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Sample records for acute gouty arthritis

  1. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval.

  2. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis complicated by gouty arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, Yasutaka; Kamura, Azusa; Yasuda, Sumie; Tashiro, Makoto

    2015-06-17

    Gouty arthritis is uncommon in childhood and adolescence. On the other hand, there has been no report of cases with development of gouty arthritis with post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN) in pediatric patients. Here we report the case of a mildly obese 12-year-old boy with PSAGN complicated by gouty arthritis of the left first metatarsophalangeal joint. On follow-up, it was confirmed that as serum C3 level returned to normal, urinary excretion of uric acid increased and serum uric acid level decreased, thereby resolving the burning pain of the left big toe. In this case, not only did renal insufficiency associate with PSAGN but also mild obesity may have led to hyperuricemia and gouty arthritis. In conclusion, clinicians should be aware that PSAGN may be complicated by gouty arthritis in obese pediatric patients.

  3. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  4. The application of dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huaxiang; Xue, Jing; Ye, Lu; Zhou, Qijing; Shi, Dan; Xu, Rongzhen

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis, and the related risk factors for urate crystal deposition. One hundred ninety-one patients (143 with acute gouty arthritis and 48 with other arthritic conditions) were studied. All patients had acute arthritic attack in the recent 15 days and underwent dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) scan with the affected joints. The urate volume was calculated by DECT and the basic information of these patients was recorded at the same time. Uric acid crystals were identified with DECT in 140 of 143 (97.9 %) gout patients and 6 of 48 (12.5 %) of nongout patients, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DECT in the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis were 97.9, 87.5, 95.9, and 93.3 %, respectively. The urate volumes were ranged from 0.57 to 54,543.27 mm(3) with a mean volume of 1,787.81 ± 7,181.54 mm(3). Interestingly, urate volume was correlated with the disease duration, serum uric acid levels, the presence of tophi, and bone erosion. Two-year follow-up data was available in one patient with recurrent gouty arthritis, whose urate volume was gradually reduced in size by DECT detection after urate-lowering therapies. DECT showed high sensitivity and specificity for the identification of urate crystals and diagnosis of acute gout. The risk factors for uric acid deposition include the disease duration, serum uric acid levels, the presence of tophi, and bone erosion. DECT has an important role in the differential diagnosis of arthritis, and also could be served as a follow-up tool.

  5. Canakinumab: a guide to its use in acute gouty arthritis flares.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2013-08-01

    Canakinumab (Ilaris®), an anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody, is a novel approach to treat acute gouty arthritis flares in a targeted population of patients in whom treatment options are limited. Relative to on-demand treatment with intramuscular triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg, on-demand treatment with subcutaneous canakinumab 150 mg significantly relieved the pain and inflammation of a new gout flare, and reduced the risk of new flares in patients with acute gouty arthritis flares in whom standard treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and/or colchicine was inappropriate. Canakinumab has an acceptable tolerability profile in this difficult-to-treat population. The increased risk of infections and neutropenia associated with canakinumab treatment can be minimized by following the recommended precautions.

  6. Effect of sodium alginate addition to resveratrol on acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Ren, Dunlin; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Meiju; Wang, Robin; Wang, Yan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, while sodium alginate is a common pharmaceutic adjuvant with antioxidative and immunomodulatory properties. We performed an animal study to investigate the effect of sodium alginate addition to resveratrol on acute gouty arthritis. Twenty-four SPF Wistar mice were randomized to four groups receiving the combination of sodium alginate and resveratrol, resveratrol alone, colchicine, and placebo, respectively. Acute gouty arthritis was induced by injection of 0.05 ml monosodium urate (MSU) solution (25g/mL) into ankle joint cavity. IL-1β, CCR5, and CXCL10 levels in both serum and synovial fluid were measured using ELISA. NLRP3 expression in the synovial tissues was measured using western plot. The combination of sodium alginate and resveratrol significantly reduced synovial levels of IL-1β, CCR5, and CXCL10 when compared with colchicines, and all P values were less than 0.0001. The combination of sodium alginate and resveratrol was also superior to resveratrol in terms of both serum levels and synovial levels of IL-1β, CCR5, and CXCL10. In addition, resveratrol, with or without sodium alginate, could reduce NLRP3 expression obviously in the synovial tissues. The combination of sodium alginate and resveratrol has better effect over colchicines in treating MSU-induced acute gouty arthritis.

  7. Mechanistic aspects of inflammation and clinical management of inflammation in acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cronstein, Bruce N; Sunkureddi, Prashanth

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that interleukin 1β (IL-1β) plays a central role in monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation and that the NALP3 inflammasome plays a major role in IL-1β production. These discoveries have offered new insights into the pathogenesis of acute gouty arthritis. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which monosodium urate crystals induce acute inflammation and examine the mechanisms of action (MOAs) of traditional anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, and glucocorticoids) and biologic agents (e.g., the IL-1β antagonists anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab) to understand how their MOAs contribute to their safety profiles. Traditional anti-inflammatory agents may act on the IL-1β pathway at some level; however, their MOAs are broad-ranging, unspecific, and biologically complex. This lack of specificity may explain the range of systemic adverse effects associated with them. The therapeutic margins of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, and glucocorticoids are particularly low in elderly patients and in patients with cardiovascular, metabolic, or renal comorbidities that are frequently associated with gouty arthritis. In contrast, the IL-1β antagonists act on very specific targets of inflammation, which may decrease the potential for systemic adverse effects, although infrequent but serious adverse events (including infection and administration reactions) have been reported. Because these IL-1β antagonists target an early event immediately downstream from NALP3 inflammasome activation, they may provide effective alternatives to traditional agents with minimal systemic adverse effects. Results of ongoing trials of IL-1β antagonists will likely provide clarification of their potential role in the management of acute gouty arthritis.

  8. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p < 0.001); (2) a significant decrease in the occurrence of leukocyte infiltration and mild hemorrhage; (3) a significant reduction in the presence of serum Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, p < 0.001); and (4) a significant inhibition in the Nuclear Factor -κappaB (NF-κB) activity (p < 0.001). AMP-induced hypothermia could inhibit acute inflammation reaction and protect the synovial tissue against acute injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model.

  9. Colchicine-responsive protracted gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Fumiaki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Haramura, Tomoko; Sumiyoshi, Remi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-05-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a severe but self-limiting arthritis caused by inflammatory responses to urate crystals. Oral colchicines are effective for initial stages or prophylaxis, but generally, colchicines are ineffective for established gouty arthritis. We describe an unusual case of gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions, including high fever and polymyalgia. Refractory polyarthritis and high fever were eradicated by colchicine treatment. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of the MEFV gene (E148Q). This case underscores the possibility that MEFV gene mutations may modify the phenotype of gouty arthritis.

  10. Application of a Novel Diagnostic Rule in the Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Arthritis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Choi, Sang-Tae; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yoon, Bo-Young

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis and gout are major diseases that should be suspected in patients with acute monoarthritis. These two diseases are clinically similar and often indistinguishable without the help of synovial fluid analysis. Recently, a novel diagnostic rule for gout without synovial fluid analysis was developed and showed relevant performances. This study aimed to determine whether this diagnostic rule could perform well in distinguishing gout from septic arthritis. The diagnostic rule comprises 7 clinical and laboratory variables, each of which is given a specified score. The probability of gout is classified into 3 groups according to the sum of the scores: high (≥ 8), intermediate (> 4 to < 8) and low probability (≤ 4). In this retrospective study, we applied this diagnostic rule to 136 patients who presented as acute monoarthritis and were subsequently diagnosed as acute gout (n = 82) and septic arthritis (n = 54) based on synovial fluid analysis. The mean sum of scores of acute gout patients was significantly higher than that of those with septic arthritis (8.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.32, P < 0.001). Patients with acute gout had significantly more 'high', and less 'low' probabilities compared to those with septic arthritis (Eta[η]: 0.776). The prevalence of acute gouty arthritis, as confirmed by the presence of monosodium crystal, was 95.5% (61/64), 57.5% (19/33), and 5.1% (2/39) in high, intermediate and low probability group, respectively. The recently introduced diagnostic rule properly discriminates acute gout from septic arthritis. It may help physicians diagnose gout in cases difficult to be differentiated from septic arthritis.

  11. An improved acute gouty arthritis rat model and therapeutic effect of rhizoma Dioscoreae nipponicae on acute gouty arthritis based on the protein-chip methods.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Dong, Wanru; Lu, Fang; Liu, Shumin

    2012-01-01

    Rhizoma Dioscoreae nipponicae (RDN) is an herbal medicine. In the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the function of RDN is to expel wind and remove dampness. Inflammatory mechanisms play an important role in the pathological process and prognosis of acute gouty arthritis (AGA). The aim of this study was to determine the specially expressed proteins through testing the proteins of the synovium in rats with AGA. The animal model of AGA was set up by Monosodium urate crystal (MSU) combined with hypoxanthine (HX), which was ameliorated in our previous experiment. Blood samples for measurement of serum uric acid were collected prior to sacrifice. Outcomes were assessed (two days after injection) by histological stain and protein quantitation. Three chips of RayBio® Human Label-based Antibody Array I were applied to detect 90 proteins in the synovium tissue of AGA rats. 14 differently expressed proteins were found in the synovium of AGA rats, and nine of them were first found in this model. There were seven up-regulated and seven down-regulated proteins, both TRAIL and Neuropilin-2 could be identified as key contributors to the pathomechanism of AGA.

  12. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  13. Effect of acupuncture on rats with acute gouty arthritis inflammation: a metabonomic method for profiling of both urine and plasma metabolic perturbation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Si-Lan; Liu, Yu-Jie; Yin, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Liu; Xiao, Jin; Zhu, Hong-Yuan; Xue, Jin-Tao; Ye, Li-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a common inflammation model with multiple pathogenic mechanisms seen in clinical practice, for which acupuncture may potentially be an alternative therapy. To investigate the effect of acupuncture on acute gouty arthritis and search for its mechanism, a metabonomic method was developed in this investigation. Acute gouty arthritis model rats were induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. The urine and plasma samples were collected at several time points and the endogenous metabolites were analyzed by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). Data were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analysis to compare metabolic profiles of MSU crystal-induced acute gouty arthritis rats with MSU crystal-induced acute gouty arthritis, treated with acupuncture rats. The results showed that acupuncture could restore the metabolite network that disturbed by MSU administration. Our study indicates that UPLC-MS-based metabonomics can be used as a potential tool for the investigation of biological effect of acupuncture on acute gouty arthritis.

  14. Gemcitabine-induced gouty arthritis attacks.

    PubMed

    Bottiglieri, Sal; Tierson, Neil; Patel, Raina; Mo, Jae-Hyun; Mehdi, Syed

    2013-09-01

    In this case report, we review the experience of a patient who presented with early stage pancreatic cancer (Stage IIb) who underwent a Whipple procedure and adjuvant chemoradiation. The patient's past medical history included early stage colon cancer in remission, post-traumatic-stress-disorder, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, osteoarthritis, gout, and pre-diabetes. Chemotherapy initially consisted of weekly gemcitabine. The patient developed acute gouty attacks after his second dose of gemcitabine, which brought him to the emergency room for emergent treatment on several occasions. Gemcitabine was held and treatment began with fluorouracil and concurrent radiation. After completion of his chemoradiation with fluorouracil, he was again treated with weekly gemcitabine alone. As soon as the patient started gemcitabine chemotherapy the patient developed gouty arthritis again, requiring discontinuation of chemotherapy. The patient received no additional treatment until his recent recurrence 8 months later where gemcitabine chemotherapy was again introduced with prophylactic medications consisting of allopurinol 100 mg by mouth daily and colchicine 0.6 mg by mouth daily throughout gemcitabine chemotherapy, and no signs of gouty arthritis occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing gout attacks associated with gemcitabine therapy. There is limited data available describing the mechanism that gouty arthritis may be precipitated from gemcitabine chemotherapy. Further monitoring and management may be required in patients receiving gemcitabine chemotherapy with underlying gout.

  15. Current concepts in the treatment of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhen-hua; Waizy, Hazibullah

    2013-02-01

    Gouty arthritis is an extremely painful condition that causes functional impairment. Gouty arthritis has become increasingly complex because of multiple comorbidities, iatrogenic factors and hyperuricemia that is refractory to treatment. In this review, we present a general overview of gouty arthritis including its pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, predisposing factors and prophylactic therapy for preventing gouty arthritis flares.

  16. Chuanhu Anti-Gout Mixture versus Colchicine for Acute Gouty Arthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YanGang; Wang, Luan; Li, EnZe; Li, Yang; Wang, ZhongChao; Sun, XiaoFang; Yu, XiaoLong; Ma, Lin; Wang, YunLong; Wang, YouXin

    2014-01-01

    Background The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture has been used for many years in the treatment of gout in Chinese Traditional Medicine, and current methods for treatments for acute gouty arthritis have been either less effective or have had serious side effects. Methods In this 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, non-inferiority study, outpatient individuals with newly diagnosed acute gouty arthritis were randomly assigned to receive Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or colchicine. Both the study investigators and the participants were masked to the treatment assignments. The primary outcome was the recurrence rate of acute gouty arthritis, and the secondary outcomes were changes in white blood cells (WHC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This trial is registered at ISRCTN.org as trial ISRCTN65219941. Results A total of 176 patients were randomly assigned to receive either the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or Colchicine. The overall recurrence rates in the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture group (CH group) and the Colchicine group (Col group) were 12.50% vs 14.77% (difference -2.22%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -10.78%~6.23%), meeting the predefined non-inferiority criterion of 15%, as did the data for WHC and CRP. The incidence of adverse events (mainly diarrhea) was less in the Col group than in the CH group (2.27% vs 28.41%, 95% CI 0.01~0.26). In addition, changes in blood uric acid, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine in the CH group were significantly larger compared to those in the Col group (P<0.05). Conclusions The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture was non-inferior to colchicine for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. The study suggested that the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture can be considered an alternative choice for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis because of its lower incidence of adverse events and its protection of kidney and renal function. PMID:25013367

  17. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD.

  18. Acute gouty arthritis complicated with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction is independently associated with short- and long-term adverse non-fatal cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Lee, Hsin-Fu; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Lin, Yen-Chen; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Chang, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Lung-An

    2014-01-01

    Large epidemiologic studies have associated gouty arthritis with the risk of coronary heart disease. However, there has been a lack of information regarding the outcomes for patients who have gout attacks during hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction. We reviewed the data of 444 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital between 2005 and 2008 due to acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The clinical outcomes were compared between patients with gout attack and those without. Of the 444, 48 patients with acute STEMI developed acute gouty arthritis during hospitalization. The multivariate analysis identified prior history of gout and estimated glomerular filtration rate as independent risk factors of gout attack for patients with acute STEMI (odds ratio (OR) 21.02, 95 % CI 2.96-149.26, p = 0.002; OR 0.92, 95 % CI 0.86-0.99, p = 0.035, respectively). The in-hospital mortality and duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the gouty group and the non-gouty group (controls). During a mean follow-up of 49 ± 28 months, all-cause mortality and stroke were similar for both groups. Multivariate Cox regression showed that gout attack was independently associated with short- and long-term adverse non-fatal cardiac events (hazard ratio (HR) 1.88, 95 % CI 1.09-3.24, p = 0.024; HR 1.82, 95 % CI 1.09-3.03, p = 0.022, respectively). Gout attack among patients hospitalized due to acute STEMI was independently associated with short-term and long-term rates of adverse non-fatal cardiac events.

  19. Attenuation of gouty arthritis by emodinol in monosodium urate crystal-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lvyi; Lan, Zhou; Ma, Shuwei; Zhao, Ling; Yang, Xinzhou

    2013-05-01

    A series of studies have recently demonstrated that the release of interleukin 1β induced by monosodium urate crystals is central to the experimental gouty arthritis. Elaeagnus pungens has been traditionally used for the treatment of gouty arthritis in China for more than thousands years. However, there is still little known about the active ingredients and mechanisms of E. pungens against gouty arthritis. Emodinol, as a major triterpene compound in E. pungens, has been seldom reported to have an effect on gouty arthritis. Therefore, the potential beneficial effects and mechanisms of emodinol on gouty arthritis were investigated in this study. Results showed that it significantly ameliorated the hyperalgesia, inflammation, and levels of multiple proinflammatory cytokines in monosodium urate crystals-treated mice. These findings elucidate that emodinol exhibits a prominent effect on improving symptoms of acute gouty arthritis induced by monosodium urate crystals through inhibiting the generation of proinflammatory cytokines.

  20. Coexistence of Sarcoidosis and Gouty Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Semiz, Hüseyin; Kobak, Senol

    2017-08-21

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma formations. It may present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, the involvement of eye and symptoms on the locomotor system. Gouty arthritis is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by hyperuricemia, recurrent arthritis attacks and the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in the joints and the surrounding tissues. We reported the coexistence of sarcoidosis and gouty arthritis in this paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. The Unique Macroscopic Appearance of Gouty Arthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Mittl, Gregory S; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2015-07-01

    Patients with significant gouty arthritis can develop disabling joint pain secondary to monosodium urate (MSU) articular deposition. We report a case of white, chalky MSU crystal deposition covering the articular surfaces of the knee as discovered by total knee arthroplasty. A 65-year-old male with a history of gout presented with bilateral knee pain. His radiographic imaging was negative for gouty tophi, and he elected to undergo left total knee arthroplasty. Intraoperatively a distinct chalky, white paste consistent with MSU deposition was observed covering the articular surfaces of the knee consistent with the diagnosis of gouty arthritis. Gout is the most common inflammatory arthritis affecting more than 3 million people in the USA. The inflammation results from the phagocytosis of monosodium urate crystals (MSU) and the release of inflammatory cytokines within the joint. Gout progresses from acute to chronic over many years and frequently causes chronic arthropathy. When significant knee pain and disability is associated with gouty arthropathy, total knee arthroplasty is certainly an option. The pathological appearance of gouty joints is characteristic. Macroscopic examination of joints affected by gout reveals a nodular, white, chalky appearance. Polarized microscopy of gout demonstrates negative birefringent needle-shaped MSU crystals. In this case report, we describe the characteristic chalky, white MSU deposit that covers the articular surfaces of a knee joint in a patient with a history of gout undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The investigators have obtained the patient's informed written consent for print and electronic publication of the case report.

  2. The effect of resveratrol on the recurrent attacks of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zheng, Shucong; Wang, Yuankai; Zhu, Huiqing; Liu, Qiong; Xue, Yu; Qiu, Jianhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Gouty arthritis is characterized by inflammation induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition, which is resulted by an increase of serum urate concentration. The management of gout, especially the recurrent acute attacks of chronic gouty arthritis, is still a problem to be resolved. In this study, we aimed to develop the preventive and therapeutic effect of resveratrol on gouty arthritis. MSU was used to induce gouty arthritis in the foot pad of C57BL/6 mice. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in Kunming mice. Resveratrol was intraperitoneal injected to the mice in the treatment group. The pad inflammation and the level of serum uric acid were investigated to estimate the effect of resveratrol in gouty arthritis. Hyperuricemia was significantly detected in the mice treated with yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate, and gouty arthritis was successfully induced with MSU in mice. We further identified that resveratrol inhibited pad swelling and pad 99mTc uptake in gouty mice. Moreover, serum uric acid level was also decreased by resveratrol in hyperuricemia mice. This study highlighted that resveratrol might be applied to prevent the recurrent acute attack of gouty arthritis because of its inhibition of articular inflammation and down-regulation of serum uric acid.

  3. Gouty arthritis: understanding the disease state and management options in primary care.

    PubMed

    Sunkureddi, Prashanth

    2011-09-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of monosodium urate crystal deposits into the joint space. The disease is associated with debilitating clinical symptoms and functional impairments as well as adverse economic and quality-of-life burdens. Because gouty arthritis is typically diagnosed and managed in the primary care setting, clinicians require a thorough knowledge of the presenting clinical features, risk factors, differential diagnoses, and treatment options for appropriate management. Although generally effective, the use of currently available therapies to control gouty arthritis is challenging because many medications used to treat comorbidities can exacerbate gouty arthritis and because current agents are associated with a number of adverse events, contraindications, or both. Based on an understanding of the underlying inflammatory pathogenesis of gouty arthritis, several new agents are being developed that may provide improved efficacy.

  4. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GOUTY ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Talbott, John H.

    1953-01-01

    The characteristic phenomena of acute gouty arthritis are acute arthritis in a middle-aged male, associated with serum uric acid above 6 mg. per 100 cc. and a satisfactory response to colchicine. Roentgenographically observable changes do not occur early. In recent years uric acid metabolism has been studied by means of isotope techniques utilizing labeled substances. Uric acid is excreted in relatively constant amounts by humans and is little affected by variations in dietary intake, except for purine or nucleic acid substances. Persons with gout have a greater total amount of uric acid and a lower turnover than normal persons. In the treatment of acute attacks of gout colchicine is still the most practical single drug, even though its pharmacologic action remains unknown. Benemid (probenecid) is a powerful uricosuric agent of low toxicity which has been subjected to extensive clinical trial for three years. It causes inhibition of the resorption of urate from the glomerular filtrate; the site of action is believed to be the tubular cells. The author's usual dose is 2 gm. a day. This has caused a lowering of the uric acid in the serum and an increase in the urinary output. PMID:13082423

  5. The pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Thiele, Ralf G

    2010-11-01

    The characteristic radiographic hallmarks of chronic gouty arthritis are the presence of macroscopic tophi and erosions with overhanging edges and relative preservation of the joint space. In recent years there has been more insight into the processes underlying the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. This review discusses the mechanical, pathological, cellular and immunological factors that may have a role in the pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. It highlights the evidence suggesting that monosodium urate crystal deposition is associated with the presence of underlying osteoarthritis and the important role of osteoclasts and the receptor for activation of nuclear factor κ B (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANK-RANKL) pathway in the pathogenesis of gouty erosions. Gouty arthritis is primarily driven by interleukin 1β (IL-1β). IL-1β has been implicated in bone destruction and erosions in other inflammatory arthridities. Thus, future IL-1 inhibitors may prevent and treat erosion formation due to tophaceous gouty arthritis. This review discusses imaging modalities and highlights ultrasongraphic evidence suggesting a significant relationship between the presence of the gouty tophus and bone erosions as well as the frequent presence of persistent low-grade inflammation in asymptomatic chronic tophaceous gouty arthritis on high-resolution ultrasonography. It is the tophus eroding the underlying bone that is pivotal for the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

  6. The Human and Economic Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Gouty Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Thomas; Voshaar, Martijn A H Oude; van de Laar, Martinus A F J

    2015-10-01

    Gouty arthritis, one of the most painful and common forms of adult arthritis, is caused by monosodium urate crystal deposits in joints, most often in the lower extremities. Crystals trigger an inflammatory response leading to acute flares characterized by a rapid onset of pain, warmth, swelling, and redness in involved joints. Over time, continued monosodium urate crystal deposits and inflammation can lead to chronic tophaceous gout that result in bone erosion, progressing to joint destruction and significant disability. The goal of therapy in an acute gout flare is prompt and safe termination of pain and inflammation. Acute gouty arthritis is usually treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, or corticosteroids. However, for a growing number of patients, current standard treatments are ineffective or are contraindicated, largely due to the presence of comorbidities. Gouty arthritis can have a major negative impact of health-related quality of life, especially in patients with difficult-to-treat disease, as revealed by recent studies comparing health-related quality of life with that of the general population. Additionally, gouty arthritis also constitutes an important economic burden through absence from work and medical costs. This burden is even greater in patients with difficult-to-treat disease.

  7. Difficult-to-treat gouty arthritis: a disease warranting better management.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi

    2011-07-30

    Gouty arthritis is the most common inflammatory arthritis in adults and is characterized by very painful flares. Gouty arthritis results from an elevated body uric acid pool, which leads to deposition of monosodium urate crystals, mainly in the joints. These crystals trigger the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin (IL)-1β, which stimulates inflammation. Gouty arthritis can progress to a chronic, deforming and physically disabling disease through the development of disfiguring tophi, joint destruction and persistent pain. Standard treatments are effective in most patients. Acutely, anti-inflammatory therapies provide rapid pain relief and resolution of flares. Chronically, urate-lowering therapies reduce serum urate levels and, in combination with anti-inflammatory prophylaxis, reduce the risk of flares. However, for a growing number of patients, current standard treatments are ineffective or are contraindicated, largely due to the presence of co-morbidities. Indeed, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and renal impairment are all highly prevalent in individuals with gouty arthritis, and may lead to standard treatments being ineffective or inappropriate. Such patients with difficult-to-treat disease require alternative therapies. Gouty arthritis can have a major impact on health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), especially in patients with difficult-to-treat disease, as revealed by recent studies comparing HR-QOL for patients with gouty arthritis with that of the general population. All studies revealed clinically significant reductions in physical functioning for individuals with gouty arthritis compared with the general population. The difference was particularly marked for patients with difficult-to-treat disease. Gouty arthritis also constitutes an important economic burden through absence from work and medical costs. Again, the burden is greater in patients with difficult

  8. Trikatu, a herbal compound that suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Murunikkara, Vachana; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2014-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory joint disorder characterized by hyperuricaemia and precipitation of monosodium urate crystals in the joints. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of trikatu, a herbal compound in monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Paw volume and levels/activities of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidant status and histopathological examination of ankle joints were determined in control and monosodium urate crystal-induced rats. In addition, analgesic (acetic acid-induced writhing response), anti-pyretic (yeast-induced pyrexia) and gastric ulceration effects were tested. The levels of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation and paw volume were significantly increased, and anti-oxidant status was found to be reduced in monosodium urate crystal-induced rats, whereas the biochemical changes were reverted to near normal levels upon trikatu (1000 mg/kg b.wt) administration. The trikatu has also been found to exhibit significant analgesic and anti-pyretic effects with the absence of gastric damage. In conclusion, the present results clearly indicated that trikatu exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect against monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in rats in association with analgesic and anti-pyretic effects in the absence of gastrointestinal damage.

  9. Acute gouty bursitis: report of 15 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Canoso, J J; Yood, R A

    1979-01-01

    Fifteen cases of acute gouty bursitis were seen among 136 crystal-proved cases of gout. Bursal aspirate yielded yellow or pink fluid in 10, chalky white fluid in 1, and a small amount of bloody fluid in 4. Monosodium urate crystals were present in all. Bursal fluid leucocyte counts averaged 2.9 X 10(9)/1 compared with synovial fluid leucocyte counts that averaged 25.5 X 10(9)/1 in cases of articular gout (P less than 0.05). Gouty, septic, and idiopathic (traumatic) bursitis share clinical features, and detailed bursal fluid analysis is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:496446

  10. Can ultrasonography make identification of asymptomatic hyperuricemic individuals at risk for developing gouty arthritis more crystal clear?

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi

    2011-04-19

    Hyperuricemia is the most important risk factor for gouty arthritis. The quandary is how to predict which patient with asymptomatic hyperuricemia will develop gouty arthritis. Can ultrasonography help identify hyperuricemic individuals at risk for developing gouty arthritis? In the previous issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy, Pineda and colleagues found ultrasonography changes suggestive of gouty arthritis in 25% of hyperuricemic individuals. These were found exclusively in hyperuricemic individuals but not in normouricemic patients. Ultrasonography may serve as a noninvasive means to diagnose gouty arthritis in hyperuricemic individuals who have yet to develop symptomatic gouty arthritis.

  11. Subclinical atherosclerosis in gouty arthritis patients: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Çukurova, Selçuk; Pamuk, Ömer Nuri; Ünlü, Ercüment; Pamuk, Gülsüm Emel; Çakir, Necati

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the incidence of subclinical atherosclerosis and associated factors in our gouty arthritis patients. We included 55 gouty arthritis patients diagnosed at our center within the last 4 years. The control group included 41 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 34 patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia (AHU). Atherosclerotic risk factors were determined in all subjects. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the presence of plaques were evaluated by B-mode ultrasonography. The carotid IMT in gouty arthritis patients (0.730 ± 0.19) was significantly higher than in AHU subjects (0.616 ± 0.12) (P = 0.004) and tended to be higher than the RA group (0.669 ± 0.17) (P = 0.1). Atheromatous plaques were significantly more frequent in gouty arthritis patients (16 cases, 29.1%) than in RA patients (5 cases, 12.2%) and AHU subjects (3 cases, 8.8%) (P values, 0.05 and 0.023). Gout patients with plaques were older (P = 0.006) and tended to have tophi more frequently (P = 0.06). Logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.02-1.54) and the presence of tophi (OR: 12.5, 95% CI: 1.2-140) were independent risk factors for the presence of plaques. Gouty arthritis bears a higher risk of atherosclerosis than both RA and AHU.

  12. Use of diuretics and the risk of gouty arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hueskes, Berdine A A; Roovers, Elisabeth A; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Janssens, Hein J E M; van de Lisdonk, Eloy H; Janssen, Matthijs

    2012-06-01

    To systematically review the literature investigating the relationship between use of diuretics and the risk of gouty arthritis. PubMed (1950-October 2009), Embase (1974-October 2009), and the Cochrane Library (up to October 2009) were searched using keywords and MeSH terms diuretics, adverse effects, and gout. For this review, the technique of "best evidence synthesis" was used. Studies reporting frequency, absolute or relative risks, odds ratio, or rate ratio of gouty arthritis in diuretic users compared with nonusers were selected and evaluated. Studies had to be published in English. Checklists from the Dutch Cochrane Centre were used to assess the quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort, and case-control studies. Two RCTs, 6 cohort studies, and 5 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of the studies was moderate. In a RCT the rate ratio of gout for use of bendrofluazide vs placebo was 11.8 (95% CI 5.2-27.0). The other RCT found a rate ratio of 6.3 (95% CI 0.8-51) for use of hydrochlorothiazide plus triamterene vs placebo. Three cohort studies and 4 case-control studies found higher risks of gouty arthritis in users compared with nonusers of diuretics. There is a trend toward a higher risk for acute gouty arthritis attacks in patients on loop and thiazide diuretics, but the magnitude and independence is not consistent. Therefore, stopping these useful drugs in patients who develop gouty arthritis is not supported by the results of this review. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of Prednisolone, Etoricoxib, and Indomethacin in Treatment of Acute Gouty Arthritis: An Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingling; Liu, Shiqun; Guan, Meiping; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Background At present there are several kinds of medicine for treating acute gout arthritis (AGA). This study compared the efficacy and safety of prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin in the treatment of AGA. Material/Methods This was an open-label, randomized, active-comparator study in patients with AGA. Patients were randomized to 4 days of prednisolone 35 mg qd, etoricoxib 120 mg qd, or indomethacin 50 mg tid. The primary efficacy endpoint was the reduction of self-assessed pain in the index joint from baseline. Secondary endpoints included changes in physician’s assessment of tenderness, erythema, swelling, and joint activity; patient assessment of response to therapy; and safety. Results We analyzed 113 patients. Baseline demographics were comparable among treatment groups. Oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in improving pain, tenderness, and joint activity over 4 days. For inflammation, oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in reducing erythema, but prednisolone might be more effective in reducing swelling than indomethacin. The patient response to therapy was similar in the 3 groups. There were more total adverse events with indomethacin compared with the other 2 drugs. Conclusions Efficacy was comparable among prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin for the treatment of AGA. Prednisolone might be more effective in reducing inflammation and it had a better safety profile. PMID:26965791

  14. PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone affects rat gouty arthritis by regulating cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wang, R-C; Jiang, D-M

    2014-08-28

    The objective was to study peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist pioglitazone regulation effect and its mechanism of expression of cytokines on acute gouty arthritis synovial in rats. Rats with unilateral ankle were injected with artificial monosodium urate (MSU) crystals to make the acute gouty arthritis model. Taking the synovium 48 h after the injection of MSU and using RT-PCR, we assessed the effect of pioglitazone (20 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), oral administration) on synovial expression, by detecting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The pioglitazone treatment group showed synovial expression of TNF-α, and IFN-γ was significantly lower than in the control group; the inhibition rates were 78.5 and 60.4%. The IL-1 expression difference was not statistically significant between the two groups. Pioglitazone has anti-inflammatory effects on acute gouty arthritis by inhibiting the expression of TNF-α and IFN-γ.

  15. The effect of montelukast in a model of gouty arthritis induced by sodium monourate crystals.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Loida; Arjona, Marjorie; Blanco, Gustavo; Alvarez, Stuart; Arcila, Eduardo; Ortega, Arnaldo; Nuñez, Dubelis; Verzura, Julie; Tovar, Robert; Bethencourt, Sarah; Riera, Ricardo; Mora-Orta, Sioly; Corado, José

    2011-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are the first line of therapy in acute gouty arthritis. NSAIDs inhibit the cyclooxygenase pathway, but not the lipooxygenase activity and can have many adverse effects and thus have a limited effect on the control of inflammation in this disease. In this work we studied the effect of montelukast on the cellular inflammatory infiltrate in a model of murine arthritis induced by sodium monourate crystals (SMU), using a subcutaneous air cavity (air pouch) in BALB/c mice. Seven groups of BALB/c mice (n = 4) were distributed into five experimental groups and two inflammatory control groups, a positive and a negative one. Previous to SMU exposure, the experimental groups received montelukast (1 and 0.01 mg/Kg/w) and/or indomethacine (2.5 mg/Kg/w), followed by administration of SMU in the air pouch. The total and differential counts of inflammatory cells were analyzed after 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours. Montelukast, significantly reduced the total number of cells (p < 0.05), with a predominant impact on polymorphonuclear over mononuclear cells, especially after 12 hours of the medication. The montelukast/indometacine combination showed an additive effect. Our data show that montelukast has an anti-inflammatory effect in the model of gouty arthritis. Consequently, anti-leukotrienes could represent a new and effective therapy, either isolated or combined with conventional therapy of gouty arthritis.

  16. [The effects of electro-acupuncture on the signaling pathway of TLR/MYD88 in ankle joint synovial tissue of acute gouty arthritis rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao-nan; Huang, Xue-kuan; Luo, Yan; Jiang, Juan; Wan, Lei; Wang, Ling

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effects of electro-acupuncture ( EA) on the related protein expression of the signaling pathway of the toll-like receptor2 (TLR2)/myeloid differentiation factor (MYD) 88 in ankle joint synovial tissue of acute gouty arthritis (AGA) rats. Fifty male SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: normal group, SMD group, AGA model group, medication group and EA group, 10 rats in each group. SMD group established model by inducing SMD, other groups established AGA model by inducing monosodium urate, except the normal group. Two days before model was established, normal and SMD and AGA model groups were lavaged with normal saline (20 mL/kg), medication group was lavaged with colchicine solution (1 mg/kg), EA (1. 5-2 Hz, D.-D. wave, 9 V, 1-3 mA) was applied to"Sanyinjiao" (SP6),"Jiexi"(ST41) and "kunlun" (BL60) for 20 min, once daily, continuously for 9 days. Then the join sewlling index was observed periodically, the protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Compared to the normal group, the join sewlling of the SMD group in test join increased significantly (P<0. 05) and the protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 in synovial tissue has not statistically significant (P>0.05), the oin sewlling and protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 in synovial tissue of model group increased significantly P<0. 05); The medication and EA group compared to the model group, the protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 in synovial tissue decreased significantly (P <0. 05), the join sewlling in test join decreased significantly P<1. 05); There were not statistically significant between the EA group and the medication group (P>0.05). EA can alleviate the symptoms of AGA, which may be related to regulation of the protein expression Y TRI and MYD88 in the TLR/MYD88 signaling pathway.

  17. Overinfection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in Gouty Crystal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla-Abadía, F.; Vélez, J. D.; Zárate-Correa, L. C.; Carrascal, E.; Guarín, N.; Castañeda-Ramírez, C. R.; Cañas, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an endemic South American systemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (P. brasiliensis). The main clinical form of disease is pulmonary, but all organs may be involved. We report a case of overinfection by P. brasiliensis in chronic gouty arthritis affecting the proximal phalanx of the right hallux. The patient required proximal amputation and long-term antifungal therapy. PMID:23251162

  18. Comprehensive review on therapeutic strategies of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Usmanghani, Khan; Ahmed, Iqbal; Azhar, Iqbal; Hamid, Abdul

    2014-09-01

    Traditional medicines are practiced worldwide for treatment of gouty arthritis since ancient times. Herbs and plants always have been used in the treatment of different diseases such as gout. The present article deals with the therapeutic strategies and options for the cure of gouty arthritis. Bibliographic investigation was carried out by analyzing classical textbooks and peer reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases. In this article a detailed introduction, classification, epidemiology, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of gout with reference to modern and Unani system of medicines have been discussed. It is also tried to provide a list of plants used in the treatment of gout along with their formulations used in Unani system of medicine. The herbs and formulations have been used in different systems of medicine particularly Unani system of medicines exhibit their powerful role in the management and cure of gout and arthritis. Most of herbs and plants have been chemically evaluated and some of them are in clinical trials. Their results are magnificent and considerable. However their mechanisms of actions are still on the way.

  19. Update on the Clinical Effect of Acupuncture Therapy in Patients with Gouty Arthritis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Jin-Ming; Lv, Zheng-Tao; Chen, An-Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. Methods. A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, and CNKI was conducted from the inception date of each database up to October 2015. Two investigators screened each article independently and were blinded to the findings of the other reviewer. Data was extracted according to the predetermined collection form. Meta-analysis was performed. Results. We analyzed data from 28 RCTs involving 2237 patients with gouty arthritis. Compared with conventional pharmacological treatments acupuncture was more effective in rendering patients free from symptoms after 24 hours, lowering serum urate, alleviating pain associated with gouty arthritis, and decreasing the ESR; regarding CRP, no statistically significant difference was found. In addition, the frequency of adverse events in acupuncture treatment was lower than that in control group. Conclusion. Based on the findings of our study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture is an effective and safe therapy for patients with gouty arthritis. However, the potential beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to the methodological deficiency of included studies. High quality RCTs with larger scale are encouraged.

  20. Update on the Clinical Effect of Acupuncture Therapy in Patients with Gouty Arthritis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei-wei; Zhang, Jin-ming; Lv, Zheng-tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. Methods. A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, and CNKI was conducted from the inception date of each database up to October 2015. Two investigators screened each article independently and were blinded to the findings of the other reviewer. Data was extracted according to the predetermined collection form. Meta-analysis was performed. Results. We analyzed data from 28 RCTs involving 2237 patients with gouty arthritis. Compared with conventional pharmacological treatments acupuncture was more effective in rendering patients free from symptoms after 24 hours, lowering serum urate, alleviating pain associated with gouty arthritis, and decreasing the ESR; regarding CRP, no statistically significant difference was found. In addition, the frequency of adverse events in acupuncture treatment was lower than that in control group. Conclusion. Based on the findings of our study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture is an effective and safe therapy for patients with gouty arthritis. However, the potential beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to the methodological deficiency of included studies. High quality RCTs with larger scale are encouraged. PMID:27847529

  1. The effect of resveratrol on the recurrent attacks of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zheng, Shucong; Wang, Yuankai; Zhu, Huiqing; Liu, Qiong; Xue, Yu; Qiu, Jianhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2014-11-26

    Gouty arthritis is characterized by inflammation induced by monosodium urate crystal (MSU) deposition, which is resulted by increase of serum urate concentration. The management of gout, especially the recurrent attacks of chronic gouty arthritis, is still a problem to be resolved. In this study, we aimed to develop the preventive and therapeutic effects of resveratrol on gouty arthritis. Monosodium urate crystal (MSU) was used to induce gouty arthritis in foot pad of C57BL/6 mice. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in Kunming mice. Resveratrol was intraperitoneally injected to the mice in the treatment group. Article inflammation and serum uric acid level were investigated to estimate the effect of resveratrol in gout. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in mice, and MSU to induce gouty arthritis. We identified that resveratrol inhibited foot swelling and inflammation-associated 99mTc uptake in gouty mice. Moreover, serum uric acid level was also decreased by resveratrol in hyperuricemia mice. This study highlighted that resveratrol might be applied to prevent the recurrent attack of gouty arthritis because of its inhibition of articular inflammation and down-regulation of serum uric acid.

  2. Acute Posterior Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Caused by Gouty Tophus.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Gouty tophus of the tarsal tunnel is a rare cause of posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. We present a case of acute posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome due to gouty tophus that required early tarsal tunnel release in order to avoid irreversible nerve damage. The presence of background neuropathy resulted in a less favorable result than expected. Therapeutic, Level V: Case report. © 2014 The Author(s).

  3. Serum Procalcitonin as a Useful Serologic Marker for Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with gout are similar to those with bacterial infection in terms of the nature of inflammation. Herein we compared the differences in procalcitonin (PCT) levels between these two inflammatory conditions and evaluated the ability of serum PCT to function as a clinical marker for differential diagnosis between acute gouty attack and bacterial infection. Materials and Methods Serum samples were obtained from 67 patients with acute gouty arthritis and 90 age-matched patients with bacterial infection. Serum PCT levels were measured with an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay. Results Serum PCT levels in patients with acute gouty arthritis were significantly lower than those in patients with bacterial infection (0.096±0.105 ng/mL vs. 4.94±13.763 ng/mL, p=0.001). However, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. To assess the ability of PCT to discriminate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infection, the areas under the curves (AUCs) of serum PCT, uric acid, and CRP were 0.857 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.798–0.917, p<0.001], 0.808 (95% CI, 0.738–0.878, p<0.001), and 0.638 (95% CI, 0.544–0.731, p=0.005), respectively. There were no significant differences in ESR and white blood cell counts between these two conditions. With a cut-off value of 0.095 ng/mL, the sums of sensitivity and specificity of PCT were the highest (81.0% and 80.6%, respectively). Conclusion Serum PCT levels were significantly lower in patients with acute gouty attack than in patients with bacterial infection. Thus, serum PCT can be used as a useful serologic marker to differentiate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infections. PMID:27401644

  4. A case of gouty arthritis to tophi on 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Morooka, Miyako; Kubota, Kazuo

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of gouty arthritis with tophi that was evaluated using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography. A 77-year-old man with a history of gouty attacks was admitted with severe polyarticular pain and fever. 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/CT demonstrated focal uptake at multiple joints, including the juxta-articular soft-tissue-density masses of the elbows, and the bases of bilateral large toes. Gouty arthritis should be considered with focal 18F-FDG uptake in juxta-articular soft-tissue-density masses (tophi) with or without associated erosions.

  5. Pregnancy in a patient with gouty arthritis secondary to pseudo-Bartter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Metyas, Samy; Rouman, Heba; Arkfeld, Daniel G

    2010-08-01

    A 32-year-old woman with pseudo-Bartter syndrome secondary to excessive use of laxatives, presented with hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperuricemia, and gouty arthritis with tophi. Subsequently the patient became pregnant and displayed recurrent severe gouty flares of multiple joints. Monosodium urate crystals were aspirated from the knee confirming the diagnosis of gout. Previous reports have stated an association between Bartter syndrome and gout, but this is the first case report of a pregnancy with active gouty arthritis combined with pseudo-Bartter syndrome.

  6. Canakinumab for the Patient With Difficult-to-Treat Gouty Arthritis: Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with gouty arthritis experience frequent flares and have comorbidities that may limit their anti-inflammatory treatment options for acute flare management. For patients with contraindications to both NSAIDs and/or colchicine, treatment options are particularly limited, and there is an unmet medical need in this subgroup of patients. Two phase 3 studies and their extensions have demonstrated that a single dose of canakinumab during an acute flare provided rapid and effective pain relief and prolonged suppression of flares and inflammation in patients with a history of frequent flares and contraindicated for, intolerant of, or unresponsive to NSAIDs and/or colchicine. Canakinumab was consistently superior to the active comparator triamcinolone acetonide and was generally well tolerated in this patient population with a high prevalence of multiple medical comorbidities. Canakinumab should therefore be considered as a treatment option in a target population of patients with frequent gouty arthritis attacks who are unable to use NSAIDs and colchicine and in whom frequent use of corticosteroids is not considered appropriate.

  7. Canakinumab relieves symptoms of acute flares and improves health-related quality of life in patients with difficult-to-treat Gouty Arthritis by suppressing inflammation: results of a randomized, dose-ranging study.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi; De Meulemeester, Marc; Pikhlak, Andrey; Yücel, A Eftal; Richard, Dominik; Murphy, Valda; Arulmani, Udayasankar; Sallstig, Peter; So, Alexander

    2011-03-25

    We report the impact of canakinumab, a fully human anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody, on inflammation and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with difficult-to-treat Gouty Arthritis. In this eight-week, single-blind, double-dummy, dose-ranging study, patients with acute Gouty Arthritis flares who were unresponsive or intolerant to--or had contraindications for--non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or colchicine were randomized to receive a single subcutaneous dose of canakinumab (10, 25, 50, 90, or 150 mg) (N = 143) or an intramuscular dose of triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg (N = 57). Patients assessed pain using a Likert scale, physicians assessed clinical signs of joint inflammation, and HRQoL was measured using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) (acute version). At baseline, 98% of patients were suffering from moderate-to-extreme pain. The percentage of patients with no or mild pain was numerically greater in most canakinumab groups compared with triamcinolone acetonide from 24 to 72 hours post-dose; the difference was statistically significant for canakinumab 150 mg at these time points (P < 0.05). Treatment with canakinumab 150 mg was associated with statistically significant lower Likert scores for tenderness (odds ratio (OR), 3.2; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27 to 7.89; P = 0.014) and swelling (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.09 to 6.50, P = 0.032) at 72 hours compared with triamcinolone acetonide. Median C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A levels were normalized by seven days post-dose in most canakinumab groups, but remained elevated in the triamcinolone acetonide group. Improvements in physical health were observed at seven days post-dose in all treatment groups; increases in scores were highest for canakinumab 150 mg. In this group, the mean SF-36 physical component summary score increased by 12.0 points from baseline to 48.3 at seven days post-dose. SF-36 scores for physical functioning and bodily pain for the canakinumab

  8. High Level Serum Procalcitonin Associated Gouty Arthritis Susceptibility: From a Southern Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Sigdel, Keshav Raj; Wang, Ying; Su, Qun; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Yan Lin; Chen, Jie; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Guixiu

    2015-01-01

    To study the serum Procalcitonin (PCT) level in inflammatory arthritis including gouty arthritis (GA), Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) without any evidence of infection were evaluated the possible discriminative role of PCT in gouty arthritis susceptibility in southern Chinese Han Population. From Feb, 2012 to Feb, 2015, 51 patients with GA, 37 patients with RA, 41 patients with AS and 33 healthy control were enrolled in this study with no evidence of infections. The serum level of PCT (normal range < 0.05 ng/ml) was measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). Disease activity was determined by scores of VAS (4.07 ± 1.15), DAS28 (4.97 ± 1.12), and ASDAS (2.97 ± 0.81) in GA, RA and AS groups respectively. Other laboratory parameters such as, serum creatinine (CRE), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), uric acid (UA) and white blood cells (WBC) were extracted from medical record system. Serum PCT level was predominantly higher in gouty arthritis than in RA and AS patients, especially in the GA patients with tophi. PCT was significantly positively correlated with VAS, CRP and ESR in gouty arthritis and CRP in AS. PCT also had positive correlation-ship with ESR, DAS28 and ASDAS in RA and AS patients respectively, but significant differences were not observed. These data suggested that PCT is not solely a biomarker for infection, but also an indicator in inflammatory arthritis, especially in gouty arthritis.

  9. Value of Shear Wave Elastography in the Diagnosis of Gouty and Non-gouty Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanjiao; Yan, Feng; Yang, Yujia; Xiang, Xi; Wang, Liyun; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2017-02-07

    Our aim was to analyze the diagnostic performance of shear wave elastography (SWE) in the diagnosis of gouty arthritis (GA) and non-gouty arthritis (non-GA). Thirty-nine patients in the GA group and 55 patients in the non-GA group were included in the study. Based on the echo intensity of the joint lesions, the GA group was subdivided into hypo-echoic GA, slightly hyper-echoic GA and hyper-echoic GA subgroups. Quantitative SWE features were evaluated and receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed. On the basis of the study, the elastic modulus (Emax), mean elastic modulus (Emean), minimum elastic modulus (Emin) and elastic modulus standard deviation (ESD) were significantly higher in the GA group than in the non-GA group and were highest in the hyper-echoic GA subgroup (p < 0.01 for all). Emin, Emean and Emax were significantly higher in the hyper-echoic GA subgroup than in the hypo-echoic GA subgroup and non-GA group (p < 0.001 for all), and ESD was significantly higher in the hyper-echoic GA subgroup than in the non-GA group (p = 0.001). Emin, Emean, Emax and ESD were higher in the hypo-echoic GA subgroup than in the non-GA group, and the differences were significant (p < 0.001 for all). Based on the hypo-echoic GA subgroup and non-GA group, areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the prediction of GA were 0.749 for Emin, 0.877 for Emean, 0.896 for Emax and 0.886 for ESD, with optimal cutoff values of 29.40 kPa for Emin, 45.35 kPa for Emean, 67.54 kPa for Emax and 7.85 kPa for ESD. Our results indicate that SWE can differentially diagnose GA and non-GA, especially when the ultrasound manifestations are not typical.

  10. Prevalence and significance of MEFV gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Karaarslan, Ahmet; Kobak, Senol; Kaya, Işın; Intepe, Nazım; Orman, Mehmet; Berdelı, Afig

    2016-11-01

    Gouty arthritis is a chronic erosive autoinflammatory disease. Pyrin has anti-inflammatory effects in the regulation of inflammasome and is encoded by the MEFV gene. The relationship between different rheumatic diseases and the MEFV gene mutations was demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of MEFV gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis and identify a possible correlation with disease phenotype. Ninety-three patients with gouty arthritis and 102 healthy controls, compatible with age, gender and ethnicity, were included in the study. MEFV gene mutations were investigated by PCR method. Out of 93 patients with gouty arthritis, 36 (38.7 %) showed MEFV gene mutations carriage, whereas 20.6 % in healthy control group. Distribution of mutations identified in patients with gouty arthritis was as; R202Q in 18 (19.3 %), E148Q in 5 (5.4 %), K695R in 4 (4.3 %), M680I in 2 (2.1 %), V726A in 2 (2.1 %), P369S in 2 (2.1 %), R408Q in 2 (2.1 %), M694 V in 1 (1.1 %), respectively. Three patients were identified with compound heterozygosity. Distribution of MEFV gene mutations carriage in healthy controls was; E148Q in 11 (10.7 %), M694 V in 2 (1.9 %), M694I in 1 (0.9 %), M680I in 2 (1.9 %), V726A in 1 (0.9 %), A744S in 1 (0.9 %), K695R in 2 (1.9 %), and P369S in 1 (0.9 %) patients, respectively. Higher MEFV gene mutations carrier frequency was observed in patients with gouty arthritis, compared with the control group (p = 0.009). Heterozygous R202Q was the most common mutation detected in patients with gouty arthritis, while heterozygous E148Q in healthy control group. Statistically significant difference was not detected between clinical findings of gouty arthritis and the MEFV gene mutations (p > 0.05). We determined higher prevalence of MEFV gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis compared with the healthy control group. The most frequently detected mutation was heterozygous R202Q, whereas E148Q in healthy

  11. Rare coexistence of gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ichiseki, Toru; Ueda, Shusuke; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis is rare. In particular, no reports have described the development of both gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. He had a history of diabetes mellitus (HbA1c: 7.4%), but not of gout, and the GFR was decreased (GFR=46). During the postoperative course fever suddenly developed and joint fluid retention was found. Uric acid crystals were detected when the joint fluid was aspirated, after which when the culture results became available sepsis due to methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was diagnosed. On the 2(nd) day after fever onset, lavage and debridement were performed under arthroscopy, with the subsequent course uneventful with no recurrence of the infection or gouty arthritis and no joint destruction. When uric acid crystals are found in aspirated joint fluid, gouty arthritis tends to be diagnosed, but like in the present case if infection also supervenes, joint destruction and a poor general state may result if appropriate intervention is not initiated swiftly. Accordingly, even if uric acid crystals are found, the possibility of coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis should be kept in mind.

  12. [Historical study on traditional Chinese formulations and crude drugs used for gouty arthritis].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Kikuyo; Moriyama, Kenzo; Murata, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hideaki; Tani, Tadato

    2011-01-01

    Rates of gouty arthritis with hyperuricemia have increased recently as it has become a lifestyle-related disease. We reviewed historical treatments for pain due to gouty arthritis in traditional Chinese medical books, with special interest in pathological causes, including dietary and drinking habits, as well as the frequency of crude drugs used in historical prescriptions. From the present historical survey, we showed that six traditional terms may be equivalent to modern gouty arthritis and that the "Manbyokaishun," a formulary edited in the 16th century in China, included medical information for gouty arthritis. Furthermore, the 46 prescriptions, including Sokeikakketsuto, mentioned in the "Manbyokaishun," were selected as likely treatments for gouty arthritis. The most common crude drugs in the 46 prescriptions were aconite root, angelica root, cinnamon bark, peony root and saposhnikovia root. The inhibitory activity of these crude drugs extracts against xanthine oxidase was investigated. Angelica root and saposhnikovia root showed more potent inhibitory activity (20% at 250 microg/mL) than aconite root (16%), notopterygium rhizome (15%) and cinnamon bark (12%).

  13. [Is there a relationship between gouty arthritis and Mediterranean fever gene mutations?].

    PubMed

    Sari, Ismail; Simsek, Ismail; Tunca, Yusuf; Kisacik, Bunyamin; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih; Cay, Hasan Fatih; Gul, Davut; Dinc, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Gouty arthritis and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) share some clinical and pathological features such as being classified as auto inflammatory disease, association with inflammasome, short-lived intermittent arthritis, and good response to colchicine and anti-interleukin-1 treatments. As Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene is the causative factor of FMF, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of MEFV gene mutations and their effect on disease manifestations in Turkish gouty arthritis patients. Ninety-seven patients diagnosed with primary gouty arthritis (93M and 4 F, 54 [37-84] years) and 100 healthy controls (94M and 6 F, 57 [37-86] years) included in the study. All subjects were genotyped for the MEFV variations. Number of gout attacks, diuretic use, and history of nephrolithiasis and presence of tophus were also recorded. The carriage rate of MEFV mutations for patients and controls were 22.7% (n=22) and 24% (n=24) respectively. The comparison of the patient and control groups yielded no significant difference in terms of the MEFV mutations carriage rate (p=0.87). The allelic frequencies of the MEFV mutations in patients were 11.9% (n=23) and 14% (n=28) in controls (p=0.55). The presence of MEFV variants did not show any association with clinical features of gouty arthritis. The subgroup analysis of patients revealed that gouty arthritis patients with mutations had similar frequencies of tophus, history of nephrolithiasis and podogra compared to the ones without mutations (p>0.05). This study does not provide support for a major role of MEFV mutations in Turkish gouty arthritis patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. An update on the pathology and clinical management of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Emilio B

    2012-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is an inflammatory condition associated with debilitating clinical symptoms, functional impairments, and a substantial impact on quality of life. This condition is initially triggered by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals into the joint space. This causes an inflammatory cascade resulting in the secretion of several proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil recruitment into the joint. While generally effective, currently available agents are associated with a number of adverse events and contraindications that complicate their use. Based on our increased understanding of the inflammatory pathogenesis of gouty arthritis, several new agents are under development that may provide increased efficacy and reduced toxicity.

  15. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-05

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats.

  16. Traditional Chinese Medicine Formula "Xiaofeng granules" suppressed gouty arthritis animal models and inhibited the proteoglycan degradation on chondrocytes induced by monosodium urate.

    PubMed

    Shi, Le; Zhao, Fangli; Zhu, Fangfang; Liang, Yuqiong; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Guangji; Xu, Li; Yin, Lian

    2016-09-15

    Xiaofeng Granules (XF) is a kind of granules prepared by the famous traditional Chinese medicine formula for its efficiency in treating gouty diseases. We investigated the relevance between XF that made from Modified simiaowan (MSW) as the anti-gouty arthritis drugs and protective mechanisms for cartilage matrix in order to provide the evidence for new drug application. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-gouty arthritis activity of XF in rats and rabbits models induced by MSU together with chondrocytes focusing on the link to proteoglycan degradation in vitro studies. The results demonstrated that XF significantly reduced the swelling rate and attenuated the pathological changes in joints. The XF-containing serum were used medicated serum in cellular experiments. The in vitro data were in accordance with the in vivo results, showing that the constituents in XF-containing serum had obvious inhibitory effects on the activation of pro-inflammatory mediators in chondrocytes. Moreover, XF-containing serum substantially inhibited MSU-induced expression of glycosaminoglycans(GAG) and hydroxyproline(Hyp), and up regulated proteoglycan, which might be associated with the regulation of the balance of MMP-3/TIMP-1and ADAMTS-4/TIMP-3 inchondrocytes. In conclusion, XF that made from MSW showed obvious effects on acute gouty arthritis, which also provided an effective protection on cartilage matrix degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polymorphisms in the NLRP3 gene and risk of primary gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dong-Mei; Zhou, Yu-Jiao; Wang, Luan; Ren, Wei; Cui, Ling-Ling; Han, Lin; Qu, Zheng-Hai; Li, Chang-Gui; Zhao, Jia-Jun

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between genetic variants in 17 tagSNPs of the NLRP3 gene and the susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis. A genotype-phenotype analysis of 480 primary gout and 480 control patients was performed. Samples from all the patients were collected from The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College (Qingdao, China). Seventeen tagSNPs of the NLRP3 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and MassARRAY technology was used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The genetic frequency of rs7512998 was significantly different between the gout and control patients (P<0.05), whereas no significant differences were identified for the remaining SNPs. The 17 SNPs conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in the control group (P>0.05). The haplotype association among the 17 SNPs of the NLRP3 gene indicated that no individual SNP was significantly associated with primary gouty arthritis. CTATCAGCGCCCAGTGC was the most common haplotype in the case and control groups, with a frequency of 0.224 and 0.243, respectively. However, the odds ratios (ORs) of the 8 haplotypes were not identified to be significantly associated with gouty arthritis (P>0.05 for all the 8 haplotypes). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the association between SNPs of the NLRP3 gene and the risk of primary gouty arthritis, although no significant association was identified. Further clinical studies and functional analysis are required to explore the potential associations between NLRP3 gene polymorphisms and the risk of primary gouty arthritis.

  18. The Way Forward: Practical Clinical Considerations for the Use of Canakinumab in Patients With Difficult-to-Treat Gouty Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Thomas; van de Laar, Martinus A F J

    2015-10-01

    Canakinumab is indicated for patients with frequent gouty arthritis attacks who cannot be managed with standard-of-care medication, and should be used according to the labeled indication. Given its mechanism of action, physicians need to be aware of the potential contraindications and precautions with its use. When deciding as to whether a patient with gouty arthritis is an appropriate candidate for canakinumab treatment, several key clinical considerations should be kept in mind, which are discussed herein.

  19. Sonographic Findings in Gouty Arthritis: Diagnostic Value and Association with Disease Duration.

    PubMed

    Elsaman, Ahmed M; Muhammad, Eman M S; Pessler, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the sonographic features of gouty arthritis and correlate findings with disease duration. The study was conducted on 100 patients in ambulatory care aged ≥40 y. Inclusion criteria included mono- or oligo-arthritis with effusion of the knee or the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint and no known history of gout. A complete medical history was obtained with emphasis on the known risk factors or causes of gouty arthritis. A 12-MHz Medison linear probe was used for ultrasonography (US). Synovial fluid analysis with polarizing light microscopy was performed on all patients. Ninety-eight knee joints and 33 first MTP joints were examined. Gouty arthritis was found by US in four forms: (i) floating echogenic foci in effusion fluid or Baker cysts, (ii) deposits on the cartilage surface (double contour sign), (iii) erosions and (iv) mature tophus/tophi. These were found in 78.9%, 42.3%, 39.4% and 28.2% of patients, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of US in detecting gout (as defined by the clinical gold standard, i.e., detection of urate crystals by polarizing light microscopy) were 85.9% and 86.7%, respectively. Detection of echogenic foci in effusion fluid was associated with the shortest duration of symptoms (median duration 2 y) followed by double contour sign (3.5 y), erosions (4 y) and tophus (12.5 y). Sonographic findings in gout can be assigned a temporal pattern, with echogenic foci being associated with the shortest and full tophus formation with the longest disease duration.

  20. First metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis for the treatment of tophaceous gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sang; Park, Eui Hyun; Lee, Ho Jin; Koh, Yong Gon

    2014-02-01

    In tophaceous gouty arthritis, surgeons face the choice between preservation of the involved joint and arthrodesis after tophi excision. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can allow evaluation of the distribution of tophaceous deposits, which can be difficult to visualize on radiography. The goal of this study was to evaluate the characteristic MRI features of tophaceous lesions and to compare the clinical outcomes of arthrodesis after tophi excision with those of simple tophi excision. The authors reviewed 16 feet in 15 consecutive patients diagnosed with tophaceous gouty arthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint who underwent surgery. Nine feet (group A) were treated with simple tophi excision, whereas the other 7 (group B) underwent first MTP joint arthrodesis after tophi excision. For clinical evaluation, the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, Tegner activity scale, and patient satisfaction assessments were used. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate the characteristics of tophaceous deposits in the first MTP joint. Mean VAS and AOFAS scores and patient satisfaction significantly differed between the 2 groups at final follow-up (P=.007, .005, and .002, respectively). In group A, progression of arthritis of the first MTP joint was observed in 6 of 9 cases at final follow-up. The tophaceous lesions of these 6 cases were found to be located intra-articularly on MRI. Arthrodesis after tophi excision should be considered for treating tophaceous gouty arthritis of the first MTP joint when tophi are located intra-articularly and loss of cartilage involved is greater than 50% of the entire joint.

  1. Genetic variants of PPAR-gamma coactivator 1B augment NLRP3-mediated inflammation in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wan-Chun; Jan Wu, Yeong-Jian; Chung, Wen-Hung; Lee, Yun-Shien; Chin, See-Wen; Chen, Ting-Jui; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Der-Yuan; Hung, Shuen-Iu

    2017-03-01

    Gout is characterized by recurrent attacks of arthritis with hyperuricaemia and urate crystal-induced inflammation. Although urate transporters are known as risk factors, the immunogenetics of gouty inflammation remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the genetic association between immune/metabolism regulators and gout. We enrolled 448 gout patients and 943 population controls from Taiwan; all were Han Chinese. We screened association between gout and 22 variants of candidate genes, including NLRP3 , caspase 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α ( PPARGC1A ) and 1β ( PPARGC1B ). The association was validated by replication and combined-sample analyses. Functional assays were performed by quantitative PCR, ELISA, siRNA knockdown and transfection using THP-1 cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial cells from patients. Gouty arthritis exhibited significant association with variants of peroxisome PPARGC1B , which included a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, rs45520937 [P = 6.66 × 10 -9 ; odds ratio (95% CI): 1.85 (1.51, 2.28)]. Expression of PPARGC1B and NLRP3 was induced in urate crystal-activated THP-1, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial cells from gout patients in acute stage. siRNA knockdown of PPARGC1B upregulated NLRP3 in urate crystal-activated macrophages. Compared with the wild-type carriers, patients with the risk A allele of rs45520937 showed statistically increased NLRP3 (P = 0.044) and plasma IL-1β (P = 0.006). Transfection of PPARGC1B cDNA with rs45520937 A allele to macrophages significantly augmented the expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β. Genetic variants of PPARGC1B are significantly associated with gout, and a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, rs45520937, augments NLRP3 and IL-1β expression. These data suggest that variants of PPARGC1B , a regulator of metabolism and inflammation, contribute to the pathogenesis of gouty arthritis.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of canakinumab in patients with gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Van, Linh M; Skerjanec, Andrej; Floch, David; Klein, Ulf R; Krammer, Gerhard; Sunkara, Gangadhar; Howard, Dan

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the anti-interleukin (IL)-1β monoclonal antibody, canakinumab, in gouty arthritis patients from three studies are reported. Canakinumab has low serum clearance (0.214 L/day), low steady-state volume of distribution (7.44 L), a 25.8-day half-life, and approximately 60% subcutaneous absolute bioavailability in a typical 93-kg patient. Creatinine clearance had a small positive impact on serum canakinumab clearance that is not likely to be clinically relevant. Binding to circulating IL-1β was demonstrated by increases in total serum IL-1β following canakinumab dosing. Total IL-1β kinetics and canakinumab pharmacokinetics were characterized by a population-based pharmacokinetic-binding model, where the estimated apparent in vivo dissociation constant (signifying binding affinity of canakinumab to circulating IL-1β) was 0.99 nmol/L in gouty arthritis patients. Canakinumab treatment provided rapid, sustained decreases in C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, provided superior pain relief to triamcinolone acetonide, and increased time to first recurrent attack (P ≤ 0.01 favoring all canakinumab doses vs. triamcinolone acetonide).

  3. NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Karaarslan, Ahmet; Kobak, Senol; Berdeli, Afig

    2016-11-10

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domains/caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 15 (NOD2/CARD15) is a cytoplasmic molecule controlling apoptosis and inflammatory processes by recognizing some microbial components. We aimed to identify the frequencies of NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis and to determine their possible correlation with the disease phenotype. The study included 93 patients with gouty arthritis and 51 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. The NOD2/CARD15 R702W and G908R gene mutations were explored by the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism method while the 3020insC mutation was analyzed by DNA sequencing. The mean patient age was 54.2 ± 14.2 years and mean duration of the disease was 3.1 ± 2.9 years. The first metatarsophalangeal and finger joint involvements were detected in 72 (77.4%) and 18 (19.5%) patients, respectively. Ankle arthritis and knee arthritis were detected in 43 (46.2%) and 20 (21.5%) patients, respectively. In total, 4 (9%) heterozygous mutations were detected in the G908R and R702W genes, while no mutation was detected in the 3020insC gene. Compared to the control group, there were no significant differences in all three DNA regions (G908R, R702W, and 3020insC; p = 0.452, p = 0.583, and p = 0.350, respectively). No correlation between the NOD2/CARD15 variants and clinical or laboratory findings (p > 0.05) was found. The frequencies of the NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations in the patients were similar to healthy control group. No association between clinical or laboratory findings and the NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations was observed.

  4. NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet; Kobak, Senol; Berdeli, Afig

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domains/caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 15 (NOD2/CARD15) is a cytoplasmic molecule controlling apoptosis and inflammatory processes by recognizing some microbial components. We aimed to identify the frequencies of NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis and to determine their possible correlation with the disease phenotype. The study included 93 patients with gouty arthritis and 51 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. The NOD2/CARD15 R702W and G908R gene mutations were explored by the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism method while the 3020insC mutation was analyzed by DNA sequencing. The mean patient age was 54.2 ± 14.2 years and mean duration of the disease was 3.1 ± 2.9 years. The first metatarsophalangeal and finger joint involvements were detected in 72 (77.4%) and 18 (19.5%) patients, respectively. Ankle arthritis and knee arthritis were detected in 43 (46.2%) and 20 (21.5%) patients, respectively. In total, 4 (9%) heterozygous mutations were detected in the G908R and R702W genes, while no mutation was detected in the 3020insC gene. Compared to the control group, there were no significant differences in all three DNA regions (G908R, R702W, and 3020insC; p = 0.452, p = 0.583, and p = 0.350, respectively). No correlation between the NOD2/CARD15 variants and clinical or laboratory findings (p > 0.05) was found. The frequencies of the NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations in the patients were similar to healthy control group. No association between clinical or laboratory findings and the NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations was observed. PMID:27357501

  5. [Value of procalcitonin measurement in the diagnosis of bacterial infections in patients with fever and flare of chronic gouty arthritis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jian; Long, Li; Zhou, Qiao; Cheng, Jia; Zhou, Bin

    2015-08-18

    We assessed serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels to distinguish bacterial infections from non-bacterial infections in patients with fever and flare of chronic gouty arthritis. One hundred febrile patients with chronic tophaceous gout flare-ups were collected consecutively between November 2011 and January 2014 from the Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital. These patients were divided into non-infectious febrile group (68 patients) and bacterial infectious febrile group (32 patients, including 6 cases of pulmonary infection, 3 cases of infectious arthritis and 21 cases of skin infection, 2 patients died from severe infection were excluded), and 30 patients with flare of chronic gouty arthritis without fever and infection. Serum PCT, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC) count and neutrophil ratio were determined. 57.3% (39/68) patients in the non-infectious febrile group had PCT levels ≥ 0.5 × 10³ ng/L and the ratio in the infectious febrile group was 66.7% (20/30) . No statistically significant difference was detected between them (P>0.05). 16.7% (5/30) patients had PCT levels ≥ 0.5 × 10³ ng/L in the afebrile group and both the differences between the afebrile group and the two febrile groups were significant (P<0.05). The differences of ESR, CRP, WBC count and neutrophil ratio between the two febrile groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). In the chronic gouty arthritis patients with fever, the sensitivity and specificity of high PCT level (≥ 0.5 × 10³ ng/L) for detection of bacterial infections was 33.9% and 74.4%, the positive predictive value was 36.9% and the negative predictive value was 71.9%. The area under the curve (AUC) of PCT, CRP, ESR, WBC count and neutrophil ratio in patients with fever and chronic gouty arthritis was 0.598, 0.636, 0.612, 0.596 and 0.727, respectively. Serum PCT levels may be not a good marker for detection of bacterial

  6. Role of IL-8 rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms in the development of primary gouty arthritis in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y X; Zhao, H; Guo, H Q

    2016-10-17

    In this study, we investigated the role of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of the interleukin-8 gene (IL-8; rs4073 and rs2227306) in the susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis in a Chinese population. Three hundred and twelve patients with primary gouty arthritis and 340 healthy controls were recruited from the Yan'an University Affiliated Hospital between January 2014 and March 2015. The IL-8 rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Unconditional multiple-logistic regression analysis revealed that the TT genotype of rs4073 was correlated with primary gouty arthritis risk, compared to the AA genotype [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-2.54; P = 0.02]. In addition, the IL-8 rs4073 T allele was associated with a significant elevated risk of primary gouty arthritis, in comparison to the A allele (OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.07-1.67; P = 0.01). However, we observed no significant relationship between the IL-8 rs2227306 polymorphism and primary gouty arthritis risk. The results of this study suggest that the IL-8 rs4073 polymorphism could be a marker for primary gouty arthritis development.

  7. Effects of Extract from Mangifera indica Leaf on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; You, Xiao-Ying; Fu, Kong-Long; Yin, Wan-Le

    2012-01-01

    The leaves of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae) is used as a medicinal material in traditional herb medicine for a long time in India, China, and other Eastern Asian countries. Our present study investigated the therapeutic effects of the ethanol extract from Mangifera indica (EMI) in rat with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals-induced gouty arthritis. Effects of EMI (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) administrated for 9 days on the ankle swelling, synovial tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) levels were assessed in MSU crystal rat. Data from our study showed that rat with gouty arthritis induced by MSU crystal demonstrated an elevation in ankle swelling, synovial TNF-α, IL-1β mRNA, and protein levels. Oral administration of 100 and 200 mg/kg EMI for 9 days reversed the abnormalities in ankle swelling, synovial TNF-α, IL-1β mRNA, and protein levels. The results indicated that the beneficial antigouty arthritis effect of EMI may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting TNF-α and IL-1β expression in the synovial tissues. Our study suggests that Mangifera indica and its extract may have a considerable potential for development as an anti-gouty arthritis agent for clinical application.

  8. Challenges associated with the management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Rodolfo V; Guzman, Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    As many as half of all patients with gouty arthritis have some degree of renal impairment. The goal of this systematic review is to provide physicians with a comprehensive examination of available data on the risks and benefits of gouty arthritis treatment options when used in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a systematic literature review to determine what information is available to guide treatment decisions in this patient population. PubMed was searched for English-language articles indexed through July 2011 containing the terms "gout" or "hyperuricemia" and synonyms for renal impairment in combination with drug names. Publications were deemed relevant if they reported results from clinical studies, case reports, or prescribing practices of the drug of interest in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are oftentimes not considered appropriate in patients with CKD. Corticosteroids may be an effective alternative in this population; however, their efficacy has not been confirmed in randomized controlled trials and these agents can cause serious side effects. Allopurinol can be used for the prophylactic management of chronic hyperuricemia in patients with CKD, but the recommended decreased dosage may limit efficacy and serious hypersensitivity reactions may preclude its use. Febuxostat and pegloticase are new treatment options for chronic urate-lowering prophylaxis; however, the safety of these drugs in patients with advanced CKD has not yet been reported. There is currently an unmet need for additional treatment options for the management of gouty arthritis in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  10. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Selaginella moellendorffii in Gouty Arthritis: Antihyperuricemic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Chen, Ke-li; Zhang, Guo-li

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron. (SM) on gouty arthritis and getting an insight of the possible mechanisms. HPLC method was developed for chemical analysis. The paw oedema, the neutrophil accumulation, inflammatory mediators, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes of the joints were analyzed in gouty arthritis rat model, and the kidney injury and serum urate were detected in hyperuricemic mice. Pharmacokinetic result demonstrated that the main apigenin glycosides might be quantitatively transformed into apigenin in the mammalian body. Among these compounds, the apigenin exhibited the strongest effect on xanthine oxidase (XOD). SM aqueous extract has proved to be active in reducing hyperuricemia in dose-dependent manner, and the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in high dose group were decreased significantly as compared with hyperuricemic control group (P < 0.01). The high dose of SM extract could significantly prevent the paw swelling, reduce gouty joint inflammatory features, reduce the release of IL-1β and TNF-α, lower malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, and increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) level (P < 0.01). For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of SM aqueous extract against gout in folk medicine. PMID:28250791

  11. The Role of miRNAs in Common Inflammatory Arthropathies: Osteoarthritis and Gouty Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Stivarou, Theodora; Tsironi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA species that are highly evolutionarily conserved, from higher invertebrates to man. Up to 1000 miRNAs have been identified in human cells thus far, where they are key regulators of the expression of numerous targets at the post-transcriptional level. They are implicated in various processes, including cell differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. An expanding list of miRNAs is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of common, non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Interestingly, osteoarthritis (OA) is now being conceptualized as a metabolic disease, as there is a correlation among hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Experimental evidence suggests that metabolic deregulation is a commonality between these different pathological entities, and that miRNAs are key players in the modulation of metabolic routes. In light of these findings, this review discusses the role of miRNAs in OA and gouty arthritis, as well as the possible therapeutic targetability of miRNAs in these diseases. PMID:27845712

  12. Association of DNA methyltransferase polymorphisms with susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaowu; Peng, Yuanhong; Yao, Chengjiao; Qing, Yufeng; Yang, Qibin; Guo, Xiaolan; Xie, Wenguang; Zhao, Mingcai; Cai, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is the most common type of inflammatory and immune disease, and the prevalence and incidence of gout increases annually. Genetic variations in the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) gene have not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported to influence gene expression and to participate in the pathogenesis of gout. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B polymorphisms contribute to gout susceptibility. These polymorphisms were screened for in 336 gout patients and 306 healthy control subjects (from a South China population) for association with gout. The distribution frequencies of DNMT1 rs2228611 AA genotype (P=0.007) and A allele (P=0.002; odds ratio=1.508, 95% confidence interval=1.158–1.964) were found to be significantly increased in the gout patients when compared with those in the healthy control subjects. The rs1550117 in DNMT3A and rs2424913 in DNMT3B exhibited no significant associations with gout susceptibility between the patients and control subjects. These results demonstrated that the DNMT1 rs2228611 polymorphism may be involved in the pathogenesis of gout, while DNMT3A rs1550117 and DNMT3B rs2424913 did not show any obvious significance in the current study; thus, may not be used as risk factors to predict the susceptibility to gout. However, further studies are required to investigate the functions and regulatory mechanism of the polymorphisms of DNMTs in gout. PMID:27699015

  13. Association of DNA methyltransferase polymorphisms with susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaowu; Peng, Yuanhong; Yao, Chengjiao; Qing, Yufeng; Yang, Qibin; Guo, Xiaolan; Xie, Wenguang; Zhao, Mingcai; Cai, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jing-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Gouty arthritis is the most common type of inflammatory and immune disease, and the prevalence and incidence of gout increases annually. Genetic variations in the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) gene have not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported to influence gene expression and to participate in the pathogenesis of gout. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B polymorphisms contribute to gout susceptibility. These polymorphisms were screened for in 336 gout patients and 306 healthy control subjects (from a South China population) for association with gout. The distribution frequencies of DNMT1 rs2228611 AA genotype (P=0.007) and A allele (P=0.002; odds ratio=1.508, 95% confidence interval=1.158-1.964) were found to be significantly increased in the gout patients when compared with those in the healthy control subjects. The rs1550117 in DNMT3A and rs2424913 in DNMT3B exhibited no significant associations with gout susceptibility between the patients and control subjects. These results demonstrated that the DNMT1 rs2228611 polymorphism may be involved in the pathogenesis of gout, while DNMT3A rs1550117 and DNMT3B rs2424913 did not show any obvious significance in the current study; thus, may not be used as risk factors to predict the susceptibility to gout. However, further studies are required to investigate the functions and regulatory mechanism of the polymorphisms of DNMTs in gout.

  14. The Effects of Modified Simiao Decoction in the Treatment of Gouty Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Zhang, Jun-Jun; Xing, Guo-Lan; Chen, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    The modified Simiao decoctions (MSD) have been wildly applied in the treatment of gouty arthritis in China. However, the evidence needs to be evaluated by a systematic review and meta-analysis. After filtering, twenty-four randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of MSD and anti-inflammation medications and/or urate-lowering therapies in patients with gouty arthritis were included. In comparison with anti-inflammation medications, urate-lowering therapies, or coadministration of anti-inflammation medications and urate-lowering therapies, MSD monotherapy significantly lowered serum uric acid (p < 0.00001, mean difference = −90.62, and 95% CI [−128.38, −52.86]; p < 0.00001, mean difference = −91.43, and 95% CI [−122.38, −60.49]; p = 0.02, mean difference = −40.30, and 95% CI [−74.24, −6.36], resp.). Compared with anti-inflammation medications and/or urate-lowering therapies, MSD monotherapy significantly decreased ESR (p < 0.00001; mean difference = −8.11; 95% CI [−12.53, −3.69]) and CRP (p = 0.03; mean difference = −3.21; 95% CI [−6.07, −0.36]). Additionally, the adverse effects (AEs) of MSD were fewer (p < 0.00001; OR = 0.08; 95% CI [0.05, 0.16]). MSD are effective in the treatment of gouty arthritis through anti-inflammation and lowering urate. However, the efficacy of MSD should be estimated with more RCTs. PMID:28373889

  15. Spinal and sacroiliac gouty arthritis: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Omoumi, Patrick; Wieers, Gregoire; Maldague, Baudouin; Malghem, Jacques; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Vande Berg, Bruno C

    2014-01-01

    In this case report, we describe an “uncommon” case of axial gouty arthropathy in a 69-year-old woman with bilateral sciatica that was thoroughly evaluated with conventional radiography, CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy, and PET-CT. Axial gouty arthropathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of chronic low back pain, mainly when several risk factors for gout are present. PMID:25346852

  16. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis.

  17. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal-induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal-induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  18. Effects of RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Y.-Y.; Li, Y.-F.; Xu, M.; Li, W.-Y.; Yang, M.; Li, R.-L.

    2015-01-01

    RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses antigout, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperuricemic properties based on the traditional conceptions. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effect of PRP15 in rat gouty arthritis induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. In the present study, we found that treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg) in rats with gouty arthritis induced by MSU crystals significantly attenuated the knee swelling. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that MSU-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and the elevated expressions of nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in synovial tissues were significantly inhibited, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) result showed that MSU-induced high levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in synovial fluid were reduced by treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg). We conclude that RPP15 may be a promising candidate for the development of a new treatment for gout and its activity of antigout may be partially related to inhibiting TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and NF-κB p65 expression in the synovial tissues. PMID:26221174

  19. Suppressive effect of Sanmiao formula on experimental gouty arthritis by inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation: An in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fangfang; Yin, Lian; Ji, Leilei; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Guangji; Shi, Le; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Sanmiao formula (SM) is a compound prescription, which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine since the Ming Dynasty for gouty and rheumatoid arthritis treatments. However, no evidence has been unfolded to show the relationship between SM and gouty arthritis (GA), particularly inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation. In the present study, we undertook a characterization of anti-GA activity of SM using an in vivo rat model induced by potassium oxonate and cold bath together with in vitro studies with chondrocytes for further molecular characterization. Potassium oxonate and cold bath rats were treated with SM at doses of 7.2g/kg per day for 5days. SM treatments significantly suppressed the swelling rate and the severe pathologic changes in the joints of the animals in gout model. Inflammatory factors count by ELISA analysis, SM exhibited inhibition on IL-1β and TNF-α. Moreover, histological analysis of the joints and SM-serum substantially interfered with the MSU-induced expression of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), up-regulated the content of proteoglycan. Importantly, SM interfered with GA-augmented expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -3 and aggrecanases (ADAMTS)-4, which are considered to be key enzymes in cartilage matrix degradation, and simultaneously augmented GA-reduced tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) -1 and -3 expression in the joints and chondrocytes. Therefore, SM is looking forward to be a potential novel agent that could prevent cartilage matrix degradation effectively in gouty arthritis, and this provides a new target for development of new medicines.

  20. Kinsenoside screening with a microfluidic chip attenuates gouty arthritis through inactivating NF-κB signaling in macrophages and protecting endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qiao; Bing, Wang; Di, Yin; Hua, Li; Shi-he, Li; Yu-hua, Zheng; Xiu-guo, Han; Yu-gang, Wang; Qi-ming, Fan; Shih-mo, Yang; Ting-ting, Tang

    2016-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is a rheumatic disease that is characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) in synovial joints cause by the increased serum hyperuricemia. This study used a three-dimensional (3D) flowing microfluidic chip to screen the effective candidate against MSU-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) damage, and found kinsenoside (Kin) to be the leading active component of Anoectochilus roxburghi, one of the Chinese medicinal plant widely used in the treatment of gouty arthritis clinically. Cell viability and apoptosis of HUVECs were evaluated, indicating that direct Kin stimulation and conditioned medium (CM) from Kin-treated macrophages both negatively modulated with MSU crystals. Additionally, Kin was capable of attenuating MSU-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (NF-κB/MAPK) signaling, targeting IκB kinase-α (IKKα) and IKKβ kinases of macrophages and influencing the expressions of NF-κB downstream cytokines and subsequent HUVEC bioactivity. Inflammasome NLR pyrin domain-containing 3 (NALP3) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) were also inhibited after Kin treatment. Also, Kin downregulated CD14-mediated MSU crystals uptake in macrophages. In vivo study with MSU-injected ankle joints further revealed the significant suppression of inflammatory infiltration and endothelia impairment coupled with alleviation of ankle swelling and nociceptive response via Kin treatments. Taken together, these data implicated that Kin was the most effective candidate from Anoectochilus roxburghi to treat gouty arthritis clinically. PMID:27584788

  1. Kinsenoside screening with a microfluidic chip attenuates gouty arthritis through inactivating NF-κB signaling in macrophages and protecting endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiao; Bing, Wang; Di, Yin; Hua, Li; Shi-He, Li; Yu-Hua, Zheng; Xiu-Guo, Han; Yu-Gang, Wang; Qi-Ming, Fan; Shih-Mo, Yang; Ting-Ting, Tang

    2016-09-01

    Gouty arthritis is a rheumatic disease that is characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) in synovial joints cause by the increased serum hyperuricemia. This study used a three-dimensional (3D) flowing microfluidic chip to screen the effective candidate against MSU-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) damage, and found kinsenoside (Kin) to be the leading active component of Anoectochilus roxburghi, one of the Chinese medicinal plant widely used in the treatment of gouty arthritis clinically. Cell viability and apoptosis of HUVECs were evaluated, indicating that direct Kin stimulation and conditioned medium (CM) from Kin-treated macrophages both negatively modulated with MSU crystals. Additionally, Kin was capable of attenuating MSU-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (NF-κB/MAPK) signaling, targeting IκB kinase-α (IKKα) and IKKβ kinases of macrophages and influencing the expressions of NF-κB downstream cytokines and subsequent HUVEC bioactivity. Inflammasome NLR pyrin domain-containing 3 (NALP3) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) were also inhibited after Kin treatment. Also, Kin downregulated CD14-mediated MSU crystals uptake in macrophages. In vivo study with MSU-injected ankle joints further revealed the significant suppression of inflammatory infiltration and endothelia impairment coupled with alleviation of ankle swelling and nociceptive response via Kin treatments. Taken together, these data implicated that Kin was the most effective candidate from Anoectochilus roxburghi to treat gouty arthritis clinically.

  2. Therapeutic Effects of Chinese Medicine Herb Pair, Huzhang and Guizhi, on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats Revealed by Anti-Inflammatory Assessments and NMR-Based Metabonomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Huang, Huizhu; Li, Zhong; Gong, Mengjuan; Shi, Wan; Zhu, Chunxia; Gu, Zulian; Zou, Zhongjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of Huzhang-Guizhi herb pair (HG), firstly included in Hu-Zhang Power documented in Taiping Shenghui Fang, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystals-induced gouty arthritis in rats. We found that pretreatment with HG in rats with gouty arthritis could significantly attenuate the ankle joint swelling, and this beneficial antigout effect might be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) production in synovial fluid as well as nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) protein expression in synovial tissue. Moreover, metabonomic analysis demonstrated that 5 and 6 potential biomarkers associated with gouty arthritis in plasma and urine, respectively, which were mainly involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism, were identified. HG could reverse the pathological process of MSU-induced gouty arthritis through regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provided important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of HG against MSU-induced gouty arthritis in rats.

  3. [Differential diagnosis of acute arthritis].

    PubMed

    Eviltis, Egidijus

    2003-01-01

    Acute arthritis can first present as a symptom of dangerous and rapidly progressing disease. It is quite easy to differentiate between arthritis and periarthritis. More problematical is correct early differential diagnosis of the acute arthritis. Determining whether one, several or many joints are affected can narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Arthrocentesis and synovial fluid testing provide much information and should be done at initial evaluation if possible. The presence or absence of fever, rash, family history of joint disease and exposure to infective organisms can further direct diagnostic studies and treatment. In general, to avoid masking clues, drug therapy should be delayed for mild symptoms until diagnosis is complete. This article is designed mostly for primary care physicians, residents and includes author's original data and review of recommended reading.

  4. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Arthroscopic Debridement in Combination with Oral Medication Versus Oral Medication in Patients with Gouty Knee Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wanyan, Pingping; Wang, Jian Min; Tian, Jin Hui; Hu, Long; Shen, Xi Ping; Yang, Ke Hu

    2015-12-01

    Gouty knee arthritis refers to a form of inflammatory diseases caused by deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in knee joint. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of arthroscopic debridement in combination with oral medication versus oral medication alone for the treatment of gouty knee arthritis. A total of 60 patients with gouty knee arthritis were randomized to receive either arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication or oral medication alone. Efficacy was assessed with the angle of motion, functions, and visual analog scale (VAS). These indices were measured prior to treatment and at 2, 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks posttreatment. Surgery- and medication-related complications were observed. Significant differences in flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and VAS were detected between the two groups at 2, 4, and 12 weeks posttreatment (P < 0.05) but not at weeks 24 and 48 posttreatment (P > 0.05) . Significant differences in these indices were detected at different time points in each group (P < 0.05), except between weeks 24 and 48 (P > 0.05). Arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication is superior to single oral medication in the flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and pain relief (VAS) before 24 weeks, although no statistical differences were detected in the efficacy after 24 weeks, and in medication-related safety between the two groups. Although arthroscopic debridement cannot replace systemic uric acid-lowering treatments such as medication and dietary control, it is still an effective approach.

  5. A prospective evaluation of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in acute microcrystalline arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Pascal; Pascal, Zufferey; Valcov, Roxana; Fabreguet, Isabelle; Dumusc, Alexandre; Omoumi, Patrick; So, Alexander

    2015-07-22

    The performance of ultrasound (US) in the diagnosis of acute gouty (MSU) arthritis and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) arthritis is not yet well defined. Most studies evaluated US as the basis for diagnosing crystal arthritis in already diagnosed cases of gout and few prospective studies have been performed. One hundred nine consecutive patients who presented an acute arthritis of suspected microcrystalline arthritis were prospectively included. All underwent an US of the symptomatic joints(s) and of knees, ankles and 1(st) metatarsopalangeal (MTP) joints by a rheumatologist "blinded" to the clinical history. 92 also had standard X-rays. Crystal identification was the gold standard. Fifty-one patients had MSU, 28 CPP and 9 had both crystals by microscopic analysis. No crystals were detected in 21. One had septic arthritis. Based on US signs in the symptomatic joint, the sensitivity of US for both gout and CPP was low (60% for both). In gout, the presence of US signs in the symptomatic joint was highly predictive of the diagnosis (PPV = 92%). When US diagnosis was based on an examination of multiple joints, the sensitivity for both gout and CPP rose significantly but the specificity and the PPV decreased. In the absence of US signs in all the joints studied, CPP arthritis was unlikely (NPV = 87%) particularly in patients with no previous crisis (NPV = 94%). X-ray of the symptomatic joints was confirmed to be not useful in diagnosing gout and was equally sensitive or specific as US in CPP arthritis. Arthrocenthesis remains the key investigation for the diagnosis of microcrystalline acute arthritis. Although US can help in the diagnostic process, its diagnostic performance is only moderate. US should not be limited to the symptomatic joint. Examination of multiple joints gives a better diagnostic sensitivity but lower specificity.

  6. Soft coral-derived lemnalol alleviates monosodium urate-induced gouty arthritis in rats by inhibiting leukocyte infiltration and iNOS, COX-2 and c-Fos protein expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Pai; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lin, Yen-You; Wang, Hui-Min; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Wu, Shu-Fen; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-10

    An acute gout attack manifests in the joint as dramatic inflammation. To date, the clinical use of medicinal agents has typically led to undesirable side effects. Numerous efforts have failed to create an effective and safe agent for the treatment of gout. Lemnalol-an extract from Formosan soft coral-has documented anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties. In the present study, we attempt to examine the therapeutic effects of lemnalol on intra-articular monosodium urate (MSU)-induced gouty arthritis in rats. In the present study, we found that treatment with lemnalol (intramuscular [im]), but not colchicine (oral [po]), significantly attenuated MUS-induced mechanical allodynia, paw edema and knee swelling. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that MSU-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, as well as the elevated expression of c-Fos and pro-inflammatory proteins (inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) observed in synovial tissue, were significantly inhibited by treatment with lemnalol. We conclude that lemnalol may be a promising candidate for the development of a new treatment for gout and other acute neutrophil-driven inflammatory diseases.

  7. Soft Coral-Derived Lemnalol Alleviates Monosodium Urate-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Leukocyte Infiltration and iNOS, COX-2 and c-Fos Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Pai; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lin, Yen-You; Wang, Hui-Min; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Wu, Shu-Fen; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    An acute gout attack manifests in the joint as dramatic inflammation. To date, the clinical use of medicinal agents has typically led to undesirable side effects. Numerous efforts have failed to create an effective and safe agent for the treatment of gout. Lemnalol—an extract from Formosan soft coral—has documented anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties. In the present study, we attempt to examine the therapeutic effects of lemnalol on intra-articular monosodium urate (MSU)-induced gouty arthritis in rats. In the present study, we found that treatment with lemnalol (intramuscular [im]), but not colchicine (oral [po]), significantly attenuated MUS-induced mechanical allodynia, paw edema and knee swelling. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that MSU-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, as well as the elevated expression of c-Fos and pro-inflammatory proteins (inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) observed in synovial tissue, were significantly inhibited by treatment with lemnalol. We conclude that lemnalol may be a promising candidate for the development of a new treatment for gout and other acute neutrophil-driven inflammatory diseases. PMID:23306170

  8. Severe Gouty Arthritis and Mild Neurologic Symptoms Due to F199C, a Newly Identified Variant of the Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Bardin, Thomas; Jinnah, H. A.; Aral, Bernard; Lioté, Frédéric; Ceballos-Picot, Irène

    2010-01-01

    A deficiency in hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity leads to overproduction of uric acid. According to the degree of enzymatic deficiency, a large spectrum of neurologic features can also be observed, ranging from mild or no neurologic involvement to complete Lesch-Nyhan disease. Herein, we describe a patient with hyperuricemia, juvenile-onset gouty arthritis, nephrolithiasis, and mild neurologic symptoms, attributed to a newly identified variant of the hprt gene, c.596T>G, resulting in the amino acid change p.F199C. Residual HPRT activity (8%) protected against severe neurologic involvement in this patient. Modeling of the mutated protein was used to predict the mechanisms that led to partial enzymatic activity. Careful neurologic examination is warranted in juvenile and middle-aged patients with gout, in order to detect mild symptoms that may lead to a diagnosis of HPRT deficiency. PMID:19565499

  9. Treatment of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a rare, but potentially devastating disease. The treatment is initiated intravenously, but can be safely switched to oral after 2-4 days providing large doses of a well-absorbing antibiotic and, for time-dependent antibiotics, 4 times-a-day administration are used. Empiric treatment should always cover Staphylococcus aureus and common respiratory pathogens, whereas Kingella kingae and Salmonella are important only regionally. Studies conducted by our group have shown that a total course of 10 days may suffice for previously healthy children in a Western setting. Treatment of neonates, patients with immunodeficiency or cases caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus, may deserve a different approach.

  10. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  11. Therapeutic effect of Rhizoma Dioscoreae Nipponicae on gouty arthritis based on the SDF-1/CXCR 4 and p38 MAPK pathway: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Liu, Lei; Yu, Dong-hua; Li, Xu-zhao; Zhou, Qi; Liu, Shu-min

    2014-02-01

    Rhizoma Dioscoreae Nipponicae (RDN) is a widely used traditional Chinese herb, which is used to treat arthroncus, arthrodynia and arthritis. As is known to us, inflammatory mechanisms have played an important role in the occurrence, course and prognosis of gouty arthritis (GA). The aim of this study was to determine the characteristic expressed proteins of synovium in GA rat and synovial cell. The rat model of GA was induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystal. Tissue samples were assayed by immunohistochemical method. The effects of RDN on Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), CXCR 4 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were investigated in MSU crystal-induced rat. The levels of SDF-1 and mitogen-activated kinase kinase (MKK) 3/6 were measured by Western Blot in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) incubated fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). A significant increase in the levels of SDF-1, CXCR 4 and p38 MAPK were observed in MSU crystal-induced rat. The increased SDF-1 and MKK 3/6 levels were observed in IL-1β incubated FLS. With the treatment of RDN, the above changes were reverted back to near normal levels. RDN might have some therapeutic effects on GA through SDF-1/CXCR 4 and p38 MAPK pathway, and dioscin may be the active compound in RDN to exert therapeutic effect on GA.

  12. Changes in toll-like receptor (TLR)4-NFκB-IL1β signaling in male gout patients might be involved in the pathogenesis of primary gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Quan-Bo; Zhou, Jing-Guo; Jiang, Li

    2014-02-01

    We undertook this study to determine whether the altered toll-like receptor (TLR)4-nuclear factor κB (NFκB)-interleukin1β (IL1β) signaling in peripheral blood of gout patients could provide insights into the pathogenesis of primary gouty arthritis (GA). TLR4 mRNA, TLR4 and NFκBp65 proteins expression and IL1β production were measured in 52 acute GA (AGA) and 34 non-acute GA (NAGA) male patients and 78 male healthy subjects (HC). NFκBp65 transcriptional activity and IL1β production were measured after TLR4 inhibition with anti-TLR4 antibody in peripheral whole blood from 13 AGA patients. The TLR4, NFκBp65 and IL1β expression was significantly increased in the AGA group than those in the NAGA or HC group (P < 0.05, respectively), also the levels were higher in the NAGA group comparing with those in the HC group (P < 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, moderate positive correlations were observed between concentration of uric acid and the TLR4 mRNA level, serum IL1β production (r = 0.649, 0.616), and strong positive correlation was observed between TLR4 mRNA level and serum IL1β (r = 0.848) in 52 AGA patients. On the other hand, NFκBp65 level and IL1β production were dramatically reduced after TLR4 blockade with anti-TLR4 antibody in peripheral blood from the AGA patients (P < 0.05, respectively). TLR4-NFκB-IL1β signaling might play a crucial role in the development of acute inflammation in primary gout patients.

  13. Therapeutic Effect of Total Saponins from Dioscorea nipponica Makino on Gouty Arthritis Based on the NF-κB Signal Pathway: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Liu, Shumin; Yua, Donghua; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dioscorea nipponica Makino is one of the most common used traditional Chinese drugs which are used to treat gouty arthritis (GA). Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway plays an important role during this process. In the present study, we investigated the effects of total saponins from D. nipponica Makino (TDN) on NF-κB pathway in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induced fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Materials and Methods: FLS were divided into three groups: Normal group, model group, which was given 10 μg/L IL-1β to induce the proliferation, and TDN group (10 μg/L IL-1β +100 μg/L TDN). 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after treating, immune fluorescence method was used to detect the cell location of NF-κB p65. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to detect the activation of NF-κB p65. Western blot method was used to detect the protein expressions of NF-κB p65, IκBα, and p-IκBα. Results: TDN could inhibit the activation and transfer of NF-κB p65. As time went on, the expression of NF-κB p65 in the cytoplasm was decreased while it was increased in the nucleus. The expression of p-IκBα was increased, whereas the expression of IκBα was not changed. TDN could regulate these abnormal expressions. Conclusion: TDN may treat GA by regulating NF-κB signal pathway. SUMMARY TDN could inhibit the transfer of NF-κB p65.TDN could inhibit the activation of NF-κB p65.TDN could inhibit the expression of p-IκBa. Abbreviations used: TDN: Total saponins from Dioscorea nipponica Makino, GA: Gouty arthritis, FLS: Fibroblast-like synoviocytes, IL-1β: Interleukin-1 beta, IF: Immune fluorescence, EMSA: Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, WB: Western blot. PMID:27601855

  14. Anti-nociceptive and anti-edematogenic effects of glibenclamide in a model of acute gouty attack in rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Rosane M S; Oliveira, Sara M; Silva, Cássia R; Hoffmeister, Carin; Ferreira, Juliano; Assreuy, Jamil

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the effect of glibenclamide on inflammatory parameters in a model of acute gouty attack in rats. Intra-articular injection of 50 μl of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals (1.25 mg/site) was used to induce gout-related inflammation. The effects of glibenclamide (1-10 mg/kg, s.c.) or dexamethasone (8 mg/kg, s.c., positive control) were assessed on several inflammation parameters. Spontaneous nociception assessment, edema measurement, total and differential leucocyte counts, interleukin (IL)-1β release, prostaglandin E2 production and determination of blood glucose levels were analyzed. Peritoneal macrophages were incubated with MSU and levels of IL-1β were measured. Statistical significance was assessed by one- or two-way analysis of variance. Glibenclamide (3 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (8 mg/kg) prevented nociception and edema induced by MSU injection in rats. Glibenclamide did not affect leukocyte infiltration, IL-1β release and PGE2 production, but only reduced IL-1β production by MSU-stimulated macrophages at very high concentration (200 μM). Dexamethasone significantly reduced leukocyte infiltration, IL-1β release and PGE2 production. Glibenclamide reduced whereas dexamethasone increased blood glucose levels of MSU-injected rats. Glibenclamide reduced nociception and edema, but not leukocyte infiltration, IL-1β release and PGE2 production. However, its substantial effect on nociception and edema suggests that glibenclamide can be an interesting option as an adjuvant treatment for pain induced by acute attacks of gout.

  15. In vitro xanthine oxidase and albumin denaturation inhibition assay of Barringtonia racemosa L. and total phenolic content analysis for potential anti-inflammatory use in gouty arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nurul Izzati; Sidik, Norrizah Jaafar; Awal, Asmah; Adam, Nurul Athirah Mohamad; Rezali, Nur Inani

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities and total phenolic content (TPC) of methanolic extracts of infloresence axes, endosperms, leaves, and pericarps of Barringtonia racemosa L. Methods: The anti-inflammatory study was conducted by assessing the potential through xanthine oxidase (XO) and albumin denaturation inhibition assays. Meanwhile, the TPC in the extracts were assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu assay. Results: In the XO inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract was found to exert the highest inhibition capacity at 0.1% (w/v) with 59.54 ± 0.001% inhibition followed by leaves (58.82 ± 0.001%), pericarps (57.99 ± 0.003%), and endosperms (57.20 ± 0.003%) extracts. Similarly in the albumin denaturation inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract had shown the greatest inhibition capacity with 70.58 ± 0.004% inhibition followed by endosperms (66.80 ± 0.024%), leaves (65.29 ± 0.006%), and pericarps extracts (43.33 ± 0.002%). Meanwhile, for TPC analysis, leaves extract was found to have the highest phenolic content (53.94 ± 0.000 mg gallic acid equivalent [GAE]/g DW) followed by infloresence axes (31.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), endosperms (22.63 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), and the least was found in pericarps (15.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW). Conclusion: The results indeed verified the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of B. racemosa and supported its potential to be used in alleviating gouty arthritis and XO-related diseases. PMID:27757263

  16. Gram staining in the diagnosis of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Faraj, A A; Omonbude, O D; Godwin, P

    2002-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the sensitivity and specificity of Gram staining of synovial fluid as a diagnostic tool in acute septic arthritis. A retrospective study was made of 22 patients who had arthroscopic lavage following a provisional diagnosis of acute septic arthritis of the knee joint. Gram stains and cultures of the knee aspirates were compared with the clinical and laboratory parameters, to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosing acute arthritis. All patients who had septic arthritis had pain, swelling and limitation of movement. CRP was elevated in 90% of patients. The incidence of elevated white blood cell count was higher in the group of patients with a positive Gram stain study (60%) as compared to patients with a negative Gram stain study (33%). Gram staining sensitivity was 45%. Its specificity was however 100%. Gram staining is an unreliable tool in early decision making in patients requiring urgent surgical drainage and washout.

  17. Etoricoxib for arthritis and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Peter; Kubler, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, have come to play an important role in the pharmacologic management of arthritis and pain. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of etoricoxib in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, acute gouty arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, low back pain, acute postoperative pain, and primary dysmenorrhea. Comparative studies indicate at least similar efficacy with etoricoxib versus traditional NSAIDs. Etoricoxib was generally well tolerated in these studies with no new safety findings during long-term administration. The gastrointestinal, renovascular, and cardiovascular tolerability profiles of etoricoxib have been evaluated in large patient datasets, and further insight into the cardiovascular tolerability of etoricoxib and diclofenac will be gained from a large ongoing cardiovascular outcomes program (MEDAL). The available data suggest that etoricoxib is an efficacious alternative in the management of arthritis and pain, with the potential advantages of convenient once-daily administration and superior gastrointestinal tolerability compared with traditional NSAIDs. PMID:18360581

  18. Comparison of intramuscular compound betamethasone and oral diclofenac sodium in the treatment of acute attacks of gout.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-K; Yang, H; Zhang, J-Y; Song, L-J; Fan, Y-C

    2014-05-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis but have the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular toxicity. Glucocorticoid was as effective as oral NSAIDs in the initial treatment of gout arthritis of patients intolerant of NSAIDs. However, whether glucocorticoid has the same or preferable effect as oral NSAIDs on patients with acute gouty arthritis irrespective of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks factor remains unknown. This study was to compare the efficacy, safety and tolerance of compound betamethasone (diprospan) 7 mg intramuscular injection (i.m.) once for all during the study with diclofenac sodium 75 mg twice a day in the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. Sixty patients with acute gouty arthritis were randomised (1 : 1) to receive compound betamethasone 7 mg i.m. once for all during the study or diclofenac sodium 75 mg twice a day for 7 days in this open-label study. Pain intensity, tenderness, swelling and global assessment of response to therapy were collected as end-points for the treatment. The mean change in pain intensity from baseline to Day 3 and Day 7 in both treatment groups demonstrated that compound betamethasone had preferable efficacy over diclofenac sodium on Day 3 and comparable efficacy on Day 7. The compound betamethasone group had fewer adverse effects (AEs) than diclofenac sodium group. No statistically significant differences were observed about serum uric acid levels at different pain intensity at baseline. A single dose of compound betamethasone may be better than diclofenac sodium for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Research on relationship of syndrome type and parameters of hemorheology and platelet activation in patients with acute gout arthritis of dampness-heat blockage type and stasis-heat accumulate type].

    PubMed

    Shao, Pei; Huang, Xing-tao; Zjang, Fan

    2006-11-01

    To study the relationship between syndrome type and the parameters of hemorrheology and platelet activation in patients with acute gout arthritis of dampness-heat blockage (DHB) type and stasis-heat accumulation (SHA) type. Forty patients with acute gouty arthritis were divided into 2 groups according to TCM syndrome differentiation, the DHB group (n=24) and the SHA group (n=16), and 20 healthy people were taken as the control group. Hemorrheological parameters, platelet activating factor (PAC-1) and P-selection (CD62p) in them were detected. Plasma viscosity, outcome of erythrocyte sedimentation and K value of its equation, levels of PAC-1 and CD62p were higher, erythrocyte electrophoresis index was significantly lower in gout patients of both types than those in the control group (all P < 0.01), and the levels of PAC-1 and CD62p in the SHA group were higher than those in the DHB group (P < 0.05). DHB type and SHA syndrome type of acute gout arthritis are correlated with parameters of hemorrheology and platelet activation, and the different levels of these pameters showed in the two types, may be the internal factors for their genesis.

  20. Cubital tunnel syndrome secondary to gouty tophi: A case report.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Hatice; Zateri, Coskun; Akbal, Ayla; Gokmen, Ferhat; Adam, Gurhan; Bilim, Serhad; Bozkurt, Emre

    2017-03-01

    Gout is a chronic rheumatic disease resulting from accumulation of monosodium urate crystals in tissues. The most important risk factor for the disease is hyperuricaemia. Precipitation of uric acid in the joint in the form of monosodium urate crystals is the main factor responsible for triggering attacks of arthritis. Tophi occur as a result of urate crystals that precipitate into joints and surrounding tissues. Tophi can erode the bone where they are located and cause compression in soft tissue due to a mass effect. The following case report describes a case of cubital tunnel syndrome developed in association with tophaceous compression and resolved with surgical decompression in a patient with chronic gouty arthritis.

  1. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  2. Endoscopic Decompression of a Gouty Tophus at the Hand Dorsum.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2017-06-01

    Medical treatment including lifestyle and dietary modifications and drug therapy remains the mainstay of treatment for gouty arthritis of the hand and wrist. Without proper and timely treatment, tophi develop approximately 10 years after the onset of the disease. Open surgery for tophaceous gout is associated with a relatively high rate of complications particularly related to the surgical wound and overlying skin necrosis. Intralesional shaving of the tophi through small incisions has been reported and has the advantage of fewer wound complications. However, this is a blind procedure, and the underlying tendons and neurovascular bundles are at risk. The purpose of this Technical Note is to report an endoscopic approach to debulking a gouty tophus at the hand dorsum. This allows the minimally invasive debulking procedure to be performed under endoscopic visualization and reduces the risk of injury to the tendon and neurovascular structures.

  3. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  4. Anakinra for the treatment of acute severe gout in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Thueringer, Jessica T; Doll, Natalie K; Gertner, Elie

    2015-08-01

    To report on the efficacy and safety of anakinra for treatment of acute gouty arthritis in medically complex, critically ill patients. Retrospective chart review of 13 critically ill hospitalized patients treated with anakinra for 20 episodes of acute gouty arthritis between 2009 and 2014 at a single health plan and institution (HealthPartners Medical Group and Regions Hospital) in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Data was obtained on baseline characteristics, medical comorbidities, reason for hospitalization, prior gout treatment, reason for choosing anakinra over standard therapy, anakinra dosing, response to treatment, and adverse outcomes. A total of 10 patients were in the Intensive Care Unit, 1 was in the Burn Unit for extensive 3rd degree burns, 1 was critically ill with a new diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and 1 was critically ill in isolation with active disseminated multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Of these patients, 85% had active infections and 92% had renal insufficiency. All patients had a significant response to anakinra treatment: 50% (10/20 episodes) within 24h, an additional 40% (8/20 episodes) by 48h, and the remaining 10% (2/20 episodes) by 72h. Anakinra was well tolerated with only 1 case of leukopenia and 1 possible infectious complication. Anakinra is a safe and efficacious treatment for acute gouty arthritis in medically complex, critically ill patients when standard treatment modalities cannot be used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  6. Low-intensity laser therapy efficacy evaluation in FVB mice subjected to acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Trawitzki, Bianca Ferreira; Ervolino, Edilson; Macedo, Ana Paula; Lilge, Lothar

    2017-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune inflammation, has a high prevalence in the population, and while therapy is available, it required often injection of drugs causing discomfort to patients. This study evaluates the clinical and histological effect of low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) as an alternative treatment, in a murine model of acute and chronic inflammation. FVB mice received either a Zymosan A injection into one knee joint inducing acute inflammation, followed after 15 min or 24 h by LILT or a collagen bovine type II injection emulsified in "Freund's Complete Adjuvant" to induce chronic arthritis, followed at 4 weeks with multiple LILT sessions. LILT mediated by either 660, 808, or 905 nm and tissue response was evaluated based on clinical symptoms and histological analysis of inflammatory infiltrate and damage to the articular surfaces. LILT can be effective in elevating clinical symptoms, so Kruskal-Wallis testing indicated no significant differences between knees affected by acute arthritis and treated once with LILT and an injured knee without treatment (p > 0.05) for 660 and 808 nm with some improvements for the 905-nm LILT. Mice receiving two treatments for acute arthritis showed exacerbation of inflammation and articular resorption following therapy with a 660-nm continuous laser (p < 0.05). For chronic inflammation, differences were not noted between LILT treated and untreated injured knee joints (p > 0.05). Among the lasers, the 905 nm tends to show better results for anti-inflammatory effect in acute arthritis, and the 660 nm showed better results in chronic arthritis. In conclusion, LILT wavelength selection depends on the arthritis condition and can demonstrate anti-inflammatory effects for chronic arthritis and reduced resorption area in this murine model.

  7. Symptomatic acute reactive arthritis after an outbreak of salmonella.

    PubMed

    Rohekar, Sherry; Tsui, Florence W L; Tsui, Hing Wo; Xi, Nancy; Riarh, Reena; Bilotta, Rose; Inman, Robert D

    2008-08-01

    In 2005, 592 individuals in Ontario developed acute gastroenteritis, predominantly after consuming bean sprouts contaminated with Salmonella enteritidis. Salmonella is a known trigger of reactive arthritis (ReA). We describe the population affected by the Salmonella outbreak in terms of clinical presentation of self-reported arthritic symptoms and HLA-B27 genotyping. Subjects were mailed a questionnaire, which assessed symptoms consistent with ReA. Subsequently, subjects were asked to submit saliva samples, which were analyzed for HLA-B27. Simple descriptive statistics were performed for analysis of survey responses, and the genetic component was analyzed by chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Most respondents were female (71.3%), with a mean age of 46.0 years. The mean duration of diarrhea symptoms was 16.5 days. 62.5% of respondents reported extraintestinal symptoms that were consistent with ReA. The most commonly reported features were joint pain, swelling or stiffness (46.2%), stiffness > 30 min (35.6%), ocular symptoms (24.0%), and visibly swollen joints (19.2%). Subjects with Salmonella infection had a similar incidence of HLA-B27, regardless of whether they developed symptoms consistent with ReA or not. Notably, HLA-B27 was present more frequently in those who developed Salmonella infection than in healthy controls (OR 3.0). The study, one of the largest for a dysenteric outbreak, revealed a high event rate of self-reported symptoms consistent with ReA in those infected with Salmonella. Our results showed that HLA-B27 may have rendered individuals more susceptible to Salmonella infection, but did not contribute to the development of symptoms consistent with ReA after infection. We note that the methods used in this study, including self-report, are not ideal for diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis. However, given the rarity of large outbreaks of Salmonella, the study adds valuable knowledge about the course of ReA.

  8. Viscosupplementation of the knee: Three cases of acute Pseudoseptic Arthritis with painful and irritating complications and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Murat; Arıkan, Murat; Toğral, Güray; Varış, Onur; Aydın, Güle

    2017-01-01

    Acute pseudoseptic arthritis is a very rare complication that is associated with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections, which normally involve minimal risk. The most common adverse events that are caused by hyaluronic acid injections are inflammatory reactions or flares at the injection site. In this study, we described three cases of acute pseudoseptic arthritis that was caused by hyaluronic acid; the symptoms in these cases were reminiscent of acute septic arthritis. Moreover, we performed a literature review on pseudoseptic arthritis following hyaluronic acid injections to determine the manner in which this condition can be described, diagnosed, and treated. PMID:28293455

  9. Viscosupplementation of the knee: Three cases of acute Pseudoseptic Arthritis with painful and irritating complications and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Murat; Arıkan, Murat; Toğral, Güray; Varış, Onur; Aydın, Güle

    2017-03-01

    Acute pseudoseptic arthritis is a very rare complication that is associated with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections, which normally involve minimal risk. The most common adverse events that are caused by hyaluronic acid injections are inflammatory reactions or flares at the injection site. In this study, we described three cases of acute pseudoseptic arthritis that was caused by hyaluronic acid; the symptoms in these cases were reminiscent of acute septic arthritis. Moreover, we performed a literature review on pseudoseptic arthritis following hyaluronic acid injections to determine the manner in which this condition can be described, diagnosed, and treated.

  10. Hypouricemic and arthritis relapse-reducing effects of compound tufuling oral-liquid in intercritical and chronic gout

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhijun; Wu, Huaxiang; Jing, Xiaoqing; Li, Xiuyang; Li, Yasong; Han, Yongmei; Gao, Xiangfu; Tang, Xiaopo; Sun, Jing; Fan, Yongshen; Wen, Chengping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Trial Design: In the double-blind, randomized, controlled trial, we aimed to evaluate the effects of compound tufuling oral liquid (CoTOL) on serum uric acid (sUA) levels and recurrence of acute gouty arthritis in intercritical and chronic gout treatment. Methods: A total of 210 patients with gout were screened from 8 hospitals to observe the sUA and acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate-reducing effects of CoTOL in intercritical and chronic gout during a 12-week treatment. We treated 139 and 71 patients with CoTOL and the placebo, respectively, and evaluated their sUA levels, acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate, and adverse events at week 0, 6, and 12. Results: Twenty-five and 12 patients in the treatment and control groups, respectively, had interrupted treatments, whereas 114 and 59 cases, respectively, completed their treatments. At the end of the 12-week treatment, the average decrease in sUA was 74.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.74–91.77 μmol/L) and 28.81 μmol/L (95% CI: 4.91–52.71 μmol/L) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004). The average decrease rate of sUA was 12.76% (95% CI: 9.82%–15.70%) and 4.57% (95% CI: 0.42%–8.71%) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004), and the gouty arthritis recurrence rate of the treatment group was lower than that of the control group (from week 6 to 12, 21.93% and 50.88% in the treatment and control group, respectively, P < 0.001; from baseline to week 12, 38.5% and 63.16%, respectively, P = 0.003). Severe adverse events were not observed in either groups, and fewer leucopenia incidences were observed in the treatment group than those in the control group (3/139 vs. 7/71, respectively, P = 0.033). Conclusion: CoTOL reduced sUA levels and effectively prevented acute arthritis recurrence in intercritical and chronic gout without serious adverse events. PMID:28296744

  11. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints Infection, most often by bacteria or virus Crystals such as uric acid or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate ... common types of inflammatory arthritis include: Ankylosing ... calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease Juvenile rheumatoid ...

  12. Hypouricemic and arthritis relapse-reducing effects of compound tufuling oral-liquid in intercritical and chronic gout: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhijun; Wu, Huaxiang; Jing, Xiaoqing; Li, Xiuyang; Li, Yasong; Han, Yongmei; Gao, Xiangfu; Tang, Xiaopo; Sun, Jing; Fan, Yongshen; Wen, Chengping

    2017-03-01

    In the double-blind, randomized, controlled trial, we aimed to evaluate the effects of compound tufuling oral liquid (CoTOL) on serum uric acid (sUA) levels and recurrence of acute gouty arthritis in intercritical and chronic gout treatment. A total of 210 patients with gout were screened from 8 hospitals to observe the sUA and acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate-reducing effects of CoTOL in intercritical and chronic gout during a 12-week treatment. We treated 139 and 71 patients with CoTOL and the placebo, respectively, and evaluated their sUA levels, acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate, and adverse events at week 0, 6, and 12. Twenty-five and 12 patients in the treatment and control groups, respectively, had interrupted treatments, whereas 114 and 59 cases, respectively, completed their treatments. At the end of the 12-week treatment, the average decrease in sUA was 74.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.74-91.77 μmol/L) and 28.81 μmol/L (95% CI: 4.91-52.71 μmol/L) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004). The average decrease rate of sUA was 12.76% (95% CI: 9.82%-15.70%) and 4.57% (95% CI: 0.42%-8.71%) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004), and the gouty arthritis recurrence rate of the treatment group was lower than that of the control group (from week 6 to 12, 21.93% and 50.88% in the treatment and control group, respectively, P < 0.001; from baseline to week 12, 38.5% and 63.16%, respectively, P = 0.003). Severe adverse events were not observed in either groups, and fewer leucopenia incidences were observed in the treatment group than those in the control group (3/139 vs. 7/71, respectively, P = 0.033). CoTOL reduced sUA levels and effectively prevented acute arthritis recurrence in intercritical and chronic gout without serious adverse events.

  13. [Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children: one year experience].

    PubMed

    Timsit, S; Pannier, S; Glorion, C; Chéron, G

    2005-01-01

    To describe bacteriologic epidemiology of bone and joint infections, a total of 52 osteomyelitis, 52 arthritis and 20 osteoarthritis of children aged one month to 15 years during a one-year period (2001) were included in a retrospective unicentric review. The mean age was 3,9 +/-3,6 years. Fever and pain were the most common clinical symptoms. The site of infection was single in 95%, involving lower extremities in 80%. Bone scintigraphy was abnormal in 71% of osteomyelitis. Positive cultures was obtained in 29% of all cases (blood cultures: 20%, aspiration cultures: 29%), but in 42% of cases which have both blood and aspiration cultures. Thirty-six bacteria were identified: 19 Staphylococcus (14 aureus), ten Streptococcus (four pneumoniae), three Salmonella, three Kingella kingae, one Moraxella. All the isolates were susceptible to the empiric antibiotic therapy. Outcome was good in 100% of osteomyelitis and in 96% of arthritis.

  14. Success rates of first-line antibiotics for culture-negative sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chuckpaiwong, Bavornrit; Phoompoung, Saravut

    2014-09-01

    A combination of surgical and medical treatment is normally required for patients with septic arthritis. Antibiotics selected for use on these patients are normally based on tissue culture results. However, in sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis cases, the results of the culture are usually negative as a result of prior treatment. The present study will investigate the incidence of culture-negative septic arthritis and the outcomes based on the use of first-line drug antibiotics for the treatment of sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis. For the present study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of surgically treated septic arthritis cases over the past 10 years at Siriraj Hospital. The patient culture results, the antibiotics used, and the results of treatment were all recorded and analyzed. One hundredfifty-three septic arthritis patients were reviewed. Sixty-two patients were classified as having been diagnosed with either sub-acute or chronic septic arthritis. Thirty-six of 62 patients (58.1%) had a negative culture result. In the culture-positive patients, 42.3% had Streptococcus, 26.9% had Staphylococcus aureus, 11.5% had other gram positive bacteria, 15.4% had gram-negative bacteria, and 3.8% had tuberculus infection. In the culture-negative sub-acute and chronic group (36 of 62), 23 patients received Cefazolin, nine patients received Cloxacillin, and four patients received Clindamycin. Successful results were 69.9%, 66.7% and 75%, respectively. The present study reflects that the incidence ofculture-negative, sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis is approximately 58.1%. The first-line class of antibiotics remains the appropriate antibiotic choice for these patients because they are still effective for treatment of septic arthritis in up to 70% of all cases.

  15. Giant gouty tophi of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Falk; Wuenschel, Markus

    2011-11-09

    Gout is an inflammatory-rheumatic disease characterized by an elevated serum urate concentration and recurrent flares, including painful, hot, red, and swollen joints and surrounding tissue. Untreated gout often develops into a chronic disease with tophi and destruction of joint surfaces. Giant tophi are often resistant to medication and change in diet.This article presents a case of a 44-year-old man with giant gouty tophi at his hand and wrist. The last acute gout flare in his left wrist was approximately 3 years prior. For 2 years he had refused adequate nutrition, such as a low-purine diet, and had refused to take any preventive medication. Blood urate level was elevated to 8.7 mg/dL (normal range, 3.4-7.0 mg/dL). In time, the tophi led to a massive limitation of motion and use of especially the left wrist and thumb. Under the condition that the patient changed his diet and took the medication for his underlying disease, we surgically removed the almost skin-perforating tophi. Surgical debulking significantly improved joint function and cosmetic appearance.The best treatment for gouty tophi is prevention by ensuring adequate nutrition, treating the underlying causes, and taking effective medication. In the case of massive limitation of joint motion, skin breakdown with risk of infection, and compression of neurovascular structures, surgical debulking of the tophi should be considered. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines.

  18. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  19. Acute kidney injury, hyperbilirubinemia, and ischemic skin necrosis due to massive sulindac overdose.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, John L; Shah, Kejal V; Ghossein, Maroun M; Meyer, William L; Kirkpatrick, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Sulindac is a long-acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) widely used for the management of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing sponydlitis, and acute gouty arthritis. Reports of sulindac toxicity in the literature are rare. We report the case of a 22-year old male with a history of bipolar disorder who was brought to the emergency department after ingesting approximately 15 g of sulindac in a suicide attempt. He was found to have acute kidney injury and hyperbilirubinemia. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation, his renal function progressively worsened requiring the initiation of hemodialysis. Ten days following ingestion of sulindac, he began to develop ischemic skin changes with a gangrenous appearance in his hands and feet. He continued to receive supportive treatment, and his acute kidney injury, hyperbillirubinemia, and ischemic skin necrosis eventually resolved. Clinicians should be aware of this long-acting NSAID and its ability to cause prolonged multisystem organ dysfunction.

  20. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus. There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout. The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available. PMID:26844519

  1. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis.All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus.There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout.The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available.

  2. Effects of TGFbeta1 and extracts from Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe on acute and chronic arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Woon; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kang, Bong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Soo; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-07-23

    To elucidate the pharmacological activities of deer antler acupuncture and TGF61538;1 on the acute and chronic phases of rheumatoid arthritis diseases. Polyarthritis rats were administered with TGF61538;1 and water extract of deer antler acupunture (DAA), prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe. TGF61538; (0.1 to 2 61549;g/animal) and DAA (5-100 61549;g/kg animal) were initiated 1 day before an arthritogenic dose of streptococcal cell wall fragments to see the effects on the joint swelling and distortion during the acute phase and the chronic phase of the disease. Arthritic index suppression of rat arthritis model was examined by TGF61538; and DAA administrations. TGF61538;1 and DAA diminished the polyarthritis development in rats. TGF61538; and DAA eliminated the joint swelling and distortion observed during the acute phase and the chronic phase of the disease. The TGF61538; and DAA suppressed the arthritis progress when administration was begun after acute phase of arthritis. Consistent with the inhibition of inflammatory cell recruitment into the synovium, TGF61538;1 and DAA reversed the leukocytosis associated with the chronic phase of the arthritis, respectively.

  3. Monoarticular Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Vogelgesang, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis is inflammation characterized by joint pain, swelling, and sometimes periarticular erythema. Although chronic causes are seen, the onset is often acute. An infected joint can quickly lead to permanent damage, making it a medical emergency. However, acute gout presenting as monoarticular arthritis is often so uncomfortable it requires urgent attention. Monoarticular crystalline arthritis is common and a septic joint is a medical emergency so it is no surprise that these diagnoses come to mind with complaint of inflammation in 1 joint. However, there are many causes of monoarticular arthritis that clinicians must consider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [SEIP-SERPE-SEOP Consensus document on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Lozano, J; Calvo, C; Huguet Carol, R; Rodrigo, C; Núñez, E; Obando, I; Rojo, P; Merino, R; Pérez, C; Downey, F J; Colino, E; García, J J; Cilleruelo, M J; Torner, F; García, L

    2015-04-01

    This is a Consensus Document of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediatrica), Spanish Society of Paediatric Rheumatology (Sociedad Española de Reumatología Pediátrica) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Orthopaedics (Sociedad Española de Ortopedia Pediátrica), on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. A review is presented on the medical and surgical treatment of acute osteoarticular infection, defined as a process with less than 14 days of symptomatology, uncomplicated and community-acquired. The different possible options are evaluated based on the best available scientific knowledge, and a number of evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice are provided. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Protective effects of a blueberry extract in acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Maria-Eduardo; Oliveira, Mónica; Direito, Rosa; Rocha, João; Alves, Paula; Serra, Ana-Teresa; Duarte, Catarina; Bronze, Rosário; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Freitas, Marisa; Fernandes, Eduarda; Sepodes, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Here we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of a blueberry extract in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and collagen-induced arthritis model, both in rats. Along with the chemical characterization of the phenolic content of the fruits and extract, the antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst, were studied in order to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract significantly inhibited paw edema formation in an acute model the rat. Our results also demonstrate that the standardized extract had pharmacological activity when administered orally in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, consequently improving articular function in treated animals.

  6. Role of cytokines, acute-phase proteins, and chemokines in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Badolato, R; Oppenheim, J J

    1996-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has no firm etiologic basis. It progresses as an autoimmune disease and evolves into a chronic inflammatory joint disease complicated by recurrent episodes of systemic acute-phase reactions, which sometimes result in amyloidosis. Cytokines play a pivotol role in inflammation and the immune response. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 are present at high levels in arthritic joints, and their blood concentration correlates with the severity of the RA. Some of the activities of the proinflammatory cytokines, such as stimulation of leukocyte infiltration and release of their proteolytic enzymes, may be mediated by acute phase proteins (APPs), such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, and by chemokines such as interleukin-8. Cytokines, chemokines, and APPs reciprocally regulate each others' expression and activities, constituting a communication network between fibroblasts, macrophages, lymphocytes, and hepatocytes. Activation of the network results in inflammation and the progressive destruction of joints and systemic symptoms characteristic of RA.

  7. [Experimental systemic enzyme therapy of gouty and primary glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, I V; Nikolenko, V Iu

    2003-01-01

    The influence of a systemic enzymotherapy on the morphological, biochemical, and functional manifestations of the kidney damage during the experimental gouty and primary glomerulonephritis is described in comparison to the results obtained by traditional methods.

  8. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  9. A case of chikungunya virus disease presenting with remarkable acute arthritis of a previously damaged finger joint.

    PubMed

    Eyer-Silva, Walter de Araujo; Pinto, Henrique de Barros; Silva, Guilherme Almeida Rosa da; Ferry, Fernando Raphael de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arthritogenic alphavirus that has recently been introduced to Brazil. We report the case of a 36-year-old male patient from the City of Rio de Janeiro who developed molecularly-confirmed CHIKV disease and whose clinical picture was remarkable because of acute arthritis of an interphalangeal joint that had been damaged by trauma 8 years previously. This case illustrates that acute CHIKV disease may preferentially target previously damaged joints. Careful study of individual cases may provide valuable information on the presentation and management of this emerging zoonosis in Brazil.

  10. Protective effects of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil in animal models of acute inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Sepodes, B; Rocha, J; Direito, R; Fernandes, A; Brites, D; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Bronze, M R; Figueira, M E

    2015-04-01

    Virgin olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, and its beneficial health effects have been related with oleic acid and phenolic compounds content. Hydroxytyrosol, a typical virgin olive oil phenolic compound, has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as previously reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg in a rodent model of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced by intradermic administration, in male Wistar rats, of Freund's adjuvant with collagen type II on days 1 and 21. Hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils were administrated by gavage from day 23 until day 35. The treatment at 5-mg/kg dose significantly decreased paw edema (P<.01), histological damage, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and markedly reduced the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, improving articular function in treated animals. Acute inflammation, induced by carrageenan, was also evaluated for hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg. Both doses significantly reduced paw edema (P<.001). Our results suggest that the supplementation of refined olive oil with hydroxytyrosol may be advantageous in rheumatoid arthritis with significant impact not only on chronic inflammation but also on acute inflammatory processes.

  11. Risk of acute gout among active smokers: data from nationwide inpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Dilli Ram; Karmacharya, Paras; Donato, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    Smoking has been found to be negatively correlated with serum uric acid levels by virtue of reduced production and increased consumption of endogenous antioxidant uric acid among smokers and has been reported to decrease incidence of gout. To shed further light on the question of association between active smoking and acute gout by examining this association using a large inpatient US database, using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample data from 2009 to 2011, we identified current smokers based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 305.1 and were assumed to have ceased smoking during hospital stay. Patients who developed acute gout inhospital were identified based on ICD-9 code 274.01 at secondary diagnosis position. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to derive odds ratio for measures of association. Statistical analysis was done using STATA version 13.0 (College Station, TX). A total of 17,847,045 discharge records were used which included 13,932 (0.08 %) inhospital acute gouty arthritis and 2,615,944 (14.66 %) active smokers. Both univariate (OR 0.59, CI 0.54-0.63, p < 0.0001) and multivariate (OR 0.64, CI 0.59-0.68, p < 0.0001) regressions showed statistically significant reduction of acute gout among hospitalized patients who were current smokers but were assumed to have ceased smoking during hospital stay. Active tobacco use was associated with a lower risk of acute inpatient gouty arthritis, even when controlling for conventional risk factors. More study is needed to correlate this finding with uric acid levels, and a better understanding of the mechanisms that explain this finding are necessary.

  12. Treatment of acute gout: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Puja P; Gladue, Heather S; Singh, Manjit K; FitzGerald, John D; Bae, Sangmee; Prakash, Shraddha; Kaldas, Marian; Gogia, Maneesh; Berrocal, Veronica; Townsend, Whitney; Terkeltaub, Robert; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-08-01

    Acute gout is traditionally treated with NSAIDs, corticosteroids, and colchicine; however, subjects have multiple comorbidities that limit the use of some conventional therapies. We systematically reviewed the published data on the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic agents used for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. A systematic search was performed using PubMed and Cochrane database through May 2013. We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included NSAIDs, corticosteroids, colchicine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors, topical ice, or herbal supplements. Thirty articles were selected for systematic review. The results show that NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors are effective agents for the treatment of acute gout attacks. Systemic corticosteroids have similar efficacy to therapeutic doses of NSAIDs, with studies supporting oral and intramuscular use. ACTH is suggested to be efficacious in acute gout. Oral colchicine demonstrated to be effective, with low-dose colchicine demonstrating a comparable tolerability profile as placebo and a significantly lower side effect profile to high-dose colchicine. The IL-1β inhibitory antibody, canakinumab, was effective for the treatment of acute attacks in subjects refractory to and in those with contraindications to NSAIDs and/or colchicine. However, rilonacept was demonstrated to be not as effective, and there are no RCTs for the use of anakinra. NSAIDs, COX-2 selective inhibitors, corticosteroids, colchicine, ACTH, and canakinumab have evidence to suggest efficacy in treatment of acute gout. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Gonococcal and nongonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo

    2009-02-01

    Acute bacterial arthritis usually is caused by gonococcal or nongonococcal infection of the joints. Nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis are the most potentially dangerous and destructive forms of acute arthritis. These bacterial infections of the joints are usually curable with treatment, but morbidity and mortality are still significant in patients who have underlying rheumatoid arthritis, patients who have prosthetic joints, elderly patients, and patients who have severe and multiple comorbidities. This article reviews the risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis.

  14. Long-term outcomes and secondary prevention after acute coronary events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Ängla; Holmqvist, Marie; Jernberg, Tomas; Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig; Askling, Johan

    2017-08-20

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and suffer from poorer short-term outcomes after ACS. The aims of this study were to assess long-term outcomes in patients with RA with ACS compared with non-RA patients with ACS, and to investigate whether the use of secondary preventive drugs could explain any differences in ACS outcome. We performed a cohort study based on 1135 patients with RA and 3184 non-RA patients who all developed an incident ACS between 2007 and 2010. We assessed 1-year and overall relative risks for ACS recurrence and mortality, as well as prescriptions of standard of care secondary preventive drugs. The risk of ACS recurrence, and of mortality, was increased in RA, both at 1 year after adjusting for baseline comorbidities (HR=1.30(95% CI 1.04 to 1.62) and 1.38(95% CI 1.20 to 1.59), respectively) and throughout the complete (mean 2 years) follow-up (HR=1.27(95% CI 1.06 to 1.52) and 1.50(95% CI 1.34 to 1.68), respectively). Among certain subgroups of ACS, there was a tendency of lower usage of statins, whereas there were no apparent differences in others. The increased rates of ACS recurrence and mortality remained in subgroup analyses of individuals whose prescription pattern indicated both adequate initiation and persistence to secondary preventive treatments. Patients with RA suffer from an increased risk of ACS recurrence and of death following ACS compared with general population, which in the present study could not readily be explained by differences in usage of secondary preventive drugs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Acute phase protein haptoglobin as inflammatory marker in serum and synovial fluid in an equine model of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, Laura; Remacha, Ana Rosa; Soler, Lourdes; García, Natalia; Romero, Antonio; Vázquez, Francisco José; Vitoria, Arantza; Álava, María Ángeles; Lamprave, Fermín; Rodellar, Clementina

    2016-12-01

    Acute phase proteins are useful inflammatory markers in horses. Haptoglobin (Hp) serum level is increased in horses undergoing different inflammatory processes, including arthritis. However, Hp concentration has not been assessed in inflammatory synovial fluid (SF). The aim of the present study was to investigate the Hp response in serum and SF in horses undergoing experimentally induced arthritis. For this purpose, serum and SF samples were collected from 12 animals before amphotericin B-induced arthritis was created (T0, healthy) and 15days after the lesion induction (T1, joint inflammation) and Hp was determined by single radial immunodiffusion. The Hp increase between T0 and T1 was significant in both serum and SF, and serum Hp concentration at T0 was significantly higher than in SF, but significant differences were not found at T1, indicating a higher Hp increase in SF. A significant positive correlation for Hp concentration between serum and SF samples was found. These results highlight the potential usefulness of Hp as inflammatory marker in horses, showing for the first time the increase of Hp in SF from joint inflammation in the horse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a rare causative origin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Ham, Hyang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a rare entity with symptoms that include erythema, swelling, and tenderness over the AC joint, fever, and limitation of shoulder motion with pain. In previous reports, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species have been mentioned as common causative organisms. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. However, it sometimes causes opportunistic infections leading to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. AC joint infection associated with H.parainfluenzae is very rare, and only one case has been reported in the literature. Moreover, septic arthritis in immunocompetent patients is also very rare. Here, we report the case of a healthy patient with H. parainfluenzae-related septic arthritis of the AC joint.

  17. [SEIP-SERPE-SEOP Consensus Document on aetiopathogenesis and diagnosis of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Lozano, J; Calvo, C; Huguet Carol, R; Rodrigo, C; Núñez, E; Pérez, C; Merino, R; Rojo, P; Obando, I; Downey, F J; Colino, E; García, J J; Cilleruelo, M J; Torner, F; García, L

    2015-09-01

    This is a Consensus Document of the Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Reumatología Pediátrica and Sociedad Española de Ortopedia Pediátrica on the aetiology and diagnosis of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. A review is presented of the aetiopathogenesis and pathophysiology of acute osteoarticular infection defined as a process with less than 14 days of symptomatology, uncomplicated, and community-acquired. The diagnostic approach to these conditions is summarised based on the best available scientific knowledge. Based on this evidence, a number of recommendations for clinical practice are provided.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis patients receive less frequent acute reperfusion and secondary prevention therapy after myocardial infarction compared with the general population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The 30-day case-fatality rate after acute myocardial infarction (MI) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is twice that of the general population. This study compared the frequency and timeliness of early reperfusion therapy and treatment with secondary prevention medications after acute MI in RA patients and controls. Methods We performed a structured medical chart review of RA patients and matched controls who had been admitted with acute MI to one of three hospitals in Victoria, Australia, between 1995 and 2005. The administration and timing of acute reperfusion therapy and in-hospital treatment with secondary prevention medications were compared between the two groups. Acute reperfusion was defined as thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 12 hours of the first symptom of MI. Results The medical charts of 90 RA patients and 90 matched controls were reviewed. The RA patients were significantly less likely to receive acute reperfusion compared with the controls (16% versus 37%: odds ratio (OR), 0.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.10 to 0.64)), and this difference persisted after adjusting for type of MI, clinical setting of MI, and prior MI (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.6). The RA patients also received less-frequent in-hospital treatment with beta blockers (71% versus 83%; OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.96) and lipid-lowering agents (40% versus 70%; OR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.09 to 0.46). Conclusions RA patients who experience acute MI receive acute reperfusion and secondary prevention medications less frequently than do controls. This may contribute to higher case-fatality rates after MI in RA patients. PMID:20929534

  19. Septic arthritis of the neonatal hip: acute management and late reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Samora, Julie Balch; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip in neonates is rare but can have devastating consequences. Presenting signs and symptoms may differ from those encountered in older children, which may result in diagnostic challenge or delay. Many risk factors predispose neonates to septic arthritis, including the presence of transphyseal vessels and invasive procedures. Bacterial infection of the joint occurs via hematogenous invasion, extension from an adjacent site, or direct inoculation. A strong correlation exists between younger age at presentation and severity of residual hip deformity. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination, laboratory markers, and ultrasound evaluation. Early management includes parenteral antibiotics and surgical drainage. Late-stage management options include femoral and pelvic osteotomies, trochanteric arthroplasty, arthrodesis, pelvic support procedures, and nonsurgical measures. Early diagnosis and management continues to be the most important prognostic factor for a favorable outcome in the neonate with septic arthritis.

  20. Development of a new humanized mouse model to study acute inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substantial advances have been generated in understanding the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Current murine models of RA-like disease have provided great insights into the molecular mechanism of inflammatory arthritis due to the use of genetically deficient or transgenic mice. However, these studies are limited by differences that exist between human and murine immune systems. Thus, the development of an animal model that utilizes human immune cells, will afford the opportunity to study their function in the initiation and propagation of inflammatory arthritis. Methods One to two-day old irradiated NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice were reconstituted with human CD34+ cord blood stem cells. Leukocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry and circulating antibodies were determined by ELISA. Arthritis was induced by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant into knee or ankle joints. Mice were also treated with the TNF inhibitor, Etanercept, or PBS and joints were analyzed histologically. Results Humanized mice were established with high reconstitution rates and were able to spontaneously produce human immunoglobulins as well as specific IgG in response to immunization. Intraperitoneal injection of thioglycolate or injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into joints resulted in migration of human immune cells to the injected sites. Arthritic humanized mice treated with Etanercept had markedly less inflammation, which was associated with decreased total numbers of human CD45+ cells, including human lymphocytes and neutrophils. Conclusions The humanized mouse model is a new model to study inflammatory arthritis disease using human leukocytes without rejection of engrafted tissue. Future studies may adapt this system to incorporate RA patient cord blood and develop a chimeric animal model of inflammatory arthritis using genetically predisposed immune cells. PMID:22974474

  1. Acute exacerbation of preexisting interstitial lung disease after administration of etanercept for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kiyofumi; Sato, Takeo; Takagi-Kobayashi, Shoko; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Shigihara, Nayumi; Akiyama, Osamu

    2007-05-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a 6-year history of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and asymptomatic interstitial lung disease (ILD) began taking etanercept for ongoing arthritis despite treatment with methotrexate (MTX) and bucillamine. MTX was discontinued before introduction of etanercept. She developed lung injury 8 weeks after starting etanercept. Etanercept was discontinued and oral prednisolone 40 mg/day was begun, and her clinical findings gradually improved. Lung injury, although rare, is a recently noticed, potentially fatal adverse effect of all 3 licensed biological anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents. We recommend caution in the use of anti-TNF agents in elderly RA patients with preexisting ILD.

  2. Acute pediatric septic arthritis: a systematic review of literature and current controversies.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Yashwant Singh; Jaiswal, Atin; Singh, Satyaprakash; Arya, Rajender Kumar; Lal, Hitesh

    2014-03-31

    We present a review of the current literature and the author's opinion regarding Septic arthritis in the pediatric age group. The etiopathogenesis, clinical features, the laboratory parameters for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment, radiological features, are discussed along-with the debatable issues pertaining to the choice of antibiotics, their duration, and the need and mode of surgical drainage and mobilization of the joint.

  3. Fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi: report of a unique case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Xuan; Yu, Bo; Shi, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Qun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor. To the author’s best knowledge, no previous case of fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi has been reported. Here we reported the first case of fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi. A case of 58-year-old man was presented with a mass with ulcer and infection in the second joint of left middle finger for 2 months, with long standing gouty tophi. The tumor was biopsied and the biopsy showed complete excision of the tumor. With the pathological and immunohistochemical features considered, the diagnosis of fibrosarcoma associated with gouty tophi was made. The clinical findings, pathological characteristics and treatment were described. PMID:26097616

  4. Targeting ASC in NLRP3 inflammasome by caffeic acid phenethyl ester: a novel strategy to treat acute gout

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Eun; Yang, Gabsik; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeong, Seongkeun; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Hyun Ho; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is caused by the deposition of uric acid crystals, which induce the activation of NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3(NLRP3) inflammasome. The NLRP3 inflammasome, composed of NLRP3, the adaptor protein ASC, and caspase-1, is closely linked to the pathogenesis of various metabolic diseases including gouty arthritis. We investigated whether an orally administrable inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome was effective for alleviating the pathological symptoms of gouty arthritis and what was the underlying mechanism. In primary mouse macrophages, caffeic acid phenethyl ester(CAPE) blocked caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production induced by MSU crystals, showing that CAPE suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In mouse gouty arthritis models, oral administration of CAPE suppressed MSU crystals-induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production in the air pouch exudates and the foot tissues, correlating with attenuation of inflammatory symptoms. CAPE directly associated with ASC as shown by SPR analysis and co-precipitation, resulting in blockade of NLRP3-ASC interaction induced by MSU crystals. Our findings provide a novel regulatory mechanism by which small molecules harness the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome by presenting ASC as a new target. Furthermore, the results suggest the preventive or therapeutic strategy for NLRP3-related inflammatory diseases such as gouty arthritis using orally available small molecules. PMID:27934918

  5. Targeting ASC in NLRP3 inflammasome by caffeic acid phenethyl ester: a novel strategy to treat acute gout.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Eun; Yang, Gabsik; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeong, Seongkeun; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Hyun Ho; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-12-09

    Gouty arthritis is caused by the deposition of uric acid crystals, which induce the activation of NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3(NLRP3) inflammasome. The NLRP3 inflammasome, composed of NLRP3, the adaptor protein ASC, and caspase-1, is closely linked to the pathogenesis of various metabolic diseases including gouty arthritis. We investigated whether an orally administrable inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome was effective for alleviating the pathological symptoms of gouty arthritis and what was the underlying mechanism. In primary mouse macrophages, caffeic acid phenethyl ester(CAPE) blocked caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production induced by MSU crystals, showing that CAPE suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In mouse gouty arthritis models, oral administration of CAPE suppressed MSU crystals-induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production in the air pouch exudates and the foot tissues, correlating with attenuation of inflammatory symptoms. CAPE directly associated with ASC as shown by SPR analysis and co-precipitation, resulting in blockade of NLRP3-ASC interaction induced by MSU crystals. Our findings provide a novel regulatory mechanism by which small molecules harness the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome by presenting ASC as a new target. Furthermore, the results suggest the preventive or therapeutic strategy for NLRP3-related inflammatory diseases such as gouty arthritis using orally available small molecules.

  6. Simultaneous acute shoulder arthritis and multiple mononeuropathy in a newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patient - First case report.

    PubMed

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Gołąb-Janowska, Monika; Zaborowski, Grzegorz; Ciećwież, Sylwester; Nowacki, Przemysław

    Diabetes is a common disorder that leads to the musculoskeletal symptoms such as the shoulder arthritis. The involvement of peripheral nervous system is one of the troublesome for the patients as it provokes chronic sensory symptoms, lower motor neuron involvement and autonomic symptoms. In the course of the disease there has been several types of neuropathies described. A 41-year-old male patient was admitted to the internal medicine department because of the general weakness, malaise, polydypsia and polyuria since several days. The initial blood glucose level was 780mg/dl. During the first day the continuous insulin infusion was administered. On the next day when he woke up, the severe pain in the right shoulder with limited movement, right upper extremity weakness and burning pain in the radial aspect of this extremity appeared. On examination right shoulder joint movement limitation was found with the muscle weakness and sensory symptoms in the upper limbs. The clinical picture indicated on the right shoulder arthritis and the peripheral nervous system symptoms such as the right musculocutaneous, supraspinatus, right radial nerve and left radial nerve damage. We present a first case report of simultaneous, acute involvement of the shoulder joint and multiple neuropathy in a patient with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, presumably in the state of ketoacidosis.

  7. Dipeptidyl peptidase I activates neutrophil-derived serine proteases and regulates the development of acute experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, April M.; Raptis, Sofia Z.; Kelley, Diane G.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2002-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment in inflammation is critical for host defense, but excessive accumulation of inflammatory cells can lead to tissue damage. Neutrophil-derived serine proteases (cathepsin G [CG], neutrophil elastase [NE], and proteinase 3 [PR3]) are expressed specifically in mature neutrophils and are thought to play an important role in inflammation. To investigate the role of these proteases in inflammation, we generated a mouse deficient in dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) and established that DPPI is required for the full activation of CG, NE, and PR3. Although DPPI–/– mice have normal in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis and in vivo neutrophil accumulation during sterile peritonitis, they are protected against acute arthritis induced by passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies against type II collagen. Specifically, there is no accumulation of neutrophils in the joints of DPPI–/– mice. This protective effect correlates with the inactivation of neutrophil-derived serine proteases, since NE–/– × CG–/– mice are equally resistant to arthritis induction by anti-collagen antibodies. In addition, protease-deficient mice have decreased response to zymosan- and immune complex–mediated inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch. This defect is accompanied by a decrease in local production of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results implicate DPPI and polymorphonuclear neutrophil–derived serine proteases in the regulation of cytokine production at sites of inflammation. PMID:11827996

  8. Resveratrol lowers synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory markers and oxidative damage in an acute antigen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Naveira, Romina R; Valcárcel-Ares, Marta N; Almonte-Becerril, Maylin; Vaamonde-García, Carlos; Loureiro, Jesús; Hermida-Carballo, Laura; López-Peláez, Eduardo; Blanco, Francisco J; López-Armada, María J

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to determine the protective effects of dietary supplementation with resveratrol (RSV) in an acute antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, AIA and RSV-treated AIA group. RSV (12.5 mg/kg/day) was given orally for 8 weeks before induction of AIA and until the end of the experiment (48 h after intra-articular injection). The control and AIA animals were administered 100 μl of water. Results were evaluated by macroscopic observation, histopathology and immunohistochemistry for anti-PCNA, macrophages (CD68), T lymphocytes (CD3), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanine (a marker of DNA damage). Cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 in serum and peroxidase activity in synovial tissue were measured using commercial kits. At the end of the study, RSV significantly reduced knee swelling. Likewise, the histological score of synovial tissue also reduced significantly. The arthritis-protective effects were associated with a significant decrease in PCNA, CD68, CD3 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 staining, as well as a reduction in serum concentrations of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1. RSV treatment also decreased the level of the marker of DNA damage, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanine. Accordingly, peroxidase activity in the synovial tissue was up-regulated. Dietary supplementation with RSV lowers the main pathological hallmarks of RA disease in an acute model of AIA. RSV may represent a promising strategy in controlling the severity of RA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1, But Not Type 2, Deficiency Worsens Acute Inflammation and Experimental Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Agnes E.; Gray, Mohini; Brownstein, David G.; Salter, Donald M.; Sawatzky, Deborah A.; Clay, Spike; Gilmour, James S.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Savill, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids profoundly influence immune responses, and synthetic glucocorticoids are widely used clinically for their potent antiinflammatory effects. Endogenous glucocorticoid action is modulated by the two isozymes of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD). In vivo, 11β-HSD1 catalyzes the reduction of inactive cortisone or 11-dehydrocorticosterone into active cortisol or corticosterone, respectively, thereby increasing intracellular glucocorticoid levels. 11β-HSD2 catalyzes the reverse reaction, inactivating intracellular glucocorticoids. Both enzymes have been postulated to modulate inflammatory responses. In the K/BxN serum transfer model of arthritis, 11β-HSD1-deficient mice showed earlier onset and slower resolution of inflammation than wild-type controls, with greater exostoses in periarticular bone and, uniquely, ganglion cysts, consistent with greater inflammation. In contrast, K/BxN serum arthritis was unaffected by 11β-HSD2 deficiency. In a distinct model of inflammation, thioglycollate-induced sterile peritonitis, 11β-HSD1-deficient mice had more inflammatory cells in the peritoneum, but again 11β-HSD2-deficient mice did not differ from controls. Additionally, compared with control mice, 11β-HSD1-deficient mice showed greater numbers of inflammatory cells in pleural lavages in carrageenan-induced pleurisy with lung pathology consistent with slower resolution. These data suggest that 11β-HSD1 limits acute inflammation. In contrast, 11β-HSD2 plays no role in acute inflammatory responses in mice. Regulation of local 11β-HSD1 expression and/or delivery of substrate may afford a novel approach for antiinflammatory therapy. PMID:22067318

  10. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Psoriatic Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Fast Facts Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic arthritis. ... appear before the skin disorder. What is psoriatic arthritis? Psoriasis is a disease in which scaly red ...

  11. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  12. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Fast Facts Arthritis in children is treatable. It ... as fevers or rash. What is juvenile idiopathic arthritis? Several types of arthritis, all involving chronic (long- ...

  13. Serum-sickness-like disease is a common cause of acute arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Kunnamo, I; Kallio, P; Pelkonen, P; Viander, M

    1986-11-01

    Among 283 children in a prospective study of arthritis we found 15 patients with a self-limited serum-sickness-like disease consisting of urticaria or joint erythema and mostly polyarticular arthritis. The mean duration of joint symptoms was 5.9 days. A preceding infection was reported in 12 patients and 12 had received drugs, the therapy starting on average 12.8 days before the onset of joint symptoms. In 9 cases the drug was penicillin. Four patients had recurrent attacks. Circulating immune complexes were detected in the serum of 12 patients, but specific IgE antibodies to penicillin only in 3 patients. The estimated annual incidence of the condition was 4.7/100,000 children under age 16.

  14. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  15. [Gonococcus-associated arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bodmer, K

    1989-04-01

    The various forms of arthritis associated with a gonococcus infection are pathogenetically and clinically differentiated. Whereas an infectious systemic process with different clinical symptoms is said to be underlying the arthritis-dermatitis syndrome as well as the septic GO-arthritis, the third form is para-infectious reactive arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose an infectious GO-arthritis, as direct evidence of the virus found in joint and blood is rarely positive, so that the diagnosis can be affirmed or negated on the basis of clinical facts of the reaction of arthritis after an appropriate antibiotic therapy. Differential diagnostic considerations may help to find the correct diagnosis in view of an acute urethritis arthritis.

  16. Acute Pyogenic Arthritis of the Hip: An Operation Giving Free Access and Effective Drainage

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    healing. For that reason, I suggest the name Girdlestone not be used for contemporary operations except as they apply to what he described: excision arthroplasty more accurately describes current procedures. References Girdlestone GR. Arthrodesis and other operations for tuberculosis of the hip. In: Milford H, ed. The Robert Jones Birthday Volume. London, UK: Oxford University Press; 1928:347–374. Girdlestone GR. Acute pyogenic arthritis of the hip: an operation giving free access and effective drainage. Lancet. 1943;241:419–421. In Memorium: Gathorne Robert Girdlestone. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1951;33:130–133. Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre National Health Service Web site. Available at: http://www.noc.nhs.uk/. Accessed October 4, 2007. PMID:18196404

  17. Acute osteomyelitis, septic arthritis and discitis: differences between neonates and older children.

    PubMed

    Offiah, A C

    2006-11-01

    There are aetiological, clinical, radiological and therapeutic differences between musculoskeletal infection in the neonate (and infant) and in older children and adults. Due to the anatomy and blood supply in neonates, osteomyelitis often co-exists with septic arthritis. Discitis is more common in infants whereas vertebral body infection is more common in adults. This review article discusses the important clinical and radiological differences that in the past have led many authors to consider neonatal osteomyelitis a separate entity from osteomyelitis in the older child.

  18. Kinematic Analysis of Gait Following Intra-articular Corticosteroid Injection into the Knee Joint with an Acute Exacerbation of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh; Szturm, Tony; El-Gabalawy, Hani S.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of intra-articular corticosteroid injection (ICI) on ipsilateral knee flexion/extension, ankle dorsiflexion/plantarflexion (DF/PF), and hip abduction/adduction (abd/add) during stance phase in people with an acute exacerbation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the knee joint. The study also assessed the effects of ICI on spatiotemporal parameters of gait and functional status in this group. Methods: Nine people with an exacerbation of RA of the knee were recruited. Kinematic and spatiotemporal gait parameters were obtained for each participant. Knee-related functional status was assessed using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles (knee flexion, ankle DF/PF, hip abd/add) of the affected side were compared pre- and post-ICI. Results: Data for eight people were available for analysis. Median values for knee flexion and ankle PF increased significantly following ICI. Gait parameters of cadence, velocity, bilateral stride length, bilateral step length, step width, double-support percentage, and step time on the affected side also showed improvement. Pain and knee-related functional status as measured by the KOOS showed improvement. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a beneficial short-term effect of ICI on knee-joint movements, gait parameters, and knee-related functional status in people with acute exacerbation of RA of the knee. PMID:22942516

  19. Reactive arthritis or post-infectious arthritis?

    PubMed

    Hannu, Timo; Inman, Robert; Granfors, Kaisa; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta

    2006-06-01

    The term 'reactive arthritis' was first used in 1969 to describe the development of sterile inflammatory arthritis as a sequel to remote infection, often in the gastrointestinal or urogenital tract. The demonstration of antigenic material (e.g. Salmonella and Yersinia lipopolysaccharide), DNA and RNA, and, in occasional cases, evidence of metabolically active Chlamydia spp. in the joints has blurred the boundary between reactive and post-infectious forms of arthritis. No validated and generally agreed diagnostic criteria exist, but the diagnosis of reactive arthritis is mainly clinical based on acute oligoarticular arthritis of larger joints that develops within 2-4 weeks of the preceding infection. In about 25% of patients, the infection can be asymptomatic. Diagnosis of the triggering infection is very helpful for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis. This is mainly achieved by isolating the triggering infection (stools, urogenital tract) by cultures (stool cultures for enteric microbes) or ligase reaction (Chlamydia trachomatis). However, after the onset of arthritis, this is less likely to be possible. Therefore, the diagnosis must rely on various serological tests to demonstrate evidence of previous infection, but, these serological tests are unfortunately not standardized. Treatment with antibiotics to cure Chlamydia infection is important, but the use of either short or prolonged courses of antibiotics in established arthritis has not been found to be effective for the cure of arthritis. The long-term outcome of reactive arthritis is usually good; however, about 25-50% of patients, depending on the triggering infections and possible new infections, subsequently develop acute arthritis. About 25% of patients proceed to chronic spondyloarthritis of varying activity.

  20. Targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines following joint injury: acute intra-articular inhibition of interleukin-1 following knee injury prevents post-traumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a progressive, degenerative response to joint injury, such as articular fracture. The pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1(IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), are acutely elevated following joint injury and remain elevated for prolonged periods post-injury. To investigate the role of local and systemic inflammation in the development of post-traumatic arthritis, we targeted both the initial acute local inflammatory response and a prolonged 4 week systemic inflammatory response by inhibiting IL-1 or TNF-α following articular fracture in the mouse knee. Methods Anti-cytokine agents, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or soluble TNF receptor II (sTNFRII), were administered either locally via an acute intra-articular injection or systemically for a prolonged 4 week period following articular fracture of the knee in C57BL/6 mice. The severity of arthritis was then assessed at 8 weeks post-injury in joint tissues via histology and micro computed tomography, and systemic and local biomarkers were assessed in serum and synovial fluid. Results Intra-articular inhibition of IL-1 significantly reduced cartilage degeneration, synovial inflammation, and did not alter bone morphology following articular fracture. However, systemic inhibition of IL-1, and local or systemic inhibition of TNF provided no benefit or conversely led to increased arthritic changes in the joint tissues. Conclusion These results show that intra-articular IL-1, rather than TNF-α, plays a critical role in the acute inflammatory phase of joint injury and can be inhibited locally to reduce post-traumatic arthritis following a closed articular fracture. Targeted local inhibition of IL-1 following joint injury may represent a novel treatment option for PTA. PMID:24964765

  1. Articular inflammation is controlled by myeloid cell-derived interleukin 1 receptor antagonist during the acute phase of arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lamacchia, Céline; Rodriguez, Emiliana; Palmer, Gaby; Vigne, Solenne; Martin, Praxedis; Talabot-Ayer, Dominique; Seemayer, Christian A; Gabay, Cem

    2012-02-01

    To define the cell type (myeloid vs other cells) specific effect of interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) deficiency on the acute inflammatory phase of arthritis. Arthritis was induced by K/BxN serum transfer in wild-type (WT), IL-1Ra-deficient (IL-1Ra(-/-)) and conditional knockout mice. In the latter, IL-1Ra production was specifically targeted in myeloid cells (IL-1Ra(ΔM)) or in both hepatocytes and myeloid cells (IL-1Ra(ΔH+M)). Arthritis severity was clinically evaluated and ankle sections were scored for synovial inflammation and cartilage erosion. Quantitative RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses measured expression, localisation and cellular sources of the different IL-1Ra isoforms in arthritic joints. Total and myeloid cell-specific IL-1Ra deficiency was associated with increased arthritis severity, although disease incidence was similar to that of WT mice. Increased clinical scores were associated with exacerbated synovial inflammation. All IL-1Ra isoforms, except for intracellular (ic)IL-1Ra2, were expressed in arthritic joints of WT mice. In contrast, production of secreted (s)IL-1Ra and icIL-1Ra3 isoforms was markedly decreased in arthritic joints of both IL-1Ra(ΔM) and IL-1Ra(ΔH+M) mice. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses suggested that the icIL-1Ra1 isoform is produced primarily by synovial fibroblasts. Myeloid cell-derived IL-1Ra, including both sIL-1Ra and icIL-1Ra3 isoforms, controls articular inflammation during the acute phase of K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis.

  2. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  3. Acute CD4+ T lymphocyte-dependent interleukin-1-driven arthritis selectively requires interleukin-2 and interleukin-4, joint macrophages, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-6, and leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Kate E; Wong, Peter K K; Campbell, Ian K; van Rooijen, Nico; Wicks, Ian P

    2005-12-01

    To further investigate the effects of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in immune-mediated joint inflammation, we examined the role of IL-2, Th1 interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines, joint macrophages, and macrophage-derived cytokines (IL-12 p40, IL-6, leukemia inhibitory factor [LIF], oncostatin M [OSM], and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) in a CD4+ T lymphocyte-dependent model of acute arthritis. Methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA)/IL-1-induced arthritis was elicited in wild-type, gene-knockout, and monoclonal antibody-treated mice. Synovial lining macrophages were selectively depleted by intraarticular injection of clodronate liposomes prior to disease induction. The severity of arthritis was assessed histologically. Mice deficient in IL-2 were almost completely protected from arthritis, and neutralization of IL-4 reduced the severity of disease. In contrast, arthritis severity and resolution appeared to be independent of IFNgamma. Synovial lining macrophage depletion markedly reduced arthritis severity. IL-6 or LIF deficiency was only modestly protective, although as previously reported, GM-CSF deficiency conferred profound disease resistance. IL-12 p40-deficient mice (which lack IL-12 and IL-23) and OSM receptor-deficient mice were susceptible to mBSA/IL-1-induced arthritis. Acute mBSA/IL-1-induced arthritis is dependent on IL-2 and IL-4, but not IFNgamma. In vivo, the Th1/Th2 paradigm may be distorted by the presence of macrophage-derived cytokines such as IL-1. Synovial lining macrophages are essential in mBSA/IL-1-induced arthritis. However, the requirement for macrophage-derived cytokines is selective; that is, IL-6, LIF, and especially GM-CSF are necessary, but IL-12, IL-23, and OSM are dispensable. IL-1 may therefore influence both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms in acute inflammatory arthritis.

  4. Identification of relevant functional issues for the care of patients with acute arthritis by health professionals, using the ICF framework and a multi-disciplinary focus group approach.

    PubMed

    Zochling, J; Grill, E; Alten, R; Ernst, J; Stucki, G; Braun, J

    2007-01-01

    To identify the most relevant problems to be addressed in the multi-disciplinary care of patients with acute arthritis using focus groups of health professionals followed by a Delphi process. Focus group and Delphi methodology were applied. The focus groups were conducted at three specialist rheumatology hospital clinics in Germany, each group comprising rheumatologists, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, psychologists and social workers. The participants were asked to decide which categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) are relevant to the care of patients with acute inflammatory arthritis. The results from the focus groups were then followed by an anonymous Delphi process. Twenty-six health professionals participated in the 3 focus groups. 167 of the second-level ICF categories (63% of all second-level categories) were considered as relevant by the rheumatology health professionals. Items from all four components, Body Functions, Body Structures, Activities and Participation and Environmental Factors were represented. Agreement between focus groups and between different health professional groups was substantial for all components with the exception of Environmental Factors (Cohen's kappa 0.23). The involvement of experts from different health professions is a valuable tool to identify typical patient characteristics, expressed as distinct ICF categories, to aid in patient care in the acute rheumatology setting. Acute patient care cannot and should not be separated from ongoing long-term management.

  5. Gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucurull, E; Espinoza, L R

    1998-05-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection is the most common systemic complication of acute gonorrhea and occurs in 0.5% to 3.0% of patients with untreated mucosal infection. It is also the most common cause of septic arthritis in patients less than 30 years of age. Fortunately, the incidence of gonorrhea is decreasing dramatically in the United States and Western Europe, although it is still high in developing countries. Increasing resistance to antibiotics requires continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to determine the efficacy of current therapeutic measures.

  6. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to gouty tenosynovitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pledger, S R; Hirsch, B; Freiberg, R A

    1976-01-01

    A 30-year-old patient developed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to gouty tenosynovitis. Relief of symptoms followed removal of the tophaceous masses from the carpal tunnel. Surgical treatment is recommended whenever there is symptomatic median nerve compression.

  7. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity.

  8. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  9. Near-infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute versus chronic phases of arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-07-01

    To develop an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/BxN mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Indocyanine green, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpads of wild-type mice, mouse limbs were illuminated with an 806-nm near-infrared laser, and the movement of indocyanine green from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (LN) was recorded with a CCD camera. Indocyanine green near-infrared images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. Images of K/BxN arthritic mice and control nonarthritic littermates were obtained at 1 month of age, when acute joint inflammation commenced, and again at 3 months of age, when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in popliteal LNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Indocyanine green and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized, and quantitative measures were derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated, with increased indocyanine green signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and popliteal LNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, the appearance of indocyanine green in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of popliteal LN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/BxN mice. Our findings indicate that indocyanine green near-infrared lymphatic imaging is a valuable method for assessing the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. Indocyanine green-near-infrared imaging of K/BxN mice identified 2 distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders.

  10. Near infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute vs. chronic phases of arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M.; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-01-01

    Objective Development of an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/B×N mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpad of wild-type mice, the limb was illuminated with an 806 nm NIR laser, and the movement of ICG from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN) was recorded with a CCD camera. ICG-NIR images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. K/B×N arthritic mice and control non-arthritic littermates were imaged at one-month of age when acute joint inflammation commenced, and repeated at 3 months when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in PLNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Results ICG and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized and quantitative measures derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated with increased ICG signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and PLNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, ICG appearance in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of PLN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/B×N mice. Conclusion ICG-NIR lymphatic imaging is a valuable method to assess the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. ICG-NIR imaging of K/B×N mice identified two distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders. PMID:20309866

  11. Septic arthritis after ureteroneocystostomy.

    PubMed

    Allen, W R

    1979-04-01

    Acute infectious arthritis is an uncommon disease that is most commonly caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or gram-positive cocci. Gram-negative bacteria are an infrequent and highly virulent cause of septic arthritis and most commonly enter the circulation through the urinary tract, as in this case after ureteroneocystostomy. The resulting arthritis carries a mortality of 25% and a morbidity of 80%. Early recognition and treatment with appropriate antibiotics and mechanical drainage is imperative. Needle drainage of the affected joint has been shown superior to open surgical drainage.

  12. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  13. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  15. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD.

  16. [Comparison of hospital prevalence of rheumatic heart diseases and acute rheumatic arthritis in France and Africa].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Gérard, R

    1993-03-01

    This study reports the results of a multicentre enquiry performed in France in 1990 which included 41,242 adults hospitalised in Cardiology Units, 33,907 children hospitalised in Pediatric departments and 8,868 soldiers. A comparative enquiry was also carried out in North Africa (Tunis) and West Africa (Abidjan, Ouagadougou). The results of the French arm of the enquiry showed that rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has become very rare in adults (3.1% of all cardiac disease) and that it tends to occur in older subjects (average 54.4 years of age). There is practically no RHD in young adults. This decreased prevalence of RHD is confirmed in children in whom this diagnosis represents only 0.04% of cases of all cardiac disease--of which 87.5% are of extra-European origin. In contrast, there is a high frequency of RHD in Tunisia (29.3%) and West Africa (13.2% in Abidjan and 13% in Ouagadougou). The disease remains active as is shown by the age of affected adults in Africa (average 21 and 27 years of age). The results also show a reduction to a very low prevalence of acute rheumatic fever in French pediatric departments (0.005%). The authors discuss the reasons for the persistence of endemic infection in Africa: virulence of the streptococcus, predisposing factors (HLA group?), geographic factors and, above all, socioeconomic factors and difficulties in obtaining treatment and prophylaxis. A movement of international cooperation is suggested in order to combat RHD in Africa, especially with regards to its prevention in childhood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Fatal acute pancreatitis associated with reactive AA amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis with end-stage renal disease: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroe; Hasegawa, Hisashi; Wada, Yoko; Murakami, Shuichi; Saeki, Takako; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2011-01-01

    We report three cases of fatal pancreatitis associated with systemic AA amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All of the patients showed end-stage renal failure, and hemodialysis was introduced during the course of treatment. Autopsy was performed on two of the three patients, and this revealed amyloid deposition on the vascular walls in the pancreas. It was strongly suggested that the acute pancreatitis in all three patients was attributable to deposition of amyloid in vascular and pancreatic tissues. Acute pancreatitis is considered to be a rare complication of end-stage amyloidosis associated with RA, and is frequently fatal. It is important to treat RA patients intensively to avoid such deposition of amyloid.

  18. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  19. Femur chondrosarcoma misdiagnosed as acute knee arthritis and osteomyelitis--further developing a hitherto unreported complication of tumor embolic ischemic ileal perforation after arthroscopic lavage.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2014-12-01

    The differentiation between osteomyelitis and bone tumor may be difficult due to their overlapping clinical and radiological features. A 25-year-old lady presented with left knee pain and joint effusion associated with redness and hotness. A sub-optimally taken plain radiograph showed mixed osteolytic and osteoblastic lesion in the left lower femur with surrounding soft tissue swelling. Since the clinical diagnosis was acute osteomyelitis and arthritis, arthroscopic lavage was performed as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The removed loose bodies and fibrinous tissue showed pathological features suspicious of chondrosarcoma. Subsequent MRI revealed an infiltrative tumor eroding through the cortex and joint cartilage. En bloc excision of the left lower femur, upper tibia including the knee joint and patella was performed, and the final diagnosis was grade 2 chondrosarcoma. The patient developed bilateral pulmonary metastasis 33 months after operation. Five months later, she suffered from a hitherto undescribed complication of ischemic perforation of the terminal ileum secondary to tumor embolic arterial obstruction with no macroscopic intestinal or peritoneal tumor deposit. The patient developed multiple brain metastases and died 43 months after initial presentation. Our case illustrates that malignant bone tumor as a differential diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis and arthritis merits recognition and exclusion before arthroscopic lavage, which may enhance tumor dissemination and in our patient results in embolic ischemic ileal perforation.

  20. Some historical remarks on microcrystalline arthritis (gout and chondrocalcinosis).

    PubMed

    Marson, P; Pasero, G

    2012-01-19

    The history of microcrystalline arthritis only began in 1961 when Daniel McCarty and Joseph Lee Hollander demonstrated the presence of sodium monourate crystals in the synovial fluid of gouty patients. However, gout is a historical disease, thanks to the descriptions of Hippocrates, Caelius Aurelianus, Soranus of Ephesus and Araeteus of Cappadocia. The relationship between hyperuricemia and gout was first documented in the nineteenth century by Alfred Baring Garrod, who demonstrated deposits of uric acid crystals on a linen thread held dipped in acidified blood (the so-called "thread method"). Gout has always been considered a prerogative of the moneyed classes (arthritis divitum), and history is full of famous gouty personalities, including kings, emperors, popes, commanders, politicians, artists, writers, philosophers and scientists. Another form of microcrystalline arthritis, chondrocalcinosis, was identified as being a rheumatic disorder different from gout in the 1960s. As a specific clinical entity, it was first identified in 1958 by Dušan Žitnˇan and Štefan Sit'aj in a few Slovak families.

  1. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  2. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  3. Early-Onset Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Pattern Recognition.

    PubMed

    Vanderver, Adeline; Prust, Morgan; Kadom, Nadja; Demarest, Scott; Crow, Yanick J; Helman, Guy; Orcesi, Simona; La Piana, Roberta; Uggetti, Carla; Wang, Jichuan; Gordisch-Dressman, Heather; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Livingston, John H

    2015-09-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is an inherited leukodystrophy with calcifying microangiopathy and abnormal central nervous system myelination. As fewer diagnostic computed tomographic (CT) scans are being performed due to increased availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there is a potential for missed diagnoses on the basis of calcifications. We review a series of patients with MRIs selected from IRB-approved leukodystrophy biorepositories to identify MRI patterns for recognition of early-onset Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and scored for a panel of radiologic predictors. Each individual predictor was tested against disease status using exact logistic regression. Features for pattern recognition of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome are temporal lobe swelling followed by atrophy with temporal horn dilatation, early global cerebral atrophy and visible calcifications, as evidenced by 94.44% of cases of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome correctly classified with a sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 96.9%. We identify a panel of MRI features predictive of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome in young patients that would differentiate it from other leukoencephalopathies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Acute paraplegia in a patient with spinal tophi: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Hung, Y C; Lee, E J; Chen, H H

    2001-03-01

    A 28-year-old man with a 5-year history of gouty arthritis suffered from an acute episode of lower back pain. He visited a rehabilitative clinic and received physical therapy following his examination. Weakness and numbness of both lower legs developed rapidly after physical therapy. He was sent to our hospital with complete paralysis of both lower limbs and complete sensory loss below the umbilicus 3 hours after the physical therapy. No peripheral tophi were found. Myelography showed an extrinsic compression of the dura sac at T10. Emergency decompressive laminectomy of T9 to T11 was performed. During the surgery, caseous material was found deposited in the ligamentum flavum and the left T9 to T10 facet joint, with indentation of the dura sac. The pathologic diagnosis was spinal tophi. After surgery, the patient's neurologic function recovered rapidly. It was suspected that inappropriate physical therapy might have aggravated acute inflammation of spinal gout and resulted in a rapid deterioration of neurologic function. Though gout is a chronic medical disease, an acute attack of spinal gout may be disastrous and requires emergency neurosurgical intervention.

  5. Striatal opioid receptor availability is related to acute and chronic pain perception in arthritis: does opioid adaptation increase resilience to chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Matthews, Julian; Fairclough, Michael; McMahon, Adam; Barnett, Elizabeth; Al-Kaysi, Ali; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K P

    2015-11-01

    The experience of pain in humans is modulated by endogenous opioids, but it is largely unknown how the opioid system adapts to chronic pain states. Animal models of chronic pain point to upregulation of opioid receptors (OpR) in the brain, with unknown functional significance. We sought evidence for a similar relationship between chronic pain and OpR availability in humans. Using positron emission tomography and the radiotracer (11)C-diprenorphine, patients with arthritis pain (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9) underwent whole-brain positron emission tomography scanning to calculate parametric maps of OpR availability. Consistent with the upregulation hypothesis, within the arthritis group, greater OpR availability was found in the striatum (including the caudate) of patients reporting higher levels of recent chronic pain, as well as regions of interest in the descending opioidergic pathway including the anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The functional significance of striatal changes were clarified with respect to acute pain thresholds: data across patients and controls revealed that striatal OpR availability was related to reduced pain perception. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic pain may upregulate OpR availability to dampen pain. Finally, patients with arthritis pain, compared with healthy controls, had overall less OpR availability within the striatum specifically, consistent with the greater endogenous opioid binding that would be expected in chronic pain states. Our observational evidence points to the need for further studies to establish the causal relationship between chronic pain states and OpR adaptation.

  6. Increased prevalence of poor sulphoxidation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: effect of changes in the acute phase response and second line drug treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Emery, P; Bradley, H; Gough, A; Arthur, V; Jubb, R; Waring, R

    1992-01-01

    A minority of normal subjects have an impaired ability to oxidise sulphur, which is associated with an increased risk of side effects when they receive sulphur containing drugs. In 114 patients with rheumatoid arthritis a greatly increased prevalence of poor sulphoxidation was found in 82 (72%) patients compared with 70/200 (35%) healthy controls, 45/121 (37%) controls matched for age, and 4/35 (11%) of the normal aged general population. In a longitudinal study of 37 patients there was no significant alteration in sulphoxidation status after the introduction of a second line drug or with marked changes in the acute phase response. It seems, therefore, that the poor sulphoxidation status in patients with RA is not an epiphenomenon and may be an important factor in determining the clinical features of rheumatoid disease. PMID:1575574

  7. Acute-phase serum amyloid A regulates tumor necrosis factor α and matrix turnover and predicts disease progression in patients with inflammatory arthritis before and after biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mary; Mullan, Ronan H; McCormick, Jennifer; Matthews, Clare; Sullivan, Owen; Kennedy, Aisling; FitzGerald, Oliver; Poole, A Robin; Bresnihan, Barry; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between acute-phase serum amyloid A (A-SAA) and joint destruction in inflammatory arthritis. Serum A-SAA and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and levels of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and type I and type II collagen-generated biomarkers C2C and C1,2C were measured at 0-3 months in patients with inflammatory arthritis commencing anti-tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNFα) therapy and were correlated with 1-year radiographic progression. The effects of A-SAA on MMP/TIMP expression on RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), primary human chondrocytes, and RA/psoriatic arthritis synovial explant cultures were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antibody protein arrays, and gelatin zymography. Serum A-SAA levels were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with MMP-3, the MMP-3:TIMP-1 ratio, C1,2C, C2C, and VEGF. The baseline A-SAA level but not the ESR or the CRP level correlated with the 28-joint swollen joint count and was independently associated with 1-year radiographic progression (P = 0.038). A-SAA increased MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and MMP/TIMP expression in RA FLS and synovial explants (P < 0.05). In chondrocytes, A-SAA induced MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 messenger RNA and protein expression (all P < 0.01), resulting in a significant shift in MMP:TIMP ratios (P < 0.05). Gelatin zymography revealed that A-SAA induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity. Blockade of the A-SAA receptor SR-B1 (A-SAA receptor scavenger receptor-class B type 1) inhibited MMP-3, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in synovial explant cultures ex vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that A-SAA has the ability to induce TNFα expression in RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). A-SAA may be involved in joint destruction though MMP induction and collagen cleavage in

  8. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  9. Thumb Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... A joint is where bones connect and move. Arthritis is thinning of the cartilage, which is the ...

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000431.htm Rheumatoid arthritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-term disease. It leads ...

  11. [Arthritis and infections].

    PubMed

    Cimaz, R; Meregalli, E; Biggioggero, M; Casadei, A; Careddu, P

    2005-08-01

    Arthritis caused by infectious agents can be secondary to direct invasion of the joint space or to immune mechanisms (subsequent to or concomitant to an infection). Septic arthritis refers to a situation when bacteria can be cultured in synovial fluid. Arthritis can complicate for example meningococcemia or infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Haemophilus influenzae. Reactive (postinfectious) arthritides are an important diagnostic category within a pediatric rheumatology practice. Yersinia and, less frequently, Salmonella, play an important role in postdiarrheal disorders. The arthritis that can ensue is usually oligoarticular and occurs 1-2 weeks after the enteric infection. Reiter's syndrome, rare in the pediatric age, is characterized by the triad urethritis-conjunctivitis-arthritis. Postviral arthritides can occur after a variety of viral infections, including Parvovirus B19, rubella, and others (e.g. hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, chickenpox, mumps). Especially in patients with acute arthritis, the presence of preceding infections should always be investigated. Although the majority of postinfectious arthritides are self-limiting in nature and do not require specific treatment, conditions such as Lyme borreliosis and rheumatic fever can be associated with significant morbidity, and sometimes can be even lethal.

  12. Gouty wrist arthritis causing carpal tunnel syndrome--a case report.

    PubMed

    Sikkandar, M F; Sapuan, J; Singh, R; Abdullah, S

    2012-06-01

    A 63 year old male with a history of gout and hypertension presented with carpal tunnel syndrome. He gave history of bilateral wrist pain associated with numbness over the median nerve distribution of the hand. Tinels sign and Phalens test were positive with no obvious thenar muscle wasting on examination. Tophaceous deposits in the flexor tendons and within the synovium of the wrist joint was seen during surgery and this established gout as the cause of median nerve entrapment in this patient.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... men. About two to three times as many women as men have the disease. Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis Video length: 2 min 54 sec Click to watch this video Learn more about how rheumatoid arthritis occurs. Effects Vary Rheumatoid arthritis affects people differently. Some people ...

  14. Comparison of the suppressive effects of soluble CR1 and C5a receptor antagonist in acute arthritis induced in rats by blocking of CD59

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, M; Nishikawa, K; Morgan, B P; Matsuo, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of suppression of complement activation at C3 level and inhibition of C5a on acute synovitis in rats. Acute synovitis was induced in Wistar rats by intra-articular (i.a.) injection into one knee of 0.3 mg of MoAb 6D1 (anti-rat CD59 antibody). In the treatment groups, soluble CR1 (sCR1) or C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist was administered intra-articularly or intravenously and effects on the course of the acute synovitis were monitored. Synovitis induced by 6D1 was characterized by joint swelling, thickening of synovial tissue, cellular infiltration and deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) on the synovial surface. Neither inflammatory change nor MAC deposition was found in rats which received an i.a. injection of sCR1 to suppress complement activity in the joint. Intra-articular injection of sCR1 did not reduce plasma complement activity. Intravenous administration of sCR1 suppressed plasma complement activity but had no effect on the course of the arthritis and synovitis with MAC deposition was observed. Neither i.a. nor i.v. injection of C5aR antagonist had any suppressive effects on inflammatory change or MAC deposition in synovium. The data show that inflammatory change induced by 6D1 was mediated by local complement activation and was not accompanied by systemic complement activation. C5a generation was not responsible for the observed inflammation, suggesting that other complement activation products, possibly MAC, mediate the inflammatory change observed in this model of acute synovitis in rats. PMID:10632677

  15. Epilepsy in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramantani, Georgia; Maillard, Louis G; Bast, Thomas; Husain, Ralf A; Niggemann, Pascal; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Hertzberg, Christoph; Ungerath, Kristina; Innes, Micheil A; Walkenhorst, Hartmut; Bevot, Andrea; von Stülpnagel, Celina; Thomas, Kara; Niemann, Frank; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Tacke, Uta; Häusler, Martin; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetically determined early-onset encephalopathy with variable phenotype, including neurologic manifestations such as dystonia, spasticity, epileptic seizures, progressive microcephaly, and severe developmental delay. The aim of our study was the characterization of epilepsy, one of the most frequent and severe AGS manifestations, in molecularly confirmed patients. We reviewed the medical records, EEG, and CT/MRI findings in 16 patients aged 1-22 years that carried AGS1-5 mutations. Epilepsy manifested in 12 (75%) patients and took a refractory course in 9 (56%). 4 (25%) patients presented with seizures in the first four weeks and 11 (69%) altogether in the first year of life. Spasms were reported in 3 (19%) patients, focal seizures in 4 (25%), myoclonic in 5 (31%), symmetric or asymmetric tonic in 11 (69%), generalized tonic-clonic in 3 (19%) and status epilepticus in 4 (25%). EEG recordings initially showed a slow and disorganized background, followed by a regional intermittent theta/delta slow, while obvious multifocal or generalized epileptic discharges were only observed at follow-up. None of these EEG features were specific of AGS. There was no discernible correlation between the genotype and epilepsy onset, seizure types and epilepsy evolution. Epilepsy severity did not correspond to neuroimaging pathology. Epilepsy constitutes a cardinal feature of AGS, characterized by early onset, predominantly tonic semiology and a refractory course. The early discrimination of epileptic seizures from paroxysmal dystonia poses a challenge for neuropaediatricians, considering the initially inconspicuous or non-specific EEG findings. This study underlines the necessity of a more systematic serial evaluation of AGS patients using long-term video-EEG recordings. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... IBD Help Center Home > Resources > Arthritis Go Back Arthritis Email Print + Share Arthritis, or inflammation of the ... joints and a reduction in flexibility. TYPES OF ARTHRITIS In IBD, arthritis may appear in three different ...

  17. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Bioactivity at the Site of an Acute Cell-Mediated Immune Response Is Preserved in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Responding to Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Byng-Maddick, Rachel; Turner, Carolin T.; Pollara, Gabriele; Ellis, Matthew; Guppy, Naomi J.; Bell, Lucy C. K.; Ehrenstein, Michael R.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2017-01-01

    The impact of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapies on inducible TNF-dependent activity in humans has never been evaluated in vivo. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients responding to anti-TNF treatments exhibit attenuated TNF-dependent immune responses at the site of an immune challenge. We developed and validated four context-specific TNF-inducible transcriptional signatures to quantify TNF bioactivity in transcriptomic data. In anti-TNF treated rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we measured the expression of these biosignatures in blood, and in skin biopsies from the site of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) as a human experimental model of multivariate cell-mediated immune responses. In blood, anti-TNF therapies attenuated TNF bioactivity following ex vivo stimulation. However, at the site of the TST, TNF-inducible gene expression and genome-wide transcriptional changes associated with cell-mediated immune responses were comparable to that of RA patients receiving methotrexate only. These data demonstrate that anti-TNF agents in RA patients do not inhibit inducible TNF activity at the site of an acute inflammatory challenge in vivo, as modeled by the TST. We hypothesize instead that their therapeutic effects are limited to regulating TNF activity in chronic inflammation or by alternative non-canonical pathways. PMID:28824652

  19. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation Induced Acute Hepatitis and Gastric Erosions in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis under Treatment with an Anti-IL-6 Receptor Antibody, Tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Komura, Takuya; Ohta, Hajime; Nakai, Ryotaro; Seishima, Jun; Yamato, Masatoshi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Kaji, Kiichiro; Marukawa, Yohei; Kagaya, Takashi; Kitagawa, Kiyoki; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Tocilizumab, an anti-human interleukin 6 receptor (IL-6R) monoclonal antibody, is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is expected to exhibit clinical efficacy when used to treat other autoimmune diseases. However, a risk of opportunistic infection is occasionally recognized. A 54-year-old woman had received an oral corticosteroid and methotrexate to treat RA. Despite receiving these treatments, she received additional treatment with tocilizumab due to poor control of the disease activity. She presented at our hospital with a high fever and epigastralgia 19 days after receiving this treatment. A laboratory evaluation revealed liver injury and cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed hepatosplenomegaly, but no ascites. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric erosions induced by CMV, which were confirmed immunohistochemically. Hence, we diagnosed the patient with CMV reactivation-induced acute hepatitis and gastric erosions under tocilizumab treatment. She received an anti-cytomegalovirus drug, ganciclovir, for 14 days due to her viremia and impaired general condition, which was suggestive of a severe infection. Her general condition subsequently improved, the liver function test results normalized, and the gastric erosions disappeared. In conclusion, although tocilizumab is very useful for treating certain autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and will be prescribed more widely in the future, associated CMV infections must be closely monitored, as these can be lethal.

  20. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  1. Septic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... septic arthritis. Knees are most commonly affected, but septic arthritis also can affect hips, shoulders and other joints. The infection can quickly and severely damage the cartilage and bone within the joint, so prompt treatment is crucial. Treatment involves draining the joint with ...

  2. Sea urchin spine arthritis in the foot.

    PubMed

    Schefflein, Javin; Umans, Hilary; Ellenbogen, David; Abadi, Maria

    2012-09-01

    We present a case of sea urchin spine arthritis (SUSA) in a 33-year-old woman who sustained penetrating trauma to the interphalangeal (IP) joint of the hallux while snorkeling in Japan. Serial radiographs and MRI were obtained over a period from 7 weeks to 10 months following injury. At 7 weeks radiographs revealed periarticular osteopenia and subtle marginal erosion, similar to the appearance of tuberculous arthritis. Over the ensuing months, radiographs and MRI documented progressive marginal and periarticular erosions with synovitis, despite preservation of cartilage space and restoration of bone mineral density. Delayed radiographs and imaging features mimic gouty arthropathy. Only the history points to the proper diagnosis, which was confirmed by histopathology, demonstrating necrobiotic granuloma with central fibrinoid necrosis following synovectomy and arthrodesis. The majority of previous case reports affected the hand, with few cases in the feet. In all, radiographic illustrations were limited and demonstrated only minimal osteolysis and periosteal reaction. No other report included MRI or serial radiographs over a long period to illustrate the natural progression of the disease.

  3. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) ... people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people as much ...

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  5. Inflammatory Gout: Observations over a Half-Century

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, Stephen E.; Chevance de Boisfleury, Anne; Naccache, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    This is a discussion of acute gouty arthritis, seen for over 50 years of engagement. It addresses the evolution of our current understanding of the interaction between urate crystals and key cellular components of the gouty inflammatory paroxysm, with new material on pathogenesis. PMID:22131362

  6. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Yoginder N; Dunnavant, F Daniel; Royal, Stuart A; Beukelman, Timothy; Stoll, Matthew L; Cron, Randy Q

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is extremely common but frequently asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast remains the gold standard for identifying TMJ arthritis in JIA. A reliable scoring system with published MRI examples of typical acute and chronic TMJ arthritis changes will be invaluable for future prospective treatment trials of TMJ arthritis in JIA. MRIs were collected from routine clinical studies assessing TMJ arthritis in JIA. Representative images were selected for publication to depict acute (synovial fluid, bone marrow edema, and synovial enhancement) and chronic (pannus, disc derangement, and condylar head flattening and erosions) TMJ arthritis findings. A preliminary MRI-based scoring system for assessing degrees of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis was developed and tested for inter- and intrareader reliability. TMJ MRIs representative of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis in JIA were selected from among thousands taken (>500 TMJ MRI studies annually at Children's of Alabama) since September 2007. Moreover, computed tomography scans depicting select bony changes (osteophyte formation, micrognathia) were chosen for publication. A description of the MRI protocol for assessing TMJ arthritis is included. A preliminary scoring system weighted for degree of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis MRI findings was found to have substantial inter- and intrareader reliability. A published set of MRIs depicting representative acute and chronic changes will help establish a standardized scoring system to assess TMJ arthritis in children with JIA. Future validation will aid in assessing improvement during treatment trials of TMJ arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walk Test (SMWT) Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) Fracture Risk ... Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in ...

  8. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walk Test (SMWT) Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) Fracture Risk ... Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in ...

  9. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... following conditions increase your risk for septic arthritis: Artificial joint implants Bacterial infection somewhere else in your body Presence of bacteria in your blood Chronic illness or disease (such as diabetes, rheumatoid ...

  10. Acute coronary syndrome in new-onset rheumatoid arthritis: a population-based nationwide cohort study of time trends in risks and excess risks.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Marie; Ljung, Lotta; Askling, Johan

    2017-10-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and other cardiovascular diseases are the main drivers of the increased morbidity and preterm mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ACS in RA has been linked to inflammation and RA severity. During recent years and with new therapeutic options and treat-to-target strategies, increasing efforts have been made to reach RA remission as soon as possible after diagnosis, and the average level of RA disease activity has declined. Whether this has resulted in declining excess risks for RA comorbidities remains unclear. We performed a nationwide population-based cohort study of patients with new-onset RA from 1997 to 2014, and matched general population comparators. In the Swedish healthcare system, all residents have equal access to healthcare services. Healthcare is monitored using high-quality population-based registers that can be linked together. 15 744 patients with new-onset RA, identified from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register, and 70 899 general population comparator subjects were included. Seven hundred and seventy two patients with RA developed an ACS during 103 835 person-years of follow-up (crude incidence, 7.4 per 1000), corresponding to an overall HR versus the general population of 1.41 (95% CI 1.29 to 1.54). Whereas the ACS incidence declined over calendar time in both the RA and the general population cohort, the excess and the relative risks of ACS remained the same. Despite improved disease control in new-onset RA, the elevated risk of ACS in RA remains a concern. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  12. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment.

  13. Gout Initially Mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis and Later Cervical Spine Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Eduardo Araújo Santana; Rosseti, Adroaldo Guimarães; Ribeiro, Daniel Sá; Santiago, Mittermayer

    2014-01-01

    Gout is clinically characterized by episodes of monoarthritis, but if not treated properly, it can lead to a chronic polyarthritis, which may eventually mimic rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We present the case of a 59-year-old man, with a history of symmetrical polyarthritis of the large and small joints with later development of subcutaneous nodules, which was initially misdiagnosed as RA, being treated with prednisone and methotrexate for a long period of time. He complained of occipital pain and paresthesia in his left upper limb, and computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of an expansive formation in the cervical spine with compression of the medulla. He was admitted for spinal decompressive surgery and the biopsy specimen demonstrated a gouty tophus. Chronic gout can mimic RA and rarely involves the axial skeleton, and thus its correct diagnosis and the implementation of adequate therapy can halt the development of such damaging complications. PMID:25574418

  14. MyD88-dependent IL-1 receptor signaling is essential for gouty inflammation stimulated by monosodium urate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Shi, Yan; Hearn, Arron; Fitzgerald, Kate; Golenbock, Douglas; Reed, George; Akira, Shizuo; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    While it is known that monosodium urate (MSU) crystals cause the disease gout, the mechanism by which these crystals stimulate this inflammatory condition has not been clear. Here we find that the Toll/IL-1R (TIR) signal transduction adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is required for acute gouty inflammation. In contrast, other TIR adaptor molecules, TIRAP/Mal, TRIF, and TRAM, are not required for this process. The MyD88-dependent TLR1, -2, -4, -6, -7, -9, and -11 and IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) are not essential for MSU-induced inflammation. Moreover, MSU does not stimulate HEK cells expressing TLR1–11 to activate NF-κB. In contrast, mice deficient in the MyD88-dependent IL-1R showed reduced inflammatory responses, similar to those observed in MyD88-deficient mice. Similarly, mice treated with IL-1 neutralizing antibodies also showed reduced MSU-induced inflammation, demonstrating that IL-1 production and IL-1R activation play essential roles in MSU-triggered inflammation. IL-1R deficiency in bone marrow–derived cells did not affect the inflammatory response; however, it was required in non–bone marrow–derived cells. These results indicate that IL-1 is essential for the MSU-induced inflammatory response and that the requirement of MyD88 in this process is primarily through its function as an adaptor molecule in the IL-1R signaling pathway. PMID:16886064

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  16. Merlin's 'invalid or gouty chair' and the origin of the self-propelled wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Marie-France; Silver, John R

    2016-08-01

    Wheelchairs are a major advance in enabling independence for people with walking difficulties. The first self-propelled wheelchair has been attributed to John Joseph Merlin, the 'ingenious mechanick', in the early 19th century and his 'gouty chair' is exhibited at Kenwood House. Research would suggest that comparable chairs existed in France as early as 1751 and the French Revolutionary, Georges Couthon, used one to get around Paris. A later design, also attributed to Merlin, the invalid wheelchair, features large wheels with outer hoops for the occupant to grasp and this is the true ancestor of the modern wheelchair. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Endoscopic Resection of Gouty Tophus of the Patellar Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Tophaceous deposition of tendon can result in spontaneous patellar tendon rupture. Surgical therapy may be needed to control symptoms and prevent tendon rupture. Open debridement of the lesion requires a lengthy incision over the lesion; this may result in symptomatic scar adhesion of the patellar tendon or an unhealed wound with persistent tophaceous discharge. Moreover, the other part of the patellar tendon cannot be examined through the incision. We describe a technique for endoscopic resection of a gouty tophus of the patellar tendon. It has the advantage of small incisions away from the lesion and tendon and minimizes wound problems. The whole patellar tendon can be examined endoscopically.

  18. Parvovirus infection in early arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mauermann, Maria; Hochauf-Stange, Kristina; Kleymann, Alexander; Conrad, Karsten; Aringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the subgroup of early arthritis patients with new onset parvovirus infections for details that may help narrow the population tested. From their routine patient charts, patient histories and clinical and serological data were obtained for all 130 patients of the Rheumatology division with parvovirus serology performed. 11 patients had acute parvovirus infections, defined by specific IgM antibodies. 95 patients had a previous infection, 16 were never infected, together forming the n=111 control group, and 8 patients had to be excluded. Most patients with acute parvovirus infection had an acute onset, highly symmetrical polyarthritis of small joints, which was preceded by prodromal symptoms. Positive ANA were frequently found, whereas C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were only mildly elevated. No frank synovitis was found longer than two weeks after disease onset. Most patients were free of symptoms within three months, and no patient in the parvovirus group developed rheumatoid arthritis or a connective tissue disease. Parvovirus serology may be helpful in patients with acute polyarthritis of very recent onset, and if they give a history of prodromal symptoms, in particular. In most instances, parvovirus arthritis is an acute disease, which is rapidly self-limiting.

  19. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mary; Marrelli, Alessandra; Blades, Mark; McCormick, Jennifer; Maderna, Paola; Godson, Catherine; Mullan, Ronan; FitzGerald, Oliver; Bresnihan, Barry; Pitzalis, Costantino; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  20. Gouty pitch midge damage to ponderosa pines planted on fertile and infertile soils in the western Sierra Nevada

    Treesearch

    George T. Ferrell; William D. Bedard; James L. Jenkinson

    1987-01-01

    Crown damage caused by gouty pitch midge (GPM) and its effects on tree growth were assessed in two 14-year-old ponderosa pine plantations, one on a shallow, infertile soil derived from serpentine and the other on a deeper, more fertile nonserpentine soil of marine parent material. Seed sources for each plantation were nearby indigenous stands on the same soils. Trees...

  1. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  2. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Fungal Infections Infectious Arthritis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare ... for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D. ...

  3. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  4. Mycotic Septic Arthritis of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Adam; Matthews, Scott; Wilson, Alister

    Septic arthritis is a debilitating acute orthopedic emergency. Unfortunately, the diagnosis can be delayed or missed in immunocompromised patients with diabetes mellitus, and the result can be catastrophic. These patients are also at risk for atypical infections, including mycotic subtypes, which are more insidious than their more aggressive, more common Staphylococcus counterparts. The result is increased morbidity. In this article, we report a case of Candida albicans septic arthritis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. Her case highlights the complexities of this specific disease entity. With early diagnosis, treatment is multimodal, involving surgical débridement and prolonged antifungal therapy.

  5. Arthritis in America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Arthritis in America Time to Take Action! Language: English ( ... by about 40% by being physically active. Problem Arthritis is common and a growing health threat. Arthritis ...

  6. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  7. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: 10:20 Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  8. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people ...

  9. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out other conditions or infections, such as Lyme disease , that may cause similar symptoms or occur along ... ESR) Bones, Muscles, and Joints Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Word! Arthritis Arthritis Lupus Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ( ...

  10. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs Five Key Public Health Messages Arthritis Types Fibromyalgia Gout Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Management Risk Factors ... the Unites States is osteoarthritis followed by gout, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis. Top of Page What are ...

  11. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  12. S100A9 is not essential for disease expression in an acute (K/BxN) or chronic (CIA) model of inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, R R; Esserman, D; McGinnis, M W; Lee, D M; Patel, D D; Tarrant, T K

    2009-01-01

    S100A8 (calgranulin A, MRP8) and S100A9 (calgranulin B, MRP14) are calcium-binding proteins highly expressed by activated myeloid cells and thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Circulating levels of S100A8/S100A9 are elevated in both human and experimental models of autoimmune disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice deficient in S100A9 (S100A9 - /-) and wild-type controls were immunized using standard techniques for the K/BxN serum transfer or the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. S100A9 - /- animals, with defective expression of both S100A8 and S100A9 proteins, had similar arthritis and histopathology to that of wild-type controls in both mouse models. S100A8 and S100A9 are not essential for disease expression in either the K/BxN serum transfer or the CIA model of inflammatory arthritis.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Inflammatory myopathy in a patient with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tumienė, Birutė; Voisin, Norine; Preikšaitienė, Eglė; Petroška, Donatas; Grikinienė, Jurgita; Samaitienė, Rūta; Utkus, Algirdas; Reymond, Alexandre; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2017-03-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an inflammatory disorder belonging to the recently characterized group of type I interferonopathies. The most consistently affected tissues in AGS are the central nervous system and skin, but various organ systems and tissues have been reported to be affected, pointing to the systemic nature of the disease. Here we describe a patient with AGS due to a homozygous p.Arg114His mutation in the TREX1 gene. The histologically proven inflammatory myopathy in our patient expands the range of clinical features of AGS. Histological signs of muscle biopsies in the proband, and in two other AGS patients described earlier, are similar to those seen in various autoimmune myositises and could be ascribed to inapproapriate IFN I activation. In view of signs of possible mitochondrial damage in AGS, we propose that mitochondrial DNA could be a trigger of autoimmune responses in AGS.

  15. New real-time PCR-based method for Kingella kingae DNA detection: application to samples collected from 89 children with acute arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Bidet, Philippe; Lorrot, Mathie; Even, Julien; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Liguori, Sandrine; Vitoux, Christine; Lefevre, Yann; Doit, Catherine; Fitoussi, Franck; Penneçot, Georges; Bingen, Edouard; Mazda, Keyvan; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2009-06-01

    Inoculation of blood culture vials with joint fluid samples has revealed the important pathogenic role of Kingella kingae in pediatric arthritis. However, recent studies based on broad-range 16S ribosomal DNA PCR and real-time PCR without a probe suggest that conventional methods remain suboptimal. We developed a new real-time PCR method with a probe that is highly specific for K. kingae and applied it to joint fluid samples collected from 89 children with suspected arthritis admitted to our institution during a 2-year period. Real-time PCR was also applied to blood samples obtained before surgery and to joint drainage fluid samples obtained during several days after surgery. Thirty-six (40%) of the 89 cases of suspected septic arthritis had positive culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the main isolate (n = 19/36, 53%), followed by K. kingae (n = 7/36, 19%). Specific real-time PCR identified K. kingae in 24 of the 53 culture-negative cases. Thus, K. kingae was present in 31 (52%) of the 60 documented cases, making it the leading pathogen. Real-time PCR on all 15 blood DNA extracts from patients with K. kingae infection was negative, demonstrating that joint fluid positivity did not result from DNA circulating in blood. Real-time PCR amplification of drainage fluid samples showed that the pathogen could be detected for up to 6 days after antibiotic initiation. K. kingae real-time PCR applied to DNA extracted from joint fluid samples, but not from blood samples, markedly improved the etiological diagnosis of septic arthritis in children. Retrospective diagnosis is feasible for up to 6 days after treatment initiation.

  16. Suppressive effect of Withania somnifera root powder on experimental gouty arthritis: An in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahaboobkhan; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan

    2006-12-15

    The effect of Withania somnifera L. Dunal root powder on paw volume and serum lysosomal enzyme activities was investigated in monosodium urate crystal-induced rats. The levels of beta-glucuronidase and lactate dehydrogenase were also measured in monosodium urate crystal incubated polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL). A significant increase in the level of paw volume and serum lysosomal enzymes was observed in monosodium urate crystal-induced rats. The increased beta-glucuronidase and lactate dehydrogenase level were observed in untreated monosodium urate crystal incubated polymorphonuclear leucocytes. On treatment with the W. somnifera root powder (500/1000 mg/kg body weight), the above changes were reverted back to near normal levels. W. somnifera also showed potent analgesic and antipyretic effect with the absence of gastric damage at different dose levels in experimental rats. For comparison purpose, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin was used as a standard. These results provide evidence for the suppressive effect of W. somnifera root powder by retarding amplification and propagation of the inflammatory response without causing any gastric damage.

  17. An unusual case of gonococcal arthritis of the finger.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susanne B; Unglaub, Frank; Dragu, Adrian; Gessner, André; Horch, Raymund E

    2009-10-01

    Gonococcal arthritis is the most common acute septic arthritis in sexually active young adults. It is caused by the gram-negative diplococcus Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In 0.5-3% an untreated mucosal infection disseminates throughout the system and affects mostly big joints like the knee, elbows, and ankles. N. gonorrhoeae is a fragile microorganism which is difficult to culture. Penicillin resistance has developed worldwide in recent years, therefore, patients should be treated by a third generation Cephalosporin. In this article, we describe the unexpected finding of septic arthritis in the proximal interphalangeal joint of a 50-year-old patient. The septic arthritis was caused by N. gonorrhoeae.

  18. A Case of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Unilateral Knee Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si Bog

    2012-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman suffering right hemiplegia came in with pain and swelling on her left knee, general weakness and poor oral intake for 2 months. On physical examination we were able to palpate a mass with irregular margin around the left suprapatellar area. From the results of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), synovial proliferative disease, infectious arthritis, or gouty arthritis was suspected. We performed a blood laboratory test to detect rheumatologic diseases, knee joint aspiration, and bone scan for differential diagnosis, and were able to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the results of blood laboratory, physical examination, and bone scan. Consequently, we started medications for controlling RA. Herein, we report a case of rheumatoid arthritis with unilateral knee synovial hypertrophy in hemiplegia. If a right hemiplegic patient has recurrent pain on the left knee and synovial hypertrophy, and fails to respond to treatment for osteoarthritis, early detection by evaluation for rheumatic disease is crucial to prevent severe sequelae influencing rehabilitation of hemiplegia. PMID:22506248

  19. Four-Week Effects of Allopurinol and Febuxostat Treatments on Blood Pressure and Serum Creatinine Level in Gouty Men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of uric acid lowering therapy (UALT), febuxostat and allopurinol, on blood pressure (BP) and serum creatinine level. Post-hoc data were derived from a phase-III, randomised, double-blind, 4-week trial of male gouty patients that compared the safety and efficacy of febuxostat and allopurinol in adults with gout. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups, 35-37 in each group (febuxostat: 40, 80, 120 mg/d; allopurinol: 300 mg/d; control group: placebo). Blood pressure and serum creatinine level were measured at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Diastolic BP and creatinine level had decreased significantly in the UALT groups compared to the control group at week 4. Diastolic BP had decreased significantly in the allopurinol group and serum creatinine level had decreased significantly in the febuxostat groups at week 4. After adjusting for confounding variables, serum uric acid changes were found to be significantly correlated with changes in serum creatinine level but were not associated with changes in systolic or diastolic BP. UALT in gouty subjects significantly decreased diastolic BP and serum creatinine level. Changes in uric acid were significantly correlated with those in serum creatinine level, suggesting the feasibility of renal function improvement through UALT in gouty men. PMID:25120316

  20. Four-week effects of allopurinol and febuxostat treatments on blood pressure and serum creatinine level in gouty men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Seo, Young-Il; Song, Yeong W

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of uric acid lowering therapy (UALT), febuxostat and allopurinol, on blood pressure (BP) and serum creatinine level. Post-hoc data were derived from a phase-III, randomised, double-blind, 4-week trial of male gouty patients that compared the safety and efficacy of febuxostat and allopurinol in adults with gout. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups, 35-37 in each group (febuxostat: 40, 80, 120 mg/d; allopurinol: 300 mg/d; control group: placebo). Blood pressure and serum creatinine level were measured at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Diastolic BP and creatinine level had decreased significantly in the UALT groups compared to the control group at week 4. Diastolic BP had decreased significantly in the allopurinol group and serum creatinine level had decreased significantly in the febuxostat groups at week 4. After adjusting for confounding variables, serum uric acid changes were found to be significantly correlated with changes in serum creatinine level but were not associated with changes in systolic or diastolic BP. UALT in gouty subjects significantly decreased diastolic BP and serum creatinine level. Changes in uric acid were significantly correlated with those in serum creatinine level, suggesting the feasibility of renal function improvement through UALT in gouty men.

  1. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  2. MP Joint Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... important for both pinching and gripping. MP joint arthritis is most common in the thumb and index ...

  3. Sex and Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pre Meeting and Ticketed Sessions Knowledge Bowl Thieves Market Call for Proposals Faculty Abstracts Abstract Submission Abstract ... Arthritis Fast Facts Sex and arthritis can coexist. Open and honest communication between partners about feelings, desires, ...

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  5. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  6. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spondylitis, Q&A Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q& ... role. For example, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and fibromyalgia are more common among women. Other Rheumatic Diseases ...

  7. Arthritis - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  8. Effects of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome mutations predicted from ADAR-RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew J; Beal, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing is important for life in metazoan organisms. Dysregulation or mutations that compromise the efficacy of A to I editing results in neurological disorders and a shorten life span. These reactions are catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs), which hydrolytically deaminate adenosines in regions of duplex RNA. Because inosine mimics guanosine in hydrogen bonding, this prolific RNA editing alters the sequence and structural information in the RNA landscape. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood autoimmune disease that is one of a broader set of inherited disorders characterized by constitutive upregulation of type I interferon (IFN) referred to as type I interferonopathies. AGS is caused by mutations in multiple genes whose protein products, including ADAR1, are all involved in nucleic acid metabolism or sensing. The recent crystal structures of human ADAR2 deaminase domain complexed with duplex RNA substrates enabled modeling of how AGS causing mutations may influence RNA binding and catalysis. The mutations can be broadly characterized into three groups; mutations on RNA-binding loops that directly affect RNA binding, "second-layer" mutations that can alter the disposition of RNA-binding loops, and mutations that can alter the position of an α-helix bearing an essential catalytic residue.

  9. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  10. Mycoplasma fermentans, but not M penetrans, detected by PCR assays in synovium from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Schaeverbeke, T; Gilroy, C B; Bébéar, C; Dehais, J; Taylor-Robinson, D

    1996-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND: Mycoplasmas, especially Mycoplasma fermentans, were suggested more than 20 years ago as a possible cause of rheumatoid arthritis but this hypothesis was never substantiated. In view of the superior sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay over culture, the aim was to use this method to seek M fermentans and M penetrans in synovial samples from patients with various arthritides. METHODS: Synovial fluid samples (n = 154) and synovial biopsy specimens (n = 20) from 133 patients with various rheumatic disorders were stored at -80 degrees C for between one and 40 months. Aliquots (500 microliters) of the synovial fluid samples were centrifuged and the deposit, and also the synovial biopsy specimens (approximately 1 g) were placed in lysis buffer with proteinase K for DNA extraction. The DNA was tested by using a semi-nested PCR assay for M fermentans and a single-round PCR for M penetrans. RESULTS: M fermentans was detected in the joints of eight (21%) of 38 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, two (20%) of 10 patients with spondyloarthropathy with peripheral arthritis, one (20%) of five patients with psoriatic arthritis, and four (13%) of 31 patients with unclassified arthritis. M fermentans was not found in the joints of the seven patients with reactive arthritis, the 29 with osteoarthritis or post-traumatic hydrarthrosis, the nine with gouty arthritis, nor the four with chronic juvenile arthritis. M penetrans was not detected in any sample. CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that the presence of M fermentans in the joint is associated with inflammatory rheumatic disorders of unknown cause, including rheumatoid arthritis. However, whether this organism triggers or perpetuates disease of behaves as a passenger remains conjectural. PMID:8943749

  11. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  12. Anticollagen type II antibodies are associated with an acute onset rheumatoid arthritis phenotype and prognosticate lower degree of inflammation during 5 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Manivel, Vivek Anand; Mullazehi, Mohammed; Padyukov, Leonid; Westerlind, Helga; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Rönnelid, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Antifibrillar collagen type II (anti-CII) antibody-positive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have early but not late signs of increased inflammation and joint erosions. We wanted to replicate this in a large RA cohort, and to relate to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1* alleles. Methods Anti-CII and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)2 were measured at baseline in 773 patients with RA from the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation in Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study with clinical follow-up data from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (SRQ) registry, and 1476 with HLA-DRB1* information. Comparisons were done concerning C reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC), Disease Activity Score encompassing 28 joints based on ESR (DAS28), DAS28CRP, pain-Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), global-VAS and Health Assessment Questionnaire Score (HAQ) at eight occasions during 5 years, and association with HLA-DRB1* alleles. Results Anti-CII associated with elevated CRP, ESR, SJC, DAS28 and DAS28CRP at diagnosis and up to 6 months, whereas anti-CCP2 associated with SJC and DAS28 from 6 months to 5 years, but not earlier. The anti-CII-associated phenotype was strong, and predominated in anti-CII/anti-CCP2 double-positive patients. Anti-CII was associated with improvements in CRP, ESR, SJC, TJC and DAS28, whereas anti-CCP2 was associated with deteriorations in SJC and DAS28 over time. Anti-CII-positive patients achieved European League Against Rheumatism good or moderate response more often than negative patients. Anti-CII was positively associated with HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-DRB1*03, with significant interaction, and double-positive individuals had >14 times higher mean anti-CII levels than HLA double negatives. Whereas smoking was associated with elevated anti-CCP2 levels, smokers had lower anti-CII levels. Conclusions Anti-CII seropositive RA represents a distinct phenotype, in

  13. Anticollagen type II antibodies are associated with an acute onset rheumatoid arthritis phenotype and prognosticate lower degree of inflammation during 5 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Manivel, Vivek Anand; Mullazehi, Mohammed; Padyukov, Leonid; Westerlind, Helga; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Rönnelid, Johan

    2017-09-01

    Antifibrillar collagen type II (anti-CII) antibody-positive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have early but not late signs of increased inflammation and joint erosions. We wanted to replicate this in a large RA cohort, and to relate to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1* alleles. Anti-CII and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)2 were measured at baseline in 773 patients with RA from the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation in Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study with clinical follow-up data from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (SRQ) registry, and 1476 with HLA-DRB1* information. Comparisons were done concerning C reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC), Disease Activity Score encompassing 28 joints based on ESR (DAS28), DAS28CRP, pain-Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), global-VAS and Health Assessment Questionnaire Score (HAQ) at eight occasions during 5 years, and association with HLA-DRB1* alleles. Anti-CII associated with elevated CRP, ESR, SJC, DAS28 and DAS28CRP at diagnosis and up to 6 months, whereas anti-CCP2 associated with SJC and DAS28 from 6 months to 5 years, but not earlier. The anti-CII-associated phenotype was strong, and predominated in anti-CII/anti-CCP2 double-positive patients. Anti-CII was associated with improvements in CRP, ESR, SJC, TJC and DAS28, whereas anti-CCP2 was associated with deteriorations in SJC and DAS28 over time. Anti-CII-positive patients achieved European League Against Rheumatism good or moderate response more often than negative patients. Anti-CII was positively associated with HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-DRB1*03, with significant interaction, and double-positive individuals had >14 times higher mean anti-CII levels than HLA double negatives. Whereas smoking was associated with elevated anti-CCP2 levels, smokers had lower anti-CII levels. Anti-CII seropositive RA represents a distinct phenotype, in many respects representing the converse

  14. In vivo inhibition of human neutrophil collagenase (MMP-8) activity during long-term combination therapy of doxycycline and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in acute reactive arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lauhio, A; Salo, T; Ding, Y; Konttinen, Y T; Nordström, D; Tschesche, H; Lähdevirta, J; Golub, L M; Sorsa, T

    1994-01-01

    We studied the in vivo effect of long-term doxycycline treatment combined with NSAID on human interstitial collagenases, other matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteinases, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and lactoferrin from saliva and serum during the course of acute reactive arthritis (ReA). Collagenase activity and serine proteases (elastase-like, cathepsin G-like and trypsin-like activities) of saliva (n = 10) and gelatinase, lactoferrin and TIMP-1 of saliva (n = 10) and serum (n = 10) samples before and after 2 months doxycycline treatment, combined with NSAID, were studied by quantitative SDS-PAGE assay, ELISA assay and by spectrophotometric assay. The cellular source and molecular forms of salivary collagenase were characterized by immunoblotting using specific antisera. We found that activities of total and endogenously active interstitial collagenase reduced significantly. The salivary collagenase was found to originate from neutrophils. No fragmentation of either pro 75-kD and active 65-kD MMP-8 was detected after 2 months doxycycline treatment. However, during 2 months doxycycline and NSAID treatment no reduction of salivary and serum gelatinase, lactoferrin and TIMP-1-levels and salivary serine protease activities were detected. The in vivo inhibition of collagenase (MMP-8) activity during long-term doxycycline therapy in human saliva containing inflammatory exudate of ReA patients may contribute to the reduced tissue destruction observed in recent clinical and animal model studies in arthritides during long-term doxycycline/tetracycline treatment. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7923879

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of enthesitis-related arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic, inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) JIA category describes a clinically heterogeneous group of children including some who have predominately enthesitis, enthesitis and arthritis, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, or inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthropathy. ERA accounts for 10%–20% of JIA. Common clinical manifestations of ERA include arthritis, enthesitis, and acute anterior uveitis. Axial disease is also common in children with established ERA. Treatment regimens for ERA, many of them based on adults with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, include the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and biologic agents either individually or in combination. PMID:23236258

  16. In Vitro TNF-α Inhibitory Activity of Brazilian Plants and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Stryphnodendron adstringens in an Acute Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Bárbara O.; Corrêa, Olívia; Azevedo, Elaine Patrícia C.; Pádua, Rodrigo M.; de Oliveira, Vívian Louise S.; Oliveira, Thiago Henrique C.; Boff, Daiane; Dias, Ana Carolina F.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Castilho, Rachel O.

    2016-01-01

    Stryphnodendron species, popularly named “barbatimão,” are traditionally used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory agents. This study aimed to investigate the effect of barbatimão and 11 other species on the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated THP-1 cells, as well as their anti-arthritis activity. The extracts of Stryphnodendron adstringens, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Campomanesia lineatifolia, and Terminalia glabrescens promoted a concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α. Mice injected with LPS in the knee joint were treated per os with fractions from the selected extracts. Both the organic (SAO) and the aqueous (SAA) fractions of S. adstringens promoted a dose-dependent reduction of leukocyte migration and neutrophil accumulation into the joint, but none of them reduced CXCL1 concentration in the periarticular tissue. In contrast, treatment with C. lineatifolia and T. glabrescens fractions did not ameliorate the inflammatory parameters. Analyses of SAO by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) led to the identification of gallic acid along with 11 prodelphinidins, characterized as monomers and dimers of the B-type. Our findings contribute to some extent to corroborating the traditional use of S. adstringens as an anti-inflammatory agent. This activity is probably related to a decrease of leukocyte migration into the inflammatory site. Polyphenols like gallic acid and prodelphinidins, identified in the active fraction, may contribute to the observed activity. PMID:27867403

  17. In Vitro TNF-α Inhibitory Activity of Brazilian Plants and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Stryphnodendron adstringens in an Acute Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Bárbara O; Corrêa, Olívia; Azevedo, Elaine Patrícia C; Pádua, Rodrigo M; de Oliveira, Vívian Louise S; Oliveira, Thiago Henrique C; Boff, Daiane; Dias, Ana Carolina F; de Souza, Danielle G; Amaral, Flávio A; Teixeira, Mauro M; Castilho, Rachel O; Braga, Fernão C

    2016-01-01

    Stryphnodendron species, popularly named "barbatimão," are traditionally used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory agents. This study aimed to investigate the effect of barbatimão and 11 other species on the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated THP-1 cells, as well as their anti-arthritis activity. The extracts of Stryphnodendron adstringens, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Campomanesia lineatifolia, and Terminalia glabrescens promoted a concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α. Mice injected with LPS in the knee joint were treated per os with fractions from the selected extracts. Both the organic (SAO) and the aqueous (SAA) fractions of S. adstringens promoted a dose-dependent reduction of leukocyte migration and neutrophil accumulation into the joint, but none of them reduced CXCL1 concentration in the periarticular tissue. In contrast, treatment with C. lineatifolia and T. glabrescens fractions did not ameliorate the inflammatory parameters. Analyses of SAO by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) led to the identification of gallic acid along with 11 prodelphinidins, characterized as monomers and dimers of the B-type. Our findings contribute to some extent to corroborating the traditional use of S. adstringens as an anti-inflammatory agent. This activity is probably related to a decrease of leukocyte migration into the inflammatory site. Polyphenols like gallic acid and prodelphinidins, identified in the active fraction, may contribute to the observed activity.

  18. Acute Hepatitis E Virus infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Detlev; Mani, Bernhard; Dollenmaier, Günter; Sahli, Roland; Zbinden, Andrea; Krayenbühl, Pierre Alexandre

    2015-10-29

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most recently discovered of the hepatotropic viruses, and is considered an emerging pathogen in developed countries with the possibility of fulminant hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. Especially in the latter elevated transaminases should be taken as a clue to consider HEV infection, as it can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression and/or ribavirin therapy. To our best knowledge, this is a unique case of autochthonous HEV infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 68-year-old Swiss woman with RA developed hepatitis initially diagnosed as methotrexate-induced liver injury, but later diagnosed as autochthonous HEV infection accompanied by reactivation of her latent EBV infection. She showed confounding serological results pointing to three hepatotropic viruses (HEV, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and EBV) that could be resolved by detection of HEV and EBV viraemia. The patient recovered by temporary discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy. In immunosuppressed patients with RA and signs of liver injury, HEV infection should be considered, as infection can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression. Although anti-HEV-IgM antibody assays can be used as first line virological tools, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) for detection of HEV RNA are recommended--as in our case--if confounding serological results from other hepatotropic viruses are obtained. After discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy, our patient recovered from both HEV infection and reactivation of latent EBV infection without sequelae.

  19. ICPMS analysis of proteins separated by Native-PAGE: Evaluation of metaloprotein profiles in human synovial fluid with acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Mario F; Mariño-Repizo, Leonardo; Tamashiro, Héctor; Villegas, Liliana; Acosta, Mariano; Gil, Raúl A

    2016-07-01

    The role of trace elements bound to proteins in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. In this sense, the identification and detection of metalloproteins has a strong and growing interest. Metalloprotein studies are currently carried out by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and despite that complete information can be obtained for metals such as Fe, Cu and Zn, difficulties due to poor sensitivity for other trace elements such as Sn, As, etc, are currently faced. In the present work, a simple and fast method for the determination of trace metals bound to synovial fluid (SF) proteins was optimized. Proteins from SF (long and short-term RA) were separated in ten fractions by native PAGE, then dissolved in nitric acid and peroxide hydrogen, and analyzed by ICPMS. Fifteen metals were determined in each separated protein fraction (band). Adequate calibration of proteins molecular weight allowed stablishing which protein type were bound to different metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. [Septic arthritis? Gonococcal infection despite negative bacterial cultures].

    PubMed

    Saur, M; Distler, O; Müller, N

    2008-09-10

    Clinical signs of acute arthritis are non-specific. An acute painfull joint with effusion of unknown origin needs to be evaluated by puncture. The analysis of the synovial fluid will enable to divide an arthritis into three categories: crystal induced, rheumatological or septic arthritis. A bacterial infection should always be suspected. Cultures from blood, synovia and Gram stain do not reliably exclude a bacterial infection. If gonococcal, mycobacterial, borrelial and non-gonococcal-infective arthritis under antibiotic therapy is suspected, direct DNA-amplification can be helpful. A disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) must be suspected on appearance of tenosynovitis, polyarthralgia and skin lesions. The clinical picture, diagnosis and therapy of a case with DGI is discussed.

  1. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child.

    PubMed

    Shivamurthy, V M; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features.

  2. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints.

  3. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  5. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  6. How undifferentiated arthritis evolves into chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, D; Toes, R E M; Scherer, H U

    2014-08-01

    Undifferentiated arthritis (UA) is a frequently occurring clinical presentation with a variable outcome. While some forms of UA will spontaneously remit, other forms will progress to chronic arthritis; an outcome that would preferably be prevented. Which immunological factors are normally at the basis of resolution of inflammation, and what, on the other hand, causes inflammation to persist? This review provides an overview of the immunological mechanisms involved in these two scenarios, including specific examples of how these mechanisms apply, or can be influenced in rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, what do we know about risk factors for chronic arthritis, such as the development of autoantibodies? The recent years have provided many insights concerning risk factors for autoantibody-positive versus autoantibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis, which are discussed along with a possible pathophysiological model incorporating autoantibodies into the larger process of disease development. Finally, the evolution of the autoantibody response over time is described.

  7. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Antonio; Yáñez, Antonio; León-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  8. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  9. [Tocilizumab in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rueda Gotor, Javier; Blanco Alonso, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the receptor for IL-6, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan, Europe and the US. Wide clinical development has shown the efficacy of TCZ in most of the possible situations of RA: RA without prior failure to MTX (AMBITION), RA unresponsive to MTX (SATORI, OPTION, LITHE) or any DMARD (TOWARD, ROSE) as well as RA refractory to anti-TNFa agents (RADIATE). In addition to its early onset, efficacy was constant and even increased as time passed (GROWTH95, GROWTH96). TCZ has shown great efficacy in correcting laboratory alterations in RA, both in acute phase reactants as well as anemia of inflammatory disease. Although in RA TCZ us initially indicated in combination with MTX, it has also shown its efficacy as monotherapy (AMBITION). TCZ is equally effective in the prevention of structural damage (SAMURAI, LITHE). In addition, it has shown to be a safe and well-tolerated drug, similar to other biologic therapies. All of these aspects make TCZ an adequate therapeutic alternative to be considered in any RA scenario.

  10. Effects of acute exercise on circulating endothelial and progenitor cells in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and healthy controls: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Joyce; Nguyen, Thanh; Cellucci, Tania; Larché, Maggie J; Timmons, Brian W

    2015-10-12

    Youth with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may be at risk of poor cardiovascular health. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are markers of cardiovascular repair and damage, respectively, and respond to exercise. The objectives of this study were to compare resting levels of EPCs and CECs in JIA and controls, and to assess the effects of distinct types of exercise on EPCs and CECs in JIA and controls. Seven youth with JIA and six controls completed 3 visits. First, aerobic fitness was assessed. Participants then performed either moderate intensity, continuous exercise (MICE) or high intensity, intermittent exercise (HIIE) on separate days. Blood samples were collected at the beginning (REST), mid-point (MID) and end of exercise (POST) for determination of EPCs (CD31(+)CD34(bright)CD45(dim)CD133(+)) and CECs (CD31(bright)CD34(+)CD45(-)CD133(-)) by flow cytometry. Between group differences in EPCs and CECs were examined using two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's HSD post hoc, where appropriate. Statistical significance set at p ≤ 0.05. Both EPCs and CECs were similar between groups at REST (p = 0.18-0.94). During MICE, EPCs remained unchanged in JIA (p = 0.95) but increased significantly at POST in controls (REST: 0.91 ± 0.55 × 10(6) cells/L vs. POST: 1.53 ± 0.36 × 10(6) cells/L, p = 0.04). Compared with controls, lower levels of EPCs were observed in JIA at MID (0.48 ± 0.50 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 1.10 ± 0.39 × 10(6) cells/L, p = 0.01) and POST (0.38 ± 0.34 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 1.53 ± 0.36 × 10(6) cells/L, p < 0.001) during MICE. No changes were detected in CECs with MICE in JIA and controls (p = 0.69). Neither EPCs nor CECs were modified with HIIE (p = 0.28-0.69). Youth with JIA demonstrated a blunted EPC response to MICE when compared with controls. Future work should examine factors that may increase or normalize EPC

  11. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602 reduces nociception in a rat model of acute arthritis via the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55.

    PubMed

    Schuelert, Niklas; McDougall, Jason J

    2011-08-01

    Cannabinoids classically act via CB₁ and CB₂ receptors to modulate nociception; however, recent findings suggest that some cannabinoids bind to atypical receptors. One such receptor is GPR55 which is activated by the abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602. This study investigated whether the synthetic GPR55 agonist O-1602 can alter joint nociception in a rat model of acute joint inflammation. Acute (24 h) inflammatory joint pain was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-articular injection of 2% kaolin and 2% carrageenan. Single unit extracellular recordings were made from arthritic joint afferents in response to mechanical rotation of the knee. Peripheral administration of O-1602 significantly reduced movement-evoked firing of nociceptive C fibres and this effect was blocked by the GPR55 receptor antagonist O-1918. Co-administration of the CB₁ and CB₂ antagonists (AM281 and AM630 respectively) had no effect on O-1602 responses. This study clearly shows that atypical cannabinoid receptors are involved in joint nociception and these novel targets may be advantageous for the treatment of inflammatory pain.

  13. Assessment of Biomarkers Associated with Joint Injury and Subsequent Post-Traumatic Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    future registries of acute joint injuries. 2. KEYWORDS: Post-traumatic arthritis, post-traumatic osteoarthritis , articular fracture, joint ...develop PTA and MRL/MpJ mice that are protected from PTA. Serum and synovial 4 "Assessment of Biomarkers Associated with Joint Injury and Subsequent Post... Joint Injury and Subsequent Post- Traumatic Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Farshid Guilak CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Duke

  14. Assessment of Biomarkers Associated with Joint Injury and Subsequent Post-Traumatic Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    may be useful in future registries of acute joint injuries. 2. KEYWORDS: Post-traumatic arthritis, post-traumatic osteoarthritis , articular...6 mice that develop PTA and MRL/MpJ mice that are protected from PTA. Serum and synovial 4 "Assessment of Biomarkers Associated with Joint Injury... Joint Injury and Subsequent Post- Traumatic Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven A. Olson CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Duke

  15. Assessment of Biomarkers Associated with Joint Injury and Subsequent Post-Traumatic Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    future registries of acute joint injuries. 2. KEYWORDS: Post-traumatic arthritis, post-traumatic osteoarthritis , articular fracture, joint injury...PTA and MRL/MpJ mice that are protected from PTA. Serum and synovial 4 "Assessment of Biomarkers Associated with Joint Injury and Subsequent Post... Joint Injury and Subsequent Post- Traumatic Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Virginia B. Kraus CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Duke

  16. Chronic arthritis in chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Lourdes; Roure, Silvia

    2017-07-24

    Chikungunya virus infection causes arthralgia and arthritis in the acute phase of the disease but, in more than half of the cases, musculoskeletal manifestations can be prolonged over time and, in some cases, become chronic. Although polyarthralgia is the most frequent chronic manifestation, forms with polyarthritis, tenosynovitis and enthesopathy are also common. To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent articular manifestations after infection with the Chikungunya virus. Report of 3 cases of chronic arthritis after infection with chikungunya virus diagnosed at outpatient care in a university hospital of Catalonia, all of them imported after exposure in areas of epidemic infection between 2013-2015. All three patients had inflammatory joint pain for more than one year after acute disease (3, 2 and 1 years, respectively). In all cases, it appeared as polyarthritis with involvement of small joints of hands and feet (pseudorheumatoid arthritis-like). Laboratory tests showed a slight elevation of acute phase reactants, and analyses for immune markers were negative. Two of the patients required treatment with glucocorticoids and hydroxychloroquine. The course led to slow clinical improvement, but only one of them came to be completely asymptomatic. In the differential diagnosis of chronic polyarthritis, Chikungunya virus disease should also be considered in areas in which it is not endemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Profile of arthritis disability.

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, L. M.; Juarez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 1994-95 National Health Interview Supplement Disability Supplement, the authors study levels of disabilities and accommodations among US adults with arthritis disability, compared to people with disability due to other conditions. Arthritis-disabled people are defined in two ways. One definition covers a broad range of arthritis and rheumatic conditions, and the other concentrates solely on arthritis. The authors find that arthritis-disabled people have more total disabilities than other-disabled peop e. However, their disabilities are less severe, have shorter durations, and accumulate more gradually over time. Despite more disabilities, people with arthritis disability use fewer assistive and service accommodations than other-disabled people. They do use more mobility aids. Because arthritis is the leading chronic condition for middle-aged and older adults, th s profile of extensive but mild-to-moderate disability is experienced by many millions of adults. Accommodations for arthritis may also be extensive but aimed more toward self-care than toward assistive and medical services. PMID:11889283

  18. Living with Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone might fall or be injured in a car accident. Then, years after the individual’s knee has apparently healed, he might get arthritis in his knee joint. Rheumatoid arthritis happens when the body’s own defense system doesn’t work properly. It affects joints and bones (often of ...

  19. Arthritis in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Pile, K D; Richens, J E; Laurent, R M; Bhatia, K; Prasad, M L; Lupiwa, T; Hudson, B J; Tapsall, J; McPetrie, R

    1993-01-01

    Acute polyarthritis is an important cause of morbidity in many tropical countries. Classification has often been difficult, with the term tropical polyarthritis used for those in whom a diagnosis could not be made. The implication that this is a distinct entity is probably incorrect, with likely causes being septic arthritis or post-infective reactive arthritis. This study aimed to determine the types of arthritis found in 43 patients (30 men) presenting consecutively to the Goroka Base Hospital in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Gonococcal arthritis was diagnosed in eight patients (six men) on the basis of isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the joint aspirate. In all cases the N gonorrhoeae was identified by the closed culture system on chocolate agar, but not always by routine plating. There were no specific clinical features that identified patients with a gonococcal septic arthritis. The remaining 34 patients had an undifferentiated oligoarthritis. The pattern of arthritis in men and women was of a lower limb pauciarticular arthritis with a predilection for the knee and ankle joints. A total of 30% of male patients had a history of urethral discharge and 44% of all patients had preceding diarrhoea. Arthritis was the only feature in 59% of patients and in 32% there was an associated enthesitis. In this study most patients had an oligoarthritis consistent with a reactive arthritis or a septic arthritis due to N gonorrhoeae. Broth inoculation of synovial fluid was the best method to isolate N gonorrhoeae, with standard methods for gonococcal isolation failing in some patients. It is recommended that the term 'tropical polyarthritis' is no longer used as it does not refer to a specific entity but consists of several known arthritides.

  20. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  1. Psoriasis and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cats, A

    1990-10-01

    The exact association between psoriasis and arthritis remains an enigma. Some investigators consider that the two disorders constitute a disease entity, psoriatic arthritis, while others support the thesis that psoriasis and arthritis are common diseases and occur simultaneously by chance. The author upholds the latter view as viable. To underscore his viewpoint he presents a comprehensive overview of the controversial opinions through an historical perspective as well as reporting on his epidemiologic and clinical findings from large population studies in the Netherlands. Therapeutic regimens for the management of both skin and joint problems are presented.

  2. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... beans that may play a role. Psoriatic arthritis: Psoriasis is often thought of as a skin disorder, ... affect the joints as well. On the skin, psoriasis appears as dry, scaly patches. Not all people ...

  3. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  4. Arthritis in hip (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on ... like when walking. Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones ...

  5. Juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Southwood, T R; Woo, P

    1995-05-01

    The nomenclature and classification criteria for arthritis in children should be dealt with initially as separate issues, although they are undoubtedly intertwined. The classification criteria should aim to delineate homogeneous patient populations, yet should be flexible enough to incorporate advances in disease knowledge. It should be recognized that arriving at an international consensus for classification criteria will merely provide a set of operational definitions to facilitate research, and not a set of diagnostic criteria. Indeed the only point to obtaining consensus is to begin a process of systematic ongoing review of the criteria. The labels attached to any of these diseases should facilitate accurate communication. In view of the heterogeneous nature of childhood arthritis, consideration should be given to using a broad umbrella term such as juvenile or childhood arthritis only for communicating with the lay public. Medical nomenclature should be formulated to reflect accurately homogeneous subgroups of arthritis, and should not artificially proscribe a relationship between paediatric and adult disease.

  6. Rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Parsons, Wendy J; Atteno, Mariangela; Ferrara, Nicola

    2009-08-01

    This article summarizes the state of the art of rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Very little evidence was available to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation. Some data were borrowed from studies on ankylosing spondylitis. Covering certain aspects of the disease by the standard measure of functioning was difficult. However, rehabilitation was considered by the GRAPPA Group (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis), as part of treatment of axial PsA.

  7. Osteoporosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Parisi, Anna; Atteno, Mariangela; Montalbano, Simona; Vitiello, Maria; Esposito, Carmela; Bertolini, Nicoletta; Foglia, Francesca; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture. The prevalence of OP in the general population is very high as established in several studies, and OP represents one of the possible aspects of bone involvement in arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis this involvement is particularly complex because it affects not only mechanisms of bone loss but also of bone formation. We will discuss these aspects and the available epidemiological data.

  8. Rapidly Evolving Coronary Aneurysm in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pappy, Reji; Wayangankar, Siddharth; Kalapura, Thomachan; Abu-Fadel, Mazen S.

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) formation in the setting of an acute inflammatory state due to connective tissue disease is rare. We report a case of rapid progression from an ectatic to an aneursymatic left circumflex coronary artery leading to an acute coronary event in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report the accelerated growth of the aneurysm as it was temporally related to the lapse in treatment and the management strategies involved with this entity. PMID:21403892

  9. Rapidly evolving coronary aneurysm in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pappy, Reji; Wayangankar, Siddharth; Kalapura, Thomachan; Abu-Fadel, Mazen S

    2011-02-21

    Coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) formation in the setting of an acute inflammatory state due to connective tissue disease is rare. We report a case of rapid progression from an ectatic to an aneursymatic left circumflex coronary artery leading to an acute coronary event in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report the accelerated growth of the aneurysm as it was temporally related to the lapse in treatment and the management strategies involved with this entity.

  10. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  11. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  12. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Research Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of ... a project plan to address relevant challenges for rheumatoid arthritis. Read Part 1 on Lupus in MedlinePlus magazine, ...

  13. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... debilitating when it affects the hands and fingers. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms of ...

  14. Psoriatic arthritis update.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis occurring in up to 30% of patients with psoriasis. Its clear distinction from rheumatoid arthritis has been described clinically, genetically, and immunohistologically. Updated classification criteria have been recently derived from a large international study. Key pathophysiologic cellular processes are being elucidated, increasing our understanding of potential targets of therapy. Therapies that target cells, such as activated T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), are rational to pursue. Outcome measures have been "borrowed" from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis studies. A variety of domains are assessed including joints, skin, enthesium, dactylitis, spine, function, quality of life, and imaging assessment of disease activity and damage. The performance qualities of outcome measures in these various domains is being evaluated by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), and improved measures are being developed and validated specifically for psoriatic arthritis. Traditional therapies for psoriatic arthritis have included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, oral immunomodulatory drugs, topical creams, and light therapy. These therapies have been helpful in controlling both musculoskeletal and dermatologic aspects of the disease, but they may not be fully effective in all disease domains, may eventually show diminished benefit, and may produce treatment-limiting toxicities. In the past several years, use of biologic agents has generally yielded greater benefit across more domains, yielding significant and enduring benefits for clinical manifestations, function, and quality of life, and especially with the anti-TNF agents, inhibition of structural damage. Adverse effects with these agents can be significant but are usually manageable. Cost is also significant, but cost-effectiveness analysis is demonstrating reasonable

  15. Cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walsmith, Joseph; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating, chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that causes destruction of joint cartilage and bone. It generally occurs between the fourth and sixth decades of life, and affects two to three times more women than men. It is characterized by joint stiffness, pain, and swelling, and is accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in skeletal muscle, but also occurs in the viscera and immune system. Thus, rheumatoid cachexia leads to muscle weakness and a loss of functional capacity, and is believed to accelerate morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently there is no established mechanism for rheumatoid cachexia, but it is accompanied by elevated resting energy expenditure, accelerated whole-body protein catabolism, and excess production of the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is probably the central mediator of muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis, and is known to act synergistically with interleukin-1beta to promote cachexia. In general, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta are thought to alter the balance between protein degradation and protein synthesis in rheumatoid arthritis to cause muscle wasting. The precise mechanism by which they do this is not known. Reduced peripheral insulin action and low habitual physical activity are important consequences of rheumatoid arthritis, and have also been implicated as mediators of rheumatoid cachexia. Insulin inhibits muscle protein degradation. Consequently, reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is thought to be permissive to cytokine-driven muscle loss. The cause of reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is not known, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha has been shown to interfere with insulin receptor signaling and is probably an important contributor. Low habitual physical

  16. Gout: epitome of painful arthritis.

    PubMed

    VanItallie, Theodore B

    2010-10-01

    Arthritic pain and disability are at or near the top of the list of reasons adult patients seek medical attention. At least 47.8 million US residents have arthritis. In Europe, the magnitude of the problem is similar, affecting 8 million in the United Kingdom and 108 million across the continent. Osteoarthritis is by far the most common form of arthritis. In a regional UK study, nearly half of adults 50 years or older reported some form of osteoarthritic knee pain over a 1-year period. Among the arthritides, gout is notable for the agonizing nature and unique pathogenesis of the pain it generates. Gout is the most common cause of inflammatory arthritis among men and postmenopausal women. Because of the atypical nature of some of its clinical manifestations, gout can present serious diagnostic challenges for practicing physicians. In recent years, knowledge about gout's pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and differential diagnosis has advanced on a broad front. Genetic variants within a newly identified transport gene, SLC2A9, have been associated with a low fractional excretion of uric acid and the presence of gout in several population samples. The SLC2A9 gene encodes glucose transporter 9-a unique hexose and high-capacity urate transporter. In addition, human ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G2 (ABCG2), encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found to mediate renal urate secretion. Introduction of a mutation encoded in a model system by a common single nucleotide polymorphism, rs2231142, resulted in a 53% reduction in urate transport rates compared with wild-type ABCG2. Based on a large population study, it has been estimated that at least 10% of all gout cases in white persons may be attributable to this single nucleotide polymorphism causal genetic variant. Of the various categories of arthritis, the crystal-induced arthropathies, gout and pseudogout, are manifested by acute inflammation and tissue damage arising from deposition in joints and periarticular tissues of

  17. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Ray

    2017-09-27

    Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises-practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique-may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  18. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child

    PubMed Central

    Shivamurthy, V. M.; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features. PMID:27366165

  19. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  20. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. [Arthritis and clinical history].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lígia; Sampaio, Luzia; Pinto, José; Ventura, Francisco S

    2011-01-01

    In front of a patient with arthritis, clinical good-sense tells that the most probable diagnosis are the most prevalent ones. Nevertheless, we have to exclude a multiplicity of other aetiologies, less frequent, but with highest implications in the therapeutic conduct. Infections by Brucella and by Borrelia are rare causes of chronic arthritis, yet are diagnosis to consider, even when the clinical manifestations aren't the most typical, as there still exist endemic areas in Portugal. Here we report two clinical cases about patients with arthritis for more than one year, subject to ineffective exams ant treatments. Only the clinical history could put on evidence clinical-epidemiological data, suggestive of Brucellosis and Lyme Disease, namely the professional contact with infected animals, and the history of probable erythema migrans, that pointed toward the correct diagnosis. So, with directed therapeutic, there was complete resolution of the inflammatory symptoms.

  2. Arthritis in Roman Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Thould, A K; Thould, B T

    1983-01-01

    The pattern of arthritis in Roman Britain was investigated by examining the skeletons of 416 adults from the Roman cemetery at Poundbury Camp near Dorchester, Dorset. The mean height of the people was not much less than that of the current British population, and the prevalence of right handedness was similar to our own. There was a high prevalence of osteoarthritis for such a relatively young community, with particularly severe changes in the vertebral column. The pattern of joints affected by osteoarthritis was different from that seen now, but the prevalence of vertebral ankylosing hyperostosis was much the same. Rheumatoid arthritis was seen as often as the expected rat would indicate, given that the population died young, but it was rare. Other forms of arthritis, including gout and ankylosing spondylitis, were not seen. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6418269

  3. Arthritis-associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Osial, T A; Cash, J M; Eisenbeis, C H

    1993-12-01

    There are a number of diseases characterized by inflammatory arthropathy that, although not as commonly seen as rheumatoid arthritis, often present to the family physician as difficult diagnostic problems. The diagnosis is frequently most difficult during the early course of these diseases. During recent years, new and altered concepts have arisen regarding both diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging group of arthropathies. This article presents a review of the more common arthritis-associated syndromes with emphasis on the differential diagnosis and medicinal therapeutics.

  4. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sarcopaenia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Targowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016 a new independent disease called sarcopaenia (according to ICD-10 classification) appeared. According to the recommendation of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), sarcopaenia is defined as abnormally low muscle mass plus low skeletal muscle strength or low physical performance. Sarcopaenia, as a primary disease, is mainly observed in older people, but it can also appear in younger adults in the course of many clinical chronic conditions. One of the most frequent chronic diseases associated with chronic inflammation and functional limitation of skeletal system is rheumatoid arthritis. In the present article, current knowledge on the epidemiology of sarcopaenia and its association with rheumatoid arthritis is presented.

  6. Ackerman syndrome: a rare cause of arthritis with dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Kosar; Thomas, Liza; Shaikh, Niaz Ahmed; Ahmed Abdul Hamid, Badr

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a middle-aged woman who presented with acute onset of non-erosive oligoarthritis and cutaneous lesions. Her laboratory work up revealed mild anaemia with positive antinuclear antibody. Her skin biopsy confirmed the presence of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. She was treated with a successful trial of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis (IGDA), or Ackerman syndrome, is an under-recognised cause of arthritis with dermatitis. This is primarily due to the varied clinical presentation of the skin lesions and the non-specific laboratory findings. Our aim is to highlight the pivotal role of skin biopsy as part of the diagnostic assessment of patients who present with arthritis and concomitant skin lesions. PMID:25666244

  7. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  8. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... If arthritis is due to damaged ligaments, the support structures of the joint may be unstable or “loose.” ... dominant hand is affected • Your personal goals, home support structure, and ability to understand the treatment and comply ...

  9. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the possible causes of juvenile arthritis. They are studying genetic and environmental factors that they think are involved. They are also trying to improve current treatments and find new medicines that will work better with fewer side effects. Research supported by ...

  10. Dapsone in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, D J; Lamothe, M; Stevens, R M; Sigal, L H

    1996-06-01

    Dapsone, a synthetic sulfone with chemical similarities to sulfapyridine, has been used for a number of years to treat leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a number of prospective, randomized, double-blind trials have shown their success in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, with dapsone being superior to placebo and comparable to chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. Its mode of anti-inflammatory actions in rheumatoid arthritis is not clearly understood, but modulation of neutrophil activity or inhibition of neutrophil inflammatory product formation or release appear to play a role. The major limiting side effect is hemolytic anemia, which may be mitigated through careful patient selection, conservative drug dosing, close monitoring, and possibly, concurrent administration of antioxidants or cytochrome P450 inhibitors. Methemoglobinemia is another common finding among patients receiving dapsone therapy, but rarely does it result in prominent symptoms other than transient pallor. Less common adverse events to dapsone include the idiosyncratic reactions of leukopenia and agranulocytosis, cutaneous eruptions, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis, toxic hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, nephrotic syndrome, renal papillary necrosis, severe hypoalbuminemia without proteinuria, an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome, and minor neurological and gastrointestinal complaints. In this report, two patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis, who were safely and effectively treated with dapsone after failure with other second-line agents, are described and the literature is reviewed. We suggest that dapsone is an effective second-line agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  12. [Juvenile idiopathic systemic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Baksiene, Dalia; Kasparaviciene, Jūrate; Zebiene, Migla; Puteliene, Brigita

    2003-01-01

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY was to evaluate the peculiarities of the clinical features, laboratory parameters and tactics of treatment in juvenile idiopatic systematic arthritis. A retrospective data review of 41 children (26 boys and 15 girls) who underwent treatment for systemic arthritis (according to ILAR criteria) in our institution between 1992 and 2002 was performed. The disease started with fever of unknown origin in all cases. In 73% of patients it lasted longer than one month, in 54% fever was with twice daily spikers in the morning and in the evening. The rash during the rise of temperature appeared in 49%, in most cases (70%) there was a maculo-papular rash. Lymphadenopathy and serositis were observed in 32%, hepatomegaly in 29%, and splenomegaly in 24%. Arthritis coincided with the fever in 29% of patients, in majority of cases it was progressing to a severe persistent arthritis after the systematic phase. There was no specific laboratory findings: neutrophilic leucocytosis was found in 73%, anemia - in 80.5%, trombocytosis - in 36.6%, elevated CRP - in 63.4%, dysproteinemia - in 79% of patients. Antinuclear factors were absent in all examined children. For all patients intravenous methylprednisolone pulses have been administered (10-22 mg/kg/infusion). Prednisolone was also continued orally (1-2 mg/kg/day). 24.4% of patients required in addition immunosupressive agents such as methotrexate, azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. Puls-therapy of methylprednisolone is a safe and sufficiently effective method of treatment in most cases of the systematic juvenile arthritis.

  13. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  14. Chondrosternal Arthritis in Infant: An Unusual Entity

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Primary arthritis of chondrosternal joint is very rare and occurs in infants less than 18 months of age. Presentation is most often subacute but may be acute. Child presents with a parasternal mass with history of fever and/or local signs of infection. Clinical symptoms vary from a painless noninflammatory to a painful mass with local tenderness and swelling, while fever may be absent. Laboratory data show low or marginally raised levels of white blood cells and C-reactive protein, reflecting, respectively, the subacute or acute character of the infection. It is a self-limiting affection due to the adequate immune response of the patient. Evolution is generally good without antibiotherapy with a progressive spontaneous healing. A wait-and-see approach with close follow-up in the first weeks is the best therapeutic option. PMID:25386377

  15. [The role of biomarkers in diagnostics and forecasting of effectiveness of modern therapy of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E N; Novikov, A A; Nasonov, E L

    2013-08-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most severe and widespread systemic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. The modern laboratory diagnostic of rheumatoid arthritis includes detection of large spectrum of biomarkers (autoantibodies, indicators of acute phase of inflammation, cytokines, markers of activation of endothelium, subpopulations of lymphocytes, products of metabolism of bone and cartilaginous tissue, genetic markers) in blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue. Alongside with common techniques of immunodiagnostics, the multiplex analysis of biomarkers based on genetic, transcript and proteomic technologies is applied. The results of identification of biomarkers are an important instrument of early diagnostics, activity evaluation, severity of disease course and disease prognosis and effectiveness of applied therapy. Among biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis the most clinical value have antibodies (rheumatoid factor class IgM, antibodies to citrullinized proteins) and acute phase indicators (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) which are diagnostic criteria of rheumatoid arthritis and can be used in evaluation of prognosis of this disease. On basis of multi-parametric analysis of 12 key proteins of blood serum the new index of activity of rheumatoid arthritis (Vectra DA) is developed Nowadays, the potential biomarkers are detected providing to implement immunologic monitoring and prognosis of effectiveness of therapy of rheumatoid arthritis with genetic engineering biologic preparations. The laboratory tests are developed to evaluate immunogenicity of genetic engineering biologic preparations and diagnostic of latent tuberculosis infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis against the background of therapy with using this group of pharmaceuticals.

  16. The Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (familial, early onset encephalopathy with calcifications of the basal ganglia and chronic cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis).

    PubMed Central

    Tolmie, J L; Shillito, P; Hughes-Benzie, R; Stephenson, J B

    1995-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (Mendelian inheritance in man Catalog No *225750) is an autosomal recessive encephalopathy which causes developmental arrest, intracerebral calcification, and white matter disease in the presence of chronic cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis, and a raised level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Diagnosis requires the presence of progressive encephalopathy with onset shortly after birth, and characteristic clinical neurological and neuroimaging signs together with chronic CSF lymphocytosis. The syndrome has superficial resemblance to the neurological sequelae of congenital infection, thus a rigorous search for microbiological and serological evidence of embryopathic infections should be carried out in each case. Images PMID:8592332

  17. Gonococcal arthritis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sena Corrales, Gabriel; Mora Navas, Laura; Palacios Muñoz, Rosario; García López, Victoria; Márquez Solero, Manuel; Santos González, Jesús

    We report a case of gonococcal arthritis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and review 17 previously published cases; only one patient presented urethritis, and blood cultures were positive in one case. Gonococcal arthritis is rare in HIV-infected patients and is not usually associated with other symptoms. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute arthritis in patients with HIV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  18. HLA B27 associated chronic arthritis in children: review of 65 cases.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M

    1987-01-01

    The study of sixty-five children with antigen HLA B27 associated chronic rheumatism was performed. There was a male preponderance, and mean age at onset was ten. A family history was available in half patients. After a 5-year follow up study, 32% of the patients were diagnosed as having ankylosing spondylitis or Reiter's syndrome or psoriatic arthritis or arthritis associated to inflammatory bowel disease. The other patients should be considered as having an HLA B27 associated juvenile chronic arthritis with special features such as enthesopathy, acute joint pain or sausage-like digits. Three patients had a very severe outcome with considerable joint lesion seen on X Ray.

  19. Reactive arthritis associated with proctitis due to Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2b.

    PubMed

    Pendle, Stella; Gowers, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We report the first case of reactive arthritis associated with lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) proctitis in Australia. Since 2004, LGV proctitis has emerged as an important infection worldwide in men who have sex with men. While reactive arthritis is usually associated with serovars D to K of Chlamydia trachomatis, association with LGV serovars is historically rare. Screening for chlamydial infection should be considered in this group if they present with an acute arthritis otherwise the condition could go undiagnosed. Asymptomatic infections are being increasingly reported in Europe and prolonged treatment is required to ensure a cure.

  20. Safety and efficacy of uric acid in patients with acute stroke (URICO-ICTUS): a randomised, double-blind phase 2b/3 trial.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Angel; Amaro, Sergio; Castellanos, Mar; Segura, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan; Martí-Fábregas, Joan; Gállego, Jaime; Krupinski, Jurek; Gomis, Meritxell; Cánovas, David; Carné, Xavier; Deulofeu, Ramón; Román, Luis San; Oleaga, Laura; Torres, Ferran; Planas, Anna M

    2014-05-01

    Uric acid is an antioxidant with neuroprotective effects in experimental models of stroke. We assessed whether uric acid therapy would improve functional outcomes at 90 days in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. URICO-ICTUS was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b/3 trial that recruited patients with acute ischaemic stroke admitted to ten Spanish stroke centres. Patients were included if they were aged 18 years or older, had received alteplase within 4·5 h of symptom onset, and had an eligible National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (>6 and ≤25) and premorbid (assessed by anamnesis) modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score (≤2). Patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive uric acid 1000 mg or placebo (both infused intravenously in 90 min during the infusion of alteplase), stratified by centre and baseline stroke severity. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with excellent outcome (ie, an mRS score of 0-1, or 2 if premorbid score was 2) at 90 days, analysed in the target population (all randomly assigned patients who had been correctly diagnosed with ischaemic stroke and had begun study medication). The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00860366. Between July 1, 2011, and April 30, 2013, we randomly assigned 421 patients, of whom 411 (98%) were included in the target population (211 received uric acid and 200 received placebo). 83 (39%) patients who received uric acid and 66 (33%) patients who received placebo had an excellent outcome (adjusted risk ratio 1·23 [95% CI 0·96-1·56]; p=0·099). No clinically relevant or statistically significant differences were reported between groups with respect to death (28 [13%] patients who received uric acid vs 31 [16%] who received placebo), symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (nine [4%] vs six [3%]), and gouty arthritis (one [<1%] vs four [2%]). 516 adverse events occurred in the uric acid group and 532 in the placebo group, of which 61 (12

  1. Postoperative Surgical Infection After Spinal Surgery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kensuke; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for infection than the general population, and surgical site infection after spinal surgery in this population can result in clinically significant complications. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for acute surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with nonbiologic (conventional) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or with biologic DMARDs. All patients treated with biologic agents were treated with nonbiologic agents as well. The authors performed a retrospective, single-center review of 47 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent spinal surgery and had follow-up of 3 months or longer. The incidence of surgical site infection was examined, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of surgical site infection with putative risk factors, including the use of biologic agents, methotrexate, and prednisolone, as well as the duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the presence of diabetes, patient age, length of surgery, and number of operative levels. After spinal surgery, 14.89% (7 of 47) of patients had surgical site infection. Use of methotrexate and/or prednisolone, patient age, diabetes, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, length of surgery, number of operative levels, and use of biologic DMARDs did not significantly increase the risk of infection associated with spinal surgery. All patients who had surgical site infection had undergone spinal surgery with instrumentation. The findings show that greater attention to preventing surgical site infection may be needed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who undergo spinal surgery with instrumentation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show that the use of biologic agents did not increase the incidence of surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  2. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  6. Pharmacological Value of Murine Delayed-type Hypersensitivity Arthritis: A Robust Mouse Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline

    2017-02-01

    In this MiniReview, we summarize the body of knowledge on the delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model, a recently developed arthritis model with 100% incidence, low variation and synchronized onset in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, and compare it to other murine arthritis models. It is desirable to have robust arthritis models in B6 mice, as many transgene strains are bred on this background. However, several of the most widely used mouse model of arthritis cannot be induced in B6 mice without the drawback of lower incidence, reduced severity and higher variation, if at all. DTHA is induced by modifying a classical methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA)-induced DTH response by administering a cocktail of anti-type II collagen antibodies (anti-CII) between immunization and challenge. Arthritis affects one, predefined paw in which acute inflammation and severe arthritis rapidly develop and peak after 4-7 days. Disease is self-resolving over the course of around 3 weeks. Disease manifestations resemble those seen in other arthritis models and include bone erosion, cartilage destruction, oedema, pannus and new bone formation. Induction of DTHA is dependent on CD4(+) T cells while B cells are dispensable. The DTHA model is set apart from other murine arthritis models in that it can be induced in B6 mice with 100% incidence and with high and consistent severity. This is the clearest advantage of the model, as the mechanisms of disease and clinical manifestations can be found in other arthritis models. The model holds potential for future modifications that may improve the lack of chronicity.

  7. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  8. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  9. Alternative for anti-TNF antibodies for arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  10. Characteristics of chronic arthritis and other rheumatic condition-related ambulatory care visits, united states, 1997.

    PubMed

    Hootman; Helmick; Schappert

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize ambulatory medical care visits among persons with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions, the leading cause of disability.METHODS: The 1997 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) collect annual data on the utilization of ambulatory medical services provided by non-federal office-based physicians and hospital outpatient and emergency departments. Arthritis-related visits were defined using a predetermined set of ICD9-CM diagnostic codes developed by an expert panel and designed to include all potential diagnoses for arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Visits related to acute conditions such as injuries were not included. National estimates and rates of arthritis-related ambulatory care visits were calculated by age, race, and sex groups.RESULTS: In 1997, there were an estimated 959.3 million ambulatory care visits, of which over 38 million (4.0%) were related to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Arthritis-related visits were more likely to be made by females (65.4%), white persons (82.2%), non-Hispanic persons (72.7%) and persons aged 25-64 years (61.9%). More than one-third of arthritis-related visits were for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and unspecified myalgia/myositis. About half (50.2%) of the office visits for arthritis were made to general/family physicians or internists, while an additional 16.2% were to rheumatologists. Counseling or education related to exercise, diet/nutrition and injury prevention were provided at 18.9%, 9.2% and 2.2% of office and outpatient department visits respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Arthritis and other rheumatic conditions are common conditions associated with ambulatory medical care. These results suggest missed opportunities for counseling patients regarding public health prevention messages for arthritis, including increasing moderate physical activity, weight management and injury prevention.

  11. Pathogenetic difference between collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Daily treatment with cyclosporin at a dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 d gave complete suppression of the development of collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats during an observation period of 45 d. To study whether the immunologic unresponsiveness produced by cyclosporin is antigen specific, we rechallenged the cyclosporin- protected rats with either type II collagen or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) after discontinuation of cyclosporin treatment. Type II collagen-immunized, cyclosporin-protected rats did not develop arthritis in response to reimmunization with type II collagen, but, they did develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA. Similarly, CFA-injected, cyclosporin-protected rats showed a suppressed arthritogenic reaction in response to reinjection of CFA, whereas their response to a subsequent immunization with type II collagen was unaffected. On the other hand, the rats that were treated with cyclosporin without any prior antigenic challenge could develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA or type II collagen after cessation of cyclosporin treatment. These results indicate that specific immunologic unresponsiveness can be induced by cyclosporin in the two experimental models of polyarthritis, collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis, and that there is no cross-reactivity between type II collagen and the mycobacterial cell wall components. The results further indicate that immunity to type II collagen plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of collagen arthritis but that its pathogenetic role in adjuvant arthritis is insignificant. PMID:6201583

  12. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint.

  13. Evidence-based Diagnostics: Adult Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Everett, Worth W.; Pines, Jesse M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acutely swollen or painful joints are common complaints in the emergency department (ED). Septic arthritis in adults is a challenging diagnosis, but prompt differentiation of a bacterial etiology is crucial to minimize morbidity and mortality. Objectives The objective was to perform a systematic review describing the diagnostic characteristics of history, physical examination, and bedside laboratory tests for nongonococcal septic arthritis. A secondary objective was to quantify test and treatment thresholds using derived estimates of sensitivity and specificity, as well as best-evidence diagnostic and treatment risks and anticipated benefits from appropriate therapy. Methods Two electronic search engines (PUBMED and EMBASE) were used in conjunction with a selected bibliography and scientific abstract hand search. Inclusion criteria included adult trials of patients presenting with monoarticular complaints if they reported sufficient detail to reconstruct partial or complete 2 × 2 contingency tables for experimental diagnostic test characteristics using an acceptable criterion standard. Evidence was rated by two investigators using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS). When more than one similarly designed trial existed for a diagnostic test, meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model. Interval likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed when possible. To illustrate one method to quantify theoretical points in the probability of disease whereby clinicians might cease testing altogether and either withhold treatment (test threshold) or initiate definitive therapy in lieu of further diagnostics (treatment threshold), an interactive spreadsheet was designed and sample calculations were provided based on research estimates of diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic risk, and therapeutic risk/benefits. Results The prevalence of nongonococcal septic arthritis in ED patients with a single acutely painful joint is approximately 27

  14. Oxidation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol A; El-Gabalawy, Hani S

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative bursts, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. They also serve as important intracellular signaling molecules that amplify the synovial inflammatory–proliferative response. Repetitive cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation associated with changes in synovial perfusion are postulated to activate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and nuclear factor-κB, two key transcription factors that are regulated by changes in cellular oxygenation and cytokine stimulation, and that in turn orchestrate the expression of a spectrum of genes critical to the persistence of synovitis. An understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways might allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15535839

  15. Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carette, Simon

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disease, for which every physician should have a sound approach. This paper details the global management of the disease. Guidelines are given for educating the patient and assessing the level of disease activity. Common questions about the indications and uses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local corticosteroid injections, slow-acting agents, immunosuppressive drugs and steroids are discussed. PMID:21278947

  16. [Sarcopenia in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena

    The clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis covers the condition of chronic inflammation connected to the increased concentration of inflammatory mediators, reduced physical activity, immobilization caused by pain, stiffness and joint destruction as well as accompanying hormonal and metabolic disorders. It all may lead to extra-articular complications, also to the loss of muscle mass with the weakness of muscle strength, adding to the disability and significantly lowering the patients' quality of life. Sarcopenia is an advanced form of muscle mass loss which constitutes an independent and vital threat for dexterity. Attempts are made to define and classify sarcopenia basing on the measurements of muscle mass where the examinations are conducted by the method of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, absorptiometry of two X-ray beams of various energies, electric bioimpedance and anthropometric methods. The data gained in few studies conducted in order to estimate the reduction of muscle mass in patients with rheumatoid arthritis confirm the significant increase of sarcopenia occurence in this group. Procedure with rheumatoid arthritis covers primarily treatment of the inflammatory process with traditional and biological medicaments that modify the course of illness. Such treatment seems to diminish the risk of equal sarcopenia occurrence. The effectiveness of using anabolic medicaments and high protein diet has not been proved. Currently, regular physical activity including aerobic exercise and exercises with load is considered a good method of muscle mass loss prevention and a procedure in case of confirmed muscle mass loss.

  17. [Sport and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Proschek, D; Rehart, S

    2014-06-01

    Sport is becoming increasingly more important in our society. Due to the changing age spectrum with a greater number of elderly and substantially more active people, an increasing number of people with underlying orthopedic diseases are becoming interested in participating in sport. This article deals with the possibilities and effects of sporting activities for people with rheumatoid arthritis within the framework of a conservative therapy. A literature search was carried out using medical search engines, in particular PubMed, and also via the recommendations of specialist societies and patient help groups. The quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis consists of physical, mental and social components. Sport as a means of rehabilitation influences all of these components. Sport should be comprehended as a form of therapy and be adapted to the needs of the individual patient. The willingness to actively participate in sport should always be highly rated and encouraged. Sport is therefore an important pillar of therapy in a conservative total concept. The main aspects of sport therapeutic activities are functional, pedagogical and experience-oriented aspects. The clinical symptoms, extent of damage and physical impairment must, however, be evaluated and taken into consideration for the therapeutic concept. The amount of data on the complex topic of sport and rheumatoid arthritis is low and is mainly dealt with as retrospective reviews. A prospective randomized study basis is lacking. The aim must therefore be to confirm the currently available recommendations for various types of sport in controlled studies.

  18. Arthritis and iritis after BCG therapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Price, G E

    1994-03-01

    A patient with preexisting inactive ankylosing spondylitis experienced a recurrence of back pain and his first episode of acute peripheral arthritis and iritis after a second course of treatment with BCG for bladder cancer. The occurrence of iritis after BCG therapy has not been reported. The recurrence of spondyloarthropathy and the new appearance of iritis may have been part of a generalized enhancement of immunological reactivity produced by the BCG.

  19. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Laboratory findings in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Punzi, L; Podswiadek, M; Oliviero, F; Lonigro, A; Modesti, V; Ramonda, R; Todesco, S

    2007-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has been classically defined as an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. However, in comparison with other relevant inflammatory arthropathies, in which a definite diagnosis is frequently possible only by means of laboratory investigations, in PsA true laboratory diagnostic markers are lacking. Some markers are utilised more to differentiate other diseases than to characterise PsA. For example in polyarticular PsA, which may be in some cases indistinguishable from RA, the rheumatoid factor (RF) or the more specific and recently introduced antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP), may be useful to better identify RA. However, RF was found in 5% to 13% of patients with PsA, and anti-CCP may be observed in almost similar percentage. The determination of ESR and/or CRP is frequently disappointing in PsA, since they are both elevated in only half of the patients with PsA. However, ESR and/or CRP are included in the most utilised response criteria for RA, such as ACR and DAS, and, in addition are also considered reliable in the assessment of PsA. Furthermore, elevated levels of ESR have been proposed as one of the best predictors of damage progression and, in addition, a low ESR seems protective, while an ESR >15 mm/h is one of the factors associated with an increased mortality in PsA. The synovial fluid (SF) effusion is much higher in PsA, in comparison with other arthropathies. When available, SF analysis may offer additive information useful for the diagnosis, such as the increased number of leukocytes, which underlines the inflammatory nature of the effusion even in a patient with normal serum levels of acute phase response. We found that elevated IL-1 levels in SF of patients with early disease (<6 months), may be predictive of an evolution in polyarticular form at follow-up. This observation is in keeping with the crucial role that inflammatory cytokines play in PsA, probably related to a genetic predisposition

  1. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  2. Kartagener syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rébora, Martin Esteban; Cuneo, Julia Ana; Marcos, Josefina; Marcos, Juan Carlos

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient, affected with Kartagener syndrome (primary ciliary dyskinesia), who developed seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis. According to our review, there are only 6 cases reported so far with this association without a definite etiopathogenic linkage recognized in common. Chronic infections resulting from the ciliary dysfunction might be a trigger for rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding.

  4. Axial disease in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna D

    2007-12-01

    The definition of axial disease in psoriatic arthritis has varied from isolated unilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis to criteria similar to those used for ankylosing spondylitis. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of axial disease varies from 25% to 70% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the prevalence, clinical and radiologic features, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of psoriatic spondylitis.

  5. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    with other inflam- matory rheumatic diseases, including gout (n 4), pseudogout (n 2), psoriatic arthritis (n 1), spondyloarthritis (n 3...Expression and function of CXCL16 in a novel model of gout . Arthritis Rheum 2010;62:2536–44. 23. Koch AE, Burrows JC, Marder R, Domer PH, Leibovich SJ

  6. The microbiome and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eppinga, Hester; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Thio, H Bing

    2014-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, seen in combination with the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis and belonging to the family of spondylarthritides (SpA). A link is recognized between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Environmental factors seem to induce inflammatory disease in individuals with underlying genetic susceptibility. The microbiome is a subject of increasing interest in the etiology of these inflammatory immune-mediated diseases. The intestinal microbiome is able to affect extra-intestinal distant sites, including the joints, through immunomodulation. At this point, evidence regarding a relationship between the microbiome and psoriatic arthritis is scarce. However, we hypothesize that common immune-mediated inflammatory pathways seen in the "skin-joint-gut axis" in psoriatic arthritis are induced or at least mediated by the microbiome. Th17 has a crucial function in this mechanism. Further establishment of this connection may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for psoriatic arthritis.

  7. Capillaroscopic pattern in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina Nikolova; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Background There are limited data about the role of nailfold capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis. Objectives To study the role of capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis — rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and early arthritis. Methods Patients from the following groups were included in the study: 62 patients with RA; 34 patients with PsA with involvement of the joints of the hands; 9 women with early arthritis. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed with videocapillaroscope. Results Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) was found in 30.6% (19/62) of RA patients, in 32.4% (11/34) of PsA patients and 44.4%, (4/9) of cases with early arthritis. The most frequent found capillaroscopic changes in RA patients were presence of elongated capillaries in 58% of cases (36/62) and prominent subpapillary plexus in 69% (43/62). Dilated capillaries were found in 78.9% (15/19) of patients with secondary RP and in 62.8% (27/43) of those without RP. “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was observed with low frequency in RA patients (14.5%/9/62). “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was also found in 11.1% (1/9) in the group of patients with early arthritis. The low frequency of the last type of capillaroscopic pattern in RA requires patients with such changes to be observed during regular follow-up for the development of systemic rheumatic disease different from inflammatory arthritis. In patients with PsA capillaries with specific morphology (tight terminal convolutions) were found in 58.8% (20/34) of cases. Conclusions Results from the present study confirm the necessity for inclusion of the nailfold capillaroscopy in the diagnostic algorithm in patients with inflammatory arthritis. PMID:22426123

  8. Potential triggering infections of reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Butrimiene, I; Ranceva, J; Griskevicius, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate possible triggering infections causing reactive arthritis (ReA) of urogenital origin. One hundred and twenty ReA patients, 85 control group patients with other arthritides (61 with rheumatoid arthritis, 13 with osteoarthritis, and 11 with microcrystal arthritis), and 52 healthy persons were tested for urogenital tract inflammation and several infectious agents. Ligase chain reaction was used for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Genital mycoplasmas Ureaplasma urealyticum (Uu) and Mycoplasma hominis (Mh) were tested using the Mycoplasma Duo Test (MDT). Only titres greater than 10(4) CCU/mL were accepted as pathogenecity threshold levels for Uu. Inflammation of the urogenital tract (most frequently urethritis in men and cervicitis in women) was found in 95% of patients with acute ReA. Possible causative pathogens were identified in 58% of ReA patients. CT was found in 29%, Uu in 21%, and Mh in 8% of patients with ReA. While CT and Uu were found more often in HLA-B27-positive than in HLA-B27-negative patients, this was statistically proved only for CT. In ReA males Uu was found four times more frequently than in men with other arthritides. In active ReA of urogenital origin, inflammation of the urogenital tract is found in the majority of patients. Although CT is the main microorganism associated with urethritis in men and cervicitis in women, mycoplasmas, especially Uu, may be possible aetiological factors for ReA.

  9. Skin Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, and Spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Chua-Aguilera, Carolyn Jean; Möller, Burkhard; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2017-07-27

    Extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and various spondyloarthritides including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis often involve the skin and may occur before or after diagnosis of these rheumatic diseases. Cutaneous manifestations encompass a wide range of reactions that may have a notable negative impact not only on the physical but especially on the emotional and psychosocial well-being of these patients. Several cutaneous manifestations have been related to rheumatoid arthritis such as subcutaneous nodules including classical rheumatoid nodules, accelerated rheumatoid nodulosis, and rheumatoid nodulosis; vascular disorders like rheumatoid vasculitis, livedo racemosa, and Raynaud's phenomenon; and neutrophilic and/or granulomatous diseases like pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet's syndrome, rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatitis, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis, as well as palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the main cutaneous manifestations include an evanescent rash, rheumatoid nodules, as well as plaque and guttate psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis is also the main skin disease involved in spondyloarthritides. Furthermore, other forms of psoriasis including guttate, inverse, erythrodermic, pustular, and particularly nail psoriasis may also occur. In addition, a variety of drug-induced skin reactions may also appear in these diseases. Early recognition and understanding of these different dermatologic manifestations together with an interdisciplinary approach are often needed to optimize management of these diseases.

  10. Classification of degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, N. S.; Cruess, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the former division of degenerative arthritis into idiopathic types and those secondary to some disease process is no longer valid. Recent studies have indicated that abnormal concentrations of force on cartilage lead to the development of this disease. A classification is presented that is based on the assumption that the process is initiated by abnormal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix, normal concentrations of force on abnormal cartilage matrix or normal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix that is supported by bone of abnormal consistency. PMID:907947

  11. Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Rakhi; Hadley, Susan

    2005-12-01

    Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis are uncommon diseases and generally present in an indolent fashion. The incidence of fungal bone and joint dis-ease is increasing with an increase in the prevalence of factors predisposing to invasive fungal disease, such as the use of central venous catheters, broad spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppression, and abdominal surgery. Definitive diagnosis relies on bone or synovial culture or biopsy. Successful management has traditionally consisted of amphotericin B in combination with surgical debridement. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment is not well defined, but reports of success with the use of azole antifungal agents, including itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, are promising.

  12. An atypical pneumococcal arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Pascal; Granel, Brigitte; Mouly, Philippe; Demoux, Anne-Laurence; Le Mée, Fanny; Bernard, Fanny; Faugère, Gerard; Francès, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Bone and joint infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae usually occur in patients who are immunocompromised, and involve one site. The unique case of a 49-year-old immunocompetent man, with an unremarkable medical history, with septicaemia and polyarticular septic arthritis involving the shoulder and knee and with cervical spondylodiscitis due to S pneumoniae, is described. In this case, S pneumoniae probably originated from the gingiva, which is commonly colonised in children and adults. S pneumoniae should be considered routinely when facing bone and joint infections, and multiple locations should be carefully sought owing to the possible lack of symptoms. PMID:22790283

  13. Pneumococcal septic arthritis of the shoulder. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bertone, C; Rivera, F; Avallone, F; Urgelli, S; Maniscalco, P

    2002-06-01

    Septic arthritis due to Streptococcus Pneumoniae appears to be relatively uncommon. Single- or clustered-case histories constitute the majority of reports on pneumococcal septic arthritis. A 70-year-old man presented with a 7-day history of pain, erythema and swelling of the left shoulder. Physical examination of the left shoulder revealed a warm, swollen, erythematous, and markedly tender to light palpation. The patient was unable to elevate his arm more than 30 degrees without pain. Arthrocentesis performed on admission produced 30 cc of grossly purulent fluid whose culture demonstrated S. Pneumoniae. The septic arthritis was treated with intravenous vancomycin and imipenem. The antibiotics were substituted when the sensitivities were known with oral ciprofloxacin and rifampycin to complete 8 weeks' total treatment. On follow-up examination 1 year later, the patient has remained afebrile and asymptomatic without evidence of increasing joint effusion or acute joint inflammation. Pneumococcal arthritis is classically described as a painful monoarticular arthritis complicating an active pneumococcal infection, generally a primary pulmonary infection. Pneumococcal arthritis appears to be predominantly a disease affecting the elderly. Clinical presentation ranges from septicemia to indolent infection with few systemic symptoms. With adequate antibiotic therapy and aspiration or drainage of the joint, the prognosis for return of normal joint function appears to be excellent. Although pneumococcal organisms are not likely causes, this bacteria should certainly be considered as a possible cause of arthritis or prosthetic infection.

  14. Copper chelation with tetrathiomolybdate suppresses adjuvant-induced arthritis and inflammation-associated cachexia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Omoto, Atsushi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Prudovsky, Igor; Tubouchi, Yasunori; Kimura, Mizuho; Ishino, Hidetaka; Wada, Makoto; Yoshida, Makie; Kohno, Masataka; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Sano, Hajime

    2005-01-01

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM), a drug developed for Wilson's disease, produces an anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effect by reducing systemic copper levels. TM therapy has proved effective in inhibiting the growth of tumors in animal tumor models and in cancer patients. We have hypothesized that TM may be used for the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis and have examined the efficacy of TM on adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat, which is a model of acute inflammatory arthritis and inflammatory cachexia. TM delayed the onset of and suppressed the severity of clinical arthritis on both paw volume and the arthritis score. Histological examination demonstrated that TM significantly reduces the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cell invasion in joint tissues. Interestingly, TM can inhibit the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in serum synovial tissues, especially in endothelial cells and macrophages. Moreover, the extent of pannus formation, which leads to bone destruction, is correlated with the content of vascular endothelial growth factor in the serum. There was no mortality in TM-treated rat abnormalities. TM also suppressed inflammatory cachexia. We suggest that copper deficiency induced by TM is a potent approach both to inhibit the progression of rheumatoid arthritis with minimal adverse effects and to improve the well-being of rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:16277669

  15. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

  17. Targeting GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is well-known as a haemopoietic growth factor. However, it is also essential in regulating functions of mature myeloid cells such as macrophages. Preclinical studies and observations of flares of arthritis in patients following GM-CSF treatment supported its important contribution to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As the most advanced compound, mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against GM-CSF receptor, has already completed phase II trials with a long term of follow-up period of 74 weeks. During this exposure period, an acceptable sustained safety and tolerability profile has been observed addressing the concerns of development of cytopenias or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Of note, a rapid and sustained efficacy and normalisation of acute phase reactants were consistently shown in studies both targeting GM-CSF and its receptor. Its tumour necrosis factor (TNF) independent mode of action with concurrent blockade of GM-CSF as well as IL-17 signalling reported from preclinical studies supports the assumption that it can be a useful biologic and an alternative agent in TNF inhibitor resistant patients with RA. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted to investigate the safety and efficacy of GM-CSF blocking agents in different subgroups of RA.

  18. APLAR rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chak Sing; Chia, Faith; Harrison, Andrew; Hsieh, Tsu-Yi; Jain, Rahul; Jung, Seung Min; Kishimoto, Mitsumasa; Kumar, Ashok; Leong, Khai Pang; Li, Zhanguo; Lichauco, Juan Javier; Louthrenoo, Worawit; Luo, Shue-Fen; Nash, Peter; Ng, Chin Teck; Park, Sung-Hwan; Suryana, Bagus Putu Putra; Suwannalai, Parawee; Wijaya, Linda Kurniaty; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Yang, Yue; Yeap, Swan Sim

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects approximately 1% of the world's population. There are a wide number of guidelines and recommendations available to support the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the evidence used for these guidelines is predominantly based on studies in Caucasian subjects and may not be relevant for rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, the Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology established a Steering Committee in 2013 to address this issue. The AGREE II instrument and the ADAPTE Collaboration framework were applied to systematically identify, appraise, synthesize, and adapt international rheumatoid arthritis guidelines for use in the Asia-Pacific region. Forty rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, were drafted and are presented in this report. The Asia Pacific of Associations for Rheumatology rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations are intended to serve as a reference for best practice management of rheumatoid arthritis in Asia-Pacific, focusing on local issues to ensure the delivery of basic care for these patients, and to improve their outcomes. In addition, the document will serve as a reference for national rheumatology associations in Asia-Pacific for developing guidelines in their respective countries. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. [Lower costovertebral arthritis in rheumatic pelvispondylitis. Pseudourologic manifestation].

    PubMed

    Benhamou, C L; Roux, C; Benhamou-Mayoux, A; Gauvain, J B; Corlieu, P; Viala, J F; Amor, B

    1987-03-01

    Costo-vertebral and costo-transverse joints are often involved during rheumatoid pelvispondylitis. Their involvement may lead to thoracic ankylosis and decreased respiratory capabilities. These arthritis may also cause intercostal or pseudo-visceral pains. The authors report three cases of lower costo-vertebral arthritis, revealed by pseudo-urological, acute or subacute pains. The diagnosis was made on clinical findings (especially mobilization of the lower ribs) and confirmed by X-Rays (especially tomodensitometry). One of the cases presents an image of unilateral pedicle opacity secondary to costovertebral arthritis. The pseudo-urological manifestation of the pain is likely explained by the anatomical relationship between costo-vertebral joints and the sympathetic communicating rami. This close anatomical relationship was confirmed by dissection. Through the communicating rami, the costo-vertebral joints are thus in relation with the sympathetic system, which is responsible for the sensory innervation of the renal space. The pseudo-urological revelation of this arthritis should be compared to that of costal sprains.

  20. Evaluation of Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Autoantibodies and C-Reactive Protein in Common Autoimmune Skin Diseases with and without Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Bandana; Kumar, Pawan; Chaudhary, Radha Krishna Prasad

    2017-07-01

    Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptides (CCPs) are a well known diagnostic and prognostic noble marker for rheumatoid arthritis. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein whose level rises in response to inflammation. This study was undertaken to show the role of the two markers (anti-CCPs and CRP) in autoimmune skin disorder and their association with associated arthritis in these disorder. Serum anti-CCP antibodies and CRP was measured in 50 patients of autoimmune skin disease of which 28 were of psoriasis, 12 of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and 10 of Pemphigus Vulgaris (PV). These patients were categorised in two groups, with associated arthritis and without arthritis. The serum level of anti-CCP and CRP was correlated with the presence or absence of arthritis in these patients. Control group consists of 20 healthy subjects in which these two parameters were measured. Out of total of 50 patients, anti-CCP was raised in 36.37% of patients with associated arthritis and 12.82% of patients without arthritis whereas CRP was raised in 63.63% of patients with arthritis and 35.89% of patients without arthritis. Mean serum anti-CCP in patient with arthritis was 15.78±13.94 U/ml and without arthritis was 7.56±7.68 U/ml with p=0.01 which was statistically significant. Mean serum CRP in arthritis was 21.11±15.51 mg/l and CRP without arthritis was 13.14±12.27 mg/l with p=0.07 which was statistically not significant. Although both anti-CCP and CRP are valuable markers for autoimmune skin disorder, anti-CCP seems to show significant association with arthritis.

  1. [Constrictive pericarditis and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Baubion, N; Vacheron, A; Heulin, A; Gilles, R; Le Sourd, P; Le Parc, J M; Di Matteo, J

    1979-09-01

    Pericarditis is the commonest cardiac manifestation of rhumatoid arthritis. It is often clinically latent but it may evolve to constriction or less often to tamponade. The case presented is of a 60 year-old woman with a 5 year history of seropositive nodular rhumatoid arthritis in whom bilateral pleural effusions and constrictive pericarditis were observed after sudden termination of corticotherapy. She was treated successfully by pericardectomy. This complication is far from being exceptional (55 cases already reported). It justifies a systematic search for pericarditis in rhumatoid arthritis, especially by echocardiography.

  2. Septic Arthritis of Native Joints.

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2017-03-30

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency that may lead to disability or death. Prompt evacuation of the joint, either by arthrocentesis at the bedside, open or arthroscopic drainage in the operating room, or imaging-guided drainage in the radiology suite, is mandatory. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of septic arthritis in the United States. MRSA joint infection seems to be associated with worse outcomes. Antibiotic courses of 3 to 4 weeks in duration are usually adequate for uncomplicated bacterial arthritis. Treatment duration should be extended to 6 weeks if there is imaging evidence of accompanying osteomyelitis.

  3. Suppression of glycine-15N incorporation into urinary uric acid by adenine-8-13C in normal and gouty subjects

    PubMed Central

    Seegmiller, J. Edwin; Klinenberg, James R.; Miller, John; Watts, R. W. E.

    1968-01-01

    Adenine inhibited the de novo synthesis of purines in both normal and gouty man as shown by inhibition of the incorporation of glycine-15N into urinary uric acid without altering the incorporation of glycine-15N into urinary creatinine. The diminished purine synthesis did not result in a diminution in the 24 hr excretion of uric acid. This observation was explainable in part by the prompt conversion of adenine to uric acid. In addition to this direct conversion, adenine-8-13C provided a slow and prolonged contribution to urinary uric acid. A feedback inhibition of purine synthesis by nucleotides derived from adenine provides the best interpretation of these results. PMID:5645862

  4. Glucocorticoid use in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harris, E D

    1983-09-01

    Although the early hopes and enthusiasm held for glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis therapy have been greatly modified, there is still a secondary therapeutic role for these drugs, one which has been refined by clinical experience.

  5. Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein as the acute-phase reactant to detect systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis disease activity during anti-interleukin-6 blockade therapy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masaki; Nakagishi, Yasuo; Inoue, Natsumi; Mizuta, Mao; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-09-01

    To assess the role of leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG) as a biomarker for monitoring systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) disease activity during interleukin (IL)-6 blockade treatment. We serially measured serum LRG levels in four s-JIA patients treated with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab and determined the correlation between clinical symptoms and other inflammatory biomarkers and proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-18, IL-6, neopterin, and tumor necrosis factor-α receptor type I and II. The serum levels of LRG and proinflammatory cytokines were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum LRG levels increased concomitantly with s-JIA disease flare-up and macrophage activation syndrome development. Furthermore, even in the clinically inactive phase, serum LRG levels were well above normal values. There were no correlations between serum LRG levels and indicators of s-JIA disease activity other than aspartate aminotransferase. There were significant positive correlations between serum LRG levels and proinflammatory cytokines. Serum LRG levels might be a unique and potential biomarker of s-JIA disease activity during IL-6 blockade treatment.

  6. Molecular Pathophysiology of Gout.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jyaysi; Steiger, Stefanie; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Three contradictory clinical presentations of gout have puzzled clinicians and basic scientists for some time: first, the crescendo of sterile inflammation in acute gouty arthritis; second, its spontaneous resolution, despite monosodium urate (MSU) crystal persistence in the synovium; and third, immune anergy to MSU crystal masses observed in tophaceous or visceral gout. Here, we provide an update on the molecular pathophysiology of these gout manifestations, namely, how MSU crystals can trigger the auto-amplification loop of necroinflammation underlying the crescendo of acute gouty arthritis. We also discuss new findings, such as how aggregating neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) might drive the resolution of arthritis and how these structures, together with granuloma formation, might support immune anergy, but yet promote tissue damage and remodeling during tophaceous gout. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Melodie; Bergman, Martin Jan

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a dynamic systemic disease that can have a profound affect on a patient’s self-esteem. Fortunately, numerous therapeutic advances have been made over the last 10 years. In order to help patients manage their disease, healthcare providers should be aware of the modifiable risk factors that may exacerbate psoriasis. Additionally, exploring the impact the disease has on a patient and how it may change over their lifespan will help ensure appropriate therapies are used. Patients are unique so one medication will not fit all of our patients’ needs. In this paper, the authors look at available treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Educating psoriasis patients, in addition to collaborating with patients and other healthcare providers, may help initiate therapies that will result in patients living their lives to the fullest. PMID:28360971

  8. Canine rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Heuser, W

    1980-11-01

    A miniature poodle was presented with a history of a chronic, insidious hind limb lameness. As part of the clinical approach to the case, a serum electrophoresis was done which revealed a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Analysis of stife and carpal joint fluid revealed an elevated white cell count, that consisted of about 75% neutrophils and 25% monocytes. The joint fluid was sterile on bacteriological culture. Radiographs of the carpal joints indicated some narrowing of joint spaces and subchondral lucencies. Rheumatoid factor was identified on serological testing. Histopathology of carpal joint biopsies indicated a nonsuppurative synovitis. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The dog was treated with prednisone on a long term basis. Response to treatment has been good.

  9. Psoriatic Arthritis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Peter; Ryan, Caitriona; Menter, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating condition, which affects approximately one-quarter of psoriasis patients. Recent findings have furthered our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of PsA. There have been major advances in the identification of genes associated with joint involvement but not with cutaneous disease alone. The elucidation of key immunologic pathways has allowed the development of novel targeted therapies that are in the research pipeline. Currently, good screening tests and biomarkers to diagnose early PsA and to guide therapy are limited. In this paper, we present recent findings with regard to the immunopathogenesis and genetics of PsA, biomarkers, and screening tools and review the targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. PMID:23209897

  10. Comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turesson, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition, which is associated with an increased risk of comorbidity from other diseases. RA disease severity is a major predictor of development of cardiovascular disease, serious infections and malignant lymphoma. This reflects the role of chronic inflammation in the underlying pathology. Recent surveys indicate that although clinical outcomes have improved in patients with RA, mainly owing to access to more efficient pharmacotherapy, comorbidity remains a major issue in many patients. Register-based observational studies are useful sources of information on the impact of comorbidity and the efficacy and safety of antirheumatic treatment in patients with coexisting diseases. As a part of strategies to improve further the management of patients with RA, multidisciplinary collaboration for prevention and early detection of comorbidities is of major importance.

  11. Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Katz, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the current information on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Severe fatigue is common among individuals with RA and has a significant impact on quality of life (QOL). RA-related factors (e.g., inflammation, pain) are associated with greater fatigue, but other factors, such as obesity, physical inactivity, sleep disturbance, and depression, explain the majority of variation in fatigue. Medications targeting RA have little effect on fatigue. Instead, the most effective interventions seem to address non-RA-specific factors such as physical inactivity or use cognitive behavioral approaches. No recommendations have been made for tools to measure fatigue in RA, leading to potential difficulty comparing studies. Although fatigue has great impact on patients' QOL, effective interventions that are feasible for broad dissemination remain elusive. Additional multi-faceted research is needed to identify modifiable sources of fatigue. Such research would be enhanced by harmonization of fatigue measurement across studies.

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  13. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  14. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  15. Long term evaluation of septic arthritis in hemophilic patients.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M S; Aledort, L M; Seremetis, S; Needleman, B; Oloumi, G; Forster, A

    1996-07-01

    Before 1983, septic arthritis was rare in patients with hemophilia. With the advent of human immunodeficiency virus infection in the hemophilia population, many centers noted an increasing incidence of patients with septic arthritis. Fifteen septic joints in 10 patients with severe hemophilia were documented. Eight patients were human immunodeficiency virus positive, 1 was human immunodeficiency virus negative, and 1 was not tested. The diagnosis was delayed in 5 patients because the symptoms are similar to an acute hemarthrosis. An elevated temperature was common. The white blood cell count was elevated in only 1/3 of the infections, being modified by human immunodeficiency virus infection. Associated risk factors included infected angioaccess catheters (2), pneumonia (2), and generalized sepsis (1). All but 1 joint responded to appropriate antibiotics and either repeated aspiration or arthrotomy. However, 6 patients died of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from 2 to 109 months after infection. Three patients are alive 29, 86, and 96 months, respectively, after infection.

  16. Lyme Disease and the Orthopaedic Implications of Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian G.; Cruz, Aristides I.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. Increased awareness of the clinical manifestations of the disease is needed to improve detection and treatment. In the acute and late stages, Lyme disease may be difficult to distinguish from other disease processes. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of Lyme disease are directly related to the Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete and its effects on the integumentary, neurologic, cardiac, and musculoskeletal systems. Lyme arthritis is a common clinical manifestation of Lyme disease and should be considered in the evaluation of patients with monoarticular or pauciarticular joint complaints in a geographic area in which Lyme disease is endemic. Management of Lyme arthritis involves eradication of the spirochete with antibiotics. Generally, the prognosis is excellent. Arthroscopic synovectomy is reserved for refractory cases that do not respond to antibiotics. PMID:21292932

  17. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  18. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R(2)  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Antibiotic treatment and long term prognosis of reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laasila, K; Laasonen, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether a three month course of lymecycline has an effect on the long term prognosis of reactive arthritis (ReA). Methods: In 1987–88 a double-blind controlled study with three month course of lymecycline/placebo was conducted. 17 of 23 patients treated at the outpatient department of Helsinki University Central Hospital volunteered to take part in a follow up study, where a physical examination were performed, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints and of symptomatic peripheral joints were examined. Results: 16/17 (94%) patients reported some kind of back pain and 10/17 (59%) peripheral joint symptoms during the follow up. Two patients had unilateral grade 1 sacroiliitis, one patient grade 4 sacroiliitis, and one patient bilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis. In one patient the disease had progressed to ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and in another to chronic spondyloarthropathy. In addition, two patients had small erosions in radiocarpal joints. No statistically significant differences were found between placebo and lymecycline groups in the development of chronic arthritis, sacroiliitis, or AS. Conclusion: The results of the initial study showed that long term treatment with lymecycline in patients with acute ReA decreased the duration of arthritis in those with Chlamydia trachomatis triggered ReA, but not in other patients with ReA. Ten years after the acute arthritis one patient had developed AS, and three had radiological sacroiliitis, three patients had radiological changes at peripheral joints. Long term lymecycline treatment did not change the natural history of the disease. PMID:12810429

  20. Antibiotic treatment and long term prognosis of reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laasila, K; Laasonen, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate whether a three month course of lymecycline has an effect on the long term prognosis of reactive arthritis (ReA). In 1987-88 a double-blind controlled study with three month course of lymecycline/placebo was conducted. 17 of 23 patients treated at the outpatient department of Helsinki University Central Hospital volunteered to take part in a follow up study, where a physical examination were performed, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints and of symptomatic peripheral joints were examined. 16/17 (94%) patients reported some kind of back pain and 10/17 (59%) peripheral joint symptoms during the follow up. Two patients had unilateral grade 1 sacroiliitis, one patient grade 4 sacroiliitis, and one patient bilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis. In one patient the disease had progressed to ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and in another to chronic spondyloarthropathy. In addition, two patients had small erosions in radiocarpal joints. No statistically significant differences were found between placebo and lymecycline groups in the development of chronic arthritis, sacroiliitis, or AS. The results of the initial study showed that long term treatment with lymecycline in patients with acute ReA decreased the duration of arthritis in those with Chlamydia trachomatis triggered ReA, but not in other patients with ReA. Ten years after the acute arthritis one patient had developed AS, and three had radiological sacroiliitis, three patients had radiological changes at peripheral joints. Long term lymecycline treatment did not change the natural history of the disease.

  1. [Diagnosing and therapy of gout].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, Karel

    2015-06-01

    Gout is an inflammatory, metabolically conditioned crystal-induced disease. Prevalence of gout is on the increase. In clinical practice it is frequently wrongly diagnosed and the therapy of acute attacks in particular is not adequate. The first part of the publication discusses diagnostic possibilities of gouty arthritis. First of all the advantage of the analysis of synovial exudate and of direct evidence of crystals in the polarization microscope is emphasized. If the material for crystallographic analysis is not available, it is necessary to use a combination of clinical criteria as specified e.g. in the recommendations of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). The second part focuses on the therapy of gout which is divided into the periods of asymptomatic hyperuricemia, acute gouty attack, intercritical and chronic tophaceous gout. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is only treated when uricemia greater than 540 µmol/l occur repeatedly, or when other risk factors and comorbidities are present. In the treatment of acute gouty attack its early start is more important than the choice of a preparation. Alternatives are NSA, colchicine or glucocorticoids. A newly regist-ered medicine for the treatment of refractory acute inflammation is the IL-1 inhibitor canakinumab. The treatment of hyperuricemia involves regimen and diet measures, abstinence and hypouricemic therapy. Available are the xanthine oxidase inhibitors, allopurinol and febuxostat; the latter is better suited for patients with moderate renal insufficiency. A new medicine for the treatment of severe refractory tophaceous gout is pegloticase.Key words: gouty arthritis - colchicine - nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs.

  2. Fish Eaters Report Less Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_166848.html Fish Eaters Report Less Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain Study suggests most fish may play role ... significantly reduce the pain and swelling associated with rheumatoid arthritis, a new study says. Prior studies have shown ...

  3. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  4. Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, J T

    1986-10-01

    Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children are reviewed as distinct entities in the differential diagnosis of the many types of juvenile arthritis reviewed here and in other articles.

  5. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 ... Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with ...

  6. Can Botox Injections Relieve Arthritis Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Botox injections relieve arthritis pain? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Botox injections into arthritic joints ... focus of most arthritis treatment plans. With April Chang-Miller, M.D. References Hameed F, et al. ...

  7. Pelvic radiotherapy in the setting of rheumatoid arthritis: Refining the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Felefly, T; Mazeron, R; Huertas, A; Canova, C H; Maroun, P; Kordahi, M; Morice, P; Deutsch, É; Haie-Méder, C; Chargari, C

    2017-04-01

    Conflicting results concerning the toxicity of radiotherapy in the setting of rheumatoid arthritis were reported in literature. This work describes the toxicity profiles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies at our institution. Charts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent pelvic radiotherapy for cervical or endometrial cancer in a curative intent at the Gustave-Roussy Cancer Campus between 1990 and 2015 were reviewed for treatment-related toxicities. Acute and late effects were graded as per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 scoring system. Eight patients with cervical cancer and three with endometrial cancer were identified. Median follow-up was 56 months. Median external beam radiotherapy dose was 45Gy. All patients received a brachytherapy boost using either pulse- or low-dose rate technique. Concomitant chemotherapy was used in seven cases. Median time from rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis to external beam radiation therapy was 5 years. No severe acute gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was reported. One patient had grade 3 dermatitis. Any late toxicity occurred in 7 /11 patients, and one patient experienced severe late toxicities. One patient with overt systemic rheumatoid arthritis symptoms at the time of external beam radiation therapy experienced late grade 3 ureteral stenosis, enterocolitis and lumbar myelitis. Pelvic radiotherapy, in the setting of rheumatoid arthritis, appears to be feasible, with potentially slight increase in low grade late events compared to other anatomic sites. Patients with overt systemic rheumatoid arthritis manifestation at the time of radiotherapy might be at risk of potential severe toxicities. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scuccimarri, R.; Azouz, E; Duffy, K.; Fassier, F.; Duffy, C.

    2000-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.

 PMID:11053062

  9. Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias.

    PubMed

    Scuccimarri, R; Azouz, E M; Duffy, K N; Fassier, F; Duffy, C M

    2000-11-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.

  10. Celecoxib for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fidahic, Mahir; Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Radic, Mislav; Puljak, Livia

    2017-06-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic auto-immune disorder that causes widespread and persistent inflammation of the synovial lining of joints and tendon sheaths. Presently, there is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis and treatment focuses on managing symptoms such as pain, stiffness and mobility, with the aim of achieving stable remission and improving mobility. Celecoxib is a selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for treatment of people with rheumatoid arthritis. To assess the benefits and harms of celecoxib in people with rheumatoid arthritis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase and clinical trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization trials portal) to May 18, 2017. We also searched the reference and citation lists of included studies. We included prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared oral celecoxib (200 mg and 400 mg daily) versus no intervention, placebo or a traditional NSAID (tNSAID) in people with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis, of any age and either sex. We excluded studies with fewer than 50 participants in each arm or had durations of fewer than four weeks treatment. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included eight RCTs with durations of 4 to 24 weeks, published between 1998 and 2014 that involved a total of 3988 adults (mean age = 54 years), most of whom were women (73%). Participants had rheumatoid arthritis for an average of 9.2 years. All studies were assessed at high or unclear risk of bias in at least one domain. Overall, evidence was assessed as moderate-to-low quality. Five studies were funded by pharmaceutical companies. Celecoxib versus placeboWe included two studies (N = 873) in which participants received 200 mg daily or 400 mg daily or placebo. Participants who received celecoxib showed significant clinical improvement compared with those receiving placebo (15% absolute

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Members of the America 2 Anywhere 4 Arthritis (A2A4A) running group after finishing a marathon. Through ...

  12. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  13. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0408 5c...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT It is now well established that there is a preclinical period of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development that is

  14. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  15. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  16. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Eryka A; Young, Sean M; McKenna, Samuel J; McNaughton, Candace D

    2013-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular (TM) joint is rare, but it is associated with high risk for significant morbidity. We reviewed the available literature regarding the presentation, evaluation, treatment, and clinical course of TM joint septic arthritis, focusing on elements relevant to emergency physicians. In the first case, a healthy 6-year-old boy presented with fever and trismus; computed tomography with contrast revealed a TM joint effusion. After empiric intravenous antibiotics, intraoperative arthrocentesis of the TM joint returned 1 mL of flocculent fluid, which was cultured and grew pan-sensitive Streptococcus pyogenes. He was discharged home with amoxicillin/clavulanate and experienced complete resolution of his symptoms. In the second case, more than 3 weeks after extraction of her third molars, an 18-year-old woman presented with facial pain, swelling, and trismus and was found to have a loculated abscess involving the left masseteric and pterygomandibular spaces with extension to the left deep temporal region and the skull base. She experienced a complicated postoperative course and required multiple procedures and intravenous antibiotics for growth of multiple bacteria. More than a month later she underwent TM joint arthrotomy for TM joint septic arthritis, and she was found to have acute osteomyelitis. She continued to require multiple treatment modalities; 20 months after her initial presentation, she underwent left total TM joint arthroplasty for fibrous ankylosis of the TM joint. Septic arthritis of the TM joint may be caused by hematogenous spread of distant infection or local spread of deep masticator space infections. Patients may present with TM joint septic arthritis acutely or sub-acutely. Septic arthritis of the TM joint should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with trismus and pain or fever. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Differential Diagnosis of Polyarticular Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pujalte, George G A; Albano-Aluquin, Sheila A

    2015-07-01

    Polyarticular arthritis is commonly encountered in clinical settings and has multiple etiologies. The first step is to distinguish between true articular pain and nonarticular or periarticular conditions by recognizing clinical patterns through the history and physical examination. Once pain within a joint or joints is confirmed, the next step is to classify the pain as noninflammatory or inflammatory in origin. Noninflammatory arthritis, which is mostly related to osteoarthritis, has a variable onset and severity and does not have inflammatory features, such as warm or swollen joints. Osteoarthritis usually presents with less than one hour of morning stiffness and pain that is aggravated by activity and improves with rest. A review of systems is usually negative for rashes, oral ulcers, or other internal organ involvement. In contrast, inflammatory arthritis generally causes warm, swollen joints; prolonged morning stiffness; and positive findings on a review of systems. Once inflammatory arthritis is suspected, possible diagnoses are sorted by the pattern of joint involvement, which includes number and type of joints involved, symmetry, and onset. The suspicion for inflammatory arthritis should be confirmed by the appropriate serologic/tissue and/or imaging studies in the clinical setting or in consultation with a subspecialist.

  18. Epigenetics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kerstin; Gay, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    To give an overview of recently published articles addressing the role of epigenetic modifications in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we focused on DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications. Recent studies attempted to link epigenetic modifications with genetic or environmental risk factors for RA. There is evidence that histone deacetylases confer effects of environmental triggers such as smoking, diet or therapy on expression levels of target genes. Additionally, disturbed methylation patterns and cell-type specific histone methylation marks were identified as potential mediators of genetic risk in RA. Altered methylome signatures were found in several cell types in RA, first of all RA synovial fibroblasts, and contribute to the intrinsic fibroblast activation. The reversal of DNA hypomethylation by inhibiting the polyamine recycling pathway was suggested as new epigenetic therapy in RA. Moreover, targeting epigenetic reader proteins, such as bromodomain proteins, emerged as a new field in drug development and the first studies underscored the potential of these drugs not only in malignant and inflammatory conditions but also in autoimmune diseases. Epigenetic factors represent a promising area to link genetics, regulation of gene expression and environmental risk factors.

  19. Pregnancy and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vishal R; Sharma, Sudhaa; Mahajan, Annil; Khajuria, Vijay; Kumar, Ajay

    2006-08-01

    Pregnancy in most cases, is associated with remission of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but a quarter of patients continue to have active disease or even worsening of the disease and most patients who improve, relapse in the postpartum period. The pathophysiology of this improvement in disease activity during pregnancy remains unknown, but hormonal, cell-mediated immunological and humoral immunological changes during pregnancy, have been proposed responsible for this. Most of the pregnant women with RA have an uneventful course, with no significant complications. In general, no significant increase in maternal or fetal morbidity seems to be attributable to RA. Patients with RA do not have decreased fertility. A majority of patients with RA may go in remission and anti-rheumatic treatment may not be required as soon as women become pregnant. But other patients who continue with the disease activity require treatment. The preferred disease-modifying agents during pregnancy are sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine. Azathioprine and cyclosporine can be used if the benefits outweigh the risks. Paracetamol and low dose prednisone are preferred and considered safe, both for mother and fetus. Methotrexate and lefunomide are contraindicated and must be prophylactically withdrawn before a planned pregnancy. Biologics generally should be stopped when pregnancy is discovered. An overall rational approach is highly warranted to treat RA during pregnancy.

  20. [Pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lequerré, Thierry; Richez, Christophe

    2012-10-01

    These last years were especially marked by the best understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the processes of joint inflammation and joint destruction. RA is more and more considered as a syndrome with at least two clinical entities with different phenotype and profiles: seronegative RA and seropositive RA. In RA with ACPA, it is the process of immunization, that is the immunological reaction against citrullinated peptides, that leads to the disease. The peptide citrullination is directly favored by environmental factors such as tobacco, infection to Porphyromonas gingivalis and alcohol. The immunization supposes a genetic predisposition including approximately 22 genetic factors including the molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and PTPN22. Finally, joint damage result at the same time from an excess of destruction (RANK/RANKL, TNFalpha) and from a defect of bone reparation by the way Wnt/Frizzled. It is thanks to the best understanding of RA physiopathology that leads to development of targeted treatments and specially processing for this disease.

  1. Pregnancy and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ince-Askan, Hilal; Dolhain, Radboud J E M

    2015-01-01

    Fertility is impaired in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is related to disease activity and the use of certain medication. During pregnancy, disease activity usually improves, but less than previously thought. Especially in women with high disease activity, the pregnancy outcome is also impaired. All of this underscores the importance of strict control of disease activity in RA patients who wish to conceive. Management of RA disease activity during pregnancy might be a challenge as the treatment options are limited. Evidence is accumulating that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers can be safely used during pregnancy, particularly during the first trimester and the beginning of the second trimester. Far less is known about the problems faced by male RA patients who wish to conceive, in terms of not only fertility and pregnancy outcome but also the safety of medication. In this paper, the fertility issues in patients with RA, the pregnancy-associated improvement of RA, the pregnancy outcomes, including the long-term effects on the offspring, and treatment options, including those during lactation and for male patients wishing to conceive, will be reviewed.

  2. Vaccinations for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Perry, Lisa M; Winthrop, Kevin L; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients.

  3. Lactate UV-system: a rapid method for diagnosis of septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Behn, A R; Mathews, J A; Phillips, I

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of lactic acid in synovial fluid was estimated in 43 specimens from patients with an acute monoarthritis by a simple enzyme method. In 9 patients with 10 episodes of septic arthritis concentrations of synovial fluid lactic acid were significantly higher (mean 10.8 mmol/l) than in 33 patients with nonseptic effusions (mean 3.1 mmol/l). With this method concentrations of synovial fluid lactic acid provide a rapid diagnostic guide in the separation of septic from nonseptic arthritis. PMID:7305472

  4. Giant iliopsoas bursitis: a complication of chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire-Louise; Meaney, James F M; Rana, Haider; McCarthy, Eoghan M; Howard, Donough; Cunnane, Gaye

    2010-03-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis is a poorly recognized cause of hip pain that requires early recognition to avoid potentially serious complications caused by compression of adjacent structures. It can occur in the setting of trauma in athletes or those who engage in heavy labor and is also associated with acute or chronic arthritis. We describe the cases of 2 patients, one of whom developed a femoral neuropathy, while the other had marked venous compression of the lower limb resulting from enlargement of the iliopsoas bursa. Magnetic resonance imaging offers the most accurate information on the extent of the problem. Recalcitrant cases may require bursectomy in addition to treatment of the underlying cause.

  5. Serum Protein Changes in Still's Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gout

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, H. G. Minchin; Freeman, T.; Pryse-Phillips, W. E. M.

    1970-01-01

    Numerous workers have reported the electrophoretic changes in gout, rheumatoid arthritis and Still's disease. The recent introduction of an analytical technique capable of measuring discrete proteins rather than groups of proteins prompted a reassessment of the protein changes in these conditions. Eleven discrete α- and β-globulins were studied in all 3 conditions. All 3 showed statistically significant differences from normal values. The results obtained are discussed in relation to previous work and to the so called “acute phase reaction”. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4099410

  6. Improving recognition of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, Philip G; Coates, Laura C

    2009-12-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common form of inflammatory arthritis but is underdiagnosed. Psoriasis affects over 1.5% of the UK population. Around 15% of these patients will be diagnosed with PsA, but up to 40% may have evidence of arthritis if reviewed thoroughly. PsA can be difficult to diagnose as patients present with a variety of different patterns of arthritis. Most patients with PsA have relatively mild skin psoriasis, but some have more significant disease. Only 10-20% develop arthritis before their skin disease. Many patients have mild skin psoriasis that they are unaware of, or have not had diagnosed. Joint involvement is far more variable in PsA, compared with rheumatoid arthritis, and patients may present with: monoarthritis; oligoarthritis; involvement of the distal interphalangeal joints; a rheumatoid arthritis-like picture with multiple joints involved including the small joints in the hand or axial disease producing symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis. Features such as dactylitis (uniform sausage-like swelling of the whole digit either finger or toe) and enthesitis (inflammation at the sites of muscle or tendon attachment to bone) may also help diagnose PsA. Skin disease is present in the majority of patients although not all. Hidden areas for psoriasis include: behind the ears; at the top of the natal cleft and around the umbilicus. Larger joints, particularly the knees, can develop very big effusions causing obvious swelling. Areas to test for enthesitis should include the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, costochondral joints and the elbow. Patients with suspected PsA should be referred promptly to a rheumatologist for further assessment and treatment. Diagnosis of PsA can be made on clinical grounds but blood tests and radiographs are performed routinely to aid diagnosis. Initial therapy for PsA should include NSAIDs to ease pain and stiffness. Local injections of corticosteroids are recommended for peripheral arthritis (given IA) and

  7. Current Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kamin, Edward J.; Multz, Carter V.

    1969-01-01

    The well informed and well motivated patient with rheumatoid arthritis today has an excellent chance of avoiding serious disability and deformity. No available pharmacologic agent can permanently alter the course of the disease, and no pharmacologic agent can preclude the need for a balanced program emphasizing moderation, rest and constant attention to physical therapy. Early synovectomy is enjoying increasing popularity although the long-term benefits have yet to be established. The several drugs now undergoing trial hold little promise of materially altering the management of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. The skills of physician, surgeon, and physiatrist must be brought to bear to provide optimal care. PMID:4883503

  8. Management of Arthritis and Rheumatism

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Duncan

    1970-01-01

    The principles of successful management of the patient with arthritis depend on adequate patient education and various medical and physical therapy measures to control pain and maintain function. In many instances psychiatric and orthopaedic consultations are invaluable. The treatment of arthritis at any age, however, must depend on a precise diagnosis. This may require examination of synovial fluid including polarizing microscopy, serological studies, arthrographic procedures and an awareness of factors which may influence the level of serum uric acid. The establishment of a diagnosis alone may be insufficient for proper evaluation and the physician may be assisted by physio, occupational therapy and medical social work assessments. Imagesp37-a PMID:20468462

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Personality: A Controlled Study*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Dermot J.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence in support of claims for the existence of a special relationship between personality and rheumatoid arthritis is conflicting. In this study four groups—one of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, one of patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis, one of neurotic patients, and a normal control group—were compared by means of the Maudsley Personality Inventory (M.P.I.) and a neurotic trait in childhood (N.T.C.) score. Both arthritis groups had a lower M.P.I. neuroticism score than the normal control group, with greater significance in the chronic arthritis group. The neurotic group had a significantly higher neuroticism score than the other three groups. Both arthritis groups had a lower extraversion score than normal controls, again with greater significance in the chronic arthritis group. The neurotic group scored significantly less than normal controls on the extraversion scale and intermediately between the early and chronic arthritis groups. There was no significant difference between the arthritis groups and the normal control group in the N.T.C. score, but it was significantly increased in the neurotic group. These findings suggest that people with rheumatoid arthritis differ significantly in personality from normal and from neurotic people, that the differences are accentuated with chronicity in the rheumatoid process, and that the differences develop as a result of the arthritis. PMID:4102507

  10. Efficacy and safety of febuxostat in 73 gouty patients with stage 4/5 chronic kidney disease: A retrospective study of 10 centers.

    PubMed

    Juge, Pierre-Antoine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Pillebout, Evangeline; Ottaviani, Sébastien; Vigneau, Cécile; Loustau, Clotilde; Cornec, Divi; Pascart, Tristan; Snanoudj, Renaud; Bailly, Florian; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Saraux, Alain; Dieudé, Philippe; Flipo, René-Marc; Richette, Pascal; Lioté, Frédéric; Bardin, Thomas; Chalès, Gérard; Ea, Hang-Korng

    2017-10-01

    The allopurinol dose is limited in chronic kidney disease, particularly stage 4/5 chronic kidney disease. Febuxostat has a hepatic metabolism and has been approved without dose adaptation in gouty patients with stage 1-3 chronic kidney disease. We aimed to study the safety and efficacy of febuxostat for stage 4/5 chronic kidney disease. In this retrospective study, we included patients with (1) a diagnosis of gout, (2) febuxostat treatment, (3) estimated glomerular filtration rate≤30mL/min/1.73m(2) (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula) at febuxostat initiation and (4) follow-up for at least 3 months after febuxostat initiation. Efficacy, safety and variation in estimated glomerular filtration rate were analyzed. We included 73 patients (mean age 70.2±11.8, 61 men, 31 with vascular chronic kidney disease and 18 renal transplantation) with gout (baseline serum uric acid level=9.86±2.85mg/dL, mean gout duration 6.2±7.0 years) from 10 academic centers. Comorbidities included cardiac failure (17.8%), hypertension (98.6%), diabetes mellitus (30.1%), dyslipidemia (64.8%) and history of cardiovascular events (38.4%). At the last visit (mean follow-up 68.5±64.8 weeks), the daily dose of febuxostat was 40mg for 7 patients (10.5%), 80mg for 50 (74.6%) and 120mg for 10 (14.9%). Serum uric acid level was<6mg/dL for 49 patients (67%). Renal function improved for 18 patients, was unchanged for 24 and worsened for 31; 19 patients experienced flares and 1 patient, limb edema. Febuxostat seemed efficient in gouty patients with stage 4/5 chronic kidney disease. However, safety data were not clear regarding renal function. Larger studies are needed to assess safety. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  12. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  13. Rituximab for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc D; Keystone, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed at the CD20 molecule on the surfaces of some but not all B cells. It depletes almost all peripheral B cells, but other niches of B cells are variably depleted, including synovium. Its mechanism of action in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is only partially understood. Rituximab was efficacious in clinical trials of patients with RA, including those who are methotrexate naïve, those with an incomplete response to methotrexate, and those with an incomplete response to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. The need for a concomitant traditional disease-modifying drug, the optimal dose of rituximab, and the optimal interval for retreatment remain somewhat uncertain. Rituximab seems to be most efficacious in seropositive patients and those with an incomplete response to only one tumor necrosis factor inhibitor. Rituximab has a reasonable safety profile, with a small risk of serious infectious events, which is stable over time and repeat courses. Opportunistic infections are rare. Reactivation of hepatitis B remains a concern. The possible association of rituximab and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may still require vigilance. Malignancies and cardiovascular events do not appear to be increased. Infusion reactions are more likely with the initial infusion, and are usually mild. Rituximab may cause hypogammaglobulinemia, but any risk of subsequent risk of increased infectious events is not yet well established. Before initiating rituximab, patient screening for hypersensitivity to murine proteins, infections, congestive heart failure, pregnancy, and hypogammaglobulinemia is imperative. Vaccinations should be administered prior to treatment whenever possible. Rituximab has been a significant addition to the rheumatologists' armamentarium for the treatment of RA.

  14. [Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Florea, Aurora; Job-Deslandre, Chantal

    2008-11-01

    During pregnancy, oestrogen and progesterone levels are increased. Consequently the initial predominant immune cellular response (Th1 type) is decreased, whereas humoral response (Th2 type) is increased. Due to this switch, a lot of Th2 anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 are synthesized. During the last months of pregnancy Treg lymphocytes level is elevated leading to overexpression of IL-4 and IL-10. Due to these mechanisms, reduce disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) occurred. Impaired fertility has not been demonstrated in women with RA. However, some studies suggest that polyarthritis could induced a reduced weight at birth and more frequent pregnancy and delivery complications. Methotrexate and biotherapies have demonstrated no effect on fertility; however these drugs must be stopped before conception for a period equal to seven fold of the half live of the molecule. No teratogenic effect are known for sulfazalasine and hydroxychloroquine; these drugs could be used during pregnancy. It is also the same for ciclosporine, which used is quite unfrequent in RA. Methotrexate is teratogenic in animal models and is forbidden during pregnancy. For leflunomide which is metabolised in A771726, highly teratogenic, a washout period of 3,5 months is necessary. All commercially available TNFalpha inhibitors are classified by the food and Drug Administration as pregnancy risk category B: no adverse pregnancy adverse effects have been observed in animal studies, but there have been insufficient controlled human studies. The published experiences with TNFalpha inhibition in pregnancy is limited to some case reports and ongoing registry. More recently some cases of Vater syndromes (polymalformations) were possibly related to TNFalpha blocking agents. Such treatment must be avoided during pregnancy. Only few case reports are published concerning rituximab use during pregnancy. No data have been found for abatacept.

  15. [Understanding rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Sordet, Christelle; Mrabet, Dalila; Wachsmann, Dominique

    2005-12-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common and severe inflammatory rheumatic disease, for which the immune mechanisms are being decoded little by little. The pathogenic ncludes significant cellular actors of innate immunity (fibroblastic synoviocytes, macrophages, mastocytes...) and adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocytes). These actors interact through the production of and response to specific (cytokines, chemokines and auto-antibodies) and non-specific (prostaglandins, nitrous oxide [NO], complement, proteases) mediators. The chronology of this rheumatoid synovitis is becoming progressively clearer. Its initiation could be the consequence of a precocious activation of the innate immunity, induced by bacterial agents or debris (PAMP). The activation of the synoviocytes and the macrophages via specific receptors (PPR) unleashes an intense inflammatory reaction that triggers a cascade of events. The ongoing nature of this synovitis leads to the intra-articular recruitment of different cells of immunity. This cellular afflux amplifies the macrophagic and synoviocytic activation and proliferation. All of these interactive phenomena end in the production of large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFa, IL1, IL6, IL15, IL17, IL18) but also other pathogenic mediators (auto-antibodies, complement, prostaglandins, nitrous oxide...). This synovitis persists, as it is no longer regulated by a sufficient production of physiological regulators (soluble receptors and inhibitors of cytokines). The consequence of this intense inflammation and synovial proliferation leads to osteo-articular destruction by the production of proteases and the activation of osteoclasts by the RANK/RANK-ligand pathway under the effect of cytokines (TNFa, IL5, IL1, IL6, IL17) and other mediators (prostaglandins) liberated by synoviocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes. The decryption of this puzzle has already created new therapeutic orientations. The identification of new targets is one of the major

  16. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 88 KB) Related Resources Alcoholism Anorexia Nervosa Arthritis Artritis (Arthritis) Arthritis and Osteoporosis: Common But Different Asthma ... Partner Resources Rheumatoid Arthritis (NIAMS) ¿Qué es la artritis reumatoide? (NIAMS) What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis ( 繁體中文 )(NIAMS) '); ...

  18. An unusual case of gout in the wrist: the importance of monitoring medication dosage and interaction. A case report.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Craig L; Stern, Paula J

    2007-10-09

    Gouty arthritis of the wrist is uncommon although gout itself is the most common inflammatory arthritis in older patients. Some known risk factors for the development of gout include trauma, alcohol use, obesity, hyperuricaemia, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. As well, certain medications have been shown to promote the development of gout. These include thiazide diuretics, low dose salicylates and cyclosporine. We present a case of gouty wrist pain possibly precipitated by a medication dosage increase as well as medication interactions. A 77 year old male presented with right wrist pain. Redness and swelling was present at the dorsal aspect of his wrist and range of motion was full with pain at end range upon examination. One week prior, his anti-hypertensive medication dosage had been increased. The patient's situation continued to worsen. Radiographic examination revealed changes consistent with gouty arthritis. It is important for clinicians treating joint conditions to be aware of patients' comorbidities, medication usage and changes in dosages. Education of patients with gout is of prime importance. Clinicians should educate patients that gout may occur at any joint in the body not only the lower limb. Patients should be aware of the signs and symptoms of an acute gouty attack and be made aware that changes in certain medication dosages may precipitate an attack. Awareness of radiographic changes associated with gout is still of importance although these changes are not seen as frequently as they have been in the past due to better control of the disease.

  19. Cationic Yersinia antigen-induced chronic allergic arthritis in rats. A model for reactive arthritis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, A K; Batsford, S R; Curschellas, E; Kist, M J; Gondolf, K B

    1991-01-01

    Cationic antigens are known to have considerable arthritogenic potential in experimental systems. During a systematic search for suitable, naturally occurring candidates an intracellular protein was isolated from the ribosomal pellet of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3, a bacterial strain associated with reactive arthritis in humans. The protein is highly cationic, contains two 19-kD polypeptide chains linked by a disulfide bond, and reveals a strong tendency for spontaneous aggregation. It is suggested to be a nucleic acid binding protein. We tested this antigen for its ability to induce arthritis after intra-articular challenge in preimmunized rats. An acute inflammatory phase followed by transition to chronicity was observed both by technetium-99m scintigraphy and from histology. Massive polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration of the synovium was seen early on and fibrosis and thickening of the joint capsule occurred in later stages. Control groups showed no evidence of inflammation. Western blot and ELISA analysis of unselected sera from Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3-infected patients revealed antibodies to the antigen in the majority of cases, whereas healthy individuals rarely reacted. This is the first report of a naturally occurring cationic antigen capable of inducing immunologic tissue injury; it justifies the speculation that cationic antigens from prokaryotic cells could trigger reactive arthritis in humans. Images PMID:1864972

  20. Primary Meningococcal Type C Arthritis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Catalan, Jaime; Sato, Yoshiro; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a common clinical problem in emergency departments. Primary meningococcal arthritis (PMA) is very rare and few cases are reported in literature. D. B. M. consulted the emergency department for knee pain and fever; analysis showed that the cause was a Neisseria meningitidis type C infection. He received a treatment consisting of 2 arthroscopies and 5 weeks of antibiotics. At five weeks he returned to work and at 2 months he resumed sports (jogging and soccer) without complaints. Primary arthritis of the knee caused by Neisseria meningitidis is very rare. It has a very good response to antibiotics and arthroscopy procedure. Short-term follow-up and functional results are often good or excellent. PMID:28487799

  1. Factors associated with self-reported arthritis 7 to 24 years after a traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Chan, Sharon; Badley, Elizabeth; Dawson, Deirdre R; Ratcliff, Graham; Colantonio, Angela

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to profile characteristics of people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who self-reported arthritis 7 to 24 yr. post-injury. Pre- and post-injury socio-demographic factors, injury-related factors, and postinjury standardized assessments measuring health, activity, and participation outcomes were assessed in a retrospective cohort study of 274 participants. The group self-reporting arthritis had significantly more sleep disturbances, poorer overall health, lower mental health and physical function, and decreased productivity. Also, they were older and reported a shorter length of loss of consciousness from TBI. These resulted suggest that musculoskeletal complaints from long-term survivors of TBI sholud be addressed in post-acute care and could guide future research on arthritis in the TBI population.

  2. Therapeutic Trial of a Pyrazole Derivative, KB-95, for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Price, G. E.; Ford, D. K.

    1963-01-01

    A phenylbutazone-like pyrazole derivative, Sandoz KB-95, claimed to have antiserotonin, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, was tested on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind study on 17 patients with definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis was performed for two-week periods on both KB-95 and placebo. Grip strength, the time to walk 50 feet, the number of other analgesic tablets taken daily, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and a subjective rating of pain were the parameters of measurement. KB-95 failed to produce significantly more improvement than the placebo in this trial and was therefore considered not to be a useful drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. No acute toxic effects were observed to this dose of 300 mg. given three times daily. PMID:13986133

  3. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  4. Zinc sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, P. C.; Mowat, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate, 27 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in a 6-month, randomised, double-blind, between-group trial of oral zinc sulphate versus placebo. Twelve patients on zinc and 9 on placebo completed the trial, but no significant antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate was demonstrated. PMID:6751243

  5. Eupatilin ameliorates collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juryun; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Eupatilin is the main active component of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia. Recently, eupatilin was reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of eupatilin in a murine arthritis model and human rheumatoid synoviocytes. DA-9601 was injected into collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Arthritis score was regularly evaluated. Mouse monocytes were differentiated into osteoclasts when eupatilin was added simultaneously. Osteoclasts were stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and then manually counted. Rheumatoid synoviocytes were stimulated with TNF-α and then treated with eupatilin, and the levels of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression in synoviocytes were measured by RT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of DA-9601 reduced arthritis scores in CIA mice. TNF-α treatment of synoviocytes increased the expression of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNAs, which was inhibited by eupatilin. Eupatilin decreased the number of osteoclasts in a concentration dependent manner. These findings, showing that eupatilin and DA-9601 inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the differentiation of osteoclasts, suggest that eupatilin and DA-9601 is a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  6. AntiArthritis Therapies 2005.

    PubMed

    Braddock, Martin

    2005-04-01

    This meeting, hosted by Visiongain and B2B conferences, comprised approximately 35 delegates, predominantly from the pharmaceutical industry, and promoted interactive discussion. It covered a broad range of drug discovery and development activities, ranging from preclinical studies with compounds requiring further optimisation, through to launched drugs used in the treatment of arthritis today.

  7. Emerging drugs for psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caso, Francesco; Del Puente, Antonio; Peluso, Rosario; Caso, Paolo; Girolimetto, Nicolò; Del Puente, Aurora; Scarpa, Raffaele; Costa, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The majority of Psoriatic Arthritis patients experience a good clinical response to anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α therapies. However, treatment failure with anti-TNF-α can represent a relevant clinical problem. We review the efficacy and safety profile of biological therapies that have been reported from randomized, controlled trials in phase II and phase III available in Pubmed Database for agents targeting IL-12/23p40 antibody (ustekinumab) and IL-17 (secukinumab), inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, (apremilast), and of JAK/STAT pathways (tofacitinib) and CTLA4 co-stimulation (abatacept) in Psoriatic Arthritis. In Psoriatic Arthritis, main emerging drugs are represented by the fully human monoclonal IL-12/23p40 antibody, ustekinumab, the agent targeting IL-17, secukinumab, and the inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, apremilast. Results on T cell co-stimulation inhibition by abatacept are insufficient both in psoriasis and in PsA. In vitro investigations on JAK/STAT pathways in PsA suggest that tofacitinib could represent a further valuable therapeutic option. Emerging biological treatments other than anti-TNF agents, ustekinumab, secukinumab and apremilast appear promising for Psoriatic Arthritis and recent studies have showed a good efficacy and an acceptable safety profile; however, further and long-term studies are advocated.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis are variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes , especially the HLA-DRB1 gene. The proteins produced from HLA genes help the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  9. Corticosteroid transdermal delivery significantly improves arthritis pain and functional disability.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, Tommaso; McDermott, Michael F; Laurino, Carmen; Malagoli, Andrea; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2017-02-01

    Arthritis is characterized by pain and functional limitation affecting the patients' quality of life. We performed a clinical study to investigate the efficacy of a betamethasone valerate medicated plaster (Betesil) in improving pain and functional disability in patients with arthritis and osteoarthritis. We enrolled 104 patients affected by osteoarthritis (n = 40) or arthritis (n = 64) in different joints. Patients received diclofenac sodium cream (2 g, four times a day) or a 2.25-mg dose of Betesil applied to the painful joint every night before bedtime for 10 days. Pain and functional disability were assessed, by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores. Redness was assessed by clinical inspection, and edema by the "fovea sign" method. C-reactive protein (CRP) was also measured; CRP can be used to cost-effectively monitor the pharmacological treatment efficacy and is increased during the acute-phase response, returning to physiological values after tissue recovery and functional restoration. All measurements were at baseline and at 10-day follow-up. At 10-day follow-up, a greater improvement in VAS and WOMAC pain and WOMAC stiffness and functional limitation scores from baseline was observed in patients treated with Betesil compared with diclofenac (all p < 0.01). At 10-day follow-up, improvement in redness, edema, and CRP levels from baseline was also greater in patients treated with Betesil compared with diclofenac (all p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the safety and efficacy of transdermal delivery of betamethasone valerate in patients affected by arthritis and osteoarthritis.

  10. Phenotypic variation in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome explained by cell-specific IFN-stimulated gene response and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Eloy; Michailidou, Iliana; van Bodegraven, Emma J; Jansen, Machiel H; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Geerts, Dirk; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; De Filippis, Lidia; Vescovi, Angelo L; Kuijpers, Taco W; Hol, Elly M

    2015-04-15

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a monogenic inflammatory encephalopathy caused by mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR1, or MDA5. Mutations in those genes affect normal RNA/DNA intracellular metabolism and detection, triggering an autoimmune response with an increase in cerebral IFN-α production by astrocytes. Microangiopathy and vascular disease also contribute to the neuropathology in AGS. In this study, we report that AGS gene silencing of TREX1, SAMHD1, RNASEH2A, and ADAR1 by short hairpin RNAs in human neural stem cell-derived astrocytes, human primary astrocytes, and brain-derived endothelial cells leads to an antiviral status of these cells compared with nontarget short hairpin RNA-treated cells. We observed a distinct activation of the IFN-stimulated gene signature with a substantial increase in the release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6) and chemokines (CXCL10 and CCL5). A differential impact of AGS gene silencing was noted; silencing TREX1 gave rise to the most dramatic in both cell types. Our findings fit well with the observation that patients carrying mutations in TREX1 experience an earlier onset and fatal outcome. We provide in the present study, to our knowledge for the first time, insight into how astrocytic and endothelial activation of antiviral status may differentially lead to cerebral pathology, suggesting a rational link between proinflammatory mediators and disease severity in AGS. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Rofecoxib for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Garner, S E; Fidan, D D; Frankish, R R; Judd, M G; Towheed, T E; Wells, G; Tugwell, P

    2005-01-25

    Editor's note: The anti-inflammatory drug rofecoxib (Vioxx) was withdrawn from the market at the end of September 2004 after it was shown that long-term use (greater than 18 months) could increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Further information is available at www.vioxx.com. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic auto-immune disorder, in which the synovial lining of many joints and tendon sheaths are persistently inflamed. To assess the efficacy and toxicity of rofecoxib for treating RA. We searched the following electronic databases up to December 2000: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, National Research Register, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, Health Technology Assessment database. The bibliographies of retrieved papers were scanned for additional references. The manufacturers of rofecoxib, MSD, were also approached by the UK National Institute for Clinical Excellence to submit additional evidence to inform it's appraisal on the use of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors for arthritis. We included randomised controlled trials of parallel group design evaluating the efficacy and/or toxicity of rofecoxib in RA, both placebo based and comparative trials were eligible. Relevant outcome criteria had to be available to evaluate efficacy and/or toxicity, such as the OMERACT outcomes. Data were abstracted independently by two reviewers and the results were compared for the degree of agreement. A validated tool (Jadad 1996) was used to score the quality of the randomised controlled trials. The planned analysis was to pool, where appropriate, continuous outcome measures using mean or standardized mean differences, and dichotomous outcome measures using relative risk ratios. Two randomised controlled trials evaluating rofecoxib for the treatment of RA were identified and met the inclusion criteria. One compared rofecoxib to placebo and was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of several doses of

  12. Diagnostic utility of musculoskeletal ultrasound in patients with suspected arthritis--a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Hamed; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; af Klint, Erik; Backheden, Magnus; Kisten, Yogan; Györi, Noémi; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the utility of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) in patients with joint symptoms using a probabilistic approach. One hundred and three patients without prior rheumatologic diagnosis and referred to our clinic for evaluation of inflammatory arthritis were included. Patients were assessed clinically including joint examination, laboratory testing including acute-phase reactants, rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti citrulinated protein antibody (ACPA), and radiographs of hands and feet if clinically indicated. A diagnostic assessment was then performed by the responsible rheumatologist where the probability of a) any inflammatory arthritis and b) rheumatoid arthritis was given on a 5-point scale ranging from 0 to 20% up to 80 to 100% probability. Subsequently, an ultrasound examination of the wrist, metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints 2 to 5 in both hands, metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints 2 to 5 in both feet and any symptomatic joints was performed and the results presented to the same rheumatologist. The latter then assessed the diagnostic probabilities again, using the same scale. The rheumatologists' certainty for presence/absence of inflammatory arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis was increased significantly following ultrasound performance. The proportion of patient for whom diagnostic certainty for inflammatory arthritis was maximal was 33.0% before and 71.8% after musculoskeletal ultrasound (P <0.001). With regard to a diagnosis of RA, the proportions were 31.1% pre-test and 61.2% post-test (P <0.001). MSUS findings agreed with the final diagnosis in 95% of patients. Musculoskeletal ultrasound, when added to routine rheumatologic investigation, greatly increases the diagnostic certainty in patients referred for the evaluation of inflammatory arthritis. The changes from pre-test to post-test probability quantify the diagnostic utility of musculoskeletal ultrasound in probabilistic terms.

  13. Smoking and nicotine exposure delay development of collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Sofia S; Mydel, Piotr; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Senior, Robert M; Tarkowski, Andrej; Bokarewa, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have implicated smoking as an environmental risk factor for the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study is the evaluation of the role of cigarette smoke (CS) in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. DBA/1 mice exposed to CS for 16 weeks (n = 25) and mice exposed to nicotine in drinking water (n = 10) were immunized with collagen type II (CII). Severity of arthritis was evaluated clinically and morphologically and compared with control mice (n = 35). Intensity of inflammation was evaluated by serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels. Additionally, antibody response to CII (anti-CII) and citrullinated peptides (aCCP) was measured. Clinical evaluation of arthritis showed a delayed onset of arthritis in CS-exposed mice compared with non-smoking controls (P < 0.05). Histologic index and weight changes were comparable between the groups; however, smoking mice presented less weight loss during the acute phase of the disease and gained weight significantly faster in the recovery phase (P < 0.05). Similar results were obtained in the mice exposed to nicotine. Nicotine also showed a direct anti-inflammatory effect diminishing IL-6 production by stimulated splenocytes in vitro (P < 0.001). Additionally, smoking mice had lower levels of aCCP and anti-CII antibodies compared with non-smoking (P < 0.05). Neither smoking nor nicotine exposure aggravates development of CII-induced arthritis in mouse model. Moreover, CS exposure was associated with a lower level of anti-CII antibodies, providing a possible explanation for a delay of arthritis onset in this group.

  14. Intestinal permeability in patients with yersinia triggered reactive arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lahesmaa-Rantala, R; Magnusson, K E; Granfors, K; Leino, R; Sundqvist, T; Toivanen, A

    1991-01-01

    The passive intestinal permeability of patients with yersinia triggered reactive arthritis was studied using different sized polyethylene glycols (PEGs) contained in a mixture of PEG 400 and PEG 1000. The investigation was carried out at least one year after the onset of yersinia infection, and patients had neither acute gastrointestinal nor joint symptoms. The control groups included patients with uncomplicated yersiniosis as well as healthy subjects who were either HLA-B27 positive or negative. An altered intestinal barrier function to PEG molecules was detected in patients with a history of yersinia infection compared with healthy controls. No significant differences in the permeability were found between patients with or without reactive arthritis, nor was there any association of increased permeability with HLA-B27. The passive permeability of the intestinal mucosa to the larger molecules was increased for an unexpectedly long time after the acute yersinia infection, probably contributing to the perpetuation of joint symptoms in subjects susceptible to a chronic joint disease. PMID:1998397

  15. Poncet's disease (reactive arthritis associated with tuberculosis): retrospective case series and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abdulaziz, Sultana; Almoallim, Hani; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Samannodi, Mohammed; Shabrawishi, Mohammed; Meeralam, Yasir; Abdulmajeed, Ghadi; Banjar, Ghadeer; Qutub, Weam; Dowaikh, Hiba

    2012-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with Poncet's disease (PD) in the Makkah region in Saudi Arabia, where tuberculosis is on the rise. The secondary objective is conducting a PD systematic literature review to compare our findings. We studied seven patients who presented with arthritis within the first 3 years from diagnosis of active tuberculosis in two centers in the Makkah region: King Faisal Specialist Hospital and King Fahad Hospital in Jeddah from January 2005 to December 2011. We conducted a literature review on PD in multiple biomedical/pharmaceutical databases up to December 2011. We detected a new pattern of reactive arthritis associated with tuberculosis (TB). We identified this as PD or tuberculous rheumatism, which is a sterile reactive arthritis that can emerge during any stage of acute TB infection. Seven cases of Poncet's disease were identified in our study. The most common presentation was extrapulmonary with involvement of multiple sites. Six out of seven patients developed arthritis after initiation of anti-TB drugs; one patient developed polyarthritis after completion of anti-TB medication. Asymmetrical polyarthritis was the most common presentation and the resolution of the arthritis was with symptomatic treatment and continuation of anti-TB drugs except in one case. PD may manifest in a variable pattern during the course of active tuberculous infection. Physicians should be aware of this rare complication associated with a common disease to prevent delay in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment.

  16. Gait abnormalities differentially indicate pain or structural joint damage in monoarticular antigen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boettger, Michael K; Weber, Konstanze; Schmidt, Manuela; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Bräuer, Rolf; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2009-09-01

    Gait abnormalities have been suggested to provide an objective measure for joint pain in animal models. Here, we aimed to assess whether parameters of gait analysis correlate with measures of pain-related behavior in experimental monoarthritis. For this purpose, antigen-induced arthritis was induced in the left knee joints of 68 female Lewis rats, of which 30 were treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF)-neutralizing compounds. During the course of arthritis, paw print analysis parameters and measures for mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were obtained. Knee joints harvested on either day 3 or day 21 were scored histologically for signs of inflammation and cartilage and bone destructions. Data were compared to those obtained from 33 immunized control rats and correlated for days 3 and 21. Arthritic rats showed distinct asymmetric gait abnormalities. In the acute stage of antigen-induced arthritis, but not in the chronic phase, there was a significant correlation between the gait parameter 'left-right distance' and measures of primary and secondary hyperalgesia. Both in the acute and chronic phases, however, the gait parameter 'angle between paws' indicating outward rotation of paws mainly correlated with joint destruction as assessed using histology. Etanercept treatment exhibited pronounced anti-nociceptive and pro-locomotional effects, but the described correlations remained. In conclusion, some parameters of gait analysis may represent a good measure for arthritis pain, mainly in acute inflammation, while others are increasingly influenced by mechanical joint deformation as indicated by cartilage and bone destructions. Thus, gait abnormalities may not unequivocally be suitable for objective pain assessment in all stages of experimental arthritis.

  17. Interleukin-1 as a therapeutic target in gout.

    PubMed

    Dumusc, Alexandre; So, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    To give an overview of current evidence for interleukin (IL)-1 blockade in the management of gout. Three IL-1 blockers are currently available for clinical use: anakinra, rilonacept and canakinumab. Recent studies have focused on drugs with a long half-life: rilonacept and canakinumab. For treatment of acute gouty arthritis, three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) showed efficacy of canakinumab with some safety concerns and one RCT failed to show efficacy of rilonacept. For prevention of gout flare when starting uric acid lowering therapy (ULT), four RCTs showed efficacy of rilonacept and one RCT showed efficacy of canakinumab. There is sufficient evidence supporting the use of IL-1 blockers for treatment of acute gouty arthritis or for prevention of gout flares when starting ULT in selected patients, with contraindications or intolerance to conventional therapy. More data are needed to assess safety and to specify their use in routine practice.

  18. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium).

  19. Endomorphins in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jessop, David S; Fassold, Alexander; Wolff, Christine; Hofbauer, Rafael; Chover-Gonzalez, Antonio; Richards, Louise J; Straub, Rainer H

    2010-04-01

    The opioid tetrapeptides endomorphins (EM)-1 and EM-2 are widely expressed in central nervous system and immune tissues of rats and humans. Their analgesic properties are well characterized but they also have anti-inflammatory properties. EM-1 significantly attenuated the onset of hindpaw inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of EMs in T cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts in synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In an ex vivo superfusion system, EM-1 potently inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or RA. These results demonstrate that EMs are endogenously synthesized within human immune cells and have the potential to act as potent therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. We discuss the clinical potential for EM analogues chemically modified to resist proteolytic degradation and identify modified protease-resistant analogues with enhanced bioactivity.

  20. Polyarticular septic arthritis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Clements, J; Dinneen, A; Heilpern, G

    2013-03-01

    Septic arthritis is an uncommon condition with an incidence of 2-3/100,000. It is clinically notable, however, as it is a rapidly destructive joint disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular septic arthritis has an estimated incidence of 15% of all cases of infectious arthritis. We report a case of polyarticular septic arthritis with involvement of bilateral shoulders and wrist to highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment as well as the high mortality rates associated with this condition. Bilateral septic shoulder arthritis poses a challenge to treat, and its significance should not be underestimated as even with early surgical intervention and aggressive antibiotic and fluid resuscitation death is a sad but perhaps not uncommon outcome. It is therefore imperative that the diagnosis of polyarticular septic arthritis is kept prominent in the physician's mind when confronted with a patient with symptomatic polyarthralgia.

  1. TNF inhibition as therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2002-07-01

    The introduction of TNF- alpha -inhibiting biologicals has been a major therapeutic breakthrough in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Against a background of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug experience, this review focuses on present experiences and possible future developments. TNF inhibition results in profound improvement in the majority of rheumatoid arthritis patients, but non-response and adverse effects need attention. Adalimumab is being filed for approval. Other monoclonal antibodies or receptor constructs are in late development. Small molecule inhibitors of TNF production or signalling are a hot topic. One emerging target is nuclear factor kappa B and selective inhibition has proved effective in animal models of arthritis. Synovial proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by diminished apoptosis of fibroblasts, whereas bone marrow precursor cells undergo accelerated apoptosis in active rheumatoid arthritis. Both abnormalities are seemingly ameliorated by TNF inhibition. Anti-apoptotic strategies will soon go into development for control of unresponsive rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Psoriatic arthritis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tai; Yeh, Horng-Ming; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of psoriatic arthritis has evolved as new knowledge of the disease has emerged. However, the exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated in disease development. Early diagnosis and treatment have become primary objectives in clinical rheumatology. Psoriatic arthritis not only causes functional impairment, but also increases mortality risk of patients. The advent of new therapeutic agents capable of arresting the progression of joint damage is expected. However, early psoriatic arthritis assessment remains limited. The objectives of this article are to outline the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriatic arthritis and to suggest a paradigm for identifying early psoriatic arthritis patients. PMID:25232529

  3. Adrenergic urticaria and rheumatoid arthritis in a patient with melanoma: an intricate medical management.

    PubMed

    Capella, Giovanni Luigi

    2012-03-01

    A 45-year-old woman with marital and working troubles, a personal history positive for malignant melanoma, and a family history of vitiligo presented with adrenergic urticaria (AU), which at first responded to propranolol, but later became unresponsive to both ?-blockers and antihistamines. Meanwhile, rheumatoid arthritis became apparent. Treatment with corticosteroids and methotrexate led to remission of neither the rheumatologic nor the dermatologic condition. Attempts to taper the immunosuppressive treatment were invariably followed by recurrence of adrenergic urticaria, which still proved unresponsive to propranolol, as did the rheumatoid arthritis. The courses of the diseases strictly paralleled each other. Rheumatoid arthritis could have triggered adrenergic urticaria by simply adding a supplemental stress, but also by systemically activating mast cells, which are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. A brief discussion of either the dermatological manifestations of, or treatments for rheumatoid arthritis is provided, in order to illustrate the kind of clinical difficulties that such atypical patients pose to physicians. Adrenergic urticaria is an uncommon yet probably under-diagnosed form of urticaria, which is considered a form of neurogenic acute reaction mainly triggered by acute stress. The author presents a case of AU, however, that is only partially explained by a stress setting, though it is strongly associated with the course of an autoimmune disease.

  4. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  5. Septic arthritis in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingyuan Alvin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis has long been considered an orthopedic emergency. Historically, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus have been the most common causes of septic arthritis worldwide but in the modern era of biological therapy and extensive use of prosthetic joint replacements, the spectrum of microbiological causes of septic arthritis has widened considerably. There are also new approaches to diagnosis but therapy remains a challenge, with a need for careful consideration of a combined medical and surgical approach in most cases.

  6. Prevalence of arthritis in older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    al Snih, S; Markides, K S; Ray, L; Freeman, J L; Goodwin, J S

    2000-12-01

    This study examines the prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis symptoms and their relationship to functional limitations in Mexican American elderly. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a probability sample of 2,873 non-institutionalized Mexican American men and women aged 65 or older, residing in the southwestern United States. Measures included self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis, morning pain or stiffness, pain when standing, global health rating, activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), depressive symptoms, presence of chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart attack, stroke), and body mass index. The Mantel-Haenszel chi-square statistic was used to test differences by arthritis status, and a logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of having arthritis. The overall prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis in the sample was 40.8 percent, 50.0 percent among women and 28.8 percent among men (P < 0.001). Morning pain or stiffness was reported by 37.7 percent of respondents and pain when standing or walking by 31.9 percent. All comorbid conditions, and both IADL and ADL limitations, were more prevalent in those with arthritis than in those without arthritis. Female sex and several medical conditions were independently associated with self-reported arthritis. Self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis is common among older Mexican Americans. Functional limitation and disability are more prevalent among subjects with arthritis than among those without arthritis.

  7. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kevin D. Deane, MD/PhD...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...preclinical period of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development that is characterized by abnormalities of the immune system prior to the onset of the

  8. Galectin-3: A key player in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Yéléhé-Okouma, Mélissa; Ea, Hang-Korng; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Reboul, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis is more and more considered as the leading reason for the disability in the world, particularly regarding its main entities, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The common feature of arthritis is inflammation, which is mainly supported by synovitis (synovial inflammation), although the immune system plays a primary role in rheumatoid arthritis and a secondary one in osteoarthritis. During the inflammatory phase of arthritis, many pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators are secreted by infiltrating immune and resident joint cells, which are responsible for cartilage degradation and excessive bone remodeling. Amongst them, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, galectin-3, has been reported to be highly expressed and secreted by inflamed synovium of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients. Furthermore, galectin-3 has been demonstrated to induce joint swelling and osteoarthritis-like lesions after intra-articular injection in laboratory animals. However, the mechanisms underlying its pathophysiological role in arthritis have not been fully elucidated. This review deals with the characterization of arthritis features and galectin-3 and summarizes our current knowledge of the contribution of galectin-3 to joint tissue lesions in arthritis.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Steere, Allen C

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late-stage Borrelia burgdorferi infection, usually beginning months after the initial bite. In some, earlier phases are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in 1 or a few large joints. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid polymerase chain reaction for B burgdorferi DNA is often positive before treatment, but is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after therapy. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  11. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.

 PMID:10577958

  12. Update in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim-Howard, Xana R; Staudt, Leslie; James, Judith A

    2005-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by polyarticular symmetrical arthritis. Inflammatory mediators targeting joint structures produce joint inflammation with pain, functional loss, joint destruction and permanent deformity. Currently, no cure for RA exists but the increasing use of combination therapy and immunomodulatory agents has led to improved quality of life and long-term outlook for many of these patients. While traditionally employed therapies have provided limited disease suppression, advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of RA have resulted in new therapies targeting very specific components of the inflammatory process. These new treatments have shown very promising results with improved efficacy and an overall decreased toxicity profile. This review provides an overview for practicing clinicians of the current immunosuppressive therapies in RA with an emphasis on newer biological agents regarding their mechanisms of action, efficacy, side effects and monitoring recommendations. Developing therapeutics will be briefly discussed.

  13. Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Shristi; Kolasinski, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, which originated over 5,000 years ago. Parts of this alternative medical system have become increasingly popular worldwide as patients seek approaches to medical care that they perceive as more holistic and less toxic than those offered by conventional Western medicine. Despite the advent of highly effective pharmacologic therapy, most individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) continue to use alternative therapy at some point in the treatment of their disease. This report discusses some of the in-vitro data that suggest potential mechanisms through which Ayurvedic herbal medicines might have beneficial actions in rheumatoid arthritis, and the available clinical data evaluating the use of Ayurvedic medicine for RA.

  14. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  15. Nutritional considerations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Touger-Decker, R

    1988-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The severity of the disease process adversely affects nutritional status. Articular changes, such as small joint deformities and temporomandibular joint syndrome, alter the ability to self-feed. The inflammatory process may increase metabolic rate. Ingestion, digestion, absorption, and excretion may be compromised by secondary manifestations of the disease. Comprehensive nutrition assessment incorporates evaluation of disease and treatment-specific factors, along with the usual assessment parameters. Abnormal values for certain assessment parameters do not necessarily reflect nutritional status. Treatment methods, including medications, may have an impact on nutritional status, assessment tools, and self-feeding. Nutrition management goals focus on identification and implementation of feeding strategies. Evaluation of the ability to feed oneself includes consideration of functional status, secondary manifestations, and medical treatment. Multiple feeding modalities may be required. Oral supplements, tube feedings, and parenteral nutrition may be employed to meet the nutrition needs of the individual with rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally affects people between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients with RA have a significantly higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) compared to the general population. The increased cardiovascular risk (CVR) associated with RA places this disease among the most widely studied. The duration of RA was associated with MS, implicating the role of inflammation in MS development. The presence of MS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis. A positive correlation between prevalence of MS and worsening of functional status was found in patients with RA. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk and a higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the rheumatologist should be aware of those MS risk factors and attempt to modify them. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of MS in RA.

  17. Emerging treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schiff, M

    1997-01-27

    Rheumatoid arthritis was considered for centuries to be a nuisance condition, limiting in its effects on an individual's range of motion and the source of considerable distress, but not a life-threatening disease. Recently, however, it has become apparent that patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis may have a decreased life span. Current pharmacologic therapies for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, methotrexate, and corticosteroids, have been moderately successful in alleviating the discomforts associated with swollen, painful joints. Many practitioners have sought to improve use of these agents and slow joint destruction by challenging traditional treatment paradigms, altering the sequence in which drugs are given. Nevertheless, most standard medical approaches to treatment have had little or no impact on the course of rheumatoid disease. Innovative strategies, particularly those based on new concepts in the immunobiology of rheumatoid arthritis, are being developed to target cellular inflammatory mechanisms and actually prevent disease progression. Some agents, such as inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase-omega-3 fatty acid and zileuton-may be most useful in treatment of milder disease manifestations such as moderate synovitis. Other agents, such as oral type II collagen, minocycline, subcutaneous interleukin-1ra, and anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, have produced such inconsistent results that substantial additional research will be required before any conclusions may be drawn about their value. Among the most promising agents, and the most extensively studied, are tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibodies, immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil, and the novel compound tenidap, which has both cytokine-modulating and anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  19. Nail involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Piotr; Walecka, Irena; Dopytalska, Klaudia

    2017-01-01

    Nail psoriasis is considered a significant psychological and social problem causing functional impairment in affected patients. Nail changes hamper their daily and occupational activities and contribute to a worse quality of life. Almost 50% of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and up to 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis are afflicted with nail lesions. The important correlation between psoriatic arthritis and nail changes is well established - the presence of the latter is a strong predictor of the development of arthritis. There is a broad spectrum of nail dystrophies associated with psoriasis, ranging from the common pitting, subungual hyperkeratosis and loosening of the nail plate to less frequent discolouration and splinter haemorrhages. Some of these symptoms are also observed in other nail diseases, and further diagnostics should be performed. The assessment tools NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), mNAPSI (Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), and PNSS (Psoriasis Nail Severity Score) are most commonly used to grade the severity of nail involvement in psoriasis and enable the evaluation of therapy effectiveness. The treatment of nail psoriasis is a major clinical challenge. It should be adjusted to the extent of dermal, articular and ungual lesions. Systemic therapies of psoriasis, especially biological agents, are most likely to be effective in treating nail psoriasis. However, as their use is limited in scope and safety, topical therapy remains a mainstay, and the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogues is considered to be most helpful.

  20. Chronic gonococcal arthritis with C5 deficiency presenting with brief flare-ups: case study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Davido, B; Dinh, A; Lagrange, A; Mellon, G; de Truchis, P; Perronne, C; Cremieux, A C

    2014-09-01

    Gonococcal arthritis is typically acute and appears within 3 weeks after initial infection. Chronic gonococcal arthritis is now exceptionally rare, since the advent of the antibiotic era. Numerous host factors are involved in gonococcal dissemination, such as complement deficiency, HIV and gonococcus strain characteristics. Gonococcal arthritis shares the same risk factors. In this instance, our patient was a 16-year-old girl suffering from persistent polyarthralgia with joint swelling presenting with brief flare-ups for a period of 1 year. She disclosed a single episode of unprotected sexual intercourse 1 year ago, i.e. just before developing her first rheumatological symptoms. Therefore, we performed a joint aspiration (arthrocentesis), and synovial fluid was inoculated directly into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles, which tested positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae within 24 h. Clinical presentation was consistent with previous reports of chronic gonococcal arthritis. Further investigation revealed a C5 complement deficiency, which might explain the chronic Neisseria process. A favourable outcome was reached after a ten-day course of IV ceftriaxone, with no apparent sequelae found during follow-up 6 weeks later. This case demonstrates an unusual gonococcal arthritis with brief flare-ups for the course of a year, followed by a subacute form. N. meningitidis infections, similar to N. gonorrhoeae, are typically acute and may sometimes be involved in chronic processes. However, this characteristic appears to be rare in the case of N. gonorrhoeae. Risk factors for this chronic process will be discussed with a review of the literature.

  1. Septic arthritis due to Clostridium ramosum.

    PubMed

    García-Jiménez, Antonio; Prim, Núria; Crusi, Xavier; Benito, Natividad

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium species are anaerobic bacilli that are rarely reported as etiologic agents of infectious arthritis. Previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium ramosum have not been reported. We describe the first 2 cases of C. ramosum arthritis. We reviewed the etiology of arthritis in our hospital during the previous 15 years. Both patients had underlying immunocompromising conditions and their infections involved a joint with preexisting disease: patient 1 had rheumatic arthritis and a prosthetic joint; patient 2, chronic renal failure on dialysis and hip osteoarthritis. The infection was hematogenously acquired and the course was indolent but destructive in both the cases. Management included open arthrotomy and resection arthroplasty. The infection had a persisting and relapsing course, and prolonged antibiotic treatment was required. In the literature review, we found 55 previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium species between 1966 and 2014; Clostridium perfringens was the most common infecting species; the infection was traumatically acquired in most of the cases. A total of 15 patients have been described with infections caused by C. ramosum; none had septic arthritis. The majority were elderly or immunocompromised adults. Proper collection, transportation and processing of clinical specimens is essential for diagnosing clostridial infections. More information about the best management of clostridial arthritis are needed. We describe the first 2 cases of septic arthritis caused by C. ramosum. They shared several pathogenic and clinical features. The possibility of anaerobic arthritis should always be considered when collecting diagnostic specimens. An increasing number of clostridial arthritis cases are likely to be diagnosed in future years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  3. Prevalence of ischemic heart disease and associated factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rafael Kmiliauskis Santos; Albers, Ana Carolina; Salussoglia, Ana Isadora Pianowski; Bazzan, Ana Maria; Schreiner, Luana Cristina; Vieira, Mateus Oliveira; Silva, Patrícia Giovana da; Machado, Patrícia Helena; Silva, Cynthia Mara da; Mattos, Mauro Marcelo; Nobre, Moacyr Roberto Cuce

    2016-12-21

    To estimate the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and associated factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A cross-sectional study using the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria in order to select patients seen at primary or secondary health care units in Blumenau, Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, in 2014. The presence of ischemic heart disease was defined as an acute myocardial infarction with percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft surgery that has occurred after diagnosis. Fischer's exact test, Wald's linear trend test, and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to test the associations. Among 296 patients (83.1% female) with a mean age of 56.6 years and a mean rheumatoid arthritis duration of 11.3 years, 13 reported having acute myocardial infarction requiring a percutaneous or surgical reperfusion procedure, a prevalence of 4.4% (95% CI 2.0-6.7). Diabetes Mellitus (odds ratio [OR] 4.9 (95% CI 1.6-13.8) and disease duration >10 years (OR 8.2 [95% CI 1.8-39.7]) were the only factors associated with an ischemic disease that remained in the final model, after the multivariate analysis. The prevalence of acute myocardial infarction was similar to that observed in other studies. Among the traditional risk factors, Diabetes Mellitus, and among the factors related to rheumatoid arthritis, disease duration, were the variables associated with comorbidity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44 ± 13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4 ± 2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4 ± 3.1 days (range 7–16 days). WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 19.4 months (range 13–66 months) no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94 ± 5.6 points (range 91–100) at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:27800188

  5. Inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter retrospective study and literature review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsène; Braun, Thorsten; Decaux, Olivier; Falgarone, Géraldine; Toussirot, Eric; Raffray, Loic; Omouri, Mohamed; Gombert, Bruno; De Wazieres, Benoit; Buchdaul, Anne-Laure; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Launay, David; Denis, Guillaume; Madaule, Serge; Rose, Christian; Grignano, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcome of inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in a French multicenter retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with MDS (median age, 77.5 yr [interquartile range, 69-81]; 10 women) were included. Inflammatory arthritis presented as polyarthritis in 17 cases (77%) and with symmetric involvement in 15 cases (68%). At diagnosis, the median disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) was 4.5 [2-6.5]. Two patients had anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and 1 had radiologic erosions. The median time between the diagnoses of arthritis and MDS was 10 months [6-42], with a median articular symptom duration of 3 months [2-8]. The diagnosis of both diseases was concomitant in 6 cases (27%); arthritis preceded MDS in 12 cases (55%), and occurred after MDS in 4 (18%). While the number of swollen and tender joints significantly decreased during follow-up, as did the median DAS28-CRP (from 4.3 [3.8-4.6] at baseline to 2.9 [1.75-3.3]; p < 0.05), CRP remained elevated (CRP >20 mg/L) in 8 patients (42%). Nevertheless, radiographic progression and new ACPA positivity were not observed during a median follow-up of 29 months [9-76]. While most of the patients were treated with steroids (n = 16) for arthritis, additional treatment was administered in only 4 patients (hydroxychloroquine, n = 2; sulfasalazine [Salazopyrin] and etanercept, n = 1, respectively). Eleven patients died during follow-up from acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5); infections (n = 3); or cerebral bleeding, cardiorespiratory failure, or undetermined cause (n = 1, respectively). Inflammatory arthritis associated with MDS can have various presentations and is often seronegative and nonerosive. Steroids alone are the most common treatment in MDS-associated arthritis, but that treatment is insufficient to control arthritis. Steroid-sparing strategies need to be identified.

  6. Students with Juvenile Arthritis Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The participation of a student with juvenile arthritis in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and general education teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with juvenile arthritis and present basic solutions to improve the education of these students in the recess setting. Initially the…

  7. Microbiota and arthritis: correlations or cause?

    PubMed

    Bravo-Blas, Alberto; Wessel, Hannah; Milling, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The microorganisms that colonise our bodies, the commensal 'microbiota', respond to changes in our behaviour and environment, and can also profoundly affect our health. We can now investigate these organisms with unprecedented depth and precision, revealing that they may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases including arthritis. Here we discuss the changes occurring in the microbiota in people with arthritis, and how manipulation of the microbiota may provide an additional pathway for therapy. We highlight two important aspects of the recent literature. First we describe changes in the microbiota identified in people with arthritis; these correlations give insights into the microbial changes that may contribute to symptoms of arthritis. We then discuss attempts to ameliorate arthritis by manipulating the microbiota. This is a rapidly developing area of research. There are tantalising hints that interventions targeting the microbiota may become therapeutically viable for some types of inflammatory arthritis. Our commensal microbial communities respond to changes in our health, and are altered in people with arthritis. Understanding the complex relationships between the microbiota and the body may enable us to deliberately manipulate these organisms and provide additional therapeutic options for people with arthritis.

  8. Opioid analgesics for rheumatoid arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Samuel L; Richards, Bethan L; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2013-02-06

    CLINICAL QUESTION Do the benefits of opioid analgesics outweigh the risks in patients with persistent pain due to rheumatoid arthritis? BOTTOM LINE Weak opioids (such as codeine, dextropropoxyphene, and tramadol) may be effective in the short-term management of rheumatoid arthritis pain, but adverse effects are common and may outweigh the benefits; alternative analgesics should be considered first.

  9. Septic Arthritis Caused by Noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Le Quellec, Sandra; Gaillot, Olivier; Chotel, Franck; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Vandenesch, François

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of type b Haemophilus influenzae vaccination, noncapsulated H. influenzae has become responsible for most cases of invasive H. influenzae diseases. In our two cases of septic arthritis, we isolated strains with β-lactamase-positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance (BLPACR). Thus, the increasing prevalence of BLPACR should be taken into account when empirical therapy is chosen for septic arthritis. PMID:23515545

  10. Periodontal Disease as a Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sushil; White, Sarahlouise; Bartold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to identify and synthesise the best available evidence to examine whether periodontal disease is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology and has a complex multifactorial pathogenesis affecting joints and other tissues. The natural history of rheumatoid arthritis is poorly defined; its clinical course fluctuates and the prognosis unpredictable. Rheumatoid arthritis affects up to 1-3% of the population, with a 3:1 female preponderance disappearing in older age. There is also evidence of a genetic predisposition to the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the synovial-lined joints causing loss of joint space, bone and function, leading to deformity. Extracellular matrix degradation is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis which is responsible for the typical destruction of cartilage, ligaments, tendons, and bone.Rheumatoid arthritis is characteristically a symmetric arthritis (symmetrical swelling of the joints). Articular and periarticular manifestations include joint swelling and tenderness to palpation, with morning stiffness and severe motion impairment in the involved joints. Extra-articular signs can involve pulmonary, cardiovascular, nervous, and reticuloendothelial systems. The clinical presentation of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis varies, but an insidious onset of pain with symmetric swelling of the small joints is the most frequent finding. Rheumatoid arthritis onset is acute or subacute in about 25% of patients. Early rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by symmetric polyarthritis involving the small joints of the hands and feet with no radiologic changes. Rheumatoid arthritis most frequently affects the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and wrist joints. Although any joint, including the cricoarytenoid joint, can be affected, the distal interphalangeal, the

  11. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  12. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  13. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  14. [Immunogenetic aspects of early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Guseva, I A; Demidova, N V; Soroka, N E; Novikov, A A; Luchikhina, E L; Aleksandrova, E N; Lukina, G V; Fedorenko, E V; Aronova, E S; Samarkina, E Iu; Boldyreva, M N; Trofimov, D Iu; Karateev, D E; Nasonov, E L

    2013-01-01

    The study is aimed to investigate the distribution of alleles of HLA-DRB1 gene in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy individuals in Russian population, and evaluate their significance as molecular genetic markers of rheumatoid arthritis predisposition and protection. The association between alleles of HLA-DRB1 genes, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides and IgM rheumatoid factor was also studied. Low and high resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping were compared. In the cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, the alleles of HLA-DRB1 gene were found to be markers of rheumatoid arthritis protection/risk, especially in the homozygous state. They determined production of antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides but were not associated with rheumatoid factor IgM levels. These findings support different autoimmune mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis.

  15. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  16. The molecular and cellular aspects of arthritis due to alphavirus infections: lesson learned from Ross River virus.

    PubMed

    Rulli, Nestor E; Melton, Julian; Wilmes, Anja; Ewart, Gary; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2007-04-01

    Alphaviruses such as the Sindbis-group viruses, Scandinavian Ockelbo virus, the African Asian chikungunya virus, the African O'nyong-nyong virus, the South American Mayaro virus, and the Australasian Barmah Forest and Ross River viruses, are commonly associated with outbreaks of acute and persistent arthritis and arthralgia in humans. The mechanisms by which these viruses cause arthritis/arthralgia are poorly understood. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of viral arthritides using our newly developed mouse model of Ross River virus-induced joint and muscle inflammation.

  17. Persistence of parvovirus B19 DNA in synovium of patients with haemophilic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, K; Azzi, A; De Biasi, E; Radossi, P; De Santis, R; Davoli, P G; Tagariello, G

    2001-10-01

    A progressive arthropathy develops commonly in haemophiliacs and its pathogenesis is not fully understood. Human parvovirus B19 has been associated with several diseases including acute and chronic arthropathy and some studies suggest its implication in chronic inflammatory diseases of the joints such as rheumatoid arthritis. In haemophiliacs parvovirus B19 infection occurs very frequently because of its transmission with plasma derivatives. In order to assess a role of B19 virus in haemophilic arthritis, synovial tissue samples from patients with haemophilia with arthritis and from patients, nonhaemophiliacs, with arthrosis or with joint trauma were examined for B19 DNA by nested PCR. In addition, the prevalence of antibody to parvovirus B19 NS1 protein as a possible serological marker of persistent B19 infection was tested and the association of the outcome of parvovirus infection with genetic diversity of B19 P6 promoter sequences was investigated. B19 DNA was detected in the synovial tissue of 31% of haemophiliacs with progressive arthropathy and of 5% of control patients. Fourteen out of 17 patients (82%) with haemophilic arthritis and with B19 DNA in their synovial membranes had IgG antibodies against the nonstructural protein NS1 of parvovirus B19. On the other hand, 19% of patients with haemophilia with B19 PCR negative synovial tissue and 21% of controls showed anti-NS1 antibodies. The P6 promoter presented specific sites of point mutations shared frequently by isolates from patients with haemophilia and arthritis. These results indicate that B19 DNA can persist in the synovial membranes of patients with haemophilic arthritis significantly more frequently in comparison to control individuals with arthrosis or joint trauma and show a correlation between anti- NS1 antibody presence and B19 DNA persistence in the synovial tissue.

  18. Emerging ideas: prevention of posttraumatic arthritis through interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J Todd R; Birmingham, James; Toth, Alison P

    2011-12-01

    Despite surgical and mechanical stabilization of an acutely injured joint through ligament reconstruction, meniscus repair, or labral repair, the risk of posttraumatic arthritis remains high. Joint injury triggers three phases of pathogenic events: the early (acute) phase involves joint swelling, hemarthrosis, expression of inflammatory cytokines (especially interleukin-1 [IL-1] and tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α]), and biomarkers of cartilage catabolism; an intermediate phase is characterized by reduction of joint inflammation, ongoing joint catabolism, but no evidence yet for typical features of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA); and a late phase characterized by radiographic OA. We hypothesize that the early phase of acute knee injury represents a window of opportunity for providing biologic treatment to promote healing and to slow or prevent a subsequent cascade of destructive joint processes leading to OA. We propose a phase II, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, clinical trial to treat acute knee injuries with intraarticular injection of an IL-1 inhibitor. Patient-centered outcomes will include pain reduction and improvement of knee function. MR imaging and measurement of biochemical markers will be monitored during the subsequent 2 years to determine if the structural response to injury can be reversed. If this model is validated, modulation of the molecular pathways responsible for articular cartilage breakdown will augment current reconstructive procedures in the treatment of acute joint injuries and prevent the development of injury-related arthritis.

  19. Surgical Management of Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mulon, Pierre-Yves; Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2016-11-01

    Lameness related to synovial infection needs to be addressed promptly because rapid degradation of the synovial homeostasis results in permanent cartilage alterations detrimental to complete recovery. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, synovial fluid analysis, and imaging. Commonly affected joints are the fetlock, carpus, tarsus, and stifle; shoulder, elbow, and hip may also be infected. Knowing the source of infection is essential in cases of remote septic arthritis. Antimicrobials should be administered; local delivery systems may be used. Therapy relies on the removal of inflammatory mediators. Pain management is critical throughout the surgical procedures and the recovery period.

  20. Conventional Radiology in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Llopis, Eva; Kroon, Herman M; Acosta, Jose; Bloem, Johan L

    2017-09-01

    In clinical practice, the conventional radiography is still the radiologic method for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Moreover, it provides a quick overview of the symptomatic joints to narrow the differential diagnosis and to evaluate progression. RA is a polyarticular disease with bilateral and symmetric involvement of the peripheral joints, especially small joints, and less frequently, the cervical spine. The radiologic features are soft tissue swelling, periarticular osteoporosis, erosions, loss of joint space, and in advanced disease, osteolysis and typical subluxations or deformities, such as ulnar deviation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Flurbiprofen in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Pipitone, V; Numo, R; Loizzi, P

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary findings are reported from an open study of 300 mg flurbiprofen daily in 24 patients and from 6 out of 30 patients treated so far in a double-blind crossover comparison of 300 mg flurbiprofen daily and 150 mg indomethacin daily in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The results indicate that flurbiprofen is effective in relieving symptoms and is better tolerated than indomethacin. Using an experimental model in rats to assess the anti-inflammatory activity of flurbiprofen, data suggest that flurbiprofen is unable to prevent an immunological type of inflammation but is capable of modifying the type and extent of cellular infiltration.

  2. [Garlic effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Denisov, L N; Andrianova, I V; Timofeeva, S S

    1999-01-01

    To perform of clinical trial of alisate--a garlic preparation produced in Russia. An open controlled trial of alisate enrolled 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 15 patients with RA of varying clinical form, stage and activity were given alisate in a dose 300 mg (1 tablet) twice a day for 4-6 weeks. 15 control RA patients received conventional antirheumatic therapy. The alisate group achieved a good and partial response in 86.5% of cases. The drug was well tolerated and had no side effects. In control group, some parameters changed for the worse. Alisate can be recommended for treatment of RA patients in combined and monotherapy.

  3. Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome mimicking acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scheib, J S; Quinet, R J

    1989-01-01

    This case illustrates the potential severity of an uncommon and generally benign condition of the knee--the Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome. The regional bone scan clearly showed the etiologic role of the inflamed ligamentous attachment site. Therapy should include joint rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, and possibly ice for symptomatic relief.

  4. Arthritis of the Knee Joint in Rheumatoid Arthritis - Evaluation of Treatment Response by Ultrasound in Daily Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, VS; Schmidt, WA; Backhaus, M; Hartung, W

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) commonly involves the knee joint in up to 30% of patients. Musculoskeletal ultrasound enables the skilled clinician to easily assess disease activity. Objective: To evaluate the sensitivity to change of the sonography score of large joints in Rheumatology (SOLAR) for different treatments of knee arthritis in RA. Method: Joints were assessed by ultrasound at 4 visits. Laboratory, immunological and clinical parameters were recorded. Results: 225 RA patients were analyzed. The DAS 28 in the subgroup receiving systemic steroids was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than in patients treated with intraarticular glucocorticosteroids (GCs) at T0, comparing the values from T0 to T3 the same appeared (p=0.003). Concerning the acute GC treatment regimens, the gray scale ultrasound (GSUS) sum score was found to be significantly higher in patients receiving intraarticular GCs versus no GCs (p=0,035), as well as in patients receiving systemic versus intraarticular GCs (p=0.001). Regarding the differences from T0 and T3, similar to the baseline analysis, a high GSUS sum score was significantly associated with intraarticular GCs, a low to no GC administration (p=0.035), while a high GSUS sum score was significantly linked to intraarticular GCs, rather than systemic GCs (p=0.008). Conclusion: SOLAR score is sensitive to change in knee arthritis. Intraarticular GC administration is performed in patients with high GSUS scores. Systemic administration of GC is linked to high disease activity (DAS28) rather than GSUS or power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) results. PMID:27867432

  5. Immunopathological features of rat Staphylococcus aureus arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bremell, T; Lange, S; Holmdahl, R; Rydén, C; Hansson, G K; Tarkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species found in nongonococcal bacterial arthritis in humans. We present the first description, to our knowledge, of an outbreak of spontaneous staphylococcal arthritis in a rat colony. In a group of 10 rats, 9 displayed arthritis. Clinically, the most obvious findings were arthritis of one or both hindpaws and malaise. Bacteriophage typing showed the common phage type 85 in isolates recovered from the joints, blood, and bedding of rats and from the nose and cheeks of one person from the staff of the animal facility. The S. aureus strain proved to produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A and exhibited strong binding to collagen types I and II and bone sialoprotein, which are potentially important virulence factors. When the recovered S. aureus strain was injected intravenously into healthy rats, severe septic arthritis was induced in almost all of the animals. The arthritic lesions were characterized by infiltration of phagocytic cells and T lymphocytes into the synovium. Many of the synovial cells strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Increased levels of interleukin 6 in serum as well as a prominent polyclonal B-cell activation were noted throughout the disease course. Pretreatment of S. aureus-injected rats in vivo with an antibody to the alpha beta T-cell receptor significantly decreased the severity of the arthritis. Our results indicate that alpha beta + T lymphocytes contribute to an erosive and persistent course of S. aureus arthritis. Images PMID:8188356

  6. [Relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dai-zun; Zhong, De-yu; Deng, Jing; Wang, Ji-bo

    2005-12-01

    To study a population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and determine the extent of periodontal disease in these patients, in order to investigate the relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The experimental group was composed of 70 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the control group consisted of 70 age- and gender-matched individuals without rheumatoid arthritis. The relationship between periodontal status in rheumatoid arthritis and control groups as well as the relationship between periodontal status and rheumatological findings in patients were analyzed. The percentage of periodontal disease was statistically significant between experimental and control group (P < 0.01). The difference of average number of missing teeth and bleeding on probing in the experimental group and control group were not statistically significant (P >0.05). There were more number of periodontal disease index 5 or 6 in experimental group than in control group ( P < 0.05). Rheumatoid arthritis patients with moderate to severe bone loss had deeper degree of morning stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels and serum C-reactive protein levels than patients with no or mild bone loss. Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are more likely to experience periodontal disease compares to healthy subjects. They are also very likely to suffer from moderate to severe periodontitis.

  7. Gastrocnemius Contracture in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jastifer, James R; Green, Adam

    2017-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease affecting multiple joints of the body. More than 90% of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis develop foot or ankle pain over the course of their disease. The purpose of the current study was to report ankle dorsiflexion in rheumatoid arthritis patients as well as a control group utilizing a validated measurement instrument. Using a previously validated device, 70 patients presenting with rheumatoid arthritis and 70 controls were measured for ankle range motion and isolated gastrocnemius contractures. Clinical and goniometer measurement of ankle range of motion was also performed. The rheumatoid arthritis group had a mean dorsiflexion of 12.3 degrees compared to a mean of 17.3 degrees in the control group ( P < .05). The difference in dorsiflexion was significantly less utilizing a goniometer than using the validated device, which may be due to measurement technique and external landmarks ( P < .05). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had less ankle dorsiflexion than the control group. The clinical significance of this study is that it provides evidence that patients with rheumatoid arthritis have decreased ankle dorsiflexion even despite a lack of foot and ankle pain. In light of the high lifetime incidence of foot and ankle pain in these patients, this study provides some evidence that the decreased ankle dorsiflexion may be a contributing factor in foot and ankle pain, but further studies are needed. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  8. Medication-related Self-management Behaviors among Arthritis Patients: Does Attentional Coping Style Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Geryk, Lorie L.; Blalock, Susan J.; DeVellis, Robert F.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Han, Paul K. J.; Carpenter, Delesha M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the attentional coping styles (monitoring and blunting) of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients and: (a) receipt of medication information; (b) receipt of conflicting medication information; (c) ambiguity aversion; (d) medication-related discussions with doctors and spouse/partners; and (e) medication adherence. Method: A sample of 328 adults with a self-reported diagnosis of arthritis (RA n=159; OA n=149) completed an Internet-based survey. Coping style was assessed using the validated short version of the Miller Behavioral Style Scale. Measures related to aspects of medication information receipt and discussion and validated measures of ambiguity aversion and medication adherence (Vasculitis Self-Management Survey) were collected. Pearson correlation coefficients, ANOVA, independent samples t-tests and multiple regression models were used to assess associations between coping style and the other variables of interest. Results: Arthritis patients in our sample were more likely to be high monitors (50%) than high blunters (36%). Among RA patients, increased information-receipt was significantly associated with decreased monitoring (b = -1.06, p = .001). Among OA patients, increased information-receipt was significantly associated with increased blunting (b = .60, p = .02). Conclusion: In our sample of patients with arthritis, attentional coping style is not in accordance with the characteristic patterns outlined in the acute and chronic disease coping literature. PMID:27843510

  9. TDAG8, TRPV1, and ASIC3 involved in establishing hyperalgesic priming in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wei-Shan; Kung, Chia-Chi; Huang, Shir-Ly; Lin, Shih-Chang; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2017-08-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), characterized by chronic inflammation of synovial joints, is often associated with ongoing pain and increased pain sensitivity. High hydrogen ion concentration (acidosis) found in synovial fluid in RA patients is associated with disease severity. Acidosis signaling acting on proton-sensing receptors may contribute to inflammation and pain. Previous studies focused on the early phase of arthritis (<5 weeks) and used different arthritis models, so elucidating the roles of different proton-sensing receptors in the chronic phase of arthritis is difficult. We intra-articularly injected complete Freund's adjuvant into mice once a week for 4 weeks to establish chronic RA pain. Mice with knockout of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) or transient receptor potential/vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1) showed attenuated chronic phase (>6 weeks) of RA pain. Mice with T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) knockout showed attenuated acute and chronic phases of RA pain. TDAG8 likely participates in the initiation of RA pain, but all three genes, TDAG8, TRPV1, and ASIC3, are essential to establish hyperalgesic priming to regulate the chronic phase of RA pain.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension: Clinical challenges reflecting the diversity of pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, Evangelia; Sourla, Evdokia; Kotoulas, Serafim Xrisovalantis; Akritidou, Sofia; Bikos, Vasileios; Bagalas, Vasileios; Stanopoulos, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    The present article reports three clinical cases in order to elucidate the diversity of the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension. The condition's three major causes are: interstitial lung disease, vasculitis, and chronic thromboembolic disease, but it should be noted that the multiple pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, can all contribute to chronic lung disease or hypoxia. The first patient in this report suffered from moderate restriction due to fibrosis and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension during an episode of life threatening hypoxia. Early upfront combination therapy prevented intubation and reversed hypoxia to adequate levels. The second presented patient was a case of isolated pulmonary hypertension attributable to vasculopathy. The patient maintained normal lung volumes but low diffusion capacity and echocardiography dictated the need for right heart catheterization. Finally, the third patient presented severe functional limitation due to several manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, but a past episode of acute pulmonary embolism was also reported although it had never been evaluated. Chronic thromboembolic disease was eventually proved to be one major cause of the patient's pulmonary hypertension. The importance of early identification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is therefore emphasized, especially since multiple treatment options are available, symptoms can be treated, and right heart failure can be avoided.

  11. Reactive arthritis after an outbreak of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype O:3 infection

    PubMed Central

    Hannu, T; Mattila, L; Nuorti, J; Ruutu, P; Mikkola, J; Siitonen, A; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence and clinical characteristics of reactive arthritis (ReA) after an outbreak of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype O:3 infection. Methods: From 15 October to 6 November 1998, a widespread outbreak of Y pseudotuberculosis serotype O:3 occurred in Finland. A questionnaire on musculoskeletal symptoms was mailed to 38 patients with infection confirmed by culture. All patients who reported joint symptoms were interviewed by phone and their medical records of outpatient visits or hospital admission because of recent joint symptoms were reviewed. Results: Thirty three of 38 (87%) patients returned the questionnaire. Reactive musculoskeletal symptoms were reported by 5/33 (15%): four patients (12%) fulfilled the criteria for ReA and one additional patient had reactive enthesopathy. The patients with ReA were adults (age range 40–47 years), whereas the patient with reactive enthesopathy was a 14 year old boy. In all patients with ReA, the arthritis was polyarticular. In addition to peripheral arthritis, other musculoskeletal symptoms included sacroiliitis (one patient), pain in Achilles tendon (one patient), and heel pain (two patients). HLA-B27 was positive in all the three patients tested. In three of four patients with ReA, the duration of acute arthritis was over six months. Conclusion: Y pseudotuberculosis serotype O:3 infection is frequently associated with ReA and the clinical picture is severe. PMID:12922960

  12. Medication-related Self-management Behaviors among Arthritis Patients: Does Attentional Coping Style Matter?

    PubMed

    Geryk, Lorie L; Blalock, Susan J; DeVellis, Robert F; Jordan, Joanne M; Han, Paul K J; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the attentional coping styles (monitoring and blunting) of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients and: (a) receipt of medication information; (b) receipt of conflicting medication information; (c) ambiguity aversion; (d) medication-related discussions with doctors and spouse/partners; and (e) medication adherence. A sample of 328 adults with a self-reported diagnosis of arthritis (RA n=159; OA n=149) completed an Internet-based survey. Coping style was assessed using the validated short version of the Miller Behavioral Style Scale. Measures related to aspects of medication information receipt and discussion and validated measures of ambiguity aversion and medication adherence (Vasculitis Self-Management Survey) were collected. Pearson correlation coefficients, ANOVA, independent samples t-tests and multiple regression models were used to assess associations between coping style and the other variables of interest. Arthritis patients in our sample were more likely to be high monitors (50%) than high blunters (36%). Among RA patients, increased information-receipt was significantly associated with decreased monitoring (b = -1.06, p = .001). Among OA patients, increased information-receipt was significantly associated with increased blunting (b = .60, p = .02). In our sample of patients with arthritis, attentional coping style is not in accordance with the characteristic patterns outlined in the acute and chronic disease coping literature.

  13. Laser therapy of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J A; Chiapella, J; Casey, H; Bass, N; Graham, J; McClatchey, W; Dronavalli, R V; Brown, R; Bennett, W J; Miller, S B; Wilson, C H; Pearson, B; Haun, C; Persinski, L; Huey, H; Muckerheide, M

    1980-01-01

    Thirty people with classical or definite rheumatoid arthritis received laser exposure to a Q-switch neodymium laser that operated at 1.06 micrometer with an output of 15 joules/cm2 for 30 nsec. One hand was lased at the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and metacarpal phalangeal (MCP) joints, whereas the other hand was sham lased. The patient, physician, and occupational therapy evaluators did not know which hand was being lased. Twenty-one patients noted improvement of both their MCP and PIP joints of both hands during laser therapy. Twenty-seven noted improvement of their PIP joints and 26 noted improvement of the MCP joints during therapy. Heat, erythema, pain, swelling, and tenderness all improved with time in both hands, but the lased hand had more significant improvement in erythema and pain. There was also significant improvement in grasp and tip pressure on the lased side. The level of circulating immune complexes as measured by platelet aggregation decreased during lasing. The improvement may be related to laser exposure. The exact role that laser radiation has upon rheumatoid arthritis and its mechanism of action remain to be elucidated.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S; Liao, Katherine P; Davis, John M; Solomon, Daniel H; Matteson, Eric L; Knutson, Keith L; Hlatky, Mark A; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatic disease and heart disease share common underpinnings involving inflammation. The high levels of inflammation that characterize rheumatic diseases provide a “natural experiment” to help elucidate the mechanisms by which inflammation accelerates heart disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common of the rheumatic diseases and has the best studied relationships with heart disease. Methods Review of current literature on heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis Results Patients with RA have an increased risk of developing heart disease that is not fully explained by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Therapies used to treat RA may also affect the development of heart disease; by suppressing inflammation, they may also reduce the risk of heart disease. However, their other effects, as in the case of steroids, may increase heart disease risk. Conclusions Investigations of the innate and adaptive immune responses occurring in RA may delineate novel mechanisms in the pathogenesis of heart disease, and help identify novel therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of heart disease. PMID:24093840

  15. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  16. Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Promotes Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Duffau, Pierre; Menn-Josephy, Hanni; Cuda, Carla M.; Dominguez, Salina; Aprahamian, Tamar R.; Watkins, Amanda A.; Yasuda, Kei; Monach, Paul; Lafyatis, Robert; Rice, Lisa M.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Gravallese, Ellen M.; Baum, Rebecca; Richez, Christophe; Perlman, Harris; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Polymorphisms in the transcription factor IRF5 are associated with an increased risk of developing RA. This study was done to determine the role of IRF5 in arthritis development. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in mice deficient in IRF5, or lacking IRF5 only in myeloid cells, and arthritis severity was evaluated. K/BxN arthritis was also induced in mice deficient in TRIF, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 to determine pathways through which IRF5 might promote arthritis. In-vitro studies were performed to determine the role of IRF5 in IL-1 receptor and TLR signaling. Results Arthritis severity was reduced in IRF5-deficient, TRIF-deficient, TLR3-deficient and TLR7-deficient mice. The expression of multiple genes regulating neutrophil recruitment or function and bioactive IL-1β formation was reduced in the joints during active arthritis in IRF5-deficient mice. In vitro studies showed that TLR7 and the TRIF-dependent TLR3 pathway induce pro-inflammatory cytokine production in disease relevant cell types in an IRF5-dependent manner. Conclusion IRF5 contributes to disease pathogenesis in inflammatory arthritis. This is likely due at least in part to the role of IRF5 in mediating pro-inflammatory cytokine production downstream of TLR7 and TLR3. As TLR7 and TLR3 are both RNA-sensing TLRs, this suggests that endogenous RNA ligands present in the inflamed joint promote arthritis development. These findings may be relevant to human RA as RNA capable of activating TLR7 and TLR3 is present in synovial fluid and TLR7 and TLR3 are upregulated in the joints of RA patients. PMID:26315890

  17. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, Anthony L; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L; Brooks, D Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A; Kepley, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  18. Inhibition of Inflammatory Arthritis Using Fullerene Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Anthony L.; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L.; Brooks, D. Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis. PMID:25879437

  19. A novel de novo PSTPIP1 mutation in a boy with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fathalla, Basil M; Al-Wahadneh, Adel M; Al-Mutawa, Mariam; Kambouris, Marios; El-Shanti, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders are a group of Mendelian disorders characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammatory bouts without high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T-cells and are probably due to defects in the innate immunity. We here report on a 4-year-old Arabic boy with the clinical presentation of an autoinflammatory disorder, namely Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum and Acne (PAPA) syndrome. The presentation includes abscess formation after immunization and recurrent mono-articular acute arthritis in various joints that responded favourably to systemic glucocorticosteroids, albeit without acne or pyoderma gangrenosum. The mutation analysis of the boy identified a novel de novo mutation in PSTPIP1, the gene responsible for PAPA syndrome. We recommend that the diagnosis of PAPA syndrome should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent sterile pyogenic arthritis prior to the development of pyoderma gangrenosum or acne in order to initiate a timely management of the disorder.

  20. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508