking and examination by a core medical trainee took 22 minutes for a patient referred from the ED and 21 minutes for a patient referred from primary care. A complete admission clerking with prescription and ordering of investigations ranged from a mean of 15 minutes for a consultant in acute medicine to a mean of 55 minutes for a foundation year 1 trainee. The duration of post-take ward rounds also showed significant variability.Our data can be used to model staffing patterns if combined with information about admission numbers and local set up. PMID:27481373

  10. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. PMID:25758161

  11. MEDUSA: a fuzzy expert system for medical diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Fathi-Torbaghan, M; Meyer, D

    1994-12-01

    Even today, the diagnosis of acute abdominal pain represents a serious clinical problem. The medical knowledge in this field is characterized by uncertainty, imprecision and vagueness. This situation lends itself especially to be solved by the application of fuzzy logic. A fuzzy logic-based expert system for diagnostic decision support is presented (MEDUSA). The representation and application of uncertain and imprecise knowledge is realized by fuzzy sets and fuzzy relations. The hybrid concept of the system enables the integration of rule-based, heuristic and case-based reasoning on the basis of imprecise information. The central idea of the integration is to use case-based reasoning for the management of special cases, and rule-based reasoning for the representation of normal cases. The heuristic principle is ideally suited for making uncertain, hypothetical inferences on the basis of fuzzy data and fuzzy relations. PMID:7869951

  12. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  13. Obstetric Acute Kidney Injury; A Three Year Experience at a Medical College Hospital in North Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, K.S.; Gorikhan, Gousia; M.M., Umadi; S.T., Kalsad; M.P., Madhavaranga; Dambal, Amrut; Padaki, Samata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury is a rare and sometimes fatal complication of pregnancy, the incidence of which has been declining worldwide, though still high in developing countries. There are recent observations of increasing incidence in some developed countries attributed to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have analysed the records of all patients referred to the dialysis unit of a medical college hospital in Karnataka for acute kidney injury related to pregnancy. AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network) criteria for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury were adapted. Age, parity, gestational age, causative factors for acute kidney injury, mode of delivery, access to antenatal care, operative procedures, blood component transfusions, number of haemodialysis, time for initiation of haemodialysis, duration of hospital stay and mortality were analysed by finding mean, standard deviation and standard error. Results: Fifteen patients out of 21563 who delivered in our hospital developed acute kidney injury. These (n=15) were out of 149 patients of acute kidney injury of various aetiologies who underwent haemodialysis between 2012 and 2014. Of these two were unregistered for antenatal care. Ten were multiparous, Eleven were from rural background, one had home delivery, six had vaginal delivery, seven had caesarean section and two had second trimester abortion. Placental abruption with intrauterine death was the commonest Cause in 9 out of 15 cases. All had severe anaemia. Patients received a mean of 3.9 (SD+/- 2.4) sessions of haemodialysis. Eleven patients recovered completely, two died and two left against medical advice. Conclusion: Obstetric acute kidney injury is associated with poor access to antenatal care, multiparity and rural background. Placental abruption is the commonest cause of obstetric acute kidney injury. Blood component transfusions, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs and early initiation of haemodialysis are

  14. A sustained quality improvement program reduces nephrotoxic medication-associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L; Mottes, Theresa; Simpson, Kendria; Barclay, Cynthia; Muething, Stephen; Haslam, David B; Kirkendall, Eric S

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to nephrotoxic medication is among the most common causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients. Here we conducted a prospective quality improvement project implementing a systematic Electronic Health Record screening and decision support process (trigger) in our quaternary pediatric inpatient hospital. Eligible patients were noncritically ill hospitalized children receiving an intravenous aminoglycoside for more than 3 days or more than 3 nephrotoxins simultaneously (exposure) from September 2011 through March 2015. Pharmacists recommended daily serum creatinine monitoring in exposed patients after appearance on the trigger report and AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria. A total of 1749 patients accounted for 2358 separate hospital admissions during which a total of 3243 episodes of nephrotoxin exposure were identified with 170 patients (9.7%) experiencing 2 or more exposures. A total of 575 individual AKI episodes occurred over the 43-month study period. Overall, the exposure rate decreased by 38% (11.63-7.24 exposures/1000 patient days), and the AKI rate decreased by 64% (2.96-1.06 episodes/1000 patient days). Assuming initial baseline exposure rates would have persisted without our project implementation, we estimate 633 exposures and 398 AKI episodes were avoided. Thus, systematic surveillance for nephrotoxic medication exposure and near real-time AKI risk can lead to sustained reductions in avoidable harm. These interventions and outcomes are translatable to other pediatric and nonpediatric hospitalized settings. PMID:27217196

  15. Application of pattern recognition tools for classifying acute coronary syndrome: an integrated medical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The classification of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), using artificial intelligence (AI), has recently drawn the attention of the medical researchers. Using this approach, patients with myocardial infarction can be differentiated from those with unstable angina. The present study aims to develop an integrated model, based on the feature selection and classification, for the automatic classification of ACS. Methods A dataset containing medical records of 809 patients suspected to suffer from ACS was used. For each subject, 266 clinical factors were collected. At first, a feature selection was performed based on interviews with 20 cardiologists; thereby 40 seminal features for classifying ACS were selected. Next, a feature selection algorithm was also applied to detect a subset of the features with the best classification accuracy. As a result, the feature numbers considerably reduced to only seven. Lastly, based on the seven selected features, eight various common pattern recognition tools for classification of ACS were used. Results The performance of the aforementioned classifiers was compared based on their accuracy computed from their confusion matrices. Among these methods, the multi-layer perceptron showed the best performance with the 83.2% accuracy. Conclusion The results reveal that an integrated AI-based feature selection and classification approach is an effective method for the early and accurate classification of ACS and ultimately a timely diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:24044669

  16. Acute Uterine Bleeding Unrelated to Pregnancy: A Southern California Permanente Medical Group Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2013-01-01

    Acute uterine bleeding unrelated to pregnancy has been defined as bleeding “sufficient in volume as to, in the opinion of the treating clinician, require urgent or emergent intervention.” The Southern California Permanente Medical Group updated its guidelines for the management of this condition on the basis of the best available evidence, as identified in a systematic review of the available literature. Given the paucity of studies evaluating this condition, the guidelines, by necessity, include recommendations largely based on opinion or other sources such as case series that are, in general, categorized as low-quality evidence. Medical interventions with single or combined gonadal steroidal agents administered parenterally or orally show promise, but more high-quality studies are needed to better define the appropriate drugs, dose, and administrative scheduling. There is also some evidence that intrauterine tamponade may be useful in at least selected cases. Special attention must be paid to both diagnosing and treating inherited disorders of hemostasis, such as von Willebrand disease, that may otherwise be underdiagnosed in both adolescent and adult women. PMID:24355890

  17. 75 FR 11638 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics and gerontology. The Committee assesses the capability of VA health care facilities and programs to meet the medical... training, recruitment and retention approaches), Veterans Health Administration (VHA) strategic...

  18. Simulating Geriatric Home Safety Assessments in a Three-Dimensional Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Allen D.; Cifuentes, Pedro; Mintzer, Michael J.; Roos, Bernard A.; Anam, Ramanakumar; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2012-01-01

    Virtual worlds could offer inexpensive and safe three-dimensional environments in which medical trainees can learn to identify home safety hazards. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of virtual worlds for geriatric home safety assessments and to correlate performance efficiency in hazard identification with…

  19. Team Assessment of Geriatric Mental Patients: The Care of Functional Dementia Produced by Hysterical Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Henry B.; Harper, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team identified hysterical behavior, rather than depression, as one form of pseudodementia in many cases of cognitive impairment observed in geriatric patients. Seven cases required thorough medical and neuropsychological assessment and careful functional analysis of patients' behavior patterns to determine the adaptive utility…

  20. [Choosing wisely--against overuse in healthcare systems--activities in Germany and Austria in geriatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Gogol, Manfred; Siebenhofer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    In 2012, the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation initiated the Choosing Wisely campaign to promote discussion between physicians and patients (or proxies) on decision-making in medicine, and to reduce the use of procedures and therapies which are not necessary, or harmful to patients. The American Geriatrics Society (AGS), the American Medical Directors Association and the Society of Post-Acute and Long-Term Medicine (AMDA) participated in this initiative and both published 10 recommendations on procedures that should be discussed and avoided. Furthermore, some scientific societies have also published recommendations concerning elderly patients. As the campaign attracted considerable international attention, an International Roundtable was established in 2014. In Germany a similar initiative to address overuse and underuse was established by the German Society of Internal Medicine (DGIM) in 2015. The German Society of Geriatrics (DGG) was invited to address subjects affecting elderly patients that are of relevance to the German health care system. As a member of the Commission of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), it also participated actively in the development of a methods paper on how to prepare recommendations. The German College of General Practitioners and Family Physicians (DEGAM) has developed a new guideline on this topic and in Austria preliminary activities are already underway. A clear, transparent, structured and evidence-based approach may help avoid some of the methodological weaknesses to be found in the development of the U.S. recommendations. Whereas the U.S. campaign only addresses overuse, the German campaign will also address underuse and misuse. PMID:26811241

  1. [Geriatric patients with chronic kidney insufficiency: which antalgia?].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, M; Hemett, O M; Descombes, E; Blondel, N; Hayoz, D

    2014-04-01

    Pain is a leading cause of office visits. In the geriatric population, it is known that the prevalence of renal failure increases exponentially with age, modifing the elimination of drugs and of their metabolites. What analgesia should be offered to these patients? The holy grail would be a medication without renal elimination, without toxic metabolites and without nephrotoxicity. Based on the literature we try to propose a specific approach to analgesia in older patients with kidney insufficiency, in order to help practitioners to better prescribe for this group of patients. PMID:24791426

  2. Medication regimen complexity and readmissions after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Karam, Nada; Bradford, Chad; Lor, Kajua B; Barnett, Mitchell; Ha, Michelle; Rizos, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Readmission rate is increasingly being viewed as a key indicator of health system performance. Medication regimen complexity index scores may be predictive of readmissions; however, few studies have examined this potential association. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether medication regimen complexity index is associated with all-cause 30-day readmission after admission for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: This study was an institutional review board–approved, multi-center, case–control study. Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were randomly selected for inclusion. Patients were excluded if they discharged against medical advice or expired during their index visit. Block randomization was utilized for equal representation of index diagnosis and site. Discharge medication regimen complexity index scores were compared between subjects with readmission versus those without. Medication regimen complexity index score was then used as a predictor in logistic regression modeling for readmission. Results: Seven hundred and fifty-six patients were randomly selected for inclusion, and 101 (13.4%) readmitted within 30 days. The readmission group had higher medication regimen complexity index scores than the no-readmission group (p < 0.01). However, after controlling for demographics, disease state, length of stay, site, and medication count, medication regimen complexity index was no longer a significant predictor of readmission (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.97–1.01) or revisit (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02). Conclusion: There is little evidence to support the use of medication regimen complexity index in readmission prediction when other measures are available. Medication regimen complexity index may lack

  3. What caring means to geriatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Shwu-Jiuan, Liu

    2004-06-01

    Caring is the major concept in nursing. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of caring for nurses caring for elderly patients. Parse' s phenomenology was addressed in the research design, which included four steps: participant selection, dialogical engagement, extraction-synthesis, and heuristic interpretation. By stratified sampling, 30 nurses who worked in medical-surgical wards in a general teaching hospital were selected as participants. Dialogical engagement was completed through in-depth, tape-recorded interviews on the open question, " What is the meaning of caring for you as a provider of care to the elderly? ". Data were interpreted by process of Parse' s phenomenology, which included extracting the essence, synthesizing the essence, formulating a proposition, extracting concepts, and structuring the meaning. The meaning of caring for nurses engaged in caring for the elderly was: " Through the initiative deliberation from sincerity, the nurse is to dedication by the empathy and tolerance". The core concepts of caring were: deliberation, initiative, sincerity, tolerance, empathy, and dedication. It should develop and apply the caring concept and theory actively to geriatric nursing care. PMID:15208778

  4. CURVES: a mnemonic for determining medical decision-making capacity and providing emergency treatment in the acute setting.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Czarny, Matthew J; Hughes, Mark T; Carrese, Joseph A

    2010-02-01

    The evaluation of medical decision-making capacity and provision of emergency treatment in the acute care setting may present a significant challenge for both physicians-in-training and attending physicians. Although absolutely essential to the proper care of patients, recalling criteria for decision-making capacity may prove cumbersome during a medical emergency. Likewise, the requirements for providing emergency treatment must be fulfilled. This article presents a mnemonic (CURVES: Choose and Communicate, Understand, Reason, Value, Emergency, Surrogate) that addresses the abilities a patient must possess in order to have decision-making capacity, as well as the essentials of emergency treatment. It may be used in conjunction with, or in place of, lengthier capacity-assessment tools, particularly when time is of the essence. In addition, the proposed tool assists the practitioner in deciding whether emergency treatment may be administered, and in documenting medical decisions made during an acute event. PMID:20133288

  5. Early Medication Nonadherence After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insights into Actionable Opportunities from the TRANSLATE-ACS Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Robin; Peterson, Eric D.; Honeycutt, Emily; Chin, Chee Tang; Effron, Mark B.; Zettler, Marjorie; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Henry, Timothy D.; Wang, Tracy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to prescribed evidence-based medications after acute myocardial infarction (MI) can contribute to worse outcomes and higher costs. We sought to better understand the modifiable factors contributing to early nonadherence of evidence-based medications after acute MI. Methods and Results We assessed 7,425 acute MI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at 216 United States hospitals participating in TRANSLATE-ACS between 04/2010–05/2012. Using the validated Morisky instrument to assess cardiovascular medication adherence at 6 weeks post-MI, we stratified patients into self-reported high (score 8), moderate (score 6–7), and low (score <6) adherence groups. Moderate and low adherence was reported in 25% and 4% of patients, respectively. One-third of low adherence patients described missing doses of antiplatelet therapy at least twice a week after PCI. Signs of depression and patient-reported financial hardship due to medication expenses were independently associated with a higher likelihood of medication nonadherence. Patients were more likely to be adherent at 6 weeks if they had follow-up appointments made prior to discharge and had a provider explain potential side effects of their medications. Lower medication adherence may be associated with a higher risk of 3-month death/readmission (adjusted HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.98, 1.87) although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Even early after MI, a substantial proportion of patients report suboptimal adherence to prescribed medications. Tailored patient education and pre-discharge planning may represent actionable opportunities to optimize patient adherence and clinical outcomes. Clinical Trial Registry Information clinical trial #NCT01088503; URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01088503 PMID:26038524

  6. Nonantithrombotic medical options in acute coronary syndromes: old agents and new lines on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Soukoulis, Victor; Boden, William E; Smith, Sidney C; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2014-06-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) constitute a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to ST-segment myocardial infarction. Myocardial ischemia in this context occurs as a result of an abrupt decrease in coronary blood flow and resultant imbalance in the myocardial oxygen supply-demand relationship. Coronary blood flow is further compromised by other mechanisms that increase coronary vascular resistance or reduce coronary driving pressure. The goals of treatment are to decrease myocardial oxygen demand, increase coronary blood flow and oxygen supply, and limit myocardial injury. Treatments are generally divided into disease-modifying agents or interventions that improve hard clinical outcomes and other strategies that can reduce ischemia. In addition to traditional drugs such as β-blockers and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, newer agents have expanded the number of molecular pathways targeted for treatment of ACS. Ranolazine, trimetazidine, nicorandil, and ivabradine are medications that have been shown to reduce myocardial ischemia through diverse mechanisms and have been tested in limited fashion in patients with ACS. Attenuating the no-reflow phenomenon and reducing the injury compounded by acute reperfusion after a period of coronary occlusion are active areas of research. Additionally, interventions aimed at ischemic pre- and postconditioning may be useful means by which to limit myocardial infarct size. Trials are also underway to examine altered metabolic and oxygen-related pathways in ACS. This review will discuss traditional and newer anti-ischemic therapies for patients with ACS, exclusive of revascularization, antithrombotic agents, and the use of high-intensity statins. PMID:24902977

  7. Hyperthyroidism in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Federman, D D

    1991-02-15

    Although the thyroid gland can become overactive at any age, the syndrome of hyperthyroidism changes considerably in elderly persons. The principal reason is comorbidity. The patient over age 65 is much more likely than a young adult of 20 or 25 to have one or more preexisting disorders when the thyroid becomes overactive. In the elderly, therefore, the classic picture of hyperthyroidism--the constellation of irritability, sweating, palpitations without heart disease, weight loss despite good appetite, goiter, and warm, fine skin, familiar to all physicians--may never develop. Well before it might have appeared, a milder degree of thyroid hyperfunction may become manifest because of worsening of an underlying disease. Accordingly, the recognition of the thyroid disorder is often delayed. The purpose of this article is not so much to review hyperthyroidism as to delineate the special features found in geriatric patients and to describe a simple but effective scheme of evaluation. PMID:1899255

  8. Needs for CME in geriatrics. Part 1: Perceptions of patients and community informants.

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, L.; Russell, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the needs of physicians for continuing education in geriatrics as perceived by patients and community informants. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey by mail and in-person interviews. SETTING: Organizations working with the elderly in the community and patients in a primary care population in Calgary. PARTICIPANTS: Key informants working with the elderly in the community, including managers and providers of physical, psychosocial, educational, or mental health services to the elderly, and the first two geriatric patients visiting physicians after telephone contact from study investigators were surveyed. Twenty-five of 27 key community informants and 32 of 61 geriatric patients responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Potential topics for continuing medical education. RESULTS: The 10 most frequently identified topics were communication, time management, attitudes to the elderly, medication, continuity of care, mental health, medical management of complicated cases, knowledge of community resources, health promotion, and compassion. Patients were more concerned than key informants about the process of care. Key informants were concerned about the technical aspects of care. CONCLUSIONS: The process of care as well as technical aspects of care must be addressed in continuing education in geriatrics for physicians. PMID:8616284

  9. Aging Q3: an initiative to improve internal medicine residents' geriatrics knowledge, skills, and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, William P; Zapka, Jane; Iverson, Patty J; Zhao, Yumin; Wiley, M Kathleen; Pride, Pamela; Davis, Kimberly S

    2012-05-01

    A growing number of older adults coupled with a limited number of physicians trained in geriatrics presents a major challenge to ensuring quality medical care for this population. Innovations to incorporate geriatrics education into internal medicine residency programs are needed. To meet this need, in 2009, faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina developed Aging Q(3)-Quality Education, Quality Care, and Quality of Life. This multicomponent initiative recognizes the need for improved geriatrics educational tools and faculty development as well as systems changes to improve the knowledge and clinical performance of residents. To achieve these goals, faculty employ multiple intervention strategies, including lectures, rounds, academic detailing, visual cues, and electronic medical record prompts and decision support. The authors present examples from specific projects, based on care areas including vision screening, fall prevention, and caring for patients with dementia, all of which are based on the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. The authors describe the principles driving the design, implementation, and evaluation of the Aging Q(3) program. They present data from multiple sources that illustrate the effectiveness of the interventions to meet the knowledge, skill level, and behavior goals. The authors also address major challenges, including the maintenance of the teaching and modeling interventions over time within the context of demanding primary care and inpatient settings. This organized, evidence-based approach to quality improvement in resident education, as well as faculty leadership development, holds promise for successfully incorporating geriatrics education into internal medicine residencies. PMID:22450181

  10. Predicting mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    de Gelder, Jelle; Lucke, Jacinta A; Heim, Noor; de Craen, Antonius J M; Lourens, Shantaily D; Steyerberg, Ewout W; de Groot, Bas; Fogteloo, Anne J; Blauw, Gerard J; Mooijaart, Simon P

    2016-06-01

    Acutely hospitalized older patients have an increased risk of mortality, but at the moment of presentation this risk is difficult to assess. Early identification of patients at high risk might increase the awareness of the physician, and enable tailored decision-making. Existing screening instruments mainly use either geriatric factors or severity of disease for prognostication. Predictive performance of these instruments is moderate, which hampers successive interventions. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all patients aged 70 years and over who were acutely hospitalized in the Acute Medical Unit of the Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands in 2012. We developed a prediction model for 90-day mortality that combines vital signs and laboratory test results reflecting severity of disease with geriatric factors, represented by comorbidities and number of medications. Among 517 patients, 94 patients (18.2 %) died within 90 days after admission. Six predictors of mortality were included in a model for mortality: oxygen saturation, Charlson comorbidity index, thrombocytes, urea, C-reactive protein and non-fasting glucose. The prediction model performs satisfactorily with an 0.738 (0.667-0.798). Using this model, 53 % of the patients in the highest risk decile (N = 51) were deceased within 90 days. In conclusion, we are able to predict 90-day mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients using a model with directly available clinical data describing disease severity and geriatric factors. After further validation, such a model might be used in clinical decision making in older patients. PMID:26825335

  11. From Aging...to Saging--The Ohio State Senior Partners Program: Longitudinal and Experiential Geriatrics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Bonnie S.; Myers, Michelle R.

    2006-01-01

    The Ohio State College of Medicine began its Senior Partners Program (SPP) in 2001 as part of its commitment to integrate geriatric education throughout all four years of the medical curriculum. For participating senior partners and medical students, the SPP has signified a journey through a continuum of aging. Initial evaluations suggest that…

  12. Multimorbidity Patterns in Hospitalized Older Patients: Associations among Chronic Diseases and Geriatric Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Clerencia-Sierra, Mercedes; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Martínez-Velilla, Nicolás; Vergara-Mitxeltorena, Itziar; Aldaz-Herce, Pablo; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Machón-Sobrado, Mónica; Egüés-Olazabal, Nerea; Abellán-van Kan, Gabor; Prados-Torres, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives The clinical status of older individuals with multimorbidity can be further complicated by concomitant geriatric syndromes. This study explores multimorbidity patterns, encompassing both chronic diseases and geriatric syndromes, in geriatric patients attended in an acute hospital setting. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting Unit of Social and Clinical Assessment (UVSS), Miguel Servet University Hospital (HUMS), Zaragoza (Spain). Year, 2011. Participants A total of 924 hospitalized patients aged 65 years or older. Measurements Data on patients’ clinical, functional, cognitive and social statuses were gathered through comprehensive geriatric assessments. To identify diseases and/or geriatric syndromes that cluster into patterns, an exploratory factor analysis was applied, stratifying by sex. The factors can be interpreted as multimorbidity patterns, i.e., diseases non-randomly associated with each other within the study population. The resulting patterns were clinically assessed by several physicians. Results The mean age of the study population was 82.1 years (SD 7.2). Multimorbidity burden was lower in men under 80 years, but increased in those over 80. Immobility, urinary incontinence, hypertension, falls, dementia, cognitive decline, diabetes and arrhythmia were among the 10 most frequent health problems in both sexes, with prevalence rates above 20%. Four multimorbidity patterns were identified that were present in both sexes: Cardiovascular, Induced Dependency, Falls and Osteoarticular. The number of conditions comprising these patterns was similar in men and women. Conclusion The existence of specific multimorbidity patterns in geriatric patients, such as the Induced Dependency and Falls patterns, may facilitate the early detection of vulnerability to stressors, thus helping to avoid negative health outcomes such as functional disability. PMID:26208112

  13. Use of emergency medical services in the second gulf registry of acute coronary events.

    PubMed

    AlHabib, Khalid F; Alfaleh, Hussam; Hersi, Ahmad; Kashour, Tarek; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Saif, Shukri Al; Almahmeed, Wael; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-09-01

    Data are scarce regarding emergency medical service (EMS) usage by patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the Arabian Gulf region. This 9-month in-hospital prospective ACS registry was conducted in Arabian Gulf countries, with 30-day and 1-year follow-up mortality rates. Of 5184 patients with ACS, 1293 (25%) arrived at the hospital by EMS. The EMS group (vs non-EMS) was more likely to be male, have cardiac arrest on presentation, be current or exsmokers, and have moderate or severe left ventricular dysfunction and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The EMS group had higher crude mortality rates during hospitalization and after hospital discharge but not after adjustment for clinical factors and treatments. The EMSs are underused in the Arabian Gulf region. Short- and long-term mortality rates in patients with ACS are similar between those who used and did not use EMS. Quality improvement in the EMS infrastructure and establishment of integrated STEMI networks are urgently needed. PMID:24019088

  14. Respiratory Emergencies in Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Katren; Stevenson, Dane

    2016-02-01

    Acute dyspnea in older patients is a common presentation to the emergency department. Acute dyspnea in older adults is often the consequence of multiple overlapping disorders, such as pneumonia precipitating acute heart failure. Emergency physicians must be comfortable managing patients with acute dyspnea of uncertain cause and varying goals of care. In addition to the important role noninvasive ventilation (NIV) plays in full resuscitation, NIV can be useful as a method of providing supportive or nearly fully supportive care while more information is gathered from the patients and their loved ones. PMID:26614240

  15. The Faculty Learning About Geriatrics (FLAG) program: bringing together experts in geriatric nursing education.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Janice A; Cheung, Corjena K; Voss, Jo A; Kaas, Merrie J

    2011-08-01

    Strengthening geriatric content in schools of nursing is a key initiative for the Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence. The first Faculty Learning About Geriatrics (FLAG) program was implemented in the summer of 2008. Selected nursing faculty from across the Upper Midwest and tribal colleges have successfully completed the FLAG program in the last 2 years. Participants completed a 5-day summer institute at the University of Minnesota and a 1-year mentorship program. The FLAG program is designed to broaden expertise in geriatric nursing through building teaching and academic leadership skills and to increase content knowledge through collaboration with academic and geriatric leaders. This article provides an overview of the educational experience of FLAG participants who have earned the title of FLAG program fellow. The perspectives of the FLAG mentors and fellows are highlighted. PMID:21598851

  16. Developments of geriatric autopsy database and Internet-based database of Japanese single nucleotide polymorphisms for geriatric research (JG-SNP).

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Motoji; Arai, Tomio; Kasahara, Ichiro; Esaki, Yukiyoshi; Nakahara, Ken-ichi; Hosoi, Takayuki; Orimo, Hajime; Takubo, Kaiyo; Murayama, Shigeo; Tanaka, Noriko

    2004-08-01

    To facilitate geriatric research on the roles of genetic polymorphisms of candidate genes, two databases were developed based on data obtained from autopsy examinations of elderly subjects: the geriatric autopsy database (GEAD) and the Japanese single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) database for geriatric research (JG-SNP) which is accessible on the Internet (http://www.tmgh.metro.tokyo.jp/jg-snp/english/E_top.html). The data for the GEAD were derived from 1074 consecutive autopsy cases (565 male and 509 female cases) with an average age of 80 years. The GEAD was installed on a stand-alone Windows 2000 server using Oracle 8i as the database application. The GEAD contains clinical diagnoses of 26 geriatric diseases, histories of smoking and alcohol consumption, pathological findings (720 items), severity of atherosclerosis, genetic polymorphism data, etc. On the JG-SNP website, case distribution corresponding to a specified SNP or disease can be searched or downloaded. Although there are several Internet-based SNP databases such as dbSNP, no databases are available at present on the web that contain both SNP data and phenotypic data. As autopsy studies can provide large amounts of accurate medical information, including the presence of undiagnosed diseases such as latent cancers, the GEAD is a unique and excellent database for research on genetic polymorphisms. PMID:15336912

  17. Pharmaceutical services in a capitated geriatric care program.

    PubMed

    Sorrento, T A; Bonanza, K C; Salisbury, D W

    1996-12-01

    A hospital outpatient pharmacy's planning and implementation of pharmaceutical services for a capitated geriatric care program are described. The hospital's director of pharmacy and pharmacy ambulatory care manager proposed providing distributive and clinical services for enrollees in Independent Living for Seniors (ILS), a program designed to help elderly persons to continue living at home instead of in nursing homes. ILS receives pooled monthly payments from Medicare and Medicaid; a copayment is required of enrollees not eligible for Medicaid. Medical and social services are offered, primarily through adult daycare centers. Nurses at the centers monitor ILS enrollees regularly and help them manage their medications. After a year of negotiations with the program, the outpatient satellite of the hospital's inpatient pharmacy began providing services; one pharmacist was assigned to ILS. Problems with medication stock at the daycare centers were corrected. Conservative supplies of stock drugs (mostly nonprescription items) and medications to meet patients' needs between daily pharmacy deliveries were established. A new computerized medication administration record was developed. Once distributive services were in place, a pharmacy and therapeutics committee began establishing a formulary. The pharmacist functions as part of an interdisciplinary care team, providing education on drug use and managing costs; he reviews all patients' charts every four months and meets weekly with ILS staff to recommend changes in drug therapy. The cost of services provided by the hospital outpatient pharmacy averaged $77 per patient per month in the first year, compared with about $120 for the previous vendor. A hospital's ambulatory care pharmacy improved the pharmaceutical services provided to a capitated geriatric care program. PMID:8957345

  18. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal. PMID:26186379

  19. THE INFLAMMATION HYPOTHESIS IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, George S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko

    2011-01-01

    Background A large body of research has focused on “mediating mechanisms” and predisposing brain abnormalities to geriatric depression, but little is known about its etiology. This paper examines whether age-related and comorbid disease-related immune deregulation is an etiologic contributor to geriatric depression. Methods This article reviews findings on neuroinflammation during the aging process and depression as well as studies of anti-inflammatory actions of classical antidepressants and antidepressant actions of anti-inflammatory agents. Results Aging results in increased peripheral immune responses, impaired peripheral-CNS immune communication, and a shift of the CNS into a pro-inflammatory state. These exaggerated and prolonged immune responses may lead to changes in the function of emotional and cognitive networks pertinent to geriatric depression and to behavioral changes reminiscent of the depressive and cognitive symptoms of geriatric depression. Some antidepressants may reduce the expression of inflammation markers. Limited data suggest that some anti-inflammatory agents may have antidepressant properties. Conclusions A synthesis of available findings suggests that aging-related and comorbid disease-related inflammatory processes may promote changes in the neural systems predisposing to geriatric depression or facilitating metabolic changes that mediate depressive syndromes. The “inflammation hypothesis” in geriatric depression cannot be tested in its entirety, but it can lead to testable hypotheses and data on mechanisms by which inflammatory processes promote geriatric depression. The significance of such an effort is that it may lead to a novel treatment development model bringing to bear recent advances of anti-inflammatory pharmacology to the treatment of depressed elderly patients. PMID:21370276

  20. Evaluation of geriatric changes in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Soumyaranjan; Panda, S. K.; Acharya, A. P.; Senapati, S.; Behera, M.; Behera, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study has been envisaged to ascertain the old age for critical management of geriatric dogs considering the parameters of externally visible changes, haemato-biochemical alterations and urine analysis in geriatric dogs approaching senility. Materials and Methods: The study was undertaken in the Department of Veterinary Pathology in collaboration with Teaching Veterinary Clinic complex spanning a period of 1 year. For screening of geriatric dogs, standard geriatric age chart of different breeds was followed. The external characteristics such as hair coat texture, dental wear and tear, skin texture and glaucoma were taken as a marker of old age. Haematology, serum biochemistry and urine analysis were also included in the study. Results: External visible changes like greying of hair, dull appearance of hair coat, glaucoma, osteoarthritis, dental wear and tear were commonly encountered in the aged dogs. The haemoglobin, total erythrocyte count and packed cell volume showed a decreasing trend in the geriatric groups. Biochemical values like total protein, albumin, calcium level showed a decreasing trend while urea level with an increasing trend in geriatric dogs without any much alteration in serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminse, serum glutamic-pyruvate transaminase, cholesterol and creatinine. Physical examination of urine revealed yellow, amber, red, deep red color with turbidity and higher specific gravity. Chemical examination revealed presence of protein, glucose, ketone bodies, blood and bilirubin on some cases. The culture and sensitivity test of the urine samples revealed presence of bacteria with sensitive and resistance to some antibiotics. Conclusion: External visible changes are still the golden standard of determining the old age in dogs. Haemato-biochemical evaluation can be useful for correlating with the pathophysiological status of the animal. Biochemical analysis of urine can be employed rightly as kidney dysfunction is being major

  1. The Effects of Preexisting Medical Comorbidities on Mortality and Length of Hospital Stay in Acute Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, Brett D.; Singh, Vijay A.; Halonen, Jill; Diallo, Alfa; Milner, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether and to what extent preexisting medical comorbidities influence mortality risk and length of hospitalization in patients with acute burn injury. Summary Background Data: The effects on mortality and length of stay of a number of important medical comorbidities have not been examined in acute burn injury. Existing studies that have investigated the effects of medical comorbidities on outcomes in acute burn injury have produced inconsistent results, chiefly due to the use of relatively small samples from single burn centers. Methods: Records of 31,338 adults who were admitted with acute burn injury to 70 burn centers from the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, were reviewed. A burn-specific list of medical comorbidities was derived from diagnoses included in the Charlson Index of Comorbidities and the Elixhauser method of comorbidity measurement. Logistic regression was used to assess the effects of preexisting medical conditions on mortality, controlling for demographic and burn injury characteristics. Ordinal least squares regression with a logarithmic transformation of the dependent variable was used to assess the relationship of comorbidities with length of stay. Results: In-hospital mortality was significantly predicted by HIV/AIDS (odds ratio [OR] = 10.2), renal disease (OR = 5.1), liver disease (OR = 4.8), metastatic cancer (OR = 4.6), pulmonary circulation disorders (OR = 2.9), congestive heart failure (OR = 2.4), obesity (OR = 2.1), non-metastatic malignancies (OR = 2.1), peripheral vascular disorders (OR = 1.8), alcohol abuse (OR = 1.8), neurological disorders (OR = 1.6), and cardiac arrhythmias (OR = 1.5). Increased length of hospital stay among survivors was significantly predicted by paralysis (90% increase), dementia (60%), peptic ulcer disease (53%), other neurological disorders (52%), HIV/AIDS (49%), renal disease (44%), a psychiatric diagnosis (42%), cerebrovascular disease (41%), cardiac arrhythmias

  2. [Imaging update in geriatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Gualdi, G F; Bertini, L; Lanciotti, S; Colaiacomo, M C; Casciani, E; Polettini, E

    2004-09-01

    The cancer is a problem that plagues all the ages but the greater part of the malignant tumors hits the old persons. The more elevated incidence sites of primary tumor in geriatrical age are the prostate, the lung and the colon-rectum in the men and the breast, the colon-rectum, the lung and the stomach in the women. The imaging has made steps of giant in the last few decades, with the introduction of new equipment and methodical news so as to assure everybody early and accurated diagnosis. For the lung carcinoma great advantages have been bring to us with the introduction of CT-PET and the multislice CT, that has concurred the execution of virtual bronchoscopy. The virtual endoscopy has been applied with happening also in the screening of the carcinoma of colon-rectum, executed through CT or MR. New MR technologies have allowed perform spectroscopic studies in such organs as prostate and breast, bringing the biochemical diagnosis beyond that morphologic. The MR then turns out fundamental in the appraisal of the Patient with bone metastases thanks also to the new whole body examinations. Finally the recent technology has allowed the execution of multiorgan CT screening bringing in this way new possibilities but also new questions. PMID:15700630

  3. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding: A 15-year nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors.A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996-2000), T2 (2001-2005), and T3 (2006-2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate.Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality.Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were

  4. Educational needs, practice patterns and quality indicators to improve geriatric pharmacy care

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Background: As the population ages and pressure increases to reduce adverse drug reactions and drug-related hospitalizations in the elderly, there will be a growing demand for pharmacists to competently take on shared responsibility for effective and safe prescribing in older adults. Methods: A cross-sectional postal survey was distributed to 3927 hospital and community pharmacists across Québec about their educational needs and practice patterns in geriatric care. Perceptions of different quality performance indicators were sought. Modifiable factors associated with higher performance were determined using univariate logistic regression. Results: Seven hundred six pharmacists (18%) completed the survey. Less than 50% were aware of the prevalence of polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, drug-related hospitalizations or falls in the geriatric population. Forty-one percent of community pharmacists and 74% of hospital pharmacists acknowledged familiarity with the Beers criteria of drugs to avoid in the elderly. The likelihood of screening for inappropriate prescriptions was 2.96 (95% confidence interval = 1.97-4.47) among pharmacists familiar with the Beers criteria and 2.24 (95% confidence interval = 1.50-3.34) among those who received continuing geriatric education in the workplace. On average, pharmacists reported having time to conduct detailed medication reviews in 30% of their older patients. The 2 quality indicators of geriatric care that were ranked most pertinent were being able to track the number of patients requiring hospitalization for drug-related problems and monitoring rates of inappropriate prescriptions. Ninety-six percent of respondents desired continuing education about geriatric care. Conclusion: Exposure to continuing education in geriatric pharmacotherapy in the workplace is the most consistent determinant of professional performance to improve drug outcomes in the elderly. PMID:24660011

  5. Delirium in the geriatric unit: proton-pump inhibitors and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Otremba, Iwona; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium remains a major nosocomial complication of hospitalized elderly. Predictive models for delirium may be useful for identification of high-risk patients for implementation of preventive strategies. Objective Evaluate specific factors for development of delirium in a geriatric ward setting. Methods Prospective cross-sectional study comprised 675 consecutive patients aged 79.2±7.7 years (66% women and 34% men), admitted to the subacute geriatric ward of a multiprofile university hospital after exclusion of 113 patients treated with antipsychotic medication because of behavioral disorders before admission. Comprehensive geriatric assessments including a structured interview, physical examination, geriatric functional assessment, blood sampling, ECG, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, Confusion Assessment Method for diagnosis of delirium, Delirium-O-Meter to assess delirium severity, Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale to assess sedation or agitation, visual analog scale and Doloplus-2 scale to assess pain level were performed. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed five independent factors associated with development of delirium in geriatric inpatients: transfer between hospital wards (odds ratio [OR] =2.78; confidence interval [CI] =1.54–5.01; P=0.001), preexisting dementia (OR =2.29; CI =1.44–3.65; P<0.001), previous delirium incidents (OR =2.23; CI =1.47–3.38; P<0.001), previous fall incidents (OR =1.76; CI =1.17–2.64; P=0.006), and use of proton-pump inhibitors (OR =1.67; CI =1.11–2.53; P=0.014). Conclusion Transfer between hospital wards, preexisting dementia, previous delirium incidents, previous fall incidents, and use of proton-pump inhibitors are predictive of development of delirium in the geriatric inpatient setting. PMID:27103793

  6. [Ambulatory geriatric rehabilitation--concepts, chances and responsibilities of participating physicians].

    PubMed

    Stamm, T; Rittgerodt, K; Gehrke, A

    1995-12-01

    The third stage of the bill of the health structure (GSG) still focuses on the tremendous increase of costs in hospitals. Hospitals are accused that the care of the older patients involves too much money and staff. Experts complain that geriatric-rehabilitative thinking and acting does hardly influence the daily work on the wards. Competent geriatric rehabilitation should diminish or prevent the need for nursing, should support the patients ability for self-sufficiency, and decrease hospitalization time. Since the expenses for the hospital care of older patients have increased during the last couple of years and show the greatest dynamic of increase together with the supply of aids, health politicians and health economists, physicians, health insurances, and social insurances set more and more medical and economic hope on the geriatric rehabilitation. Especially models of out of hospital programs in connection with panel doctors are discussed to relieve the hospitals and are favoured by legal institutions and health politicians. Despite the documented success of geriatric rehabilitation, it is surprising the only a few areas realize differentiated out of hospital concepts. This article summarizes the most important models of out of hospital geriatric rehabilitation as they are tested in different areas in Germany. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed and the demands of the participating physicians are demonstrated. The goal of this paper is to describe the medical role in these models to win more physicians for this task. The urgently necessary development of a country-wide out of hospital rehabilitation, introduces new important medical fields of activity. PMID:8850116

  7. The 3 D's of geriatric psychiatry: depression, delirium, and dementia.

    PubMed

    Dharia, Sheetal; Verilla, Kailen; Breden, Ericka L

    2011-08-01

    A Caucasian female octogenarian with multiple medical problems was admitted to the inpatient geriatric psychiatry unit with intermittent altered mental status and decline in memory. She had been hospitalized four times in the previous three months. She was admitted on more than 10 medications and received more than 20 different medications in this time period. It was determined that she had delirium concurrent with dementia and/or depression. During her hospital stay a urinary tract infection (UTI) was treated, her anticholinergic medications were minimized, and her digoxin dose was adjusted. As her mental status cleared, a workup was completed to differentiate between dementia and depression. She was initially treated with memantine, but as time progressed it became more evident she was experiencing depression and a "pseudodementia," which was treated with sertraline. Her Mini-Mental State Examination returned to 29/30 (her score previously was 26/29). This case demonstrates the complexity of treating an elder individual and the importance of differentiating among delirium, depression, and dementia. The pharmacy team played an active role in medication reconciliation. Additionally, they worked with the medical team to minimize her potentially harmful medications and optimize the treatment of her UTI and depression. PMID:21840820

  8. Argon laser peripheral iridoplasty versus systemic intraocular pressure-lowering medications as immediate management for acute phacomorphic angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky WY; Lai, Jimmy SM; Yick, Doris WF; Yuen, Can YF

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of argon laser peripheral iridoplasty (ALPI) and systemic intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering medications in the immediate management of acute phacomorphic angle closure. Methods Consecutive cases of acute phacomorphic angle closure were randomized to receive ALPI and an intravenous or oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitor as initial treatment. Intravenous mannitol was administered for presenting IOP > 60 mmHg or IOP > 40 mmHg 2 hours posttreatment in both arms. Results Of 10 consecutive cases, six received medical therapy and four received ALPI. Fifty percent in the medical group and none in the ALPI group required intravenous mannitol. The ALPI group took less time to achieve IOP < 25 mmHg (18.8 ± 7.5 minutes versus 115.0 ± 97.0 minutes, P = 0.001, F test); had a greater IOP reduction within 30 minutes (69.8% ± 7.7% versus 40.9 ± 23.9%, P = 0.03, t-test); and had a consistently smaller post-attack cup to disc ratio (0.50 ± 0.02 versus 0.60 ± 0.20, P = 0.002, F test). Conclusion ALPI offers greater safety, consistency, and efficacy than systemic IOP-lowering medications as initial treatment for phacomorphic angle closure. PMID:23326185

  9. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care. PMID:25847647

  10. Undergraduate Teaching in Geriatric Medicine: The Role of National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John; Masud, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent international concern that the teaching of geriatrics may be in decline. Research has suggested that support for geriatrics in national undergraduate curricula is the key to effective delivery of teaching in the specialty. We set out to determine the geriatric medicine content in the U.K. generic curriculum, reviewing this in…

  11. Impact of geriatric comorbidity and polypharmacy on cholinesterase inhibitors prescribing in dementia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although most guidelines recommend the use of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) for mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease, only a small proportion of affected patients receive these drugs. We aimed to study if geriatric comorbidity and polypharmacy influence the prescription of ChEIs in patients with dementia in Germany. Methods We used claims data of 1,848 incident patients with dementia aged 65 years and older. Inclusion criteria were first outpatient diagnoses for dementia in at least three of four consecutive quarters (incidence year). Our dependent variable was the prescription of at least one ChEI in the incidence year. Main independent variables were polypharmacy (defined as the number of prescribed medications categorized into quartiles) and measures of geriatric comorbidity (levels of care dependency and 14 symptom complexes characterizing geriatric patients). Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results On average, patients were 78.7 years old (47.6% female) and received 9.7 different medications (interquartile range: 6-13). 44.4% were assigned to one of three care levels and virtually all patients (92.0%) had at least one symptom complex characterizing geriatric patients. 13.0% received at least one ChEI within the incidence year. Patients not assigned to the highest care level were more likely to receive a prescription (e.g., no level of care dependency vs. level 3: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR]: 5.35; 95% CI: 1.61-17.81). The chance decreased with increasing numbers of symptoms characterizing geriatric patients (e.g., 0 vs. 5+ geriatric complexes: OR: 4.23; 95% CI: 2.06-8.69). The overall number of prescribed medications had no influence on ChEI prescription and a significant effect of age could only be found in the univariate analysis. Living in a rural compared to an urban environment and contacts to neurologists or psychiatrists were associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of receiving ChEIs in the

  12. Acute medical management of the non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) in older patients.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) represent many clinical challenges. For example diagnosis can be difficult, and comorbidities are common. Furthermore, NSTE-ACS is particularly common in older patients (>60% of acute myocardial infarctions occurring in patients aged 65 years or older) and the mortality associated with NSTE-ACS is particularly high. Despite these many concerns, evidence from clinical trials based on this group of patients is limited. Future prospective clinical trials should therefore more accurately reflect the NSTE-ACS patient population by including more elderly patients and including efficacy endpoints that are relevant for these patients. Furthermore, the lack of clear clinical evidence in this population means that the current treatment guidelines do not fully address the needs of elderly patients. Several recent clinical trials have highlighted some of the main considerations we should make when treating elderly patients with NSTE-ACS. Different therapy options in the pharmacological management of NSTE-ACS in this age group are also discussed. PMID:19819566

  13. Antimicrobial Stewardship for a Geriatric Behavioral Health Population

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Kristen; Rubal-Peace, Georgina; Chang, Victoria; Liang, Eva; Wong, Nicolas; Campbell, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health concern. Antimicrobial stewardship and multi-disciplinary intervention can prevent inappropriate antimicrobial use and improve patient care. Special populations, especially older adults and patients with mental health disorders, can be particularly in need of such intervention. The purpose of this project was to assess the impact of pharmacist intervention on appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing on a geriatric psychiatric unit (GPU). Patients ≥18 years old prescribed oral antibiotics during GPU admission were included. Antimicrobial appropriateness was assessed pre- and post-pharmacist intervention. During the six-month pre- and post-intervention phase, 63 and 70 patients prescribed antibiotics were identified, respectively. Subjects in the post-intervention group had significantly less inappropriate doses for indication compared to the pre-intervention group (10.6% vs. 23.9%, p = 0.02), and significantly less antibiotics prescribed for an inappropriate duration (15.8% vs. 32.4%, p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for use of appropriate drug for indication or appropriate dose for renal function between groups. Significantly more patients in the post intervention group had medications prescribed with appropriate dose, duration, and indication (51% vs. 66%, p = 0.04). Pharmacist intervention was associated with decreased rates of inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing on a geriatric psychiatric unit. PMID:27025523

  14. Chronic diseases in captive geriatric female Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Lee, D Rick; Lammey, Michael L

    2012-04-01

    The current aging population of captive chimpanzees is expected to develop age-related diseases and present new challenges to providing their veterinary care. Spontaneous heart disease and sudden cardiac death are the main causes of death in chimpanzees (especially of male animals), but little is known about the relative frequency of other chronic diseases. Furthermore, female chimpanzees appear to outlive the males and scant literature addresses clinical conditions that affect female chimpanzees. Here we characterize the types and prevalence of chronic disease seen in geriatric (older than 35 y) female chimpanzees in the colony at Alamogordo Primate Facility. Of the 16 female chimpanzees that fit the age category, 87.5% had some form of chronic age-related disease. Cardiovascular-related disease was the most common (81.25%) followed by metabolic syndrome (43.75%) and renal disease (31.25%). These data show the incidence of disease in geriatric female chimpanzees and predict likely medical management challenges associated with maintaining an aging chimpanzee population. PMID:22546920

  15. Lack of association of acute phase response proteins with hormone levels and antidepressant medication in perimenopausal depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depression is associated with higher plasma levels of positive acute-phase proteins, as well as with lower plasma levels of negative acute-phase proteins. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of acute-phase response proteins and whether these levels are influenced by reproductive hormones and antidepressant medication in the perimenopausal depression. Methods Sixty-five women (age range: 40–58 years old) participated in this study. All women were in the perimenopausal phase. The diagnosis of depression was made through a psychiatric interview and with the aid of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17 (HAM-D 17). The acute-phase response proteins, such as haptoglobin (HP), transferrine (TRf), α1-antitrypsin, complement protein 3 (C3), complement protein 4 (C4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and the reproductive hormones, for example follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol (E2), were analyzed using standard laboratory methods. Pearson’s correlations were applied to evaluate the relationship between acute-phase proteins and hormones. Results Perimenopausal women were divided into three groups. The first group consisted of normal controls, the second one involved depressed perimenopausal women, who were taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and the third one included depressed women that were not treated with SSRIs. Depressed women in perimenopause, when being compared to non-depressed women, did not differ as to serum levels of acute-phase proteins. There was a positive correlation between HP and E2 in depressed perimenopausal women, who were not taking SSRIs. Conclusions The lack of association between acute-phase proteins and depressive mood mentioned in this study does not support previous findings in patients with major depression. This negative finding in perimenopausal depression indicates either the absence or a more complex nature of the interactions between acute-phase proteins

  16. Palliative care in the ambulatory geriatric practice.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E; Nirmalasari, Olivia; Graham, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Geriatrics and palliative care often overlap. This article focuses on 2 areas where the disciplines may differ in their approach. The first is planning for extreme illness and death, with explicit acknowledgment that limiting therapy might be a good idea. This situation is likely to have a different impact in the course of a routine geriatrics visit than in a palliative care context. The second is pain management, especially chronic pain. In patients with sharply limited life expectancy, the risk/benefit equation tilts easily toward narcotic use. In frail elders working to remain independent, the calculus may be quite different. PMID:25920055

  17. How the principles of geriatric assessment are shaping managed care.

    PubMed

    Fillit, H M; Hill, J; Picariello, G; Warburton, S

    1998-04-01

    In traditional geriatric medicine, comprehensive assessment is considered crucial to the care of frail older patients. The principles of geriatric assessment--identifying high-risk patients and targeting them for preventive interventions--are also practiced by managed care organizations (MCOs). Self-reported health surveys and administrative data are two methods used by MCOs to identify members at high risk for adverse health outcomes and functional decline who may benefit from geriatric case management. For a successful partnership with primary care physicians, it is very important that geriatric care managers should be knowledgeable in the principles of geriatric medicine. PMID:9559029

  18. Description and students' perceptions of a required geriatric clerkship in postacute rehabilitative care.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Miho K; Meuleman, John R; Shorr, Ron I; Beyth, Rebecca J

    2009-09-01

    This article describes medical students' evaluation of a geriatric clerkship in postacute rehabilitative care settings. This was a cross-sectional study of fourth-year medical students who completed a mandatory 2-week rotation at a postacute care facility. Students were provided with three instructional methods: Web-based interactive learning modules; small-group sessions with geriatric faculty; and Geriatric Interdisciplinary Care Summary (GICS), a grid that students used to formulate comprehensive interdisciplinary care plans for their own patients. After the rotation, students evaluated the overall clerkship, patient care activities, and usefulness of the three instructional methods using a 5-point Likert scale (1=poor to 5=excellent) and listed their area of future specialty. Of 156 students who completed the rotation, 117 (75%) completed the evaluation. Thirty (26%) chose specialties providing chronic disease management such as family, internal medicine, and psychiatry; 34 (29%) chose specialties providing primarily procedural services such as surgery, radiology, anesthesiology, pathology, and radiation oncology. Students rated the usefulness of the GICS as good to very good (mean+/-standard deviation 3.3+/-1.0). Similarly, they rated overall clerkship as good to excellent (3.8+/-1.0). Analysis of variance revealed no significant group difference in any of the responses from students with the overall clerkship (F(112, 4)=1.7, P=.20). Students rated the geriatric clerkship favorably and found the multimodal instruction to be useful. Even for students whose career choice was not primary care, geriatrics was a good model for interdisciplinary care training and could serve as a model for other disciplines. PMID:19682134

  19. Addressing ethical issues in geriatrics and long-term care: ethics education at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M; Turner, L; Bourret, E

    2000-01-01

    An innovative program in ethics education exists at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. This program can serve as a helpful model for long-term care and geriatric care facilities seeking to implement formal training programs in bioethics. Various aspects of the ethics education program are examined. In addition to describing the role of the ethics committee and research ethics board, consideration is given to case consultations, ethics rounds, the training of junior physicians and medical students, grand rounds and the planning of conferences and guest lectures. With regard to educational content in bioethics, health law, professional guidelines and the principlist approach of Beauchamp and Childress are used to explore the ethical dimensions of particular cases. Given the clinical context of the educational initiatives, the pedagogical approach is predominately case-based. While the bioethics literature emphasizes the patient-physician relationship, ethics education at Baycrest recognizes the importance of multiple professions. Physicians, nurses, social workers, speech pathologists, nutritionists and other health care providers are involved in ethical deliberation and education. PMID:11143884

  20. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE. PMID:24576517

  1. Geriatric Syndromes: Clinical, Research and Policy Implications of a Core Geriatric Concept

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Sharon K.; Studenski, Stephanie; Tinetti, Mary E.; Kuchel, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Geriatricians have embraced the term “geriatric syndrome”, using it extensively to highlight the unique features of common health conditions in the elderly. Geriatric syndromes, such as delirium, falls, incontinence and frailty, are highly prevalent, multifactorial, and associated with substantial morbidity and poor outcomes. Nevertheless, this central geriatric concept has remained poorly defined. This article reviews criteria for defining geriatric syndromes, and proposes a balanced approach of developing preliminary criteria based on peer-reviewed evidence. Based on a review of the literature, four shared risk factors—older age, baseline cognitive impairment, baseline functional impairment, and impaired mobility—were identified across five common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, incontinence, falls, functional decline, and delirium). Understanding basic mechanisms involved in geriatric syndromes will be critical to advancing research and developing targeted therapeutic options. However, given the complexity of these multifactorial conditions, attempts to define relevant mechanisms will need to incorporate more complex models, including a focus on synergistic interactions between different risk factors. Finally, major barriers have been identified in translating research advances, such as preventive strategies of proven effectiveness for delirium and falls, into clinical practice and policy initiatives. National strategic initiatives are required to overcome barriers and to achieve clinical, research, and policy advances that will improve quality of life for older persons. PMID:17493201

  2. Geriatric dentistry--meet the need.

    PubMed

    Issrani, Rakhi; Ammanagi, Renuka; Keluskar, Vaishali

    2012-06-01

    Geriatric dentistry or gerodontics is the delivery of dental care to older adults involving the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of problems associated with normal ageing and age-related diseases as part of an inter-disciplinary team with other health care professionals. Geriatric health is an ignored and under-explored area worldwide. Oral health reflects overall well being for the elderly population. Conversely, elderly patients are more predisposed to oral conditions due to age-related systemic diseases and functional changes. The major barriers to practising geriatric dentistry are the lack of trained faculty members, a crowded curriculum and monetary concerns. For successful treatment, the practitioner must adopt a humanitarian approach and develop a better understanding of the feelings and attitudes of the elderly. Prevention and early intervention strategies must be formulated to reduce the risk of oral diseases in this population. In future, dental professionals must have a proper understanding of the magnitude of the services to be provided to the elderly. This could only be realised through an education programme in geriatric dentistry, which should be started without further delay. This article hence sets out the objectives, needs, present scenario, strategies and types of dental treatment required by the elderly population. PMID:22612827

  3. [The problems and outlook of geriatric pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Zapadniuk, V I

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related changes in manifestations of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs in the elderly is presented. The ways of their correction are discussed. The advances in the development of geriatric drugs (dekamevit, kvadevit, ampevit, orkomin, potassium glutaminate, rikavit, trimethylglycine) and the perspectives for the creation of new geroprotectors are described. PMID:2201563

  4. [The particular characteristics of caregivers in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Viana, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The perception of the work of a caregiver in geriatrics is often inaccurate. Considered to consist of the most unrewarding tasks, the role of caregivers in supporting residents and families is however essential, both in terms of day-today care as well as for the prevention of dependency. PMID:22741315

  5. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  6. Geriatric Staff Training for Patient Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Tom

    The project investigated the effectiveness of an evironmental therapy training program for geriatric mental health workers when used in two different institutional settings. Site A was a State-operated facility for psychiatric in-patient care, accommodating 2,000 patients, with emphasis on maintenance and general patient welfare. Site B, a former…

  7. Faculty Preparedness in Geriatric Optometry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancil, Gary L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of chief academic officers and faculty (n=27) in 16 schools of optometry found that, since 1986, there has been a 75% increase in institutions requiring coursework in geriatric optometry and an 83% increase in those offering continuing professional education in this field. However, 67% of faculty report no formal training. Three faculty…

  8. A Health Belief Interview for Clinical Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakowski, William; Dengiz, Alan N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a brief nine-item interview, designed for use by practitioners. Based upon results from field-testing with 65 ambulatory geriatric patients, the instrument can be used as an aid to assess health and treatment perceptions in clinical settings. Responses to specific items may also suggest broader areas for follow-up discussion. (JAC)

  9. Medication use as a risk factor for inpatient falls in an acute care hospital: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Shuto, Hideki; Imakyure, Osamu; Matsumoto, Junichi; Egawa, Takashi; Jiang, Ying; Hirakawa, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yasufumi; Yanagawa, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The present study aimed to evaluate the associations between medication use and falls and to identify high risk medications that acted as a trigger for the onset of falls in an acute care hospital setting. METHODS We applied a case-crossover design wherein cases served as their own controls and comparisons were made within each participant. The 3-day period (days 0 to −2) and the 3-day periods (days −6 to −8, days −9 to −11 and days −12 to −14) before the fall event were defined as the case period and the control periods, respectively. Exposures to medications were compared between the case and control periods. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the onset of falls with respect to medication use were computed using conditional logistic regression analyses. RESULTS A total of 349 inpatients who fell during their hospitalization were recorded on incident report forms between March 2003 and August 2005. The initial use of antihypertensive, antiparkinsonian, anti-anxiety and hypnotic agents as medication classes was significantly associated with an increased risk of falls, and these ORs (95% CI) were 8.42 (3.12, 22.72), 4.18 (1.75, 10.02), 3.25 (1.62, 6.50) and 2.44 (1.32, 4.51), respectively. The initial use of candesartan, etizolam, biperiden and zopiclone was also identified as a potential risk factor for falls. CONCLUSIONS Medical professionals should be aware of the possibility that starting a new medication such as an antihypertensive agent, including candesartan, and antiparkinsonian, anti-anxiety and hypnotic agents, may act as a trigger for the onset of a fall. PMID:20573090

  10. A Reflection on Aging: A Portfolio of Change in Attitudes toward Geriatric Patients during a Clerkship Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Duca, Danny; Duque, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    The process of students' evaluation in medical schools has changed from a tutor-led evaluation system based on students' performance to a student-based evaluation that involves self-reflection and their level of change in skills and attitudes. At the McGill University Division of Geriatric Medicine, we developed an innovative system of evaluation…

  11. The Making of Careers, the Making of a Discipline: Luck and Chance in Migrant Careers in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornat, Joanna; Henry, Leroi; Raghuram, Parvati

    2011-01-01

    The geriatric specialty, unpopular among most UK born and trained medical graduates, provided an opportunity for career development and achievement for those doctors whose training had been non-standard for a variety of reasons. Migrant doctors who have played a substantive role in the UK National Health Service since its inception made an…

  12. The Senior Mentor Program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine: An Innovative Geriatric Longitudinal Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ellen; Richeson, Nancy A.; Thornhill, Joshua T., IV; Corwin, Sara J.; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes development, implementation, and evaluation strategies of a longitudinal geriatric curriculum, the Senior Mentor Program (SMP). The rationale for exposing undergraduate medical students to healthy, community-dwelling older adults is to use the relationship and activities as vehicles for improving knowledge of aging and…

  13. [Sophrology in geriatrics, an innovative approach to reducing pain and anxiety].

    PubMed

    Tocheport, Pascale

    2012-03-01

    Sophrology is a non medication-based method which involves both the body and mind. It combines relaxing the muscles, increasing awareness of breathing and positive thinking, and leads to the search for improved well-being through the integration of the body percept. It generates a feeling of "letting go" and helps to relieve physical, psychological and spiritual suffering, in particular in geriatrics. PMID:22533280

  14. Xerostomia in the Geriatric Patient: Causes, Oral Manifestations, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ouanounou, Aviv

    2016-05-01

    Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is common among elderly people and is typically associated with decreased salivary gland function. Causes of xerostomia in the geriatric population have been attributed to the use of medications, chronic disorders, and radiation therapy to the head and neck region. Patients with chronic xerostomia may have multiple oral and dental consequences such as dental caries, periodontal disease, fungal infections, ill-fitting dentures, and taste alterations. Xerostomia can seriously impact quality of life and may alter speech, eating, and swallowing. Current therapeutics for the management of xerostomia are grouped as local and systemic salivary stimulation. This article reviews the main reasons for xerostomia and the complications it causes in the oral cavity. It also discusses the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents used to treat this condition. PMID:27213776

  15. Comprehensive geriatric assessment of a patient with complex needs.

    PubMed

    Birch, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    This is the third in a short series that presents case study examples of the application of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic assessment model, which is designed to determine a frail older person's medical and mental health status, as well as functional, social and environmental issues. When undertaken by nurses, it can enable individualised care planning. The case study presented explores the application of CGA with an 89-year-old patient with complex health and social care needs. It demonstrates how a hospital admission was avoided and the patient's health outcomes improved, by using a nurse-led systematic approach to assessment and by careful consideration of CGA domains. PMID:27125938

  16. [LIMITATIONS OF THE BIOMEDICAL PARADIGM IN GERIATRICS INSTITUTIONS].

    PubMed

    Robledo, María Laura; Cabello, Cecilia; Dahl, Silvina

    2015-01-01

    The social perception of ageing related to the loss of both physical and psychological functions that determine in many cases the institutionalization of the elderly in nursing homes, leads to a medical care focused on a biomedical model, centered on organic factors as determinants of the illness. Illness is not an isolated condition in an individual, but has a subjective and social dimension. For this reason the biographic history becomes the main reference point in the care of the elderly. People experiment their disease within a narrative that gives a meaning to their experience; but this is not considered by the biomedical model, where the psychosocial factors that influence the onset or progression of the pathology are disregarded. This article attempts to explore the problem that arises when the care of the elderly that reside in geriatric institutions is centered on the biomedical model. PMID:26650415

  17. Predictors for Delayed Emergency Department Care in Medical Patients with Acute Infections – An International Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Amin, Devendra; Amin, Adina; Haubitz, Sebastian; Conca, Antoinette; Reutlinger, Barbara; Canavaggio, Pauline; Sauvin, Gabrielle; Bernard, Maguy; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In overcrowded emergency department (ED) care, short time to start effective antibiotic treatment has been evidenced to improve infection-related clinical outcomes. Our objective was to study factors associated with delays in initial ED care within an international prospective medical ED patient population presenting with acute infections. Methods We report data from an international prospective observational cohort study including patients with a main diagnosis of infection from three tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland, France and the United States (US). We studied predictors for delays in starting antibiotic treatment by using multivariate regression analyses. Results Overall, 544 medical ED patients with a main diagnosis of acute infection and antibiotic treatment were included, mainly pneumonia (n = 218; 40.1%), urinary tract (n = 141; 25.9%), and gastrointestinal infections (n = 58; 10.7%). The overall median time to start antibiotic therapy was 214 minutes (95% CI: 199, 228), with a median length of ED stay (ED LOS) of 322 minutes (95% CI: 308, 335). We found large variations of time to start antibiotic treatment depending on hospital centre and type of infection. The diagnosis of a gastrointestinal infection was the most significant predictor for delay in antibiotic treatment (+119 minutes compared to patients with pneumonia; 95% CI: 58, 181; p<0.001). Conclusions We found high variations in hospital ED performance in regard to start antibiotic treatment. The implementation of measures to reduce treatment times has the potential to improve patient care. PMID:27171476

  18. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  19. Relationship between Blood Pressure and Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Administered Lytic Medication in the TIMS-China Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xingquan; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Chunjuan; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased blood pressure (BP) management following acute ischemic stroke (AIS) remains controversial. This study aimed to identify the association between BP and clinical outcomes in AIS patients administered lytic medication in the TIMS-China (thrombolysis implementation and monitor of acute ischemic stroke in China) database. Methods The sample comprised 1128 patients hospitalized within 4.5 hours (h) of AIS for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (i.v. rt-PA) thrombolysis. Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) at baseline, 2 h and 24 h after treatment, and changes from baseline were analyzed. The study outcomes comprised a favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0–1 at 90 days) and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), analyzed using logistic regression, with low BP as the reference group. Results Lower BP (baseline, 2 h, and 24 h) was beneficial in AIS patients and significantly related to a favorable outcome (P<0.05). A substantial BP decrease at 24 h after rt-PA thrombolysis was significantly associated with a favorable outcome compared with a moderate BP decrease (P = 0.0298). A SBP >160 mmHg 2 h after rt-PA thrombolysis was significantly associated with SICH compared with a SBP <140 mmHg (P = 0.0238). An increase or no change (>25 mmHg) in SBP was significantly associated with SICH (P = 0.002) compared with a small SBP decrease (1–9 mmHg). Conclusions This study provides novel evidence that lower BP within the first 24 h is associated with a more favorable outcome and less frequent SICH in AIS patients administered lytic medication. Routine BP-lowering treatment should be considered in AIS patients following lytic medication. PMID:26828609

  20. Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Sodium-Restricted/Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet After Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Hospitalization: Design and Rationale for the Geriatric OUt of hospital Randomized MEal Trial in Heart Failure (GOURMET-HF)

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Jeffrey D.; Maurer, Mathew S.; Hummel, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart Failure (HF) is a major public health problem affecting predominantly older adults. Non-adherence to diet remains a significant contributor to acute decompensated HF (ADHF). The sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH/SRD) eating plan reduces cardiovascular dysfunction that can lead to ADHF and is consistent with current HF guidelines. We propose that an intervention that promotes adherence to the DASH/SRD by home-delivering meals will be safe and improve health-related quality of life (QOL) in older adults following hospitalization for ADHF. Methods/Design This is a three center, randomized, single-blind, controlled trial of 12 weeks duration designed to determine the safety and efficacy of home-delivered DASH/SRD-compliant meals in older adults following discharge from ADHF hospitalization. 66 subjects will be randomized in a 1:1 stratified fashion by gender and left ventricular ejection fraction (< vs. ≥50%). Study subjects will receive either pre-prepared, home-delivered DASH/SRD-compliant meals or usual dietary advice for 4 weeks after hospital discharge. Investigators will be blinded to group assignment, food diaries, and urinary electrolyte measurements until study completion. The primary efficacy endpoint is the change in the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) summary scores for health-related QOL from study enrollment to 4 weeks post-discharge. Safety evaluation will focus on hypotension, renal insufficiency, and hyperkalemia. Exploratory endpoints include echocardiography, non-invasive vascular testing, markers of oxidative stress, and salt taste sensitivity. Conclusion This randomized controlled trial will test the efficacy, feasibility and safety of 4 weeks of DASH/SRD after ADHF hospitalization. By testing a novel dietary intervention supported by multiple levels of evidence including preliminary data in outpatients with stable HF, we will address a critical evidence gap in the care of older

  1. Developing Leadership in Geriatric Education: An Annual Faculty Institute. Proceedings of the Summer Geriatric Institute (4th, Lexington, Kentucky, July 24-27, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Davis L., Ed.; Hoekelman, Margaret C., Ed.

    This document presents the proceedings of a conference on geriatric education. These papers are included: Promoting Healthy Aging: A Leadership Role for Geriatric Education; National Research Priorities in Aging; Aging with a Disability; Recent Advances in Clinical Strategies in Geriatric Education: The Role of the Geriatric Nurse in the Acute…

  2. Direct Medical Cost of Influenza-Related Hospitalizations among Severe Acute Respiratory Infections Cases in Three Provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Lidong; Li, Zhong; Feng, Ao; Jin, Hui; Wang, Shiyuan; Su, Qiru; Xu, Zhen; Feng, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza-related hospitalizations impose a considerable economic and social burden. This study aimed to better understand the economic burden of influenza-related hospitalizations among patients in China in different age and risk categories. Methods Laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations between December 2009 and June 2011 from three hospitals participating in the Chinese Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) sentinel surveillance system were included in this study. Hospital billing data were collected from each hospital’s Hospital Information System (HIS) and divided into five cost categories. Demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records. Mean (range) and median (interquartile range [IQR]) costs were calculated and compared among children (≤15 years), adults (16–64 years) and elderly (≥65 years) groups. Factors influencing cost were analyzed. Results A total of 106 laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations were identified, 60% of which were children. The mean (range) direct medical cost was $1,797 ($80–$27,545) for all hospitalizations, and the median (IQR) direct medical cost was $231 ($164), $854 ($890), and $2,263 ($7,803) for children, adults, and elderly, respectively. Therapeutics and diagnostics were the two largest components of direct medical cost, comprising 57% and 23%, respectively. Cost of physician services was the lowest at less than 1%. Conclusion Direct medical cost of influenza-related hospitalizations imposes a heavy burden on patients and their families in China. Further study is needed to provide more comprehensive evidence on the economic burden of influenza. Our study highlights the need to increase vaccination rate and develop targeted national preventive strategies. PMID:23717485

  3. Supportive medical care for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Antillon, Federico; Pacheco, Carlos; Sullivan, Courtney E; Lam, Catherine G; Howard, Scott C; Conter, Valentino

    2015-10-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable progress in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been achieved in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), but survival rates remain significantly lower than those in high-income countries. Inadequate supportive care and consequent excess mortality from toxicity are important causes of treatment failure for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in LMIC. This article summarizes practical supportive care recommendations for healthcare providers practicing in LMIC, starting with core approaches in oncology nursing care, management of tumor lysis syndrome and mediastinal masses, nutritional support, use of blood products for anemia and thrombocytopenia, and palliative care. Prevention and treatment of infectious diseases are described in a parallel paper. PMID:26013005

  4. Optimization of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy: Role of Multifaceted Cooperation in the Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Mirko; Somers, Annemie; Onder, Graziano

    2016-03-01

    Because older patients are more vulnerable to adverse drug-related events, there is a need to ensure appropriate pharmacotherapy in these patients. This narrative review describes approaches to improve pharmacotherapy in older people in the hospital setting. Screening to identify older patients at risk of drug-related problems and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is the first critical step within a multistep approach to geriatric pharmacotherapy. Two methods that have been developed are the GerontoNet ADR risk score and the Brighton Adverse Drug Reactions Risk (BADRI) model, which take into account a number of factors, the most important of which is the number of medicines. In order to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older patients, different types of interventions exist, such as pharmacist-led medication reviews, educational interventions, computerized decision support systems, and comprehensive geriatric assessment. The effects of these interventions have been studied, sometimes in a multifaceted approach, by combining different techniques. None of the existing interventions shows a clear beneficial effect on patients' health outcomes if applied in isolation; however, when these interventions are combined within the context of a multidisciplinary team, positive effects on patients' health outcomes can be expected. Appropriate geriatric pharmacotherapy, global assessment of patients' clinical and functional parameters, and integration of skills from different healthcare professionals are needed to address medical complexity of older adults. PMID:26884392

  5. Integrating geriatric resources into the classroom: a virtual tour example.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Wanda; Fletcher, Kathy; Wingate, Anita

    2007-01-01

    As the older adult population increases, nursing students at all levels need geriatric content and access to geriatric resources. The Virtual Tour (VT) assignment, a combination of Web-based geriatric resources and applied learning activities, provides a simple way to integrate Web-based resources into classroom learning. VTs provide students a guide or "road map" to practical Web-based resources for client care. Evaluation data support that students like VTs and gain useful information for practice. VTs provide an easy way to expand geriatric resources available to students and to complement classroom content. PMID:17923286

  6. [Anesthesiological care in orthogeriatric co-management. Perioperative treatment of geriatric trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Luger, Thomas J; Luger, Markus F

    2016-04-01

    Elderly patients increasingly need to undergo surgery under anesthesia, especially following trauma. A timely interdisciplinary approach to the perioperative management of these patients is decisive for the long-term outcome. Orthogeriatric co-management, which includes geriatricians and anesthesiologists from an early stage, is of great benefit for geriatric patients. Patient age, comorbidities and self-sufficiency in activities of daily life are decisive for an anesthesiological assessment of the state of health and preoperative risk stratification. If necessary additional investigations, such as echocardiography must be carried out, in order to guarantee optimal perioperative anesthesiological management. Certain medical factors can delay the initiation of anesthesia and it is absolutely necessary that these are taken into consideration for surgical management. Not every form of anesthesia is equally suitable for every geriatric patient. PMID:27090913

  7. A comprehensive fracture prevention strategy in older adults: the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) statement.

    PubMed

    Blain, H; Masud, T; Dargent-Molina, P; Martin, F C; Rosendahl, E; van der Velde, N; Bousquet, J; Benetos, A; Cooper, C; Kanis, J A; Reginster, J Y; Rizzoli, R; Cortet, B; Barbagallo, M; Dreinhöfer, K E; Vellas, B; Maggi, S; Strandberg, T

    2016-08-01

    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region, the European Union of Medical Specialists, and the International Osteoporosis Foundation-European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people. PMID:27299902

  8. What’s Behind a Name: The Kaufman Prize of the Canadian Geriatrics Society

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Kaufman Prize has been given by the Canadian Geriatrics Society for nearly 30 years, but few Society members are aware of who Kaufman was or why the Prize was named after him. They are equally unclear about the objectives established for the Prize and how successful it has been in achieving them. This paper reviews the history of the Kaufman Prize and the eponymous A.R. Kaufman. The original objectives of the award were to encourage clinical research in geriatric medicine and to foster research interest in medical residents. Over the years the Prize has allowed the Society to both recognize and encourage excellence in age-related research among trainees. With the renaming of the Prize, now would be an opportune time for the Society to review both its objectives and its format. PMID:23251314

  9. A Comprehensive Fracture Prevention Strategy in Older Adults: The European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) Statement.

    PubMed

    Blain, H; Masud, T; Dargent-Molina, P; Martin, F C; Rosendahl, E; van der Velde, N; Bousquet, J; Benetos, A; Cooper, C; Kanis, J A; Reginster, J Y; Rizzoli, R; Cortet, B; Barbagallo, M; Dreinhöfer, K E; Vellas, B; Maggi, S; Strandberg, T

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region (IAGG-ER), the European Union of Medical Specialists (EUMS), the International Osteoporosis Foundation - European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people. PMID:27273355

  10. The acute medical management of detained Somali pirates and their captives.

    PubMed

    Schranz, Craig

    2012-09-01

    Over the last several years, piracy off the coast of East Africa has resulted in significant risks to merchant vessels and their crews. There have been multiple instances of both pirates being detained and captives being liberated by military vessels. The unique health concerns of this population have been minimally studied and military health providers must be prepared to identify and manage potential medical conditions. In an attempt to provide further guidance for providers, this article reviews the limited available literature and identifies potential health concerns of pirates and recently released captives. In addition to traumatic injuries, specific medical concerns that must be considered include infectious disease, wound management, dehydration, hypothermia, malnutrition, electrolyte disturbance, and potential psychiatric conditions. Infectious disease is also a major threat. Malaria, tuberculosis, and intestinal parasites likely pose the greatest risk. A careful medical screening along with an extensive intake history and physical examination are essential for rapid identification and initial management of this unique population. PMID:23025141

  11. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3–32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-03-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:24462332

  13. An update on prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Samama, Meyer Michel; Kleber, Franz-Xaver

    2006-01-01

    Both the recently updated consensus guidelines published by the American College of Chest Physicians, and the International Union of Angiology recommend thromboprophylaxis with either low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or unfractionated heparin (UFH) in medical patients at risk of VTE. However, no guidance is given regarding the appropriate dosing regimens that should be used for thromboprophylaxis in this patient group. LMWH (enoxaparin and dalteparin) and UFH have been shown to be effective for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk hospitalized medical patients. Although LMWH once daily (o.d.) has been shown to be as effective as UFH three times daily (t.i.d.) for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk medical patients, there are no data to show that UFH twice daily (b.i.d) is as effective as either LMWH o.d. or UFH t.i.d. On the basis of currently available evidence, the LMWHs enoxaparin and dalteparin are more attractive alternatives to UFH for the prevention of VTE in hospitalized medical patients because of their convenient once-daily administration and better safety profile, demonstrated in terms of reduced bleeding, HIT, and other adverse events. PMID:16817957

  14. An analysis of clinical process measures for acute healthcare delivery in Appalachia: The Roane Medical Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Karla Rae; Hancock, John S; Sills, Eric Scott

    2006-01-01

    Objective To survey management of selected emergency healthcare needs in a Tennessee community hospital. Materials and methods In this descriptive report, discharges and associated standard process measures were retrospectively studied for Roane Medical Center (RMC) in Harriman, Tennessee (pop. 6,757). Hospital data were extracted from a nationwide database of short-term acute care hospitals to measure 16 quality performance measures in myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure, and pneumonia during the 14 month interval ending March 2005. The data also permitted comparisons with state and national reference groups. Results Of RMC patients with myocardial infarction (MI), 94% received aspirin on arrival, a figure higher than both state (85%) and national (91%) averages. Assessment of left ventricular dysfunction among heart failure patients was also higher at RMC (98%) than the state (74%) or national (79%) average. For RMC pneumonia patients, 79% received antibiotics within 4 h of admission, which compared favorably with State (76%) and national (75%) average. RMC scored higher on 13 of 16 clinical process measures (p<0.01, sign test analysis, >95% CI) compared to state and national averages. Discussion Although acute health care needs are often met with limited resources in medically underserved regions, RMC performed above state and national average for most process measures assessed in this review. Our data were derived from one facility and the associated findings may not be applicable in other healthcare settings. Further studies are planned to track other parameters and specific clinical outcomes at RMC, as well as to identify specific institutional policies that facilitate attainment of target quality measures. PMID:16571127

  15. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    PubMed Central

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P<0.001). Conclusion Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679

  16. Early start renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury-Universal panacea or another case of over medicalization?

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Despite advances in medical practice and renal replacement therapy, the mortality of patients who develop acute kidney injury remains high. In the field of cardiology, the management of myocardial infarction has evolved from one of conservative bed rest to primary coronary intervention. As renal replacement therapy is now generally available, the question arises whether earlier intervention could lead to improved patient outcomes. The evidence to date is primarily centered on retrospective observational reports, with the majority reporting increased patient survival for earlier intervention. However, these reports are typically based on small numbers of patients and differ in the etiology of acute kidney injury, patient comorbidity, and definitions of what constitutes "early" start. To date, there is less than a handful of prospective randomized studies published in the modern era. Again these are small studies, with differing patient populations, and definitions of "early" start, but generally do not show any significant advantage for an "early" start approach. As such until adequately powered prospective trial data become available, the decision to initiate renal replacement therapy should be made by the traditional review of patient history, repeated clinical assessments, and trends in biochemical data. PMID:26448386

  17. [Guideline for integrated geriatric assessment].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Doubova, Svetlana Vladislavovna; García-González, José Juan; Espinosa-Aguilar, Amilcar; Jiménez-Uribe, Rodrigo; Peña-Valdovinos, Abel; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2009-01-01

    A clinical practice guideline was developed as a response to the increasing of elderly in Mexican population due to the epidemiological transition; this instrument allows the assessment of health conditions for people from 60 years of age and older, and it can be a tool for helping family physicians and nurses in providing care for the main health problems of this group of age. The guideline for gerontologic assessment includes six principal health priorities in older people (loss of vision, difficulty to hear, falls or problems walking, nutritional disorders, memory difficulties, and sleep disorders); additionally, another four components for assessment are revised (medication use, physical functionality, quality of life, and social support). Simple recommendations for detection, diagnosis and management of these problems in primary care settings are presented. PMID:20141660

  18. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  19. Comparative assessment of blood and urine analyses in patients with acute poisonings by medical, narcotic substances and alcohol in clinical toxicology.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Yury Nikolaevich; Lisovik, Zhanna Andreevna; Belova, Maria Vladimirovna; Luzhnikov, Evgeny Alekseevich; Livanov, Alexandr Sergeevich

    2005-01-01

    Acute poisonings by medical, narcotic substances and alcohol are actual in Russia in the recent years. Comparison of analytic facilities of modern analytical techniques: chromatographic (HPLC, GC, GC-MS) and immuno-chemical (FPIA) in clinical toxicology for urgent diagnostics, assessment of the severity of acute poisoning and the efficacy of the treatment in patients with acute poisonings by psychotropic drugs, narcotics and alcohol have been done. The object of the study were serum, blood, urine of 611 patients with acute poisonings by amitriptyline, clozapine, carbamazepine, opiates and also alcohol. Threshold concentrations (threshold, critical and lethal) of the toxicants and their active metabolites which corresponded to different degrees of poisoning severity have been determined. The most comfortable and informative screening method for express diagnostics and assessment of severity of acute poisonings by psychotropic drugs and narcotics showed the HPLC with using automatic analyzers. FPIA using the automatic analyzer could be applied for screening studies, if group identification is enough. GC-FID method is advisable in case of poisoning by medical substances and narcotics in view of repeated investigation for assessment of the efficacy of the therapy. GC-MS could be advisable for confirming the results of other methods. GC-TCD possess high sensitivity and specificity and is optimal for express differential diagnostics and quantitative assessment of acute poisoning by ethanol and other alcohols. PMID:16225131

  20. The need for geriatric dental education in India: the geriatric health challenges of the millennium.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susan

    2013-06-01

    The rapid growth in the elderly population in a developing country such as India poses social and financial challenges by causing a shift towards non-communicable diseases and increases in chronic diseases. The economic impact of the burden of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and cancer are high. The link between oral health and general health are particularly pronounced in older populations and impairs their quality of life. This paper reveals that in order to address the increasing health challenges and demands of a growing geriatric population, undergraduates and graduate students in dental schools should be given comprehensive or holistic health assessment training. Cost-effective modern educational strategies and educational tools such as problem-based learning will help to overcome the dearth of trained faculty in geriatric dentistry. Multidisciplinary health-care approaches and extended health-care team work are of vital importance to older patients who could benefit physically and psychologically from more efficient dental treatment. With often more than one chronic disease affecting individuals and use of polypharmacy, there is a need to increase overall knowledge of geriatric pharmacy and geriatric medicine. Measures to help older people remain healthy and active are a necessity in developing countries such as India for effective social and economic development. PMID:23691957

  1. Multiresistant pathogens in geriatric nursing – infection control in residential facilities for geriatric nursing in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Claudia; Schablon, Anja; Bollongino, Kirsten; Maaß, Monika; Kaß, Dietmar; Dulon, Madeleine; Diel, Roland; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) causes problems in geriatric nursing homes. Older people are at increased a growing risk of infection due to multimorbidity and frequent stays in hospital. A high proportion of the elderly require residential care in geriatric nursing facilities, where hygiene requirements in nursing homes are similar to those in hospitals. For this reason we examined how well nursing homes are prepared for MDROs and how effectively protect their infection control residents and staff. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on infection control in residential geriatric nursing facilities in Germany 2012. The questionnaire recorded important parameters of hygiene, resident and staff protection and actions in case of existing MDROs. Results: The response was 54% in Hamburg and 27% in the rest of Germany. Nursing homes were generally well equipped for dealing with infection control: There were standards for MDROs and regular hygiene training for staff. The facilities provided adequate protective clothing, affected residents are usually isolated and hygienic laundry processing conducted. There are deficits in the communication of information on infected residents with hospitals and general practitioners. 54% of nursing homes performed risk assessments for staff infection precaution. Conclusion: There is a growing interest in MDROs and infection control will be a challenge in for residential geriatric nursing facilities in the future. This issue has also drawn increasing attention. Improvements could be achieved by improving communication between different participants in the health service, together with specific measures for staff protection at work. PMID:25285266

  2. Development of an Interview-Based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Christine; Scogin, Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Developed interview-based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDRS) and administered 35-item GDRS to 68 older adults with range of affective disturbance. Found scale to have internal consistency and split-half reliability comparable to those of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Geriatric Depression Scale. Concurrent validity, construct…

  3. Designing a Multi-Disciplinary Geriatrics Health Professional Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, J. James; Coogle, Constance L.; Parham, Iris A.; Head, Colleen; Fulton, LaQuana; Watson, Kathleen; Curtis, Angela

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a Geriatric Health Professionals Mentoring Program designed to address recruitment and retention of health professionals in geriatrics and gerontology. The training provided information on the mentoring process, negotiating mentoring agreements, and coaching mentees. The evaluative framework described examines: (a) the effects…

  4. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly true…

  5. Dental Students' Self-Assessed Competence in Geriatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiyak, H. Asuman; Brudvik, James

    1992-01-01

    A study of four classes of dental students (n=172) exposed to both didactic and clinical geriatric dental training found that the students perceived significant improvements in their abilities to manage geriatric patients in all areas assessed, notably treatment planning, preventive dentistry, referrals, and providing care in alternative settings.…

  6. Factor Analytic Composition of the Geriatric Rating Scale (GRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Ambulatory geriatric patients (N=370) were rated on the Geriatric Rating Scale and results factor analyzed. The scale was found to be composed of three factors: Withdrawal/Apathy, Antisocial Disruptive Behavior, and Deficits in Activities of Daily Living. The results help explain some of the findings regarding sex differences in previous research.…

  7. Behavioral Ratings of Health Professionals' Interactions with the Geriatric Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelson, R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Reports the reliability and validity of the Health Professional-Geriatric Patient Interaction Behavior Rating Code, an observational instrument that is used to quantify the interpersonal behaviors of health professionals in the care of the geriatric patient. Condensed 15 behavioral factors into 10 operationally defined behavioral categories.…

  8. Teaching the Multidisciplinary Team Approach in a Geriatrics Miniresidency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, J. Edward; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A description is provided of the miniresidency program in geriatrics at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine which focuses on the multidisciplinary approach to the care of geriatric patients. Observations are given as to the program's effectiveness. (GLR)

  9. Pheochromocytoma presenting as acute decompensated heart failure reversed with medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Christopher M; Marik, Paul Ellis

    2012-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman presented to hospital with acute chest pain, hypertension, tachycardia and an elevated serum creatinine. She developed respiratory distress requiring endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. She progressed to multiorgan failure due to decompensated congestive heart failure. Echocardiography demonstrated global hypokinesis and an ejection fraction of <10%. Her cardiac function improved with fluid resuscitation and β blockade, and she was eventually discharged home. She was readmitted a few days later with pancreatitis after presenting with nausea, abdominal pain and hypertension. During hospitalisation she had paroxysms of headache, nausea and diaphoresis associated with hypertension and tachycardia. A CT scan of her abdomen revealed an adrenal mass and serum metanephrine studies confirmed the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. After fluid resuscitation and sympathetic blockade her ejection fraction improved to 55%. The patient underwent an uneventful adrenalectomy and made a complete recovery. PMID:22814979

  10. Inclusion of geriatric nutrition in ADA-approved undergraduate programs.

    PubMed

    Shoaf, L R; Jensen, H M

    1989-09-01

    All ADA Plan IV programs were surveyed to determine whether geriatric nutrition was included in their curriculums. Of the 268 Plan IV programs, 66% responded. Less than one-fifth of the programs offered or planned to offer a specific geriatric nutrition course. An overview of geriatric nutrition occurred most frequently in a human nutrition course. A practicum/clinical experience or a course other than nutrition most frequently provided in-depth study, if such was available. Nursing homes and congregate meal sites were the primary locations for experiences with the geriatric population. Major activities with that age group included (a) taking diet histories, (b) making nutrition assessments, and (c) providing diet instruction. In some programs, didactic and experiential training with the geriatric population may not be adequate to prepare dietetic undergraduate students to meet the health care needs of that growing segment of society. PMID:2768741

  11. Intention of nursing students to work in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Ben Natan, Merav; Danino, Sharon; Freundlich, Nelli; Barda, Ayelet; Yosef, Racheli Mor

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined factors related to nursing students' intention to work in geriatrics upon graduation. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. A random sample of 200 nursing students completed a questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and Kogan's Attitudes Toward Old People Scale. Participants expressed low intention to work in geriatrics upon graduation. Results of a multiple linear regression indicated that students' attitudes toward working in geriatrics and normative and control beliefs were found to be predictors of this intention. Additionally, male and religious students were more inclined to work in geriatrics. The current study indicated that nursing students' attitudes toward working in geriatrics were significantly predictive of their intention to work in this field upon graduation. PMID:25707032

  12. Psychiatric Symptoms and Acute Care Service Utilization over the Course of the Year Following Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admission: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Hough, Catherine L.; Zatzick, Douglas; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the presence of in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms, as well as substantial depressive or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 3-months post-intensive care unit (ICU), are associated with increased acute care service utilization over the course of the year following medical-surgical ICU admission. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 150 patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to medical-surgical ICUs for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results Participants were interviewed in-hospital to ascertain substantial acute stress symptoms using the PTSD Checklist-civilian version (PCL-C). Substantial depressive and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the PCL-C respectively at 3 months post-ICU. The number of rehospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits were ascertained at 3 and 12 months post-ICU using the Cornell Services Index. After adjusting for participant and clinical characteristics, in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms were independently associated with greater risk of an additional hospitalization (Relative Risk [RR]: 3.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.80, 4.99) over the year post-ICU. Substantial PTSD symptoms at 3 months post-ICU were independently associated with greater risk of an additional ER visit during the subsequent 9 months (RR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.84) even after adjusting for both rehospitalizations and ER visits between the index hospitalization and 3 months post-ICU. Conclusions Post-ICU psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased acute care service utilization during the year after a medical-surgical ICU admission. Early interventions for at-risk ICU survivors may improve longer-term outcomes and reduce subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:25083985

  13. The Debrisoft(®) Monofilament Debridement Pad for Use in Acute or Chronic Wounds: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    PubMed

    Meads, Catherine; Lovato, Eleonora; Longworth, Louise

    2015-12-01

    As part of its Medical Technology Evaluation Programme, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited a manufacturer to provide clinical and economic evidence for the evaluation of the Debrisoft(®) monofilament debridement pad for use in acute or chronic wounds. The University of Birmingham and Brunel University, acting as a consortium, was commissioned to act as an External Assessment Centre (EAC) for NICE, independently appraising the submission. This article is an overview of the original evidence submitted, the EAC's findings and the final NICE guidance issued. The sponsor submitted a simple cost analysis to estimate the costs of using Debrisoft(®) to debride wounds compared with saline and gauze, hydrogel and larvae. Separate analyses were conducted for applications in home and applications in a clinic setting. The analysis took an UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective. It incorporated the costs of the technologies and supplementary technologies (such as dressings) and the costs of their application by a district nurse. The sponsor concluded that Debrisoft(®) was cost saving relative to the comparators. The EAC made amendments to the sponsor analysis to correct for errors and to reflect alternative assumptions. Debrisoft(®) remained cost saving in most analyses and savings ranged from £77 to £222 per patient compared with hydrogel, from £97 to £347 compared with saline and gauze, and from £180 to £484 compared with larvae depending on the assumptions included in the analysis and whether debridement took place in a home or clinic setting. All analyses were severely limited by the available data on effectiveness, in particular a lack of comparative studies and that the effectiveness data for the comparators came from studies reporting different clinical endpoints compared with Debrisoft(®). The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee made a positive recommendation for adoption of Debrisoft(®) and this has been published

  14. Geriatric vestibulopathy assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Joseph M.; Raz, Yael; Whitney, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review discusses the demographics of dizziness in the older person, the evaluation of the older dizzy patient and how the treatment of dizziness in older patients differs from that in younger individuals. Recent findings Seven percent of all visits to primary care physicians for patients older than 65 years of age are for dizziness, and dizziness is the most common complaint for patients older than 75 years. In a German study, the 12-month prevalence of vertigo in the general population was 5% with an incidence of 1.4% in adults overall. For individuals aged 60–69 the 12-month prevalence was found to be 7.2% and in individuals 70 years of age or older 8.9%. Data from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys indicated that the prevalence of vestibular dysfunction for individuals in the seventh decade of life, eighth decade of life, and older was 49.4, 68.7, and 84.8 percent, respectively. Only subtle age effects are seen on caloric and rotational testing whereas vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) change somewhat with age. Particle repositioning for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo combined with vestibular rehabilitation is more effective than only performing the repositioning maneuver. Tai Chi appears to be an effective intervention for older adults at risk for falling. Summary When caring for an older dizzy patient always assess medication use, perform a Dix–Hallpike maneuver, obtain orthostatic vital signs, discuss fall risk precautions, and consider referral for vestibular rehabilitation. PMID:20613528

  15. Interdisciplinary educational approaches to promote team-based geriatrics and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Howe, Judith L; Witt Sherman, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Despite the increasing public demand for enhanced care of older patients and those with life-threatening illness, health professionals have had limited formal education in geriatrics and palliative care. Furthermore, formal education in interdisciplinary team training is limited. In order to remedy this situation, proactive interventions are being undertaken so that education and training in palliative care is being embedded within the training of physicians, nurses, social workers, as well as other associated health team members. This article discusses various educational approaches to interdisciplinary team-based geriatric and palliative care, highlighting the interdisciplinary didactic and clinical educational opportunities offered by an Interprofessional Palliative Care Fellowship Program, as well as an Associated Health Training Program at the Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Bronx Veteran's Medical Center. The article further describes the educational initiatives in palliative care offered through the Veteran's Integrated Service Network (VISN). Innovative educational strategies are discussed within the context of the existing literature on interdisciplinary health care team training. PMID:16446268

  16. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Leuthauser, Amy; McVane, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain in the elderly can be a challenging and difficult condition to diagnose and treat. The geriatric population has significant comorbidities and often takes polypharmacy that can mask symptoms. The presentation of common conditions can be different than that in the younger population, often lacking the traditional indicators of disease, making it of pivotal importance for the clinician to consider a wide differential during their workup. It is also important to consider extra-abdominal abnormality that may manifest as abdominal pain. PMID:27133249

  17. Delta Alerts: Changing Outcomes in Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Lynn L; Day, Mark D; Harris, LeAnna

    2016-01-01

    Geriatric trauma patients (GTPs) suffering minor injuries have suboptimal outcomes compared with younger populations. Patients 65 years or older account for 10% of all traumas but 28% of all trauma deaths. This trauma center established a third tier trauma alert specifically targeting GTPs at risk for poor outcomes. A Delta Alert is activated when GTPs suffer injuries that fall outside traditional trauma alert guidelines. Early identification and treatment of injuries and expedited referral to specialty groups have improved our GTPs' outcomes including decreased mortality and length of stay and increased percentage of GTPs who are discharged home. PMID:27414140

  18. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    Introduction: This experimental study of biological effects of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants which were used for prophylaxis and treatment of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by high doses of the low-LET radiation. An important role of Reactive Oxyden Species (Singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and bio-radicals)in development of the Acute Radiation Syndromes could be defined as a "central dogma" of radiobiology. Oxida-tion and damages of lipids, proteins, DNA, and RNA are playing active role in development of postradiation apoptosis. However, the therapeutic role of antioxidants in modification of a postradiation injury caused by high doses of radiation remains controversial.Previous stud-ies had revealed that antioxidants did not increase a survival rate of mammals with severe forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by High Doses of the low-LET radiation. The Antiradiation Vaccine(ARV) contains toxoid forms of the Radiation Toxins(RT) from the Specific Radiation Determinants Group (SRD). The RT SRD has toxic and antigenic prop-erties at the same time and stimulates a specific antibody elaboration and humoral response form activated acquired immune system. The blocking antiradiation antibodies induce an im-munologically specific effect and have inhibiting effects on radiation induced neuro-toxicity, vascular-toxicity, gastrointestinal toxcity, hematopoietic toxicity, and radiation induced cytol-ysis of selected groups of cells that are sensitive to radiation. Methods and materials: Scheme of experiments: 1. Irradiated animals with development of Cerebrovascular ARS (Cv-ARS), Cardiovascular ARS (Cr-ARS) Gastrointestinal ARS(GI-ARS), Hematopoietic ARS (H-ARS) -control -were treated with placebo administration. 2. Irradiated animals were treated with antioxidants prophylaxisis and treatment of Cv-ARS, Cr-SRS, GI-ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 3. irradiated animals were treated with radioprotection by Antiradiation Vaccine

  19. The quality of medical care during an acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pradan, Liana; Ferreira, Ivone; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of global morbidity and mortality, with a substantial economic impact. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) represent a dramatic event in the course of the disease; is an important cause of morbidity and the fourth cause of mortality worldwide. During the hospitalization for AECOPD mortality is 10%. AECOPD are also associated with a significant reduction of functional capacity and health-related quality of life. Despite these alarming evidence-based data the response of the healthcare system globally is not adequate to the gravity of the situation. A recently published study done in a Canadian hospital reveals that the treatment of the AECOPD is sub-optimal. The management of the COPD exacerbations prior, during and after the hospitalization showed inadequate adherence of the physicians (respirologists, internists and hospitalists) to the current guidelines. This review outlines the worrisome findings of this study and the proposed measures suggested by the authors in order to optimize the management of AECOPD. PMID:24502063

  20. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    Introduction: This experimental study of biological effects of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants which were used for prophylaxis and treatment of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by high doses of the low-LET radiation. An important role of Reactive Oxyden Species (Singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and bio-radicals)in development of the Acute Radiation Syndromes could be defined as a "central dogma" of radiobiology. Oxida-tion and damages of lipids, proteins, DNA, and RNA are playing active role in development of postradiation apoptosis. However, the therapeutic role of antioxidants in modification of a postradiation injury caused by high doses of radiation remains controversial.Previous stud-ies had revealed that antioxidants did not increase a survival rate of mammals with severe forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by High Doses of the low-LET radiation. The Antiradiation Vaccine(ARV) contains toxoid forms of the Radiation Toxins(RT) from the Specific Radiation Determinants Group (SRD). The RT SRD has toxic and antigenic prop-erties at the same time and stimulates a specific antibody elaboration and humoral response form activated acquired immune system. The blocking antiradiation antibodies induce an im-munologically specific effect and have inhibiting effects on radiation induced neuro-toxicity, vascular-toxicity, gastrointestinal toxcity, hematopoietic toxicity, and radiation induced cytol-ysis of selected groups of cells that are sensitive to radiation. Methods and materials: Scheme of experiments: 1. Irradiated animals with development of Cerebrovascular ARS (Cv-ARS), Cardiovascular ARS (Cr-ARS) Gastrointestinal ARS(GI-ARS), Hematopoietic ARS (H-ARS) -control -were treated with placebo administration. 2. Irradiated animals were treated with antioxidants prophylaxisis and treatment of Cv-ARS, Cr-SRS, GI-ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 3. irradiated animals were treated with radioprotection by Antiradiation Vaccine

  1. [New oral anticoagulants for prophylaxis of stroke : Results of an expert conference on practical use in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Bahrmann, Philipp; Harms, Fred; Schambeck, Christian Martin; Wehling, Martin; Flohr, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Geriatric patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) are increasingly being treated with novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) to prevent ischemic stroke. This article highlights the outcome of an expert meeting on the practical use of NOAC in elderly patients. An interdisciplinary group of experts discussed the current situation of stroke prevention in geriatric patients and its practical management in daily clinical practice. The topic was examined through focused impulse presentations and critical analyses as the basis for the expert consensus. The key issues are summarized in this paper. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines from 2012 for the management of patients with non-valvular AF recommend NOAC as the preferred treatment and vitamin K antagonists (VKA) only as an alternative option. Currently, the NOAC factor Xa inhibitors apixaban and rivaroxaban and the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran are more commonly used in clinical practice for patients with AF. Although these drugs have many similarities and are often grouped together it is important to recognize that the pharmacology and dose regimes differ between compounds. Especially n elderly patients NOAC drugs have some advantages compared to VKA, e.g. less drug-drug interactions with concomitant medication and a more favorable risk-benefit ratio mostly driven by the reduction of bleeding. Treatment of anticoagulation in geriatric patients requires weighing the serious risk of stroke against an equally high risk of major bleeding and pharmacoeconomic considerations. Geriatric patients in particular have the greatest benefit from NOAC, which can also be administered in cases of reduced renal function. Regular control of the indications is indispensable, as also for all other medications of the patient. The use of NOAC should certainly not be withheld from geriatric patients who have a clear need for oral anticoagulation. PMID:26861870

  2. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  3. [Acute Leaflet Arrest in St. Jude Medical Regent Mechanical Aortic Valve;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yuji; Arakaki, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with combined valvular disease and atrial fibrillation, and was admitted for surgery. We performed double valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty and maze operation. At the operation, a 19 mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve was implanted with non-everting mattress sutures at the aortic supra-annular position after mitral valve replacement. Although pulling down of the prosthesis into the aortic annulus was easy, the leaflets were unable to open at all in a movability test. After removing several stitches on the mitral side of the hinges, the subvalvular tissue was seen bulging into the hinge, hindering the free movement. The prosthesis was removed and replaced with a 17 mm Regent valve by the same technique. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. We suggest it is necessary to pay special attention to the structural characteristics of the prosthesis. PMID:26066878

  4. [Acute anterior myocardial infarction presented with cardiogenic shock in a patient on herbal medication].

    PubMed

    Güneş, Hakan; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Karapınar, Hekim; Gül, İbrahim

    2012-04-01

    Uncontrolled usage of herbal medications may cause problems that can lead to serious complications, including death. Panax is thought to have hypocholesterolemic, anticarcinogenic, antiinflammatory, and antimicrobial effects via its saponin ingredient and positive inotropic effects via its panax ginseng effect. However, clinical studies have shown that it can increase the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels secondary to its hypocholesterolemic effect, have a hypertensive effect in chronic users via ginseng abuse syndrome, and also have hypotensive effects. Here, we present a case with typical angina pectoris in which coronary angiography was suggested but refused. The male patient initiated panax therapy and presented to our emergency department with diffuse anterior myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock, and was discharged after appropriate therapy. PMID:22864324

  5. Prediction of mortality in patients in acute medical wards using basic laboratory and anthropometric data.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J.; Mak, Y. T.; Lau, J.; Swaminathan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The value of anthropometric and biochemical indices in predicting short-term mortality among patients in general medical wards was assessed in 294 patients admitted consecutively to a district hospital over a one month period. Using a stepwise logistic regression model and supported by the linear discriminant analysis method, mortality within 3 months could be predicted with sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 84% using the following variables: sex, functional ability, urea, total protein, alkaline phosphatase and albumin-adjusted calcium. Addition of anthropometric values and biochemical nutritional indices did little to improve the accuracy of the prediction, contrary to previous findings among surgical patients and elderly residents of long-term care institutions. PMID:1494524

  6. Geriatric psycho-social history outline.

    PubMed

    Velardo, C C

    1976-10-01

    The details of a Geriatric Psycho-Social History Outline for use with the institutional aged are presented. All health care facilities require background information on the patient at the time of admission, but with long-term facilities a more comprehensive psycho-social history is needed. The Outline provides a basis for obtaining information in five categories: 1) identification (detailed, observational and attitudinal); 2) referral source; 3) background; 4) family constellation or environmental factors; and 5) finances. Its comprehensiveness requires more than one pre-admission interview. It is aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality rates following admission to long-term facilities. If the aged person becomes somewhat familiar with the institution before admission, he is less susceptible to accelerated physiologic and psycho-social deterioration and death. Because of constant growth in the field of gerontology, new and improved instruments must be devised to help carry the load. The Geriatric Psycho-Social History Outline is for use as a guide to those who require such information if they are to function at maximum efficiency. PMID:965679

  7. Why do geriatric patients visit otorhinolaryngology?

    PubMed

    Özler, Gül Soylu; Yengil, Erhan

    2016-06-01

    The number and proportion of people more than 65 years old in the population are increasing with the rise in life expectancy. This study was designed to investigate the otolarygologic needs and visits of geriatric patients. We conducted a retrospective study that included all patients ≥65 years of age who visited the otolaryngology department between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. during 1 year. Age, gender, main complaint, and clinical diagnosis were noted on a chart and analyzed. In 2012, a total of 19,875 patients attended the otolaryngology department between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., of whom 418 (2.1%) were aged ≥65 years. The most common complaints were ear and hearing disorders (24.2%), epistaxis(15.3%), balance disorders (15.1%), pharyngotonsillar pathologies (14.8%), and head and facial trauma (9.6%). This study shows that the changing patient population will change the type and frequencies of pathologies seen in general otolaryngology practices. Geriatric patients need a targeted approach to their diseases because they have special issues unique to their population. PMID:27304440

  8. Global initiative for interdisciplinary approach to improve innovative clinical research and treatment outcomes in geriatrics: biological cell-based targeted drug delivery systems for geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay

    2013-06-01

    At the intersection of the late 20(th) century and early 21(st) century, a worldwide challenge began to emerge--how can the quality of life be improved for a steadily increasing elderly population. It is well known that elderly patients show increased susceptibility to infections and a higher incidence of co-morbidity rates. Older adults frequently demonstrate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes promoting adverse drug reactions and complications. Analysis of world literature and practical observations indicate that new approaches are required in gerontology and geriatric medicine due to recent significant advances in biomedical science. Global interdisciplinary approaches to improve medical science and medical care services for growing elderly population are indicated. This global, interdisciplinary initiative should integrate select, tangible clinical results achieved in leading research centers and universities that are applicable in the field of geriatrics and helpful to geriatricians. Among past scientific and clinically significant study results in the field of biomedicine, one must consider targeted drug delivery systems (DDS), which are designed to minimize drug side effects, increase the efficacy of drugs, and prolong and target drug interactions with particular pathological foci in sick patients. Many review articles focus on various methods of drug encapsulation and pharmacokinetics, but not on developing clinical modalities. This article attempts to further the discussion with researchers and clinicians from various fields, as well as to encourage comprehensive and elderly patient-oriented research focused on clinical implementation of DDS, especially erythrocyte-based DDS. PMID:23496161

  9. The BRIGHTEN Program: Implementation and Evaluation of a Program to Bridge Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Erin E.; Lapidos, Stan; Eisenstein, Amy R.; Ivan, Iulia I.; Golden, Robyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of the BRIGHTEN Program (Bridging Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking), an interdisciplinary team intervention for assessing and treating older adults for depression in outpatient primary and specialty medical clinics. The BRIGHTEN team collaborates "virtually"…

  10. Medical management of acute ocular hypertension in a western screech owl (Megascops kennicottii).

    PubMed

    Jayson, Stephanie; Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, David; Petritz, Olivia; Freeman, Kate; Maggs, David J

    2014-03-01

    A wild young adult western screech owl (Megascops kennicottii) of unknown sex was presented for evaluation of an abnormal left eye (OS). Ophthalmic examination OS revealed raised intraocular pressure (37 mm Hg; reference interval 7-16 mm Hg), mydriasis, conjunctival and episcleral hyperemia, shallow anterior chamber due to anterior displacement of the lens and iris, rubeosis iridis, and engorgement of the pecten. The intraocular pressure in the right eye (OD) was 11 mm Hg. Multifocal pale, variably translucent, curvilinear to vermiform opacities were observed in the medial and ventral peripheral regions of the retina OD, consistent with focal retinitis. Mannitol (0.46 g/kg IV) was administered over 10 minutes. Forty minutes later, the intraocular pressure was 27 mm Hg OS and 13 mm Hg OD. Dorzolamide (one drop OS q12h), diclofenac (one drop OU q8-12h), and meloxicam (0.5 mg/kg PO q24h) were administered for 3 days. The intraocular pressure OS was within normal limits 1 day (11 mm Hg), 7 days (13 mm Hg), and 4 weeks (14 mm Hg) after this treatment. Complications arising during hospitalization and rehabilitation included superficial corneal ulceration of both eyes presumed secondary to trauma on being caught and superficial damage to a talon. The owl was released after a period of rehabilitation. Characteristic presenting signs as well as response to therapy suggest aqueous misdirection was the cause of ocular hypertension in this owl. To our knowledge, this is the first report of suspected aqueous misdirection and its medical management in a raptor. PMID:24881152

  11. CQUIN audit for prescription of antibiotics for urinary tract infections in an acute medical assessment unit.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Maylin; Rezwan, Nivin

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common presentation in a medical assessment unit, and we wanted to check compliance with hospital guidelines for antibiotic prescribing in patients presenting to hospital with urinary tract infection. The guidelines are based on local organisms and sensitivities. A retrospective audit of 40 patient records with positive urine cultures from July to August 2013 showed that 20% of patients with culture confirmed UTI were not given antibiotics at all. Of those prescribed antibiotics, 25% were non-compliant with local policy, and nearly one in two patients received more than one antibiotic. Furthermore, stop dates were not stated on 77% of the drug charts and duration of treatment ranged from one to 11 days. Interventions were then introduced in the form of group teaching sessions, proactive checks by Trust pharmacists and widely distributed posters, and the same data sets collected for April to March 2014 to assess for efficacy of the interventions. On re-auditing, 35% patients were not prescribed any antibiotics. However, compliance with local policy was 100%, including 100% drug charts having a stop/review date stated. The overall duration of treatment now ranged from one to seven days, and fewer than one in four patients had more than one antibiotic. Our results showed that improvement was needed in antibiotic stewardship, in particular with regards to compliance with the local guidelines and documentation of prescription. We have demonstrated that it is possible to improve compliance through teaching, by displaying information prominently, and vigilance by the clinical team. The outcome of this is a decreased number and duration of antibiotics prescribed, which has benefits for the patients, the hospital, and the community as a whole. Further work would include interventions to improve the number of patients who are missing antibiotic prescriptions altogether. PMID:26734357

  12. Contemporary Systemic Therapy for Urologic Malignancies in Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Grivas, Petros D

    2015-11-01

    Current data on systemic therapy in geriatric populations with genitourinary malignancies are largely derived from retrospective analyses of prospectively conducted trials or retrospective reviews. Although extrapolation of these data to real-world patients should be cautious, patients aged 65 years or older with good functional status and minimal comorbidities seem to enjoy similar survival benefit from therapy as their younger counterparts. Chronologic age alone should generally not be used to guide management decisions. Comprehensive geriatric assessment tools and prospective studies in older adults integrating comprehensive geriatric assessment can shed light on the optimal management of urologic malignancies in this population. PMID:26476122

  13. 75 FR 32490 - Issues in the Development of Medical Products for the Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... treatment of acute AMR in kidney transplant recipients, including clinical trial design and endpoints. The... acute AMR Endpoints to be evaluated to assess outcome Outcomes achieved with currently used...

  14. Primary Care for the Older Adult Patient: Common Geriatric Issues and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katherine; Shi, Sandra; Kiraly, Carmela

    2016-06-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the US population and the majority of older adults are women. Primary care for the older adult patient requires a wide variety of skills, reflecting the complexity and heterogeneity of this patient population. Individualizing care through consideration of patients' goals, medical conditions, and prognosis is paramount. Quality care for the older adult patient requires familiarity with common geriatric syndromes, such as dementia, falls, and polypharmacy. In addition, developing the knowledge and communication skills necessary for complex care and end-of-life care planning is essential. PMID:27212097

  15. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    PubMed

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants. PMID:26243566

  16. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene. PMID:26837258

  17. A Geriatric Perspective on Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Parham, Kourosh; Kuchel, George A

    2016-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo in older adults. Beyond the unpleasant sensation of vertigo, BPPV also negatively affects older adults' gait and balance and increases their risk of falling. As such it has a profound effect on function, independence, and quality of life. Otoconia are the inner ear structures that help detect horizontal and vertical movements. Aging contributes to the fragmentation of otoconia, whose displacement into the semicircular, most commonly posterior canals, can produce rotatory movement sensations with head movement. BPPV is more commonly idiopathic in older adults than in younger individuals, can present atypically, and has a more-protracted course and higher risk of recurrence. Medications such as meclizine that are commonly prescribed for BPPV can be associated with significant side effects. Dix-Hallpike and Head Roll tests can generally identify the involved canal. Symptoms resolve as otoconia fragments dissolve into the endolymph, but appropriate canalith repositioning (e.g., Epley maneuver) can expedite recovery and reduce the burden of this disorder. Observations suggesting an association between idiopathic BPPV and vitamin D deficiency and osteoporosis indicate that BPPV may share risk factors with other common geriatric conditions, which highlights the importance of moving beyond purely otological considerations and addressing the needs of older adults with vertigo through a systems-based multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26804483

  18. Improving the quality of geriatric nursing care: enduring outcomes from the geriatric nursing education consortium.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Wilson, Laurie Dodge; Stanley, Joan; Watman, Rachael; Shire, Amy; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Mezey, Mathy

    2014-01-01

    The nation's aging demography, few nursing faculty with gerontological nursing expertise, and insufficient geriatric content in nursing programs have created a national imperative to increase the supply of nurses qualified to provide care for older adults. Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium (GNEC), a collaborative program of the John A. Hartford Foundation, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the New York University (NYU) Nursing Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, was initiated to provide faculty with the necessary skills, knowledge, and competency to implement sustainable curricular innovations in care of older adults. This article describes the background, step-by-step process approach to the development of GNEC evidence-based curricular materials, and the dissemination of these materials through 6-, 2-, and a half-day national Faculty Development Institutes (FDIs). Eight hundred eight faculty, representing 418 schools of nursing, attended. A total of 479 individuals responded to an evaluation conducted by Baruch College that showed faculty feasibility to incorporate GNEC content into courses, confidence in teaching and incorporating content, and overall high rating of the GNEC materials. The impact of GNEC is discussed along with effects on faculty participants over 2 years. Administrative- and faculty-level recommendations to sustain and expand GNEC are highlighted. PMID:25455325

  19. Routine HIV testing in acute medical admissions in a high prevalence area reduces morbidity and mortality of HIV: a full cycle audit.

    PubMed

    Hill-Tout, Rachel; Cormack, Ian; Elgalib, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Late HIV diagnosis in the UK remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In line with British HIV Association recommendations, we implemented routine HIV Screening in Croydon University Hospital Acute Medical Unit in London after an audit in 2011 revealed very high levels of late diagnosis. Our re-audit assessed the impact of Acute Medical Unit screening and found that patients identified by screening, compared to those tested due to clinical suspicion of HIV, were significantly less likely to be diagnosed late, had fewer AIDS-defining illnesses and shorter hospital admissions. In addition, screening identified patients who were not in traditional 'high-risk' groups and patients who had defaulted HIV care and who subsequently re-engaged with care. PMID:26378190

  20. Does Admission to Medicine or Orthopaedics Impact a Geriatric Hip Patient’s Hospital Length of Stay?

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Lakomkin, Nikita; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Jahangir, Amir Alex; Boyce, Robert H.; Obremksey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our study was to determine the association between admitting service, medicine or orthopaedics, and length of stay (LOS) for a geriatric hip fracture patient. Design Retrospective. Setting Urban level 1 trauma center. Patients/Participants Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients from 2000 to 2009. Interventions Orthopaedic surgery for geriatric hip fracture. Main Outcome Measurements Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, hospitalization length, and admitting service. Negative binomial regression used to determine association between LOS and admitting service. Results Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients were included in the analysis, of whom 49.2% of patients (n = 302) were admitted to the orthopaedic service and 50.8% (3 = 312) to the medicine service. The median LOS for patients admitted to orthopaedics was 4.5 days compared with 7 days for patients admitted to medicine (P < 0.0001). Readmission was also significantly higher for patients admitted to medicine (n = 92, 29.8%) than for those admitted to orthopaedics (n = 70, 23.1%). After controlling for important patient factors, it was determined that medicine patients are expected to stay about 1.5 times (incidence rate ratio: 1.48, P < 0.0001) longer in the hospital than orthopaedic patients. Conclusions This is the largest study to demonstrate that admission to the medicine service compared with the orthopaedic service increases a geriatric hip fractures patient’s expected LOS. Since LOS is a major driver of cost as well as a measure of quality care, it is important to understand the factors that lead to a longer hospital stay to better allocate hospital resources. Based on the results from our institution, orthopaedic surgeons should be aware that admission to medicine might increase a patient’s expected LOS. PMID:26371621

  1. Geriatric syndromes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Bartosik, Hanna; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The recent epidemiologic data pointed out, that the general number of patients on hemodialysis is steadily increasing, especially in group of elderly patients over 75 years old. The geriatric syndromes are a multietiological disorder related to physiological aging and partly associated with comorbid conditions. Frailty, falls, functional decline and disability, cognitive impairment and depression are main geriatric syndromes and occurs in patients with impaired renal function more often than among general population. The causes of higher prevalence of those syndromes are not well known, but uremic environment and overall renal replacement therapy may have an important impact on its progress. The patient with geriatric syndrome require comprehensive treatment as well as physical rehabilitation, psychiatric cure and support in everyday activities. Herein below we would like to review recent literature regarding to particular features of main geriatric syndromes in a group of nephrological patients. PMID:27333928

  2. [The nessesarity of a geriatric care improvement for population of the country side in Ulyanovsk area].

    PubMed

    Kabakova, T A; Balandin, A N; Gorbunov, V I

    2005-01-01

    In this article there is data which shows the results of Ulyanovsk area country side older persons complex medical tests. 345 of 60-85 years old patients were tested (204 males, 141 females). Result--there are no healthy people in the tested group. In average each old patient has 4.3 diseases--in 3.1 times more than adults do. The most of the sicknesses are the case rates of the blood-transporting, eyes and ears ones and bone-muscle system. The level of a medical care tolerance war analyzed by 172 old patients application checking. Result is a high tolerance of a medical care. So, it's nessesary to improve a specialized geriatric services. PMID:16075690

  3. Review of efficacy and safety of laxatives use in geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Izzy, Manhal; Malieckal, Anju; Little, Erin; Anand, Sury

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatment of constipation in geriatrics. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, google scholar, and Ovid were searched to identify human studies performed on the use of laxatives in elderly with constipation, which were conducted between January 1990 and January 2013 using the specified keywords. Controlled studies that enrolled geriatric patients with a diagnosis of constipation and addressed the efficacy and/or the safety of pharmacological treatments were included. Studies were excluded from this review if they were non-controlled trials, case series, or case reports. RESULTS: Out of twenty three studies we initially retrieved in our search, only nine studies met the eligibility criteria of being controlled trials within geriatrics. The laxatives examined in the nine studies were senna, lactulose, sorbital, polyethylene glycol (PEG), lubiprostone, linaclotide, and prucalopride. In those studies, senna combinations had a higher efficacy than sorbitol or lactulose as well as, a very good adverse effect profile. PEG was also shown to be safe and effective in geriatric population. Furthermore, it has been shown that PEG is as safe in geriatrics as in general population. New agents like lubiprostone and prucalopride show promising results but the data about these agents in geriatrics are still limited which warrants further investigation. CONCLUSION: Senna combinations and PEG appear to have a more favorable profile over the other traditionally used laxatives in elderly patients with constipation. PMID:27158549

  4. How can we keep patients with dementia safe in our acute hospitals? A review of challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    George, Jim; Long, Susannah; Vincent, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining patient safety in acute hospitals is a global health challenge. Traditionally, patient safety measures have been concentrated on critical care and surgical patients. In this review the medical literature was reviewed over the last ten years on aspects of patient safety specifically related to patients with dementia. Patients with dementia do badly in hospital with frequent adverse events resulting in the geriatric syndromes of falls, delirium and loss of function with increased length of stay and increased mortality. Contributory factors include inadequate assessment and treatment, inappropriate intervention, discrimination, low staff levels and lack of staff training. Unfortunately there is no one simple solution to this problem, but what is needed is a multifactorial, multilevel approach at the seven levels of care – patient, task, staff, team, environment, organisation and institution. Improving safety and quality of care for patients with dementia in acute hospitals will benefit all patients and is an urgent priority for the NHS. PMID:23759885

  5. Telemedicine for Specialist Geriatric Care in Small Rural Hospitals: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Gray, Leonard C; Fatehi, Farhad; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Peel, Nancye M; Smith, Anthony C

    2016-06-01

    Small rural hospitals admit and manage older adults who, in city hospitals, would usually be offered geriatrician-supported comprehensive geriatric assessment and coordinated subacute care if required. Distance and diseconomies of scale prohibit access to the conventional in-person approach. A telegeriatric service model involving a geriatrician consulting remotely using wireless, mobile, high-definition videoconferencing; a trained host nurse at the rural site; structured geriatric assessment configured on a web-based clinical decision support system; routine weekly virtual rounds; and support from a local multidisciplinary team was established to overcome these barriers. This was a prospective observational study to examine the feasibility and sustainability of the model. Patient characteristics were recorded using the interRAI Acute Care assessment system. Usage patterns were derived from health service data sets and a service statistics database. Patients had characteristics that are consistent with characteristics of individuals typically referred for geriatric assessment. Overall, 53% of patients had cognitive impairment, 75% had limitations with activities of daily living, and the average Frailty Index was 0.44 ± 0.12. Stable patterns of consultation occurred within 6 months of start-up and continued uninterrupted for the remainder of the 24-month observation period. The estimated overall rate of initial consultation was 1.83 cases per occupied bed per year and 2.66 review cases per occupied bed per year. The findings indicate that the model was feasible and was sustained throughout and beyond the study period. This telegeriatric service model appears suitable for use in small rural hospitals. PMID:27321617

  6. How Medicare Part D Benefit Phases Affect Adherence with Evidence-Based Medications Following Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Bruce; Davidoff, Amy; Erten, Mujde; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Dai, Mingliang; Shaffer, Thomas; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Bryant-Comstock, Lynda; Shenolikar, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Assess impact of Medicare Part D benefit phases on adherence with evidence-based medications after hospitalization for an acute myocardial infarction. Data Source. Random 5 percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Study Design. Difference-in-difference analysis of drug adherence by AMI patients stratified by low-income subsidy (LIS) status and benefit phase. Data Collection/Extraction Methods. Subjects were identified with an AMI diagnosis in Medicare Part A files between April 2006 and December 2007 and followed until December 2008 or death (N = 8,900). Adherence was measured as percent of days covered (PDC) per month with four drug classes used in AMI treatment: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), beta-blockers, statins, and clopidogrel. Monthly exposure to Part D benefit phases was calculated from flags on each Part D claim. Principal Findings. For non-LIS enrollees, transitioning from the initial coverage phase into the Part D coverage gap was associated with statistically significant reductions in mean PDC for all four drug classes: statins (−7.8 percent), clopidogrel (−7.0 percent), beta-blockers (−5.9 percent), and ACE inhibitor/ARBs (−5.1 percent). There were no significant changes in adherence associated with transitioning from the gap to the catastrophic coverage phase. Conclusions. As the Part D doughnut hole is gradually filled in by 2020, Medicare Part D enrollees with critical diseases such as AMI who rely heavily on brand name drugs are likely to exhibit modest increases in adherence. Those reliant on generic drugs are less likely to be affected. PMID:23742013

  7. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  8. A System Design for Studying Geriatric Patients with Dementia and Hypertension Based on Daily Living Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Betz, Willian R.; Frezza, Stephen T.; Liu, Yunkai

    2011-08-01

    Geriatric patients with dementia and hypertension (DAH) suffer both physically and financially. The needs of these patients mainly include improving the quality of daily living and reducing the cost of long-term care. Traditional treatment approaches are strained to meet these needs. The goal of the paper is to design an innovative system to provide cost-effective quality treatments for geriatric patients with DAH by collecting and analyzing the multi-dimensional personal information, such as observations in daily living (ODL) from a non-clinical environment. The proposed ODLs in paper include activities, cleanliness, blood pressure, medication compliance and mood changes. To complete the system design, an incremental user-centered strategy is exploited to assemble needs of patients, caregivers, and clinicians. A service-oriented architecture (SOA) is employed to make full use of existing devices, software systems, and platforms. This health-related knowledge can be interpreted and utilized to help patients with DAH remain in their homes safely and improve their life quality while reducing medical expenditures.

  9. The Relative Value Unit in academic geriatrics: incentive or impediment?

    PubMed

    Resnick, Neil M; Radulovich, Nichole

    2014-03-01

    Although the number of older adults is rapidly expanding, the number of healthcare professionals trained in geriatrics is small and declining. The reasons are multifaceted, but because responsibility for training such professionals resides largely in academic health centers (AHCs), their support for geriatrics is critical. As AHCs face increasing financial pressure, many are seeking metrics to measure productivity and the Relative Value Unit (RVU) may be the one most commonly selected. Yet little is known about the RVU's effect on geriatric programs. Review of the literature and a survey of the leaders of the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs suggest that the advantages of an RVU-based metric are likely eclipsed by its negative impact on the care of older adults, the ability of academic geriatrics to accomplish its mission, and even the survival of geriatrics. If the RVU is to continue to be used as the index of productivity, it should be modified--by reweighting its codes (or by adding new ones)--and complemented by interventions to ensure patient access, care quality, and efficiency. Because an alternative metric, such as a Patient-based Value Unit may be preferable, this article describes the principles on which one might be based. Regardless, urgent action is required by all stakeholders to address this issue. Without it, the future of academic geriatrics--and with it the innovative care models, research, and training the nation needs to improve care and bend the cost curve--will be difficult if not impossible to sustain. PMID:24512218

  10. A Survey of Geriatrics Courses in North American Chiropractic Programs

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Cara L.; Osterbauer, Paul J.; Wiles, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: There has been a growing interest in meeting the health care needs of the anticipated “age wave.” In order to prepare for the current demographic trends, we sought to describe the status of geriatrics curricula in the 18 North American English-speaking chiropractic colleges by reviewing geriatric course syllabi. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using syllabi and catalog information solicited from each English-speaking chiropractic college in North America, collected from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Information was then summarized. Results: As of June 30, 2007, roughly 78% of colleges submitted their current geriatrics course syllabi. The remaining 4 colleges were estimated using online course catalog information. Sixty-one percent of colleges offered a course that was solely dedicated to the topic of geriatrics. Additionally, 37.5% of syllabi indicating credit load offer 4 or more credits to the course containing the geriatrics component. Also, 31.3% of courses include non-classroom clinical experience, while 50% require an independent study project that provides further geriatrics experience. Furthermore, 41.2% of reported courses classify the teaching strategies as lecture only. Conclusions: These results warrant a proposal for improved curricula in this specialty population. It is proposed that more time be dedicated for this topic, more experiential learning be required, and more clinical focus be given on the needs of this population. A restructure of curricula will provide more clinical experiences for students to better equip future doctors of chiropractic for the increase in geriatric health care needs. PMID:19390680

  11. Reconstruction of the Radiation Emergency Medical System From the Acute to the Sub-acute Phases After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Crisis

    PubMed Central

    OJINO, Mayo; ISHII, Masami

    2014-01-01

    The radiation emergency medical system in Japan ceased to function as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which has commonly become known as the “Fukushima Accident.” In this paper, we review the reconstruction processes of the radiation emergency medical system in order of events and examine the ongoing challenges to overcoming deficiencies and reinforcing the system by reviewing relevant literature, including the official documents of the investigation committees of the National Diet of Japan, the Japanese government, and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, as well as technical papers written by the doctors involved in radiation emergency medical activities in Fukushima. Our review has revealed that the reconstruction was achieved in 6 stages from March 11 to July 1, 2011: (1) Re-establishment of an off-site center (March 13), (2) Re-establishment of a secondary radiation emergency hospital (March 14), (3) Reconstruction of the initial response system for radiation emergency care (April 2), (4) Reinforcement of the off-site center and stationing of disaster medical advisors at the off-site center (April 4), (5) Reinforcement of the medical care system and an increase in the number of hospitals for non-contaminated patients (From April 2 to June 23), and (6) Enhancement of the medical care system in the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant and the construction of a new medical care system, involving both industrial medicine and emergency medicine (July 1). Medical resources such as voluntary efforts, academic societies, a local community medical system and university hospitals involved in medical care activities on 6 stages originally had not planned. In the future, radiation emergency medical systems should be evaluated with these 6 stages as a basis, in order to reinforce and enrich both the existing and backup systems so that minimal harm will come to nuclear power plant workers or evacuees and that they will receive proper care

  12. Summary of Closed Circuit Television Activities in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London Univ. (England). Inst. of Education.

    This 1967 summary of closed circuit television (CCTV) activities in medical education presents descriptive information on 35 different medical institutions in Great Britain. Specific data on CCTV are offered by institution, equipment, and uses under each medical field: anatomy, anaesthetics, geriatrics, medicine, obstretrics and gynaecology,…

  13. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  14. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  15. Research ethics issues in geriatric psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Laura B; Misra, Sahana

    2009-06-01

    Progress in geriatric psychiatric research may be impeded by lack of attention to collecting evidence relevant to ethical issues. As has been noted for some time, unless proactive work is done to identify, clarify, and remediate ethical challenges (see Table 2 for research directions), deleterious effects on research can result, including research bans, unduly overprotective stances, or inaccurate weighing of risks and benefits of research by review boards. With regard to proxy consent, a number of issues require further study. These include: how state laws address (or fail to address) research involving cognitively impaired individuals and what effects this has on research conduct; how IRBs define and weigh risks and benefits in considering research involving proxy consent; how various stakeholders, including the general public, people with disorders that may impair decision-making capacity, and proxies themselves view proxy consent for research; and to what degree proxies' research decisions reflect what patients themselves would decide. The use of advanced directives as a stand alone method for future consent is fraught with difficulties around adequate informed consent for a particular study; however, future study may clarify if such directives provide surrogates with improved understanding of their relative's overall views of the research enterprise and possibly the types of studies they would be willing to participate in even if they are no longer able to provide their own consent. In depression and suicide research, further work is needed to develop standard procedures for meeting the ethical demands of research while conducting rigorous, crucial research. PMID:19486821

  16. Ash Split Cath in geriatric dialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Conz, P A; Catalano, C; Rizzioli, E; Normanno, M; Fabbian, F; Preciso, G

    2001-09-01

    Vascular access is the essential step in performing hemodialysis in uremic patients. In the absence of a permanent and utilizable native arterio-venous fistula, the use of a tunnelled catheter makes dialysis therapy possible. The Ash Split Cath, a recently introduced chronic hemodialysis catheter, was inserted in five patients (7.1% of our prevalent dialysis population) because of repeated venous thrombosis in three patients and a poor venous tree in two. The mean age of patients was 78 years +/- 7. The average blood flow rate was 250+/-50 ml/minute and the mean venous pressure 140mm Hg +/- 35. Recirculation determined by low flux technique was less than 2%. KT/V calculated 3 months after the catheter placement was 1.2+/-0.02. During the follow-up we did not document any infection of the exit site or related to the catheter. This device is simple to place, gives adequate dialysis treatment and is useful in geriatric dialyzed patients in whom the arterio-venous fistula can no longer be used. PMID:11693424

  17. Treating parents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: the effects of behavioral parent training and acute stimulant medication treatment on parent-child interactions.

    PubMed

    Babinski, Dara E; Waxmonsky, James G; Pelham, William E

    2014-10-01

    This multiple baseline study evaluated the efficacy of behavioral parent training (BPT) for 12 parents (M age = 39.17 years; 91% mothers) and their children (ages 6-12; 83% boys) both with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and also explored the acute effect of stimulant medication for parents before and after BPT. Parents rated their own and their children's symptoms and impairment and were stabilized on optimally dosed medication. Then, parents discontinued medication and were randomly assigned to a 3, 4, or 5 week baseline (BL), during which they provided twice-weekly ratings of their impairment, parenting, and their child's behavior. Following BL, parents and their children completed two laboratory tasks, once on their optimally dosed medication and once on a placebo to assess observable effects of medication on parent-child behavior, and they completed additional assessments of family functioning. Parents then completed eight BPT sessions, during which they were unmedicated. Twice-weekly ratings of parent and child behavior were collected during BPT and additional ratings were collected upon completing BPT. Two more parent-child tasks with and without parent medication were conducted upon BPT completion to assess the observable effects of BPT and BPT plus medication. Ten (83.33%) parents completed the trial. Improvements in parent and child behavior were observed, and parents reported improved child behavior with BPT. Few benefits of BPT emerged through parent reports of parent functioning, with the exception of inconsistent discipline, and no medication or interaction effects emerged. These results, although preliminary, suggest that some parents with ADHD benefit from BPT. While pharmacological treatment is the most common intervention for adults with ADHD, further examination of psychosocial treatments for adults is needed. PMID:24687848

  18. Altered Synchronizations among Neural Networks in Geriatric Depression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Chou, Ying-Hui; Potter, Guy G.; Steffens, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Although major depression has been considered as a manifestation of discoordinated activity between affective and cognitive neural networks, only a few studies have examined the relationships among neural networks directly. Because of the known disconnection theory, geriatric depression could be a useful model in studying the interactions among different networks. In the present study, using independent component analysis to identify intrinsically connected neural networks, we investigated the alterations in synchronizations among neural networks in geriatric depression to better understand the underlying neural mechanisms. Resting-state fMRI data was collected from thirty-two patients with geriatric depression and thirty-two age-matched never-depressed controls. We compared the resting-state activities between the two groups in the default-mode, central executive, attention, salience, and affective networks as well as correlations among these networks. The depression group showed stronger activity than the controls in an affective network, specifically within the orbitofrontal region. However, unlike the never-depressed controls, geriatric depression group lacked synchronized/antisynchronized activity between the affective network and the other networks. Those depressed patients with lower executive function has greater synchronization between the salience network with the executive and affective networks. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the between-network analyses in examining neural models for geriatric depression. PMID:26180795

  19. Altered Synchronizations among Neural Networks in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Chou, Ying-Hui; Potter, Guy G; Steffens, David C

    2015-01-01

    Although major depression has been considered as a manifestation of discoordinated activity between affective and cognitive neural networks, only a few studies have examined the relationships among neural networks directly. Because of the known disconnection theory, geriatric depression could be a useful model in studying the interactions among different networks. In the present study, using independent component analysis to identify intrinsically connected neural networks, we investigated the alterations in synchronizations among neural networks in geriatric depression to better understand the underlying neural mechanisms. Resting-state fMRI data was collected from thirty-two patients with geriatric depression and thirty-two age-matched never-depressed controls. We compared the resting-state activities between the two groups in the default-mode, central executive, attention, salience, and affective networks as well as correlations among these networks. The depression group showed stronger activity than the controls in an affective network, specifically within the orbitofrontal region. However, unlike the never-depressed controls, geriatric depression group lacked synchronized/antisynchronized activity between the affective network and the other networks. Those depressed patients with lower executive function has greater synchronization between the salience network with the executive and affective networks. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the between-network analyses in examining neural models for geriatric depression. PMID:26180795

  20. Posttraumatic stress following acute medical trauma in children: A proposed model of bio-psycho-social processes during the peri-trauma period

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Widaman, Keith; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children worldwide experience acute medical events. Children’s responses to these events range from transient distress to significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS). While many models suggest explanations for the development and maintenance of PTSS in adults, very few have focused on children. Current models of child PTSS are primarily restricted to the post-trauma period, thus neglecting the critical peri-trauma period when screening and preventive interventions may be most easily implemented. Research on PTSS in response to pediatric medical trauma typically examines predictors in isolation, often overlooking potentially important interactions. This paper proposes a new model utilizing the bio-psycho-social framework and focusing on peri-trauma processes of acute medical events. Understanding the relationships among bio-psycho-social factors during peri-trauma can inform early identification of at-risk children, preventive interventions, and clinical care. Recommendations for future research, including the need to examine PTSS in the context of multiple influences, are discussed. PMID:25217001

  1. Applications for detection of acute kidney injury using electronic medical records and clinical information systems: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    James, Matthew T; Hobson, Charles E; Darmon, Michael; Mohan, Sumit; Hudson, Darren; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Electronic medical records and clinical information systems are increasingly used in hospitals and can be leveraged to improve recognition and care for acute kidney injury. This Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) workgroup was convened to develop consensus around principles for the design of automated AKI detection systems to produce real-time AKI alerts using electronic systems. AKI alerts were recognized by the workgroup as an opportunity to prompt earlier clinical evaluation, further testing and ultimately intervention, rather than as a diagnostic label. Workgroup members agreed with designing AKI alert systems to align with the existing KDIGO classification system, but recommended future work to further refine the appropriateness of AKI alerts and to link these alerts to actionable recommendations for AKI care. The consensus statements developed in this review can be used as a roadmap for development of future electronic applications for automated detection and reporting of AKI. PMID:26925245

  2. Co-Prescription of QT-Interval Prolonging Drugs: An Analysis in a Large Cohort of Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schächtele, Simone; Tümena, Thomas; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Fromm, Martin F.; Maas, Renke

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug-induced QT-interval prolongation is associated with occurrence of potentially fatal Torsades de Pointes arrhythmias (TdP). So far, data regarding the overall burden of QT-interval prolonging drugs (QT-drugs) in geriatric patients are limited. Objective This study was performed to assess the individual burden of QT-interval prolonging drugs (QT-drugs) in geriatric polymedicated patients and to identify the most frequent and risky combinations of QT-drugs. Methods In the discharge medication of geriatric patients between July 2009 and June 2013 from the Geriatrics in Bavaria–Database (GiB-DAT) (co)-prescriptions of QT-drugs were investigated. QT-drugs were classified according to a publicly available reference site (CredibleMeds®) as ALL-QT-drugs (associated with any QT-risk) or High-risk-QT-drugs (corresponding to QT-drugs with known risk of Torsades de Pointes according to CredibleMeds®) and in addition as SmPC-high-risk-QT-drugs (according to the German prescribing information (SmPC) contraindicated co-prescription with other QT-drugs). Results Of a cohort of 130,434 geriatric patients (mean age 81 years, 67% women), prescribed a median of 8 drugs, 76,594 patients (58.7%) received at least one ALL-QT-drug. Co-prescriptions of two or more ALL-QT-drugs were observed in 28,768 (22.1%) patients. Particularly risky co-prescriptions of High-risk-QT-drugs or SmPC-high-risk-QT-drugs with at least on further QT-drug occurred in 55.9% (N = 12,633) and 54.2% (N = 12,429) of these patients, respectively. Consideration of SmPCs (SmPC-high-risk-QT-drugs) allowed the identification of an additional 15% (N = 3,999) patients taking a risky combination that was not covered by the commonly used CredibleMeds® classification. Only 20 drug-drug combinations accounted for more than 90% of these potentially most dangerous co-prescriptions. Conclusion In a geriatric study population co-prescriptions of two and more QT-drugs were common. A considerable proportion of QT

  3. Fieldwork Rotation: A Model for Educating Social Work Students for Geriatric Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivry, Joann; Lawrance, Frances P.; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Robbins, Virginia Cooke

    2005-01-01

    The Geriatric Social Work Practicum Partnership Program was funded to attract graduate students to the field of aging and to strengthen field education in geriatric social work. Rotation was selected to achieve the program's goals to provide students with exposure to the spectrum of care in geriatric social work services. This paper describes the…

  4. Geriatric-Focused Educational Offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research,…

  5. Geriatric Pharmacy Curriculum in U.S. Pharmacy Schools: A Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, William; Pratt, Clara Collette

    1982-01-01

    A survey of 72 pharmacy schools shows 22 percent of the schools had no geriatric coursework, 35 percent offered only courses in which the geriatric content averaged under 12 percent of course content, and 43 percent offered courses that focused primarily on geriatrics, most including a major clinical component. (Author/MSE)

  6. Medical problems in hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Chong, Carol Pei Wei; Savige, Judith A; Lim, Wen Kwang

    2010-11-01

    Increasing number of older patients are admitted to hospital with hip fractures. This review evaluates the common medical problems that arise as a consequence of having a hip fracture. Older patients with fractures commonly have co-morbidities that require evaluation prior to and after surgery. Joint acute orthopaedic-geriatric units have been established to provide comprehensive orthopaedic and medical care with some studies showing a reduction in postoperative complications and mortality. Recommendations surrounding the care of the older orthopaedic patient include early surgical fixation, the use of prophylactic antibiotics and thromboembolic prophylaxis, good perioperative pain control to improve ambulation, delirium detection and management to decrease the risk complications, such as institutionalisation, the avoidance of malnutrition, urinary tract management, osteoporosis management and the promotion of early mobilisation to improve functional recovery. Physicians are well placed to manage these patients with orthopaedic surgeons during the perioperative period. Sufficient evidence exists for most recommendations for fracture patients, but further research is needed in most areas. PMID:20049603

  7. Increasing geriatric social work content through university/community partnerships.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Rosemary; Barnstable, Cherie Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Since their inception, social work education programs have operated in partnership with community agencies, as both field sites and foci for research. However, surprisingly little has been written on models of university/community partnerships in social work or the role of agencies in shaping curricula. This study analyzed the outcome reports of 67 Council on Social Work Education Geriatric Enrichment Projects (Gero Rich), funded by the Hartford Foundation, that sought to infuse geriatric content throughout the foundation curricula of B.S.W. and M.S.W. programs. Using both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the structures and functions of the programs' university/community partnerships were examined along with their association with the sustainability of curriculum change efforts. Findings suggest that these partnerships were a critical component in increasing and sustaining geriatric curricular content and were beneficial for faculty, students, and agencies. PMID:19042224

  8. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. PMID:26361161

  9. Geriatric epilepsy: research and clinical directions for the future.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Erik D; Hope, Omotola A; Martin, Roy C; Schmidt, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    There is a growing awareness of the need for improved treatment and care of older adults with epilepsy. The present review article highlights key clinical and research issues in the emerging field of geriatric epilepsy. Drs. Martin and Schmidt explore the scope of the problems in the field, outline topic areas including cognitive health/dementia, and diagnostic challenges, and also present important research questions that should be considered for the future. As part of this presentation, we will highlight the work of two promising young investigators whose work holds great promise for the field of geriatric epilepsy. Dr. Roberson will discuss his work focusing on the relationship of epilepsy and cognitive impairment, particularly as it relates to Alzheimer's disease pathology including tau and its role in epileptiform activity. Dr. Hope will outline key issues, as well as her work, relating to defining and measuring quality care in geriatric epilepsy. PMID:21596624

  10. [Health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edgar A; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence occurs frequently in geriatric patients. In the doctor's practice, the symptoms are often not mentioned by the patients; this may lead to loss of autonomy and social isolation. A screening for urinary incontinence should therefore be part of each geriatric assessment. In the presence of urinary incontinence, several treatment options are available, which need to be tailored according to the individual capabilities (mobility, motivation and cognitive performance) of the patient. Non-pharmacological treatment options, such as behavior modification, toilet training and pelvic floor training, should be exploited before any pharmacotherapy commences. If the pharmacological treatment involves the use of anticholinergic agents, the cognitive performance should be monitored. An interdisciplinary collaboration is a prerequisite for the optimized treatment and adequate health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence. PMID:25826038

  11. Predicting Geriatric Falls Following an Episode of Emergency Department Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Avidan, Michael S.; Wildes, Tanya; Stark, Susan; Fowler, Susan A.; Lo, Alexander X.

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls are the leading cause of traumatic mortality in geriatric adults. Despite recent multispecialty guideline recommendations that advocate for proactive fall prevention protocols in the emergency department (ED), the ability of risk factors or risk stratification instruments to identify subsets of geriatric patients at increased risk for short-term falls is largely unexplored. Objectives This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of ED-based history, physical examination, and fall risk stratification instruments with the primary objective of providing a quantitative estimate for each risk factor’s accuracy to predict future falls. A secondary objective was to quantify ED fall risk assessment test and treatment thresholds using derived estimates of sensitivity and specificity. Methods A medical librarian and two emergency physicians (EPs) conducted a medical literature search of PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, DARE, the Cochrane Registry, and Clinical Trials. Unpublished research was located by a hand search of emergency medicine (EM) research abstracts from national meetings. Inclusion criteria for original studies included ED-based assessment of pre-ED or post-ED fall risk in patients 65 years and older with sufficient detail to reproduce contingency tables for meta-analysis. Original study authors were contacted for additional details when necessary. The Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) was used to assess individual study quality for those studies that met inclusion criteria. When more than one qualitatively similar study assessed the same risk factor for falls at the same interval following an ED evaluation, then meta-analysis was performed using Meta-DiSc software. The primary outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios for fall risk factors or risk stratification instruments. Secondary outcomes included estimates of test and treatment thresholds using the Pauker method based on accuracy

  12. Development and validation of a multidimensional prognostic index for one-year mortality from comprehensive geriatric assessment in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franceschi, Marilisa; D'Ambrosio, Luigi P; Scarcelli, Carlo; Cascavilla, Leandro; Paris, Francesco; Placentino, Giuliana; Seripa, Davide; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Leandro, Gioacchino

    2008-02-01

    Our objective was to construct and validate a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-year mortality from a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) routinely carried out in elderly patients in a geriatric acute ward. The CGA included clinical, cognitive, functional, nutritional, and social parameters and was carried out using six standardized scales and information on medications and social support network, for a total of 63 items in eight domains. A MPI was developed from CGA data by aggregating the total scores of the eight domains and expressing it as a score from 0 to 1. Three grades of MPI were identified: low risk, 0.0-0.33; moderate risk, 0.34-0.66; and severe risk, 0.67-1.0. Using the proportional hazard models, we studied the predictive value of the MPI for all causes of mortality over a 12-month follow-up period. MPI was then validated in a different cohort of consecutively hospitalized patients. The development cohort included 838 and the validation cohort 857 elderly hospitalized patients. Of the patients in the two cohorts, 53.3 and 54.9% were classified in the low-risk group, respectively (MPI mean value, 0.18 +/- 0.09 and 0.18 +/- 0.09); 31.2 and 30.6% in the moderate-risk group (0.48 +/- 0.09 and 0.49 +/- 0.09); 15.4 and 14.2% in the severe-risk group (0.77 +/- 0.08 and 0.75 +/- 0.07). In both cohorts, higher MPI scores were significantly associated with older age (p = 0.0001), female sex (p = 0.0001), lower educational level (p = 0.0001), and higher mortality (p = 0.0001). In both cohorts, a close agreement was found between the estimated mortality and the observed mortality after both 6 months and 1 year of follow-up. The discrimination of the MPI was also good, with a ROC area of 0.751 (95%CI, 0.70-0.80) at 6 months and 0.751 (95%CI, 0.71-0.80) at 1 year of follow-up. We conclude that this MPI, calculated from information collected in a standardized CGA, accurately stratifies hospitalized elderly patients into groups at varying risk of

  13. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers. PMID:24579222

  14. Meeting American Geriatrics Society Competencies: Are Residents Meeting Expectations for Quality Care of Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Bynum, Debra L; Wilson, Lindsay A; Ong, Thuan; Callahan, Kathryn E; Dalton, Thomas; Ohuabunwa, Ugochi

    2015-09-01

    In order to determine how often internal medicine and family medicine residents performed specific actions related to the geriatric competencies established by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) when caring for older hospitalized adults, a cross-sectional anonymous survey of residents at the University of North Carolina, University of Washington, Wake Forest University, Duke University, and Emory University was undertaken. Data on frequency of self-reported behaviors were analyzed, with comparisons made for different levels of training, institution, and program. A total of 375 residents responded for an overall response rate of 48%. Residents reported that they often do not demonstrate all of the AGS recommended core competencies when caring for older adults in the hospital setting. Residents report more frequently performing activities that are routinely integrated into hospital systems such as reviewing medication lists, working with an interdisciplinary team, evaluating for inappropriate bladder catheters, and evaluating for pressure ulcers. There were no consistent differences between institutions and only minor differences noted between Family Medicine and Internal Medicine residents. Operationalizing core competencies by integrating them into hospital systems' quality process indicators may prompt more consistent high-quality care and ensure systems support residents' competence. PMID:26313811

  15. Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections (CR-BSI) in Geriatric Patients in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Chernecky, Cynthia; Macklin, Denise; Blackburn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are bloodstream infections that, through specific laboratory testing, identify the intravascular catheter as the source of the bloodstream infection. By 2015, the rate of elderly patients 80 years of age and older admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) will represent 1 in 4 admissions. Approximately 80 000 CR-BSIs occur in ICUs annually, potentially resulting in as many as 56 000 CR-BSIs occurring in the geriatric ICU patient, with 20% of these cases resulting in death. To minimize the occurrence of CR-BSIs in these patients, specific knowledge about the geriatric patient will have to be factored into the ICU health care professional's practice, including the development of a vascular access plan, which includes selection of the correct device and proper insertion of that device along with an evidence-based care and maintenance program. Intensive care unit health care professionals may be at a loss when it comes to navigating the vast array of vascular access medical devices available today. The Healthcare and Technology Synergy framework can assist the ICU health care professional to logically review each vascular access device and select those devices that best meet patient needs. PMID:26039650

  16. [Why should Byzantium be considered as a cradle of clinical geriatrics?].

    PubMed

    Lapin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Generally, roots of today's medical ethics are thought to have sprouted from antiquity and from classical Hebraic consciousness, while the origin of hospital medicine and institutional nursing of the elderly was assumed in Middle Age and in modern times, respectively. But even between these two periods, notably in Byzantium (324-1453) there were many famous physicians working with surprising skills in many disciplines such as surgery and ophthalmology. The most important achievement of that time, however, was in public health care. Following the Christian ideal of philanthropy, numerous hospitals (nosokomeia), hospices (xenodocheia) and asylums for the elderly (gerokomeia) of a remarkable organisation and professionalism were founded in many cities of the Byzantine Empire. Concerning the elderly patients, interesting findings were obtained concerning ageing process (eschatogeria), geriatric symptoms, multimorbidity, marasm and typically occurring diseases. Interesting approaches were realized with regard to the nursing care, diet and recommended life style for the elderly. By the end of the Byzantium Empire in 1453 and due to the different cultural development in the West, which was sometimes marked by conflicts between church and science and by the regulations of medicine, the knowledge about the Byzantine health care was almost lost. It survived, however, only in hospitals of occidental monastic orders, which brought their experience from East-Mediterranean area. Their hospitals were than a base for modern health care and for geriatrics. PMID:18807237

  17. Family caregivers: a shadow workforce in the geriatric health care system?

    PubMed

    Bookman, Ann; Harrington, Mona

    2007-12-01

    Based on two years of fieldwork, conducted between March 2003 and March 2005 in the health care industry of the northeastern United States, this study shows that the work of family caregivers of elders goes far beyond previously recognized care in the home to acknowledge care inside health care facilities and in conjunction with community services. It reveals that family caregivers--untrained, undersupported, and unseen--constitute a "shadow workforce," acting as geriatric case managers, medical record keepers, paramedics, and patient advocates to fill dangerous gaps in a system that is uncoordinated, fragmented, bureaucratic, and often depersonalized. Detailed examination of what family caregivers actually do in traversing multiple domains reveals the extent of their contribution to and the weaknesses in the present geriatric health care system. It suggests that the experiences of family caregivers must be central to the creation of new policies and a more coordinated system that uses the complex work of family caregivers by providing the training and support that they need. PMID:18000158

  18. A longitudinal, experiential quality improvement curriculum meeting ACGME competencies for geriatrics fellows: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Kathryn E; Rogers, Matthew T; Lovato, James F; Fernandez, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) initiatives are critical in the care of older adults who are more vulnerable to substandard care. QI education meets aspects of core Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education competencies and prepares learners for the rising focus on performance measurement in health care. The authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a QI curriculum for geriatrics fellows. The evidence-based curriculum included didactics and a fellow-led QI intervention based on audit and feedback through the Practice Improvement Module in Care of the Vulnerable Elderly. QI knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors were assessed before and after the improvement project. Fellows' knowledge of QI improved (p = .0156), but behavior did not change significantly across a short-term improvement project. A structured focus group with fellows revealed themes of accountability and the importance of interprofessional teamwork in QI. QI education for geriatrics fellows can be feasible, well received, and prepare future physician leaders for patient-centered care, performance measurement, and effecting systems change. PMID:23972275

  19. The effect of chlorhexidine in reducing oral colonisation in geriatric patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharif-Abdullah, Sharifah Shafinaz Binti; Chong, Mei Chan; Surindar-Kaur, Surat Singh; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Inadequate oral care has been implicated in the development of aspiration pneumonia in frail geriatric patients and is a major cause of mortality, due to the colonisation of microbes in vulnerable patients. This type of pneumonia has been associated with an increase in respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine compared to routine oral care in edentulous geriatric inpatients. METHODS A double-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out. The intervention group received oral care with chlorhexidine 0.2%, while the control group received routine oral care with thymol. Nurses provided oral care with assigned solutions of 20 mL once daily over seven days. Oral cavity assessment using the Brief Oral Health Status Examination form was performed before each oral care procedure. Data on medication received and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia was recorded. An oral swab was performed on Day 7 to obtain specimens to test for colonisation. RESULTS The final sample consisted of 35 (control) and 43 (intervention) patients. Chlorhexidine was effective in reducing oral colonisation compared to routine oral care with thymol (p < 0.001). The risk of oral bacterial colonisation was nearly three times higher in the thymol group compared to the chlorhexidine group. CONCLUSION The use of chlorhexidine 0.2% significantly reduced oral colonisation and is recommended as an easier and more cost-effective alternative for oral hygiene. PMID:27211885

  20. Fried frailty phenotype assessment components as applied to geriatric inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Joanna; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Management of geriatric patients would be simplified if a universally accepted definition of frailty for clinical use was defined. Among definitions of frailty, Fried frailty phenotype criteria constitute a common reference frame for many geriatric studies. However, this reference frame has been tested primarily in elderly patients presenting with relatively good health status. Objective The aim of this article was to assess the usefulness and limitations of Fried frailty phenotype criteria in geriatric inpatients, characterized by comorbidity and functional impairments, and to estimate the frailty phenotype prevalence in this group. Patients and methods: Five hundred consecutive patients of the university hospital subacute geriatric ward, aged 79.0±8.4 years (67% women and 33% men), participated in this cross-sectional study. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and Fried frailty phenotype component evaluation were performed in all patients. Results Multimorbidity (6.0±2.8 diseases) characterized our study group, with a wide range of clinical conditions and functional states (Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living 72.2±28.2 and Mini-Mental State Examination 23.6±7.1 scores). All five Fried frailty components were assessed in 65% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI] =60.8–69.2) (diagnostic group). One or more components were not feasible to be assessed in 35% of the remaining patients (nondiagnostic group) because of lack of past patient’s body mass control and/or cognitive or physical impairment. Patients from the nondiagnostic group, as compared to patients from the diagnostic group, presented with more advanced age, higher prevalence of dementia, lower prevalence of hypertension, lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, Mini-Mental State Examination and Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Despite diagnostic limitations, we found ≥3 positive criteria (thus, frailty diagnosis) in 54.2% of the study group

  1. A systematic approach to pharmacotherapy for geriatric major depression.

    PubMed

    Mulsant, Benoit H; Blumberger, Daniel M; Ismail, Zahinoor; Rabheru, Kiran; Rapoport, Mark J

    2014-08-01

    The broadening use of antidepressants among older Americans has not been associated with a notable decrease in the burden of geriatric depression. This article, based on a selective review of the literature, explores several explanations for this paradox. The authors propose that the effectiveness of antidepressants depends in large part on the way they are used. Evidence supports that antidepressant pharmacotherapy leads to better outcomes when guided by a treatment algorithm as opposed to attempting to individualize treatment. Several published guidelines and pharmacotherapy algorithms developed for the treatment of geriatric depression are reviewed, and an updated algorithm proposed. PMID:25037293

  2. Demographics of health and disease in the geriatric horse.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Mary Rose

    2002-12-01

    Owners of older horses have generally owned them for a long time. They have developed a bond that is similar to that seen with companion animals. Their desire to have their animal(s) age gracefully with comfort and mobility has stirred research in the field of equine geriatric medicine. Equine geriatric medicine is to the first decade of the twenty-first century as neonatal medicine was to the 1980s. Hopefully, the demographics discussed in this article highlight area where research can be most helpful. PMID:12516924

  3. Need for geriatric dentistry training programs in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mir, Arash Poorsattar Bejeh

    2013-01-01

    A shifting pattern from communicable diseases to the chronic noncommunicable diseases and increased life expectancy are being sensed throughout the world. Aged populations with multiple chronic diseases come up with their unique needs and require specific attention to be challenged by the health systems. Neglected orodental facts among the elders and the dearth of specific designated undergraduate and postgraduate courses of geriatric dentistry in Iran inevitably adversely affect the delivery of appropriate dental care service to elders by untrained dentists. In this article, a proposal for academic geriatric dentistry courses in Iran is introduced and highlighted with regards to elders' special needs. PMID:23314475

  4. A targeted simulation curriculum can improve medical student assessment and management of acute coronary syndrome in the setting of a Clinical Practice Exam

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Matthew D.; Kern, Donna H.; Alexander, Louise A.; Nietert, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been noted that increased focus on learning acute care skills is needed in undergraduate medical curricula. This study investigated whether a simulation-based curriculum improved a senior medical student's ability to manage acute coronary syndrome (ACS)as measured during a Clinical Practice Exam (CPX). We hypothesized that simulation training would improve overall performance as compared to targeted didactics or historical controls. Methods All fourth year medical students (N=291) over 2 years at our institution were included in this study. In the third year of medical school, the “Control” group received no intervention, the “Didactic” group received a targeted didactic curriculum, and the “Simulation” group participated in small group simulation training and the didactic curriculum. For intergroup comparison on the CPX, we calculated the percentage of correct actions completed by the student. Data is presented as Mean ± SD with significance defined as p<0.05. Results There was a significant improvement in overall performance with Simulation (53.5 ± 8.9%) versus both Didactics (47.7 ± 9.0%) and Control (47.9 ± 9.8%) (P<0.001).Performance on the physical exam component was significantly better in Simulation (48.5 ± 16.2%) versus both Didactics (37.6 ± 13.1%) and Control (37.7 ± 15.7%), as was diagnosis, Simulation (75.7 ± 24.2%) versus both Didactics (64.6 ± 25.1%) and Control (62.1 ± 24.2%) (P<0.02 for all comparisons). Discussion Simulation training had a modest impact on overall CPX performance in the management of a simulated ACS. Further studies are needed to evaluate how to further improve curricula regarding unstable patients. PMID:24280987

  5. Measuring anxiety in late life: a psychometric examination of the geriatric anxiety inventory and geriatric anxiety scale.

    PubMed

    Gould, Christine E; Segal, Daniel L; Yochim, Brian P; Pachana, Nancy A; Byrne, Gerard J; Beaudreau, Sherry A

    2014-12-01

    We examined the psychometric properties, internal scale reliability and validity, of two geriatric anxiety measures: the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) and Geriatric Anxiety Scale (GAS). We also determined the extent to which memory ability influenced the psychometric properties of these measures. Older adult participants (N=110; M age=75 years) completed self-report, clinician-rated and diagnostic psychiatric measures and a neuropsychiatric battery. GAI and GAS scores had good internal consistency, adequate reliability, and strong convergent validity. GAI scores had better discriminant validity than GAS scores relative to a health rating. Both measures had strong associations with depression scores. Psychometric properties were decreased in participants with average delayed memory recall compared with those with superior recall. Both measures had good psychometric support, particularly in those with strong memory abilities. Psychometric performance characteristics indicate that the GAI and GAS may be good alternatives to anxiety measures not designed specifically for older adults. PMID:25271176

  6. A Pilot Study of Stimulant Medication for Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Who Are Parents of Adolescents with ADHD: The Acute Effects of Stimulant Medication on Observed Parent–Adolescent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Waxmonsky, James G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Humphrey, Hugh; Alfonso, Alexandra; Crum, Kathleen I.; Bernstein, Melissa; Slavec, Janine; Augustus, Junea N.; Pelham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study explores the use of stimulant medication for parents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who also have adolescents with ADHD. Methods: Five parents, diagnosed with ADHD, had their dose of lisdexamfetamine (LDX) titrated to optimal effect. Next, parents and their adolescents completed two interactions, once when parents were on placebo and once when parents were on optimal dose of LDX, to assess acute effects of parental medication on parenting during a neutral discussion (NeuDiss), a problem discussion (ProbDiss), and a homework task (HW). Results: Parents demonstrated a significant decrease in the ratio of commands to total verbalizations during the NeuDiss on LDX compared with placebo. Although no other statistically significant effects emerged at the p<0.05 level, moderate to large effects of medication on some aspects of parenting related to the amount and timing of speech (i.e., total verbalizations, total commands, ratio of commands to total verbalizations, and responsiveness) emerged and varied by task. Parental stimulant medication did not appear to impact the content of parents' speech (i.e., use of negative talk or praise). Conclusions: These results add to a growing literature suggesting that treatment for parental ADHD may impact parenting performance, and suggest that attention to parental ADHD in treatment for adolescents with ADHD may possibly enhance family functioning. PMID:25386742

  7. Nutritional status assessment in geriatrics: Consensus declaration by the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology Nutrition Work Group.

    PubMed

    Camina-Martín, M Alicia; de Mateo-Silleras, Beatriz; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Lopez-Mongil, Rosa; Niño-Martín, Virtudes; López-Trigo, J Antonio; Redondo-del-Río, M Paz

    2015-07-01

    Ongoing population ageing is one of the factors influencing the increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, because elderly people are a vulnerable group due to their biological, psychological and social characteristics. Despite its high prevalence, undernutrition is underdiagnosed in the geriatric sphere. For this reason, the aim of this consensus document is to devise a protocol for geriatric nutritional assessment. A multidisciplinary team has been set up within the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (in Spanish Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, SEGG) in order to address undernutrition and risk of undernutrition so that they can be diagnosed and treated in an effective manner. The MNA-SF is a practical tool amongst the many validated methods for nutritional screening. Following suspicion of undernutrition or after establishing the presence of undernutrition, a full assessment will include a detailed nutritional history of the patient. The compilation of clinical-nutritional and dietetic histories seeks to aid in identifying the possible risk factors at the root of a patient's undernutrition. Following this, an anthropometric assessment associated to laboratory data, will describe the patient's physical and metabolic changes associated to undernutrition. Currently, the tendency is to further nutritional assessment through the use of non-invasive techniques to study body composition in association with functional status. The latter is an indirect index for nutritional status which is very interesting from a geriatrician's point of view. To conclude, correct nutritional screening is the fundamental basis for an early undernutrition diagnosis and to assess the need for nutritional treatment. In order to achieve this, it is fundamental to foster research in the field of nutritional geriatrics, in order to expand our knowledge base and to increasingly practice evidence-based geriatrics. PMID:26025067

  8. [Nutritional status assessment in Geriatrics: Consensus declaration by the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology NutritionWork Group].

    PubMed

    Camina-Martín, María Alicia; de Mateo-Silleras, Beatriz; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Lopez-Mongil, Rosa; Niño-Martín, Virtudes; López-Trigo, José Antonio; Redondo-Del-Río, María Paz

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing population ageing is one of the factors influencing the increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, as elderly people are a vulnerable group due to their biological, psychological and social characteristics. Despite its high prevalence, undernutrition is underdiagnosed in the geriatric sphere. For this reason, the aim of this consensus document is to devise a protocol for geriatric nutritional assessment. A multidisciplinary team has been set up within the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (in Spanish Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología [SEGG]) in order to address undernutrition and risk of undernutrition so that they can be diagnosed and treated in an effective manner. The MNA-SF is a practical tool amongst the many validated methods for nutritional screening. Following suspicion of undernutrition, or after establishing the presence of undernutrition, a full assessment will include a detailed nutritional history of the patient. The compilation of clinical-nutritional and dietetic histories is intended to help in identifying the possible risk factors at the root of a patient's undernutrition. Following this, an anthropometric assessment, combined with laboratory data, will describe the patient's physical and metabolic changes associated to undernutrition. Currently, the tendency is for further nutritional assessment through the use of non-invasive techniques to study body composition in association with functional status. The latter is an indirect index for nutritional status, which is very interesting from a geriatrician's point of view. To conclude, correct nutritional screening is the fundamental basis for an early undernutrition diagnosis and to assess the need for nutritional treatment. In order to achieve this, it is fundamental to foster research in the field of nutritional geriatrics, in order to expand our knowledge base and to increasingly practice evidence-based geriatrics. PMID:26388249

  9. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  10. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias.

    PubMed

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician's experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes. PMID:26107374

  11. A Reliability Generalization Study of the Geriatric Depression Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieffer, Kevin M.; Reese, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a reliability generalization study of the Geriatric Depression Scale (T. Brink and others, 1982). Results from this investigation of 338 studies shows that the average score reliability across studies was 0.8482 and identifies the most important predictors of score reliability. (SLD)

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kathryn Betts; Matto, Holly C.; Sanders, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is widely used in clinical and research settings to screen older adults for depressive symptoms. Although several exploratory factor analytic structures have been proposed for the scale, no independent confirmation has been made available that would enable investigators to confidently identify scores…

  13. Maximizing the Potential of Internships in Gerontology and Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasik, Rona J.

    2009-01-01

    Internships and similar applied opportunities have long been valued for providing students with opportunities for practical experience, career preparation, and personal growth. The need for applied experiences in gerontology and geriatrics is particularly salient. Creating and sustaining effective internship experiences, however, requires careful…

  14. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  15. Geriatric Education in the Health Professions: Are We Making Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Rowles, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to the overall population, older adults consume a disproportionally large percentage of health care resources. Despite advocacy and efforts initiated more than 30 years ago, the number of providers with specialized training in geriatrics is still not commensurate with the growing population of older adults. This contribution…

  16. Use of Readers Theater to Enhance Interdisciplinary Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacRae, Nancy; Pardue, Karen T.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the design and implementation of an interdisciplinary geriatric educational project at a small New England University. A novel, affective teaching approach of Readers Theater is highlighted as a beginning classroom instructional strategy for interdisciplinary students. The physical and psychosocial considerations for health…

  17. A Web-Based Framework for Improving Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirth, Victor A.; Hajjar, Ihab

    2004-01-01

    Despite the growth in the elderly population, physicians with special geriatric training and certification number only 9,000 out of 650,000 doctors in the United States. The flexibility and increasing availability of the Internet makes it an ideal avenue for addressing the educational needs of health care providers to improve the health and care…

  18. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  19. Attendance At Activities With a Geriatric Population: Antecedents and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Dennis B.

    The effectiveness of various procedures in maintaining attendance at activities of residents at a geriatric facility was examined. A special, intermittently programmed or delayed consequence for attendance was added to regularly scheduled activities. Attendance at activities with and without the consequence was compared. Later, antecedent events…

  20. Health Promotion/Disease Prevention: New Directions for Geriatric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levkoff, Sue; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes 10 modules for primary care practitioners on health promotion/disease prevention for the elderly on these topics: Alzheimer's disease in minorities, dehydration, diabetes, elder abuse, geriatric nutrition, oncology, oral health in long-term care, incontinence, injury prevention, and physical activity. These areas are significant for…

  1. Comprehensive geriatric assessment basics for the cancer professional.

    PubMed

    Extermann, Martine

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) has been a cornerstone of geriatric practice for many years. However, oncology practitioners are still unfamiliar with it. Yet, recent research has shown an important potential to improve the daily care of older cancer patients. The purpose of this article is to review the basic nature of a CGA, its effectiveness, its applicability to cancer patients, and its cost-effectiveness. Cancer is one of the major health problems in our society. Furthermore, the incidence of cancer increases with age. Nowadays, half of the cancers occur beyond the age of 70. Given the aging of the US population, this proportion is expected to increase in the next decades. A challenge for the oncologists is that older people can have a highly variable health status. Yet little is known yet about how to best assess and integrate into decision making the various health problems patients may have. Taking their clues from the experience of geriatricians, geriatric oncologists advocate the use of a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as one of the tools to deal with this problem. It is, for example, part of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for the elderly'. This article offers a primer on CGA for the reader unfamiliar with the approach in an oncologic setting. PMID:12699111

  2. Clinical conundrums and challenges during geriatric orthopedic emergency surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Despite so many advancements and innovations in anesthetic techniques, expectations and challenges have also grown in plenty. Cardiac, pediatric, obstetric and neuro-anesthesia have perfectly developed to fulfill the desired needs of respective patient population. However, geriatric anesthesia has been shown a lesser interest in teaching and clinical practices over the years as compared with other anesthetic sub-specialties. The large growing geriatric population globally is also associated with an increase number of elderly patients presenting for orthopedic emergency surgeries. Orthopedic emergency surgery in geriatric population is not only a daunting clinical challenge but also has numerous socio-behavioral and economic ramifications. Decision making in anesthesia is largely influenced by the presence of co-morbidities, neuro-cognitive functions and the current socio-behavioral status. Pre-anesthetic evaluation and optimization are extremely important for a better surgical outcome but is limited by time constraints during emergency surgery. The current review aims to highlight comprehensively the various clinical, social, behavioral and psychological aspects during pre-anesthetic evaluation associated with emergency orthopedic surgery in geriatric population. PMID:25810963

  3. Expert Consensus Panel Guidelines on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, A.; Mohile, S.G.; Leech, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. Methods A four round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations in order to gain consensus on a given topic Results Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cutoff for assessment represented a higher degree of disagreement. Discussion The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. PMID:25757457

  4. Integrating Geriatric Dentistry into General Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Patrick M.; Shay, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The predoctoral dental curriculum cannot provide the depth of experience and knowledge needed for the increasing representation of geriatric patients in family dental practices. A curriculum model designed to enhance knowledge and refine clinical skills in caring for the elderly is proposed. (MSE)

  5. The Termination Phase in Group Therapy: Implications for Geriatric Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eklof, Mona

    1984-01-01

    Hypothesizes that a geriatric counseling group would have a particularly difficult time with termination because of their unique position in relation to the issues of loss and dependency. Concludes that the major work of group therapy termination involves the issues of loss and separation anxiety. (LLL)

  6. Frequent Prescription of Antibiotics and High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance among Deceased Patients in General Medical Wards of Acute Care Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yee Gyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Baek-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are often administered to terminally ill patients until death, and antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We investigated antibiotic use and the isolation of MDROs among patients who died in general medical wards. Methods All adult patients who died in the general internal medicine wards at four acute care hospitals between January and June 2013 were enrolled. For comparison with these deceased patients, the same number of surviving, discharged patients was selected from the same divisions of internal medicine subspecialties during the same period. Results During the study period, 303 deceased patients were enrolled; among them, 265 (87.5%) had do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in their medical records. Antibiotic use was more common in patients who died than in those who survived (87.5% vs. 65.7%, P<0.001). Among deceased patients with DNR orders, antibiotic use was continued in 59.6% of patients after obtaining their DNR orders. Deceased patients received more antibiotic therapy courses (two [interquartile range (IQR) 1–3] vs. one [IQR 0–2], P<0.001). Antibiotics were used for longer durations in deceased patients than in surviving patients (13 [IQR 5–23] vs. seven days [IQR 0–18], P<0.001). MDROs were also more common in deceased patients than in surviving patients (25.7% vs. 10.6%, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients who died in the general medical wards of acute care hospitals were exposed to more antibiotics than patients who survived. In particular, antibiotic prescription was common even after obtaining DNR orders in patients who died. The isolation of MDROs during the hospital stay was more common in these patients who died. Strategies for judicious antibiotic use and appropriate infection control should be applied to these patient populations. PMID:26761461

  7. Suboptimal medical care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Renal Insufficiency: results from the Korea acute Myocardial Infarction Registry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are poor in patients with renal insufficiency. This study investigated changes in the likelihood that patients received optimal medical care throughout the entire process of myocardial infarction management, on the basis of their glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods This study analyzed 7,679 patients (age, 63 ± 13 years; men 73.6%) who had STEMI and were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) from November 2005 to August 2008. The study subjects were divided into 5 groups corresponding to strata used to define chronic kidney disease stages. Results Patients with lower GFR were less likely to present with typical chest pain. The average symptom-to-door time, door-to-balloon time, and symptom-to-balloon time were longer with lower GFR than higher GFR. Primary reperfusion therapy was performed less frequently and the results of reperfusion therapy were poorer in patients with renal insufficiency; these patients were less likely to receive adjunctive medical treatment, such as treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB), or statin, during hospitalization and at discharge. Patients who received less intense medical therapy had worse clinical outcomes than those who received more intense medical therapy. Conclusions Patients with STEMI and renal insufficiency had less chance of receiving optimal medical care throughout the entire process of MI management, which may contribute to worse outcomes in these patients. PMID:22966970

  8. Trends in the Use of Guideline-Recommended Medications and In-Hospital Mortality of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Xie, Yanming; Shu, Zheng; Yang, Wei; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current practice guidelines recommend the routine use of several cardiac medications early in the course of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our objective was to analyze temporal trends in medication use and in-hospital mortality of AMI patients in a Chinese population. Methods This is a retrospective observational study using electronic medical records from the hospital information system (HIS) of 14 Chinese hospitals. We identified 5599 patients with AMI between 2005 and 2011. Factors associated with medication use and in-hospital mortality were explored by using hierarchical logistic regression. Results The use of several guideline-recommended medications all increased during the study period: statins (57.7%–90.1%), clopidogrel (61.8%–92.3%), β-Blockers (45.4%–65.1%), ACEI/ARB (46.7%–58.7%), aspirin (81.9%–92.9%), and the combinations thereof increased from 24.9% to 42.8% (P<0.001 for all). Multivariate analyses showed statistically significant increases in all these medications. The in-hospital mortality decreased from 15.9% to 5.7% from 2005 to 2011 (P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment, admission year was still a significant factor (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.79–0.96, P = 0.007), the use of aspirin (OR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46–0.87), clopidogrel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.31–0.61), ACEI/ARB (OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.56–0.94) and statins (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.40–0.73) were associated with a decrease in in-hospital mortality. Patients with older age, cancer and renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality, while they were generally less likely to receive all these medications. Conclusion Use of guideline-recommended medications early in the course of AMI increased between 2005 and 2011 in a Chinese population. During this same time, there was a decrease in in-hospital mortality. PMID:25706944

  9. A computer-aided diagnosis system for geriatrics assessment and frailty evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vairaktarakis, Charalampos; Tsiamis, Vasilis; Soursou, Georgia; Lekkas, Filippos; Nikolopoulou, Markella; Vasileiadou, Emmanouilia; Premtsis, Konstantinos; Alexiou, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    It is a common knowledge that frailty is a condition associated with getting older, and it has been considered as highly prevalent as far as falls, disability, hospitalization, and mortality are concerned. At the present time a standardized definition has not yet been established. With that in mind and for frailty being of a vital importance as a term identifying geriatric symptoms, we pursued to embody the well-known 70-scale CSHA Frailty index of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging in a Clinical Decision Support System, after categorizing and expanding it. The proposed categorization in this chapter can be helpful for usage by patients and their relatives, care givers, and medical doctors. PMID:25417017

  10. Comprehensive geriatric assessment of a mental health service user with safeguarding needs.

    PubMed

    North, Chris

    2016-05-27

    This is the final article in a short series that presents case study examples of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic model that is used to determine frail older people's medical and mental health status, as well as any functional, social and environmental issues that might affect their care. When undertaken by nurses, it can enable individualised planning for health, safety and wellbeing. This article explores the case of an older woman living in the community who was receiving support from a number of health and social care services and who had significant safeguarding needs. It highlights the complexity of caring for patients with physical and mental health conditions. CGA can link these conditions and needs together to allow a better understanding of their effects on the patient. The risks of significant transitions in care are also highlighted, along with recommendations for the provision of multidisciplinary care in community settings. PMID:27231083

  11. Musculoskeletal frailty: a geriatric syndrome at the core of fracture occurrence in older age.

    PubMed

    Gielen, E; Verschueren, S; O'Neill, T W; Pye, S R; O'Connell, M D L; Lee, D M; Ravindrarajah, R; Claessens, F; Laurent, M; Milisen, K; Tournoy, J; Dejaeger, M; Wu, F C; Vanderschueren, D; Boonen, S

    2012-09-01

    A progressive decline in physiologic reserves inevitably occurs with ageing. Frailty results from reaching a threshold of decline across multiple organ systems. By consequence, frail elderly experience an excess vulnerability to stressors and are at high risk for functional deficits and comorbid disorders, possibly leading to institutionalization, hospitalization and death. The phenotype of frailty is referred to as the frailty syndrome and is widely recognized in geriatric medical practice. Although frailty affects both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal systems, sarcopenia, which is defined as age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, constitutes one of the main determinants of fracture risk in older age and one of the main components of the clinical frailty syndrome. As a result, operational definitions of frailty and therapeutic strategies in older patients tend to focus on the consequences of sarcopenia. PMID:22797855

  12. Four Models of Medical Education about Elder Mistreatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, John M.; Dyer, Carmel B.; Kerzner, Lawrence J.; Mosqueda, Laura; Murphy, Carole

    2002-01-01

    Describe four models of incorporating elder-mistreatment curriculum and collaboration with adult protective services into geriatrics medical education. Draws on efforts at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey--Robert Wood Johnson Medical School; the University of California, Irvine College of Medicine; Hennepin County Medical…

  13. Reduced medical costs and hospital days when using oral arsenic plus ATRA as the first-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Liang, Gong-Wen; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jiang, Qian; Han, Sheng; Shi, Lu-Wen; Zhu, Hong-Hu

    2015-12-01

    We have demonstrated that oral arsenic (Realgar-Indigo naturalis formula, RIF) plus all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is not inferior to intravenous arsenic trioxide (ATO) plus ATRA as the first-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). To compare the cost-effectiveness of oral and intravenous arsenic, we analyzed the results of 30 patients in each group involved in a randomized controlled trial at our center. The median total medical costs were $13,183.49 in the RIF group compared with $24136.98 in the ATO group (p<0.0001). This difference primarily resulted from the different costs of induction therapy (p=0.016) and maintenance treatment (p<0.0001). The length of hospitalization for the RIF group was significantly lower than that for the ATO group (24 vs. 31 days, p<0.0001) during induction therapy. During maintenance treatment, the estimated medical costs were $2047.14 for each patient in the RIF group treated at home compared with $11273.81 for each patient in the ATO group treated in an outpatient setting (p<0.0001). We conclude that oral RIF plus ATRA significantly reduced the medical costs and length of hospital stay during induction and remission therapy compared with ATO plus ATRA in APL patients. PMID:26403986

  14. Patient and System-Related Delays of Emergency Medical Services Use in Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Results from the Third Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-3Ps)

    PubMed Central

    AlHabib, Khalid F.; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Almahmeed, Wael; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Amin, Haitham; Al Jarallah, Mohammed; Alfaleh, Hussam F.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Hersi, Ahmad; Kashour, Tarek; Al Aseri, Zohair; Ullah, Anhar; Altaradi, Hani B.; Nur Asfina, Kazi; Welsh, Robert C.; Yusuf, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about Emergency Medical Services (EMS) use and pre-hospital triage of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Arabian Gulf countries. Methods Clinical arrival and acute care within 24 h of STEMI symptom onset were compared between patients transferred by EMS (Red Crescent and Inter-Hospital) and those transferred by non-EMS means. Data were retrieved from a prospective registry of 36 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries, from January 2014 to January 2015. Results We enrolled 2,928 patients; mean age, 52.7 (SD ±11.8) years; 90% men; and 61.7% non-Arabian Gulf citizens. Only 753 patients (25.7%) used EMS; which was mostly via Inter-Hospital EMS (22%) rather than direct transfer from the scene to the hospital by the Red Crescent (3.7%). Compared to the non-EMS group, the EMS group was more likely to arrive initially at a primary or secondary health care facility; thus, they had longer median symptom-onset-to-emergency department arrival times (218 vs. 158 min; p˂.001); they were more likely to receive primary percutaneous coronary interventions (62% vs. 40.5%, p = 0.02); they had shorter door-to-needle times (38 vs. 42 min; p = .04); and shorter door-to-balloon times (47 vs. 83 min; p˂.001). High EMS use was independently predicted mostly by primary/secondary school educational levels and low or moderate socioeconomic status. Low EMS use was predicted by a history of angina and history of percutaneous coronary intervention. The groups had similar in-hospital deaths and outcomes. Conclusion Most acute STEMI patients in the Arabian Gulf region did not use EMS services. Improving Red Crescent infrastructure, establishing integrated STEMI networks, and launching educational public campaigns are top health care system priorities. PMID:26807577

  15. Long-Term Results of Fixed High-Dose I-131 Treatment for Toxic Nodular Goiter: Higher Euthyroidism Rates in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktaş, Gül Ege; Turoğlu, Halil Turgut; Erdil, Tanju Yusuf; İnanır, Sabahat; Dede, Fuat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Geriatric patient population has special importance due to particular challenges. In addition to the increase in incidence of toxic nodular goiter (TNG) with age, it has a high incidence in the regions of low-medium iodine intake such as in our country. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall outcome of high fixed dose radioiodine (RAI) therapy, and investigate the particular differences in the geriatric patient population. Methods: One hundred and three TNG patients treated with high dose I-131 (370-740 MBq) were retrospectively reviewed. The baseline characteristics; age, gender, scintigraphic patterns and thyroid function tests before and after treatment, as well as follow-up, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD) medication and achievement of euthyroid or hypothyroid state were evaluated. The patient population was divided into two groups as those=>65 years and those who were younger, in order to assess the effect of age. Results: Treatment success was 90% with single dose RAI therapy. Hyperthyroidism was treated in 7±7, 2 months after RAI administration. At the end of the first year, overall hypothyroidism rate was 30% and euthyroid state was achieved in 70% of patients. Age was found to be the only statistically significant variable effecting outcome. A higher ratio of euthyroidism was achieved in the geriatric patient population. Conclusion: High fixed dose I-131 treatment should be preferred in geriatric TNG patients in order to treat persistent hyperthyroidism rapidly. The result of this study suggests that high fixed dose RAI therapy is a successful modality in treating TNG, and high rates of euthyroidism can be achieved in geriatric patients.

  16. Geriatric Medicine Training for Family Practice Residents in the 21st Century: A Report from the Residency Assistance Program/Hartford Geriatrics Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for family practice residency directors provided as part of the American Academy of Family Physicians multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. (EV)

  17. Geriatric neuropsychology: implications for front line clinicians.

    PubMed

    Jamora, Christina Weyer; Ruff, Ronald M; Connor, Bonnie B

    2008-01-01

    Consistent with the aging population, neuropsychologists are being asked with increased frequency to evaluate older adults. These assessments are often complicated by medical and psychiatric co-morbidities, polypharmacy, and complex psychosocial and legal issues that are frequently encountered in this population. The aim of this review article is to address the challenges neuropsychologists and other frontline clinicians often confront when evaluating older individuals. Specifically, we review psychiatric and medical co-morbidities, testing accommodations, diagnostic versus descriptive testing approaches, normative issues, polypharmacy, and reimbursement rates. Finally, future implications are discussed for advancing the neuropsychologist's role in evaluating and treating older individuals. PMID:18957725

  18. Building a Learning Experience: The Implementation of a Clerkship in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duque, Gustavo; Bonnycastle, Michael; Nazerali, Najmi; Bailey, Robert; Ferrier, Catherine; Heilpern, Paul; Gold, Susan

    2003-01-01

    In a mandatory 4-week program, medical students assessed and managed the care of frail elderly with acute medical problems and disabilities. Web-based lectures with pre/posttests and electronic portfolio assessment were included. The experience was intended to promote reflection, interactive learning, and feedback. (Contains 24 references.) (SK)

  19. Clinical characteristics and management of patients with early acute severe pancreatitis: Experience from a medical center in China

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hou-Quan; Zhang, Jing-Xia; Zou, Shou-Chun

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study clinical characteristics and management of patients with early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). METHODS: Data of 297 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) admitted to our hospital within 72 h after onset of symptoms from January 1991 to June 2003 were reviewed for the occurrence and development of early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). ESAP was defined as presence of organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms. Sixty-nine patients had ESAP, 228 patients without organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms had SAP. The clinical characteristics, incidence of organ dysfunction during hospitalization and prognosis between ESAP and SAP were compared. RESULTS: Impairment degree of pancreas (Balthazar CT class) in ESAP was more serious than that in SAP (5.31 ± 0.68 vs 3.68 ± 0.29, P < 0.01). ESAP had a higher mortality than SAP (43.4% vs 2.6%, P < 0.01), and a higher incidence of hypoxemia (85.5% vs 25%, P < 0.01), pancreas infection (15.9% vs 7.5%, P < 0.05), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) (78.3% vs 23.2%, P < 0.01) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS)(78.3% vs 10.1%, P < 0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, the main predisposing factors to ESAP were higher APACHE II score, Balthazar CT class, MODS and hypoxemia. CONCLUSION: ESAP is characterised by MODS, severe pathological changes of pancreas, early hypoxemia and abdominal compartment syndrome. Given the poor prognosis of ESAP, these patients should be treated in specialized intensive care units with special measures such as close supervision, fluid resuscitation, improvement of hypoxemia, reduction of pancreatic secretion, elimination of inflammatory mediators, prevention and treatment of pancreatic infections. PMID:15040047

  20. Expected skin complaints of the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Walther, R R; Harber, L C

    1984-12-01

    Increased exposure to systemic medications in older patients makes drug reactions a likely cause of skin eruptions. Efforts to increase return of venous blood to the heart is the primary therapeutic and preventive measure in stasis dermatitis. If there is a suggestion of infection, antibiotics are indicated. The dermatitis can be treated with standard therapies. PMID:6238868

  1. [Forensic medical assessment of vascular and neuronal lesions in the brain associated with acute blood loss and anemia].

    PubMed

    Indiaminov, S I

    2010-01-01

    Brain tissues available for examination in the present study were obtained from 30 subjects who died from the blood loss following injuries to blood vessels and internal organs inflicted by sharp objects. The study revealed variable character of tanatogenesis induced by acute blood loss and anemia. Tanatogenesis associated with injuries to the heart and major blood vessels is most likely due to the deficiency of blood in the microcirculatory system developing in the terminal period. The main tanatogenic factors in subjects with multiple injuries to peripheral vessels are vascular dystonia and abnormal rheological properties of blood. PMID:20394188

  2. The risk of acute liver injury among users of antibiotic medications: a comparison of case‐only studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ruigómez, Ana; Klungel, Olaf; Reynolds, Robert; Feudjo Tepie, Maurille; Smeeth, Liam; Douglas, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The aims of this study were two‐fold: (i) to investigate the effect of exposure to antibiotic agents on the risk of acute liver injury using a self‐controlled case series and case‐crossover study and (ii) to compare the results between the case‐only studies. Methods For the self‐controlled case series study relative incidence ratios (IRR) were calculated by dividing the rate of acute liver injury experienced during patients' periods of exposure to antibiotics to patients' rate of events during non‐exposed time using conditional Poisson regression. For the case‐crossover analysis we calculated Odds Ratios (OR) using conditional logistic regression by comparing exposure during 14‐ and 30‐day risk windows with exposure during control moments. Results Using the self‐controlled case series approach, the IRR was highest during the first 7 days after receipt of a prescription (10.01, 95% CI 6.59–15.18). Omitting post‐exposure washout periods lowered the IRR to 7.2. The highest estimate in the case‐crossover analysis was found when two 30‐day control periods 1 year prior to the 30‐day ALI risk period were retained in the analysis: OR = 6.5 (95% CI, 3.95–10.71). The lowest estimate was found when exposure in the 14‐day risk period was compared to exposure in four consecutive 14‐day control periods immediately prior to the risk period (OR = 3.05, 95% CI, 2.06–4.53). Conclusion An increased relative risk of acute liver injury was consistently observed using both self‐controlled case series and case‐crossover designs. Case‐only designs can be used as a viable alternative study design to study the risk of acute liver injury, albeit with some limitations. © 2015 The Authors Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26248609

  3. When is an invasive palliative intervention in an acute internal medical patient worth it? A structured palliative approach.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Strasser, Florian

    2015-12-01

    A 67-year-old patient with coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery after a recent myocardial infarction despite a high perioperative risk of death. While waiting, acute renal failure developed, and the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). After the patient and his wife were informed that CABG surgery was no longer possible, he declined further intensive care treatment and subsequently died peacefully.We show that a structured palliative approach which has been proposed for cancer patients may also be feasible in palliative situations concerning nononcologic patients. PMID:26620468

  4. Image-Based Medical Expert Teleconsultation in Acute Care of Injuries. A Systematic Review of Effects on Information Accuracy, Diagnostic Validity, Clinical Outcome, and User Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Hasselberg, Marie; Beer, Netta; Blom, Lisa; Wallis, Lee A.; Laflamme, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the literature on image-based telemedicine for medical expert consultation in acute care of injuries, considering system, user, and clinical aspects. Design Systematic review of peer-reviewed journal articles. Data sources Searches of five databases and in eligible articles, relevant reviews, and specialized peer-reviewed journals. Eligibility criteria Studies were included that covered teleconsultation systems based on image capture and transfer with the objective of seeking medical expertise for the diagnostic and treatment of acute injury care and that presented the evaluation of one or several aspects of the system based on empirical data. Studies of systems not under routine practice or including real-time interactive video conferencing were excluded. Method The procedures used in this review followed the PRISMA Statement. Predefined criteria were used for the assessment of the risk of bias. The DeLone and McLean Information System Success Model was used as a framework to synthesise the results according to system quality, user satisfaction, information quality and net benefits. All data extractions were done by at least two reviewers independently. Results Out of 331 articles, 24 were found eligible. Diagnostic validity and management outcomes were often studied; fewer studies focused on system quality and user satisfaction. Most systems were evaluated at a feasibility stage or during small-scale pilot testing. Although the results of the evaluations were generally positive, biases in the methodology of evaluation were concerning selection, performance and exclusion. Gold standards and statistical tests were not always used when assessing diagnostic validity and patient management. Conclusions Image-based telemedicine systems for injury emergency care tend to support valid diagnosis and influence patient management. The evidence relates to a few clinical fields, and has substantial methodological shortcomings. As in the case

  5. "Pedogeriatrics": a pediatric nephrologist's outlook on common challenges facing pediatric and geriatric nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Grünberg, Jose

    2010-03-01

    Dramatic demographic changes longevity and medical progress helped create a new population made up of the survivors of previously fatal diseases. These trends pose new major social and economic challenges that should be accounted for in health policy making. This paper discusses the similarities between the specialties of pediatrics and geriatrics, especially in the realm of patient care. Children and the elderly share a limited autonomy and dependence on the human environment (i.e., willing and able caregiving persons) due to age or disease. The long-term care of dependent patients (DP) requires caregiving persons who share with dependent persons the risk of losing autonomy, facing burnout, family disruption, and interference with work and educational activities. Families with DPs may face potential losses of income because both patients and caregivers are partially or completely unable to work, the former for medical reasons and the latter due to the new demands on their time and energy. Additionally, new expenses have to be met because while direct medical expenses might be covered by insurance or the State, other expenses have to be financed by the family, such as co-payments for medicines, new water or electricity home installations, and transport and eventual hotel costs if they have to stay overnight near a hospital outside of their town. The main objectives of long-term care should be to maximize patients' independence and prevent their physical and psychological deterioration while minimizing the social, economic and personal costs to caregivers. To achieve these goals, one needs a holistic approach, a multidisciplinary professional team (doctors, nurses, social workers, nutritionists and psychologists) and auxiliary staff (secretaries, electricians, administrators, messengers, cleaning staff, doormen, nursing aids and coordinators of medical appointments and medical procedures). Optimal management of DPs on chronic treatments such as chronic dialysis

  6. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  7. Isolation followed by integration: a model for development of a separate geriatric course.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Meredith; Lange, Jean; Grossman, Sheila

    2005-06-01

    Because of the growing population of older adults in America, nursing faculty throughout the United States have been consistently challenged during the past decade to use the most appropriate methods to strengthen geriatric content in baccalaureate nursing programs. The question of whether to integrate content throughout the curriculum or offer a stand-alone geriatric nursing course has been explored extensively, but no ultimate conclusion has been found. With the support of a grant for geriatric curriculum integration from the John A. Hartford Foundation, one university began the journey to integrate geriatric nursing curriculum throughout all baccalaureate nursing courses. However, at a curriculum evaluation meeting held halfway through the grant period, faculty expressed the need to have concentrated content earlier in the program that could serve as a foundation on which to build geriatric knowledge. Faculty unanimously voted to create a geriatric nursing course to be offered to students during their second year of baccalaureate study. PMID:16021801

  8. Are Gold Standard Depression Measures Appropriate for Use in Geriatric Cancer Patients? A Systematic Evaluation of Self-Report Depression Instruments Used With Geriatric, Cancer, and Geriatric Cancer Samples

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christian J.; Cho, Christina; Berk, Alexandra R.; Holland, Jimmie; Roth, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Geriatric issues in cancer are becoming prominent. Depression is a significant concern for both the elderly and patients with cancer, yet identifying depression in these patients is difficult and often leads to under-recognition. We conducted a systematic review to determine which depression instruments are appropriate for use in geriatric patients with cancer. Methods We identified the most commonly used self-report depression instruments. We then used the criteria established in the US Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance on Patient-Reported Outcome Measures to determine the extent of validation evidence of these measures in geriatric cancer populations. Finally, we determined which instruments captured depressive symptoms that are common among elderly patients with cancer. Results Eight measures were selected as the most commonly used instruments. These were the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Brief Symptom Inventory-18, Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale-15, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Profile of Mood States–Short Form, and Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. Many have been validated for use with geriatric adults and patients with cancer; however, data addressing content validity and responder definition were lacking. To date, there is no validation information for geriatric patients with cancer. Furthermore, symptom profile analysis revealed that these measures do not identify many symptoms signaling depression in geriatric patients with cancer. Conclusion The validation evidence for use of common depression instruments in geriatric patients with cancer is lacking. This, and the possibility that these measures may not assess common depressive symptoms in geriatric patients with cancer, questions the adequacy of these scales in this population. PMID:19996030

  9. Medical implications of elder abuse: self-neglect.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A; Burnett, Jason; Flores, David V; Halphen, John M; Dyer, Carmel Bitondo

    2014-11-01

    Self-neglect, the most common form of elder mistreatment seen by Adult Protective Service Agencies across the United States, is an often unrecognized geriatric syndrome characterized by squalor and unsafe living circumstances. It is a result of medical, neurologic, or psychiatric disorders coupled with lack of capacity for self-care and self-protection in the absence of necessary services or medical care, and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Clinicians should evaluate self-neglecters and plan interventions based on comprehensive geriatric assessment and capacity assessment. State and federal policies are needed to address the pressing needs of this vulnerable population of seniors. PMID:25439643

  10. Geriatric Rehabilitation Patients’ Perceptions of Unit Dining Locations

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Françoise; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz-Wilner, Claire-Jehanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Eating together is promoted among hospitalized seniors to improve their nutrition. This study aimed to understand geriatric patients’ perceptions regarding meals in a common dining area versus at the bedside. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. Open-ended questions were asked of eight patients recruited from a geriatric rehabilitation unit where patients had a choice of meal location. Results Eating location was influenced by compliance with the perceived rules of the unit, physical and emotional well-being, and quarantine orders. Certain participants preferred eating in the common dining room where they had more assistance from hospital staff, a more attractive physical environment, and the opportunity to socialize. However, other participants preferred eating at their bedsides, feeling the quality of social interaction was poor in the dining room. Conclusions Participants’ experiences of, and preferences for, communal dining differed. If the benefits of communal dining are to be maximized, different experiences of this practice must be considered. PMID:24883161

  11. Challenges in the pharmacological treatment of geriatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Agusta, Fabio; Battaglia, Salvatore; Benfante, Alida; Spatafora, Mario; Scichilone, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Asthma in older populations is characterized by frequent comorbid conditions, which increase the risk of side effects and of detrimental interactions between respiratory and non-respiratory drugs. These observations lead to the need to manage asthma in older populations by applying a multidimensional assessment and a multidisciplinary treatment; therefore, we favor the use of the 'geriatric' term to define asthma in the elderly. Geriatric asthma is a complex disease, which may not necessarily imply that it is also complicated, although the two conditions may often coexist. On this basis, the switch from an organ-driven management to the holistic approach may be the key factor to attain optimal control of the disease in this age range. The current review discusses the age-related factors affecting asthma treatment in the oldest individuals, such as the comorbid conditions, and age-related changes of metabolism and excretion that can impair the efficacy and safety of drugs. PMID:26986042

  12. [Geriatric fracture centers. Improved patient care and economic benefits].

    PubMed

    Kates, S L

    2016-01-01

    The world's population is aging resulting in changes in the way we manage geriatric care. Furthermore, this population has a considerable risk of fragility fractures, most notably hip fractures. Hip fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and have large economic consequences. It is due to these factors that the concept of an elderly trauma center was developed. These trauma centers utilize the expertise in orthopedic and geriatric disciplines to provide coordinated care to the elderly hip fracture patient. As a result, studies have demonstrated improvements in clinical outcomes within the hospital stay, a reduction in iatrogenic complications, and improvements in 1-year mortality rates compared to the usual care given at a similar facility. Furthermore, economic models have demonstrated that there is a role for regionalized hip fracture centers that can be both profitable and provide more efficient care to these patients. PMID:26658903

  13. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Roshni; Myles, Puja R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52–0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55–0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  14. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Roshni; Venkatesan, Sudhir; Myles, Puja R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52-0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55-0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  15. Cumulative Cardiovascular Polypharmacy Is Associated With the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shin; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Polypharmacy is common in the elderly due to multimorbidity and interventions. However, the temporal association between polypharmacy and renal outcomes is rarely addressed and recognized. We investigated the association between cardiovascular (CV) polypharmacy and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in elderly patients.We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance PharmaCloud system to investigate the relationship between cumulative CV medications in the 3 months before admission and risk of AKI in the elderly at their admission to general medical wards in a single center. Community-dwelling elderly patients (>60 years) were prospectively enrolled and classified according to the number of preadmission CV medications. CV polypharmacy was defined as use of 2 or more CV medications.We enrolled 152 patients, 48% with AKI (based upon Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes [KDIGO] classification) and 64% with CV polypharmacy. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients taking more CV medications (0 drugs: 33%; 1 drug: 50%; 2 drugs: 57%; 3 or more drugs: 60%; P = 0.05) before admission. Patients with higher KDIGO grades also took more preadmission CV medications (P = 0.04). Multiple regression analysis showed that patients who used 1 or more CV medications before admission had increased risk of AKI at admission (1 drug: odds ratio [OR] = 1.63, P = 0.2; 2 drugs: OR = 4.74, P = 0.03; 3 or more drugs: OR = 5.92, P = 0.02), and that CV polypharmacy is associated with higher risk of AKI (OR 2.58; P = 0.02). Each additional CV medication increased the risk for AKI by 30%.We found that elderly patients taking more CV medications are associated with risk of adverse renal events. Further study to evaluate whether interventions that reduce polypharmacy could reduce the incidence of geriatric AKI is urgently needed. PMID:26252287

  16. Acute post-disaster medical needs of patients with diabetes: emergency department use in New York City by diabetic adults after Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David C; Gupta, Vibha K; Carr, Brendan G; Malik, Sidrah; Ferguson, Brandy; Wall, Stephen P; Smith, Silas W; Goldfrank, Lewis R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acute impact of disasters on diabetic patients, we performed a geospatial analysis of emergency department (ED) use by New York City diabetic adults in the week after Hurricane Sandy. Research design and methods Using an all-payer claims database, we retrospectively analyzed the demographics, insurance status, and medical comorbidities of post-disaster ED patients with diabetes who lived in the most geographically vulnerable areas. We compared the patterns of ED use among diabetic adults in the first week after Hurricane Sandy's landfall to utilization before the disaster in 2012. Results In the highest level evacuation zone in New York City, postdisaster increases in ED visits for a primary or secondary diagnosis of diabetes were attributable to a significantly higher proportion of Medicare patients. Emergency visits for a primary diagnosis of diabetes had an increased frequency of certain comorbidities, including hypertension, recent procedure, and chronic skin ulcers. Patients with a history of diabetes visited EDs in increased numbers after Hurricane Sandy for a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, prescription refills, drug dependence, dialysis, among other conditions. Conclusions We found that diabetic adults aged 65 years and older are especially at risk for requiring postdisaster emergency care compared to other vulnerable populations. Our findings also suggest that there is a need to support diabetic adults particularly in the week after a disaster by ensuring access to medications, aftercare for patients who had a recent procedure, and optimize their cardiovascular health to reduce the risk of heart attacks. PMID:27547418

  17. Diagnosis and management of acute kidney injury: deficiencies in the knowledge base of non-specialist, trainee medical staff.

    PubMed

    Muniraju, T M; Lillicrap, M H; Horrocks, J L; Fisher, J M; Clark, R M W; Kanagasundaram, N S

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced education has been recommended to improve non-specialist management of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the extent of any gaps in knowledge has yet to be defined fully. The aim of this study was to assess understanding of trainee doctors in the prevention, diagnosis and initial management of AKI. An anonymised questionnaire was completed by hospital-based trainees across Newcastle Renal Unit's catchment area. Responses were evaluated against a panel of pre-defined ideal answers. The median score was 9.5 out of 20 (n = 146; range 0-17) and was lower in more junior trainees. Fifty percent of trainees could not define AKI, 30% could not name more than two risk factors for AKI and 37% could not name even one indication for renal referral. These serious gaps in knowledge highlight the need for enhanced education aimed at all training grades. Organisational changes may also be required to optimise patient safety. PMID:22783771

  18. [Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with trans-retinoic acid. Experience of the Santa Maria Hospital, Medical School of Lisbon].

    PubMed

    De Lacerda, J F; Do Carmo, J A; De Moura, M C; Guerra, M L; Lopes, C; Raposo, J; Melo, A; De Oliveira, J J; De Lacerda, J M

    1994-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a rare subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia that is usually associated with a fatal hemorrhagic diathesis. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A that differentiates the malignant cell clone, corrects the coagulopathy, and induces complete remission in the vast majority of patients with APL. Between June 1992 and September 1993, 8 patients with APL (4 previously untreated, 3 in first relapse and 1 in second relapse) received ATRA. Complete remission was achieved in 7 patients; in 5 with ATRA alone and in 2 with ATRA followed by cytotoxic chemotherapy due to the development of asymptomatic hyperleukocytosis. The earliest signs of response were the correction of the coagulopathy and an increase in the white blood cell count. Sequential morphological and immunophenotypical analyses of the bone marrow revealed differentiation of the malignant cell clone, in the absence of bone marrow hypoplasia. 4 of 5 patients treated only with ATRA until complete remission had late leukopenia. The most frequent adverse effects were dryness of skin and mucosae, hypertrigliceridemia and hypercholesterolemia, and a moderate increase in liver transaminases. An increase in the white blood cell count was common, and in two cases exceeded 35.0 x 10(9)/l. One of these patients developed multiple thrombosis of the extremities after cytotoxic chemotherapy. We frequently observed an increase in lactic dehydrogenase levels that was concomitant with the peak in the white blood cell count. The only patient on whom complete remission was not achieved was 60 years old, had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and died in the third week of therapy with a pulmonary distress syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7717119

  19. The frailty syndrome: a critical issue in geriatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Cavazzini, Chiara; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauretani, Fulvio; Bartali, Benedetta; Repetto, Lazzaro; Longo, Dan L

    2003-05-01

    Evidence exists that the geriatric intervention guided by Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) has positive effects on a number of important health outcomes in frail older patients. Although a number of observational studies, editorials, special articles and clinical reports, suggest that CGA should be used to guide the assessment and clinical decision-making in older cancer patients, there is limited support to this view in the literature. Older patients that are diagnosed with cancer are usually healthier and less problematic than persons of the same age who are randomly sampled from the general population. In these persons, the cancer dominates the clinical picture and, therefore, instruments especially tuned for the frail elderly may provide little information. The concept of the frailty syndrome, characterized by high susceptibility, low functional reserve and unstable homeostasis, has recently received a lot of attention by the geriatric community. A CGA approach, which also evaluates elements of the frailty syndrome, may be of great interest for those oncologists who want to identify older patients likely to develop severe toxicity and severe side effects in response to aggressive treatment. Improvements in the definition of the frailty syndrome may profit from the clinical experience of oncologists. PMID:12711358

  20. Venlafaxine-Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in a Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chikkaramanjegowda, Vidyashree; de Leon, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Venlafaxine is not usually associated with risk of orthostatic hypotension. A 65-year-old US Caucasian female taking 225 mg/day of venlafaxine extended-release developed symptomatic orthostatic hypotension. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure dropped by 25 and 18 mm Hg, respectively, from supine position to standing position within 3 minutes. The patient was otherwise healthy and the orthostatic hypotension resolved with venlafaxine discontinuation. This was a probable venlafaxine adverse drug reaction according to the Naranjo scale. This case contributes to the scarce literature that indicates that clinicians need to be aware that occasionally venlafaxine can induce clinically significant orthostatic hypotension, particularly in geriatric patients. Our patient did not have orthostatic hypotension when she was taking venlafaxine at 60 years of age in higher venlafaxine doses (300 mg/day) but developed this adverse drug reaction when venlafaxine was restarted at the geriatric age. This case indicates that a history of prior tolerance to venlafaxine does not guarantee tolerance after 65 years of age. If a clinician decides to use venlafaxine in geriatric patients, the clinician should warn the patient about the risk of orthostatic hypotension and consider very slow titration and low doses. PMID:23984153

  1. The geriatric management of frailty as paradigm of "The end of the disease era".

    PubMed

    Cesari, Matteo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Thiem, Ulrich; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises; Abellan Van Kan, Gabor; Landi, Francesco; Petrovic, Mirko; Cherubini, Antonio; Bernabei, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The sustainability of healthcare systems worldwide is threatened by the absolute and relative increase in the number of older persons. The traditional models of care (largely based on a disease-centered approach) are inadequate for a clinical world dominated by older individuals with multiple (chronic) comorbidities and mutually interacting syndromes. There is the need to shift the center of the medical intervention from the disease to the biological age of the individual. Thus, multiple medical specialties have started looking with some interest at concepts of geriatric medicine in order to better face the increased complexity (due to age-related conditions) of their average patient. In this scenario, special interest has been given to frailty, a condition characterized by the reduction of the individual's homeostatic reserves and increased vulnerability to stressors. Frailty may indeed represent the fulcrum to lever for reshaping the healthcare systems in order to make them more responsive to new clinical needs. However, the dissemination of the frailty concept across medical specialties requires a parallel and careful consideration around the currently undervalued role of geriatricians in our daily practice. PMID:26997416

  2. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners. PMID:26852319

  3. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs. PMID:11952931

  4. Multifaceted Intervention to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Medical Illness: A Multicenter Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pierre-Marie; Rachas, Antoine; Meyer, Guy; Le Gal, Grégoire; Durieux, Pierre; El Kouri, Dominique; Honnart, Didier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Legall, Catherine; Hausfater, Pierre; Chrétien, Jean-Marie; Mottier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Misuse of thromboprophylaxis may increase preventable complications for hospitalized medical patients. Objectives To assess the net clinical benefit of a multifaceted intervention in emergency wards (educational lectures, posters, pocket cards, computerized clinical decision support systems and, where feasible, electronic reminders) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. Patients/Methods Prospective cluster-randomized trial in 27 hospitals. After a pre-intervention period, centers were randomized as either intervention (n = 13) or control (n = 14). All patients over 40 years old, admitted to the emergency room, and hospitalized in a medical ward were included, totaling 1,402 (712 intervention and 690 control) and 15,351 (8,359 intervention and 6,992 control) in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Results Symptomatic venous thromboembolism or major bleeding (primary outcome) occurred at 3 months in 3.1% and 3.2% of patients in the intervention and control groups, respectively (adjusted odds ratio: 1.02 [95% confidence interval: 0.78–1.34]). The rates of thromboembolism (1.9% vs. 1.9%), major bleedings (1.2% vs. 1.3%), and mortality (11.3% vs. 11.1%) did not differ between the groups. Between the pre-intervention and intervention periods, the proportion of patients who received prophylactic anticoagulant treatment more steeply increased in the intervention group (from 35.0% to 48.2%: +13.2%) than the control (40.7% to 44.1%: +3.4%), while the rate of adequate thromboprophylaxis remained stable in both groups (52.4% to 50.9%: -1.5%; 49.1% to 48.8%: -0.3%). Conclusions Our intervention neither improved adequate prophylaxis nor reduced the rates of clinical events. New strategies are required to improve thromboembolism prevention for hospitalized medical patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01212393 PMID:27227406

  5. Multidimensional Geriatric Prognostic Index, Based on a Geriatric Assessment, for Long-Term Survival in Older Adults in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee-Won; Kim, Jin Won; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Kayoung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Ki Woong

    2016-01-01

    The patient´s survival estimate is important for clinical decision-making, especially in frail patients with multimorbidities. We aimed to develop a multidimensional geriatric prognosis index (GPI) for 3- and 5-year mortality in community-dwelling elderly and to validate the GPI in a separate hospital-based population. The GPI was constructed using data for 988 participants in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA) and cross-validated with 1109 patients who underwent a geriatric assessment at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The GPI, with a total possible score of 8, included age, gender, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, comorbidities, mood, cognitive function, and nutritional status. During the 5-year observation period, 179 KLoSHA participants (18.1%) and 340 SNUBH patients (30.7%) died. The c-indices for 3- and 5-year mortality were 0.78 and 0.80, respectively, in the KLoSHA group and 0.73 and 0.80, respectively, in the SNUBH group. Positive linear trends were observed for GPI scores and both 3- and 5-year mortality in both groups. In conclusions, using common components of a geriatric assessment, the GPI can stratify the risk of 3- and 5-year mortality in Korean elderly people both in the community and hospital. PMID:26771562

  6. Multidimensional Geriatric Prognostic Index, Based on a Geriatric Assessment, for Long-Term Survival in Older Adults in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Won; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Kayoung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The patient´s survival estimate is important for clinical decision-making, especially in frail patients with multimorbidities. We aimed to develop a multidimensional geriatric prognosis index (GPI) for 3- and 5-year mortality in community-dwelling elderly and to validate the GPI in a separate hospital-based population. The GPI was constructed using data for 988 participants in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA) and cross-validated with 1109 patients who underwent a geriatric assessment at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The GPI, with a total possible score of 8, included age, gender, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, comorbidities, mood, cognitive function, and nutritional status. During the 5-year observation period, 179 KLoSHA participants (18.1%) and 340 SNUBH patients (30.7%) died. The c-indices for 3- and 5-year mortality were 0.78 and 0.80, respectively, in the KLoSHA group and 0.73 and 0.80, respectively, in the SNUBH group. Positive linear trends were observed for GPI scores and both 3- and 5-year mortality in both groups. In conclusions, using common components of a geriatric assessment, the GPI can stratify the risk of 3- and 5-year mortality in Korean elderly people both in the community and hospital. PMID:26771562

  7. Review of Postoperative Delirium in Geriatric Patients Undergoing Hip Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Paul; Morris, William; Oladeji, Philip; Huo, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative delirium is a serious complication following hip surgery in elderly patients that can adversely affect outcomes in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. Recently, the incidence of hip fracture in the Medicare population was estimated at approximately 500 000 patients per year, with the majority treated surgically. The annual volume of total hip arthroplasty is nearly 450 000 patients and is projected to increase over the next 15 to 20 years. Subsequently, the incidence of postoperative delirium will rise. The incidence of postoperative delirium after hip surgery in the elderly patients ranges between 4% and 53%, and it is identified as the most common surgical complication of older patients. The most common risk factors include advanced age, hip fracture surgery (vs elective hip surgery), and preoperative delirium/cognitive impairment. Exact pathophysiology has not been fully defined. It is hypothesized that imbalances in cortical neurotransmitters or inflammatory cytokine pathway mechanisms contribute to delirium. Development of postoperative delirium is associated with longer hospital stay, increased medical complications, and poorer short-term functional outcome. Patients who develop postoperative delirium are also at increased risk for cognitive decline beyond the acute phase. Following acute care, postoperative delirium is associated with the need for a higher level of care, an additional cost. Management of postoperative delirium centers on prevention and early recognition. Medical prophylaxis has been demonstrated to have limited utility. Utilization of delirium detection methods contributed to early recognition. The most effective means of prevention involved a multidisciplinary team focused on adequate hydration, optimization of analgesia, reduction in polypharmacy, aggressive physiotherapy, and early recognition of the delirium symptoms. PMID:27239384

  8. The role of comprehensive geriatric assessment and functional status in evaluating the patterns of antithrombotic use among older people with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, A; Bo, M; Lucenti, A; Galimberti, S; Bellelli, G; Annoni, G

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study is to investigate the use of antithrombotic drugs in older patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) at the time of hospital discharge. We enrolled 399 ≥65 years old patients with AF consecutively admitted to our acute geriatric unit from September 2012 to February 2014. Utilization of antithrombotic drugs, comorbidities, functional, mental and nutritional status were evaluated through a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). A Logistic regression model was used to assess variables associated with antithrombotic use. On admission, 198 patients (49.6%) used oral anticoagulants (OAC), 125 (21.3%) antiplatelets, 32 (8%) low weight molecular heparin (LMWH) and 44 (11%) none of them. At discharge the proportion of patients on OAC increased to 55.7%. Age>90years (OR=2.57, CI=1.28-5.16, p-value=0.008), severe functional impairment (OR=3.38, CI=1.63-7.01, p-value=0.001), polypharmacy (OR=2.07, CI=1.1-3.86, p-value=0.023), HAS-BLED score (OR=1.64, CI=1.09-2.47, p-value=0.019) and ≥1 OAC contraindication (OR=5.01, CI=2.68-9.34, p-value<0.001) were all associated with OAC underuse. In conclusion, OAC is underused in geriatric patients with AF, while antiplatelet, LMWH and no antithrombotic therapy are relatively overused. Factors associated with the decision to not prescribe OAC lie on a mix of clinical and geriatric variables, among which functional status is particularly relevant. PMID:27131228

  9. Acute behavioral crises in psychiatric inpatients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD): recognition of concomitant medical or non-ASD psychiatric conditions predicts enhanced improvement.

    PubMed

    Guinchat, Vincent; Cravero, Cora; Diaz, Lautaro; Périsse, Didier; Xavier, Jean; Amiet, Claire; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Wachtel, Lee; Cohen, David; Consoli, Angèle

    2015-03-01

    During adolescence, some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) engage in severe challenging behaviors, such as aggression, self-injury, disruption, agitation and tantrums. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute behavioral crises in adolescents with ASD admitted to a dedicated neurobehavioral unit. We included retrospectively in 2008 and 2009 29 adolescents and young adults with ASD hospitalized for severe challenging behaviors and proposed a guideline (Perisse et al., 2010) that we applied prospectively for 29 patients recruited for the same indications between 2010 and 2012. In total, 58 patients were admitted (n=70 hospitalizations, mean age=15.66 (±4.07) years, 76% male). We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), comorbid organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. We explored predictors of Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFS) score and duration of hospitalization at discharge. All but 2 patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability (ID), and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. During the inpatient stay (mean=84.3 (±94.9) days), patients doubled on average their GAFS scores (mean=17.66 (±9.05) at admission vs. mean=31.4 (±9.48) at discharge). Most common etiologies for acute behavioral crises were organic causes [n=20 (28%), including epilepsy: n=10 (14%) and painful medical conditions: n=10 (14%)], environmental causes [n=17 (25%) including lack of treatment: n=11 (16%) and adjustment disorder: n=6 (9%)], and non-ASD psychiatric condition [n=33 (48%) including catatonia: n=5 (7%), major depressive episode: n=6 (9%), bipolar disorder: n=4 (6%), schizophrenia: n=6 (9%), other/unknown diagnosis: n=12 (17%)]. We found no influence of age, gender, socio-economic status, migration, level of ID, or history of seizure on improvement of GAFS score at discharge

  10. Substance Use, Depression and Mental Health Functioning in Patients Seeking Acute Medical Care in an Inner-City ED

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Maureen A.; Barry, Kristin L.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the behavioral health of a consecutive sample of 5,641 adult emergency department (ED) patients aged 19 through 60 presenting for medical care in a large, inner-city hospital emergency department. Twenty-three percent met criteria for major depression; average mental health functioning, as measured by the mental health component of the SF-12, was half of a standard deviation lower than in the general population; 15% met criteria for alcohol or drug abuse/dependence in the past year. Comorbidity was high. These behavioral health disorders may complicate treatment and diagnosis of the chief presenting complaint. These findings, coupled with the high rates of these disorders, suggest the importance of screening and either beginning appropriate treatment or offering appropriate referral for such disorders in ED settings. PMID:21086057

  11. Impact of regional pre-hospital emergency medical services in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sozener, Cemal B; Barsan, William G

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern afflicting an estimated 795,000 Americans annually. The associated morbidity and mortality is staggering. Early treatment with thrombolytics is beneficial. The window for treatment is narrow and minimization of the time from symptom onset to treatment is vital. The general population is not well informed as to the warning signs or symptoms of stroke, leading to substantial delays in emergency medical services (EMS) activation. Ambulance transport of stroke patients to the hospital has demonstrated improvements in key benchmarks such as door to physician evaluation, door to CT initiation, and increased thrombolytic treatment. Pre-hospital notification of the impending arrival of a stroke patient allows for vital preparation in the treating emergency department, and improving timely evaluation and treatment upon arrival of the stroke patient. EMS systems are a vital component of the management of stroke patients, and resources used to improve these systems are beneficial. PMID:22994221

  12. Information resources to aid parental decision-making on when to seek medical care for their acutely sick child: a narrative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Sarah; Roland, Damian; Jones, Caroline HD; Thompson, Matthew; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the effectiveness of information resources to help parents decide when to seek medical care for an acutely sick child under 5 years of age, including the identification of factors influencing effectiveness, by systematically reviewing the literature. Methods 5 databases and 5 websites were systematically searched using a combination of terms on children, parents, education, acute childhood illness. A narrative approach, assessing quality via the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool, was used due to non-comparable research designs. Results 22 studies met the inclusion criteria: 9 randomised control trials, 8 non-randomised intervention studies, 2 qualitative descriptive studies, 2 qualitative studies and 1 mixed method study. Consultation frequency (15 studies), knowledge (9 studies), anxiety/reassurance (7 studies), confidence (4 studies) satisfaction (4 studies) and antibiotic prescription (4 studies) were used as measures of effectiveness. Quality of the studies was variable but themes supported information needing to be relevant and comprehensive to enable parents to manage an episode of minor illness Interventions addressing a range of symptoms along with assessment and management of childhood illness, appeared to have the greatest impact on the reported measures. The majority of interventions had limited impact on consultation frequencies, No conclusive evidence can be drawn from studies measuring other outcomes. Conclusions Findings confirm that information needs to be relevant and comprehensive to enable parents to manage an episode of minor illness. Incomplete information leaves parents still needing to seek help and irrelevant information appears to reduce parents’ trust in the intervention. Interventions are more likely to be effective if they are also delivered in non-stressful environments such as the home and are coproduced with parents. PMID:26674495

  13. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Aims There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. Methods The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51−0.99; P = 0.043). Conclusions Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients. PMID:26562780

  14. Optimal medical therapy for secondary prevention after an acute coronary syndrome: 18-month follow-up results at a tertiary teaching hospital in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hee Ja; Yang, Young-Mo; Choi, Eun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a fatal cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerotic plaque erosion or rupture and formation of coronary thrombus. The latest guidelines for ACS recommend the combined drug regimen, comprising aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitor, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker, β-blocker, and statin, at discharge after ACS treatment to reduce recurrent ischemic cardiovascular events. This study aimed to examine prescription patterns of secondary prevention drugs in Korean patients with ACS after hospital discharge, to access the appropriateness of secondary prevention drug therapy for ACS, and to evaluate whether to persistently use discharge medications for 18 months. Methods This study was retrospectively conducted with the patients who were discharged from the tertiary hospital, located in South Korea, after ACS treatment between September 2009 and August 2013. Data were collected through electronic medical record. Results Among 3,676 patients during the study period, 494 were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The regimen of aspirin + clopidogrel + β-blocker + angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin II receptor blocker + statin was prescribed to 374 (75.71%) patients with ACS at discharge. Specifically, this regimen was used in 177 (69.69%) unstable angina patients, 44 (70.97%) non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients, and 153 (85.96%) ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients. Compared with the number of ACS patients with all five guideline-recommended drugs at discharge, the number of ACS patients using them 12 (n=169, 34.21%) and 18 (n=105, 21.26%) months after discharge tended to be gradually decreased. Conclusion The majority of ACS patients in this study received all five guideline-recommended medications at discharge from the hospital. However, the frequency of using all of them had been gradually decreased 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after

  15. Longitudinal assessment of medical student attitudes toward older people.

    PubMed

    De Biasio, Justin C; Parkas, Valerie; Soriano, Rainier P

    2016-08-01

    Delivering adequate care to older people requires an increasing number of physicians competent in the treatment of this expanding subpopulation. Attitudes toward older adults are important as predictors of the quality of care of older people and of medical trainee likelihood to enter the geriatrics field. This study assessed the attitudes of 404 US medical students (MS) from the start of medical school to graduation using the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Geriatrics Attitude Scale. It is the first study to utilize a longitudinal design to assess attitudes among students in a medical school with a longitudinal geriatrics clinical experience in the first two years and a required geriatrics clerkship in the third year. Participants' attitude scores toward older people were found to significantly decrease from 3.9 during the first two years to 3.7 during the final two. Significant differences existed between MS1 and MS3, MS1 and MS4, MS2 and MS3, and MS2 and MS4. Women and older students held significantly more positive attitudes than men and younger students. These results show that planned clinical exposures to older adults may not be sufficient to halt the decline in attitudes in medical school. A comprehensive empathy-building intervention embedded in the curriculum may better prevent this decline. PMID:26619339

  16. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  17. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  18. 77 FR 49865 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ...), Veterans Health Administration (VHA) strategic planning activities in geriatrics and extended care, recent... of Veterans Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics and gerontology. The Committee assesses the capability of VA health care facilities and programs to meet...

  19. The Glass Is Half Full: Geriatric Precepting Encounters in Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Lisa K.; Martirosian, Tovia; Gazewood, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 19% to 20% of all family medicine office visits involve care to patients older than age 65, yet limited research addresses family medicine geriatric education in the outpatient setting. This study explored how geriatric content is incorporated into resident/attending precepting encounters, using direct observation. An observer…

  20. Strengthening Geriatric Knowledge and Use of Interdisciplinary Teams among Allied Health Students and Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Susan L.; Blue, Rebecca; Miller, Doreen; Jensen, Gwenneth; Zawada, Edward T., Jr.; Hill, Paula; Johannsen, Gail; Elsberry, Dorothy Anne; Nelson, Debralee; Lockwood, Dean

    1999-01-01

    In a three-year collaborative venture between a hospital and a university, an interdisciplinary team trained 684 allied health professionals and students in geriatrics. Outcomes included increased geriatric knowledge, more graduates serving rural underserved areas, and more interdisciplinary clinical initiatives. (SK)

  1. [Benefit of a geriatric mobile team in the emergency departments: a ten-year review].

    PubMed

    Natali, Jean-Philippe; Schwald, Nathalie; Bach, Frédérique; Bourgouin, Gaëlle; Chiffray, Dominique; Bloch, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    geriatric mobile team was created in the emergency department of Cochin Hospital in Paris, in 2005. This key player in the multi-disciplinary management of elderly patients in the emergency department and in the geriatric care pathway, showed, during its 10-year of existence, its utility. PMID:26574128

  2. Mortality of Geriatric and Younger Patients with Schizophrenia in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai; Tang, Cui-Ping; Lin, Fu-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Si-Gan; Mao, Wen-Jun; Hu, Shi-Hui; Schwab, Gerhard; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in mortality among non-institutionalized geriatric and younger patients with schizophrenia. In this study long-term mortality and suicidal behavior of all the geriatric (age greater than or equal to 65 years), middle-age (age 41-64 years), and young (age 15-40 years) subjects with schizophrenia living in a…

  3. Physician Assistant Attitude and Expressed Intent to Work with Geriatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolsey, Lisa J.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the attitudes of physician assistant students (PAS) and practicing physician assistants (PA) toward geriatric patients and the expressed intent of PAS and practicing PAs toward practicing in the specialized field of geriatric medicine using a cross-sectional study design. The 233 participants each completed a questionnaire…

  4. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  5. Specialist Physicians in Geriatrics—Report of the Canadian Geriatrics Society Physician Resource Work Group*

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.; Borrie, Michael; Basran, Jenny F.S.; Chung, A. Maria; Jarrett, Pamela G.; Morais, José A.; Peters, Eileen; Rockwood, Kenneth J.; St. John, Philip D.; Sclater, Anne L.; Stultz, Timothy; Woolmore-Goodwin, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Background At the 2011 Annual Business Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society (CGS), an ad hoc Work Group was struck to submit a report providing an estimate of the number of physicians and full-time equivalents (FTEs) currently working in the field of geriatrics, an estimate of the number required (if possible), and a clearer understanding of what has to be done to move physician resource planning in geriatrics forward in Canada. Methods It was decided to focus on specialist physicians in geriatrics (defined as those who have completed advanced clinical training or have equivalent work experience in geriatrics and who limit a significant portion of their work-related activities to the duties of a consultant). Results In 2012, there are 230–242 certified specialists in geriatric medicine and approximately 326.15 FTE functional specialists in geriatrics. While this is less than the number required, no precise estimate of present and future need could be provided, as no attempts at a national physician resource plan in geriatrics based on utilization and demand forecasting, needs-based planning, and/or benchmarking have taken place. Conclusions This would be an opportune time for the CGS to become more involved in physician resource planning. In addition to this being critical for the future health of our field of practice, there is increasing interest in aligning specialty training with societal needs (n = 216). PMID:23259019

  6. Health Care Workforce Development in Rural America: When Geriatrics Expertise Is 100 Miles Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumosa, Nina; Horvath, Kathy J.; Huh, Terri; Livote, Elayne E.; Howe, Judith L.; Jones, Lauren Ila; Kramer, B. Josea

    2012-01-01

    The Geriatric Scholar Program (GSP) is a Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) workforce development program to infuse geriatrics competencies in primary care. This multimodal educational program is targeted to primary care providers and ancillary staff who work in VA's rural clinics. GSP consists of didactic education and training in geriatrics…

  7. The Success and Struggles of Filipino Geriatric Nurses in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Coronel, Rona Denise V.; Chua, Kannerin O.; Constantino, Mariz G.; Cordova, Ericsann James C.

    2009-01-01

    Geriatric nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding job in healthcare. It is a neglected field despite the growing population of the elderly, and the experiences of geriatric nurses are one of the unrecognized aspects of this field. This qualitative study purports to explore the successes and struggles of the lived experiences of a select…

  8. 76 FR 17999 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee...

  9. 75 FR 54232 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... program advances in palliative care, and performance and oversight of the VA Geriatric Research, Education... gerontology. The Committee assesses the capability of VA health care facilities and programs to meet the... discussions on VA's geriatrics and extended care programs, aging research activities, update on VA's...

  10. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  11. Impairment in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Geriatric Syndrome of Self-Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naik, Aanand D.; Burnett, Jason; Pickens-Pace, Sabrina; Dyer, Carmel B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to characterize self-neglect definitively as a geriatric syndrome by identifying an association with functional impairment. Design and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional home evaluation of 100 community-living older adults referred by Adult Protective Services for geriatric self-neglect and 100 matched adults from a…

  12. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  13. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  14. California Geriatric Education Center Logic Model: An Evaluation and Communication Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rachel M.; Alkema, Gretchen E.; Frank, Janet C.

    2009-01-01

    A logic model is a communications tool that graphically represents a program's resources, activities, priority target audiences for change, and the anticipated outcomes. This article describes the logic model development process undertaken by the California Geriatric Education Center in spring 2008. The CGEC is one of 48 Geriatric Education…

  15. 77 FR 14860 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee...

  16. An Outcome Evaluation of Reality Orientation Therapy with Geriatric Patients in a State Mental Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clarke S.; Ivory, Peter B. C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Reality Orientation (RO) Therapy, a recently developed mode of treatment for use with geriatric patients was discussed. A controlled study was conducted comparing the effects of RO with those of traditional hospital care. The results indicated that RO is a promising technique for use with a chronic geriatric patient population. (Author)

  17. Community Psychiatrists Who See Geriatric Patients: What's Training Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieff, Susan; Andrew, Melissa; Tiberius, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the issues influencing psychiatrists' decisions to provide care to the under-served geriatric population. Methods: Community-based psychiatrists who see geriatric patients participated in focus group discussions exploring factors that influence the characteristics of their current practices. Results: Personal themes,…

  18. A Conceptual Framework for Teaching Geriatrics in a Family Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James T.; Bobula, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A competency-based curriculum model for teaching geriatrics in a family medicine residency is described that divides competencies under four major goals: understanding principles, obtaining and interpreting data, managing geriatric patients, and working in a health care team. Sample objectives, instructional methods, and student evaluation are…

  19. Gene-environment interactions in geriatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Lotrich, Francis E.

    2011-01-01

    Risk for the development of major depressive disorder (MDD) is likely influenced by an interacting set of genes and environments. Many elderly are exposed to a variety of potential MDD precipitants. Medical co-morbidities, high inflammatory states, care-giver stress, and cerebrovascular changes are often observed proximal to the development of an episode. Additionally, some adults have histories of exposure to environmental stressors such as early life traumas that may result in a life-long predisposition to MDD. Despite these exposures, many people do not develop MDD; and genetic influences are hypothesized to be one influence on vulnerability and resilience. Over the last seven years, several studies have examined a variety of genes for this gene × environment (G×E) interaction. Most have examined a length polymorphism in the promoter region for the serotonin transporter gene, but some have examined brain derived neurotrophic factor, various genes encoding for key players in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, as well as other genes involved in the monoaminergic, neuroendocrine, and inflammatory systems. There is marked variation in the design of these studies, as well as in the measures of environment, MDD, and genotyping. Interpreting the sometimes inconsistent findings among studies is complicated by this heterogeneity. However, some tentative trends have emerged. An overview is provided of both the methodologies and results of these studies, noting consistent trends as well as confounds. The progress made to date will hopefully inform the next generation of studies. PMID:21536163

  20. Preventable mortality in geriatric hip fracture inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, S. M.; Hardy, B. M.; Byth, P. L.; Brown, T. L.; Attia, J.; Balogh, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a high rate of mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip. We aimed to determine the rate of preventable mortality and errors during the management of these patients. A 12 month prospective study was performed on patients aged > 65 years who had sustained a fracture of the hip. This was conducted at a Level 1 Trauma Centre with no orthogeriatric service. A multidisciplinary review of the medical records by four specialists was performed to analyse errors of management and elements of preventable mortality. During 2011, there were 437 patients aged > 65 years admitted with a fracture of the hip (85 years (66 to 99)) and 20 died while in hospital (86.3 years (67 to 96)). A total of 152 errors were identified in the 80 individual reviews of the 20 deaths. A total of 99 errors (65%) were thought to have at least a moderate effect on death; 45 reviews considering death (57%) were thought to have potentially been preventable. Agreement between the panel of reviewers on the preventability of death was fair. A larger-scale assessment of preventable mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip is required. Multidisciplinary review panels could be considered as part of the quality assurance process in the management of these patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:1178–84. PMID:25183587