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Sample records for acute hcv detection

  1. Immune complexed (IC) hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chronically and acutely HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Riva, E; Maggi, F; Abbruzzese, F; Bellomi, F; Giannelli, G; Picardi, A; Scagnolari, C; Folgori, A; Spada, E; Piccolella, E; Dianzani, F; Antonelli, G

    2009-02-01

    In infected individuals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists in various forms of circulating particles which role in virus persistence and in HCV resistance to IFN therapy is still debated. Here, the proportion of HCV bound to immunoglobulin was determined in plasma of 107 chronically infected patients harbouring different HCV genotypes and, for comparison, of six patients with acute HCV infection. The results showed that, in spite of wide individual variability, chronically HCV-infected patients exhibited an extremely high proportion of immune complexed (IC) virus regardless of plasma HCV load and infecting genotype. Moreover, no significant association was found between baseline proportion of IC HCV and response to IFN treatment. Plasma samples collected within 2 weeks of treatment from 20 patients revealed a significant decline of mean IC HCV values relative to baseline that clearly paralleled the decay of total HCV load. In acutely infected patients, circulating HCV was not IC or IC at very low levels only in patients developing chronic HCV infection. Collectively, these findings strengthen the possibility that IC virus could play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  2. Multispecific T cell response and negative HCV RNA tests during acute HCV infection are early prognostic factors of spontaneous clearance

    PubMed Central

    Spada, E; Mele, A; Berton, A; Ruggeri, L; Ferrigno, L; Garbuglia, A R; Perrone, M P; Girelli, G; Del Porto, P; Piccolella, E; Mondelli, M U; Amoroso, P; Cortese, R; Nicosia, A; Vitelli, A; Folgori, A

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in a high frequency of chronic disease. The aim of this study was to identify early prognostic markers of disease resolution by performing a comprehensive analysis of viral and host factors during the natural course of acute HCV infection. Methods: The clinical course of acute hepatitis C was determined in 34 consecutive patients. Epidemiological and virological parameters, as well as cell mediated immunity (CMI) and distribution of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) alleles were analysed. Results: Ten out of 34 patients experienced self-limiting infection, with most resolving patients showing fast kinetics of viral clearance: at least one negative HCV RNA test during this phase predicted a favourable outcome. Among other clinical epidemiological parameters measured, the self-limiting course was significantly associated with higher median peak bilirubin levels at the onset of disease, and with the female sex, but only the latter parameter was independently associated after multivariate analysis. No significant differences between self-limiting or chronic course were observed for the distribution of DRB1 and DQB1 alleles. HCV specific T cell response was more frequently detected during acute HCV infection, than in patients with chronic HCV disease. A significantly broader T cell response was found in patients with self-limiting infection than in those with chronic evolving acute hepatitis C. Conclusion: The results suggest that host related factors, in particular sex and CMI, play a crucial role in the spontaneous clearance of this virus. Most importantly, a negative HCV RNA test and broad CMI within the first month after onset of the symptoms represent very efficacious predictors of viral clearance and could thus be used as criteria in selecting candidates for early antiviral treatment. PMID:15479691

  3. CD8 epitope escape and reversion in acute HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Timm, Joerg; Lauer, Georg M; Kavanagh, Daniel G; Sheridan, Isabelle; Kim, Arthur Y; Lucas, Michaela; Pillay, Thillagavathie; Ouchi, Kei; Reyor, Laura L; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Chung, Raymond T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M

    2004-12-20

    In the setting of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, robust HCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses are associated with initial control of viremia. Despite these responses, 70-80% of individuals develop persistent infection. Although viral escape from CD8 responses has been illustrated in the chimpanzee model of HCV infection, the effect of CD8 selection pressure on viral evolution and containment in acute HCV infection in humans remains unclear. Here, we examined viral evolution in an immunodominant human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B8-restricted NS3 epitope in subjects with acute HCV infection. Development of mutations within the epitope coincided with loss of strong ex vivo tetramer and interferon gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses, and endogenous expression of variant NS3 sequences suggested that the selected mutations altered processing and presentation of the variant epitope. Analysis of NS3 sequences from 30 additional chronic HCV-infected subjects revealed a strong association between sequence variation within this region and expression of HLA-B8, supporting reproducible allele-specific selection pressures at the population level. Interestingly, transmission of an HLA-B8-associated escape mutation to an HLA-B8 negative subject resulted in rapid reversion of the mutation. Together, these data indicate that viral escape from CD8+ T cell responses occurs during human HCV infection and that acute immune selection pressure is of sufficient magnitude to influence HCV evolution.

  4. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  5. PD-1 expression in acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with HCV-specific CD8 exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Urbani, Simona; Amadei, Barbara; Tola, Daniela; Massari, Marco; Schivazappa, Simona; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo

    2006-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8 cell exhaustion may represent a mechanism of HCV persistence. The inhibitory receptor PD-1 has been reported to be up-regulated in exhausted CD8 cells. Therefore, we studied PD-1 expression longitudinally during acute HCV infection. Most HCV-specific CD8 cells expressed PD-1 at the time of acute illness, irrespective of the final outcome. PD-1 expression declined with the acquisition of a memory phenotype and recovery of an efficient CD8 cell function in resolving HCV infections, whereas high levels were maintained when HCV persisted and HCV-specific CD8 cells remained dysfunctional. Blocking PD-1/PDL-1 interaction with an anti-PDL-1 antibody improved the capacity of expansion of virus-specific CD8 cells.

  6. Comparison of monolisa HCV Ag/Ab ULTRA with two anti-HCV assays for the detection of HCV infection in hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Yagci, Server; Padalko, Elizaveta

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we compared the performance of three serological assays (Monolisa HCV Ag/Ab ULTRA, Innotest HCV Ab IV enzyme immunoassay--EIA, and Ortho HCV 3.0 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay--ELISA) for the detection of HCV infection. Ninety plasma samples were collected, representing 63 samples from groups at risk for acquiring HCV infection and 27 HCV RNA-positive samples. The results of Ortho HCV 3.0 ELISA, Innotest HCV Ab IV, and Monolisa HCV Ag/Ab ULTRA were fully concordant for 27 HCV RNA-positive samples. Ortho HCV 3.0 ELISA test and Innotest HCV Ab IV also gave the same results for risk groups, while three samples were found to be reactive by Monolisa HCV Ag/Ab ULTRA and were consequently found negative for HCV RNA. As two of the solely Monolisa HCV Ag/Ab ULTRA-positive samples were also hepatitis B s antigen (HBsAg)-positive, neutralization of HBsAg was performed but no arguments for the HBsAg interference were observed. In conclusion, the non-specific reactive signal was observed, in three samples using Monolisa HCV Ag/Ab ULTRA, to be negative by other serological assays, and observed to be negative in an HCV RNA assessment, a result that could not be attributed to the interference with HBsAg. In the context of diagnostic testing, no test for various HCV genotypes was observed to be superior to any other.

  7. HCV

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An inspection of the sequence similarity between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein and human proteins revealed a high level of peptide sharing, with a limited number of motifs unique to the virus (i.e., with no counterpart in the human proteome). Using pentapeptide matching, only 214 motifs out of a total of 3,007 (7.11%) identified HCV as nonself compared to the Homo sapiens proteome. However, this virus-versus-human phenetic difference disappeared at the genetic level. Indeed, a BLAST analysis of pentadecameric oligodeoxynucleotide sequences corresponding to the 214 pentapeptides unique to HCV revealed that almost all of them are present in the human genome, located in the non-coding strand, introns, and/or pseudogenes, thus being, as such, untranslatable. The present data warn against using DNA-based vaccines to fight HCV infection and emphasize peptide uniqueness as the molecular basis for designing effective anti-HCV immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:22299062

  8. Impact of Isolated Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Core-Specific Antibody Detection and Viral RNA Amplification among HCV-Seronegative Dialysis Patients at Risk for Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barril, Guillermina; Quiroga, Juan A.; Arenas, María Dolores; Espinosa, Mario; García-Fernández, Nuria; Cigarrán, Secundino; Herrero, José A.; del Peso, Gloria; Caro, Pilar; García-Agudo, Rebeca; Amézquita, Yésica; Blanco, Ana; Martínez-Rubio, Pilar; Alcázar, José M.; González-Parra, Emilio; Martín-Gómez, Adoración; Castillo, Inmaculada; Bartolomé, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA from blood detected occult HCV infections in 30.9% of 210 HCV-seronegative dialysis patients with abnormal liver enzyme levels that had evaded standard HCV testing practices. Isolated HCV core-specific antibody detection identified three additional anti-HCV screening-negative patients lacking HCV RNA amplification in blood who were considered potentially infectious. Together, these findings may affect management of the dialysis setting. PMID:24850345

  9. Disparate detection outcomes for anti-HCV IgG and HCV RNA in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Strop, Alexandra; Drobeniuc, Jan; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Forbi, Joseph C; Le, Ngoc-Thao; Li, Lixia; Mei, Joanne; Terrault, Norah; Kamili, Saleem

    2015-02-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) expedite the collection, storage and shipping of blood samples, thereby facilitating large-scale serologic studies. We evaluated the sensitivity of anti-HCV IgG testing and HCV-RNA quantitation using freshly prepared and stored DBS derived from HCV-infected patients. Protocols for elution were optimized using DBS prepared from plasma of 52 HCV-infected persons and 51 uninfected persons (control DBS), then applied to DBS from 33 chronic hepatitis C patients that had been stored at -20°C for 5 years (stored DBS). Control and stored DBS, and their corresponding plasma, were processed for anti-HCV IgG testing using the VITROS chemiluminescence assay (CIA) and the HCV 3.0 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics), and for HCV RNA quantitation by quantitative (q) RT-PCR. HCV genotyping was conducted by nucleotide sequencing. The sensitivity of CIA and EIA in control DBS was 92% and 90%, respectively, compared to 100% and 97%, respectively, in stored DBS. The sensitivity of HCV RNA detection was 88% in control DBS, compared to 36% in stored DBS. Specificity was 100% for all the assays in both control and stored DBS. Genotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected in 16 (62%), 6 (23.1%), and 4 (15.3%) samples, respectively. Sequences generated from DBS and their corresponding plasma samples were identical. Whereas the sensitivity of anti-HCV IgG detection in stored DBS was equivalent to that in recently prepared DBS, the sensitivity of HCV RNA detection was markedly lower in stored DBS compared to recently prepared DBS. Stored DBS may be reliably used for anti-HCV detection but for HCV-RNA-based testing freshly prepared DBS is preferable to stored DBS.

  10. Increased Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Detection in Women of Childbearing Age and Potential Risk for Vertical Transmission - United States and Kentucky, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Alaya; Nelson, Noele; Hariri, Susan; Canary, Lauren; Sanders, Kathy J; Maxwell, Justine F; Huang, Xiaohua; Leake, John A D; Ward, John W; Vellozzi, Claudia

    2016-07-22

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality (1). Transmission of HCV is primarily via parenteral blood exposure, and HCV can be transmitted vertically from mother to child. Vertical transmission occurs in 5.8% (95% confidence interval = 4.2%-7.8%) of infants born to women who are infected only with HCV and in up to twice as many infants born to women who are also infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (2) or who have high HCV viral loads (3,4); there is currently no recommended intervention to prevent transmission of infection from mother to child (3). Increased reported incidence of HCV infection among persons aged ≤30 years (5,6) with similar increases among women and men in this age group (6), raises concern about increases in the number of pregnant women with HCV infection, and in the number of infants who could be exposed to HCV at birth. Data from one large commercial laboratory and birth certificate data were used to investigate trends in HCV detection among women of childbearing age,* HCV testing among children aged ≤2 years, and the proportions of infants born to HCV-infected women nationally and in Kentucky, the state with the highest incidence of acute HCV infection during 2011-2014 (6). During 2011-2014, commercial laboratory data indicated that national rates of HCV detection (antibody or RNA positivity(†)) among women of childbearing age increased 22%, and HCV testing (antibody or RNA) among children aged ≤2 years increased 14%; birth certificate data indicated that the proportion of infants born to HCV-infected mothers increased 68%, from 0.19% to 0.32%. During the same time in Kentucky, the HCV detection rate among women of childbearing age increased >200%, HCV testing among children aged ≤2 years increased 151%, and the proportion of infants born to HCV-infected women increased 124%, from 0.71% to 1.59%. Increases in the rate of HCV detection among women of childbearing age

  11. Clearance of HCV RNA following acute hepatitis A superinfection.

    PubMed

    Cacopardo, B; Nunnari, G; Nigro, L

    2009-05-01

    A transient reduction of hepatitis C virus replication during the course of acute hepatitis A virus infection has already been reported in the literature. The present study reports the case study of a subject with chronic hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus who went on to develop an acute hepatitis A. From the early onset of acute disease, hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid became undetectable. Following recovery from acute hepatitis, alanine amino-transferase levels became persistently normal and liver biopsy revealed a reduction in the Knodell histological activity index score. Hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid clearance was maintained up to 4 years after the onset of acute hepatitis A. During the course of the acute disease, a sharp increase in interferon gamma levels was detected in serum and in the supernatant of both unstimulated and phytoemagglutinin/lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Interferon gamma levels were still high 3 months later. We hypothesize that acute hepatitis A virus superinfection during the course of chronic hepatitis C may lead to hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid clearance through an immunological mechanism related to interferon gamma production.

  12. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  13. High level of PD-1 expression on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells during acute HCV infection, irrespective of clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; Kuntzen, Thomas; Nolan, Brian E; Longworth, Steven; Berical, Andrew; Blum, Jenna; McMahon, Cory; Reyor, Laura L; Elias, Nahel; Kwok, William W; McGovern, Barbara G; Freeman, Gordon; Chung, Raymond T; Klenerman, Paul; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M; Kim, Arthur Y; Lauer, Georg M

    2008-03-01

    We monitored expression of PD-1 (a mediator of T-cell exhaustion and viral persistence) on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells from blood and liver during acute and chronic infections and after the resolved infection stage. PD-1 expression on HCV-specific T cells was high early in acute infection irrespective of clinical outcome, and most cells continued to express PD-1 in resolved and chronic stages of infection; intrahepatic expression levels were especially high. Our results suggest that an analysis of PD-1 expression alone is not sufficient to predict infection outcome or to determine T-cell functionality in HCV infection.

  14. Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Envelope Diversification from Acute to Chronic Infection within a Sexually Transmitted HCV Cluster by Using Single-Molecule, Real-Time Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cynthia K Y; Raghwani, Jayna; Koekkoek, Sylvie; Liang, Richard H; Van der Meer, Jan T M; Van Der Valk, Marc; De Jong, Menno; Pybus, Oliver G; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard

    2017-03-15

    In contrast to other available next-generation sequencing platforms, PacBio single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing has the advantage of generating long reads albeit with a relatively higher error rate in unprocessed data. Using this platform, we longitudinally sampled and sequenced the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope genome region (1,680 nucleotides [nt]) from individuals belonging to a cluster of sexually transmitted cases. All five subjects were coinfected with HIV-1 and a closely related strain of HCV genotype 4d. In total, 50 samples were analyzed by using SMRT sequencing. By using 7 passes of circular consensus sequencing, the error rate was reduced to 0.37%, and the median number of sequences was 612 per sample. A further reduction of insertions was achieved by alignment against a sample-specific reference sequence. However, in vitro recombination during PCR amplification could not be excluded. Phylogenetic analysis supported close relationships among HCV sequences from the four male subjects and subsequent transmission from one subject to his female partner. Transmission was characterized by a strong genetic bottleneck. Viral genetic diversity was low during acute infection and increased upon progression to chronicity but subsequently fluctuated during chronic infection, caused by the alternate detection of distinct coexisting lineages. SMRT sequencing combines long reads with sufficient depth for many phylogenetic analyses and can therefore provide insights into within-host HCV evolutionary dynamics without the need for haplotype reconstruction using statistical algorithms.IMPORTANCE Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the study of genetically variable RNA virus populations, but for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses, longer sequences than those generated by most available platforms, while minimizing the intrinsic error rate, are desired. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that PacBio SMRT sequencing technology can be used to

  15. Combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody detection assay does not improve diagnosis for seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Juan A; Castillo, Inmaculada; Pardo, Margarita; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Carreño, Vicente

    2006-12-01

    A combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody assay was evaluated for 115 seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection. The assay was reactive in one patient and negative to weakly reactive in three others (all four gave indeterminate results by supplemental assay) but failed to detect HCV in the remaining patients. Despite increased sensitivity the combined assay does not improve serodiagnosis of occult HCV infection.

  16. [Viral safety of biologicals: evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) assay and development of concentration method of HCV for sensitive detection by NAT].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    The most important issue for the safety of biological products and blood products derived from human sources is how to prevent transmission of infectious agents. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence. HCV is mainly transmitted by exposure to blood and highly infectious during the early window period with extremely low viral loads. Therefore it is important to develop more sensitive detection methods for HCV. In the case of blood products, both serological test and nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) are required to detect HCV. Since NAT is highly sensitive, establishment of a new standard is required for validation of NAT assay. NAT guideline and establishment of the standard for HCV RNA and HCV genotype panel is introduced in this review. On the other hand, to enhance the sensitivity of virus detection by NAT, a novel viral concentration method using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-conjugated magnetic beads (PEI beads) was developed. PEI beads concentration method is applicable to a wide range of viruses including HCV. Studies using the national standard for HCV RNA, HCV genotype panel and seroconversion panel, suggest that virus concentration method using PEI-beads is useful for improvement of the sensitivity of HCV detection by NAT and applicable to donor screening for HCV.

  17. An accurate assay for HCV based on real-time fluorescence detection of isothermal RNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuping; Wang, Jianfang; Song, Jinyun; Li, Jiayan; Yang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the common reasons of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Early, rapid and accurate HCV RNA detection is important to prevent and control liver disease. A simultaneous amplification and testing (SAT) assay, which is based on isothermal amplification of RNA and real-time fluorescence detection, was designed to optimize routine HCV RNA detection. In this study, HCV RNA and an internal control (IC) were amplified and analyzed simultaneously by SAT assay and detection of fluorescence using routine real-time PCR equipment. The assay detected as few as 10 copies of HCV RNA transcripts. We tested 705 serum samples with SAT, among which 96.4% (680/705) showed consistent results compared with routine real-time PCR. About 92% (23/25) discordant samples were confirmed to be same results as SAT-HCV by using a second real-time PCR. The sensitivity and specificity of SAT-HCV assay were 99.6% (461/463) and 100% (242/242), respectively. In conclusion, the SAT assay is an accurate test with a high specificity and sensitivity which may increase the detection rate of HCV. It is therefore a promising tool to diagnose HCV infection.

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of HCV infection in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and other liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Fa; Peng, Wen-Wei; Yao, Ji-Lu; Tang, Yong-Huang

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To detect HCV infection in patients with HCC and other liver diseases by the immunohistochemical method. METHODS: The expression of HCV antigen was identified by means of LSAB (labelled streptavidin-biotin) method using anti-NS3 monoclonal antibody. RESULTS: The positive rates of HCV antigen in the three groups of HCC, liver cirrhosis and hepatitis were 13.5% (7/52), 12.5% (2/16), and 10% (4/40) respectively, while in the samples from patients with constitutional jaundice and normal liver samples, no HCV antigen was found. HCV antigen could be seen in the nuclei and/or cytoplasms of carcinoma cells and/or pericancerous hepatocytes. In HCC, HCV antigen was more often seen in nuclei than in cytoplasms. The positive rate of HCV antigen in pericancerous tissues was higher than that in cancerous tissues. CONCLUSION: HCV is associated with HCC, and HCV infection enhances the development of liver diseases. HCV affects the initiative period of HCC and induces the malignant phenotypic alteration of hepatocytes. PMID:11819235

  19. Detection of occult hepatitis C virus among healthy spouses of patients with HCV infection.

    PubMed

    El Shazly, Yahia; Hemida, Khaled; Rafik, Mona; Al Swaff, Reham; Ali-Eldin, Zainab A; GadAllah, Shaimaa

    2015-03-01

    The criterion standard for the diagnosis of occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is detection of HCV-RNA in liver cells. However, because of the invasive nature of liver biopsy, other methods have been studied. The present study aimed to identify subjects with occult HCV-4 infection among healthy sexual partners of patients with chronic HCV-4 infection by detecting HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fifty healthy Egyptian spouses of patients with chronic HCV-4 infection were included in this study. Real-time PCR was used to detect HCV-RNA in PBMCs in all the study subjects. The prevalence of occult HCV-4 infection was 4%, and a statistically significant higher prevalence was found among patients with a history of sexually transmitted infection. The results of the present study indicate the importance of intra-spousal transmission of HCV-4 infection, especially in subjects with a history of sexually transmitted infection.

  20. Detection and quantification of serum or plasma HCV RNA: mini review of commercially available assays.

    PubMed

    Le Guillou-Guillemette, Helene; Lunel-Fabiani, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    The treatment schedule (combination of compounds, doses, and duration) and the virological follow-up for management of antiviral treatment in patients chronically infected by HCV is now well standardized, but to ensure good monitoring of the treated patients, physicians need rapid, reproducible, and sensitive molecular virological tools with a wide range of detection and quantification of HCV RNA in blood samples. Several assays for detection and/or quantification of HCV RNA are currently commercially available. Here, all these assays are detailed, and a brief description of each step of the assay is provided. They are divided into two categories by method: those based on signal amplification and those based on target amplification. These two categories are then divided into qualitative, quantitative, and quantitative detection assays. The real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assays are the most promising strategy in the HCV virological area.

  1. Impaired hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific effector CD8+ T cells undergo massive apoptosis in the peripheral blood during acute HCV infection and in the liver during the chronic phase of infection.

    PubMed

    Radziewicz, Henry; Ibegbu, Chris C; Hon, Huiming; Osborn, Melissa K; Obideen, Kamil; Wehbi, Mohammad; Freeman, Gordon J; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Workowski, Kimberly A; Hanson, Holly L; Grakoui, Arash

    2008-10-01

    A majority of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) do not sustain an effective T-cell response, and viremia persists. The mechanism leading to failure of the HCV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response in patients developing chronic infection is unclear. We investigated apoptosis susceptibility of HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute and chronic stages of infection. Although HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the blood during the acute phase of infection and in the liver during the chronic phase were highly activated and expressed an effector phenotype, the majority was undergoing apoptosis. In contrast, peripheral blood HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells during the chronic phase expressed a resting memory phenotype. Apoptosis susceptibility of HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells was associated with very high levels of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and low CD127 expression and with significant functional T-cell deficits. Further evaluation of the "death phase" of HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells during acute HCV infection showed that the majority of cells were dying by a process of cytokine withdrawal, mediated by activated caspase 9. Contraction during the acute phase occurred rapidly via this process despite the persistence of the virus. Remarkably, in the chronic phase of HCV infection, at the site of infection in the liver, a substantial frequency of caspase 9-mediated T-cell death was also present. This study highlights the importance of cytokine deprivation-mediated apoptosis with consequent down-modulation of the immune response to HCV during acute and chronic infections.

  2. Necrotizing acute pancreatitis following therapeutic plasmapheresis in HCV-related cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Desideri, F; Van Vlierberghe, H

    2011-06-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia and hepatitis C virus infection are strongly connected and the therapeutic approach is standardized according to the severity of the symptoms. We report the difficult management of 59 year old female HCV patient presenting cutaneous lesions and arthralgia due to mixed cryoglobulinemia. No therapy was able to achieve a complete remission and during the six years of active disease we observed several clinical recurrences. The intensive plasmapheresis regimen led to a complete remission of the symptoms but it was associated with severe complications. In this case report we describe an episode of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to intravascular haemolysis following therapeutic plasmapheresis. To the best of our knowledge the association between plasmapheresis and acute pancreatitis has not been previously described.

  3. Cascaded multiple amplification strategy for ultrasensitive detection of HIV/HCV virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Fan, Daoqing; Liu, Yaqing; Dong, Shaojun

    2017-01-15

    Ultrasensitive detection of HIV and HCV virus DNA is of great importance for early accurate diagnostics and therapy of HIV virus-infected patients. Herein, to our best knowledge, it is the first to use DNA cascaded multiple amplification strategy for ultrasensitive detection of HIV virus DNA with G-quadruplex-specific fluorescent or colorimetric probes as signal carriers. The developed strategy also exhibited universal applicability for HCV virus DNA detection. After reaction for about 4h, high sensitivity and specificity can be achieved at both fluorescent and colorimetric strategies (limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fM and 0.5pM were reached for fluorescent and colorimetric detection, respectively). And the single-based mismatched DNA even can be distinguished by naked eyes. It is believed that the cascaded multiple amplification strategy presents a huge advance in sensing platform and potential application in future clinical diagnosis.

  4. A Novel Structurally Stable Multiepitope Protein for Detection of HCV

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Alexsandro S.; Santos, José C.; Souza, Marilen Q.; Nóbrega, Yanna K. M.; Xavier, Mary-Ann E.; Felipe, Maria S. S.; Freitas, Sonia M.; Torres, Fernando A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as the major pathogen of liver diseases in recent years leading to worldwide blood-transmitted chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accurate diagnosis for differentiation of hepatitis C from other viruses is thus of pivotal importance for proper treatment. In this work we developed a recombinant multiepitope protein (rMEHCV) for hepatitis C diagnostic purposes based on conserved and immunodominant epitopes from core, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5 regions of the virus polyprotein of genotypes 1a, 1b, and 3a, the most prevalent genotypes in South America (especially in Brazil). A synthetic gene was designed to encode eight epitopes in tandem separated by a flexible linker and bearing a his-tag at the C-terminal end. The recombinant protein was produced in Escherichia coli and purified in a single affinity chromatographic step with >95% purity. Purified rMEHCV was used to perform an ELISA which showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by IgG and IgM from human serum samples. The structural data obtained by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that rMEHCV is a highly thermal stable protein at neutral and alkaline conditions. Together, these results show that rMEHCV should be considered an alternative antigen for hepatitis C diagnosis. PMID:26942007

  5. Detection of HCV genotypes 1b and 2a by a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Liu, Jinxia; Sun, Dianxing

    2016-12-09

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1b and 2a are the major cause of liver disease in northern China; however, conventional detection tools are labor-consuming, technically demanding, and costly. Here, we assessed the specificity, sensitivity, and clinical utility of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for detection of HCV genotypes 1b and 2a. Firstly, clinical samples were collected from HCV genotype 1b and 2a infected patients and the RNA were extracted. Secondly, specificity of RT-LAMP assay for detection HCV genotypes 1b and 2a were tested against viral genomes of other hepatitis viruses. Sensitivity of RT-LAMP assay was determined using serial dilutions of standard HCV genotypes 1b and 2a. The amplified products were detected by both electrophoresis and calcein/Mn(2+) -dependent visual methods. Finally, we compared the clinical detection rate of RT-LAMP to that of real-time PCR. RT-LAMP assay showed high specificity to detect HCV genotypes 1b and 2b since there was no cross-reactivity with other hepatitis viruses. Sensitivity of RT-LAMP was 100 IU/mL for both genotypes detected by either electrophoresis or calcein/Mn(2+) -dependent visual methods. The detection rate of RT-LAMP assay in clinical samples was also comparable to that of real-time PCR without significant difference between the both assays. This study proposes a newly developed RT-LAMP assay for detection of HCV genotypes 1b and 2a. RT-LAMP is highly specific, sensitive, and simple diagnostic tool which would be useful for screening and early diagnosis of HCV especially in resource-limited environments.

  6. Molecular beacon probes–base multiplex NASBA Real-time for detection of HIV-1 and HCV

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Yeganeh, S; Paryan, M; Mirab Samiee, S; Kia, V; Rezvan, H

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Developed in 1991, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) has been introduced as a rapid molecular diagnostic technique, where it has been shown to give quicker results than PCR, and it can also be more sensitive. This paper describes the development of a molecular beacon-based multiplex NASBA assay for simultaneous detection of HIV-1 and HCV in plasma samples. Materials and Methods A well-conserved region in the HIV-1 pol gene and 5’-NCR of HCV genome were used for primers and molecular beacon design. The performance features of HCV/HIV-1 multiplex NASBA assay including analytical sensitivity and specificity, clinical sensitivity and clinical specificity were evaluated. Results The analysis of scalar concentrations of the samples indicated that the limit of quantification of the assay was <1000 copies/ml for HIV-1 and <500 copies/ml for HCV with 95% confidence interval. Multiplex NASBA assay showed a 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The analytical specificity study with BLAST software demonstrated that the primers do not attach to any other sequences except for that of HIV-1 or HCV. The primers and molecular beacon probes detected all HCV genotypes and all major variants of HIV-1. Conclusion This method may represent a relatively inexpensive isothermal method for detection of HIV-1/HCV co-infection in monitoring of patients. PMID:22973469

  7. Detection of HCV Persistent Infections in the Dental Pulp: A Novel Approach for the Detection of Past and Ancient Infections

    PubMed Central

    Siravenha, Layla Gomes; Siravenha, Leonardo Quintão; Madeira, Lucimar Di Paula; Oliveira-Filho, Aldemir B.; Machado, Luiz Fernando Almeida; Martins Feitosa, Rosimar Neris; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário; Ishak, Marluísa de Oliveira Guimarães; Ishak, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The dental pulp is a sterile highly vascularized tissue and has been commonly used as a biological material to detect the genome of infectious agents that reach the dental tissue. Indeed, the pulp is also used to reveal past and ancient infections in the field of paleomicrobiology. The present study aimed to detect the presence of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a small community (approximately 400 inhabitants) in the Amazon region of Brazil (Nossa Senhora do Perpetuo Socorro, Vizeu, Para, Brazil) and standardize a technique for the detection of the virus in the dental pulp. Serum samples were collected from 48 patients whose teeth were clinically recommended for surgical extraction. The group comprised an equal number of males and females, mostly agriculture workers and housewives, respectively. The majority (64.6%) received less than one minimum wage and were ill educated (less than four years of school years). An enzyme immune assay was used to detect antibodies to HCV and the 9 (18.8%) positive samples were submitted to nucleic acid extraction in the blood (using the EXTRAzol) and the pulp (QIAamp DNA Micro Kit e kit RNeasy Plus Micro). The pulp was removed using a modified protocol without the use of liquid nitrogen. Nucleic acid was found in 8 of the dental pulp, but in 7 of the blood samples. Sequencing of one of the samples showed the presence of genotype 1. Conclusions: A novel simplified methodology for the extraction and amplification of HCV nucleic acid was successful to detect the presence of persistent infections of the virus within the dental pulp tissue. The protocol may be helpful to detect past and ancient infections and to better understand the natural history of HCV. PMID:27783693

  8. Recombinant expression of the alternate reading frame protein (ARFP) of hepatitis C virus genotype 4a (HCV-4a) and detection of ARFP and anti-ARFP antibodies in HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Shehat, Michael G; Bahey-El-Din, Mohammed; Kassem, Mervat A; Farghaly, Faten A; Abdul-Rahman, Medhat H; Fanaki, Nourhan H

    2015-08-01

    HCV is a single-stranded RNA virus with a single open reading frame (ORF) that is translated into a polyprotein that is then processed to form 10 viral proteins. An additional eleventh viral protein, the alternative reading frame protein (ARFP), was discovered relatively recently. This protein results from a translational frameshift in the core region during the expression of the viral proteins. Recombinant expression of different forms of ARFP was previously done for HCV genotypes 1 and 2, and more recently, genotype 3. However, none of the previous studies addressed the expression of ARFP of HCV genotype 4a, which is responsible for 80 % of HCV infections in the Middle East and Africa. Moreover, the direct detection of the ARFP antigen in HCV-infected patients was never studied before for any HCV genotype. In the present study, recombinant ARFP derived from HCV genotype 4a was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified using metal affinity chromatography. The recombinant ARFP protein and anti-ARFP antibodies were used for detection of ARFP antigen in patients' sera, employing competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures. Furthermore, the recombinant antigen was also used to detect and quantify anti-ARFP antibodies in HCV-infected Egyptian patients at different stages of pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy, using an ELISA assay. The ARFP antigen was detectable in 69.4 % of RNA-positive sera, indicating that ARFP antigen is produced during the natural course of HCV infection. In addition, significant levels of anti-ARFP antibodies were present in 41 % of the serum samples tested. The important diagnostic value of the recombinant ARFP antigen was also demonstrated.

  9. Detection of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural proteins in anti-HCV-positive sera by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using synthetic peptides as antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, C; Matsumoto, K; Fukada, K; Matsushita, K; Shiraki, H; Maeda, Y

    1993-01-01

    We have defined 10 linear immunogenic regions encoded by the putative hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural proteins (core and envelope) by employing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by using 17 sequential synthetic peptides covering the N-terminal 330 amino acids of the structural polyproteins as antigens. These peptides correspond to amino acids 1 to 24, 21 to 44, 42 to 68, 64 to 91, and 100 to 120 of the putative core protein and amino acids 192 to 212, 223 to 238, 236 to 258, 250 to 266, and 307 to 330 of the putative envelope protein. In particular, the peptide covering amino acids 21 to 44 of the core protein was reactive with all but one (40 of 41) of the serum samples giving a positive signal in the passive hemagglutination assay (PHA) using the core and nonstructural proteins (NS 3/4) of the virus as antigens. We detected the HCV genome in 25 (61%) of 41 PHA-positive serum samples by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. Of 25 PCR-positive serum samples, 17 serum samples had reactivity to the peptides derived from the envelope protein. On the other hand, only 1 of the 16 PCR-negative serum samples had reactivity to the peptides derived from the envelope protein. Interestingly, we often observed high serum alanine aminotransferase levels in PCR-positive individuals bearing antibodies to the envelope protein. PMID:7681849

  10. The potential role of HCV core antigen testing in diagnosing HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Dawson, George J

    2012-01-01

    The potential uses of serological tests that detect HCV core antigens in biological fluids are highlighted. The most common serological tests utilized to detect exposure to HCV rely on the detection of antibodies to HCV. However, these tests cannot distinguish between individuals who have resolved their infection and those who remain actively infected with HCV. By contrast, the HCV core antigen test detects circulating HCV core antigen and identifies individuals who are actively infected with HCV. There is increasing interest in using the HCV core antigen test as a reflex test for seropositive individuals to identify individuals who are actively infected with HCV. In addition, the HCV core antigen test can be utilized to detect the early phase of HCV infection prior to the development of antibodies, both in the blood bank setting and in the diagnostic laboratory. Lastly, quantitative versions of the HCV core antigen test can be used to monitor the effectiveness of antiviral therapy.

  11. Performance of the New Aptima HCV Quant Dx Assay in Comparison to the Cobas TaqMan HCV2 Test for Use with the High Pure System in Detection and Quantification of Hepatitis C Virus RNA in Plasma or Serum.

    PubMed

    Schalasta, Gunnar; Speicher, Andrea; Börner, Anna; Enders, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Quantitating the level of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA is the standard of care for monitoring HCV-infected patients during treatment. The performances of commercially available assays differ for precision, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation (LOQ). Here, we compare the performance of the Hologic Aptima HCV Quant Dx assay (Aptima) to that of the Roche Cobas TaqMan HCV test, version 2.0, using the High Pure system (HPS/CTM), considered a reference assay since it has been used in trials defining clinical decision points in patient care. The assays' performance characteristics were assessed using HCV RNA reference panels and plasma/serum from chronically HCV-infected patients. The agreement between the assays for the 3 reference panels was good, with a difference in quantitation values of <0.5 log. High concordance was demonstrated between the assays for 245 clinical samples (kappa = 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.720 to 0.881); however, Aptima detected and/or quantitated 20 samples that HPS/CTM did not detect, while Aptima did not detect 1 sample that was quantitated by HPS/CTM. For the 165 samples quantitated by both assays, the values were highly correlated (R= 0.98;P< 0.0001). The linearity of quantitation from concentrations of 1.4 to 6 log was excellent for both assays for all HCV genotypes (GT) tested (GT 1a, 1b, 2b, and 3a) (R(2)> 0.99). The assays had similar levels of total and intra-assay variability across all genotypes at concentrations from 1,000 to 25 IU/ml. Aptima had a greater analytical sensitivity, quantitating more than 50% of replicates at 25-IU/ml target. Aptima showed performance characteristics comparable to those of HPS/CTM and increased sensitivity, making it suitable for use as a clinical diagnostic tool on the fully automated Panther platform.

  12. A novel multiplex real-time PCR assay for the concurrent detection of hepatitis A, B and C viruses in patients with acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongjung; Kim, Beom Seok; Choi, Kyu Hun; Shin, Dong Ho; Lee, Mi Jung; Cho, Yonggeun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2012-01-01

    A novel multiplex real-time PCR assay for concurrent detection of hepatitis viruses was evaluated for its clinical performance in screening patients with acute hepatitis. A total of 648 serum samples were collected from patients with acute symptoms of hepatitis. Concurrent detection of nucleic acids of HAV, HBV and HCV was performed using the Magicplex™ HepaTrio Real-time Detection test. Serum nucleic acid levels of HBV and HCV were also quantified by the Cobas® AmpliPrep/Cobas® TaqMan® (CAP/CTM) HBV and HCV tests. Patients' medical records were also reviewed. Concordance rates between the results from the HepaTrio and the CAP/CTM tests for the detection of HBV and HCV were 94.9% (k = 0.88) and 99.2% (k = 0.98), respectively. The cycle threshold values with the HepaTrio test were also correlated well with the levels of HBV DNA (r = -0.9230) and HCV RNA (r = -0.8458). The sensitivity and specificity of the HepaTrio test were 93.8% and 98.2%, respectively, for detecting HBV infection, and 99.1% and 100.0%, respectively, for HCV infection. For the HepaTrio test, 21 (3.2%) cases were positive for both HBV and HCV. Among the positive cases, 6 (0.9%) were true coinfections. This test also detected 18 (2.8%) HAV positives. The HepaTrio test demonstrated good clinical performance and produced results that agreed well with those of the CAP/CTM assays, especially for the detection of HCV. This assay was also able to detect HAV RNA from anti-HAV IgM-positive individuals. Therefore, this new multiplex PCR assay could be useful for the concurrent detection of the three hepatitis viruses.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of APRI, FIB-4 and Forns for the detection of liver cirrhosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Merli, Marco; Galli, Laura; Castagna, Antonella; Salpietro, Stefania; Gianotti, Nicola; Messina, Emanuela; Poli, Andrea; Morsica, Giulia; Bagaglio, Sabrina; Cernuschi, Massimo; Bigoloni, Alba; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Lazzarin, Adriano; Hasson, Hamid

    2016-04-01

    We determined the diagnostic accuracy and optimal cut off of three indirect fibrosis biomarkers (APRI, FIB-4, Forns) compared with liver stiffness (LS) for the detection of liver cirrhosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. An observational retrospective study on HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with concomitant LS measurement and APRI, FIB-4 and Forns was performed. The presence of liver cirrhosis was defined as a LS ≥13 KPa. The diagnostic accuracy and optimal cut-off values, compared with LS categorization (<13 vs ≥13 KPa), were determined by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. The study sample included 646 patients. The area-under-the ROC curve (95% confidence interval) for the detection of liver cirrhosis were 0.84 (0.81-0.88), 0.87 (0.84-0.91) and 0.87 (0.84-0.90) for APRI, FIB-4 and Forns, respectively. According to the optimal cut off values for liver cirrhosis (≥0.97 for APRI, ≥2.02 for FIB-4 and ≥7.8 for Forns), 80%, 80% and 82% of subjects were correctly classified by the three indirect fibrosis biomarkers, respectively. Misclassifications were mostly due to false positive cases. The study suggests that indirect fibrosis biomarkers can help clinicians to exclude liver cirrhosis in the management of HIV/HCV co-infected patients, reducing the frequency of more expensive or invasive assessments.

  14. HCV-specific CD8+ cell detection at week 12 of chronic hepatitis C treatment with PEG-interferon-α2b/ribavirin correlates with infection resolution.

    PubMed

    Larrubia, Juan-Ramón; Lokhande, Megha-Uttam; Moreno-Cubero, Elia; García-Garzón, Silvia; Miquel, Joaquín; Parra-Cid, Trinidad; González-Praetorious, Alejandro; Perna, Cristian; Lázaro, Alicia; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Lower than 2-log viral-load (VL) decrease at week 12 (w12) of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) treatment with Peg-interferon/ribavirin has 100% negative predictive value (PV) of sustained virologic response (SVR), and this could be related with absence of HCV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In this study, percentage of cases with SVR, according to peripheral HCV-specific cytotoxic response at w12, was analysed (Group-1: detection(+), Group-2: detection(-)). SVR was higher in group-1 (93%) than in group-2 (47%) (p=0.003). An increase on HCV-specific CTL frequency between baseline and w12 and higher specific reactivity were observed in group-1 (p=0.011 and p=0.025). HCV-specific CTL detection at w12 correlated with level of VL decrease (p=0.016, r=0.389), and among HCV genotype-1 patients with either early or delayed virologic response (EDVR), 100% positive PV of SVR was observed. In summary, HCV-specific CTL detection at w12 of Peg-interferon/ribavirin treatment correlates with SVR and in EDVR genotype-1 cases predicts SVR.

  15. Anti-retroviral drugs do not facilitate hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Lisa; Wilson, Matthew; Back, David; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P; Steinmann, Eike; Pietschmann, Thomas; von Hahn, Thomas; Ciesek, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    An estimated 4 to 5 million people are co-infected with HIV/HCV worldwide. Recently observed outbreaks of acute HCV infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) have been linked to behavioral factors such as high risk sexual practices and recreational drug use. However, at the molecular level, many drugs such as glucocorticoids or cyclosporine A have been found to modulate viral replication. Thus, it is conceivable that drugs used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may heighten susceptibility to HCV infection and contribute to the recent outbreaks. We therefore performed a comprehensive screen of antiretroviral drugs covering all available drug classes both individually and in typical combinations used during HAART to probe for direct effects on HCV cell entry, replication, new particle assembly and release. Importantly, no significant enhancement or inhibition of HCV cell entry, replication or new particle production was detected. While raltegravir and ritonavir boosted atazanavir reduce HCV replication, a tenfold reduction of HCVcc entry by the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc was observed. In conclusion, commonly used HAART agents do not specifically enhance HCV replication. Thus recent epidemic outbreaks of acute HCV in HIV-infected MSM are unlikely to be related to enhancing effects of HAART drugs.

  16. [Chronic hepatitis and occult HCV infection].

    PubMed

    Kowala-Piaskowska, Arleta; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Pham, Tram N Q; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered in 1989. HCV is a positive single-strand RNA. We all have thought, that HCV can replicate only in liver tissue, but now we know, that HCV can replicate in extrahepatic tissue as well. In about 48-86% of HCV infected patients, chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been noticed and eventually, after tens of years, liver insufficiency, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The current recommended treatment for CHC is a combination of pegylated-interferon alpha and Ribavirin. Presently it is known, that HCV infection can persist as an occult infection. RNA HCV can be detected in patients after successful treatment for CHC or spontaneous elimination. Persistent HCV replication in hepatocytes or lymphoid cells would likely lead to continuous antigenic stimulation of the immune system. This prolonged replication may contribute to the immune tolerance of HCV, impairment of immune response and even further virus persistence. This occult infection grows more important in transplantation.

  17. Liver fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes are intertwined: role of CD4+ T-cell count and NRTI exposure from a large cohort of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with detectable HCV-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Focà, Emanuele; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Prosperi, Mattia; Quiros Roldan, Eugenia; Castelli, Francesco; Maggiolo, Franco; Di Filippo, Elisa; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Gagliardini, Roberta; Saracino, Annalisa; Di Pietro, Massimo; Gori, Andrea; Sighinolfi, Laura; Pan, Angelo; Postorino, Maria Concetta; Torti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) suffer from faster progression of liver fibrosis (LF) and have greater risk of worse clinical outcomes. We evaluated predictors and incidence of these events in a large multicentre cohort. Methods: We selected all HIV-infected patients starting a first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), with detectable HCV-RNA, without exposure to interferon/ribavirin, with ≥2 fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4) classifications before cART. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to estimate incidence of clinical events (AIDS, non-AIDS related, deaths) and LF progression (via transitions: from FIB-4 class 1 to 2 or 3, from class 2 to class 3, and worsening by 0.5 point). Multivariate Cox regression was used to assess predictors, baseline, or time updated. Results: One thousand four hundred thirty-three patients were selected. Overall, 745 clinical events occurred, with an incidence of 7.6% over 9811 person-year of follow-up (PYFU) and a median survival time of 9.36 years. Incidence of LF progression from FIB-4 class 1 to 2 or 3 was 12.4%, and from FIB-4 class 2 to 3 was 7% with a median survival time of 5.67 and 10.35 years, respectively. At multivariate analyses, intravenous drug use and time-updated gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT) were negative predictors for any outcomes, either clinical or FIB-4 progression. Higher CD4+ T-cell protected from clinical events, and lower HIV-RNA and higher CD4+ T-cell appeared to protect from FIB-4 transitions. Moreover, independently from the viro-immunological status, current FIB-4 class 3 predicted clinical events. Occurrence of AIDS and cardiovascular/kidney events were significant predictors of 0.5 point worsening and transitions of FIB-4, respectively. Prolonged exposure to nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) was a negative predictor for any outcomes. Conclusion: Both clinical and LF progression in HIV/HCV

  18. Anti-HCV immunoassays based on a multiepitope antigen and fluorescent lanthanide chelate reporters.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Teppo; Juntunen, Etvi; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim; Talha, Sheikh M

    2016-02-01

    There is a need for simple to produce immunoassays for hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody capable of detecting all genotypes worldwide. Current commonly used third generation immunoassays use three to six separate recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides. We have developed and expressed in Escherichia coli a single recombinant antigen incorporating epitopes from different HCV proteins. This multiepitope protein (MEP) was used to develop two types of HCV antibody immunoassays: a traditional antibody immunoassay using a labeled secondary antibody (indirect assay) and a double-antigen assay with the same MEP used as capture binder and labeled binder. The secondary antibody assay was evaluated with 171 serum/plasma samples and double-antigen assay with 148 samples. These samples included an in-house patient sample panel, two panels of samples with different HCV genotypes and a seroconversion panel. The secondary antibody immunoassay showed 95.6% sensitivity and 100% specificity while the double-antigen assay showed 91.4% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Both assays detected samples from all six HCV genotypes. The results showed that combining a low-cost recombinant MEP binder antigen with a high sensitivity fluorescent lanthanide reporter can provide a sensitive and specific immunoassay for HCV serology. The results also showed that the sensitivity of HCV double-antigen assays may suffer from the low avidity immune response of acute infections.

  19. Evidence of occult HCV genotypes in haemophilic individuals with unapparent HCV mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Parodi, C; Culasso, A; Aloisi, N; García, G; Bastón, M; Corti, M; Bianco, R P; Campos, R; Ares, B R; Baré, P

    2008-07-01

    Individuals with haemophilia who received non heat-treated factor concentrates were likely to undergo multiple exposures to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Therefore, HCV mixed-genotype infections might be more frequent in these patients than in the general population. Their prevalence is extremely variable in similar groups of patients tested by different assays due to the fact that currently available genotyping techniques are not suitable to detect multiple HCV genotypes in a viral population. As an HCV viral reservoir, the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) might harbor viral variants distinct from the genotypes detected in plasma. We investigated the presence of HCV genotypes in a group of chronically infected haemophilic patients in the PBMC compartment using a non-stimulated cell culture system that allows the detection of the HCV genome in culture supernatants. We compared them to the HCV genotypes found in plasma samples. Cell culture experiments performed with PBMC demonstrated the presence of additional HCV genotypes that were undetected in the corresponding plasma samples with the same genotyping technique. Although mixed infections at HCV genotype level became evident in 5.6% of the patients (16/288), the culture methodology increased the number of HCV infections with multiple genotypes to 62.5% (10/16) (P < 0.0001). Once more, the role of mononuclear cells as HCV viral reservoirs is emphasized. Considering minor strains could influence the outcome of treatment, detection of covert HCV mixed-genotype infections might be essential for choosing the adequate therapeutic regimen.

  20. Impact of occult HBV infection in HIV/HCV co-infected patients: HBV-DNA detection in liver specimens and in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Paolo; Biasin, Maria R; Giordani, Maria T; Berardo, Laura; Menini, Vania; Carlotto, Antonio; Miotti, Maria G; Manfrin, Vinicio; Baldo, Vincenzo; Nebbia, Gaia; Infantolino, Domenico

    2008-03-01

    Prevalence and impact of occult HBV infection in HIV positive patients is controversial. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of occult HBV infection and its impact on histological and virological parameters. 52 HIV/HCV (but HBsAg-negative) co-infected patients, 29 HBsAg and anti-HCV negative chronic hepatitis, and 20 HBsAg positive chronic hepatitis controls were studied. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and amplified with primers for S, C and X regions, and for (ccc) HBV-DNA. Sera were tested for HBV-DNA with two quantitative assays (Cobas Amplicor HBV Monitor, and the real-time COBAS (r) Taqman HBV Test, Roche Diagnostics, UK). Occult HBV infection was detected in 7 (13.4%) liver biopsies of the study group, and in none case of the non viral chronic hepatitis group (p=0.04). All serum samples were HBV-DNA negative with Cobas Amplicor HBV monitor assay, while 3 cases were found positive with real time PCR. Statistical analysis didn't show any impact of occult HBV infection on liver histology, CD4+ cells count, HIV and HCV load, and ALT levels. Occult B infection is relatively frequent in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, and is underestimated by common HBV-DNA serological assays. However, it doesn't seem to exert a relevant impact.

  1. Rapid detection of HCV genotyping 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b and 6a in a single reaction using two-melting temperature codes by a real-time PCR-based assay.

    PubMed

    Athar, Muhammad Ammar; Xu, Ye; Xie, Xiaoting; Xu, Zhenxing; Ahmad, Vakil; Hayder, Zulfiqar; Hussain, Syed Sajid; Liao, Yiqun; Li, Qingge

    2015-09-15

    The genotype of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important indicator for antiviral therapeutic response. We hereby described development of a rapid HCV genotyping approach that enabled the identification of the six most common HCV subtypes of Asia, i.e., 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b, and 6a, in a single reaction. Using two dual-labeled, self-quenched probes that target the core region of the HCV genome, the exact subtype could be accurately identified by two-melting temperature codes determined from the two respective probes in a real-time PCR assay. Analytical sensitivity studies using armored RNA samples representing each of the six HCV subtypes showed that 5 copies/reaction of HCV RNA could be detected. The assay was evaluated using 244 HCV-positive serum samples and the results were compared with sequencing analysis. Of the 224 samples, subtype 3a (127, 52.3%) was the dominant, followed by 1b (51, 20.9%), 3b (47, 19.3%), 2a (8, 3.3%), 6a (4, 1.6%) and the least was subtype 1a (1, 0.4%). Moreover, 6 (2.5%) mixed infection samples were also detected. These results were fully concordant with sequencing analysis. We concluded that this real-time PCR-based assay could provide a rapid and reliable tool for routine HCV genotyping in most Asian countries.

  2. No evidence of occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in serum of HCV antibody-positive HCV RNA-negative kidney-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Nicot, Florence; Kamar, Nassim; Mariamé, Bernard; Rostaing, Lionel; Pasquier, Christophe; Izopet, Jacques

    2010-06-01

    Persistence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients who cleared HCV is still debated. Occult HCV infection is described as the presence of detectable HCV RNA in liver or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with undetectable plasma HCV-RNA by conventional PCR assays. We have assessed the persistence of HCV in 26 kidney-transplant patients, followed up for 10.5 years (range 2-16), after HCV elimination while on hemodialysis. If HCV really did persist, arising out of the loss of immune control caused by institution of the regimen of immunosuppressive drugs after kidney transplantation, HCV reactivation would have taken place. Their immunosuppression relied on calcineurin inhibitors (100%), and/or steroids (62%), and/or antimetabolites (94%). An induction therapy, given to 22 patients, relied on rabbit antithymocyte globulin (59%) or anti-IL2-receptor blockers (32%). All patients had undetectable HCV RNA as ascertained by several conventional tests. At the last follow-up, no residual HCV RNA was detected in the five liver biopsies, the 26 plasma, and in the 37 nonstimulated and 24 stimulated PBMCs tested with an ultrasensitive RT-PCR assay (detection limit, 2 IU/ml). No biochemical or virologic relapse was seen during follow-up. The absence of HCV relapse in formerly HCV-infected immunocompromised patients suggests the complete eradication of HCV after its elimination while on dialysis.

  3. ve-SEQ: Robust, unbiased enrichment for streamlined detection and whole-genome sequencing of HCV and other highly diverse pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Trebes, Amy; Brown, Anthony; Klenerman, Paul; Buck, David; Piazza, Paolo; Barnes, Eleanor; Bowden, Rory

    2015-01-01

    The routine availability of high-depth virus sequence data would allow the sensitive detection of resistance-associated variants that can jeopardize HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. We introduce ve-SEQ, a high-throughput method for sequence-specific enrichment and characterization of whole-virus genomes at up to 20% divergence from a reference sequence and 1,000-fold greater sensitivity than direct sequencing. The extreme genetic diversity of HCV led us to implement an algorithm for the efficient design of panels of oligonucleotide probes to capture any sequence among a defined set of targets without detectable bias. ve-SEQ enables efficient detection and sequencing of any HCV genome, including mixtures and intra-host variants, in a single experiment, with greater tolerance of sequence diversity than standard amplification methods and greater sensitivity than metagenomic sequencing, features that are directly applicable to other pathogens or arbitrary groups of target organisms, allowing the combination of sensitive detection with sequencing in many settings. PMID:27092241

  4. Comparative evaluation of a triplex nucleic acid test for detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA, with the Procleix Tigris System.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xinglong; Zhai, Jianxin; Zeng, Jinfeng; Tian, Cong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Yigang

    2013-02-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) is valuable for screening blood donors for occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and infection during the window period in countries where HBV is endemic, such as China. An "in-house" NAT (Triplex NAT) was developed for screening for HBV DNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. Using the Triplex NAT, a head-to-head comparative clinical evaluation was carried out against the most common commercial NAT used for blood screening in China: the Procleix Tigris System. A total of 33,025 specimens which were negative for Hepatitis B surface antigen, HCV antibody and HIV-1 antibody/antigen from potential blood donors were tested for HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA by both the in-house Triplex assay and the commercially available Procleix Tigris System. Eleven specimens were detected as HBV positive by both NATs. Twelve specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Procleix Ultrio assay and the discriminatory assays, and not the Triplex. Twenty-eight specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Triplex and not the Procleix Ultrio. This study, combined with other data obtained in China, suggest that at least 50% HBV surface antigen negative but DNA-positive blood donations would be undetected using the current commercial NATs because of their insufficient sensitivity and/or Mini-Pool formatting strategies.

  5. Hepatitis C virus RNA detection in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Cai, Qing; Chen, You-Chun; Zhang, Mu-Sen; Guan, Jian; Li, Xiao-Juan

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the existence and clinical significance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with hepatitis C. METHODS: HCV RNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested PCR) in serum and in PBMC of 46 patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC) and in 42 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). RESULTS: The positive rate of HCV RNA in PBMC of patients with CHC was markedly higher than that of patients with AHC (P < 0.01). The positive rates of HCV RNA in serum of patients with AHC and CHC and in PBMC of patients with CHC were significantly higher than those of anti-HCV positive patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (P < 0.01). HCV RNA was negative in the serum of two patients, but could be detected in PBMC. In 12 patients, anti HCV was negative while HCV RNA was positive in serum. CONCLUSION: (1) detection of serum HCV RNA by nested PCR might be helpful in the early diagnosis of anti-HCV negative hepatitis C; (2) liver damage in patients with hepatitis C might be correlated with HCV-viremia; (3) infection of PBMC by HCV might play an important role in chronic liver damage in patients with HCV and in the chronicity of its clinical course; and (4) PBMC might be considered as a “reservoir” for HCV. PMID:27041960

  6. Mother-to-Child Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Among HIV/HCV-Coinfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Checa Cabot, Claudia A.; Stoszek, Sonia K.; Quarleri, Jorge; Losso, Marcelo H.; Ivalo, Silvina; Peixoto, Mario F.; Pilotto, José H.; Salomon, Horacio; Sidi, Leon C.; Read, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has been associated with increased hepatitis C virus (HCV) mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). We hypothesized that HCV/HIV-coinfected women with well-controlled HIV disease would not have increased HCV MTCT. Methods The NISDI Perinatal and LILAC cohorts enrolled HIV-infected pregnant women and their infants in Latin America and the Caribbean. This substudy evaluated the HCV infection status of mothers at participating sites and their live born, singleton infants who had a 6-month postnatal visit by December 31, 2008. Mothers who were anti-HCV-positive, or who had CD4 counts (cells/mm3) <200 with detectable HCV RNA, were considered HCV-infected. All HCV-infected women were tested for HCV RNA. Infants with HCV RNA were considered HCV-infected. Results Of 1042 enrolled women, 739 (71%) mother-infant pairs met the inclusion criteria. Of the 739 women, 67 (9%) were anti-HCV-positive and 672 anti-HCV-negative [68 (10%) with CD4 counts <200; of these, 3 (4.4%) were HCV RNA-positive]. Therefore, our study population comprised 70 HCV-infected (47 with HCV RNA) and 669 HCV-uninfected women (and their infants). Factors associated with maternal HCV infection included unemployment (odds ratio [OR] = 2.58); tobacco (OR = 1.73) or marijuana (OR = 3.88) use during pregnancy; enrollment HIV viral load ([VL] copies/mL) ≥10 000 (OR = 2.27); HIV clinical disease stage C (OR = 2.12); and abnormal alanine aminotransferase (OR = 4.24) or aspartate aminotransferase (OR = 11.98). Four of 47 infants (8.5%) born to HCV-viremic women were HCV-infected, and all 4 mothers had HIV VL <1000 at hospital discharge after delivery. Conclusions HCV MTCT among HIV/HCV-coinfected women with well-controlled HIV disease may be lower than reported in other coinfected populations. Studies with longer infant follow-up are needed. PMID:26199724

  7. Detection of Natural Resistance-Associated Substitutions by Ion Semiconductor Technology in HCV1b Positive, Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents-Naïve Patients

    PubMed Central

    Marascio, Nadia; Pavia, Grazia; Strazzulla, Alessio; Dierckx, Tim; Cuypers, Lize; Vrancken, Bram; Barreca, Giorgio Settimo; Mirante, Teresa; Malanga, Donatella; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Torti, Carlo; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) can negatively impact the response to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) agents-based therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Herein, we set out to characterize the RASs in the HCV1b genome from serum samples of DAA-naïve patients in the context of the SINERGIE (South Italian Network for Rational Guidelines and International Epidemiology, 2014) project. We deep-sequenced the NS3/4A protease region of the viral population using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine, and patient-specific majority rule consensus sequence summaries were constructed with a combination of freely available next generation sequencing data analysis software. We detected NS3/4A protease major and minor variants associated with resistance to boceprevir (V36L), telaprevir (V36L, I132V), simeprevir (V36L), and grazoprevir (V36L, V170I). Furthermore, we sequenced part of HCV NS5B polymerase using Sanger-sequencing and detected a natural RAS for dasabuvir (C316N). This mutation could be important for treatment strategies in cases of previous therapy failure. PMID:27618896

  8. Detection of Natural Resistance-Associated Substitutions by Ion Semiconductor Technology in HCV1b Positive, Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents-Naïve Patients.

    PubMed

    Marascio, Nadia; Pavia, Grazia; Strazzulla, Alessio; Dierckx, Tim; Cuypers, Lize; Vrancken, Bram; Barreca, Giorgio Settimo; Mirante, Teresa; Malanga, Donatella; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Torti, Carlo; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo; The Sinergie-Umg Study Group

    2016-08-27

    Naturally occurring resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) can negatively impact the response to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) agents-based therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Herein, we set out to characterize the RASs in the HCV1b genome from serum samples of DAA-naïve patients in the context of the SINERGIE (South Italian Network for Rational Guidelines and International Epidemiology, 2014) project. We deep-sequenced the NS3/4A protease region of the viral population using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine, and patient-specific majority rule consensus sequence summaries were constructed with a combination of freely available next generation sequencing data analysis software. We detected NS3/4A protease major and minor variants associated with resistance to boceprevir (V36L), telaprevir (V36L, I132V), simeprevir (V36L), and grazoprevir (V36L, V170I). Furthermore, we sequenced part of HCV NS5B polymerase using Sanger-sequencing and detected a natural RAS for dasabuvir (C316N). This mutation could be important for treatment strategies in cases of previous therapy failure.

  9. HIV co-infection accelerates decay of humoral responses in spontaneous resolvers of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Shen, T; Zhang, C; Long, L; Duan, Z; Lu, F

    2014-10-01

    Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is primarily followed by chronic infection, while spontaneous recovery of HCV infection (SR-HCV) occurs in a minority of those infected. Identification of SR-HCV clinically depends on two combined indicators, persistently undetectable peripheral HCV RNA and positivity for anti-HCV. However, the characteristics of dynamic variation in anti-HCV antibodies in SR-HCV, especially in those patients co-infected with HIV, are still undefined. In this study, a cohort of patients infected with HCV through commercial blood collection practices was studied. We found that the annual decreasing rate of anti-HCV presented a gradually accelerated process in HCV resolvers. However, the variation in the decline of anti-HCV presented a slowly accelerated process within the early decrease stage and a gradually decelerated process within the latter decrease stage. In addition, we deduced that it expended approximately 16 years from natural HCV recovery to undetectable peripheral anti-HCV in HCV resolvers co-infected with HIV, while this time was estimated to be 20 years in SR-HCV without HIV co-infection. Our data indicated that the decay of anti-HCV was accelerated by HIV-related impairment of immune function. The prevalence of HCV infection may be severely underestimated in this large-scale retrospective epidemiologic investigation in an HIV-infected population.

  10. Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection Induces Consistent Changes in Circulating MicroRNAs That Are Associated with Nonlytic Hepatocyte Release

    PubMed Central

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Bailey, Justin R.; Page, Kimberly; Ray, Stuart C.; Cox, Andrea L.; Thomas, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) change in abundance in response to disease and have been associated with liver fibrosis severity in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the early dynamics of miRNA release during acute HCV infection are poorly understood. In addition, circulating miRNA signatures have been difficult to reproduce among separate populations. We studied plasma miRNA abundance during acute HCV infection to identify an miRNA signature of early infection. We measured 754 plasma miRNAs by quantitative PCR array in a discovery cohort of 22 individuals before and during acute HCV infection and after spontaneous resolution (n = 11) or persistence (n = 11) to identify a plasma miRNA signature. The discovery cohort derived from the Baltimore Before and After Acute Study of Hepatitis. During acute HCV infection, increases in miR-122 (P < 0.01) and miR-885-5p (Pcorrected < 0.05) and a decrease in miR-494 (Pcorrected < 0.05) were observed at the earliest time points after virus detection. Changes in miR-122 and miR-885-5p were sustained in persistent (P < 0.001) but not resolved HCV infection. The circulating miRNA signature of acute HCV infection was confirmed in a separate validation cohort that was derived from the San Francisco-based You Find Out (UFO) Study (n = 28). As further confirmation, cellular changes of signature miRNAs were examined in a tissue culture model of HCV in hepatoma cells: HCV infection induced extracellular release of miR-122 and miR-885-5p despite unperturbed intracellular levels. In contrast, miR-494 accumulated intracellularly (P < 0.05). Collectively, these data are inconsistent with necrolytic release of hepatocyte miRNAs into the plasma during acute HCV infection of humans. IMPORTANCE MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that emerging research shows can transmit regulatory signals between cells in health and disease. HCV infects 2% of humans worldwide, and chronic HCV infection is a major cause of severe

  11. Antiviral CD8-mediated responses in chronic HCV carriers with HBV superinfection.

    PubMed

    Boni, Carolina; Amadei, Barbara; Urbani, Simona; Fisicaro, Paola; Zerbini, Alessandro; Mori, Cristina; Missale, Gabriele; Bertoni, Roberto; Azzurri, Annalisa; Del Prete, Gianfranco; Ferrari, Carlo

    2004-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) superinfection in chronic hepatitis C represents a natural model to investigate whether or not hepatitis C virus (HCV) can influence priming and maturation of antiviral T cells; whether or not HBV superinfection, which is known to determine control of HCV replication, can restore HCV-specific T cell responsiveness; and whether or not cytokines stimulated by HBV infection can contribute to HCV control. To address these issues, the function of CD8 cells specific for HBV and HCV was studied longitudinally in two chronic HCV patients superinfected with HBV. Patients with acute hepatitis B were also examined. Frequency and function of HBV tetramer+ CD8 cells were comparable in patients acutely infected with HBV with or without chronic HCV infection. HBV-specific CD8 cell function was efficiently expressed irrespective of serum HCV-RNA levels. Moreover, fluctuations of HCV viremia at the time of HBV superinfection were not associated with evident changes of CD8 responsiveness to HCV. Finally, no correlation was found between serum levels of interferon alpha, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-10, or IL-18 and control of HCV replication. In conclusion, HCV did not affect the induction of primary and memory HBV-specific CD8 responses. HCV-specific CD8 responses were undetectable when HCV-RNA was negative, showing that inhibition of HCV replication in the setting of a HBV superinfection was not sufficient to induce a restoration of CD8 reactivity against HCV.

  12. Claudin-6 and Occludin Natural Variants Found in a Patient Highly Exposed but Not Infected with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Do Not Confer HCV Resistance In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Fénéant, Lucie; Ghosn, Jade; Fouquet, Baptiste; Helle, François; Belouzard, Sandrine; Vausselin, Thibaut; Séron, Karin; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Dubuisson, Jean; Misrahi, Micheline; Cocquerel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is highly variable between infected individual hosts: up to 80% of acutely HCV infected patients develop a chronic infection while 20% clear infection spontaneously. Spontaneous clearance of HCV infection can be predicted by several factors, including symptomatic acute infection, favorable IFNL3 polymorphisms and gender. In our study, we explored the possibility that variants in HCV cell entry factors might be involved in resistance to HCV infection. In a same case patient highly exposed but not infected by HCV, we previously identified one mutation in claudin-6 (CLDN6) and a rare variant in occludin (OCLN), two tight junction proteins involved in HCV entry into hepatocytes. Here, we conducted an extensive functional study to characterize the ability of these two natural variants to prevent HCV entry. We used lentiviral vectors to express Wildtype or mutated CLDN6 and OCLN in different cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. HCV infection was then investigated using cell culture produced HCV particles (HCVcc) as well as HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) expressing envelope proteins from different genotypes. Our results show that variants of CLDN6 and OCLN expressed separately or in combination did not affect HCV infection nor cell-to-cell transmission. Hence, our study highlights the complexity of HCV resistance mechanisms supporting the fact that this process probably not primarily involves HCV entry factors and that other unknown host factors may be implicated.

  13. HCV management in resource-constrained countries.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Gee

    2017-02-21

    With the arrival of all-oral directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapy with high cure rates, the promise of hepatitis C virus (HCV) eradication is within closer reach. The availability of generic DAAs has improved access to countries with constrained resources. However, therapy is only one component of the HCV care continuum, which is the framework for HCV management from identifying patients to cure. The large number of undiagnosed HCV cases is the biggest concern, and strategies to address this are needed, as risk factor screening is suboptimal, detecting <20% of known cases. Improvements in HCV confirmation through either reflex HCV RNA screening or ideally a sensitive point of care test are needed. HCV notification (e.g., Australia) may improve diagnosis (proportion of HCV diagnosed is 75%) and may lead to benefits by increasing linkage to care, therapy and cure. Evaluations for cirrhosis using non-invasive markers are best done with a biological panel, but they are only moderately accurate. In resource-constrained settings, only generic HCV medications are available, and a combination of sofosbuvir, ribavirin, ledipasvir or daclatasvir provides sufficient efficacy for all genotypes, but this is likely to be replaced with pangenetypic regimens such as sofosbuvir/velpatasvir and glecaprevir/pibrentaasvir. In conclusion, HCV management in resource-constrained settings is challenging on multiple fronts because of the lack of infrastructure, facilities, trained manpower and equipment. However, it is still possible to make a significant impact towards HCV eradication through a concerted effort by individuals and national organisations with domain expertise in this area.

  14. HBV/HCV dual infection impacts viral load, antibody response, and cytokine expression differently from HBV or HCV single infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Wen, Bo; Luo, Shan; Lin, Yingbiao; Ou, Wensheng; Guo, Fengfan; Tang, Ping; Liu, Wenpei; Qu, Xiaowang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus (HBV/HCV) dual infection is common among high-risk individuals. To characterize the virological and immunological features of patients with HBV/HCV dual infection, we enrolled 1,049 individuals who have been identified as injection drug users. Patients were divided into single and dual infection groups according to the serological markers. We found the average HCV RNA level was significantly lower; however, HBV viral load was significantly higher in HBV/HCV dual-infected patients (n = 42) comparing HCV single infection (n = 340) or HBV single infection (n = 136). The level of anti-HBs in patients who experienced spontaneous HBV clearance was higher than that in HCV single-infected patients with HBV spontaneous clearance. The level of anti-HCV E2 in HBV/HCV dual infection was lower than that detected in HCV single infection. Serum levels of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were significantly lower in HBV/HCV dual-infected patients than in patients infected with HBV or HCV alone. Taken together, two viral replications are imbalanced in dual infected patients. The anti-HBs and anti-HCV E2 antibody production were impaired and proinflammatory IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α also downregulated due to dual infection. These findings will help further understanding the pathogenesis of HBV/HCV dual infection. PMID:28009018

  15. Strong HCV NS3/4a, NS4b, NS5a, NS5b-specific cellular immune responses induced in Rhesus macaques by a novel HCV genotype 1a/1b consensus DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Brian; Toporovski, Roberta; Yan, Jian; Pankhong, Panyupa; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Welles, Seth L; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Weiner, David B; Kutzler, Michele A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic HCV is a surreptitious disease currently affecting approximately 3% of the world's population that can lead to liver failure and cancer decades following initial infection. However, there are currently no vaccines available for the prevention of chronic HCV. From patients who acutely resolve HCV infection, it is apparent that a strong and broad cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is important in HCV clearance. DNA vaccines are naked plasmid DNA molecules that encode pathogen antigens to induce a pathogen-specific immune response. They are inexpensive to produce and have an excellent safety profile in animals and humans. Additionally, DNA vaccines are able to induce strong CTL responses, making them well-suited for an HCV vaccine. We aimed to maximize vaccine recipients' opportunity to induce a broad T cell response with a novel antigenic sequence, multi-antigen vaccine strategy. We have generated DNA plasmids encoding consensus sequences of HCV genotypes 1a and 1b non-structural proteins NS3/4a, NS4b, NS5a, and NS5b. Rhesus macaques were used to study the immunogenicity of these constructs. Four animals were immunized 3 times, 6 weeks apart, at a dose of 1.0mg per antigen construct, as an intramuscular injection followed by in vivo electroporation, which greatly increases DNA uptake by local cells. Immune responses were measured 2 weeks post-immunization regimen (PIR) in immunized rhesus macaques and showed a broad response to multiple HCV nonstructural antigens, with up to 4680 spot-forming units per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as measured by Interferon-γ ELISpot. In addition, multiparametric flow cytometry detected HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses by intracellular cytokine staining and detected HCV-specific CD107a+/GrzB+ CD8+ T cells indicating an antigen specific cytolytic response 2 weeks PIR compared with baseline measurements. At the final study time point, 6 weeks PIR, HCV-specific CD45RA- memory-like T cells

  16. Comparison of a newly developed automated and quantitative hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen test with the HCV RNA assay for clinical usefulness in confirming anti-HCV results.

    PubMed

    Kesli, Recep; Polat, Hakki; Terzi, Yuksel; Kurtoglu, Muhammet Guzel; Uyar, Yavuz

    2011-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health care problem. Diagnosis of HCV infection is mainly based on the detection of anti-HCV antibodies as a screening test with serum samples. Recombinant immunoblot assays are used as supplemental tests and for the final detection and quantification of HCV RNA in confirmatory tests. In this study, we aimed to compare the HCV core antigen test with the HCV RNA assay for confirming anti-HCV results to determine whether the HCV core antigen test may be used as an alternative confirmatory test to the HCV RNA test and to assess the diagnostic values of the total HCV core antigen test by determining the diagnostic specificity and sensitivity rates compared with the HCV RNA test. Sera from a total of 212 treatment-naive patients were analyzed for anti-HCV and HCV core antigen both with the Abbott Architect test and with the molecular HCV RNA assay consisting of a reverse transcription-PCR method as a confirmatory test. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the HCV core antigen assay compared to the HCV RNA test were 96.3%, 100%, 100%, and 89.7%, respectively. The levels of HCV core antigen showed a good correlation with those from the HCV RNA quantification (r = 0.907). In conclusion, the Architect HCV antigen assay is highly specific, sensitive, reliable, easy to perform, reproducible, cost-effective, and applicable as a screening, supplemental, and preconfirmatory test for anti-HCV assays used in laboratory procedures for the diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.

  17. Longitudinal variation in hepatitis C virus (HCV) viraemia and early course of HCV infection after liver transplantation for HCV cirrhosis: the role of different immunosuppressive regimens

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodoridis, G; Barton, S; Andrew, D; Clewley, G; Davies, S; Dhillon, A; Dusheiko, G; Davidson, B; Rolles, K; Burroughs, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The role of the type of immunosuppression in the natural history of post-transplant hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is unclear.
AIMS—To evaluate the fluctuation of HCV viraemia and the early course of infection, and their relation to the type of immunosuppression in HCV transplant patients.
METHODS—In 47 HCV transplant patients, serum HCV RNA levels were determined pretransplant and at one and two weeks, and three and 12 months after transplant. Initial immunosuppression was triple (cyclosporin, azathioprine, prednisolone) in 31, double (cyclosporin, prednisolone) in five, and single (cyclosporin or tacrolimus) in 11 patients. Prednisolone was withdrawn at a median of six months.
RESULTS—At three months, HCV RNA levels were higher in patients with single than with triple or double initial therapy. At 12 months, HCV RNA levels correlated only with duration of prednisolone treatment and were relatively higher in patients with triple compared with single initial immunosuppression. A higher necroinflammatory activity at 12 months post-transplant was found in patients with post-transplant acute hepatitis compared with those without. Extent of fibrosis at 12 months was associated with the 12 month HCV RNA level and occurrence of post-transplant acute hepatitis.
CONCLUSIONS—HCV RNA levels at three months after transplant are higher in patients treated with single initial immunosuppressive therapy, but at 12 months are higher in patients with longer duration of steroid treatment. HCV viraemia at 12 months seems to be particularly important, as its levels are strongly correlated with the severity of fibrosis.


Keywords: HCV RNA; HCV genotype; grading score; staging score; immunosuppression; liver transplantation PMID:10446114

  18. Seroprevalence of HCV among Cairo University students in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Esmat, Gamal; Raziky, Maissa El; Nabeel, Mohammed M; Maher, Rabab; Zakaria, Zeinab

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly prevalent in Egypt. This work aimed at determining the seroprevalence of HCV among Cairo University students. The present study included 3,000 students from Cairo University, Egypt. Blood sample was obtained from each participant to be tested for HCV seromarker. HCV RNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out for those with positive anti-HCV. Overall prevalence rate of HCV antibody (anti-HCV) was 4.6%. It showed that the prevalence was relatively higher among females (86/1660; 5.2%) while males (51/1340; 3.8%) with no significant difference. PCR for HCV RNA was detected in 31.4% of the HCV antibody positive subjects (43/137). Which showed statistical significant difference between males (29/51) and females (14/86) at P = 0.001. Despite the prevalence rate reported in the present study was similar to anti-HCV prevalence among persons in the same age group, confirmed that HCV infection is detected among Cairo University students. J. Med. Virol. 88:1384-1387, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Broadly directed virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses are primed during acute hepatitis C infection, but rapidly disappear from human blood with viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Nolan, Brian E; Streeck, Hendrik; Aneja, Jasneet; Reyor, Laura L; Allen, Todd M; Lohse, Ansgar W; McGovern, Barbara; Chung, Raymond T; Kwok, William W; Kim, Arthur Y; Lauer, Georg M

    2012-01-16

    Vigorous proliferative CD4(+) T cell responses are the hallmark of spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, whereas comparable responses are absent in chronically evolving infection. Here, we comprehensively characterized the breadth, specificity, and quality of the HCV-specific CD4(+) T cell response in 31 patients with acute HCV infection and varying clinical outcomes. We analyzed in vitro T cell expansion in the presence of interleukin-2, and ex vivo staining with HCV peptide-loaded MHC class II tetramers. Surprisingly, broadly directed HCV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses were universally detectable at early stages of infection, regardless of the clinical outcome. However, persistent viremia was associated with early proliferative defects of the HCV-specific CD4(+) T cells, followed by rapid deletion of the HCV-specific response. Only early initiation of antiviral therapy was able to preserve CD4(+) T cell responses in acute, chronically evolving infection. Our results challenge the paradigm that HCV persistence is the result of a failure to prime HCV-specific CD4(+) T cells. Instead, broadly directed HCV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses are usually generated, but rapid exhaustion and deletion of these cells occurs in the majority of patients. The data further suggest a short window of opportunity to prevent the loss of CD4(+) T cell responses through antiviral therapy.

  20. Chronic HCV infection: epidemiological and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Zaltron, S; Spinetti, A; Biasi, L; Baiguera, C; Castelli, F

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first recognized as a cause of transfusion-associated acute and chronic hepatitis in 1989, plays a major role as a cause of chronic liver injury, with potential for neoplastic degeneration. It is mainly transmitted by the parenteral route. However, although with lower efficiency, it may be also transmitted by sexual intercourses and by the mother-to-child route. Epidemiological evidence shows that a wave of infection occurred in the 1945-65 period (baby boomers) in western countries. After acute infection, as many as 50-85% of the patients fail to clear the virus resulting in chronic liver infection and/or disease. It is estimated that, on a global scale, about 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV, leading to about 350.000 deaths yearly. Among western countries southern Europe, and particularly Italy, is among the most affected areas. The impact on the public health systems is noteworthy, with high number of hospitalizations due to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. While waiting for a safe and effective vaccine to be made available, new promising direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs offer a better therapeutic scenario than in the past even for the poor responder genotypes 1 and 4, provided that effective screening and care is offered. However, the long and aspecific prodromic period before clinical symptoms develop is a major obstacle to early detection and treatment. Effective screening strategies may target at-risk groups or age specific groups, as recently recommended by the CDC.

  1. Chronic HCV infection: epidemiological and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first recognized as a cause of transfusion-associated acute and chronic hepatitis in 1989, plays a major role as a cause of chronic liver injury, with potential for neoplastic degeneration. It is mainly transmitted by the parenteral route. However, although with lower efficiency, it may be also transmitted by sexual intercourses and by the mother-to-child route. Epidemiological evidence shows that a wave of infection occurred in the 1945-65 period (baby boomers) in western countries. After acute infection, as many as 50-85% of the patients fail to clear the virus resulting in chronic liver infection and/or disease. It is estimated that, on a global scale, about 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV, leading to about 350.000 deaths yearly. Among western countries southern Europe, and particularly Italy, is among the most affected areas. The impact on the public health systems is noteworthy, with high number of hospitalizations due to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. While waiting for a safe and effective vaccine to be made available, new promising direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs offer a better therapeutic scenario than in the past even for the poor responder genotypes 1 and 4, provided that effective screening and care is offered. However, the long and aspecific prodromic period before clinical symptoms develop is a major obstacle to early detection and treatment. Effective screening strategies may target at-risk groups or age specific groups, as recently recommended by the CDC. PMID:23173556

  2. Detection and genotyping of torque teno virus (TTV) in healthy blood donors and patients infected with HBV or HCV in Qatar.

    PubMed

    AbuOdeh, Raed; Al-Mawlawi, Naema; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Bohol, Marie Fe F; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Hasan, Haydar A; AbuOdeh, Lamees; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2015-07-01

    Torque Teno virus (TTV) has been associated with non A-G hepatitis. The goal of this study was to estimate the infection rates and genotypic characteristics of TTV in the State of Qatar. A total of 644 blood samples representing different nationalities: (i) Qatari (118) and (ii) non-Qatari (526) nationals (mostly from Arab and South Eeast Asia countries) were tested for the presence of TTV DNA by nested PCR. The majority (573) of the blood samples belonged to healthy blood donors, whereas 54 and 53 of the blood samples belonged to patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), respectively. The results obtained showed that the TTV infection rates in the healthy blood donors, and those infected with HBV or HCV patients were 81.4, 90.75 and 84.9%, respectively. Significant association between TTV viremia and age, or nationality was observed. Sequence analysis of PCR fragments amplified from the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of all (531) TTV positive samples showed that 65.5% (348/531) of the PCR fragment sequences were classified into main genogroup 3, followed by main genogroups 5 (24%), 2 (5.8%), and 1 (4.7%). Genogroup 4 was not detected among the our studied subjects. Phylogenetic and pairwise analyses using sequences from TTV viremic samples also showed an overall close similarity to the main genogroup 3. In conclusion, there was no significant difference in the rates of TTV detection among Qataris and non-Qataris and several genotypes, mainly genotype 3, were isolated.

  3. Performance comparison of new generation HCV core antigen test versus HCV RNA test in management of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Çetiner, Salih; Çetin Duran, Alev; Kibar, Filiz; Yaman, Akgün

    2017-03-06

    The study has evaluated the performance of HCV core antigen (Cag) test by comparing HCV RNA PCR assay which is considered the gold standard for management of HCV infection. Totally, 132 samples sent for HCV RNA (real-time PCR) test were included in the study. Anti-HCV antibody test and HCV Cag test were performed by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CMEI). Anti-HCV test was positive in all samples. HCV RNA was detected in 112/132 (84.8%) samples, and HCV Cag in 105/132 (79.5%). The most common HCV genotype was genotype 1 (86%). Considering the HCV RNA test as gold standard; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of Cag test were found to be 93.75%, 100%, 100%, 74.07% and 94.69%, respectively, and paired test results were detected as highly concordant. A high level of correlation was seen between HCV RNA and Cag tests, however, the concordance between the two tests appeared to be disrupted at viral loads lower than 10(3)IU/mL. On the contrary, the correlation reached significance for the values higher than 10(3)IU/mL. Viral loads were in the 17-2500IU/mL range for the negative results for Cag test. Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed a considerably high correlation. The concordance between HCV RNA and Cag tests was disrupted under a viral load lower than 10(3)IU/mL. Therefore, it would be appropriate to consider cost effectiveness, advantages and limitations of the HCV RNA and Cag tests during the decision on which method to use for patient management.

  4. HCV associated glomerulopathy in Egyptian patients: clinicopathological analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sabry, Alaa . E-mail: asabry20@yahoo.com; E-Agroudy, Amgd; Sheashaa, Hussein; El-husseini, Amr; Mohamed Taha, Nohir; Elbaz, Mahmoud; Sobh, Mohamed

    2005-03-30

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Egypt has reached an epidemic proportion and is associated with many extra hepatic manifestations; Glomerulonephritis (GN) is one of the most consequences of HCV infection often resulting in end stage renal disease in some cases. Detection of viral genome or particles within the kidney biopsies from HCV-infected patients has proven to be difficult. Histological characterization of renal lesions still represents a major challenge. The aim of our work was to describe the histological pattern of HCV-associated nephropathy. Methods: Fifty Patients - out of 233 - presented to Mansoura Urology and Nephrology clinic with manifestations of glomerular disease were screened for HCV antibodies by a 3rd generation ELISA test. Those tested positive for HCV antibodies were confirmed by PCR for HCV-RNA and subjected to more detailed clinical, biochemical and histological study. Kidney biopsies and in appropriate cases liver biopsies were examined by LM and electron microscopy (EM). Results: Histological study of renal biopsies revealed membranoproliferative (MPGN) type 1 to be the most common lesion encountered (54%), followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) (24%), mesangioproliferative GN (18%), membranous nephropathy (MN) (4%) in that order. EM examinations of renal biopsies were successful in identifying HCV like particles in frozen renal tissue. Conclusion: HCV-associated glomerulopathy is a distinct category of glomerulonephritis. Results of LM showed some peculiar features. In addition, we were successful in location and detection of HCV particles in renal tissues by EM.

  5. Acute hepatitis C in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Griveas, I; Germanidis, G; Visvardis, G; Morice, Y; Perelson, A S; Pawlotsky, J M; Papadopoulou, D

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequent in patients with end-stage renal disease treated by chronic dialysis, with a prevalence varying from 10-65% according to the geographical data. The prevalence is significantly associated with the duration of dialysis and the number of transfused blood products[1,2] and has dramatically declined with efficient blood screening.[3] We studied patients with acute HCV infection in a dialysis unit. The diagnosis was based on both anti-HCV detection and HCV-RNA detection. Other virological tools including HCV genotype determination was also used to tailor treatment to the individual patient and determine its efficacy for a one-year follow-up period. Seventeen patients (7 male and 10 female, mean age: 63.7 +/- 11.6 SD) with acute hepatitis C were enrolled to our study. All of them were followed up for a period of one year after the diagnosis was established. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two separate HCV subtypes 1b, which were both responsible for this acute infection (see Figure 1). These types did not differ in their behavior on the clinical situation of our patients, as confirmed by the fact that in both groups of patients, there was only one patient who presented with acute illness. Six patients of our study group, three months after the acute infection, received pegylated interferon (Peg-IFNa2a) 135 mug for a six-month period. Four of them responded very well to therapy and at the first determination HCV RNA was below the cutoff point. One of our patients with very high HCV levels (HCV RNA > 50,000,000 IU/mL), despite receiving the same therapy, did not respond well and developed cirrhosis. In conclusion, it is clear from our experience that better information is needed about the current incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for HCV infection in dialysis patients. Algorithms for the diagnosis and management of hepatitis C should be developed by academic societies. Routine screening for hepatitis C also would allow

  6. High, broad, polyfunctional, and durable T cell immune responses induced in mice by a novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine candidate (MVA-HCV) based on modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the nearly full-length HCV genome.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carmen E; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Cepeda, María Victoria; Mingorance, Lidia; García-Arriaza, Juan; Vandermeeren, Andrea; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2013-07-01

    A major goal in the control of hepatitis C infection is the development of a vaccine. Here, we have developed a novel HCV vaccine candidate based on the highly attenuated poxvirus vector MVA (referred to as MVA-HCV) expressing the nearly full-length (7.9-kbp) HCV sequence, with the aim to target almost all of the T and B cell determinants described for HCV. In infected cells, MVA-HCV produces a polyprotein that is subsequently processed into the structural and nonstructural HCV proteins, triggering the cytoplasmic accumulation of dense membrane aggregates. In both C57BL/6 and transgenic HLA-A2-vaccinated mice, MVA-HCV induced high, broad, polyfunctional, and long-lasting HCV-specific T cell immune responses. The vaccine-induced T cell response was mainly mediated by CD8 T cells; however, although lower in magnitude, the CD4(+) T cells were highly polyfunctional. In homologous protocol (MVA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main CD8(+) T cell target was p7+NS2, whereas in heterologous combination (DNA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main target was NS3. Antigenic responses were also detected against other HCV proteins (Core, E1-E2, and NS4), but the magnitude of the responses was dependent on the protocol used. The majority of the HCV-induced CD8(+) T cells were triple or quadruple cytokine producers. The MVA-HCV vaccine induced memory CD8(+) T cell responses with an effector memory phenotype. Overall, our data showed that MVA-HCV induced broad, highly polyfunctional, and durable T cell responses of a magnitude and quality that might be associated with protective immunity and open the path for future considerations of MVA-HCV as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine candidate against HCV.

  7. High, Broad, Polyfunctional, and Durable T Cell Immune Responses Induced in Mice by a Novel Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Vaccine Candidate (MVA-HCV) Based on Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Expressing the Nearly Full-Length HCV Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Carmen E.; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Cepeda, María Victoria; Mingorance, Lidia; García-Arriaza, Juan; Vandermeeren, Andrea; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.

    2013-01-01

    A major goal in the control of hepatitis C infection is the development of a vaccine. Here, we have developed a novel HCV vaccine candidate based on the highly attenuated poxvirus vector MVA (referred to as MVA-HCV) expressing the nearly full-length (7.9-kbp) HCV sequence, with the aim to target almost all of the T and B cell determinants described for HCV. In infected cells, MVA-HCV produces a polyprotein that is subsequently processed into the structural and nonstructural HCV proteins, triggering the cytoplasmic accumulation of dense membrane aggregates. In both C57BL/6 and transgenic HLA-A2-vaccinated mice, MVA-HCV induced high, broad, polyfunctional, and long-lasting HCV-specific T cell immune responses. The vaccine-induced T cell response was mainly mediated by CD8 T cells; however, although lower in magnitude, the CD4+ T cells were highly polyfunctional. In homologous protocol (MVA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main CD8+ T cell target was p7+NS2, whereas in heterologous combination (DNA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main target was NS3. Antigenic responses were also detected against other HCV proteins (Core, E1-E2, and NS4), but the magnitude of the responses was dependent on the protocol used. The majority of the HCV-induced CD8+ T cells were triple or quadruple cytokine producers. The MVA-HCV vaccine induced memory CD8+ T cell responses with an effector memory phenotype. Overall, our data showed that MVA-HCV induced broad, highly polyfunctional, and durable T cell responses of a magnitude and quality that might be associated with protective immunity and open the path for future considerations of MVA-HCV as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine candidate against HCV. PMID:23596307

  8. Studies on the role of neutralizing antibodies against envelope genes in resolving HCV pseudo-particles infection.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Shazia; Idrees, Muhammad; Ali, Amjad; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of antibodies targeting the attachment and entry of the viral particles into host cells is important for studding antibody mediated neutralization. Antibodies against the envelope glycoproteins (EGP) have neutralizing capacity and can prevent HCV infections. System based on HCV pseudo typed-particles (HCVpp) stably expressing EGP can be used for screening of HCV anti envelope neutralizing antibodies in the serum of patients with acute and chronic HCV infections. The aim of the current study was to check HCVpp as a useful tool for the detection of anti-HCV envelope antibodies in the serum of HCV infected patients and to test the binding potential of these antiviral molecules to EGP of HCV 3a. Previously developed HCVpp harboring unmodified glycoproteins from local isolates in 293T cell line were used in this study. HCVpp were pre incubated with different concentrations of anti E1 antibody and different E2 antibodies to check antiviral activity. Further we used serum samples with low/medium (≤800,000 IU/mL), and high (>800,000 IU/mL) viral titer from chronic HCV male and female patients. Infection was done in Huh-7 cells for 1 h at 37 oC. Infectivity was checked through Luciferase assay. Considerable decrease in HCVpp infectivity with anti-envelope antibodies was observed in dose dependent manner. Maximum inhibition was seen when 5 µg/ml of monoclonal anti E1 antibody used. Further increase in concentration exhibited no decrease in infectivity which suggests that other factors are also involved in causing infection. Various well characterized E2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been screened for their capability to reduce infection in Huh-7 cells. Three of the four mAbs specific for the E2 had no effect on the infectivity of HCVpp. Confirmation sensitive antibody H53 showed maximum inhibition of infectivity. HCV ELISA positive samples from both male and female patients were used to neutralize the HCVpp. The neutralizing antibody response

  9. In situ hybridization for the detection of hepatitis C virus RNA in human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Li, K; Lea, A S; Li, N L; Abdulla, N E; Eltorky, M A; Ferguson, M R

    2013-03-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) enables visualization of specific nucleic acid in morphologically preserved cells and tissue sections. Detection of the HCV genomes in clinical specimens is useful for differential diagnosis, particularly between recurrent HCV infection and acute cellular rejection in transplant specimens. We optimized an ISH protocol that demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for detecting genomic and replicative form of HCV RNA in tissue biopsies. Digoxigenin (Dig)-labelled sense and anti-sense riboprobes were synthesized using a plasmid containing a fragment of the highly conserved HCV noncoding region as a template. The efficiency of the Dig-labelled riboprobes in detecting genomic and replicative-intermediate HCV RNA was analysed in 30 liver biopsies from patients infected or uninfected with HCV in a blinded study. A Huh7 cell line that stably replicates genome-length HCV RNA was developed to be used as a positive control. Negative control riboprobes were used in parallel to evaluate and control for background staining. The anti-sense probe detected HCV RNA in 20/21 specimens from HCV-infected liver tissues obtained from patients and in 0/9 samples from patients with non-HCV-related liver diseases, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 100%, respectively. HCV genomic RNA was variably distributed in tissue sections and was located primarily in the perinuclear regions in hepatocytes. Detection of HCV RNA by our optimized ISH protocol appears to be a sensitive and specific method when processing clinical specimens. It may also be revealing when exploring the pathophysiology of HCV infection by verifying the presence of viral genetic material within heptocytes and other cellular elements of diseased liver tissue. This methodology might also evaluate the response to antiviral therapies by demonstrating the absence or alteration of genetic material in clinical specimens from successfully treated patients.

  10. Acute hepatitis C: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Resat; Tahan, Veysel

    2009-04-01

    HCV can cause acute or chronic hepatitis and is a health problem all over the world. It is one of the leading causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is a common indication for liver transplantation. Unrecognized patients with HCV infection may transmit the virus to uninfected people. The acute form of the disease leads to chronic hepatitis in the majority of cases. Since the success rate of treatment given in the chronic phase is much lower than that given in the acute phase, recognizing acute hepatitis is critical. Although HCV is less prevalent since 1990s in the Western world after improved blood-donor screening programs, needle-exchange facilities and education among intravenous drug users, it is still endemic in some regions, including African countries, Egypt, Taiwan, China and Japan. Acute HCV infection may be a challenge for the clinician; since it is often asymptomatic, detection and diagnosis are usually difficult. After an incubation period of 7 weeks (2-12 weeks), only a minority of patients (10-15%) report symptoms. The spontaneous clearance of the virus is more frequent primarily during the first 3 months of clinical onset of the disease, but may occur anytime during the 6 months of acute infection. This spontaneous resolution seems to be more frequent in symptomatic cases. Viremia persisting more than 6 months is accepted as chronic infection. The virus is transmitted more frequently through infected blood or body fluids. Detection of antibodies against HCV is not a reliable method of diagnosing acute HCV infection since the appearance of antibodies against HCV can be delayed in up to 30% of patients at the onset of symptoms. Thus, the diagnosis of acute hepatitis C relies on the qualitative detection of HCV RNA, which may appear as early as 1-2 weeks after exposure quickly followed by highly elevated alanine aminotransferase. After a follow-up period of 8-12 weeks for allowing spontaneous resolution, treatment should be initiated

  11. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cryoglobulinemia: cryoglobulin type and anti-HCV profile.

    PubMed

    Minopetrou, Martha; Hadziyannis, Emilia; Deutsch, Melanie; Tampaki, Maria; Georgiadou, Asimina; Dimopoulou, Eleni; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios; Koskinas, John

    2013-05-01

    Cryoglobulin characteristics in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) might be of importance for knowing more about the pathogenesis and treatment of the disease. We aimed to investigate the relationship between cryoglobulin types and their specificity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigenic epitopes in CHC patients. We analyzed samples from 43 patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemia, of whom 4 had concomitant lymphoma. Cryoglobulins were measured, purified, typed by immunofixation electrophoresis, and tested for IgG and IgM anti-HCV antibodies by immunoblot analysis and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Clinical and other laboratory data were recorded. The median cryocrit level of the tested samples was 6%. Type I cryoglobulins were detected in 9.3% (4/43) of the cryoprecipitates, and type II cryoglobulins were detected in 48.8% (21/43) of the cryoprecipitates. IgM monoclonal protein, mainly IgM(κ), was found in 92% (23/25) of type I and II cryoprecipitates. Type III cryoglobulins were identified in 41.9% (18/43) of the patients and were associated with high blood serum IgG levels. In 81.3% (13/16) of type II and 92.3% (12/13) of type III cryoglobulins, there was IgG reactivity against the viral core region. Ninety-two percent and 32% of IgG anti-HCV core-positive cryoprecipitates had additional specificities against the NS3 and NS4 regions, respectively. Also, IgM anti-HCV antibodies were detected in 31% of the cryoprecipitates. In conclusion, all types of cryoglobulins were found in patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemia, with type II being the most frequently identified. Type III cryoglobulins were common and were associated with high serum IgG levels. HCV-related cryoglobulins demonstrated IgM, and particularly IgG, anti-HCV specificities, mainly against the core and NS3 epitopes.

  12. HBV/HCV co-infection is associated with a high level of HCV spontaneous clearance among drug users and blood donors in China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, H; Rong, X; Wang, M; Xu, R; Huang, K; Liao, Q; Huang, J; Chen, J; Li, C; Tang, X; Shan, Z; Zhang, M; Nelson, K; Fu, Y

    2016-12-12

    Understanding the biology of spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection could lead to improved strategies to prevent the sequelae associated with chronic HCV infection. Chronic infections with hepatitis virus are very common in China, but the factors associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV have not been adequately studied. We evaluated the spontaneous clearance of HCV among 1918 drug users and 1526 HCV-seropositive blood donors in Guangzhou, China. Among participants who were co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 41.38% of drug users and 39.47% of blood donors had cleared their HCV infection without antiviral therapy compared to 9.41% of drug users and 16.73% of blood donors who were mono-infected with a single virus (P<.01). The proportion of subjects who had cleared their HCV infection was significantly greater in the co-infected subjects whose serum HBV DNA was greater than 2000IU/mL than those with lower levels. A multiple logistic regression analysis found female gender, IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype, HBV co-infection and blood donors (vs drug users) associated with increased spontaneous clearance of HCV infection. Although acute HCV infections are common in China, the incidence of chronic HCV may be reduced among the high prevalence of chronic HBV and IL28B genotypes associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV in Chinese populations.

  13. Detecting polio through surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP).

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Jagdish; Ram, Madhav; Durrani, Sunita; Wenger, Jay

    2005-12-01

    Accurate surveillance for polio is essential for eradication. Surveillance systems for polio has been developed under the guidance of the global polio eradication initiative. Surveillance of cases of acute flaccid paralysis among children less than 15 years of age is a key component for a well functioning polio surveillance system. The surveillance system works through a network of surveillance medical officers, the responsibility of them lies in assisting the health services departments of all states and maintaining a network of acute flaccid paralysis reporting sites and rapidly investigating the cases. Surveillance activities begin when a child comes in contact with a healthcare provider who in turn informs the officer in charge of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance. The goal of the polio network laboratories is to provide accurate and timely results of wild poliovirus detection in stool samples of cases of acute flaccid paralysis. Strong linkages have been established between the acute flaccid paralysis surveillance system and the laboratory network. Laboratories complete poliovirus isolation and if poliovirus is isolated, these are submitted for intratypic differentiations. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in India has demonstrated that the eradication activities implemented in India led to dramatic reduction and restriction in the number of cases and geographic spread of poliovirus transmission.

  14. Indications for treatment in chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros

    2010-01-01

    HCV Infection is a global burden disease and it is related to the development of progressive liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. At least 80% of the persons that have an acute infection evolve to chronicity. This event affects the patient and their contacts for the risk of acquiring the infection. Once chronic HCV is present some factors accelerate progression: older age, obesity, alcohol consumption, etc. Severity of fibrosis is one of the most important factors to be analyzed before deciding to treat a patient. Pegylated interferon and ribavirin is the .standard of care. for this disease, however, it has many side effects, some of them life threatening. That is the reason why this treatment must be indicated in the right moment in the right patient. A complete medical evaluation must be done previously to initiate treatment. Other concurrent problems must be ruled out or treated. Decompensated cirrhosis, autoimmune diseases or other uncontrolled disease are contraindication to HCV treatment. Previous failure to treatment for HCV must be analyzed to identify the reasons for that event and consider retreatment. Cryoglobulinemia and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis are indications for treatment independent from the severity of liver disease.

  15. HCV and Oxidative Stress: Implications for HCV Life Cycle and HCV-Associated Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Regina; Ploen, Daniela; Hildt, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    HCV (hepatitis C virus) is a member of the Flaviviridae family that contains a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of approximately 9600 bases. HCV is a major causative agent for chronic liver diseases such as steatosis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma which are caused by multifactorial processes. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered as a major factor contributing to HCV-associated pathogenesis. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in formation of ROS in HCV replicating cells and describes the interference of HCV with ROS detoxifying systems. The relevance of ROS for HCV-associated pathogenesis is reviewed with a focus on the interference of elevated ROS levels with processes controlling liver regeneration. The overview about the impact of ROS for the viral life cycle is focused on the relevance of autophagy for the HCV life cycle and the crosstalk between HCV, elevated ROS levels, and the induction of autophagy. PMID:26955431

  16. Detection of Diphtheritic Polyneuropathy by Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance, India

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Sunil; Khera, Ajay; Sutter, Roland W.

    2013-01-01

    Diphtheritic polyneuropathy is a vaccine-preventable illness caused by exotoxin-producing strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. We present a retrospective convenience case series of 15 children (6 girls) <15 years of age (mean age 5.2 years, case-fatality rate 53%, and 1 additional case-patient who was ventilator dependent at the time of last follow-up; median follow-up period 60 days) with signs and symptoms suggestive of diphtheritic polyneuropathy. All cases were identified through national acute flaccid paralysis surveillance, which was designed to detect poliomyelitis in India during 2002–2008. We also report data on detection of diphtheritic polyneuropathy compared with other causes of acute flaccid paralysis identified by this surveillance system. PMID:23965520

  17. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies to the GOR autoepitope are present in patients with occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection despite lack of HCV-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Juan A; Castillo, Inmaculada; Bartolomé, Javier; Carreño, Vicente

    2007-10-01

    Antibody responses to the GOR autoepitope are frequently detected among anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV)-positive patients with chronic hepatitis. Sera from 110 anti-HCV-negative patients with occult HCV infection, as diagnosed by detection of HCV RNA in hepatic tissue, were investigated for GOR antibody reactivity. A positive test for anti-GOR immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found for 22 (20%) of them. The frequency and titers of anti-GOR IgG were significantly lower than those in chronic hepatitis C patients (70/110, 63.6%; P < 0.001). Anti-GOR IgG was not detected in any of the 120 patients with HCV-unrelated liver disease. The anti-GOR IgG assay showed specificity and sensitivity values of 100% and 20%, respectively, among the sera from patients with occult HCV infection; the positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 44.3%, respectively. None of the clinical, laboratory, or histological characteristics of the patients with occult HCV infection were different according to GOR antibody status, except that the percentage of HCV RNA-positive hepatocytes was significantly greater (P = 0.042) in patients with occult HCV infection who tested positive for anti-GOR IgG. In conclusion, serum anti-GOR IgG is present in patients with occult HCV infection, despite a lack of detectable HCV-specific antibodies as determined by commercial tests. Testing for anti-GOR IgG in patients in whom HCV RNA is not detected in their sera may help with the identification of a subset of patients with occult HCV infection without the need to perform a liver biopsy.

  18. 6 HCV Genotyping 9G Test and its Comparison with VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 Assay (LiPA) for the Hepatitis C Virus Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, Wasun; Song, Keum-Soo; GunHo, Choi; Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Thongbaiphet, Nipa; Wongtabtim, Garanyuta; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Angkanavin, Kanokwan; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Warkad, Shrikant Dasharath; Kim, Taisun

    2016-10-25

    In this article, we describe the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test and its evaluation by using clinical samples and plasmid DNA standards. In tests with 981 plasmid DNA standards, the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test showed higher than 92.5% sensitivity and 99.4% specificity. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test was compared with the VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA 2.0) for detection and discrimination of HCV genotypes in clinical samples. The results of both tests were verified by genomic sequencing. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test demonstrated a 100% agreement with the sequencing results, which was higher than LiPA 2.0. These results indicate that the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can be a reliable, sensitive, and accurate diagnostic tool for the correct identification of HCV genotypes in clinical specimens. 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can genotype six HCV types in 1 PCR in 30min after PCR amplification. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test, thus provide critical information to physicians and assist them to apply accurate drug regimen for the effective hepatitis C treatment.

  19. 6 HCV genotyping 9G test and its comparison with VERSANT HCV genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA) for the hepatitis C virus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, Wasun; Song, Keum-Soo; GunHo, Choi; Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Thongbaiphet, Nipa; Wongtabtim, Garanyuta; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Angkanavin, Kanokwan; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Warkad, Shrikant Dasharath; Kim, Taisun

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test and its evaluation by using clinical samples and plasmid DNA standards. In tests with 981 plasmid DNA standards, the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test showed higher than 92.5% sensitivity and 99.4% specificity. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test was compared with the VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA 2.0) for detection and discrimination of HCV genotypes in clinical samples. The results of both tests were verified by genomic sequencing. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test demonstrated a 100% agreement with the sequencing results, which was higher than LiPA 2.0. These results indicate that the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can be a reliable, sensitive, and accurate diagnostic tool for the correct identification of HCV genotypes in clinical specimens. 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can genotype six HCV types in 1 PCR in 30min after PCR amplification. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test, thus provide critical information to physicians and assist them to apply accurate drug regimen for the effective hepatitis C treatment.

  20. Gaining Greater Insight into HCV Emergence in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men: The HEPAIG Study

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christine; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Le Strat, Yann; Velter, Annie; Gervais, Anne; Aupérin, Isabelle; Alric, Laurent; Duval, Xavier; Miailhes, Patrick; Pioche, Corinne; Pol, Stanislas; Piroth, Lionel; Delarocque-Astagneau, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The HEPAIG study was conducted to better understand Hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission among human immuno-deficiency (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) and assess incidence of HCV infection among this population in France. Methods and Results Acute HCV infection defined by anti-HCV or HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) positivity within one year of documented anti-HCV negativity was notified among HIV-infected MSM followed up in HIV/AIDS clinics from a nationwide sampling frame. HIV and HCV infection characteristics, HCV potential exposures and sexual behaviour were collected by the physicians and via self-administered questionnaires. Phylogenetic analysis of the HCV-NS5B region was conducted. HCV incidence was 48/10 000 [95% Confidence Interval (CI):43–54] and 36/10 000 [95% CI: 30–42] in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Among the 80 men enrolled (median age: 40 years), 55% were HIV-diagnosed before 2000, 56% had at least one sexually transmitted infection in the year before HCV diagnosis; 55% were HCV-infected with genotype 4 (15 men in one 4d-cluster), 32.5% with genotype 1 (three 1a-clusters); five men were HCV re-infected; in the six-month preceding HCV diagnosis, 92% reported having casual sexual partners sought online (75.5%) and at sex venues (79%), unprotected anal sex (90%) and fisting (65%); using recreational drugs (62%) and bleeding during sex (55%). Conclusions This study emphasizes the role of multiple unprotected sexual practices and recreational drugs use during sex in the HCV emergence in HIV-infected MSM. It becomes essential to adapt prevention strategies and inform HIV-infected MSM with recent acute HCV infection on risk of re-infection and on risk-reduction strategies. PMID:22216248

  1. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8+ cells produce transforming growth factor beta that can suppress HCV-specific T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Alatrakchi, Nadia; Graham, Camilla S; van der Vliet, Hans J J; Sherman, Kenneth E; Exley, Mark A; Koziel, Margaret James

    2007-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T-cell responses are rarely detected in peripheral blood, especially in the presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Based on recent evidence that T-regulatory cells may be increased in chronic HCV, we hypothesized that functional blockade of regulatory cells could raise HCV-specific responses and might be differentially regulated in the setting of HIV coinfection. Three groups of subjects were studied: HCV monoinfected, HCV-HIV coinfected, and healthy controls. Frequencies of peripheral T cells specific for peptides derived from HCV core, HIV type 1 p24, and recall antigens were analyzed by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immuno-spot assay. HCV-specific T-cell responses were very weak in groups with HCV and HCV-HIV infections. Addition of blocking antibodies against transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), -2, and -3 and interleukin-10 specifically increased the HCV-specific T-cell responses in both infected groups; however, this increase was attenuated in the group with HCV-HIV coinfection compared to HCV infection alone. No increase in recall antigen- or HIV-specific responses was observed. Flow cytometric sorter analysis demonstrated that regulatory-associated cytokines were produced by HCV-specific CD3(+)CD8(+)CD25(-) cells. Enhancement of the IFN-gamma effect was observed for both CD4 and CD8 T cells and was mediated primarily by TGF-beta1, -2, and -3 neutralization. In conclusion, blockade of TGF-beta secretion could enhance peripheral HCV-specific T-cell responses even in the presence of HIV coinfection.

  2. From HCV To HBV Cure.

    PubMed

    Schinazi, Raymond F; Asselah, Tarik

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV and 350 million are chronically infected with HBV worldwide. It is estimated that more than one million patients die from complications related to chronic viral hepatitis, mainly HCC which is one of the most frequent cancers in many countries, especially Africa, the Middle East and Asia. HCV drug development has been impressive, and this revolution led to several direct-acting antiviral agents achieving an HCV cure after only 6-12 weeks. This progress could theorically lead to HCV global elimination making HCV and its consequences a rarity. HBV research and development programs can learn from the HCV experience, to achieve an HBV functional or sterilizing cure. This review will summarize key steps which have been realized for an HCV cure, and discuss the next steps to achieve for an HCV elimination. And also, how this HCV revolution has inspired scientists and clinicians to achieve the same for HBV.

  3. Rapid detection of hepatitis C virus RNA by a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin-qin; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Jin-song; Chen, Hao-tai; Du, Li; Wu, Li-qin; Ding, Yao-zhong; Xiong, Sheng-he; Huang, Xin-cheng; Zhang, Yin-hong; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2011-10-01

    The usefulness of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) for the rapid diagnosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was evaluated. This assay showed higher sensitivities than that of nested RT-PCR, with a detection limit of 600 IU mL(-1) , and no cross-reactivity was observed with hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis E virus. Furthermore, 106 stored sera from recently diagnosed cases were retrospectively investigated with real-time RT-PCR, the nested RT-PCR, in parallel with this new assay. The general detection rates of HCV RT-LAMP, real-time PCR and the nested RT-PCR for 106 stored sera samples were 95%, 96% and 88%, respectively. This study provides the first data on the usefulness of HCV RT-LAMP in the diagnosis of HCV RNA, especially in the early clinical diagnosis of acute HCV infection.

  4. Modeling HCV disease in animals: virology, immunology and pathogenesis of HCV and GBV-B infections.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Cordelia; Reeves, R Keith

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has become a global public health burden costing billions of dollars in health care annually. Even with rapidly advancing scientific technologies this disease still poses a significant threat due to a lack of vaccines and affordable treatment options. The immune correlates of protection and predisposing factors toward chronicity remain major obstacles to development of HCV vaccines and immunotherapeutics due, at least in part, to lack of a tangible infection animal model. This review discusses the currently available animal models for HCV disease with a primary focus on GB virus B (GBV-B) infection of New World primates that recapitulates the dual Hepacivirus phenotypes of acute viral clearance and chronic pathologic disease. HCV and GBV-B are also closely phylogenetically related and advances in characterization of the immune systems of New World primates have already led to the use of this model for drug testing and vaccine trials. Herein, we discuss the benefits and caveats of the GBV-B infection model and discuss potential avenues for future development of novel vaccines and immunotherapies.

  5. Occult HCV Infection: An Unexpected Finding in a Population Unselected for Hepatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    De Marco, Laura; Gillio-Tos, Anna; Fiano, Valentina; Ronco, Guglielmo; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Sacerdote, Carlotta

    2009-01-01

    Background Occult Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new pathological entity characterized by presence of liver disease and absence or very low levels of detectable HCV-RNA in serum. Abnormal values of liver enzymes and presence of replicative HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells are also observed. Aim of the study was to evaluate occult HCV occurrence in a population unselected for hepatic disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We chose from previous epidemiological studies three series of subjects (n = 276, age range 40–65 years) unselected for hepatic disease. These subjects were tested for the presence of HCV antibodies and HCV-RNA in plasma and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by using commercial systems. All subjects tested negative for HCV antibodies and plasma HCV-RNA and showed normal levels of liver enzymes; 9/276 patients (3.3%) were positive for HCV-RNA in PBMCs, identifying a subset of subjects with potential occult HCV infection. We could determine the HCV type for 8 of the 9 patients finding type 1a (3 patients), type 1b (2 patients), and type 2a (3 patients). Conclusions The results of this study show evidence that occult HCV infection may occur in a population unselected for hepatic disease. A potential risk of HCV infection spread by subjects harbouring occult HCV infection should be considered. Design of prospective studies focusing on the frequency of infection in the general population and on the clinical evolution of occult HCV infection will be needed to verify this unexpected finding. PMID:19956542

  6. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Lin, Jinyong; Weng, Guo-Xing; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapidly non-invasive technique with great potential for biomedical research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed on two groups of saliva samples: one group from patients (n=30) with confirmed AMI and the other group from healthy controls (n=31). The diagnostic performance for differentiating AMI saliva from normal saliva was evaluated by multivariate statistical analysis. The combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) of the measured Raman spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps, rendering the sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 80.6%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy of human saliva can serve as a potentially clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  8. HCV Diversity among Chinese and Burmese IDUs in Dehong, Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Duo, Lin; Li, Peilu; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Zhang, Chiyu

    2016-01-01

    HCV transmission is closely associated with drug-trafficking routes in China. Dehong, a prefecture of Yunnan, is the important trade transfer station linking Southeast Asia and China, as well as the drug-trafficking channel linking “Golden triangle” and other regions of China and surrounding countries. In this study, we investigated the HCV genotype diversity among IDUs in Dehong based on 259 HCV positive samples from 118 Chinese and 141 Burmese IDUs. HCV genotypes were determined based on the phylogenies of C/E2 and NS5B genomic sequences. Six HCV subtypes, including 1a, 1b, 3a, 3b, 6n and 6u, were detected. Interestingly, 4 HCV sequences from Burmese IDUs did not cluster with any known HCV subtypes, but formed a well-supported independent clade in the phylogenetic trees of both C/E2 and NS5B, suggesting a potential new HCV subtype circulating in Dehong. Subtype 3b was the predominant subtype, followed by subtypes 6n and 6u. Comparison showed that Dehong had a unique pattern of HCV subtype distribution, obviously different from other regions of China. In particular, HCV subtypes 6u and the potential new HCV subtype had a relatively high prevalence in Dehong, but were rarely detected in other regions of China. There was no significant difference in HCV subtype distribution between Burmese and Chinese IDUs. Few HCV sequences from Burmese and Chinese IDUs clustered together to form transmission clusters. Furthermore, about half of HCV sequences from Burmese IDUs formed small transmission clusters, significantly higher than that from Chinese IDUs (p<0.01). These suggest that the Chinese and Burmese IDUs were relatively isolated from each other in injection drug use behavior and the Burmese IDUs might prefer to inject drugs themselves together. The unique genotype distribution and complex diversity of genotype 6 among IDUs may be associated with the special geographical position of Dehong. PMID:27657722

  9. Detection of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Linda; Lightner, Donald; Pantoja, Carlos; Gomez-Jimenez, Silvia

    2014-08-21

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), which has also been referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS), initially emerged as a destructive disease of cultured shrimp species in Asia in 2009. The pathogen associated with the disease, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, subsequently spread to the Western Hemisphere and emerged in Mexico in early 2013. The spread to the Western Hemisphere is a major concern to shrimp producers in the region. To date, the only peer-reviewed published method for determining whether mortalities are due to AHPND is through histological examination. A novel PCR detection method was employed to assess samples from Mexico in order to confirm the presence of the pathogen in this country. This manuscript details the detection methods used to confirm the presence of AHPND in Mexico. Both immersion and per os challenge studies were used to expose the Penaeus vannamei to the bacteria in order to induce the disease. Histological analysis confirmed AHPND status following the challenge studies. Also provided are the details of the molecular test by PCR that was used for screening candidate V. parahaemolyticus isolates. A rapid PCR assay for detection of AHPND may help with early detection and help prevent the spread of AHPND to other countries.

  10. The prevalence of HTLV-1 and its Co-Infection with HCV, HBV and HIV in Hemophilic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ziaee, Masood; Namaei, Mohammad Hassan; Azarkar, Ghodseh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Blood-borne infections, such as the HIV virus and hepatitis B and C, are major problems in patients receiving blood products. Here we examined the prevalence of HTLV-1, HCV, HBV, and HIV in hemophilic patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study on 108 hemophilic patients (101 males and 7 females) involved detection of HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV-1 infections using immunoassays for HBsAg, hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBc), hepatitis C antibodies (anti-HCV), HIV antibodies (anti-HIV) and Anti-HTLV-1. Real-time PCR was used to measure HCV RNA, and HCV genotyping was performed by direct sequencing of the 5’ noncoding region. Results: Hemophilia A was reported in 93 (86%) patients with severe symptoms in 8 cases. The seroprevalence of anti-HCV and anti-HTLV-1 antibodies was 20% and 3% respectively. One patient with severe hemophilia had a HCV/HTLV-1 co-infection. HCV-RNA was detected in 82% of patients. In terms of genotyping prevalence was 56% HCV genotype 3a, 39% HCV genotype 1a, and 6% HCV genotype2. Anti HIV and HBsAg were not detected in any patient. HTLV1 prevalence was higher, HCV lower in South Khorasan than other regions in Iran or elsewhere. Conclusion: Management of transfusion of blood and blood products should account for the underlying prevalence of infectious agents. PMID:26649023

  11. Elevation of Alanine Aminotransferase Activity Occurs after Activation of the Cell-Death Signaling Initiated by Pattern-Recognition Receptors ‎but before Activation of Cytolytic Effectors in NK or CD8+ T Cells in the Liver During Acute HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youkyung H.; Jin, Nancy; Kelly, Fiona; Sakthivel, SenthilKumar K.; Yu, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) promote host defenses against HCV infection by binding to their corresponding adapter molecules leading to the initiation of innate immune responses including cell death. We investigated the expression of PRR genes, biomarkers of liver cell-death, and T cell and NK cell activation/inhibition-related genes in liver and serum obtained from three experimentally infected chimpanzees with acute HCV infection, and analyzed the correlation between gene expression levels and clinical profiles. Our results showed that expression of hepatic RIG-I, TLR3, TLR7, 2OAS1, and CXCL10 mRNAs was upregulated as early as 7 days post-inoculation and peaked 12 to 83 days post-inoculation. All of the three HCV infected chimpanzees exhibited significant elevations of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity between 70 and 95 days after inoculation. Elevated levels of serum cytokeratin 18 (CK-18) and caspases 3 and 7 activity coincided closely with the rise of ALT activity, and were preceded by significant increases in levels of caspase 3 and caspase 7 mRNAs in the liver. Particularly we found that significant positive auto-correlations were observed between RIG-I, TLR3, CXCL10, 2OAS1, and PD-L1 mRNA and ALT activity at 3 to 12 days before the peak of ALT activity. However, we observed substantial negative auto-correlations between T cell and NK cell activation/inhibition-related genes and ALT activity at 5 to 32 days after the peak of ALT activity. Our results indicated cell death signaling is preceded by early induction of RIG-I, TLR3, 2OAS1, and CXCL10 mRNAs which leads to elevation of ALT activity and this signaling pathway occurs before the activation of NK and T cells during acute HCV infection. Our study suggests that PRRs and type I IFN response may play a critical role in development of liver cell injury related to viral clearance during acute HCV infection. PMID:27788241

  12. Twenty-four mini-pool HCV RNA screening outside a blood transfusion setting: results of a 2-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Seme, Katja; Mocilnik, Tina; Fujs, Kristina; Babic, Dunja Z; Todorović, Aleksandra; Fras-Stefan, Tamara; Poljak, Mario

    2007-03-01

    The usefulness of 24 mini-pool hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA screening was evaluated in a 2-year prospective study carried out on a total of 6432 consecutive anti-HCV negative specimens in a routine diagnostic laboratory setting. A total of 268 mini-pools were tested using an automated commercial PCR assay for qualitative detection of HCV RNA, with a lower limit of detection of 50 IU/ml. Eighteen (0.28%) anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive serum samples obtained from 12 patients (all intravenous drug users), were detected. Ten patients responded to an invitation for follow-up testing. Five, three and one patient seroconverted in the first, second and third follow-up sample, respectively. One patient had not seroconverted by the end of the study period. The interval between the first HCV RNA positive sample and the first anti-HCV positive samples was 24-192 days. The costs of detecting a single anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive sample and a single anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive patient using the 24 mini-pool HCV RNA screening strategy were estimated to be around euro 643 and 965, respectively. It was shown that screening for HCV infection using the 24 mini-pool HCV RNA screening strategy can also be both useful and cost effective outside a blood transfusion setting.

  13. Inhibition of HCV Replication by Oxysterol-Binding Protein-Related Protein 4 (ORP4) through Interaction with HCV NS5B and Alteration of Lipid Droplet Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yahong; Liu, Ziqing; Ridgway, Neale D.; Kao, C. Cheng; He, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3’x RNA element within the HCV 3’ untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3’ X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4), a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis. PMID:24069433

  14. Occurrence of occult HCV infection among Hiv infected patients in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gatserelia, L; Sharvadze, L; Karchava, M; Dolmazashvili, E; Tsertsvadze, T

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C (OCI) infection has been known as detectable HCV-RNA in the liver or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the absence of detectable serum or plasma HCV-RNA. OCI has been detected among different patients groups worldwide, it has been found not only in chronic hepatitis patients of unknown origin, but also among several groups at risk for HCV infection (hemodialysis patients or family members of patients with occult HCV). This occult infection has been reported also in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease. Prevalence of occult Hepatitis C virus has not been investigated in Georgian population, where a rate of HCV infection is highest (6.7%) among Eastern European Countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of occult HCV infection among HIV infected individuals in Georgia. As a pilot study, we have selected three groups of HIV infected patients for analyses: Group 1- HIV infected patients without evidence of liver disease (n=98), group 2- HIV infected patients with cryptogenic liver disease (n=34) and group 3- HIV/HBV co infected patients (n=29). HCV RNA was tested in PBMCs samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotyping was performed by Line-probe assay based on reverse-hybridization technology. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by transient elastography (FibroScan®). HCV-RNA was detected in PBMCs specimens among 2 (2%) subjects from group 1, 4 (12%) subjects from group 2, and 9 (31%) subjects from group 3. HCV genotypes were determined for 14 of 15 OCI subjects resulting following genotype distribution: 6 (46%) - 1b, 3 (23%) - 2a/2c and 5 (38%) - 3a. One samples failed to be genotyped due to extremely low HCV viral load. Our data revealed the occurrence of occult HCV infection in HIV infected patients. No single HCV genotype was predominant in the present study. Liver fibrosis was found more frequently and the fibrosis score was significantly higher in OCI patients versus negative ones

  15. Priming and stimulation of hepatitis C virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells against HCV antigens NS4, NS5a or NS5b from HCV-naive individuals: implications for prophylactic vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Krishnadas, Deepa K; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Agrawal, Babita

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a devastating human pathogen, yet there is no vaccine available for this virus. From studies with acute or chronic HCV-infected humans and chimpanzees, T-cell responses against HCV-derived conserved non-structural antigens have been correlated with viral clearance. In this study, recombinant adenoviral vectors containing HCV-derived NS4, NS5a or NS5b genes were employed to endogenously express the HCV antigens in human dendritic cells (DCs). The DCs expressing these HCV antigens exhibited normal phenotype and function. Intriguingly, we found that the DCs expressing HCV NS4, NS5a or NS5b antigens were able to significantly stimulate autologous T cells obtained from uninfected healthy individuals. These T cells produced various cytokines and proliferated in an HCV antigen-dependent manner. Evidence of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses generated in vitro against HCV NS4, NS5a or NS5b were obtained. HCV NS4 was much less stimulatory for CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells than NS5. Further, in secondary assays, the CD4(+) T cells primed in vitro exhibited HCV antigen-specific proliferative responses against recombinant protein antigens. In summary, we provide conclusive evidence of in vitro stimulation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from HCV-naive individuals against HCV antigens NS4, NS5a and NS5b. The studies with naive T cells represent early events in the induction of cellular immune responses, which most likely govern the outcome of HCV infection. These studies have significant implications in designing vaccines for HCV infection in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings.

  16. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection.

  17. Hidden hazards of HCV transmission.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2011-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection is a global health problem that has important epidemiological and clinical consequences. It has been well established that exposure to infected blood is the main risk factor for HCV transmission. However, in 20% of cases the agent transmission occurs by unknown route or in the presence of an unidentified source of infection. Understanding of the epidemiology of HCV is needed to help us define future control and preventive strategies. Herein, we discuss about diagnosis of HCV infection and hepatitis C surveillance in the context of its transmission.

  18. High prevalence of human parvovirus 4 infection in HBV and HCV infected individuals in shanghai.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Jing; Hong, Liang; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been detected in blood and diverse tissues samples from HIV/AIDS patients who are injecting drug users. Although B19 virus, the best characterized human parvovirus, has been shown to co-infect patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV, HCV) infection, the association of PARV4 with HBV or HCV infections is still unknown.The aim of this study was to characterise the association of viruses belonging to PARV4 genotype 1 and 2 with chronic HBV and HCV infection in Shanghai.Serum samples of healthy controls, HCV infected subjects and HBV infected subjects were retrieved from Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) Sample Bank. Parvovirus-specific nested-PCR was performed and results confirmed by sequencing. Sequences were compared with reference sequences obtained from Genbank to derive phylogeny trees.The frequency of parvovirus molecular detection was 16-22%, 33% and 41% in healthy controls, HCV infected and HBV infected subjects respectively, with PARV4 being the only parvovirus detected. HCV infected and HBV infected subjects had a significantly higher PARV4 prevalence than the healthy population. No statistical difference was found in PARV4 prevalence between HBV or HCV infected subjects. PARV4 sequence divergence within study groups was similar in healthy subjects, HBV or HCV infected subjects.Our data clearly demonstrate that PARV4 infection is strongly associated with HCV and HBV infection in Shanghai but may not cause increased disease severity.

  19. Influence of HCV genotype and co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses to hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Capa, Laura; Soriano, Vincent; García-Samaniego, Javier; Nuñez, Marina; Romero, Miriam; Cascajero, Almudena; Muñoz, Fernando; González-Lahoz, Juan; Benito, José M

    2007-05-01

    The role of T-cells in clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) during acute infection is critical. The relevance of the immunological response in the control of HCV replication is less clear in chronic HCV infection. HCV-specific T-cell responses were examined in 92 interferon-naive individuals with chronic hepatitis C. A panel of 441 overlapping peptides spanning all expressed HCV proteins was used to measure HCV-specific T-cell responses, using flow cytometry after stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with different pools of these peptides. Most patients showed responses to at least one HCV protein, with NS5B for CD8(+) responses and E2 for CD4(+) responses identified most frequently. Both the prevalence and breadth of CD4(+) and CD8(+) responses were lower in co-infected patients, independently of the HCV genotype.

  20. SPR detection of cardiac troponin T for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pawula, Maria; Altintas, Zeynep; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2016-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor developed for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) in serum samples is reported in this work. An extensive optimisation of assay parameters was conducted to achieve optimal detection strategy. Both direct and sandwich immunoassay formats were investigated and optimised. The response obtained was enhanced further by the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated to the anti-cTnT detection antibody. A regeneration method was developed to enable the reuse of the SPR sensor for multiple sample application. The SPR immunosensor showed good reproducibility for cTnT detection in the concentration range of 25-1000 ng mL(-1) and 5-400 ng mL(-1) for the direct and sandwich assays in buffer, respectively. The linear regression analysis was performed and R(2) value was found as 0.99 for both assays. In order to optimise the sensor for serum analysis, nonspecific binding of serum proteins was reduced through the use of additives in the dilution buffer. To achieve greater sensitivity, the performance of the cTnT immunosensor sandwich assay in human serum was evaluated using non-modified and AuNP modified detector antibodies. A detection limit (LOD) for the immunosensor in 50% serum was assessed as 5 ng mL(-1) cTnT for the standard sandwich assay and 0.5 ng mL(-1) cTnT when using AuNP conjugated detector antibodies with a linear dynamic range of 0.5-40 ng mL(-1). The dissociation constant was found as 3.28 × 10(-9) M using Langmuir binding model which indicates high affinity between cTnT and its antibody. The proposed SPR immunosensor has a promising potential to be developed for point-of-care testing for the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This method can also be used for the rapid detection of biomarkers in central nervous system diseases.

  1. Synergistic effect of combined HIV/HCV immunogens: a combined HIV-1/HCV candidate vaccine induces a higher level of CD8+ T cell-immune responses in HLA-A2.1 mice.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Ali; Ghorbani, Masoud; Soare, Catalina; Mojibian, Majid; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2007-03-01

    Dual infections with HIV-1 and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) may proceed in concert to cause severe disease. HIV positive individuals that become infected with HCV advance more rapidly to AIDS than those that are infected with HIV-1 alone. In this study, HLA-A2.1 mice were immunized with a combination vaccine including HIV and HCV immunogens (polycistronic DNA + proteins) or vaccine containing either HIV or HCV immunogens. Mice immunized with the combined HIV/HCV regimen had similar antibody titers as the group receiving either the HIV-1 or HCV only regimen. Proliferative immune responses showed that mice receiving the combined HIV/HCV vaccine exhibited a three fold higher stimulation index (SI) to gp120 than mice immunized with the vaccine containing HIV alone. To determine whether our vaccine strategy induced Th1 or Th2 immune responses, IFN-gamma and IL-4/IL-5 were measured. The combined HIV/HCV vaccine induced a higher level of Th1 responses to HIV-1 gag protein compared with the other groups, as measured by IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, detection of IFN-gamma by ELISPOT assay demonstrated that the combined HIV/HCV vaccine group had increased numbers of spot forming cells (SFC) to HIV-gp120 peptides when compared to that of the HIV-1 only vaccine group. The combined HIV/HCV vaccine group also showed an increase in SFC to HCV-core peptides in comparison with the group receiving the HCV only vaccine. Intracellular IFN-gamma staining confirmed the ELISPOT results and demonstrated that the combined HIV/HCV group had significantly higher percentages of HIV and HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in comparison to the groups receiving the HIV or HCV vaccines. These results suggest a new approach to maximize vaccine efficacy against HIV and HCV.

  2. Acute hepatitis C in a chronically HIV-infected patient: Evolution of different viral genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Flichman, Diego; Kott, Veronica; Sookoian, Silvia; Campos, Rodolfo

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the molecular evolution of different viral genomic regions of HCV in an acute HCV infected patient chronically infected with HIV through a 42-month follow-up. METHODS: Serum samples of a chronically HIV infected patient that seroconverted to anti HCV antibodies were sequenced, from the event of superinfection through a period of 17 mo and in a late sample (42nd month). Hypervariable genomic regions of HIV (V3 loop of the gp120) and HCV (HVR-1 on the E2 glycoprotein gene) were studied. In order to analyze genomic regions involved in different biological functions and with the cellular immune response, HCV core and NS5A were also chosen to be sequenced. Amplification of the different regions was done by RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Confirmation of sequences was done on reamplified material. Nucleotide sequences of the different time points were aligned with CLUSTAL W 1.5, and the corresponding amino acid ones were deduced. RESULTS: Hypervariable genomic regions of both viruses (HVR1 and gp120 V3 loop) presented several nonsynonymous changes but, while in the gp120 V3 loop mutations were detected in the sample obtained right after HCV superinfection and maintained throughout, they occurred following a sequential and cumulative pattern in the HVR1. In the NS5A region of HCV, two amino acid changes were detected during the follow-up period, whereas the core region presented several amino acid replacements, once the HCV chronic infection had been established. CONCLUSION: During the HIV-HCV superinfection, each genomic region analyzed shows a different evolutionary pattern. Most of the nucleotide substitutions observed are non-synonymous and clustered in previously described epitopes, thus suggesting an immune-driven evolutionary process. PMID:12854149

  3. International diagnostic guidelines for patients with HCV-related extrahepatic manifestations. A multidisciplinary expert statement.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Zignego, Anna Linda; Arcaini, Luca; Roccatello, Dario; Antonelli, Alessandro; Saadoun, David; Desbois, Anne Claire; Sebastiani, Marco; Casato, Milvia; Lamprecht, Peter; Mangia, Alessandra; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Younossi, Zobair M; Cacoub, Patrice

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is responsible for both hepatic and extra-hepatic disorders (HCV-EHDs); these latter are correlated on one hand clearly with HCV lymphotropism causing immune-system dysregulation as well as with viral oncogenic potential, and on the other hand probably with chronic inflammatory status causing cardio-metabolic complications as well as neurocognitive disturbances. The spectrum of HCV-EHDs ranges from mild or moderate manifestations, such as arthralgia, sicca syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, to severe, life-threatening complications, mainly vasculitis and neoplastic conditions. Given the clinical heterogeneity of HCV-EHDs, HCV-infected individuals are inevitably referred to different specialists according to the presenting/prevalent symptom(s); therefore, the availability of comprehensive diagnostic guidelines is necessary for a patient's whole assessment that is decisive for early diagnosis and correct therapeutic approach of various hepatic and HCV-EHDs, regardless of the specific competencies of different physicians or referral centers. In this respect, a multidisciplinary network of experts, the International Study Group of Extrahepatic Manifestations Related to Hepatitis C Virus Infection (ISG-EHCV), was organized with the intention to formulate diagnostic guidelines for the work-up of possible HCV-EHDs. There was a broad consensus among ISG-EHCV members on the proposed guidelines, which essentially are based on two main levels of patient's assessment. At the referral stage, it is proposed that all patients with HCV infection should be invariably examined by means of first-line diagnostic procedures including virological and hepatic parameter evaluation, as well as the detection of clinical findings that may suggest one or more HCV-EHDs. This preliminary assessment should reveal specific HCV-EHDs, which will be deeper analyzed by means of second-line, targeted investigations. The proposed multidisciplinary expert statement

  4. Twenty-four mini-pool HCV RNA screening in a routine clinical virology laboratory setting: a six-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Seme, Katja; Mocilnik, Tina; Poljak, Mario

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of combined anti-HCV and 24 mini-pool HCV RNA screening strategy was re-evaluated after a six-year continuous routine use in a clinical virology laboratory, at which more than half of newly diagnosed hepatitis C patients are intravenous drug users. Pools of 24 samples were prepared from 20,448 anti-HCV negative serum samples and tested using an automated commercial PCR assay with a lower limit of detection of 50 IU/ml. After detection of anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive patients, responsible physicians provided follow-up samples. Thirty-eight (0.19%) anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive samples from 30 patients (28 intravenous drug users) were detected. Follow-up samples were available for 27/30 patients. Twenty, six and one patient seroconverted in the second, third and fourth available samples, respectively. The interval between the first HCV RNA positive and the first available anti-HCV positive sample was 17-517 days. The costs of detecting a single anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive patient were 1227 Euros. Combined anti-HCV and 24 mini-pool HCV RNA screening is a useful and cost effective strategy, not only in blood-transfusion settings but also in a routine clinical virology laboratory, at which a significant proportion of the tested population belongs to a high-risk population.

  5. HCV F protein amplifies the predictions of IL-28B and CTLA-4 polymorphisms about the susceptibility and outcomes of HCV infection in Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen; Zhang, Qi; Deng, Xiao Zhao; Jiang, Long Feng; Zhu, Dan Yan; Pei, Jia Ping; Ge, Chi Yu; Li, Bing Jun; Wang, Chang Jun; Zhang, Jing Hai; Zhou, Zhen Xian; Ding, Wei Liang; Xu, Xiao Dong; Yue, Ming

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4(CTLA-4) is an inhibitory receptor with great value in the progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection related diseases. To determine the potential associations of IL-28B rs12979860 and CTLA-4 rs231775, rs3087243 and rs5742909 polymorphisms with the generation of HCV F protein, susceptibility and outcomes of HCV infection, a total of 375 healthy controls, 219 HCV spontaneous recovered patients and 600 chronic HCV patients from Southeast China were recruited and genotyped in this study. And the relative mRNA levels of CTLA-4 in T cells were detected. Logistic regression analysis showed that rs231775 A allele was associated with significantly higher rate of spontaneous viral clearance in anti-HCV F antibody negative patients (adjusted OR=0.512, P=0.008), but allele A was related to higher mRNA level of CTLA-4 with the generation of HCV F protein. And rs5742909 T allele added up to the risk of HCV infection chronicity significantly in patients with the presence of HCV F protein (adjusted OR=2.698, P=0.003). Also, the rs5742909 CC genotype, along with the presence of HCV F protein, indicated a significantly higher CTLA-4 level than that in anti-HCV F antibody negative patients. The AG+AA genotype of rs3087243 significantly increased the susceptibility to HCV infection in subjects over 56 years old (adjusted OR=1.595, P=0.011). Genotype-genotype interaction between IL-28B rs12979860 and CTLA-4 rs3087243 was found to be significantly associated with increased susceptibility to HCV infection (adjusted OR=1.509, P=0.005). Haplotype analysis in CTLA-4 also showed significant association with the generation of HCV F protein. All these results indicated the importance of IL-28B and CTLA-4 polymorphisms and their associations with HCV F protein in the risk and chronicity of HCV infection in Chinese Han population in Southeast China.

  6. Proteomics of HCV virions reveals an essential role for the nucleoporin Nup98 in virus morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lussignol, Marion; Kopp, Martina; Molloy, Kelly; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Fleck, Roland A.; Bell, Kierstin L.; Chait, Brian T.; Rice, Charles M.; Catanese, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a unique enveloped virus that assembles as a hybrid lipoviral particle by tightly interacting with host lipoproteins. As a result, HCV virions display a characteristic low buoyant density and a deceiving coat, with host-derived apolipoproteins masking viral epitopes. We previously described methods to produce high-titer preparations of HCV particles with tagged envelope glycoproteins that enabled ultrastructural analysis of affinity-purified virions. Here, we performed proteomics studies of HCV isolated from culture media of infected hepatoma cells to define viral and host-encoded proteins associated with mature virions. Using two different affinity purification protocols, we detected four viral and 46 human cellular proteins specifically copurifying with extracellular HCV virions. We determined the C terminus of the mature capsid protein and reproducibly detected low levels of the viral nonstructural protein, NS3. Functional characterization of virion-associated host factors by RNAi identified cellular proteins with either proviral or antiviral roles. In particular, we discovered a novel interaction between HCV capsid protein and the nucleoporin Nup98 at cytosolic lipid droplets that is important for HCV propagation. These results provide the first comprehensive view to our knowledge of the protein composition of HCV and new insights into the complex virus–host interactions underlying HCV infection. PMID:26884193

  7. Consensus siRNA for inhibition of HCV genotype-4 replication

    PubMed Central

    Zekri, Abdel Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; El-Din, Hanaa M Alam; Salama, Hosny M

    2009-01-01

    Background HCV is circulating as a heterogeneous group of quasispecies. It has been addressed that siRNA can inhibit HCV replication in-vitro using HCV clone and/or replicon which have only one genotype. The current study was conducted to assess whether siRNA can inhibit different HCV genotypes with many quasispecies and to assess whether consensus siRNA have the same effect as regular siRNA. Methods We generated two chemically synthesized consensus siRNAs (Z3 and Z5) which cover most known HCV genotype sequences and quasispecies using Ambium system. Highly positive HCV patient's serum with nine quasispecies was transfected in-vitro to Huh-7 cell line which supports HCV genotype-4 replication. siRNA (Z3&Z5) were transfected according to Qiagen Porta-lipid technique and subsequently cultured for eight days. HCV replication was monitored by RT-PCR for detection of plus and minus strands. Real-time PCR was used for quantification of HCV, whereas detection of the viral core protein was performed by western blot. Results HCV RNA levels decreased 18-fold (P = 0.001) and 25-fold (P = 0.0005) in cells transfected with Z3 and Z5, respectively, on Day 2 post transfection and continued for Day 3 by Z3 and Day 7 by Z5. Reduction of core protein expression was reported at Day 2 post Z3 siRNA transfection and at Day 1 post Z5 siRNA, which was persistent for Day 4 for the former and for Day 6 for the latter. Conclusion Consensus siRNA could be used as a new molecular target therapy to effectively inhibit HCV replication in the presence of more than one HCV quasispecies. PMID:19173711

  8. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  9. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA in non-A, non-B chronic hepatitis in France. Nucleotide sequence of a French HCV isolate.

    PubMed

    Kremsdorf, D; Porchon, C; Brechot, C

    1991-01-01

    The sera of 36 French patients with post-transfusional and sporadic non-A, non-B (NANB) chronic hepatitis were investigated, with a combination of serological and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, for HBV and HCV infections. Eighty-nine percent of the patients were found positive with serological and/or molecular tests. Among the positive patients, 68% (22/32) were found positive for both anti-HCV and HCV-RNA, 16% (5/32) and 16% (5/32) were found positive only for anti-HCV or HCV-RNA, respectively. HBV-DNA sequences were detected in two patients associated to the HCV viraemia. This study confirms the extremely high prevalence of HCV infection in NANB chronic hepatitis in France. It also shows the possible co-infection by HCV and HBV in NANB hepatitis. We have also determined the nucleotide sequence of the 5' non-coding, E1, E2/NS1 and NS3/NS4 regions of a French isolate using the polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of these nucleotide sequences with those available from American and Japanese isolates showed a significant genetic variability. The genetic variability is higher in the E2/NS1 (13 to 33% and 12 to 30% at the nucleic acid and amino acid level, respectively) than in the E1 (10 to 28% and 7 to 21%) and NS3/NS4 (5 to 21% and 2 to 7%) regions. The sequence of the French isolate is more closely related to that of the American HCV prototype than to the Japanese HCV isolates. This study confirms the extent of HCV genetic variability.

  10. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  11. Active co-infection with HBV and/or HCV in South African HIV positive patients due for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Musyoki, Andrew M; Msibi, Thembeni L; Motswaledi, Mojakgomo H; Selabe, Selokela G; Monokoane, Tshweu S; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) share routes of transmission. There is limited data on the incidence of active co-infection with HBV and/or HCV in cancer patients infected with HIV in Africa. This was a prospective study based on 34 patients with varied cancer diagnosis, infected with HIV and awaiting cancer therapy in South Africa. HIV viral load, CD4+ cell counts, Alanine-aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were tested. Exposure to HBV and HCV was assessed serologically using commercial kits. Active HBV and/or HCV co-infection was detected using viral specific nested PCR assays. HCV 5'-UTR PCR products were sequenced to confirm active HCV infection. Active viral infection was detected in 64.7% of patients for HBV, 38.2% for HCV, and 29.4% for both HBV and HCV. Occult HBV infection was observed in 63.6% of the patients, while seronegative HCV infection was found in 30.8% of patients. In addition, CD4+ cell count < 350 cells/µl was not a risk factor for increased active HBV, HCV or both HBV and HCV co-infections. A total of 72.7%, 18.2% and 9.1% of the HCV sequences were assigned genotype 5, 1 and 4 respectively.The study revealed for the first time a high active HBV and/or HCV co-infection rate in cancer patients infected with HIV. The findings call for HBV and HCV testing in such patients, and where feasible, appropriate antiviral treatment be indicated, as chemotherapy or radiotherapy has been associated with reactivation of viral hepatitis and termination of cancer therapy.

  12. Torque Teno Midi Virus/Small Anellovirus in Sera of Healthy, HIV/HCV and HIV Infected Individuals in Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fatholahi, Maryam; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Torque Teno Midi Virus/Small Anellovirus (TTMDV/SAV) is a member of the Gammatorquevirus genus within the family Anelloviridae. It is detected in healthy, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and HIV infected individuals and also patients with acute respiratory disease in different countries, but its role in clinical diseases and its full geographical distribution is still unclear. Objectives: The current study aimed to detect the frequency of infection with TTMDV/SAV in the sera of healthy blood donors, hepatitis C infected and HIV positive individuals in Lorestan province, Iran; and also investigate the possible role of TTMDV/SAV virus in liver diseases. Materials and Methods: Fifty two, 36, 4, and 110 serum samples from HIV positive, patients with HIV/HCV and HIV/HCV/HBV co-infections, and healthy individuals were collected in Khorramabad city, respectively. Nested-polymerase chain reaction was performed using SMAs/SMAr primers to detect TTMDV/SAV DNA. Serum aminotransferases were measured. Results: In the HIV/HCV, HIV/HCV/HBV, HIV, and control cases, 29 (80.5%), 3 (75%), 43 (82.7%), and 16 (14.5%) were positive for DNA of TTMDV/SAV, respectively. In the HIV/HCV infected cases and HIV positive cases the level of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were not significantly different in TTMDV/SAV infected and non-infected individuals (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Although significant differences (P < 0.01) were observed in the frequency of TTMDV/SAV between healthy controls and each of the HIV positive and HIV/HCV co-infected individuals, no significant difference was observed between HIV positive and HIV/HCV co-infected cases, which may be due to HIV associated immunodeficiency. This is the first time that TTMDV/SAV is reported in HIV infected individuals worldwide. Interpretation of the high frequency of the virus (82.7%) in HIV cases needs more detailed studies. PMID:26862377

  13. Analysis of a successful HCV-specific CD8+ T cell response in patients with recurrent HCV-infection after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gruener, Norbert Hubert; Jung, Maria-Christina; Ulsenheimer, Axel; Gerlach, Joern Tilman; Zachoval, Reinhart; Diepolder, Helmut Michael; Baretton, Gustavo; Schauer, Rolf; Pape, Gerd Rudolf; Schirren, Carl Albrecht

    2004-12-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells play a major role in antiviral immune defenses; their significance in the transplant setting, however, is unclear. In the present study, we asked whether hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8+ T cells were detectable in the presence of an immunosuppressive treatment and whether the HCV-specific CD8+ T cell response correlates with treatment outcome in patients who receive interferon (IFN)-alpha / ribavirin therapy after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLTx). Liver- and blood-derived T cell lines of 21 patients after OLTx were studied before, at the end of, and after antiviral treatment. Virus-specific IFN-gamma production in response to a panel of previously identified HCV-specific epitopes restricted by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules A2, A3, B7, B35, and B44 of structural and nonstructural HCV protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. Before treatment, only low numbers of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells were detectable. In 6 patients with a sustained virological response, a significant, multispecific, and sustained CD8+ T cell response was detectable, which was mainly found in the peripheral blood. Nonresponders and transient responders showed undetectable, weak, or transient HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses. (Sustained responders vs. transient and nonresponders: Wilcoxon rank-signed test; P < .01). In conclusion, our data indicate that despite immunosuppression, HCV-specific CD8+ T cells are detectable in patients with recurrent HCV infection after OLTx and that a significant, multispecific, and long-lasting HCV-specific CD8+ T cell response contributes to viral elimination.

  14. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-10-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  15. Impact of HCV kinetics on treatment outcome differs by the type of real-time HCV assay in NS3/4A protease inhibitor-based triple therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Furusyo, Norihiro; Murata, Masayuki; Hayashi, Takeo; Shimizu, Motohiro; Mukae, Haru; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Hotta, Taeko; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Hayashi, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Repeated measurement of the HCV RNA level is essential for properly monitoring treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of two HCV real-time assays in the evaluation of the impact of hepatitis C virus (HCV) kinetics on the outcome of triple therapy with NS3/4A protease inhibitors (PIs), telaprevir or simeprevir. This study consisted of 171 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1. All 3266 serum samples taken during and post treatment were tested with both the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HCV Test v2.0 and the Abbott RealTime (ART) HCV Test. Of the 2597 samples undetectable (lower limit of detection [HCV RNA by the CAP/CTM assay from the on and post treatment, 400 (15.4%) (369 detectable/less than the lower limitation of quantification [detectable by the ART assay. HCV RNA < LOD within the first four weeks by ART was associated with sustained virological response (SVR) for the difficult-to-treat group that included patients with advanced fibrosis or prior partial/null response. In contrast, for the non-difficult-to-treat group, almost all of the late responders by ART achieved SVR, unlike by CAP/CTM. Despite HCV RNA being once < LOD by ART, 33.1% patients experienced the reappearance of residual HCV RNA (detectable/HCV RNA after 12 weeks (without PI-treatment period). The superior ability to detect low-level HCV RNA by ART could be useful for predicting SVR by difficult-to-treat patients in the early period and relapse in the late period.

  16. Oral administration of genetically modified Bifidobacterium displaying HCV-NS3 multi-epitope fusion protein could induce an HCV-NS3-specific systemic immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Takei, Saki; Omoto, Chika; Kitagawa, Koichi; Morishita, Naoya; Katayama, Takane; Shigemura, Katsumi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kawabata, Masato; Hotta, Hak; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2014-05-23

    More than 170 million people worldwide are chronic HCV (Hepatitis C virus) carriers, and about 30% of them will develop progressive liver disease, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A combination of pegylated interferon-α with ribavirin, the standard treatment for HCV infection, has been effective in fewer than 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1. A strong T cell response against the nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is important for recovery from acute HCV infection, and an early multi-specific CD4+ helper and CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response is critical for HCV clearance. In the present study, we successfully constructed a genetically modified Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) displaying recombinant HCV-NS3 peptides containing some CD4 and CD8 epitopes located in the HCV-NS3 region as an oral vaccine against chronic HCV infection. The oral administration of this vaccine could induce NS3-specific immune responses in mice through intestinal mucosal immunity. Our findings suggest that this novel oral vaccine has great potential as a novel oral vaccine against chronic HCV infection.

  17. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masahiko; Kusunoki, Hideki; Mochida, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Mizuochi, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:21789042

  18. Risky exposures and national estimate of HCV seroprevalence among school children in urban Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Wahab, Ekram W; Abdel Maksoud, Ahmed; Shatat, Hanan Z; Kotkat, Amira M

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world, particularly in Egypt. Limited data are available concerning the national seroprevalence and the possible modes of transmission of HCV in the pediatric age group. The aim of this study was to obtain a better estimate of the national hepatitis C seroprevalence and the possible risky exposures among healthy school children in Alexandria; the second biggest city in Egypt. HCV knowledge and counseling for school children were also investigated. A total of 500 school children, age between 6 and 15 years were evaluated for HCV seropositivity and interviewed for potential disease risk factors. The seropositivity for Anti-HCV Ab was 2.8 %. About 71.4 % of seropositive children were 10-15 years old. Urban residence, chronic disease, male circumcision and invasive procedures were detected as significant risk factors for acquiring HCV infection among the studied children. The level of awareness of hepatitis C among school children was very low (3.6 %) and was correlated with the age and educational level. HCV infection continues to occur in children and is frequently unrecognized. This mandates immediate intervention and robust control strategies in the settings of exposure combined with health education programs to limit further HCV spread.

  19. Detection of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection in Patients with Dengue Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa Carmina; Carrillo-Navarrete, Jaquelin; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Salazar, Ma. Isabel; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Coinfection produced by dengue virus (DENV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a serious problem of public health in Mexico, as they both circulate in tropical zones and may lead to masking or complicating symptoms. In this research, we detected active coinfected patients by HCV residing in the endemic city of Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico, with positive diagnosis to dengue during the acute phase. We performed a retrospective analysis of 240 serum samples from dengue patients. The IgM-ELISA serological test was used for dengue diagnosis, as well as viral isolation to confirm infection. DENV and HCV were detected by RT-PCR. Thus, 31 (12.9%) samples showed DENV-HCV coinfection, but interestingly the highest frequency of coinfection cases was found in male patients presenting hemorrhagic dengue in 19/31 (61.29%), with a predominance of 12 : 7 in males. Firstly, coinfection of DENV-HCV in Mérida, Mexico, was detected in young dengue patients, between 11 and 20 years old (38.7%), followed by those between 21 and 30 years old (32%); only 16.13% were between 0 and 10 years of age. Diagnosis of HCV infection in patients with dengue is highly recommended in order to establish potential risk in clinical manifestations as well as dictate patients' special care. PMID:24949433

  20. Detection of hepatitis C virus coinfection in patients with dengue diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa Carmina; Carrillo-Navarrete, Jaquelin; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Salazar, Ma Isabel; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Puerto, Fernando I; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Coinfection produced by dengue virus (DENV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a serious problem of public health in Mexico, as they both circulate in tropical zones and may lead to masking or complicating symptoms. In this research, we detected active coinfected patients by HCV residing in the endemic city of Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico, with positive diagnosis to dengue during the acute phase. We performed a retrospective analysis of 240 serum samples from dengue patients. The IgM-ELISA serological test was used for dengue diagnosis, as well as viral isolation to confirm infection. DENV and HCV were detected by RT-PCR. Thus, 31 (12.9%) samples showed DENV-HCV coinfection, but interestingly the highest frequency of coinfection cases was found in male patients presenting hemorrhagic dengue in 19/31 (61.29%), with a predominance of 12 : 7 in males. Firstly, coinfection of DENV-HCV in Mérida, Mexico, was detected in young dengue patients, between 11 and 20 years old (38.7%), followed by those between 21 and 30 years old (32%); only 16.13% were between 0 and 10 years of age. Diagnosis of HCV infection in patients with dengue is highly recommended in order to establish potential risk in clinical manifestations as well as dictate patients' special care.

  1. Dynamic of Mixed HCV Infection in Plasma and PBMC of HIV/HCV Patients Under Treatment With Peg-IFN/Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Di Serio, Clelia; Trentini, Filippo; Andolina, Andrea; Hasson, Hamid; Messina, Emanuela; Merli, Marco; Porrino, Lucy; Lazzarin, Adriano; Morsica, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The extent of mixed hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype in different compartments (plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell, PBMC) and possible association with treatment efficacy in HIV/HCV coinfected patients remains to be unknown. The objective of this study was to elucidate the frequency of mixed genotype infection (MG), its profile in different compartments during anti-HCV treatment, and the possible influence of different genotypes on the response rate. The compartmentalization of HCV population was investigated by next-generation sequencing in 19 HIV/HCV coinfected patients under anti-HCV treatment with peginterferon/ribavirin (P–R). Ten individuals were nonresponder (NR) or relapser (RE) to P–R treatment and 9 had a sustained virological response (SVR). Eleven/nineteen (58%) patients had MG in plasma compartment. Ten or 12 patients infected by a difficult to treat genotype (DTG) 1 or 4 as dominant strain, had an MG, whereas only 1/7 individuals infected by easy to treat genotype (ETG) harbored a mixed genotype, P = 0.006. HCV–RNA was more frequently detected in PBMC of NR (10/10) than in those of SVR (5/9), P = 0.032. Mixed genotype infection was detected in 6/15 (40%) PBMC-positive cases and was not associated with P–R treatment response. By multivariate analysis, MG in plasma samples was the most important viral factor affecting the treatment response (P = 0.0237). Detection of MG in plasma of HIV/HCV coinfected patients seems to represent the major determinant of response to P–R treatment. This finding may have important clinical implication in light of the new therapeutic approach in HIV/HCV coinfected individuals suggesting that combination treatment with direct acting antivirals could be less effective in MG. PMID:26512601

  2. [Extrahepatic symptoms of HCV infection].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Ramírez, Juan Ramón

    2002-10-01

    Numerous extrahepatic manifestations have been reported in association with hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection, including mixed cryoglobulinemia, porphyria cutanea tarda, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and a high prevalence of autoantibodies. The aims of the present paper is to present the prevalence of clinical and biologic extrahepatic manifestation and to identify associations between these manifestation. The prevalence of dermatologic, rheumatologic, neurological, and nephrologic manifestations, diabetes, arterial hypertension, autoantibodies, and cryoglobulins and liver histologic factors associated with the presence of extrahepatic manifestations reported in the literature.

  3. HCV infection through perforating and cutting material among candidates for blood donation in Belém, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Valois, Rubenilson Caldas; Maradei-Pereira, Luciana Maria Cunha; Crescente, José Ângelo Barletta; Oliveira-Filho, Aldemir Branco de; Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated epidemiological factors for HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments among candidates for blood donation (CBD) in the city of Belém, Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Two definitions of HCV infection cases were used: anti-HCV positivity shown by EIA, and HCV-RNA detection by PCR. Infected and uninfected CBD completed a questionnaire about possible risk factors associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments. The information was evaluated using simple and multiple logistic regressions. Between May and November 2010, 146 (1.1%) persons with anti-HCV antibodies and 106 (0.8%) with HCV-RNA were detected among 13,772 CBD in Belém. Risk factors associated with HCV infection based on the EIA (model 1) and PCR (model 2) results were: use of needles and syringes sterilized at home; shared use of razors at home, sharing of disposable razors in barbershops, beauty salons etc.; and sharing manicure and pedicure material. The models of HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments should be taken into account by local and regional health authorities and by those of other countries with similar cultural practices, in order to provide useful information to guide political and public strategies to control HCV transmission.

  4. Schistosoma mansoni: a diagnostic approach to detect acute schistosomiasis infection in a murine model by PCR.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Nidia; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Lopez Aban, Julio; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Gárate, Teresa; Muro, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Schistosomiasis represents an increasing problem in non-endemic areas, due to the growing number of immigrants and to tourists contracting this disease in "off-the-beaten-track" tourism. Acute schistosomiasis is not diagnosed early due to the lack of diagnostic tools that are sufficiently sensitive enough to detect the parasite during the first weeks of infection. We have developed a diagnostic approach based on the detection of parasite DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in urine, comparing the performance of this new approach with the two currently used schistosomiasis diagnostic tools (Kato-Katz and ELISA) and the PCR in stool samples. This comparison was done in a Schistosoma mansoni murine experimental model, which permits follow up of the parasite from the acute to the chronic stage of infection. Our results suggest that this new PCR-based approach could be useful for the detection of acute schistosomiasis in easy-to-handle clinical samples such the urine.

  5. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  6. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA by a combined reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Young, K K; Resnick, R M; Myers, T W

    1993-01-01

    Amplification of RNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is normally a two-step process requiring separate enzymes and buffer conditions. We describe a combined reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA amplification in which a single enzyme and buffer condition are used. In this assay, both the RT and PCR steps are carried out with the thermoactive DNA polymerase of Thermus thermophilus. A transcription vector containing HCV sequences has also been constructed to generate quantifiable HCV RNA templates that can be used to optimize reaction conditions and to assess the efficiency of amplification. Amplification from < or = 100 copies of RNA was detected reproducibly by gel electrophoresis. The assay sensitivity was increased to 10 RNA copies by hybridization to a probe. The patterns of viremia in three individuals infected with HCV were examined by amplification of HCV RNA from plasma samples collected serially over a period of 1 year. These results were correlated with the times of seroconversion and the onset of rise in levels of alanine aminotransferase in serum. In all three subjects, HCV RNA was detected prior to seroconversion and the initial rise in levels of alanine aminotransferase in serum. Upon seroconversion, HCV RNA fell to a level below the detection limit of the assay. This pattern of transient viremia appears to be characteristic of acute, resolving HCV infections. The combined RT-PCR assay is a sensitive method which circumvents the problems associated with PCR amplification of RNA. Using this assay, we demonstrated that three donors infected by the same index case all have similar patterns of viremia. Images PMID:8385151

  7. The roles of endoplasmic reticulum overload response induced by HCV and NS4B protein in human hepatocyte viability and virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbao; Li, Shanshan; Huang, Mingjie; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Qinghua; Ye, Li; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Xiangdong; Sun, Ruina; Guo, Yunli

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its infection triggers ER stress. In response to ER stress, ER overload response (EOR) can be activated, which involves the release of Ca2+ from ER, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We have previously reported that HCV NS4B expression activates NF-κB via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Here, we showed that NS4B expression and HCV infection activated cancer-related NF-κB signaling pathway and induced the expression of cancer-related NF-κB target genes via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Moreover, we found that HCV-activated EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway had profound effects on host cell viability and HCV replication. HCV infection induced human hepatocyte death by EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway, whereas activation of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway increased the cell viability. Meanwhile, EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway inhibited acute HCV replication, which could alleviate the detrimental effect of HCV on cell viability and enhance chronic HCV infection. Together, our findings provide new insights into the functions of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway in natural HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  8. Prevalence and Incidence of HCV Infection among Prisoners in Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Larissa Melo; de Rezende, Grazielli Rocha; Dorisbor, Luiz Fernando Paiva; Tanaka, Tayana Serpa Ortiz; Cesar, Gabriela Alves; Novais, Alisson Richard Teixeira; Nepomuceno, Bruna; Castro, Lisie Souza; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this multicenter, cross sectional study was to assess the prevalence, incidence and associated risk factors among incarcerated populations from twelve Brazilian prisons. The total of 3,368 individuals from twelve prisons was randomly recruited between March 2013 and March 2014. Participants were interviewed, and provided blood samples which were tested for antibodies to Hepatitis C (HCV ab). One year after the first investigation, a cohort study was conducted with 1,656 inmates who participated the cross sectional study. Positive samples were tested for the presence of HCV RNA. Out of 3,368 inmates, 520 (15.4%) were females, and 2,848 (84.6%) were males. The overall prevalence of HCV was 2.4% (95% CI: 1.9 to 2.9), with 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4 to 0.8) in females, and 2.7% (95% CI: 2.1 to 3.3) in males (p<0.01). HCV RNA was detected in 51/80 (63.7%) samples. Among men prisoners, multivariate analysis of associated factors showed independent associations between HCV exposure and increasing age, inject drug use, length of incarceration, smoking hashish, sharing needle and syringe and HIV positivity. During the cohort study, 7/1,656 new cases of HCV infection were detected, and the incidence rate was 0.4/100 person-year. Once high frequency rates of specific HCV risk behaviors and new HCV infections have been identified inside prisons, effective interventions strategies such as screening, clinical evaluation and treatment to reduce the spread of HCV infection are essential. PMID:28060860

  9. Modulation of HCV replication after combination antiretroviral therapy in HCV/HIV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Kenneth E; Guedj, Jeremie; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Blackard, Jason T; Rouster, Susan D; Castro, Mario; Feinberg, Judith; Sterling, Richard K; Goodman, Zachary; Aronow, Bruce J; Perelson, Alan S

    2014-07-23

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients co-infected with HIV. Co-infection results in increased HCV replication and more rapid rates of liver disease progression. The effect of HIV combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on HCV replication has not been studied in depth. To address this issue, we enrolled a small cohort of HCV/HIV co-infected patients into a cART initiation trial and used dynamic modeling combined with evaluation of immune responses and microarray profiles to determine how effective treatment of HIV affects HCV. Treatment with cART resulted in increased HCV replication and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in a subset of patients. Subjects with evidence of hepatic injury (increased ALT) were more likely to have HCV-specific immune responses directed against HCV epitopes. Over time, HCV viral loads declined. Reproducible and biologically important gene expression changes occurred in co-infected patients who underwent successful cART. The effective suppression of HIV by cART initiated a cascade of early and late events in treated patients. Early events involving down-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes may have led to transiently increased viral replication and hepatic injury. At later time points, HCV viral load declined to levels comparable to those seen in the setting of HCV monoinfection. These findings support early antiretroviral therapy in those with HCV/HIV co-infection.

  10. Risk factors of delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children: for early detection of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jea Yeon; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Hann, Tchah; Kim, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the risk factors of a delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children undergoing an appendectomy. Methods This retrospective study involved children aged below 18 years, who underwent an appendectomy. After dividing them into a delayed diagnosis group and nondelayed diagnosis group according to the time interval between the initial hospital visit and final diagnosis, the risk factors of delayed diagnosis were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results Among 712 patients, 105 patients (14.7%) were classified in the delayed diagnosis group; 92 patients (12.9%) were diagnosed using ultrasonography (US), and both US and computed tomography were performed in 38 patients (5.3%). More patients in the delayed diagnosis group underwent US (P=0.03). Spring season and prior local clinic visit were significantly associated with a delayed diagnosis. Fever and diarrhea were more common in the delayed diagnosis group (fever: odds ratio [OR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.81; diarrhea: OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.08–3.46; P<0.05). These patients showed symptoms for a longer duration (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.78–3.78; P<0.05), and the admission course (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.11–1.44; P<0.05) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.19–1.82; P<0.05) were associated with the delayed diagnosis. Conclusion To decrease the rate of delayed diagnoses of acute appendicitis, symptoms such as fever and diarrhea, seasonal variations, admission course, and CRP levels should be considered and children with a longer duration of symptoms should be closely monitored. PMID:27721841

  11. Risk Factors Associated with HCV among Opioid-dependent Patients in a Multisite Study

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, M.; Hser, Y.; Saxon, A.; Evans, E.; Li, L.; Huang, D.; Hillhouse, M.; Thomas, C.; Ling, W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined risk factors associated with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among opioid-dependent patients enrolled into medication-assisted therapy (buprenorphine or methadone) to determine factors affecting chronic infection. Patients (N=1,039) were randomized as part of a larger, multisite clinical trial sponsored by the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network assessing liver function. HCV status was first assessed with an antibody screen; if positive, then current infection was determined with an antigen screen testing for detectable virus. Patients were classified as HCV negative, HCV positive but have cleared the virus, or as having chronic HCV. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine demographic and behavioral correlates of the three groups. Thirty-four percent of patients were classified with chronic infection and 14% had evidence of prior infection with apparent clearing of the virus. Chronic infection was associated with recent injection drug use and cocaine use. Chronic HCV infection was also associated with being older and Hispanic. Age, ethnicity, and current drug use increase the likelihood of being chronically infected with HCV. Strategies targeting high risk subgroups can aid in preventing further disease escalation. PMID:25814381

  12. Immunochemical evaluation of two Toxoplasma gondii GRA8 sequences to detect acute toxoplasmosis infection.

    PubMed

    Costa, Juan Gabriel; Duré, Andrea Belén

    2016-11-01

    In this work, two Toxoplasma gondii GRA8 protein sequences were tested by indirect ELISA and measurement of avidity to differentiate between acute and chronic toxoplasmosis infection. Using the antigen called GRA8B, 79.7% sensitivity and 84.1% specificity was achieved detecting IgG concentrations and a 71.2% sensitivity and a 68.3% specificity detecting IgA concentrations. This study is the first to report IgA detection with GRA8 by ELISA to differentiate stages of infection. Unfortunately the indirect ELISA to detect IgM was not effective in distinguishing stages. Also, this work is the first to report that the GRA8 protein can aid the differentiation between acute and chronic phase infection by measuring IgG antibody avidity, a technique in which we obtained 85.71% and 100% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Finally, in silico tools were used to explain the differences in our immunochemistry results.

  13. Polyfunctional HCV-specific T-cell responses are associated with effective control of HCV replication.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Donatella; Comte, Denis; Cavassini, Matthias; Giostra, Emiliano; Bühler, Leo; Perruchoud, Monika; Heim, Markus H; Battegay, Manuel; Genné, Daniel; Mulhaupt, Beat; Malinverni, Raffaele; Oneta, Carl; Bernasconi, Enos; Monnat, Martine; Cerny, Andreas; Chuard, Christian; Borovicka, Jan; Mentha, Gilles; Pascual, Manuel; Gonvers, Jean-Jacques; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Dutoit, Valérie

    2008-10-01

    HCV infection has a severe course of disease in HIV/HCV co-infection and in liver transplant recipients. However, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we evaluated functional profiles of HCV-specific T-cell responses in 86 HCV mono-infected patients, 48 HIV/HCV co-infected patients and 42 liver transplant recipients. IFN-gamma and IL-2 production and ability of CD4 and CD8 T cells to proliferate were assessed after stimulation with HCV-derived peptides. We observed that HCV-specific T-cell responses were polyfunctional in HCV mono-infected patients, with presence of proliferating single IL-2-, dual IL-2/IFN-gamma and single IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ and dual IL-2/IFN-gamma and single IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ cells. In contrast, HCV-specific T-cell responses had an effector profile in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals and liver transplant recipients with absence of single IL-2-producing HCV-specific CD4+ and dual IL-2/IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ T cells. In addition, HCV-specific proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was severely impaired in HIV/HCV co-infected patients and liver transplant recipients. Importantly, "only effector" T-cell responses were associated with significantly higher HCV viral load and more severe liver fibrosis scores. Therefore, the present results suggest that immune-based mechanisms may contribute to explain the accelerated course of HCV infection in conditions of HIV-1 co-infection and liver transplantation.

  14. A meta-analysis of the existing knowledge of immunoreactivity against hepatitis C virus (HCV).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Vaughan, Kerrie; Greenbaum, Jason; Peters, Bjoern; Law, Mansun; Sette, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 3% of the world population is infected by HCV, which represents a major global health challenge. Almost 400 different scientific reports present immunological data related to T cell and antibody epitopes derived from HCV literature. Analysis of all HCV-related epitope hosted in the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), a repository of freely accessible immune epitope data, revealed more than 1500 and 1900 distinct T cell and antibody epitopes, respectively. The inventory of all data revealed specific trends in terms of the host and the HCV genotypes from which sequences were derived. Upon further analysis we found that this large number of epitopes reflects overlapping structures, and homologous sequences derived from different HCV isolates. To access and visualize this information we developed a novel strategy that assembles large sets of epitope data, maps them onto reference genomes and displays the frequency of positive responses. Compilation of the HCV immune reactivity from hundreds of different studies, revealed a complex and thorough picture of HCV immune epitope data to date. The results pinpoint areas of more intense reactivity or research activities at the level of antibody, CD4 and CD8 responses for each of the individual HCV proteins. In general, the areas targeted by the different effector immune functions were distinct and antibody reactivity was positively correlated with hydrophilicity, while T cell reactivity correlated with hydrophobicity. At the sequence level, epitopes frequently recognized by both T cell and B cell correlated with low variability, and our analysis thus highlighted areas of potential interest for practical applications. The human reactivity was further analyzed to pinpoint differential patterns of reactivity associated with acute versus chronic infection, to reveal the apparent impact of glycosylation on T cell, but not antibody responses, and to highlight a paucity of studies involved antibody epitopes associated with

  15. Operational Failures Detected by Frontline Acute Care Nurses.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathleen R; Engh, Eileen P; Tubbs-Cooley, Heather; Conley, Deborah Marks; Cupit, Tammy; D'Errico, Ellen; DiNapoli, Pam; Fischer, Joleen Lynn; Freed, Ruth; Kotzer, Anne Marie; Lindgren, Carolyn L; Marino, Marie Ann; Mestas, Lisa; Perdue, Jessica; Powers, Rebekah; Radovich, Patricia; Rice, Karen; Riley, Linda P; Rosenfeld, Peri; Roussel, Linda; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Searle-Leach, Linda; Shonka, Nicole M; Smith, Vicki L; Sweatt, Laura; Townsend-Gervis, Mary; Wathen, Ellen; Withycombe, Janice S

    2017-03-15

    Frontline nurses encounter operational failures (OFs), or breakdowns in system processes, that hinder care, erode quality, and threaten patient safety. Previous research has relied on external observers to identify OFs; nurses have been passive participants in the identification of system failures that impede their ability to deliver safe and effective care. To better understand frontline nurses' direct experiences with OFs in hospitals, we conducted a multi-site study within a national research network to describe the rate and categories of OFs detected by nurses as they provided direct patient care. Data were collected by 774 nurses working in 67 adult and pediatric medical-surgical units in 23 hospitals. Nurses systematically recorded data about OFs encountered during 10 work shifts over a 20-day period. In total, nurses reported 27,298 OFs over 4,497 shifts, a rate of 6.07 OFs per shift. The highest rate of failures occurred in the category of Equipment/Supplies, and the lowest rate occurred in the category of Physical Unit/Layout. No differences in OF rate were detected based on hospital size, teaching status, or unit type. Given the scale of this study, we conclude that OFs are frequent and varied across system processes, and that organizations may readily obtain crucial information about OFs from frontline nurses. Nurses' detection of OFs could provide organizations with rich, real-time information about system operations to improve organizational reliability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Impact of HIV on HCV Immune Responses and Its Association with Liver Disease Progression in a Unique Plasma Donor Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, Ushani S.; Lawrence, Tessa M.; Peng, Yan-Chun; Liu, Jinghua; Xu, Keyi; Hu, Ke; Qin, Ling; Liu, Ning; Sun, Huanqin; Yan, Hui-Ping; Repapi, Emmanouela; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; McKeating, Jane A.; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-1 infected patients. Our understanding of the impact of HIV infection on HCV specific immune responses and liver disease outcome is limited by the heterogeneous study populations with genetically diverse infecting viruses, varying duration of infection and anti-viral treatment. Methods Viral-specific immune responses in a cohort of 151 HCV mono- and HIV co-infected former plasma donors infected with a narrow source of virus were studied. HCV and HIV specific T cell responses were correlated with clinical data. Results HIV-1 accelerated liver disease progression and decreased HCV specific T cell immunity. The magnitude of HCV specific T cell responses inversely correlated with lower HCV RNA load and reduced liver injury as assessed by non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis. HIV co-infection reduced the frequency of HCV specific CD4+ T cells with no detectable effect on CD8+ T cells or neutralizing antibody levels. Conclusion Our study highlights the impact of HIV co-infection on HCV specific CD4+ T cell responses in a unique cohort of patients for both HCV and HIV and suggests a crucial role for these cells in controlling chronic HCV replication and liver disease progression. PMID:27455208

  17. Acute myocarditis with normal wall motion detected with 2D speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Niel, Johannes; Aichinger, Josef; Ebner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present the case of a 26-year-old male with acute tonsillitis who was referred for coronary angiography because of chest pain, elevated cardiac biomarkers, and biphasic T waves. The patient had no cardiovascular risk factors. Echocardiography showed no wall motion abnormalities and no pericardial effusion. 2D speckle tracking revealed distinct decreased regional peak longitudinal systolic strain in the lateral and posterior walls. Ischemic disease was extremely unlikely in view of his young age, negative family history regarding coronary artery disease, and lack of regional wall motion abnormalities on the conventional 2D echocardiogram. Coronary angiography was deferred as myocarditis was suspected. To confirm the diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) was performed, showing subepicardial delayed hyperenhancement in the lateral and posterior walls correlating closely with the strain pattern obtained by 2D speckle tracking echocardiography. With a working diagnosis of acute myocarditis associated with acute tonsillitis, we prescribed antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The patient’s clinical signs resolved along with normalization of serum creatine kinase (CK) levels, and the patient was discharged on the third day after admission. Learning points Acute myocarditis can mimic acute coronary syndromes.Conventional 2D echocardiography lacks specific features for detection of subtle regional wall motion abnormalities.2D speckle tracking expands the scope of echocardiography in identifying myocardial dysfunction derived from edema in acute myocarditis. PMID:27249814

  18. Identification of a Novel Drug Lead That Inhibits HCV Infection and Cell-to-Cell Transmission by Targeting the HCV E2 Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Al Olaby, Reem R.; Cocquerel, Laurence; Zemla, Adam; Saas, Laure; Dubuisson, Jean; Vielmetter, Jost; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Khan, Abdul Ghafoor; Catalan, Felipe Vences; Perryman, Alexander L.; Freundlich, Joel S.; Forli, Stefano; Levy, Shoshana; Balhorn, Rod; Azzazy, Hassan M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infects 200 million individuals worldwide. Although several FDA approved drugs targeting the HCV serine protease and polymerase have shown promising results, there is a need for better drugs that are effective in treating a broader range of HCV genotypes and subtypes without being used in combination with interferon and/or ribavirin. Recently, two crystal structures of the core of the HCV E2 protein (E2c) have been determined, providing structural information that can now be used to target the E2 protein and develop drugs that disrupt the early stages of HCV infection by blocking E2’s interaction with different host factors. Using the E2c structure as a template, we have created a structural model of the E2 protein core (residues 421–645) that contains the three amino acid segments that are not present in either structure. Computational docking of a diverse library of 1,715 small molecules to this model led to the identification of a set of 34 ligands predicted to bind near conserved amino acid residues involved in the HCV E2: CD81 interaction. Surface plasmon resonance detection was used to screen the ligand set for binding to recombinant E2 protein, and the best binders were subsequently tested to identify compounds that inhibit the infection of Huh-7 cells by HCV. One compound, 281816, blocked E2 binding to CD81 and inhibited HCV infection in a genotype-independent manner with IC50’s ranging from 2.2 µM to 4.6 µM. 281816 blocked the early and late steps of cell-free HCV entry and also abrogated the cell-to-cell transmission of HCV. Collectively the results obtained with this new structural model of E2c suggest the development of small molecule inhibitors such as 281816 that target E2 and disrupt its interaction with CD81 may provide a new paradigm for HCV treatment. PMID:25357246

  19. Identification of a Novel Drug Lead That Inhibits HCV Infection and Cell-to-Cell Transmission by Targeting the HCV E2 Glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Al Olaby, Reem R.; Cocquerel, Laurence; Zemla, Adam; Saas, Laure; Dubuisson, Jean; Vielmetter, Jost; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Khan, Abdul Ghafoor; Catalan, Felipe Vences; Perryman, Alexander L.; Freundlich, Joel S.; Forli, Stefano; Levy, Shoshana; Balhorn, Rod; Azzazy, Hassan M.

    2014-10-30

    We report that Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infects 200 million individuals worldwide. Although several FDA approved drugs targeting the HCV serine protease and polymerase have shown promising results, there is a need for better drugs that are effective in treating a broader range of HCV genotypes and subtypes without being used in combination with interferon and/or ribavirin. Recently, two crystal structures of the core of the HCV E2 protein (E2c) have been determined, providing structural information that can now be used to target the E2 protein and develop drugs that disrupt the early stages of HCV infection by blocking E2’s interaction with different host factors. Using the E2c structure as a template, we have created a structural model of the E2 protein core (residues 421–645) that contains the three amino acid segments that are not present in either structure. Computational docking of a diverse library of 1,715 small molecules to this model led to the identification of a set of 34 ligands predicted to bind near conserved amino acid residues involved in the HCV E2: CD81 interaction. We used surface plasmon resonance detection to screen the ligand set for binding to recombinant E2 protein, and the best binders were subsequently tested to identify compounds that inhibit the infection of Huh-7 cells by HCV. One compound, 281816, blocked E2 binding to CD81 and inhibited HCV infection in a genotype-independent manner with IC50’s ranging from 2.2 µM to 4.6 µM. 281816 blocked the early and late steps of cell-free HCV entry and also abrogated the cell-to-cell transmission of HCV. Collectively the results obtained with this new structural model of E2c suggest the development of small molecule inhibitors such as 281816 that target E2 and disrupt its interaction with CD81 may provide a new paradigm for HCV treatment.

  20. Identification of a Novel Drug Lead That Inhibits HCV Infection and Cell-to-Cell Transmission by Targeting the HCV E2 Glycoprotein

    DOE PAGES

    Al Olaby, Reem R.; Cocquerel, Laurence; Zemla, Adam; ...

    2014-10-30

    We report that Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infects 200 million individuals worldwide. Although several FDA approved drugs targeting the HCV serine protease and polymerase have shown promising results, there is a need for better drugs that are effective in treating a broader range of HCV genotypes and subtypes without being used in combination with interferon and/or ribavirin. Recently, two crystal structures of the core of the HCV E2 protein (E2c) have been determined, providing structural information that can now be used to target the E2 protein and develop drugs that disrupt the early stages of HCV infection by blocking E2’smore » interaction with different host factors. Using the E2c structure as a template, we have created a structural model of the E2 protein core (residues 421–645) that contains the three amino acid segments that are not present in either structure. Computational docking of a diverse library of 1,715 small molecules to this model led to the identification of a set of 34 ligands predicted to bind near conserved amino acid residues involved in the HCV E2: CD81 interaction. We used surface plasmon resonance detection to screen the ligand set for binding to recombinant E2 protein, and the best binders were subsequently tested to identify compounds that inhibit the infection of Huh-7 cells by HCV. One compound, 281816, blocked E2 binding to CD81 and inhibited HCV infection in a genotype-independent manner with IC50’s ranging from 2.2 µM to 4.6 µM. 281816 blocked the early and late steps of cell-free HCV entry and also abrogated the cell-to-cell transmission of HCV. Collectively the results obtained with this new structural model of E2c suggest the development of small molecule inhibitors such as 281816 that target E2 and disrupt its interaction with CD81 may provide a new paradigm for HCV treatment.« less

  1. Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection impairs HCV-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity through Mcl-1/Bim imbalance due to CD127 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Larrubia, J R; Lokhande, M U; García-Garzón, S; Miquel, J; González-Praetorius, A; Parra-Cid, T; Sanz-de-Villalobos, E

    2013-02-01

    In persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, HCV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reactivity is impaired and this affects HCV control. Interleukin-7 receptor (CD127) expression on these cells could regulate CTL reactivity through Mcl-1/Bim balance modulation. Bim is a pro-apoptotic molecule blocked by the action of Mcl-1. Mcl-1/Bim expression and T cell reactivity on HCV-specific CTLs were compared according to CD127 phenotype. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from HLA-A2(+) HCV(+) patients were obtained. HCV-specific CTLs were visualized by staining PBL with anti-CD8 and HLA-A2/peptide pentameric complexes (pentamer). Mcl-1/Bim/CD127 phenotype of HCV-specific CTLs was tested by staining detectable CD8(+)/pentamer(+) cells with anti-Mcl-1/Bim/CD127 antibodies. HCV-specific CTL proliferation ability after specific in vitro challenge was tested in the presence and absence of pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. All stained cells were analysed by flow cytometry. CD127(low)-expressing HCV-specific CTLs associated with high HCV viraemia, while CD127(high) correlated with undetectable viral loads (P < 0.001). Directly ex vivo, pentamer(+) cell frequency was similar according to CD127 expression level. Nevertheless, CD127(low) pentamer(+) cell proliferation after specific in vitro challenge was impaired (P < 0.05), although this was corrected by z-VAD-fmk treatment (P < 0.05). Mcl-1 expression was low directly ex vivo (P < 0.01), and Bim was up-regulated after antigen encounter (P < 0.05) of CD127(low) pentamer(+) cells. The ex vivo difference between Mcl-1 and Bim expression on pentamer(+) cells correlated positively with CD127 expression level (P < 0.001) and with pentamer(+) cell reactivity (P < 0.05). In summary, a low ex vivo Mcl-1 expression and Bim up-regulation after antigen encounter are involved in CD127(low) HCV-specific CTL hyporeactivity during chronic infection, but it can be overcome by apoptosis blockade.

  2. Impact of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Sarcasm Detection.

    PubMed

    Deliens, Gaétane; Stercq, Fanny; Mary, Alison; Slama, Hichem; Cleeremans, Axel; Peigneux, Philippe; Kissine, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that sleep plays a pivotal role on health, cognition and emotional regulation. However, the interplay between sleep and social cognition remains an uncharted research area. In particular, little is known about the impact of sleep deprivation on sarcasm detection, an ability which, once altered, may hamper everyday social interactions. The aim of this study is to determine whether sleep-deprived participants are as able as sleep-rested participants to adopt another perspective in gauging sarcastic statements. At 9am, after a whole night of sleep (n = 15) or a sleep deprivation night (n = 15), participants had to read the description of an event happening to a group of friends. An ambiguous voicemail message left by one of the friends on another's phone was then presented, and participants had to decide whether the recipient would perceive the message as sincere or as sarcastic. Messages were uttered with a neutral intonation and were either: (1) sarcastic from both the participant's and the addressee's perspectives (i.e. both had access to the relevant background knowledge to gauge the message as sarcastic), (2) sarcastic from the participant's but not from the addressee's perspective (i.e. the addressee lacked context knowledge to detect sarcasm) or (3) sincere. A fourth category consisted in messages sarcastic from both the participant's and from the addressee's perspective, uttered with a sarcastic tone. Although sleep-deprived participants were as accurate as sleep-rested participants in interpreting the voice message, they were also slower. Blunted reaction time was not fully explained by generalized cognitive slowing after sleep deprivation; rather, it could reflect a compensatory mechanism supporting normative accuracy level in sarcasm understanding. Introducing prosodic cues compensated for increased processing difficulties in sarcasm detection after sleep deprivation. Our findings support the hypothesis that sleep deprivation might

  3. Impact of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Sarcasm Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Alison; Slama, Hichem; Cleeremans, Axel; Peigneux, Philippe; Kissine, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that sleep plays a pivotal role on health, cognition and emotional regulation. However, the interplay between sleep and social cognition remains an uncharted research area. In particular, little is known about the impact of sleep deprivation on sarcasm detection, an ability which, once altered, may hamper everyday social interactions. The aim of this study is to determine whether sleep-deprived participants are as able as sleep-rested participants to adopt another perspective in gauging sarcastic statements. At 9am, after a whole night of sleep (n = 15) or a sleep deprivation night (n = 15), participants had to read the description of an event happening to a group of friends. An ambiguous voicemail message left by one of the friends on another's phone was then presented, and participants had to decide whether the recipient would perceive the message as sincere or as sarcastic. Messages were uttered with a neutral intonation and were either: (1) sarcastic from both the participant’s and the addressee’s perspectives (i.e. both had access to the relevant background knowledge to gauge the message as sarcastic), (2) sarcastic from the participant’s but not from the addressee’s perspective (i.e. the addressee lacked context knowledge to detect sarcasm) or (3) sincere. A fourth category consisted in messages sarcastic from both the participant’s and from the addressee’s perspective, uttered with a sarcastic tone. Although sleep-deprived participants were as accurate as sleep-rested participants in interpreting the voice message, they were also slower. Blunted reaction time was not fully explained by generalized cognitive slowing after sleep deprivation; rather, it could reflect a compensatory mechanism supporting normative accuracy level in sarcasm understanding. Introducing prosodic cues compensated for increased processing difficulties in sarcasm detection after sleep deprivation. Our findings support the hypothesis that sleep

  4. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  5. Increasing risk of cataract in HCV patients receiving anti-HCV therapy: A nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Ju, Shu-Woei; Wang, I-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased systemic oxidative stress, which leads to cardiovascular events, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Similarly, cataract is also associated with increased oxidative stress. The association between HCV infection and increased risk of cataract remains unclear. Methods A total of 11,652 HCV-infected patients and 46,608 age- and sex-matched non-HCV infected patients were identified during 2003–2011. All patient data were tracked until a diagnosis of cataract, death, or the end of 2011. Cumulative incidences and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated. Results The mean follow-up durations were 5.29 and 5.86 years for the HCV and non-HCV cohorts, respectively. The overall incidence density rate for cataract was 1.36 times higher in the HCV cohort than in the non-HCV cohort (1.86 and 1.37 per 100 person-y, respectively). After adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease, and anxiety, patients with HCV infection had an increased risk of cataract compared with those without HCV infection [adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–1.32]. HCV-infected patients receiving interferon–ribavirin therapy had a 1.83 times higher (95% CI = 1.40–2.38) risk of cataract than non-HCV infected patients did. Conclusion HCV infection, even without the complication of cirrhosis, is associated with an increased risk of cataract, and this risk is higher in HCV-infected patients undergoing interferon–ribavirin therapy. PMID:28264004

  6. Molecular signature in HCV-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    De Re, Valli; Caggiari, Laura; Garziera, Marica; De Zorzi, Mariangela; Repetto, Ombretta

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive, single-stranded RNA virus, which has been associated to different subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Cumulative evidence suggests an HCV-related antigen driven process in the B-NHL development. The underlying molecular signature associated to HCV-related B-NHL has to date remained obscure. In this review, we discuss the recent developments in this field with a special mention to different sets of genes whose expression is associated with BCR coupled to Blys signaling which in turn was found to be linked to B-cell maturation stages and NF-κb transcription factor. Even if recent progress on HCV-B-NHL signature has been made, the precise relationship between HCV and lymphoma development and phenotype signature remain to be clarified.

  7. Single Nucleotide rs760370 Polymorphism at the Main Ribavirin Transporter Gene Detection by PCR-RFLP Assay Compared with the TaqMan Assay and Its Relation to Sustained Virological Response in Chronic HCV Patients Treated with Pegylated Interferon-Ribavirin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Rabab; Zachariah, Khaled; Khairy, Marwa; Khorshied, Mervat; Ezzat, Wafaa; Sheta, Marwa M; Heiba, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Ribavirin clearly plays a role in chronic hepatitis C treatment response. The equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 codified by SLC29A1 gene has been associated with ribavirin uptake into hepatocytes and erythrocytes. rs760370A>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the SLC29A1 gene may have a role in ribavirin-based regimen treatment response. Accuracy of the polymerase-chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay compared with the TaqMan assay for the detection of the SNP rs760370 at the main ribavirin transporter gene and its relation to sustained virological response in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients treated with pegylated interferon-ribavirin therapy. The study included 100 chronic HCV patients who were treated with pegylated interferon-ribavirin therapy. The patients were categorized according to the treatment response into responders (50 patients) and null responders (50 patients). rs760370 SNP was measured using TaqMan 5-nuclease assay and by the newly developed PCR-based RFLP assay. The overall accuracy of the newly developed PCR-RFLP assay compared with the TaqMan assay for rs760370 polymorphism detection was 100%. Allelic frequencies at rs760370 were as follows: A/A genotype (28%), A/G genotype (58%), and G/G genotype (14%). Treatment response was not significantly related with rs760370 polymorphism (P = 0.5). Ribavirin-induced anemia was good predictor of sustained virological response (P = 0.001), but was not related to rs760370 polymorphism (P = 0.92). PCR-RFLP assay is an accurate, cost-effective method in the detection of rs760370 compared with TaqMan assay. rs760370 SNP cannot serve as predictor of response in chronic HCV patients treated with interferon ribavirin therapy.

  8. Modulation of HCV reinfection after orthotopic liver transplantation by fibroblast growth factor-2 and other non-interferon mediators

    PubMed Central

    Van, Nguyen Dinh; Falk, Christine S; Sandmann, Lisa; Vondran, Florian W R; Helfritz, Fabian; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P; Ciesek, Sandra; von Hahn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective In HCV infected individuals graft infection occurs shortly after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We aimed to describe the composition of the inflammatory response at this time, how it affects the HCV replication cycle and identify novel proviral and antiviral factors. Design We used a Luminex assay to quantify 50 inflammatory mediators in sera before and shortly after OLT. In vitro grown HCV based on the JFH-1 isolate were used to characterise the effects of patient sera and individual mediators on HCV. Results Although the mediator composition is highly variable between individuals, sera drawn immediately post-OLT significantly enhance HCV infectivity compared with control sera from before OLT in about half of the cases. Among 27 non-interferon inflammatory mediators fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 stood out as it enhanced HCV RNA replication and release of infectious particles. The effect was concentration-dependent and detectable in dividing and non-dividing cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of FGF-2 receptor signalling abrogated the enhancing effect of FGF-2 and inhibited HCV replication in the absence of serum FGF-2 suggesting that HCV replication is dependent on basal activation of the FGF-2 triggered signalling pathway. Finally, in individuals with chronic HCV infection with high viral load, serum FGF-2 was significantly higher compared with those with low viral load. Conclusions Although no single mediator may account for this effect, serum shortly post-OLT enhances HCV infection. FGF-2 is a novel endogenous driver of HCV replication and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25800783

  9. Multiple Introduction and Naturally Occuring Drug Resistance of HCV among HIV-Infected Intravenous Drug Users in Yunnan: An Origin of China’s HIV/HCV Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Ma, Yanling; Chen, Huichao; Luo, Hongbing; Dai, Jie; Song, Lijun; Yang, Chaojun; Mei, Jingyuan; Yang, Li; Dong, Lijuan; Jia, Manhong; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) epidemic in China historically stemmed from intravenous drug users (IDUs) in Yunnan. Due to a shared transmission route, hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-1 co-infection is common. Here, we investigated HCV genetic characteristics and baseline drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan. Methods Blood samples of 432 HIV-1/HCV co-infected IDUs were collected from January to June 2014 in six prefectures of Yunnan Province. Partial E1E2 and NS5B genes were sequenced. Phylogenetic, evolutionary and genotypic drug resistance analyses were performed. Results Among the 293 specimens successfully genotyped, seven subtypes were identified, including subtypes 3b (37.9%, 111/293), 3a (21.8%, 64/293), 6n (14.0%, 41/293), 1b (10.6%, 31/293), 1a (8.2%, 24/293), 6a (5.1%, 15/293) and 6u (2.4%, 7/293). The distribution of HCV subtypes was mostly related to geographic location. Subtypes 3b, 3a, and 6n were detected in all six prefectures, however, the other four subtypes were detected only in parts of the six prefectures. Phylogeographic analyses indicated that 6n, 1a and 6u originated in the western prefecture (Dehong) and spread eastward and showed genetic relatedness with those detected in Burmese. However, 6a originated in the southeast prefectures (Honghe and Wenshan) bordering Vietnam and was transmitted westward. These subtypes exhibited different evolutionary rates (between 4.35×10−4 and 2.38×10−3 substitutions site-1 year-1) and times of most recent common ancestor (tMRCA, between 1790.3 and 1994.6), suggesting that HCV was multiply introduced into Yunnan. Naturally occurring resistance-associated mutations (C316N, A421V, C445F, I482L, V494A, and V499A) to NS5B polymerase inhibitors were detected in direct-acting antivirals (DAAs)-naïve IDUs. Conclusion This work reveals the temporal-spatial distribution of HCV subtypes and baseline HCV drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan. The findings enhance our

  10. Evaluation of performances of VERSANT HCV RNA 1.0 assay (kPCR) and Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV test v2.0 at low level viremia.

    PubMed

    Mazzuti, Laura; Lozzi, Maria Antonietta; Riva, Elisabetta; Maida, Paola; Falasca, Francesca; Antonelli, Guido; Turriziani, Ombretta

    2016-07-01

    We assess the concordance between low level HCV values obtained using the VERSANT HCV RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) and COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV Quantitative Test v2.0. The correlation between the values obtained by the two RT-PCR assays for samples with quantifiable HCV RNA levels revealed that viral load measured by kPCR significantly correlated with that of the CAP/CTM (R=0.644, P<0.0001). The results show a good concordance (n=126/144, 87%); discordant results were mainly observed in the assessment of values below the lower limit of detection of the assays. These variations may have an impact on clinical decisions for patients on HCV triple therapy or interferon- free regimens. It is therefore recommended to monitor individual patients with the same test throughout treatment.

  11. Modulation of HCV Replication After Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HCV/HIV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Guedj, Jeremie; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Blackard, Jason T.; Rouster, Susan D.; Castro, Mario; Feinberg, Judith; Sterling, Richard K.; Goodman, Zachary; Aronow, Bruce J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Coinfection results in increased HCV replication and more rapid rates of liver disease progression. The effect of HIV combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on HCV replication has not been studied in depth. To address this issue, we enrolled a small cohort of HCV/HIV coinfected patients into a cART initiation trial, and used dynamic modeling combined with evaluation of immune responses and microarray profiles to determine how effective treatment of HIV affects HCV. Treatment with cART resulted in HCV flare and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increase (2× or more increase from baseline) in a subset of treated patients. Subjects with evidence of hepatic injury (increased ALT) were more likely to have HCV-specific immune responses directed against HCV epitopes. Over time, HCV viral loads declined. Reproducible and biologically important gene expression changes occurred in patients who underwent successful cART, particularly with respect to downregulation of genes with known antiviral roles. Our findings suggest that the effective suppression of HIV by cART initiates a cascade of early and late events in treated patients with HCV. Early events involving downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes may lead to transiently increased viral replication and hepatic injury. At later time points, HCV viral load declines to levels comparable to those seen in the setting of HCV monoinfection. These findings support early antiretroviral therapy in those with HCV/HIV coinfection. PMID:25101888

  12. Real-World Safety and Efficacy of Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir/+Dasabuvir±Ribavirin (OBV/PTV/r/+DSV±RBV) Therapy in Recurrent Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Genotype 1 Infection Post-Liver Transplant: AMBER-CEE Study.

    PubMed

    Tronina, Olga; Durlik, Magdalena; Wawrzynowicz-Syczewska, Marta; Buivydiene, Arida; Katzarov, Krum; Kupcinskas, Limas; Tolmane, Ieva; Karpińska, Ewa; Pisula, Arkadiusz; Karwowska, Kornelia Magdalena; Bolewska, Beata; Jabłkowski, Maciej; Rostkowska, Karolina; Jakutiene, Jolita; Simonova, Marieta; Flisiak, Robert

    2017-04-07

    BACKGROUND The introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has considerably improved therapeutic outcomes for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. The AMBER-CEE study aimed to assess real-world efficacy and safety of ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir/+ dasabuvir ±ribavirin (OBV/PTV/r/ +DSV±RBV) in the treatment of post-transplant recurrence of HCV infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver transplant recipients with recurrent HCV genotype 1 infection, scheduled for OBV/PTV/r/+DSV±RBV according to therapeutic guidelines, were eligible. The primary efficacy endpoint was sustained virologic response (SVR) 12 weeks after the end of treatment (FU12). Clinical and laboratory adverse events (AEs) were recorded from baseline to FU12. RESULTS A total of 35 patients were included: 91.4% genotype 1b-infected, 94.3% treatment-experienced, and 77.1% at fibrosis stage ≥F2. SVR12 was achieved by all patients (35/35, 100%) including one patient with genotype 1a, one patient with detectable HCV RNA at the end of treatment, two patients with a history of first-generation DAA therapy, and two patients who prematurely discontinued the regimen. AEs were experienced by 22 patients (62.9%) and were mostly mild. No death, graft loss, or acute graft rejections were reported during the therapy. On-treatment hepatic decompensation occurred in three patients (8.6%). Anemia was observed in 29 patients (83.9%), with 21 (60%) requiring RBV dose reduction or discontinuation. CONCLUSIONS OBV/PTV/r/+DSV±RBV has excellent efficacy in post-transplant recurrence of HCV genotype 1-infection treated under real-world conditions. Excellent virologic outcomes were observed irrespective of prior treatment history or the degree of fibrosis, and AEs were mostly mild and transient.

  13. Lack of variant specific CD8+ T-cell response against mutant and pre-existing variants leads to outgrowth of particular clones in acute hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CTL escape mutations have been described during acute hepatitis C in patients who developed chronic disease later on. Our aim was to investigate the mutual relationship between HCV specific CD8+ T cells and evolution of the viral sequence during early acute HCV infection. Results We sequenced multiple clones of NS3 1406 epitope in 4 HLA-A*02 patients with acute hepatitis C genotype 1b infection. Pentamers specific for the variants were used to monitor the corresponding CD8+ T cell response. We observed outgrowth of mutations, which induced only a weak and thus potentially insufficient CD8+ T cell response. In one patient we observed outgrowth of variant epitopes with similarities to a different genotype rather than de novo mutations most probably due to a lack of responsiveness to these likely pre-existing variants. We could show that in acute hepatitis C CTL escape mutations occur much earlier than demonstrated in previous studies. Conclusions The adaption of the virus to a new host is characterized by a high and rapid variability in epitopes under CD8+ T cell immune pressure. This adaption takes place during the very early phase of acute infection and strikingly some sequences were reduced below the limit of detection at some time points but were detected at high frequency again at later time points. Independent of the observed variability, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses decline and no adaption to different or new antigens during the course of infection could be detected. PMID:24073713

  14. Loss of immune escape mutations during persistent HCV infection in pregnancy enhances replication of vertically transmitted viruses.

    PubMed

    Honegger, Jonathan R; Kim, Seungtaek; Price, Aryn A; Kohout, Jennifer A; McKnight, Kevin L; Prasad, Mona R; Lemon, Stanley M; Grakoui, Arash; Walker, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Globally, about 1% of pregnant women are persistently infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Mother-to-child transmission of HCV occurs in 3-5% of pregnancies and accounts for most new childhood infections. HCV-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are vital in the clearance of acute HCV infections, but in the 60-80% of infections that persist, these cells become functionally exhausted or select for mutant viruses that escape T cell recognition. Increased HCV replication during pregnancy suggests that maternofetal immune tolerance mechanisms may further impair HCV-specific CTLs, limiting their selective pressure on persistent viruses. To assess this possibility, we characterized circulating viral quasispecies during and after consecutive pregnancies in two women. This revealed a loss of some escape mutations in HLA class I epitopes during pregnancy that was associated with emergence of more fit viruses. CTL selective pressure was reimposed after childbirth, at which point escape mutations in these epitopes again predominated in the quasispecies and viral load dropped sharply. Importantly, the viruses transmitted perinatally were those with enhanced fitness due to reversion of escape mutations. Our findings indicate that the immunoregulatory changes of pregnancy reduce CTL selective pressure on HCV class I epitopes, thereby facilitating vertical transmission of viruses with optimized replicative fitness.

  15. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype, tissue HCV antigens, hepatocellular expression of HLA-A,B,C, and intercellular adhesion-1 molecules. Clues to pathogenesis of hepatocellular damage and response to interferon treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed Central

    Ballardini, G; Groff, P; Pontisso, P; Giostra, F; Francesconi, R; Lenzi, M; Zauli, D; Alberti, A; Bianchi, F B

    1995-01-01

    To obtain information on the mechanisms of hepatocellular damage and the determinants of response to interferon, hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype, tissue HCV antigens, hepatocellular expression of HLA-A,B,C and intercellular adhesion-1 molecules, and the number of lobular T lymphocytes were studied in 38 anti-HCV-positive patients. 14 patients did not show a primary response to interferon treatment. HCV genotype 1b was detected in 11 of them. They displayed higher scores of HCV-positive hepatocytes, HLA-A,B,C, and ICAM-1 molecules expression than with the responders. HCV-infected hepatocytes maintained the capacity to express HLA-A,B,C and ICAM-1 molecules. CD8-positive T cells in contact with infected hepatocytes and Councilman-like bodies were observed. A significant correlation was found between the number of lobular CD8-positive T cells and alanine amino transferase levels. No differences were observed in clinical, biochemical, and histological features between patients with high and low number of hepatocytes containing HCV antigens. These data suggest a prominent role of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the genesis of hepatocellular damage. The high expression of interferon-inducible antigens like HLA-A,B,C molecules suggests the presence of strong activation of the interferon system possibly related to high HCV replication in nonresponder patients infected with genotype 1b. Images PMID:7738174

  16. The role of multiparametric flow cytometry in the detection of minimal residual disease in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denise; Grigoriadis, George; Westerman, David

    2015-12-01

    Flow cytometry is the most accessible method for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection due to its availability in most haematological centres. Using a precise combination of different antibodies, immunophenotypic detection of MRD in acute leukaemia can be performed by identifying abnormal combinations or expressions of antigens on malignant cells at diagnosis, during and post treatment. These abnormal phenotypes, referred to as leukaemia-associated immunophenotypes (LAIPs) are either absent or expressed at low frequency in normal bone marrow (BM) cells and are used to monitor the behaviour and quantitate the amount of residual disease following treatment. In paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the level of MRD by multiparametric flow cytometry (MPFC) during therapy is recognised as an important predictor of outcome. Although less extensively studied, adult ALL and adult and paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) have also demonstrated similar findings. The challenge now is incorporating this information for risk-stratification so that therapy can be tailored individually and ultimately improve outcome while also limiting treatment-related toxicity. In this review we will elaborate on the current and future role of MPFC in MRD in acute leukaemia while also addressing its limitations.

  17. Creatine kinase B subunit as measured with a radioimmunoassay kit in detection of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, L R; Shuler, S E; Genre, C F; Gilbert, S S; Moore, R J; Meihaus, V; Hurry, E K

    1983-02-01

    Results with a commercial radioimmunoassay (RIA) reagent kit for quantification of the creatine kinase B subunit (CK-B) (Nuclear-Medical Laboratories, Irving, TX 75061) were compared with results obtained by electrophoresis for patients consecutively admitted to our coronary care unit for suspected acute myocardial infarction. Analytical sensitivity, precision, and specificity of the RIA were satisfactory. Its clinical efficacy was assessed in 97 patients suspected of having had an acute myocardial infarction. Of 30 patients who had had an acute myocardial infarction, increased CK-B was detected by RIA in 30 and by electrophoresis in 27. The temporal relationship between CK-B by RIA and CK-MB by electrophoresis was similar. Of 66 admissions where infarction was not established, CK-B was negligibly increased in samples from four patients by RIA, and from one by electrophoresis. Although not abnormally increased (greater than 5 U/L), CK-MB was detected by electrophoresis in samples from another five of these 66 patients. We conclude that estimation of CK-B by this RIA is an excellent alternative to estimation of CK-MB by electrophoresis in patients suspected of having had an acute myocardial infarction.

  18. Evaluation of a rapid IgM detection test for diagnosis of acute leptospirosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lizer, J; Grahlmann, M; Hapke, H; Velineni, S; Lin, D; Kohn, B

    2017-02-24

    Recently, a lateral flow assay (LFA) for detection of Leptospira-specific IgM in canine sera became commercially available in Europe. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic performance of this assay using canine sera from a collection of diagnostic accessions. Diagnostic sensitivity was assessed by testing 37 acute-phase and 9 corresponding convalescent-phase sera from dogs with a confirmed diagnosis of leptospirosis. Specificity was determined by testing sera from sick dogs with non-leptospiral infections (n=15) and healthy dogs with incomplete history of vaccination (n=45). During acute phase of illness, LFA scored positive for 28/37 sera with a sensitivity of 75.7 per cent while only 9/37 (24.3 per cent) samples were positive on microscopic agglutination test. The specificity of the LFA was 98.3 per cent (59/60). This test showed 89.7 and 100 per cent overall agreements with clinical diagnosis for acute-phase and convalescent-phase sera, respectively. The impact of vaccination on the LFA was also determined and vaccine-stimulated IgM responses were negative in 19/25 (76 per cent) dogs at 12 weeks post vaccination. In conclusion, the LFA is a rapid and reliable test for early detection of Leptospira-specific IgM during acute phase of canine leptospirosis. However, interpretation of a positive result must be made in the context of clinical signs and vaccination history.

  19. HCV dsRNA-Activated Macrophages Inhibit HCV Replication in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhong; Li, Jieliang; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Ting; Ho, Wenzhe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Macrophages play critical roles in innate immune response in the liver. Whether macrophages participate in liver innate immunity against HCV replication is poorly understood Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of macrophages in liver innate immunity against HCV replication. Materials and Methods: Freshly isolated monocytes were purified from peripheral blood of healthy adult donors. Macrophages refer to 7-day-cultured monocytes in vitro. A hepatoma cell line (Huh7) was infected with HCV JFH-1 to generate in vitro HCV infectious system. RT-PCR was used to determine HCV RNA and mRNA levels of genes expression. ELISA was used to measure the protein level of interferon-α (IFN-α) and western blot was used to determine protein expression level of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). Results: HCV dsRNA induced the expression of type I IFN (IFN-α/β) in monocyte-derived macrophages. HCV dsRNA also induced the expression of TLR3 and IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7), the key regulators of the IFN signaling pathway. When HCV JFH-1-infected Huh7 cells were co-cultured with macrophages activated with HCV dsRNA or incubated in media conditioned with supernatant (SN) from HCV dsRNA-activated macrophages, HCV replication was significantly suppressed. This macrophage SN action on HCV inhibition was mediated through type I IFN, which was evidenced by the observation that antibody to type I IFN receptor could neutralize the macrophages-mediated anti-HCV effect. The role of type I IFN in macrophages-mediated anti-HCV activity is further supported by the observation that HCV dsRNA-activated macrophages SN treatment induced the expression of several IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), ISG15, ISG56, OAS-1, OAS-2, MxA and Viperin in HCV-infected Huh7 cells. Conclusions: Macrophages may play an important role in liver innate immunity against HCV replication through a type I IFN-dependent mechanism. PMID:26322111

  20. FAT10 suppression stabilizes oxidized proteins in liver cells: Effects of HCV and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Murali; Hindman, Joseph; Tillman, Brittany; Jaramillo, Lee; Poluektova, Larisa I; French, Barbara A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; French, Samuel W; Osna, Natalia A

    2015-12-01

    FAT10 belongs to the ubiquitin-like modifier (ULM) family that targets proteins for degradation and is recognized by 26S proteasome. FAT10 is presented on immune cells and under the inflammatory conditions, is synergistically induced by IFNγ and TNFα in the non-immune (liver parenchymal) cells. It is not clear how viral proteins and alcohol regulate FAT10 expression on liver cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether FAT10 expression on liver cells is activated by the innate immunity factor, IFNα and how HCV protein expression in hepatocytes and ethanol-induced oxidative stress affect the level of FAT10 in liver cells. For this study, we used HCV(+) transgenic mice that express structural HCV proteins and their HCV(-) littermates. Mice were fed Lieber De Carli diet (control and ethanol) as specified in the NIH protocol for chronic-acute ethanol feeding. Alcohol exposure enhanced steatosis, induced oxidative stress and decreased proteasome activity in the liversof these mice, with more robust response to ethanol in HCV(+) mice. IFNα induced transcriptional activation of FAT10 in liver cells, which was dysregulated by ethanol feeding. Accordingly, IFNα-activated expression of FAT10 in hepatocytes (measured by indirect immunofluorescent of liver tissue) was also suppressed by ethanol exposure in both HCV(+) and HCV(-) mice. This suppression was accompanied with ethanol-mediated induction of lipid peroxidation marker, 4-HNE. All aforementioned effects of ethanol were attenuated by in vivo feeding of mice with the pro-methylating agent, betaine, which exhibits strong anti-oxidant properties. Based on this study, we hypothesize that FAT10 targets oxidatively modified proteins for proteasomal degradation, and that the reduction in FAT10 levels along with decreased proteasome activity may contribute to stabilization of these altered proteins in hepatocytes. In conclusion, IFNα induced FAT10 expression, which is suppressed by ethanol feeding in both HCV

  1. Multicentric performance analysis of HCV quantification assays and its potential relevance for HCV treatment.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, F; Naeth, G; Berger, A; Hirsch, H H; Regenass, S; Ross, R S; Sarrazin, C; Wedemeyer, H; Knechten, H; Braun, P

    2016-06-01

    An accurate quantification of low viremic HCV RNA plasma samples has gained importance since the approval of direct acting antivirals and since only one single measurement predicts the necessity of a prolonged or shortened therapy. As reported previously, HCV quantification assays such as Abbott RealTime HCV and Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV version 2 (CTM v2) may vary in sensitivity and precision particularly in low-level viremia. Importantly, substantial variations were previously demonstrated between some of these assays compared to the Roche High Pure System/COBAS TaqMan assay (HPS) reference assay, which was used to establish the clinical decision points in clinical studies. In this study, the reproducibility of assay performances across several laboratories was assessed by analysing quantification results generated by six independent laboratories (3× RealTime, 3× CTM v2) in comparison with one HPS reference laboratory. The 4th WHO Standard was diluted to 100, 25 and 10 IU/ml, and aliquots were tested in triplicates in 5 independent runs by each assay in the different laboratories to assess assay precision and detection rates. In a second approach, 2 clinical samples (GT 1a & GT 1b) were diluted to 100 and 25 IU/ml and tested as described above. While the result range for WHO 100 IU/ml replicates across all laboratories was similar in this analysis, the CVs of each laboratory ranged from 19.3 to 25.6 % for RealTime laboratories and were lower than CVs of CTM v2 laboratories with a range of 26.1-47.3 %, respectively, and also in comparison with the CV of the HPS reference laboratory (34.9 %). At WHO standard dilution of 25 IU/ml, 24 replicates were quantified by RealTime compared to 8 replicates with CTM v2. Results of clinical samples again revealed a higher variation of CTM v2 results as compared to RealTime values. (CVs at 100 IU/ml: RealTime: 13.1-21.0 % and CTM v2: 15.0-32.3 %; CVs at 25 IU/ml: RealTime 17.6-34.9 % and CTM v2 28

  2. [Molecular genetic detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Koehler, R; Bartram, C R

    2013-05-01

    The treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood and adolescence achieves nowadays cure rates of more than 80%. The detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) via molecular genetic methods provides - in comparison with conventional clinical and biological parameters - much more sensitive approaches to monitor individual treatment response. Here we will discuss the molecular background and technical developments in the framework of the BFM-study group.

  3. Relapse of HCV Genotype 1b Infection After Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir Treatment Presenting as De Novo Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Alan D.; Joseph, Nora; Kim, George; Fimmel, Claus J.

    2017-01-01

    Relapse of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection after combination therapy with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir is unusual. We report a treatment-naïve, non-cirrhotic patient in whom the relapse of genotype 1b HCV infection was accompanied by de novo cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and glomerulonephritis, requiring hemodialysis for acute renal failure. Sequence analysis revealed several resistance-associated variants in the HCV NS5a gene but not in NS3/4A. The patient’s vasculitis was successfully treated with immunosuppression and plasmapheresis, followed by retreatment of HCV with a combination of sofosbuvir, simeprevir, and ribavirin. The patient achieved sustained virological response, recovered his renal function, and remains in remission from cryoglobulinemia. PMID:28184378

  4. A New Twist to a Chronic HCV Infection: Occult Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Attar, Bashar M; Van Thiel, David

    2015-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of occult hepatitis C infection (OCI) in the population of HCV-RNA negative but anti-HCV positive individuals is presently unknown. OCI may be responsible for clinically overt recurrent disease following an apparent sustained viral response (SVR) weeks to years later. Purpose. To review the available current literature regarding OCI, prevalence, pathogenic mechanisms, clinical characteristics, and future directions. Data Sources. Searching MEDLINE, article references, and national and international meeting abstracts for the diagnosis of OCI (1990-2014). Data Synthesis. The long-term followup of individuals with an OCI suggests that the infection can be transient with the loss of detectable HCV-RNA in PPBMCs after 12-18 months or alternatively exist intermittently and potentially long term. The ultimate outcome of HCV infection is decided by interplay between host immune responses, antiviral therapies, and the various well-identified viral evasion mechanisms as well as the presence of HCV infection within extrahepatic tissues. Conclusion. The currently widely held assumption of a HCV-cure in individuals having had "SVR" after 8-12 weeks of a course of DAA therapy as recently defined may not be entirely valid. Careful longitudinal followup utilizing highly sensitive assays and unique approaches to viral isolation are needed.

  5. A New Twist to a Chronic HCV Infection: Occult Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Bashar M.; Van Thiel, David

    2015-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of occult hepatitis C infection (OCI) in the population of HCV-RNA negative but anti-HCV positive individuals is presently unknown. OCI may be responsible for clinically overt recurrent disease following an apparent sustained viral response (SVR) weeks to years later. Purpose. To review the available current literature regarding OCI, prevalence, pathogenic mechanisms, clinical characteristics, and future directions. Data Sources. Searching MEDLINE, article references, and national and international meeting abstracts for the diagnosis of OCI (1990–2014). Data Synthesis. The long-term followup of individuals with an OCI suggests that the infection can be transient with the loss of detectable HCV-RNA in PPBMCs after 12–18 months or alternatively exist intermittently and potentially long term. The ultimate outcome of HCV infection is decided by interplay between host immune responses, antiviral therapies, and the various well-identified viral evasion mechanisms as well as the presence of HCV infection within extrahepatic tissues. Conclusion. The currently widely held assumption of a HCV-cure in individuals having had “SVR” after 8–12 weeks of a course of DAA therapy as recently defined may not be entirely valid. Careful longitudinal followup utilizing highly sensitive assays and unique approaches to viral isolation are needed. PMID:26221136

  6. Characteristics of hepatitis viruses among Egyptian children with acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Ahmed; Yano, Yoshihiko; El-Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Utsumi, Takako; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis viral infection is hyperendemic in Egypt, western Asia and Africa. However, little is known about the status of hepatitis viruses among rural Egyptian children. Therefore, this study sought to examine the prevalence and characteristics of hepatitis viruses among symptomatic Egyptian children. Serological and molecular analyses of hepatitis viral infection were conducted in 33 children hospitalised at Mansoura University with symptomatic hepatic dysfunction (mean ± standard deviation age, 9.7±3.4 years; alanine aminotransferase level, 130±68 IU/ml). Eleven children (33%) were positive for anti-haemagglutination-IgM and were diagnosed with acute hepatitis A. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti‑hepatitis C virus (HCV) were detected in 9 (27%) and 7 (21%) children, respectively, indicating acute-on-chronic infection with hepatitis viruses. None of the children was positive for anti‑hepatitis B core antigen-IgM. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that all HBVs belonged to genotype D (subgenotype D1) and that HCV belonged to genotypes 4a and 1g. HBV-DNA was detected in 9 children (27%) in the pre-S/S region and in 16 children (48%) in the core promoter/precore region. The Y134F amino acid mutation in the 'α' determinant region was detected in all of the patients. The A1762T/G1764A double mutation, and the T1846A and G1896A single mutations were common in children with occult HBV infection. In conclusion, hepatitis viral infection, including acute-on-chronic infection with HCV and HBV, is common in Egyptian children hospitalised with acute hepatitis.

  7. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in plasma of AIDS patients during acute visceral disease by DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, S A; Merrill, R; Wolf, D; Dankner, W M

    1992-01-01

    By using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification procedure, 19 (83%) of 23 plasma specimens obtained from individuals with AIDS and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) visceral disease were found to be positive for plasma viremia as detected by PCR (PV-PCR), whereas 78% of cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes from the same samples were found to be positive. All 11 specimens prospectively obtained from individuals with acute HCMV disease were positive by PV-PCR. Plasma specimens from patients who received ganciclovir therapy rapidly became both culture and PV-PCR negative, and there was an excellent correlation between the two procedures. DNA detected by PV-PCR was unaffected by filtering plasma through a 0.2-microns-pore-size filter, although a conserved cellular gene, HLA-DQ alpha, was undetectable by PCR following filtration. HCMV DNA in plasma could be quantitated by PV-PCR by using endpoint serial dilutions, with detectable virus being present in 10(1) to 10(-2) microliters of plasma. A low titer of infectious virus could be detected in 2 of 11 plasma samples. The detection of HCMV DNA in plasma by PV-PCR promises to be a useful procedure for monitoring patients with AIDS suspected of having impending, acute, or recurrent HCMV visceral disease and suggests an additional route by which virus may disseminate in the immunocompromised host. Images PMID:1328287

  8. Vaccination of chimpanzees with plasmid DNA encoding the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope E2 protein modified the infection after challenge with homologous monoclonal HCV.

    PubMed

    Forns, X; Payette, P J; Ma, X; Satterfield, W; Eder, G; Mushahwar, I K; Govindarajan, S; Davis, H L; Emerson, S U; Purcell, R H; Bukh, J

    2000-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Development of vaccines to prevent HCV infection, or at least prevent progression to chronicity, is a major goal. In mice and rhesus macaques, a DNA vaccine encoding cell-surface HCV-envelope 2 (E2) glycoprotein stimulated stronger immune responses than a vaccine encoding intracellular E2. Therefore, we used DNA encoding surface-expressed E2 to immunize chimpanzees 2768 and 3001. Chimpanzee 3001 developed anti-E2 after the second immunization and antibodies to hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) after the third immunization. Although chimpanzee 2768 had only low levels of anti-E2 after the third immunization, an anamnestic response occurred after HCV challenge. CTL responses to E2 were not detected before challenge, but a strong response was detected after HCV challenge in chimpanzee 2768. An E2-specific CD4+ response was detected in chimpanzee 2768 before challenge and in both chimpanzees postchallenge. Three weeks after the last immunization, animals were challenged with 100 50% chimpanzee-infectious doses (CID(50)) of homologous monoclonal HCV. As a control, a naive chimpanzee was inoculated with 3 CID(50) of the challenge virus. The vaccine did not generate sterilizing immunity because both vaccinated chimpanzees were infected. However, both vaccinated chimpanzees resolved the infection early whereas the control animal became chronically infected. Compared with the control animal, hepatitis appeared earlier in the course of the infection in both vaccinated chimpanzees. Therefore, DNA vaccine encoding cell surface-expressed E2 did not elicit sterilizing immunity in chimpanzees against challenge with a monoclonal homologous virus, but did appear to modify the infection and might have prevented progression to chronicity.

  9. ASSESEMENT OF THE SEVERITY OF IMMUNODEFICIENCY IN PATIENTS OF ASIAN ETHNICITY WITH HIV/HCV CO-INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Begaidarova, R; Asenova, L; Alshynbekova, G; Devdariani, Kh; Dyusembaeva, A; Starikov, Y; Zolotareva, O

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the HIV RNA viral load and CD4+ cell count to assess the severity of immune deficiency in patients of Asian ethnicity with HIV/HCV co-infection by different HCV genotypes. 181 HIV-infected patients of Asian ethnicity were studied from several regions of Kazakhstan, predominantly from Karaganda region, including prisons. The diagnosis of HIV infection was confirmed by immunoblotting after a positive ELISA screening test. The patient data for analysis were extracted from the patients' medical charts. Analysis of peripheral blood and urine, blood biochemistry tests were performed for each patient. The flow cytometry was used to determine the CD3, CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the whole blood. Detection and quantification of HCV RNA in clinical samples of serum or plasma was performed by reverse transcription of viral RNA followed by amplification using DNA real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) with hybridization-fluorescence detection of PCR products in real-time. Statistical analysis was performed using STATISTICA software package. Student's t test was used to evaluate the differences between the means. HCV antibodies were detected in 73 patients out of 181. HCV genotyping showed presence of first genotype in 18 (24.7%), genotype 2 in 19 (26.0%) and genotype 3 in 36 (49.3%) patients. The third genotype was the most prevalent according to our study. More severe immunosuppression was observed in patients with HCV genotypes 1 and 3 in comparison with those with HCV genotype 2. HCV infection is a negative risk-factor in the course of HIV infection, accelerating the decrease of CD4+ cells. The greatest risk of progression of HIV infection to AIDS occurs in the presence of HCV genotype 1 and 3 which can be explained by more aggressive course of the disease and a poorer prognosis in comparison with the infection with genotype 2.

  10. Serum Islet Cell Autoantibodies During Interferon α Treatment in Patients With HCV-Genotype 4 Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Badra, Gamal; Waked, Imam; Selmi, Carlo; Saleh, Saleh M.; El-Shaarawy, Ahmed; Lotfy, Mahmoud

    2006-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide and HCV genotype 4 (HCV4) is predominant in African and Middle Eastern countries. It is well established that interferon-α (IFNa) treatment for HCV may trigger serum autoantibodies against pancreatic islet cells (ICA) in a subgroup of patients. Available data on the incidence of ICA during IFNa therapy for chronic HCV4 infection are not conclusive. We investigated the appearance of ICA in 40 naïve Egyptian patients (38 males, 32 ± 6 years) with histologically defined chronic HCV4 infection undergoing IFNa treatment at a dose of 9-million U/week for 24 weeks. Serum samples were collected at baseline and following IFNa therapy and ICA were detected using indirect immunofluorescence. Baseline evaluation indicated that 2/40 (5%) patients had detectable serum ICA. After the completion of the treatment scheme, 12/38 (32%) previously ICA negative patients became ICA positive; however, no patient developed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diabetes during follow-up. In conclusion, we submit that IFNa treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) may induce serum ICA in one-third of Egyptian patients with HCV4. These autoantibodies, however, do not lead to alterations in glucose metabolism. PMID:16603440

  11. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Yaniv; Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases.

  12. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-01-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases. PMID:27335150

  13. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  14. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination.

  15. Fibrosis is worse in HIV-HCV patients with low-level immunodepression referred for HCV treatment than in HCV-matched patients.

    PubMed

    Rullier, Anne; Trimoulet, Pascale; Neau, Didier; Bernard, Pierre-Henri; Foucher, Juliette; Lacoste, Denis; Winnock, Maria; Urbaniak, Rosa; Ballardini, Giorgio; Balabaud, Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Le Bail, Brigitte

    2004-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It is known to have an aggressive course in significantly immunosuppressed patients, and cirrhosis C has become one of the main causes of mortality in HIV-HCV coinfected patients since the improvement of antiretroviral therapy. The reasons for this severe fibrotic evolution are unclear. This prospective study compared chronic HCV lesions, liver immunocompetent cells, fibrosis and liver HCV loads in 2 cohorts of naive patients referred for HCV treatment: 33 HIV-HCV coinfected patients with CD4 >250/microL and 33 HCV-infected patients matched for the main risk factors of fibrosis. Fibrosis, particularly perisinusoidal fibrosis, was more marked in the coinfected patients. This occurred in the absence of a significant difference in disease activity. The number of CD3+ cells in the liver was higher in the HIV-HCV patients than in the HCV patients. Conversely, the number of liver CD4+ cells was lower in HIV-HCV patients than in HCV patients. The numbers of CD8+ and CD68+ cells were similar in the 2 groups. Finally, liver HCV load, assessed by immunostaining and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, was similar in the 2 groups. We conclude that in the population of HIV-HCV coinfected patients with low-level immunosuppression referred for HCV treatment, fibrosis is worse than in HCV patients and the proportion of CD4+ lymphocytes among CD3+ cells is markedly decreased in the liver, whereas intrahepatic viral load is similar. Our data confirm the need to treat such patients against HCV, and suggest that HIV infection could favor fibrosis via the modulation of the intrahepatic immune response.

  16. HCV synthesis project: preliminary analyses of HCV prevalence in relation to age and duration of injection.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Holly; Des Jarlais, Don C; Stern, Rebecca; Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Scheinmann, Roberta; Strauss, Shiela; Flom, Peter L

    2007-10-01

    Early acquisition of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection appears to affect a substantial proportion of injection drug users (IDUs)--between 20 percent and 90 percent. Analysing the range of HCV prevalence estimates in new injectors may help identify factors that can be modified to reduce HCV transmission. The HCV Synthesis Project is a meta-analysis of studies of HCV epidemiology and prevention in drug users worldwide. In this preliminary analysis, we examined data from 127 studies of IDUs that reported HCV prevalence in relation to age or year since onset of drug injection, analysing heterogeneity and calculating summary statistics where appropriate. Six studies reported gender-specific HCV prevalence rates among young or new injectors; the group mean prevalence was 47 percent for men and 44 percent for women (NS). Group mean age for HCV-negatives was 24.7 years (range 24-28) and 26.1 years (range 21-31) for HCV-positives (n=8 studies). Data were examined from 13 studies that compared HCV prevalence among young injectors to older injectors using 5-year age categories; substantial variation was present within these categories such that measures of central tendency were not calculated. Similarly, among studies reporting HCV prevalence among IDUs in relation to 1-year intervals of duration of injection (<1 year, <2 years, and <3 years), considerable variability was observed. Notably, there were studies in each category that reported prevalence of 70 percent or higher among recent-onset drug injectors. Our findings confirm previous studies reporting high risk of acquiring HCV shortly after onset of injection; thus, HCV prevention programmes must emphasize methods to reach new injectors. Future research should (1) report data on time to infection in depth, (2) provide detailed information on study methodology, and (3) characterize the research setting with respect to underlying factors that affect injection practices and networks. This will permit synthesis of a greater

  17. Emergence of occult minority genotype 2b hepatitis C infection in an HIV-1-co-infected patient treated for genotype 5a HCV infection with 48 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Buckton, A J; Kulasegaram, R; Ngui, S L; Fisher, M; James, R; Rangarajan, S; Teo, C G

    2007-09-01

    An HIV-1/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patient with haemophilia received a 48-week course of pegylated interferon-alpha-2b and ribavirin therapy for genotype 5a HCV infection. Virological response was achieved at week 24. At the end of treatment, HCV RNA in serum was detected and identified to belong to genotype 2b, rather than genotype 5a. A sensitive method for identifying minority HCV genotypes in pre-treatment serum showed genotype 2b HCV carriage prior to treatment. Sequencing the interferon sensitivity-determining region of the HCV NS5A gene obtained from pre-, intra- and post-treatment sera revealed emergence of quasispecies bearing R-->K and M-->A/T mutations at codons 2222 and 2223, respectively. Occult presence of minority HCV subpopulations and their acquisition of mutations following therapy can result in poor treatment outcome.

  18. Sequence-specific HCV RNA quantification using the size-dependent nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Jelani; Singh, Anant Kumar; Senapati, Dulal; Lee, Eumin; Gaylor, Kevin; Jones-Boone, Jeanette; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2009-04-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded (ss) RNA virus that is responsible for chronic liver diseases, such as cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Driven by the need to detect the presence of the HCV viral sequence, herein it is demonstrated for the first time that the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of gold nanoparticles can be used for screening and quantifying HCV RNA without any modification, with excellent detection limit (80 pM) and selectivity (single base-pair mismatch). The hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS) intensity increases 25 times when label-free, 145-mer, HCV ss-RNA is hybridized with 400 pM target RNA. The mechanism of HRS intensity change is discussed with experimental evidence for a higher multipolar contribution to the NLO response of gold nanoparticles.

  19. Liver Fibrosis in HCV Monoinfected and HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients: Dysregulation of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and Their Tissue Inhibitors TIMPs and Effect of HCV Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Tiziana; Mascia, Claudia; Pati, Ilaria; Zuccala, Paola; Mengoni, Fabio; Marocco, Raffaella; Tieghi, Tiziana; Belvisi, Valeria; Lichtner, Miriam; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria

    2016-03-26

    An imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) may contribute to liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C (HCV) infection. We measured the circulating levels of different MMPs and TIMPs in HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients and evaluated the potential for anti-HCV therapy to modulate MMP and TIMP levels in HCV subjects. We analyzed 83 plasma samples from 16 HCV monoinfected patients undergoing dual or triple anti-HCV therapy, 15 HIV/HCV coinfected patients with undetectable HIV load, and 10 healthy donors (HD). Levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were measured by a SearchLight Multiplex Immunoassay Kit. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were the highest expressed MMPs among all the analyzed samples and their levels significantly increased in HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected subjects compared to HD. TIMP-1 levels were significantly higher in HCV and HIV/HCV subjects compared to HD and were correlated with liver stiffness. These findings raise the possibility of using circulating TIMP-1 as a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis in HCV infection. A longitudinal study demonstrated that MMP-9 levels significantly decreased (40% reduction from baseline) in patients receiving dual as well as triple direct-acting antivirals (DAA) anti-HCV therapy, which had no effect on MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2. As the dysregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 may reflect inflammatory processes in the liver, the decrease of MMP-9 following HCV protease inhibitor treatment suggests a positive effect on the reduction of liver inflammation.

  20. Recent developments in the detection and management of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, James; Dhakal, Ajaya Kumar; Milford, David V; Webb, Nicholas J A; Lennon, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition in children admitted to hospital and existing serum and urine biomarkers are insensitive. There have been significant developments in stratifying the risk of AKI in children and also in the identification of new AKI biomarkers. Risk stratification coupled with a panel of AKI biomarkers will improve future detection of AKI, however, paediatric validation studies in mixed patient cohorts are required. The principles of effective management rely on treating the underlying cause and preventing secondary AKI by the appropriate use of fluids and medication. Further therapeutic innovation will depend on improving our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying AKI in children. PMID:27496911

  1. Recent developments in the detection and management of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, James; Dhakal, Ajaya Kumar; Milford, David V; Webb, Nicholas J A; Lennon, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition in children admitted to hospital and existing serum and urine biomarkers are insensitive. There have been significant developments in stratifying the risk of AKI in children and also in the identification of new AKI biomarkers. Risk stratification coupled with a panel of AKI biomarkers will improve future detection of AKI, however, paediatric validation studies in mixed patient cohorts are required. The principles of effective management rely on treating the underlying cause and preventing secondary AKI by the appropriate use of fluids and medication. Further therapeutic innovation will depend on improving our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying AKI in children.

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis: sensitivity in detection using technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.

    1986-07-01

    Forty-one proved cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis imaged with technetium-99m iminodiacetic acid (IDA) cholescintigraphy were retrospectively analyzed. After the exclusion of one indeterminate scan (showing poor initial hepatic uptake and excretion), the study yielded a 92.5% (37 of 40) sensitivity for the detection of cystic or common bile duct obstruction. Each of the three patients with false-negative scintigrams had other abnormal scintigraphic findings suggestive of biliary tract disease. Of the 20 patients (48.8%) with focal or diffuse gangrenous cholecystitis or perforation, seven (35%) exhibited either free peritoneal spill or increased pericholecystic activity to indicate the presence of advanced disease.

  3. Diagnostic value of blood inflammatory markers for detection of acute appendicitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Ulrich; Biereder, Birgit; Elouahidi, Tino; Bauer, Katrin; Keller, Thomas; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo

    2006-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis (AA) is a common surgical problem that is associated with an acute-phase reaction. Previous studies have shown that cytokines and acute-phase proteins are activated and may serve as indicators for the severity of appendicitis. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic value of different serum inflammatory markers in detection of phlegmonous or perforated appendicitis in children. Methods Data were collected prospectively on 211 consecutive children. Laparotomy was performed for suspected AA for 189 patients. Patients were subdivided into groups: nonsurgical abdominal pain, early appendicitis, phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis, perforated appendicitis. White blood cell count (WBC), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), acid α1-glycoprotein (α1GP), endotoxin, and erythrocyte sedimentation reaction (ESR) were estimated ad the time of admission. The diagnostic performance was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results WBC count, CRP and IL-6 correlated significantly with the severity of appendiceal inflammation. Identification of children with severe appendicitis was supported by IL-6 or CRP but not WBC. Between IL-6 and CRP, there were no significant differences in diagnostic use. Conclusion Laboratory results should be considered to be integrated within the clinical assessment. If used critically, CRP and IL-6 equally provide surgeons with complementary information in discerning the necessity for urgent operation. PMID:17132173

  4. Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging Detects Microstructural Changes in the Brain after Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-ran; Zeng, Jie-ying; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Kong, Ling-mei

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the technical feasibility of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in the brain after acute alcohol intoxication. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and DKI during 7.0 T MRI were performed in the frontal lobe and thalamus before and 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h after ethyl alcohol administration. Compared with controls, mean kurtosis values of the frontal lobe and thalamus first decreased by 44% and 38% within 30 min (p < 0.01 all) and then increased by 14% and 46% at 2 h (frontal lobe, p > 0.05; thalamus, p < 0.01) and by 29% and 68% at 6 h (frontal lobe, p < 0.05; thalamus, p < 0.01) after acute intake. Mean diffusivity decreased significantly in both the frontal lobe and the thalamus at various stages. However, fractional anisotropy decreased only in the frontal lobe, with no detectable change in the thalamus. This demonstrates that DKI possesses sufficient sensitivity for tracking pathophysiological changes at various stages associated with acute alcohol intoxication and may provide additional information that may be missed by conventional DTI parameters. PMID:28194415

  5. Factors Associated with Hepatitis C Infection among Chronic HCV Egyptian Patients

    PubMed Central

    W. ABD EL-WAHAB, Ekram; MIKHEAL, Ashraf; SIDKEY, Fathallah; SHATAT, Hanan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Egypt is crucial for developing appropriate prevention strategies. There are few community-based studies on the epidemiology and risk factors of hepatitis C infection in Egypt, which could not provide enough information. Clear identification of past and current risk factors for infection is of utmost importance so that intervention programs can be appropriately focused. This study aims to provide up-to-date information about changes in the incidence of individual risk factors for HCV infection transmission in Egypt. Methods A total of 396 chronic HCV patients on follow-up treatment at liver center in El-Qabbary General Hospital in Alexandria were evaluated retrospectively regarding the potential iatrogenic, community acquired and behavioral HCV risk factors. Risk factors for HCV transmission were found in all study populations. Results At least three identifiable risk factors were reported by each participant. Some behavioral and community-acquired exposures that entail several risky behaviors particularly, unsafe sexual practices were exclusively established among males. We report a significant decline in prevalence of HCV transmission through blood transfusion, parenteral treatment, hospitalization, surgery, non medicalized circumcision, Hijiama done by informal practitioner, tattooing, folk body piercing and threading, sharing hygiene and sharp items, and the use of communal barber or manicure sets among younger age cluster. Conclusion The pattern of risk differed among older patients compared to younger age group suggesting improved medical care and infection control measures and raised public health awareness regarding the different modes of viral transmission. PMID:26060718

  6. Associations between co-detected respiratory viruses in children with acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Atsushi; Kubo, Hideyuki; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Yamamoto, Seiji P; Kohdera, Urara; Togawa, Masao; Amo, Kiyoko; Shiomi, Masashi; Ohyama, Minori; Goto, Kaoru; Hase, Atsushi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Iritani, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the major etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in young children. Although respiratory virus co-detections are common, analysis of combinations of co-detected viruses has never been conducted in Japan. Nineteen respiratory viruses or subtypes were surveyed using multiplex real-time PCR on 1,044 pediatric (patient age < 6 years) ARI specimens collected in Osaka City, Japan between January 2010 and December 2011. In total, 891 specimens (85.3%) were virus positive (1,414 viruses were detected), and 388 of the virus-positive specimens (43.5%, 388/891) were positive for multiple viruses. The ratio of multiple/total respiratory virus-positive specimens was high in children aged 0-35 months. Statistical analyses revealed that human bocavirus 1 and human adenovirus were synchronously co-detected. On the other hand, co-detections of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV-1) with HPIV-3, HPIV-3 with human metapneumovirus (hMPV), hMPV with respiratory syncytial virus A (RSV A), hMPV with influenza virus A (H1N1) 2009 (FLUA (H1N1) 2009), RSV A with RSV B, and human rhinovirus and FLUA (H1N1) 2009 were exclusive. These results suggest that young children (<3 years) are highly susceptible to respiratory viruses, and some combinations of viruses are synchronously or exclusively co-detected.

  7. HCV RNA Activates APCs via TLR7/TLR8 While Virus Selectively Stimulates Macrophages Without Inducing Antiviral Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; El-Far, Mohamed; Dupuy, Franck P; Abdel-Hakeem, Mohamed S; He, Zhong; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Shi, Yu; Haddad, Elias K; Ancuta, Petronela; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Said, Elias A

    2016-07-07

    The innate and adaptive immune systems fail to control HCV infection in the majority of infected individuals. HCV is an ssRNA virus, which suggests a role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 in initiating the anti-viral response. Here we demonstrate that HCV genomic RNA harbours specific sequences that initiate an anti-HCV immune response through TLR7 and TLR8 in various antigen presenting cells. Conversely, HCV particles are detected by macrophages, but not by monocytes and DCs, through a TLR7/8 dependent mechanism; this leads to chloroquine sensitive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, while the antiviral type I Interferon response is not triggered in these cells. Antibodies to DC-SIGN, a c-type lectin selectively expressed by macrophages but not pDCs or mDCs, block the production of cytokines. Novel anti-HCV vaccination strategies should target the induction of TLR7/8 stimulation in APCs in order to establish potent immune responses against HCV.

  8. HCV RNA Activates APCs via TLR7/TLR8 While Virus Selectively Stimulates Macrophages Without Inducing Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; El-Far, Mohamed; Dupuy, Franck P.; Abdel-Hakeem, Mohamed S.; He, Zhong; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Shi, Yu; Haddad, Elias K.; Ancuta, Petronela; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Said, Elias A.

    2016-01-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems fail to control HCV infection in the majority of infected individuals. HCV is an ssRNA virus, which suggests a role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 in initiating the anti-viral response. Here we demonstrate that HCV genomic RNA harbours specific sequences that initiate an anti-HCV immune response through TLR7 and TLR8 in various antigen presenting cells. Conversely, HCV particles are detected by macrophages, but not by monocytes and DCs, through a TLR7/8 dependent mechanism; this leads to chloroquine sensitive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, while the antiviral type I Interferon response is not triggered in these cells. Antibodies to DC-SIGN, a c-type lectin selectively expressed by macrophages but not pDCs or mDCs, block the production of cytokines. Novel anti-HCV vaccination strategies should target the induction of TLR7/8 stimulation in APCs in order to establish potent immune responses against HCV. PMID:27385120

  9. Abbott RealTime Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV Assays for Prediction of Sustained Virological Response to Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients ▿

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hasegawa, Izumi; Ohno, Tomoyoshi; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Joh, Takashi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    Two commercial real-time PCR assays are currently available for sensitive hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA quantification: the Abbott RealTime HCV assay (ART) and Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV assay (CAP/CTM). We assessed whether the two real-time PCR assays were more effective than Roche Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, v.2.0 (CAM) for prediction of the sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) in chronic hepatitis C. Sixty patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1b (37 males and 23 females, 53 ± 12 years of age) were treated with PEG-IFNα2b plus RBV for 48 weeks. Stored specimens at nine time points for each patient (at baseline, on treatment, and 24 weeks after treatment) were tested by the two real-time PCR assays and CAM. Twenty-six (43.3%) patients reached SVR. The positive predictive values (PPVs) for SVR of undetectable HCV RNA at week 12 by CAM, ART, and CAP/CTM were 74.3%, 88.0%, and 95.2%, respectively. An undetectable HCV RNA level by CAM, ART, and CAP/CTM correctly predicted SVR at week 4 in 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients, at weeks 5 to 8 in 91.7%, 100%, and 100% of patients, at weeks 9 to 12 in 55.6%, 75%, and 87.5% of patients, and at weeks 13 to 24 in 0%, 26.7%, and 40% of patients, respectively. Of 16 patients who relapsed after treatment, HCV RNA was detectable in 2 patients at the end of treatment by CAP/CTM but undetectable by ART and CAM. HCV RNA tests using ART and CAP/CTM are considered to be more effective at predicting SVR than CAM, and the PPV for SVR was slightly higher in CAP/CTM than in ART. PMID:19091819

  10. Sex hormones and HCV: an unresolved mystery.

    PubMed

    Mekky, Radwa Y; Abdelaziz, Ahmed I

    2013-01-01

    The biological differences between males and females advocate the ultimate need for gender-specific medicine. The variation in response to viral infection as well as therapy among different genders makes it very intriguing to reveal the responsible factors for causing this discrepancy. HCV is one of the most noxious infectious diseases, however the impact of gender on the response to HCV has received negligible attention in the literature. The controversial studies concerning the effect of gender on the outcome of interferon-based therapy urge a need to judge the gender discrepancy in host factors responsible for both interferon release and action. The main aim of this review is to disentangle the interplay between sex hormones and several viral and host factors responsible for viral clearance in an attempt to clarify the role of gender in modulating the response to HCV as well as interferon-based therapy.

  11. Best strategies for global HCV eradication

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Liesl M.; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide eradication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is possible through a combination of prevention education, universal clinical and targeted community screening, effective linkage to care, and treatment with promising new direct-acting antiviral drug regimens. Universal screening should be offered in all healthcare visits, and parallel community screening efforts should prioritize high-prevalence, high-transmission populations including injection drug users, prison inmates, and those with HIV/HCV co-infection. Increasing awareness of HCV infection through screening, improving treatment uptake and cure rates by providing linkage to care and more effective treatment, and ultimately combining education efforts with vaccination campaigns to prevent transmission and reinfection can slow and eventually stop the “silent epidemic.” PMID:23286849

  12. Detection of respiratory viruses and the associated chemokine responses in serious acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Sumino, Kaharu C.; Walter, Michael J.; Mikols, Cassandra L.; Thompson, Samantha A.; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Arens, Max. Q.; Agapov, Eugene; Hormozdi, David; Gaynor, Anne M.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Storch, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Background A specific diagnosis of a lower respiratory viral infection is often difficult despite frequent clinical suspicion. This low diagnostic yield may be improved by use of sensitive detection methods and biomarkers. Methods We investigated the prevalence, clinical predictors and inflammatory mediator profile of respiratory viral infection in serious acute respiratory illness. Sequential bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from all patients hospitalized with acute respiratory illness over 12 months (n=283) were tested for the presence of 17 respiratory viruses by multiplex PCR assay and for newly-discovered respiratory viruses (bocavirus, WU and KI polyomaviruses) by single-target PCR. BAL samples also underwent conventional testing (direct immunoflorescence and viral culture) for respiratory virus at the clinician’s discretion. 27 inflammatory mediators were measured in subset of the patients (n=64) using a multiplex immunoassay. Results We detected 39 respiratory viruses in 37 (13.1% of total) patients by molecular testing, including rhinovirus (n=13), influenza virus (n=8), respiratory syncytial virus (n=6), human metapneumovirus (n=3), coronavirus NL63 (n=2), parainfluenza virus (n=2), adenovirus (n=1), and newly-discovered viruses (n=4). Molecular methods were 3.8-fold more sensitive than conventional methods. Clinical characteristics alone were insufficient to separate patients with and without respiratory virus. The presence of respiratory virus was associated with increased levels of interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP -10)(p<0.001) and eotaxin-1 (p=0.017) in BAL. Conclusions Respiratory viruses can be found in patients with serious acute respiratory illness by use of PCR assays more frequently than previously appreciated. IP-10 may be a useful biomarker for respiratory viral infection. PMID:20627924

  13. Second-generation Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV quantitative test for viral load monitoring: a novel dual-probe assay design.

    PubMed

    Zitzer, Heike; Heilek, Gabrielle; Truchon, Karine; Susser, Simone; Vermehren, Johannes; Sizmann, Dorothea; Cobb, Bryan; Sarrazin, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA viral load (VL) monitoring is a well-established diagnostic tool for the management of chronic hepatitis C patients. HCV RNA VL results are used to make treatment decisions with the goal of therapy to achieve an undetectable VL result. Therefore, a sensitive assay with high specificity in detecting and accurately quantifying HCV RNA across genotypes is critical. Additionally, a lower sample volume requirement is desirable for the laboratory and the patient. This study evaluated the performance characteristics of a second-generation real-time PCR assay, the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV quantitative test, version 2.0 (CAP/CTM HCV test, v2.0), designed with a novel dual-probe approach and an optimized automated extraction and amplification procedure. The new assay demonstrated a limit of detection and lower limit of quantification of 15 IU/ml across all HCV genotypes and was linear from 15 to 100,000,000 IU/ml with high accuracy (<0.2-log(10) difference) and precision (standard deviation of 0.04 to 0.22 log(10)). A specificity of 100% was demonstrated with 600 HCV-seronegative specimens without cross-reactivity or interference. Correlation to the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV test (version 1) was good (n = 412 genotype 1 to 6 samples, R(2) = 0.88; R(2) = 0.94 without 105 genotype 4 samples). Paired plasma and serum samples showed similar performance (n = 25, R(2) = 0.99). The sample input volume was reduced from 1 to 0.65 ml in the second version. The CAP/CTM HCV test, v2.0, demonstrated excellent performance and sensitivity across all HCV genotypes with a smaller sample volume. The new HCV RNA VL assay has performance characteristics that make it suitable for use with currently available direct-acting antiviral agents.

  14. Delirium Detection and Impact of Comorbid Health Conditions in a Post-Acute Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Stelmokas, Julija; Gabel, Nicolette; Flaherty, Jennifer M.; Rayson, Katherine; Tran, Kathileen; Anderson, Jason R.; Bieliauskas, Linas A.

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis and under-detection of delirium may occur in many medical settings. This is important to address as delirium clearly increases risk of morbidity and mortality in such settings. This study assessed whether Veterans who screened positive on a delirium severity measure (Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale; MDAS) differed from those with and without corresponding medical documentation of delirium in terms of cognitive functioning, psychiatric/medical history, and medication use. A medical record review of 266 inpatients at a VA post-acute rehabilitation unit found that 10.9% were identified as delirious according to the MDAS and/or medical records. Of the Veterans who screened positive on the MDAS (N = 19), 68.4% went undetected by medical screening. Undetected cases had a higher number of comorbid medical conditions as measured by the Age-Adjusted Charlson Index (AACI) scores (median = 9, SD = 3.15; U = 5.5, p = .003) than medically documented cases. For Veterans with a score of 7 or greater on the AACI, the general relative risk for delirium was 4.46. Delirium is frequently under-detected in a post-acute rehabilitation unit, particularly for Veterans with high comorbid illness. The relative risk of delirium is up to 4.46 for those with high medical burden, suggesting the need for more comprehensive delirium screening in these patients. PMID:27902744

  15. Importance of spontaneous nystagmus detection in the differential diagnosis of acute vertigo.

    PubMed

    Pavlin-Premrl, Davor; Waterston, John; McGuigan, Sean; Infeld, Bernard; Sultana, Ron; O'Sullivan, Richard; Gerraty, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Vertigo is a common cause of emergency department attendance. Detection of spontaneous nystagmus may be a useful sign in distinguishing vestibular neuritis from other vestibular diagnoses. We aimed to assess the contribution of spontaneous nystagmus in the diagnosis of acute vertigo. We enrolled consecutive consenting patients arriving at a single emergency department with acute vertigo. There was no declared protocol for the emergency department staff. A standardized history and examination was conducted by the investigators. Observation for spontaneous nystagmus, its response to visual fixation, and testing the vestibulo-ocular reflex with the horizontal head impulse test were the chief examination components. MRI was obtained within 24 hours. Clinical criteria and MRI were used to reach the final diagnosis. The investigators' physical findings and final neurological diagnosis were compared with the initial emergency department examination findings and the referral diagnosis. There were 28 patients, 15 with vestibular neuritis, six with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, one with stroke, suspected clinically, and three with migraine. In three the diagnosis remained uncertain. Spontaneous nystagmus was seen in all 15 patients with vestibular neuritis, fixation-suppressed in eight of 11 tested for this. The head impulse test was positive in 12 of 15 with vestibular neuritis. The emergency department referral diagnosis was correct in six of 23 patients. The ability to detect spontaneous nystagmus is useful in vestibular diagnosis, both in support of a diagnosis of vestibular neuritis and in avoiding false positive diagnoses of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  16. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fawkner-Corbett, David W; Khoo, Siew Kim; Duarte, Carminha M; Bezerra, Patricia G M; Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E; Le Souef, Peter N; McNamara, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5 years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analyzed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs. 5%; P = 0.04). Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV-A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A.

  17. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fawkner-Corbett, DW; Khoo, SK; Duarte, MC; Bezerra, PGM; Bochkov, YA; Gern, JE; Le Souef, PN; McNamara, PS

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterise the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Methods Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analysed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. Results RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs 5%; p=0.04). Conclusions Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A. PMID:26100591

  18. Quantification of hepatitis C virus in patients treated with peginterferon-alfa 2a plus ribavirin treatment by COBAS TaqMan HCV test.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Imazeki, F; Yonemitsu, Y; Mikami, S; Takada, N; Nishino, T; Takashi, M; Tsubota, A; Kato, K; Sugiura, N; Tawada, A; Wu, S; Tanaka, T; Nakamoto, S; Mikata, R; Tada, M; Chiba, T; Kurihara, T; Arai, M; Fujiwara, K; Kanai, F; Yokosuka, O

    2011-07-01

    Extremely low levels of serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA can be detected by COBAS TaqMan HCV test. To investigate whether the COBAS TaqMan HCV test is useful for measuring rapid virological response (RVR) and early virological response (EVR) to predict sustained virological response (SVR), we compared the virological response to PEG-IFN-alfa 2a plus RBV in 76 patients infected with HCV genotype 1 when undetectable HCV RNA by the COBAS TaqMan HCV test was used, with those when below 1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test was used, which corresponded to the use of traditional methods. Among the 76 patients, 28 (36.8%) had SVR, 13 (17.1%) relapsed, 19 (25.0%) did not respond, and 16 (21.0%) discontinued the treatment due to side effects. The positive predictive values for SVR based on undetectable HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test at 24 weeks after the end of treatment [10/10 (100%) at week 4, 21/23 (91.3%) at week 8 and 26/33 (78.7%) at week 12] were superior to those based on <1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA [17/19 (89.4%) at week 4, 27/38 (71.0%) at week 8, and 27/43 (62.7%) at week 12]. The negative predictive values for SVR based on <1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test [46/57 (80.7%) at week 4, 37/38 (97.3%) at week 8, and 32/33 (96.9%) at week 12] were superior to those based on undetectable HCV RNA [48/66 (72.7%) at week 4, 46/53 (86.7%) at week 8, and 41/43 (95.3%) at week 12]. The utilization of both undetectable RNA and <1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test is useful and could predict SVR and non-SVR patients with greater accuracy.

  19. HCV-Related Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Salvatore; Ferrari, Sergio; Gajofatto, Alberto; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Mariotto, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a wide spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations, affecting different organ systems. Neurological complications occur in a large number of patients and range from peripheral neuropathy to cognitive impairment. Pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for nervous system dysfunction are mainly related to the upregulation of the host immune response with production of autoantibodies, immune complexes, and cryoglobulins. Alternative mechanisms include possible extrahepatic replication of HCV in neural tissues and the effects of circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. PMID:22899946

  20. Packaging of HCV-RNA into lentiviral vector

    SciTech Connect

    Caval, Vincent; Piver, Eric; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Pages, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of HCV-RNA Core-D1 interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo evaluation of the packaging of HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the role of the three basic sub-domains of D1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heterologous system involving HIV-1 vector particles to mobilise HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full length mobilisation of HCV genome and HCV-receptor-independent entry. -- Abstract: The advent of infectious molecular clones of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has unlocked the understanding of HCV life cycle. However, packaging of the genomic RNA, which is crucial to generate infectious viral particles, remains poorly understood. Molecular interactions of the domain 1 (D1) of HCV Core protein and HCV RNA have been described in vitro. Since compaction of genetic information within HCV genome has hampered conventional mutational approach to study packaging in vivo, we developed a novel heterologous system to evaluate the interactions between HCV RNA and Core D1. For this, we took advantage of the recruitment of Vpr fusion-proteins into HIV-1 particles. By fusing HCV Core D1 to Vpr we were able to package and transfer a HCV subgenomic replicon into a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. We next examined how deletion mutants of basic sub-domains of Core D1 influenced HCV RNA recruitment. The results emphasized the crucial role of the first and third basic regions of D1 in packaging. Interestingly, the system described here allowed us to mobilise full-length JFH1 genome in CD81 defective cells, which are normally refractory to HCV infection. This finding paves the way to an evaluation of the replication capability of HCV in various cell types.

  1. Role of apoptotic hepatocytes in HCV dissemination: regulation by acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Murali; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhang, Jinjin; Mott, Justin L; Poluektova, Larisa I; McVicker, Benita L; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Tuma, Dean J; Osna, Natalia A

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol consumption exacerbates hepatitis C virus (HCV) pathogenesis and promotes disease progression, although the mechanisms are not quite clear. We have previously observed that acetaldehyde (Ach) continuously produced by the acetaldehyde-generating system (AGS), temporarily enhanced HCV RNA levels, followed by a decrease to normal or lower levels, which corresponded to apoptosis induction. Here, we studied whether Ach-induced apoptosis caused depletion of HCV-infected cells and what role apoptotic bodies (AB) play in HCV-alcohol crosstalk. In liver cells exposed to AGS, we observed the induction of miR-122 and miR-34a. As miR-34a has been associated with apoptotic signaling and miR-122 with HCV replication, these findings may suggest that cells with intensive viral replication undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, when AGS-induced apoptosis was blocked by a pan-caspase inhibitor, the expression of HCV RNA was not changed. AB from HCV-infected cells contained HCV core protein and the assembled HCV particle that infect intact hepatocytes, thereby promoting the spread of infection. In addition, AB are captured by macrophages to switch their cytokine profile to the proinflammatory one. Macrophages exposed to HCV(+) AB expressed more IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNAs compared with those exposed to HCV(-) AB. The generation of AB from AGS-treated HCV-infected cells even enhanced the induction of aforementioned cytokines. We conclude that HCV and alcohol metabolites trigger the formation of AB containing HCV particles. The consequent spread of HCV to neighboring hepatocytes via infected AB, as well as the induction of liver inflammation by AB-mediated macrophage activation potentially exacerbate the HCV infection course by alcohol and worsen disease progression.

  2. Combined Detection of Serum IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 Predicts Acute Rejection Following Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Young-In; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Tak, Eunyoung; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Hwang, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of non-invasive diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for acute rejection in liver transplant patients would help to ensure the preservation of liver function in the graft, eventually contributing to improved graft and patient survival. We evaluated selected cytokines and chemokines in the sera from liver transplant patients as potential biomarkers for acute rejection, and found that the combined detection of IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 at 1-2 weeks post-operation could predict acute rejection following adult liver transplantation with 97% specificity and 94% sensitivity. PMID:27498551

  3. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K; Weiner, David B; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N

    2017-03-07

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14(th) vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection.

  4. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S.; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K.; Weiner, David B.; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N.

    2017-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14th vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection. PMID:28266565

  5. Breaking down the barriers to hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment among individuals with HCV/HIV coinfection: action required at the system, provider, and patient levels.

    PubMed

    Grebely, Jason; Oser, Megan; Taylor, Lynn E; Dore, Gregory J

    2013-03-01

    The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection occurs among persons who inject drugs. Rapid improvements in responses to HCV therapy have been observed, but liver-related morbidity rates remain high, given notoriously low uptake of HCV treatment. Advances in HCV therapy will have a limited impact on the burden of HCV-related disease at the population-level unless barriers to HCV education, screening, evaluation, and treatment are addressed and treatment uptake increases. This review will outline barriers to HCV care in HCV/HIV coinfection, with a particular emphasis on persons who inject drugs, proposing strategies to enhance HCV treatment uptake and outcomes.

  6. Detection of viral respiratory pathogens in mild and severe acute respiratory infections in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Lee, Vernon Jian Ming; Cui, Lin; Lin, Raymond; Tan, Chyi Lin; Tan, Linda Wei Lin; Lim, Wei-yen; Leo, Yee-Sin; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin; Chen, Mark I-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the performance of laboratory methods and clinical case definitions in detecting the viral pathogens for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) from a prospective community cohort and hospital inpatients, nasopharyngeal swabs from cohort members reporting ARIs (community-ARI) and inpatients admitted with ARIs (inpatient-ARI) were tested by Singleplex Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (SRT-PCR), multiplex RT-PCR (MRT-PCR) and pathogen-chip system (PathChip) between April 2012 and December 2013. Community-ARI and inpatient-ARI was also combined with mild and severe cases of influenza from a historical prospective study as mild-ARI and severe-ARI respectively to evaluate the performance of clinical case definitions. We analysed 130 community-ARI and 140 inpatient-ARI episodes (5 inpatient-ARI excluded because multiple pathogens were detected), involving 138 and 207 samples respectively. Detection by PCR declined with days post-onset for influenza virus; decrease was faster for community-ARI than for inpatient-ARI. No such patterns were observed for non-influenza respiratory virus infections. PathChip added substantially to viruses detected for community-ARI only. Clinical case definitions discriminated influenza from other mild-ARI but performed poorly for severe-ARI and for older participants. Rational strategies for diagnosis and surveillance of influenza and other respiratory virus must acknowledge the differences between ARIs presenting in community and hospital settings. PMID:28218288

  7. HCV core antigen as an alternate test to HCV RNA for assessment of virologic responses to all-oral, interferon-free treatment in HCV genotype 1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt; Feld, Jordan J; Chevaliez, Stéphane; Cheng, Kevin; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Sarrazin, Christoph; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Herman, Christine; Hackett, John; Cohen, Daniel E; Dawson, George J; Cloherty, Gavin; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2017-03-27

    In light of the advances in HCV therapy, simplification of diagnosis confirmation, pre- treatment diagnostic workup and treatment monitoring is required to ensure broad access to interferon-free therapies. HCV core antigen (HCV cAg) testing is rapid, giving results in approximately 60min, and less expensive than HCV RNA methods. While extensive data on the analytical performance of HCV cAg relative to RNA or comparisons in longitudinal studies of patients on interferon based (response guided) therapy there is very limited data on the relative performance of HCV cAg in diagnosis and monitoring patients receiving all-oral interferon free regimens. Furthermore, there is no data in the literature that describes the specificity of HCV cAg in patients with resolved HCV infection i.e. anti-HCV positive/HCV RNA negative. In this study a total of 1201 plasma samples from the 411 HCV genotype 1 subjects with a HCV RNA viral load >50,000IU/ml who enrolled in a clinical trial with ombitasvir, ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir and dasabuvir, with or without ribavirin were retrospectively tested in a blinded fashion with HCV cAg test and results were compared to HCV RNA levels. The specificity of the HCV cAg test was also evaluated in anti-HCV positive but HCV RNA negative samples. Overall concordance between HCV cAg and HCV RNA was 98.6% while concordance in pre-treatment samples was 99.5% (409/411; n=2 HCV RNA pos. with viral loads>3 Mill IU/ml but HCV cAg neg.) and 99.24% in post treatment week 12 samples (391/394; n=2 HCV RNA pos.<25IU/ml and n=1 HCV RNA pos. 2180IU/ml). Specificity in anti-HCV positive HCV RNA negative samples tested was 100%.

  8. QuickBrain MRI for the detection of acute pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David C; Newgard, Craig D; Selden, Nathan R; Jafri, Mubeen A; Hansen, Matthew L

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The current gold-standard imaging modality for pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is CT, but it confers risks associated with ionizing radiation. QuickBrain MRI (qbMRI) is a rapid brain MRI protocol that has been studied in the setting of hydrocephalus, but its ability to detect traumatic injuries is unknown. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of pediatric patients with TBI who were undergoing evaluation at a single Level I trauma center between February 2010 and December 2013. Patients who underwent CT imaging of the head and qbMRI during their acute hospitalization were included. Images were reviewed independently by 2 neuroradiology fellows blinded to patient identifiers. Image review consisted of identifying traumatic mass lesions and their intracranial compartment and the presence or absence of midline shift. CT imaging was used as the reference against which qbMRI was measured. RESULTS A total of 54 patients met the inclusion criteria; the median patient age was 3.24 years, 65% were male, and 74% were noted to have a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or greater. The sensitivity and specificity of qbMRI to detect any lesion were 85% (95% CI 73%-93%) and 100% (95% CI 61%-100%), respectively; the sensitivity increased to 100% (95% CI 89%-100%) for clinically important TBIs as previously defined. The mean interval between CT and qbMRI was 27.5 hours, and approximately half of the images were obtained within 12 hours. CONCLUSIONS In this retrospective pilot study, qbMRI demonstrated reasonable sensitivity and specificity for detecting a lesion or injury seen with neuroimaging (radiographic TBI) and clinically important acute pediatric TBI.

  9. HCV/HTLV coinfection: Does HTLV-1 interfere in the natural history of HCV-related diseases?

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcelo Costa; Silva, Carolina Alves Costa; Machado, Gustavo Uzêda; Atta, Ajax; M Freire, Songeli; Carvalho, Edgar; Schinoni, Maria Isabel; Paraná, Raymundo

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) coinfection occurs in many regions. However, few studies have focused on the natural history of HCV-induced liver disease in coinfected patients. To describe the clinical, epidemiological, and histopathological aspects of HTLV-1/HCV coinfection in Brazil. A cross-sectional study with 23 patients coinfected with HCV/HTLV. The control groups consisted of 21 patients monoinfected with HCV and 20 patients monoinfected with HTLV-1. The cytokine profiles (Th1 and Th2 cell responses), clinical, laboratory features, and histopathological aspects were examined. The control group for cytokine analysis validation consisted of patients monoinfected with HTLV, and a fourth group consisted of healthy blood donors. No anthropometric differences present between the three infected groups. We observed higher serum concentrations of IFN-γ in patients coinfected with HCV/HTLV-1 than those in HCV monoinfected patients. The HCV/HTLV-1 coinfected group also exhibited a higher degree of liver steatosis than the HCV monoinfected patients. Results suggest that HCV/HTLV-1 coinfection may result in a different pattern of HCV infection due to the immunologic disorders likely associated with HTLV-1, but there is no clear evidence of the HTLV role in the natural history of HCV infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1967-1972, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Virologic Tools for HCV Drug Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the development of new antiviral drugs that target specific steps of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) lifecycle. These drugs, collectively termed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), include non-structural (NS) HCV protein inhibitors, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors (nucleotide analogues and non-nucleoside inhibitors), and NS5A inhibitors. Due to the high genetic variability of HCV, the outcome of DAA-based therapies may be altered by the selection of amino-acid substitutions located within the targeted proteins, which affect viral susceptibility to the administered compounds. At the drug developmental stage, preclinical and clinical characterization of HCV resistance to new drugs in development is mandatory. In the clinical setting, accurate diagnostic tools have become available to monitor drug resistance in patients who receive treatment with DAAs. In this review, we describe tools available to investigate drug resistance in preclinical studies, clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26690198

  11. Differential cognitive impairment in HCV coinfected men with controlled HIV compared to HCV monoinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Abadjian, Linda; Rempel, Hans; Monto, Alexander; Pulliam, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals infected with both HIV and HCV have shown impaired performance on different neuropsychological (NP) tests; however, whether coinfected individuals with controlled HIV and minimal liver damage in the era of antiretroviral therapy have impairment is understudied. Methods Nineteen HCV monoinfected, 17 HIV/HCV coinfected and 17 control male participants were evaluated for depression, attention, executive function, information processing, fine motor speed, and verbal/visual learning/memory. Eleven controls and 14 HIV monoinfected participants with controlled viral load from a previous study were also included for comparison. At time of testing, participants were not using drugs or alcohol and did not have cirrhosis. A global deficit score (GDS) was calculated from 7 domains of NP tests and alterations in specific domains were determined. Results HIV/HCV subjects had a higher depression score (11.1±7.5) than controls (5.4±4.1, p=0.010) and a higher GDS score (0.77±0.47) than HCV (0.46±0.34, p=0.036), HIV (0.45±0.36, p=0.008) and controls (0.30±0.29, p=0.001). Coinfection was associated with worse scores in attention working memory (p=0.007), executive function (p=0.01), fine motor function (p=0.011), verbal learning/memory (p<0.001) and visual learning/memory (p<0.001) compared to controls. Within the HCV group, viral load was associated with lower attention, executive function and information processing speed and positively with GDS. Conclusions Coinfection significantly increased the risk of cognitive impairment in subjects with controlled HIV viral loads. In HCV monoinfected but not coinfected subjects, HCV viral load correlated with worsening GDS, suggesting different pathways for neuropsychological impairment. PMID:23187938

  12. HCV NS5A co-operates with PKR in modulating HCV IRES-dependent translation.

    PubMed

    Karamichali, Eirini; Foka, Pelagia; Tsitoura, Eliza; Kalliampakou, Katerina; Kazazi, Dorothea; Karayiannis, Peter; Georgopoulou, Urania; Mavromara, Penelope

    2014-08-01

    Translation initiation of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome is driven by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), located within the 5' non-coding region. Several studies have suggested that different cellular non canonical proteins or viral proteins can regulate the HCV IRES activity. However, the role of the viral proteins on HCV translation remains controversial. In this report, we confirmed previous studies showing that NS5A down-regulates IRES activity in HepG2 but not in Huh7 cells suggesting that the NS5A effect on HCV IRES is cell-type dependent. Additionally, we provide strong evidence that activated PKR up-regulates the IRES activity while silencing of endogenous PKR had the opposite effect. Furthermore, we present data indicating that the NS5A-mediated inhibitory effect on IRES-dependent translation could be linked with the PKR inactivation. Finally, we show that NS5A from GBV-C but not from GBV-B down-regulates HCV IRES activity in the absence or the presence of PKR over expression. Notably, HCV and GBV-C but not GBV-B NS5A contains a previously identified PKR interacting protein domain.

  13. Distribution of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in seropositive patients in the state of Alagoas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga, Rosa Maria S.; Rodart, Itatiana F.; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ramalho Neto, Cícero Eduardo; Silva, Denise Wanderlei

    2008-01-01

    We determined the frequency of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in anti-HCV seropositive patients in the state of Alagoas, Brazil, by means of nested-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested-PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of amplified fragments of the 5´NCR. The nested-PCR with genotype-specific primers from the core region was carried out when detection was not possible by the first approach. Detectable HCV-RNA was present in 115 (74.7%) of 154 serum samples. Genotype 1 was the most frequent (77.4%), against 20.9% of genotype 3 and 0.8% of genotype 2. Subtype 1b was predominant (65.2%), followed by subtypes 1a (8.7%), and 3a (6.1%). Coinfection (1a/3a) was detected in 0.8% of the samples. Indeed, there was no significant differences in the prevalence of genotype 1 compared to what has been obtained from anti-HCV seropositive patients from other locations in Brazil. Here we report for the first time the genotype 2 in the state of Alagoas. PMID:24031281

  14. Acute toxicities to larval rainbow trout of representative compounds detected in Great Lakes fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the National Fisheries Research Center-Great Lakes has ranked the potential hazard to fish and invertebrates of various chemical compounds detected in two Great Lakes fishes-- lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, and walleye, Stizostedion vitreum vitreum (Hesselberg and Seelye 1982). This hazard assessment has included the identification of the potential sources of the compounds, determination of the occurrence and abundance of the compounds in Great Lakes fish, and the determination of acute toxicities of representative compounds of 19 chemical classes (Passino and Smith 1987a). In further studies Smith et al. (1988) focused on 6 of the 19 classes of compounds using the zooplankter Daphnia pulex as the test organism. They ranked the six classes as follows (in decreasing order of toxicity): polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, and silicon-containing compounds.

  15. Splanchnic vein thrombosis in necrotizing acute pancreatitis: Detection by computed tomographic venography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Ke, Lu; Li, Gang; Tong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Wei-Qin; Li, Jie-Shou

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomographic venography (CTV) for splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) detection in necrotizing acute pancreatitis (AP) patients. METHODS: Forty-three patients with necrotizing AP who underwent both CTV and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) within 3 d were analyzed in this retrospective comparative study. All CTV procedures were performed with a dual-source CT scanner. The presence and location of SVT were determined via blinded imaging data analyses. RESULTS: According to the DSA results, 17 (39.5%) of the total 43 patients had SVT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CTV for SVT detection were 100% (95%CI: 77.1%-100%), 92.3% (95%CI: 73.4%-98.7%), 89.5% (95%CI: 65.5%-98.2%) and 100% (95%CI: 82.8%-100%), respectively. CONCLUSION: CTV is an effective examination for SVT detection in patients with necrotizing AP with high positive and negative predictive values. PMID:25469039

  16. Computer aided detection and classification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell subtypes based on microscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    MoradiAmin, Morteza; Memari, Ahmad; Samadzadehaghdam, Nasser; Kermani, Saeed; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer that starts from the early version of white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow. It can spread to different parts of the body rapidly and if not treated, would probably be deadly within a couple of months. Leukemia cells are categorized into three types of L1, L2, and L3. The cancer is detected through screening of blood and bone marrow smears by pathologists. But manual examination of blood samples is a time-consuming and boring procedure as well as limited by human error risks. So to overcome these limitations a computer-aided detection system, capable of discriminating cancer from noncancer cases and identifying the cancerous cell subtypes, seems to be necessary. In this article an automatic detection method is proposed; first cell nucleus is segmented by fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm. Then a rich set of features including geometric, first- and second-order statistical features are obtained from the nucleus. A principal component analysis is used to reduce feature matrix dimensionality. Finally, an ensemble of SVM classifiers with different kernels and parameters is applied to classify cells into four groups, that is noncancerous, L1, L2, and L3. Results show that the proposed method can be used as an assistive diagnostic tool in laboratories.

  17. Phenotypic changes in acute myeloid leukaemia: implications in the detection of minimal residual disease.

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, A; San Miguel, J F; Vidriales, M B; López-Berges, M C; García-Marcos, M A; Gonzalez, M; Landolfi, C; Orfão, A

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of phenotypic changes as possible limiting factors in the immunological detection of minimal residual disease in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). METHODS: 20 relapses were evaluated, with special attention to changes in the criteria used for the definition of a phenotype as "aberrant". In all cases the same monoclonal antibody and fluorochrome were used at diagnosis and in relapse. RESULTS: Six out of the 16 patients showed aberrant phenotypes at diagnosis. At relapse, no changes in the aberrant phenotypes were detected in most of the patients; nevertheless, in two of the four patients with asynchronous antigen expression this aberration disappeared at relapse. At diagnosis in both cases there were already small blast cell subpopulations showing the phenotype of leukaemic cells at relapse. Ten out of the 16 cases analysed showed significant changes in the expression of at least one of the markers analysed. CONCLUSIONS: At relapse in AML the "leukaemic phenotypes" usually remained unaltered, while other phenotypic features--not relevant for distinguishing leukaemic blast cells among normal progenitors--changed frequently; however, they were not a major limitation in the immunological detection of minimal residual disease. PMID:8666678

  18. Treatment optimization for HIV/HCV co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jake A.; Chew, Kara W.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections affect millions of persons around the globe and cause profound morbidity and mortality. A major intersection exists between these two epidemics, with HCV infection being more common in persons with HIV than in the general population, largely due to shared routes of transmission. HCV co-infection increases risk for liver- and non-liver-related morbidity and mortality, making HCV treatment a priority in HIV co-infected persons, but the treatment of HCV in co-infected patients has been daunting for multiple reasons. Until recently, HCV treatment has frequently been deferred due to the low rates of cure, significant adverse effects, burdensome duration of therapy and drug–drug interactions with HIV antiretroviral medications. Untreated HCV has resulted in significant health consequences for the millions of those infected and has led to multiple downstream impacts on our healthcare systems around the world. The development of a remarkable number of new HCV direct-acting agents (DAAs) that are significantly more efficacious and tolerable than the previous interferon-based regimens has transformed this important field of medicine, with the potential to dramatically reduce the burden of infection and improve health outcomes in this population. This review will summarize the epidemiology and clinical impact of HIV/HCV co-infection and current approaches to the treatment of HCV in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. PMID:28357062

  19. Transmission of HCV to a chimpanzee using virus particles produced in an RNA-transfected HepG2 cell culture.

    PubMed

    Dash, S; Kalkeri, G; McClure, H M; Garry, R F; Clejan, S; Thung, S N; Murthy, K K

    2001-10-01

    It was demonstrated previously that HepG2 cells produce negative strand RNA and virus-like particles after transfection with RNA transcribed from a full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) cDNA clone [Dash et al. (1997) American Journal of Pathology, 151:363-373]. To determine in vivo infectivity of these in vitro synthesized viral particles, a chimpanzee was inoculated intravenously with HCV derived from HepG2 cells. The infected chimpanzee was examined serially for elevation of liver enzymes, for the presence of HCV RNA in the serum by reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), anti-HCV antibodies in the serum, and inflammation in the liver. The chimpanzee developed elevated levels of liver enzymes after the second week, but the levels fluctuated over a 10-week period. HCV RNA was detected in the serum of the chimpanzee at the second, seventh and ninth weeks after inoculation, and remained positive up to 25 weeks. Liver biopsies at Weeks 18 and 19 revealed of mild inflammation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of HCV recovered from the infected chimpanzee at the second and ninth weeks showed 100% sequence homology with the clone used for transfection studies. Serum anti-HCV antibodies were not detected by EIA during the 25 weeks follow-up period. These results suggest that intravenous administration of the virus-like particles derived from RNA-transfected HepG2 cells are infectious, and therefore, the pMO9.6-T7 clone is an infectious clone. These results provide new information that in vitro synthesized HCV particles produced from full-length HCV clone can cause infection in a chimpanzee. This study will facilitate the use of innovative approaches to the study of assembly of HCV particles and mechanisms of virus infectivity in cell culture.

  20. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, Misao; Ariumi, Yasuo; Hijikata, Makoto; Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi; Wakita, Takaji; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  1. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced interferon resistance.

    PubMed

    Qashqari, Hanadi; Al-Mars, Amany; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Maged; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the foremost causes of chronic liver disease affecting over 300 million globally. HCV contains a positive-stranded RNA of ~9600 nt and is surrounded by the 5' and 3'untranslated regions (UTR). The only successful treatment regimen includes interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. Like many other viruses, HCV has also evolved various mechanisms to circumvent the IFN response by blocking (1) downstream signaling actions via STAT1, STAT2, IRF9 and JAK-STAT pathways and (2) repertoire of IFN Stimulatory Genes (ISGs). Several studies have identified complex host demographic and genetic factors as well as viral genetic heterogeneity associated with outcomes of IFN therapy. The genetic predispositions of over 2000 ISGS may render the patients to become resistant, thus identification of such parameters within a subset of population are necessary for management corollary. The ability of various HCV genotypes to diminish IFN antiviral responses plays critical role in the establishment of chronic infection at the acute stage of infection, thus highlighting importance of the resistance in HCV treated groups. The recently defined role of viral protein such as C, E2, NS3/NS4 and NS5A proteins in inducing the IFN resistance are discussed in this article. How the viral and host genetic composition and epistatic connectivity among polymorphic genomic sites synchronizes the evolutionary IFN resistance trend remains under investigation. However, these signals may have the potential to be employed for accurate prediction of therapeutic outcomes. In this review article, we accentuate the significance of host and viral components in IFN resistance with the aim to determine the successful outcome in patients.

  2. Occult hepatitis B in HIV-HCV coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Piroth, Lionel; Lafon, Marie-Edith; Binquet, Christine; Bertillon, Pascale; Gervais, Anne; Lootvoet, Enguerrand; Lang, Jean-Marie; De Jaureguiberry, Jean Pierre; Chene, Geneviève; Leport, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection in HIV infected patients is controversial, varying from less than 1% to 62% in different studies. Blood samples of 111 HIV-infected patients, HCV-positive, HBs antigen negative, followed in the APROCO-ANRS EP11 cohort, were used to detect HBV DNA by using 2 different validated assays (Cobas Amplicor HBV Monitor Test and INSERM U271 qualitative ultra-sensitive PCR), completed when positive by HBV real-time PCR. HBV DNA was found in 6 (5.4%, 95% CI 1.2%-9.6%) patients by at least 1 of these assays, but none tested positive in all 3 assays. All 6 patients had anti-HBc without anti-HBs antibodies; 5 were not on lamivudine. Their median CD4 and CD8 counts were significantly lower and their HIV viral load higher than in the other 105 patients. In conclusion, the prevalence of occult hepatitis B may vary significantly according to the molecular assay used, even though these assays are validated with high specificity and quite high sensitivity. Occult hepatitis B may be encountered in HIV-HCV coinfected patients without anti-HBV treatment, with anti-HBc but without anti-HBs antibodies, and relatively low immunity, suggesting a potential risk of further reactivation, as already sporadically reported.

  3. CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV-infected patients express multiple negative immune checkpoints following stimulation with HCV peptides.

    PubMed

    Barathan, Muttiah; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Chang, Li Yen; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Sigamani, Panneer; Saeidi, Alireza; Ram, M Ravishankar; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are key to successful viral clearance in HCV disease. Accumulation of exhausted HCV-specific T cells during chronic infection results in considerable loss of protective functional immune responses. The role of T-cell exhaustion in chronic HCV disease remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the frequency of HCV peptide-stimulated T cells expressing negative immune checkpoints (PD-1, CTLA-4, TRAIL, TIM-3 and BTLA) by flow cytometry, and measured the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines secreted by T cells by a commercial Multi-Analyte ELISArray™ following in vitro stimulation of T cells using HCV peptides and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV (CHC) patients showed significant increase of CTLA-4. Furthermore, HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ T cells of CHC patients also displayed relatively higher levels of PD-1 and TRAIL, whereas TIM-3 was up-regulated on HCV peptide-stimulated CD8+ T cells. Whereas the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 were significantly increased, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 were markedly decreased in the T cell cultures of CHC patients. Chronic HCV infection results in functional exhaustion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells likely contributing to viral persistence.

  4. Safety and Immunogenicity of HCV E1E2 Vaccine Adjuvanted with MF59 Administered to Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Sharon E.; Houghton, Michael; Coates, Stephen; Abrignani, Sergio; Chien, David; Rosa, Domenico; Pileri, Piero; Ray, Ranjit; Di Bisceglie, Adrian; Rinella, Paola; Hill, Heather; Wolff, Mark C.; Schultze, Viola; Han, Jang H.; Scharschmidt, Bruce; Belshe, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes chronic liver disease that often leads to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In animal studies, chimpanzees were protected against chronic infection following experimental challenge with either homologous or heterologous HCV genotype 1a strains which predominates in the USA and Canada. We describe a first in humans clinical trial of this prophylactic HCV vaccine. Methods HCV E1E2 adjuvanted with MF59C.1 (an oil-in-water emulsion) was given at 3 different dosages on day 0 and weeks 4, 24 and 48 in a phase 1, placebo-controlled, dose escalation trial to healthy HCV-negative adults. Results There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects reporting adverse events across the groups. Following vaccination subjects developed antibodies detectable by ELISA, CD81 neutralization and VSV/HCV pseudotype neutralization. There was no significant difference between vaccine groups in the number of responders and geometric mean titers for each of the three assays. All subjects developed lymphocyte proliferation responses to E1E2 and an inverse response to increasing amounts of antigen was noted. Conclusions The vaccine was safe and generally well tolerated at each of the 3 dosage levels and induced anti-body and lymphoproliferative responses. A larger study to further evaluate safety and immunogenicity is warranted. PMID:20619382

  5. Co-infections and transmission networks of HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV among people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tien Ng, Kim; Takebe, Yutaka; Bee Chook, Jack; Zhen Chow, Wei; Gan Chan, Kok; Abed Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Keng Tee, Kok

    2015-01-01

    Co-infections with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human pegivirus (HPgV) are common in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected individuals. However, analysis on the evolutionary dynamics and transmission network profiles of these viruses among individuals with multiple infections remains limited. A total of 228 injecting drug users (IDUs), either HCV- and/or HIV-1-infected, were recruited in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV genes were sequenced, with epidemic growth rates assessed by the Bayesian coalescent method. Based on the sequence data, mono-, dual- and triple-infection were detected in 38.8%, 40.6% and 20.6% of the subjects, respectively. Fifteen transmission networks involving HCV (subtype 1a, 1b, 3a and 3b), HIV-1 (CRF33_01B) and HPgV (genotype 2) were identified and characterized. Genealogical estimates indicated that the predominant HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV genotypes were introduced into the IDUs population through multiple sub-epidemics that emerged as early as 1950s (HCV), 1980s (HIV-1) and 1990s (HPgV). By determining the difference in divergence times between viral lineages (ΔtMRCA), we also showed that the frequency of viral co-transmission is low among these IDUs. Despite increased access to therapy and other harm reduction interventions, the continuous emergence and coexistence of new transmission networks suggest persistent multiple viral transmissions among IDUs. PMID:26459957

  6. A New Signaling Pathway for HCV Inhibition by Estrogen: GPR30 Activation Leads to Cleavage of Occludin by MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Ulitzky, Laura; Lafer, Manuel M; KuKuruga, Mark A; Silberstein, Erica; Cehan, Nicoleta; Taylor, Deborah R

    2016-01-01

    Poor outcome in response to hepatitis C virus, including higher viral load, hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis, is more associated with men and postmenopausal women than with premenopausal women and women receiving hormone replacement therapy, suggesting that β-estradiol plays an innate role in preventing viral infection and liver disease. Consequently, most research in the field has concluded that estrogen affects HCV replication through viral interactions with estrogen receptor-α. Previously, estrogen-like antagonists, including Tamoxifen, were shown to reduce HCV RNA production and prevent viral entry, although the authors did not identify host factors involved. Estrogen can act alternatively through the membrane-bound G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor, GPR30. Here, human hepatoma Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV J6/JFH-1 and treated with estrogen or Tamoxifen, resulting in a marked decrease in detectable virus. The effect was mimicked by G1, a GPR30-specific agonist, and was reversed by the GPR30-specific antagonist, G15. While previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen down-regulated occludin in cervical cancer cells, its action on liver cells was unknown. Occludin is a tight junction protein and HCV receptor and here we report that activation and cellular export of MMP-9 led to the cleavage of occludin upon estrogen treatment of liver cells. This is the first report of the cleavage of an HCV receptor in response to estrogen. We also identify the occludin cleavage site in extracellular Domain D; the motif required for HCV entry and spread. This pathway gives new insight into a novel innate antiviral pathway and the suboptimal environment that estrogen provides for the proliferation of the virus. It may also explain the disparate host-virus responses to HCV demonstrated by the two sexes. Moreover, these data suggest that hormone replacement therapy may have beneficial antiviral enhancement properties for HCV-infected postmenopausal women and

  7. Acute viral hepatitis in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Corwin, A L; Dai, T C; Duc, D D; Suu, P I; Van, N T; Ha, L D; Janick, M; Kanti, L; Sie, A; Soderquist, R; Graham, R; Wignall, S F; Hyams, K C

    1996-01-01

    A study of acute hepatitis was conducted in Hanoi, Viet Nam, from January 1993 to February 1995; 188 sera from clinical hepatitis cases were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin (Ig) M anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV), IgM anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBc), IgG anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV), IgG anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) and IgM anti-HEV. Additionally, 187 sera from control subjects, matched by age, sex and month of admission, with no recent history of hepatitis, were tested for comparative purposes. There was serological evidence of recent HAV (29%) and hepatitis B virus (24%) infection in 53% of cases (2 mixed infections), compared with 2% of controls. HCV infections were detected in 10% of cases (with no IgM anti-HAV or IgM anti-HBc) and in 1% of control sera. There was no significant difference in the proportion of IgG anti-HEV positive sera between cases (in the absence of IgM anti-HAV or IgM anti-HBc) (21%) and controls (14%); 3% of all case sera were IgM anti-HEV positive. Younger cases (< 20 years) were more likely to have recent HAV infections (41%) than those aged > or = 20 years (21%) (P < 0.01). In contrast, a higher percentage of adult cases had IgM anti-HBc, IgG anti-HCV and IgG anti-HEV (in the absence of recent HAV or HBV infection) than did children. No seasonal trend in hepatitis admissions was detected, nor an association between water-borne infections (HAV and HEV) and the warmer months. Hepatitis patients lived throughout Hanoi and surrounding areas, with no identifiable geographical clustering, regardless of serological marker.

  8. Structural Bone Deficits in HIV/HCV-Coinfected, HCV-Monoinfected, and HIV-Monoinfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Vincent; Lynn, Kenneth; Stumm, Emily R.; Long, Jin; Nezamzadeh, Melissa S.; Baker, Joshua F.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Kapalko, Angela J.; Mounzer, Karam; Zemel, Babette S.; Tebas, Pablo; Kostman, Jay R.; Leonard, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture rates, particularly in women. The structural underpinnings for skeletal fragility in coinfected women have not been characterized. We used tibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography to evaluate skeletal parameters in women, by HIV/HCV status. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 50 HIV/HCV-coinfected, 51 HCV-monoinfected, and 50 HIV-monoinfected women. Tibial volumetric BMD and cortical dimensions were determined with peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Race-specific z scores for age were generated using 263 female reference participants without HIV infection or liver disease. Results. Coinfected participants had lower mean z scores for trabecular volumetric BMD (−0.85), cortical volumetric BMD (−0.67), cortical area (−0.61), and cortical thickness (−0.77) than reference participants (all P < .001). The smaller cortical dimensions were due to greater mean z scores for endosteal circumference (+0.67; P < .001) and comparable z scores for periosteal circumference (+0.04; P = .87). Trabecular volumetric BMD was lower in coinfected than in HCV- or HIV-monoinfected participants. HCV-infected women with stage 3–4 liver fibrosis had lower mean z scores for trabecular volumetric BMD, cortical thickness, and total hip BMD those with stage 0–2 fibrosis. Conclusions. Compared with healthy reference patients, HIV/HCV-coinfected women had decreased tibial trabecular volumetric BMD, diminished cortical dimensions, and significant endocortical bone loss. PMID:25754980

  9. A comparison of currently used serum lipase and amylase procedures in the serial detection of enzyme elevations in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, J A; Kitt, D; Wingate, B

    1983-10-14

    Twenty-eight patients having acute pancreatitis were followed during convalescence with serum amylase and lipase determinations. Starch and p-nitrophenyl-oligosaccharide substrates were used for amylase. Dimercaptotributyrate and triolein were employed for lipase. The extreme sensitivity of the lipase procedure using the tributyrate detected a persistent elevation of lipase when other parameters of measurement had returned to normal.

  10. Cross-Sectional Detection of Acute HIV Infection: Timing of Transmission, Inflammation and Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Cynthia; Dibben, Oliver; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Stacey, Andrea; Mayo, Ashley J.; Norris, Philip J.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Li, Hui; Keele, Brandon F.; Hicks, Charles; Margolis, David; Ferrari, Guido; Haynes, Barton; Swanstrom, Ronald; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Eron, Joseph J.; Borrow, Persephone; Cohen, Myron S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute HIV infection (AHI) is a critical phase of infection when irreparable damage to the immune system occurs and subjects are very infectious. We studied subjects with AHI prospectively to develop better treatment and public health interventions. Methods Cross-sectional screening was employed to detect HIV RNA positive, antibody negative subjects. Date of HIV acquisition was estimated from clinical history and correlated with sequence diversity assessed by single genome amplification (SGA). Twenty-two cytokines/chemokines were measured from enrollment through week 24. Results Thirty-seven AHI subjects were studied. In 7 participants with limited exposure windows, the median exposure to HIV occurred 14 days before symptom onset. Lack of viral sequence diversification confirmed the short duration of infection. Transmission dates estimated by SGA/sequencing using molecular clock models correlated with transmission dates estimated by symptom onset in individuals infected with single HIV variants (mean of 28 versus 33 days). Only 10 of 22 cytokines/chemokines were significantly elevated among AHI participants at enrollment compared to uninfected controls, and only 4 participants remained seronegative at enrollment. Discussion The results emphasize the difficulty in recruiting subjects early in AHI. Viral sequence diversity proved accurate in estimating time of infection. Regardless of aggressive screening, peak viremia and inflammation occurred before enrollment and potential intervention. Given the personal and public health importance, improved AHI detection is urgently needed. PMID:21573003

  11. Priming of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses using a HCV core ISCOMATRIX vaccine: a phase I study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Drane, Debbie; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Gibson, Rebecca; Mitchell, Sue; Barnden, Megan; Moskwa, Alan; Shaw, David; Gervase, Barbara; Coates, Stephen; Houghton, Michael; Basser, Russel

    2009-03-01

    The disease burden and public health impact of chronic HCV infection continues to be a major problem globally. Current treatment for chronic HCV infection is not effective in all patients and is frequently associated with unacceptable side effects. Clearly a need exists for improved treatments and one such strategy is the use of therapeutic vaccines. Although still not completely understood, emerging data indicate that the generation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are important for the clearance of HCV. We have developed a prototype vaccine with the HCV Core protein and ISCOMATRIX adjuvant (HCV Core ISCOMATRIX vaccine). ISCOMATRIX vaccines have been shown to induce CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses to a range of antigens in both animal models and in human studies. Additionally, ISCOMATRIX vaccines have been shown to be safe and generally well tolerated in several clinical trials. Preliminary studies demonstrated that the prototype HCV Core ISCOMATRIX vaccine induced strong CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in monkeys following immunization. Here we show the results of a Phase I placebo controlled, dose escalation clinical study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of the HCV Core ISCOMATRIX vaccine in healthy individuals. The 30 subjects received three immunizations of HCV Core ISCOMATRIX vaccines or placebo vaccine on days 0, 28 and 56. The HCV Core ISCOMATRIX vaccines contained 5, 20 or 50 microg HCV Core protein with 120 mug ISCOMATRIX adjuvant. The adverse events reported were generally mild to moderate in severity, of short duration and self-limiting. The most common adverse events were injection site reactions such as pain and redness as well as myalgia. Antibody responses were detected in all but one of the participants receiving the HCV Core ISCOMATRIX vaccine and there was no indication of a dose response. CD8(+) T cell responses were only detected in two of the eight participants receiving the highest dose. T cell cytokines

  12. Insights on the Russian HCV Care Cascade: Minimal HCV Treatment for HIV/HCV Co-infected PWID in St. Petersburg

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Judith I; Ko, Stephen C; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Lioznov, Dmitry; Chaisson, Christine E; Gnatienko, Natalia; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2017-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Russia, driven by injection drug use, has seen a steady rise in the past two decades. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highly prevalent in people who inject drugs (PWID). The study aimed to describe the current frequency of HCV testing and treatment among HIV-infected PWID in St. Petersburg, Russia. Methods This study examined baseline data from the “Linking Infectious and Narcology Care” (LINC) and “Russia Alcohol Research Collaboration on HIV/AIDS” (Russia ARCH) studies. Participants included in this analysis were HIV-infected with a history of injection drug use. Descriptive statistics were performed to assess frequency of HCV testing and treatment. Results Participants (n=349 [LINC], 207 [Russia ARCH]) had a mean age of 33.8 years (IQR: 31-37) in LINC and 33.0 (IQR: 30-36) in Russia ARCH; 26.6% (LINC) and 29.0% (Russia ARCH) were female; 100% were Caucasian. Nearly all participants had been tested for HCV (98.9% in LINC, 97.1% in Russia ARCH). Almost all reported being diagnosed HCV positive (98.9% in LINC, 97.1% in Russia ARCH). Only 2.3% of LINC and 5.0% of Russia ARCH participants reported ever receiving HCV treatment. Conclusions Among these cohorts of HIV-infected PWID in St. Petersburg, Russia, as of 2015 nearly all reported being tested for HCV and testing positive, while only 3.3% received any HCV treatment. In this new era of effective HCV pharmacotherapy, an enormous chasm in the HCV treatment cascade in Russia exists providing substantial opportunities for curing HCV in HIV-infected Russians with a history of injection drug use. PMID:28217368

  13. [Clinical significance of ID4 methylation detection by quantitative methylation-specific PCR in acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhong, Wen-Wen; Kang, Hui-Yuan; Wang, Li-Li; Lu, Xue-Chun; Yu, Li; Zhu, Hong-Li

    2014-06-01

    The advances of treatment improved the prognosis of the patients with acute leukemia (AL) in the last decade, but the lack of general biomarker for predicting relapse in AL, which is one of the most important factors influencing the survival and prognosis. DNA methylation of ID4 gene promoter occurred frequently in patients with AL and was found to be highly related to the tumor progression. Based on the previous work of the setup of methylation-specific quantitative PCR system for ID4 gene, this study was designed to investigate the relation between the quantitative indicator of methylation density, percentage of methylation reference(PMR) value, and different disease status of AL. PMR of ID4 was detected by MS-PCR in bone marrow (BM) samples of 17 healthy persons and 54 AL patients in the status of newly diagnosis, complete remission and disease relapse. The results showed that at different disease status, PMR value in newly diagnosed group was significantly lower than that in complete remission group (P = 0.031). Among serial samples, PMR value remained very low at the status of patients with continuous complete remission (<1.5‰), and increased along with the accumulation of tumor cells at relapse. In 1 relapse case, the abnormal rise of PMR value occurred prior to morphological relapse. PMR value seemed to be related to body tumor cell load. It is concluded that the quantitative indicator of methylation density and PMR value may reflect the change of tumor cell load in acute leukemia patients. Dynamic monitoring of PMR maybe predict leukemia relapse.

  14. Detection and characterization of acute myocardial infarction in man with use of gated magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    McNamara, M T; Higgins, C B; Schechtmann, N; Botvinick, E; Lipton, M J; Chatterjee, K; Amparo, E G

    1985-04-01

    To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and characterization of alterations in signal intensity and T2 relaxation time in acutely infarcted relative to normal myocardium 16 adult patients and normal volunteers were studied by electrocardiographically gated proton MRI. The seven volunteers were entirely asymptomatic and had no history of cardiovascular abnormality. The nine patients had each suffered an acute myocardial infarction within 5 to 12 days before the MRI studies. The diagnosis in each patient was confirmed by electrocardiographic (ECG) criteria and elevated levels of fractionated creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes. Electrocardiographically gated MRI was performed with a superconducting system operating at 0.35 tesla. MRI demonstrated infarcted myocardium as a region of high signal intensity relative to that of adjacent normal myocardium; regions of high intensity corresponded anatomically to the site of infarction as defined by the ECG changes. The mean percent difference between normal and infarcted myocardium was substantially greater on 56 msec images (70.2 +/- 21.3%) compared with 28 msec images (27.1 +/- 13.6%). Region of interest analysis revealed that infarcted myocardium had a significantly (p less than .01) prolonged T2 relaxation time (mean T2 = 80.9 msec) relative to that in normal myocardium (mean T2 = 42.3 msec) and relative to the mean T2 of left ventricular myocardium in the volunteers (mean T2 = 42.4 msec). An additional finding for each patient with myocardial infarction was a high intraluminal flow signal on 56 msec images, but this was also observed in normal subjects and is therefore a nonspecific finding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Detecting impairment: sensitive cognitive measures of dose-related acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Cash, Catherine; Peacock, Amy; Barrington, Helen; Sinnett, Nicholas; Bruno, Raimondo

    2015-04-01

    The cognitive impairment that results from acute alcohol intoxication is associated with considerable safety risks. Other psychoactive substances, such as medications, pose a similar risk to road and workplace safety. However, there is currently no legal limit for operating vehicles or working while experiencing drug-related impairment. The current study sought to identify a brief cognitive task sensitive to a meaningful degree of impairment from acute alcohol intoxication to potentially stand as a reference from which to quantify impairment from other similar substances. A placebo-controlled single-blind crossover design was employed to determine the relative sensitivity of four commonly-administered cognitive tasks (Compensatory Tracking Task, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Brief Stop Signal Task and Inspection Time Task) to alcohol-related impairment in male social drinkers at ~0.05% ascending breath alcohol concentration (BrAC), ~0.08% peak BrAC and 0.05% descending BrAC. The Inspection Time Task was identified as the most sensitive task, detecting a medium to large magnitude increase in impairment (g ≈ 0.60) at 0.05% ascending and descending BrAC, and a large magnitude effect size (g = 0.80) at 0.08% peak BrAC. The remaining tasks failed to demonstrate sensitivity to dose-dependent and limb-dependent changes in alcohol-induced impairment. The Inspection Time Task was deemed the most sensitive task for screening alcohol-related impairment based on the present results. Confirmation of equivalence with other drug-related impairment and sensitivity to alcohol-induced impairment in real-world settings should be established in future research.

  16. The HCV Revolution Did Not Happen Overnight

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The progress in HCV therapy in the last three years is similar to the progress that took HIV therapy ∼14 years. We are at the brink of approval for an all-oral drug combination that is dosed once daily as a single pill, has >95% efficacy, and is well tolerated. This article summarizes the path to this success and the challenges still ahead. PMID:24672647

  17. Prospective Follow-Up of Patients with Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Ximenez, Lia L.; Lauer, Georg M.; zur Wiesch, Julian Schulze; de Sousa, Paulo Sergio Fonseca; Ginuino, Cleber F.; Paranhos-Baccalá, Gláucia; Ulmer, Hanno; Pfeiffer, Karl P.; Goebel, Georg; Pereira, João Luiz; de Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes; Yoshida, Clara Fumiko Tachibana; Lampe, Elisabeth; Velloso, Carlos Eduardo; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Coelho, Henrique Sergio; Almeida, Adilson José; Fernandes, Carlos Augusto; Kim, Arthur Y.; Strasak, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The natural outcome of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) varies substantially among individuals. However, little is known about host and viral factors associated with a self-limiting or chronic evolution of HCV infection. Methods From 1 January 2001 through 31 December 2008, a consecutive series of 65 patients from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a well-documented diagnosis of acute HCV infection, acquired via various routes, were enrolled in this study. Patients were prospectively followed up for a median of 40 months after the estimated date of HCV infection with serial measurements of serum alanine aminotransferase, HCV RNA, and anti-HCV antibodies. Spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) was defined as undetectable levels of HCV RNA in serum, in the absence of treatment, for 3 consecutive HCV polymerase chain reaction tests within the first 6 months of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify host and viral predictors of SVC. Results The cumulative rate of SVC was 44.6% (95% confidence interval, 32.3%–57.5%). Compared with chronic HCV evolution, patients with self-limiting disease had significantly lower peak levels of anti-HCV antibodies (median, 109.0 vs 86.7 optical density–to–cutoff ratio [od/co]; P < .02), experienced disease symptoms more frequently (69.4% vs 100%; P < .001), and had lower viral load at first clinical presentation (median, 4.3 vs 0.0 log copies; P =.01). In multivariate analyses, low peak anti-HCV level (<93.5 od/co) was the only independent predictor for SVC; the hazard ratio compared with high anti-HCV levels (≥93.5 od/co) was 2.62 (95% confidence interval, 1.11–6.19; P =.03). Conclusion Our data suggest that low levels of anti-HCV antibodies during the acute phase of HCV infection are independently related to spontaneous viral clearance. PMID:20235831

  18. Circulating ECV-Associated miRNAs as Potential Clinical Biomarkers in Early Stage HBV and HCV Induced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, Joeri; Jan Poortmans, Pieter; Verhulst, Stefaan; Reynaert, Hendrik; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) virus infection is associated with the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) toward a myofibroblastic phenotype, resulting in excessive deposition of extracellular matrix, the development of liver fibrosis, and its progression toward cirrhosis. The gold standard for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis remains the liver biopsy, which is, however, associated with some mild and severe drawbacks. Other non-invasive techniques evade these drawbacks, but lack inter-stage specificity and are unable to detect early stages of fibrosis. We investigated whether circulating vesicle-associated miRNAs can be used in the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis in HBV and HCV patients. Methods: Plasma samples were obtained from 14 healthy individuals and 39 early stage fibrotic patients (F0–F2) with chronic HBV or HCV infection who underwent transient elastography (Fibroscan). Extracellular vesicles were extracted from the plasma and the level of miRNA-122, -150, -192, -21, -200b, and -92a was analyzed by qRT-PCR in total plasma and circulating vesicles. Finally, these same miRNAs were also quantified in vesicles extracted from in vitro activating primary HSCs. Results: In total plasma samples, only miRNA-200b (HBV: p = 0.0384; HCV: p = 0.0069) and miRNA-122 (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p = 0.0007) were significantly up-regulated during early fibrosis. In circulating vesicles, miRNA-192 (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p < 0.0001), -200b (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p < 0.0001), -92a (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p < 0.0001), and -150 (HBV: p = 0.0016; HCV: p = 0.004) displayed a significant down-regulation in both HBV and HCV patients. MiRNA expression profiles in vesicles isolated from in vitro activating primary mouse HSCs resembled the miRNA expression profile in circulating vesicles. Conclusion: Our analysis revealed a distinct miRNA expression pattern in total plasma and its circulating vesicles. The expression profile of miRNAs in

  19. Circulating ECV-Associated miRNAs as Potential Clinical Biomarkers in Early Stage HBV and HCV Induced Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Joeri; Jan Poortmans, Pieter; Verhulst, Stefaan; Reynaert, Hendrik; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) virus infection is associated with the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) toward a myofibroblastic phenotype, resulting in excessive deposition of extracellular matrix, the development of liver fibrosis, and its progression toward cirrhosis. The gold standard for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis remains the liver biopsy, which is, however, associated with some mild and severe drawbacks. Other non-invasive techniques evade these drawbacks, but lack inter-stage specificity and are unable to detect early stages of fibrosis. We investigated whether circulating vesicle-associated miRNAs can be used in the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis in HBV and HCV patients. Methods: Plasma samples were obtained from 14 healthy individuals and 39 early stage fibrotic patients (F0-F2) with chronic HBV or HCV infection who underwent transient elastography (Fibroscan). Extracellular vesicles were extracted from the plasma and the level of miRNA-122, -150, -192, -21, -200b, and -92a was analyzed by qRT-PCR in total plasma and circulating vesicles. Finally, these same miRNAs were also quantified in vesicles extracted from in vitro activating primary HSCs. Results: In total plasma samples, only miRNA-200b (HBV: p = 0.0384; HCV: p = 0.0069) and miRNA-122 (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p = 0.0007) were significantly up-regulated during early fibrosis. In circulating vesicles, miRNA-192 (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p < 0.0001), -200b (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p < 0.0001), -92a (HBV: p < 0.0001; HCV: p < 0.0001), and -150 (HBV: p = 0.0016; HCV: p = 0.004) displayed a significant down-regulation in both HBV and HCV patients. MiRNA expression profiles in vesicles isolated from in vitro activating primary mouse HSCs resembled the miRNA expression profile in circulating vesicles. Conclusion: Our analysis revealed a distinct miRNA expression pattern in total plasma and its circulating vesicles. The expression profile of miRNAs in

  20. Activation of extrinsic apoptosis pathway in HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients, irrespective of liver disease severity.

    PubMed

    Feuth, Thijs; Van Baarle, Debbie; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Van Erpecum, Karel J; Siersema, Peter D; Arends, Joop E

    2014-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased levels of peripheral T cell apoptosis. We aimed to study whether T cell apoptosis markers indicate pathways that may contribute to clinical progression in HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Activation of the extrinsic apoptosis pathways was measured by levels of death receptor Fas, initiator caspase 8 and effector caspases 3 and 7 activity and Annexin V binding on peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells of HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients, as well as healthy controls and HIV-infected, hepatitis B virus-infected and primary biliary cirrhosis disease controls. Association with liver fibrosis was assessed by biopsy or by transient elastography. HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients displayed enhanced peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cell apoptosis. Caspase 8 activity was highest in HIV-HCV coinfection, without enhanced downstream activity of caspases 3 and 7. Level of peripheral T cell apoptosis was independent of liver fibrosis or other disease parameters in all disease groups. The extrinsic apoptosis pathway is upregulated in HCV monoinfection and HIV-HCV coinfection, but this is independent of liver disease severity.

  1. Cellular Immune Responses in Seronegative Sexual Contacts of Acute Hepatitis C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sanaa M.; Amin, Ashraf; Madwar, Mohamed; Graham, Camilla S.; He, Qi; Al Tawil, Ahmed; Rasenack, Jens; Nakano, Tatsunori; Robertson, Betty; Ismail, Alaa; Koziel, Margaret James

    2004-01-01

    Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) is typically defined as new viremia and antibody seroconversion. Rates and immunologic correlates of hepatitis C clearance have therefore been based on clearance of viremia only in individuals who initially had an antibody response. We sought to characterize the immunological correlates of clearance in patients with acute hepatitis C and their sexual contacts. We prospectively determined CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in index patients with acute HCV and their sexual contacts who developed acute infection, either with or without spontaneous clearance, as well as those contacts who never developed viremia. Responses were measured using proliferation and ELISpot assays for CD4+ and CD8+ responses. We demonstrate in this prospective study that cellular immune responses can develop in exposed but persistently aviremic and antibody-negative individuals as well as those individuals with spontaneous clearance of acute HCV. These findings lend further credence to the importance of cellular immune responses in recovery from HCV and suggest that low exposure to HCV may lead to development of HCV-specific immune responses without ongoing HCV replication. This finding has important implications for HCV vaccine and therapeutic development. PMID:15507612

  2. Thallium-201 versus technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial imaging in detection and evaluation of patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, B.; Thrall, J.H.

    1980-12-18

    Thallium-201 myocardial imaging is of value in the early detection and evaluation of patients with suspected acute infarction. Thallium imaging may have a special value in characterizing patients with cardiogenic shock and in detecting patients at risk for subsequent infarction or death or death or both, before hospital discharge. Approximately 95 percent of pateints with transmural or nontransmural myocardial infarction can be detected with technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial imaging if the imaging is performed 24 to 72 hours after the onset of symptoms. Pyrophosphate imaging may have an important role in the evaluation of patients during the early follow-up period after hospital discharge from an episode of acute infarction. The finding of a persistently positive pyrophosphate image suggests a poor prognosis and is associated with a relatively large incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction and death.

  3. Virological Mechanisms in the Coinfection between HIV and HCV.

    PubMed

    Liberto, Maria Carla; Zicca, Emilia; Pavia, Grazia; Quirino, Angela; Marascio, Nadia; Torti, Carlo; Focà, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Due to shared transmission routes, coinfection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is common in patients infected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The immune-pathogenesis of liver disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients is a multifactorial process. Several studies demonstrated that HIV worsens the course of HCV infection, increasing the risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, HCV might increase immunological defects due to HIV and risk of comorbidities. A specific cross-talk among HIV and HCV proteins in coinfected patients modulates the natural history, the immune responses, and the life cycle of both viruses. These effects are mediated by immune mechanisms and by a cross-talk between the two viruses which could interfere with host defense mechanisms. In this review, we focus on some virological/immunological mechanisms of the pathogenetic interactions between HIV and HCV in the human host.

  4. Cross-genotype-reactivity of the immunodominant HCV CD8 T-cell epitope NS3-1073.

    PubMed

    Fytili, P; Dalekos, G N; Schlaphoff, V; Suneetha, P V; Sarrazin, C; Zauner, W; Zachou, K; Berg, T; Manns, M P; Klade, C S; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H

    2008-07-23

    The HCV-specific HLA-A2-restricted NS3(1073) epitope is one of the most frequently recognized epitopes in hepatitis C. NS3(1073)-specific T-cell responses are associated with clearance of acute HCV-infection. Therefore this epitope is an interesting candidate for a HCV-peptide vaccine. However, heterogeneity between genotypes and mutations in the epitope has to be considered as an obstacle. We here identified 34 naturally occurring NS3(1073)-variants, as compared with the wild type genotype-1 variants (CVNGVCWTV/CINGVCWTV) by sequencing sera of 251 Greek and German patients and searching for published HCV-genomes. The frequency of variants among genotype-1 patients was 10%. Importantly, HLA-A2 binding was reduced only in 3 genotype 1 mutants while all non-genotype 1 variants showed strong HLA-A2-binding. By screening 28 variants in ELISPOT assays from T cell lines we could demonstrate that HCV-NS3(1073)-wild-type-specific T-cells displayed cross-genotype-reactivity, in particular against genotypes 4-6 variants. However, single aa changes within the TCR-binding domain completely abolished recognition even in case of conservative aa exchanges within genotype-1. NS3(1073)-specific T-cell lines from recovered, chronically infected, and HCV-negative individuals showed no major difference in the pattern of cross-recognition although the proliferation of NS3(1073)-specific T-cells differed significantly between the groups. Importantly, the recognition pattern against the 28 variants was also identical directly ex vivo in a patient with acute HCV infection and a healthy volunteer vaccinated with the peptide vaccine IC41 containing the NS3(1073)-wild-type peptide. Thus, partial cross-genotype recognition of HCV NS3(1073)-specific CD8 T cells is possible; however, even single aa exchanges can significantly limit the potential efficacy of vaccines containing the NS3(1073)-wild-type peptide.

  5. Survey of US Correctional Institutions for Routine HCV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Ann E.; Bazerman, Lauri; Solomon, Liza; Patry, Emily; Rich, Josiah D.; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain HCV testing practices among US prisons and jails, we conducted a survey study in 2012, consisting of medical directors of all US state prisons and 40 of the largest US jails, that demonstrated a minority of US prisons and jails conduct routine HCV testing. Routine voluntary HCV testing in correctional facilities is urgently needed to increase diagnosis, enable risk-reduction counseling and preventive health care, and facilitate evaluation for antiviral treatment. PMID:25393180

  6. Virological effects of ISIS 14803, an antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES), on HCV IRES in chronic hepatitis C patients and examination of the potential role of primary and secondary HCV resistance in the outcome of treatment.

    PubMed

    Soler, Muriel; McHutchison, John G; Kwoh, T Jesse; Dorr, F Andrew; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2004-12-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides represent a promising class of antiviral agents. ISIS 14803 is a 20-unit phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide that inhibited hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and protein expression in cell culture and mouse models. A Phase I dose-escalation clinical study of ISIS 14803 was performed in 24 patients with HCV genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C. The patients received 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 mg/kg of ISIS 14803 for 4 weeks. Two of them receiving 2.0 mg/kg, experienced a significant (>1.0 log10) viral load reduction and nine other patients experienced minor (<1.0 log10) viral load reductions that were difficult to definitively distinguish from assay or patient variations. The aims of this study were to examine the effect of ISIS 14803 on its target site and neighbouring region quasispecies evolution, and to determine whether primary and secondary HCV resistance contributed to the observed virological response rate. The HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES), including the ISIS 14803 target site in virus specimens collected from patients at baseline and end-of-treatment, was sequenced. An extensive IRES quasispecies analysis was performed in 10 of the patients at various time points before, during and after ISIS 14803 treatment. A significant IRES genetic evolution was found in three out of 10 patients through quasispecies analysis suggesting that treatment with ISIS 14803, a drug designed to bind to HCV RNA, exerted a selective pressure on HCV IRES. However, no mutations in the ISIS 14803 target site, which would inhibit binding of the oligonucleotide to HCV RNA, were detected before (primary resistance) or after treatment (secondary resistance) with the oligonucleotide. Furthermore, no obvious nucleotide changes in the surrounding IRES region that might possibly affect oligonucleotide binding were detected.

  7. Detection of clonality by polymerase chain reaction in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, D A; Nowak, J S

    1994-09-01

    DNA-based PCR with various sets of primers for TCR gamma/delta, and Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes were used to study clonality in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Amplification of the IgH CDR-III was observed in 75 of 120 analyzed cases (62.5%). From all analyzed groups, the IgH gene rearrangement was most often observed in pre-B ALL (85.7%) and was rather rare in null-ALL (34.5%). TCR delta gene rearrangement was the most common, and was observed in 77 patients (64.2%). The typical pattern of rearrangements was defined as an incomplete V delta 2 to D delta 3, V delta 2 to D delta 2, or D delta 3 to D delta 2 recombination product. Rearrangements of TCR gamma gene we observed in 61 cases (50.8%). TCR gamma gene rearrangements were detected predominantly in null-ALL and early B-ALL (55.2% and 60%, respectively) and were rather rare in other groups. Of all eight V segments of V gamma I group, the most frequent gene usage concerns regions V gamma 2, V gamma 4, and psi V gamma 7. We have confirmed that IgH gene amplification, together with TCR gamma and delta gene amplification, provides a rapid, sensitive approach to assessing clonality in ALL almost in 100% of cases.

  8. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  9. Minimal residual disease detection in Tunisian B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, S.; Hamadou, W.S.; Boulland, M.L.; Youssef, Y.B.; Achour, B.; Regaieg, H.; Khelif, A.; Fest, T.; Soua, Z.

    2017-01-01

    IGH gene rearrangement and IGK-Kde gene deletion can be used as molecular markers for the assessment of B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Minimal residual disease detected based on those markers is currently the most reliable prognosis factor in B-ALL. The aim of this study was to use clonal IGH/IGK-Kde gene rearrangements to confirm B-ALL diagnosis and to evaluate the treatment outcome of Tunisian leukemic patients by monitoring the minimal residual disease (MRD) after induction chemotherapy. Seventeen consecutive newly diagnosed B-ALL patients were investigated by multiplex PCR assay and real time quantitative PCR according to BIOMED 2 conditions. The vast majority of clonal VH-JH rearrangements included VH3 gene. For IGK deletion, clonal VK1f/6-Kde recombinations were mainly identified. These rearrangements were quantified to follow-up seven B-ALL after induction using patient-specific ASO. Four patients had an undetectable level of MRD with a sensitivity of up to 10-5. This molecular approach allowed identification of prognosis risk group and adequate therapeutic decision. The IGK-Kde and IGH gene rearrangements might be used for diagnosis and MRD monitoring of B-ALL, introduced for the first time in Tunisian laboratories. PMID:28099581

  10. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Shanthi, Viswanathan; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis.

  11. Kidney damage biomarkers detect acute kidney injury but only functional markers predict mortality after paraquat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Fahim; Buckley, Nicholas A; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Pickering, John W; Peake, Philip; Palangasinghe, Chathura; Wijerathna, Thilini; Ratnayake, Indira; Shihana, Fathima; Endre, Zoltan H

    2015-09-02

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common following paraquat ingestion. The diagnostic performance of injury biomarkers was investigated in serial blood and urine samples from patients from 5 Sri Lankan hospitals. Functional AKI was diagnosed using serum creatinine (sCr) or serum cystatin C (sCysC). The 95th centile in healthy subjects defined the urinary biomarker cutoffs for diagnosing structural AKI. 50 poisoned patients provided 2 or more specimens, 76% developed functional AKI [AKIN stage 1 (n=12), 2 (n=7) or 3 (n=19)]; 19/26 patients with AKIN stage 2/3 also had functional AKI by sCysC criteria (≥50% increase). Urinary cystatin C (uCysC), clusterin (uClu) and NGAL (uNGAL) increased within 24h of ingestion compared with NoAKI patients and healthy controls. Each biomarker demonstrated moderate diagnostic utility [AUC-ROC: uCysC 0.79, uNGAL 0.79, uClu 0.68] for diagnosis of functional AKI at 16h. Death occurred only in subjects with functional AKI. Structural biomarker-based definitions detected more AKI than did sCr or sCysC, but did not independently predict death. Renal injury biomarkers did not add clinical value to patients who died rapidly due to multi-organ failure. Use of injury biomarkers within 16-24h may guide early intervention for reno-protection in less severe paraquat poisoning.

  12. Detection of Rotavirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Zagazig University Hospitals in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salwa Badrelsabbah; El-Bialy, Abdallah Abdelkader; Mohammed, Mervat Soliman; El-Sheikh, Azza Omar; Elhewala, Ahmed; Bahgat, Shereen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and young children all over the world. The objective of the study was to compare different methods for detecting rotavirus and to assess the burden of rotavirus as a causative agent for AGE in children younger than five. Methods: This case control study included 65 children with AGE and 35 healthy control children. They were chosen from the Pediatric Department of Zagazig University Hospitals from October 2014 to March 2015. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus by the immunochromatography test (ICT), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qr RT-PCR). Results: Fifty out of the 65 patients (76.9%) were positive for qr RT-PCR. Forty-five (69.2%) and 44 (67.7%) were positive for ICT and ELISA, respectively. There was a significant association between the severity of the disease as determined by the Vesikari score and rotavirus infection. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that ICT is a useful method for the rapid screening of group A rotavirus in fecal specimens, because it is rapid, inexpensive, easy to perform, and requires very little equipment. In addition, this study highlights the substantial health burden of rotavirus AGE among children less than five. PMID:26435821

  13. Two-dimensional paper chromatography-based fluorescent immunosensor for detecting acute myocardial infarction markers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Min-Ha; Mok, Rak-Sun; Jeon, Jin-Woo; Lim, Guei-Sam; Chai, Chan-Young; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2014-09-15

    A novel washing scheme following antigen-antibody reactions with analyte was used during construction of a fluorescent immunosensor to resolve the background problem in the lateral flow assay with human serum. An immuno-membrane strip was devised to simultaneously measure cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatinine kinase-MB isoform (CK-MB), and myoglobin to diagnose acute myocardial infarction. This strip was then installed within a cartridge containing a built-in washing solution tank, which was used to supply the solution across the signal generation pad of the strip after the immune reactions. Such cross-flow washing was initiated by onset-signaling from the internal control and began to run automatically upon sample addition. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor displayed a stably suppressed background baseline, enabling us to attain a low detection limit for cTnI (0.05 ng/mL) as well as favorable reproducibility for repetitive measurements (relative standard deviation <10%). No interference was observed among the different complex formations at the respective analyte sites, and no artifacts were caused by sample matrices. We tested the performance relationship with the Pathfast reference system for positive serum samples (36 for cTnI, 58 for CK-MB, and 17 for myoglobin), and the correlation coefficients were >0.98. This result suggests that the new immunosensor system based on two-dimensional chromatography can be used for clinical testing.

  14. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured aneurysm detected by postmortem angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is mostly caused by head trauma, but intrinsic causes also exist such as aneurysm rupture. We describe here a case involving a man in his 70s who was found lying on the bedroom floor by his family. CT performed at the hospital showed ASDH and a forensic autopsy was requested. Postmortem cerebral angiography showed dilatation of the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery, which coincided with the dilated part of the Sylvian fissure. Extravasation of contrast medium into the subdural hematoma from this site was suggestive of a ruptured aneurysm. Autopsy revealed a fleshy hematoma (total weight 110 g) in the right subdural space and findings of brain herniation. As indicated on angiography, a ruptured saccular aneurysm was confirmed at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. Obvious injuries to the head or face could not be detected on either external or internal examination, and intrinsic ASDH due to a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was determined as the cause of death. One of the key points of forensic diagnosis is the strict differentiation between intrinsic and extrinsic onset for conditions leading to death. Although most subdural hematomas (SDH) are caused by extrinsic factors, forensic pathologists should consider the possibility of intrinsic SDH. In addition, postmortem angiography can be useful for identifying vascular lesions in such cases.

  15. Development of a MALDI MS‐based platform for early detection of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Vanmassenhove, Jill; Glorieux, Griet; Metzger, Jochen; Dakna, Mohammed; Pejchinovski, Martin; Jankowski, Vera; Mansoorian, Bahareh; Husi, Holger; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    1 Purpose Septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with poor outcome. This can partly be attributed to delayed diagnosis and incomplete understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. Our aim was to develop an early predictive test for AKI based on the analysis of urinary peptide biomarkers by MALDI‐MS. 2 Experimental design Urine samples from 95 patients with sepsis were analyzed by MALDI‐MS. Marker search and multimarker model establishment were performed using the peptide profiles from 17 patients with existing or within the next 5 days developing AKI and 17 with no change in renal function. Replicates of urine sample pools from the AKI and non‐AKI patient groups and normal controls were also included to select the analytically most robust AKI markers. 3 Results Thirty‐nine urinary peptides were selected by cross‐validated variable selection to generate a support vector machine multidimensional AKI classifier. Prognostic performance of the AKI classifier on an independent validation set including the remaining 61 patients of the study population (17 controls and 44 cases) was good with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.82 and a sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 76%, respectively. 4 Conclusion and clinical relevance A urinary peptide marker model detects onset of AKI with acceptable accuracy in septic patients. Such a platform can eventually be transferred to the clinic as fast MALDI‐MS test format. PMID:27119821

  16. Comparison of five cardiac markers in the detection of reperfusion after thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, F.; Kane, M.; Forde, A.; Gannon, F.; Daly, K.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate and compare the clinical usefulness of serial measurements of five cardiac marker proteins, namely creatine kinase (CK), CK-MB mass, myoglobin, troponin T, and myosin light chain 1, in the early detection of reperfusion after thrombolytic treatment. METHOD--Serial blood samples were taken from 26 patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. Concentrations of the five markers were assayed in each sample. Thrombolytic treatment was given to the patients who were divided into those who reperfused (n = 17, group A) and those who failed to reperfuse (n = 9, group B) on the basis of clinical signs and angiography within 24 h. RESULTS--The release profiles of CK, CK-MB mass, myoglobin, and troponin T for patients in group A differed from those of patients in group B. No difference was observed in the release profile of myosin light chain 1 between the two groups. The time to peak concentration of CK, CK-MB mass, myoglobin, and troponin T occurred significantly earlier in patients of group A than in those of group B, with myoglobin peaking earlier than the other markers. An index, defined as the ratio of the concentration of each marker immediately before and 2 h after the start of thrombolytic treatment, was calculated for each marker in groups A and B. The 2 h myoglobin and troponin T indices were significantly different between groups A and B. The diagnostic efficiency of the myoglobin index, however, was best at 85%. CONCLUSIONS--These studies suggest that myoglobin has greater potential than the other markers examined in the detection of reperfusion after thrombolytic treatment. PMID:7786656

  17. Clinical relevance of multiple respiratory virus detection in adult patients with acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Hye Ryoun

    2015-04-01

    Because increasing numbers of nasopharyngeal swab specimens from adult patients with acute respiratory illness (ARI) are being tested by respiratory virus (RV) multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR (RVM-RT-PCR), multiple RV detection (MRVD) is being encountered more frequently. However, the clinical relevance of MRVD in adult patients has rarely been evaluated. The clinical characteristics of hospitalized adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests were compared to those of patients with single RV detection (SRVD) during a single year at a tertiary care center. MRVD was observed in 26 of the 190 adult patients (13.7%). The patients with MRVD had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease than the patients with SRVD (34.6% versus 15.9%, crude odds ratio [OR]=2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.13 to 6.98, P=0.03). Although the former were more likely than the latter to receive mechanical ventilation (19.2% versus 6.7%, crude OR=3.31, 95% CI=1.05 to 10.47, P=0.049), the length of hospital stay (median, 7 versus 6.5 days; P=0.66), and the in-hospital mortality rate (7.7% versus 4.3%, crude OR=1.87, 95% CI=0.37 to 9.53, P=0.35) were not different between the two groups. In multivariate analysis, chronic lung disease was associated with MRVD (adjusted OR=3.08, 95% CI=1.12 to 8.46, P=0.03). In summary, it was not uncommon to encounter adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests of nasopharyngeal swab specimens. MRVD was associated with chronic lung disease rather than the severity of the ARI.

  18. Trace amounts of sporadically reappearing HCV RNA can cause infection

    PubMed Central

    Veerapu, Naga Suresh; Park, Su-Hyung; Tully, Damien C.; Allen, Todd M.; Rehermann, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Successful hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment is defined as the absence of viremia 6 months after therapy cessation. We previously reported that trace amounts of HCV RNA, below the sensitivity of the standard clinical assay, can reappear sporadically in treatment responders. Here, we assessed the infectivity of this RNA and infused 3 chimpanzees sequentially at 9-week intervals with plasma or PBMCs from patients who tested positive for trace amounts of HCV RNA more than 6 months after completing pegylated IFN-α/ribavirin therapy. A fourth chimpanzee received HCV RNA–negative plasma and PBMCs from healthy blood donors. The 3 experimental chimpanzees, but not the control chimpanzee, generated HCV-specific T cell responses against nonstructural and structural HCV sequences 6–10 weeks after the first infusion of patient plasma and during subsequent infusions. In 1 chimpanzee, T cell responses declined, and this animal developed high-level viremia at week 27. Deep sequencing of HCV demonstrated transmission of a minor HCV variant from the first infusion donor that persisted in the chimpanzee for more than 6 months despite undetectable systemic viremia. Collectively, these results demonstrate that trace amounts of HCV RNA, which appear sporadically in successfully treated patients, can be infectious; furthermore, transmission can be masked in the recipient by an extended eclipse phase prior to establishing high-level viremia. PMID:25003189

  19. Antibodies against non-structural c100/3 and structural core antigen of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, C F; Takahashi, Y; Vanderborght, B O; Rouzere, C D; França, M S; Takahashi, C; Takamizawa, A; Yoshida, I; Schatzmayr, H G

    1993-01-01

    Two groups of patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) maintenance were evaluated for their antibody response to non-structural c100/3 protein and structural core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Forty-six patients (Group 1) never presented liver abnormalities during HD treatment, while 52 patients (Group 2) had either current or prior liver enzyme elevations. Prevalence rates of 32.6% and 41.3% were found for anti-c100/3 and anti-HCV core antibodies, respectively, in patients with silent infections (Group 1). The rate of anti-c100/3 in patients of Group 2 was 71.15% and reached 86.5% for anti-HCV core antibodies. The recognition of anti-c100/3 and anti-core antibodies was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1. A line immunoassay composed of structural and non-structural peptides was used as a confirmation assay. HBV infection, measured by the presence of anti-HBc antibodies, was observed in 39.8% of the patients. Six were HBsAg chronic carriers and 13 had naturally acquired anti-HBs antibodies. The duration of HD treatment was correlated with anti-HCV positivity. A high prevalence of 96.7% (Group 2) was found in patients who underwent more than 5 years of treatment. Our results suggest that anti-HCV core ELISA is more accurate for detecting HCV infection than anti-c100/3. Although the risk associated with the duration of HD treatment and blood transfusion was high, additional factors such as a significant non-transfusional spread of HCV seems to play a role as well. The identification of infective patients by more sensitive methods for HCV genome detection should help to control the transmission of HCV in the unit under study.

  20. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Doepke, Mandy; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Todt, Daniel; Wölk, Benno; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Geffers, Robert; Lauber, Chris; Kaderali, Lars; Penin, François; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular infectivity point to

  1. ThermoSpots to Detect Hypothermia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Thomas B.; Kennedy, Neil; Ndoya, Noel; Emond, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hypothermia is a risk factor for increased mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Yet frequent temperature measurement remains unfeasible in under-resourced units in developing countries. ThermoSpot is a continuous temperature monitoring sticker designed originally for neonates. When applied to skin, its liquid crystals are designed to turn black with hypothermia and remain green with normothermia. Aims To (i) estimate the diagnostic accuracy of ThermoSpots for detecting WHO-defined hypothermia (core temperature <35.5°C or peripheral temperature <35.0°C) in children with SAM and (ii) determine their acceptability amongst mothers. Methods Children with SAM in a malnutrition unit in Malawi were enrolled during March-July 2010. The sensitivity and specificity of ThermoSpots were calculated by comparing the device colour against ‘gold standard’ rectal temperatures taken on admission and follow up peripheral temperatures taken until discharge. Guardians completed a questionnaire to assess acceptability. Results Hypothermia was uncommon amongst the 162 children enrolled. ThermoSpot successfully detected the one rectal temperature and two peripheral temperatures recorded that met the WHO definition of hypothermia. Overall, 3/846 (0.35%) temperature measurements were in the WHO-defined hypothermia range. Interpreting the brown transition colour (between black and green) as hypothermia improved sensitivities. For milder hypothermia definitions, sensitivities declined (<35.4°C, 50.0%; <35.9°C, 39.2%). Specificity was consistently above 94%. From questionnaires, 40/43 (93%) mothers reported they were 90–100% happy with the device overall. Free-text answers revealed themes of “Skin Rashes”, “User-satisfaction” and “Empowerment". Conclusion Although hypothermia was uncommon in this study, ThermoSpots successfully detected these episodes in malnourished children and were acceptable to mothers. Research in settings where

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of HCV Monoinfection and HIV/HCV Coinfection in Injection Drug Users in Liuzhou, Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yi; Wei, Qi Hou; Chen, Liu Jun; Chan, Pui Chung; Lai, Wen Sheng; He, Ming Liang; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Lee, Shui Shan

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infection and HCV/HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) co-infection are growing problems in injection drug users (IDU). Their prevalence and genotypic patterns vary with geographic locations. Access to harm reduction measures is opening up opportunities for improving the HIV/HCV profiling of IDU in China, where IDUs account for a significant proportion of the two infections especially in the southern part of the country. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross sectional study was conducted. Through the Liuzhou Methadone Clinic, a total of 117 injection drug users (IDUs) were recruited from Guangxi, Southern China. A majority of the IDUs (96%) were HCV antibody positive, of which 21% were HIV infected. Unlike HCV monoinfection, there was spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of HIV/HCV coinfection, the latter also characterized by a higher prevalence of needle-sharing. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that genotype 6a was predominant in the study population. There were shorter genetic distances among the 6a sequences compared to the other HCV subtypes-1a, 3a, and 3b. Conclusion/Significance The results suggested that HIV and HCV were introduced at around the same time to the IDU populations in Southern China, followed by their differential spread as determined by the biologic characteristics of the virus and the intensity of behavioural risk. This pattern is different from that in other South East Asian countries where HCV infections have probably predated HIV. PMID:18974888

  3. Superior outcomes in HIV-positive kidney transplant patients compared with HCV-infected or HIV/HCV-coinfected recipients.

    PubMed

    Sawinski, Deirdre; Forde, Kimberly A; Eddinger, Kevin; Troxel, Andrea B; Blumberg, Emily; Tebas, Pablo; Abt, Peter L; Bloom, Roy D

    2015-08-01

    The prerequisite for an 'undetectable' HIV viral load has restricted access to transplantation for HIV-infected kidney recipients. However, HCV-infected recipients, owing to the historic limitations of HCV therapy in patients with renal disease, are commonly viremic at transplant and have universal access. To compare the effect of HIV, HCV, and HIV/HCV coinfection on kidney transplant patient and allograft outcomes, we performed a retrospective study of kidney recipients transplanted from January 1996 through December 2013. In multivariable analysis, patient (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.66-1.24) and allograft survival (0.60, 40-0.88) in 492 HIV patients did not differ significantly from the 117,791 patient-uninfected reference group. This was superior to outcomes in both the 5605 patient HCV group for death (1.44, 1.33-1.56) and graft loss (1.43, 1.31-1.56), as well as the 147 patient HIV/HCV coinfected group for death (2.26, 1.45-3.52) and graft loss (2.59, 1.60-4.19). HIV infection did not adversely affect recipient or allograft survival and was associated with superior outcomes compared with both HCV infection and HIV/HCV coinfection in this population. Thus, pretransplant viral eradication and/or immediate posttransplant eradication should be studied as potential strategies to improve posttransplant outcomes in HCV-infected kidney recipients.

  4. A Human Vaccine Strategy Based On Chimpanzee Adenoviral and MVA Vectors That Primes, Boosts and Sustains Functional HCV Specific T-Cell Memory*

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D.; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W.; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Sorbo, Mariarosaria Del; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T-cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype-1b. Analysis employed single cell mass cytometry (CyTOF), and HLA class-I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV specific T-cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8+ and CD4+ HCV specific T-cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T-cell populations are generated and T-cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) following heterologous MVA boost. We have developed a HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained and balanced T-cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine. PMID:25378645

  5. A human vaccine strategy based on chimpanzee adenoviral and MVA vectors that primes, boosts, and sustains functional HCV-specific T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2014-11-05

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies, and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study, we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A, and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype 1b. Analysis used single-cell mass cytometry and human leukocyte antigen class I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV-specific T cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) HCV-specific T cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T cell populations are generated, and T cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) after heterologous MVA boost. We have developed an HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained, and balanced T cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine.

  6. Therapeutic vaccines in HBV: lessons from HCV.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-02-01

    Currently, millions of people infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are committed to decades of treatment with anti-viral therapy to control viral replication. However, new tools for immunotherapy that include both viral vectors and molecular checkpoint inhibitors are now available. This has led to a resurgence of interest in new strategies to develop immunotherapeutic strategies with the aim of inducing HBeAg seroconversion--an end-point that has been associated with a decrease in the rates of disease progression. Ultimately, a true cure will involve the elimination of covalently closed circular DNA which presents a greater challenge for immunotherapy. In this manuscript, I describe the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for HBV that are approaching or currently in clinical studies, and draw on observations of T cell function in natural infection supported by recent animal studies that may lead to additional rational vaccine strategies using checkpoint inhibitors. I also draw on our recent experience in developing potent vaccines for HCV prophylaxis based on simian adenoviral and MVA vectors used in prime-boost strategies in both healthy volunteers and HCV infected patients. I have shown that the induction of T cell immune responses is markedly attenuated when administered to people with persistent HCV viremia. These studies and recently published animal studies using the woodchuck model suggest that potent vaccines based on DNA or adenoviral vectored vaccination represent a rational way forward. However, combining these with drugs to suppress viral replication, alongside checkpoint inhibitors may be required to induce long-term immune control.

  7. Assessment of HCV genotypes in Yunnan Province of Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiongfen; Yao, Yufeng; Shen, Yunsong; Cao, Danfeng; Li, Yalin; Zhang, Shuqiong; Cun, Wei; Sun, Mingbo; Yu, Jiankun; Shi, Li; Dong, Shaozhong

    2016-12-23

    Recently, we reported that the frequency of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and subtypes has rapidly changed among intravenous drug users (IDUs) in Yunnan Province over the last 5 years; this is especially true for subtype 6a which has increased in frequency from 5 to 15%. Here, we assessed 120 HCV-positive plasma samples from the general population (GP). HCV NS5B fragments were amplified and sequenced by PCR. We identified four HCV genotypes (1, 2, 3 and 6) and seven HCV subtypes (1b, 2a, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6n, and 6k) in this population. Genotype 3 was predominant, with a distribution frequency of 0.484, followed by genotype 1 (0.283), genotype 6 (0.133) and genotype 2 (0.100). HCV subtypes 3b (frequency 0.292) and 1b (frequency 0.283) were the most common subtypes. A comparison of the current data with previous results reported for IDUs showed that the distribution frequencies of genotypes 1, 2 and 6 were significantly different between patients in the GP and IDUs (P < 0.05). Among the HCV subtypes, the distribution frequencies of 1b, 2a, 6a, and 6n were significantly different between patients in the GP and IDU groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, Phylogenetic analyses showed that HCV subtype 6a strains isolated from IDUs and the GP were intermixed and not separately clustered. HCV subtype 6a was predominant not only among IDUs but also among those in the GP in the Guangdong Province and Vietnam. However, HCV subtype 6a was predominant only among IDUs and not among those in the GP in the Yunnan and Guangxi Provinces. Our results indicate that the HCV subtype 6a could rapidly spread across China.

  8. Comparison of the Abbott Realtime HIV-1 and HCV viral load assays with commercial competitor assays.

    PubMed

    Schutten, Martin

    2008-07-01

    The introduction of commercially available quantitative HIV-1 RNA detection methods at the end of the last century has had a significant impact on the management of patients requiring treatment. Similarly for hepatitis C virus (HCV), clinical decision-making with respect to initiation and prolonging therapy is largely based on data from viral load assays. The methods developed in the early 1990s and further improved since then still have significant drawbacks. For example, they are labor intensive, have a small dynamic range and are contamination sensitive. The development of real-time detection techniques for reverse transcription PCR has in part solved these problems. In the present review the advantages and disadvantages of the recently marketed Abbott Realtime HCV and HIV-1 viral load assays relative to their competitors will be discussed.

  9. Hsp72 is an early and sensitive biomarker to detect acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Pérez-Villalva, Rosalba; Cortés-González, Cesar; Ojeda-Cervantes, Marcos; Gamba, Gerardo; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Bobadilla, Norma A

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether heat shock protein Hsp72 is an early and sensitive biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) as well as to monitor a renoprotective strategy. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into six groups: sham-operated and rats subjected to 10, 20, 30, 45 and 60 min of bilateral ischemia (I) and 24 h of reperfusion (R). Different times of reperfusion (3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h) were also evaluated in 30 other rats subjected to 30 min of ischemia. Hsp72 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were determined in both kidney and urine. Hsp72-specificity as a biomarker to assess the success of a renoprotective intervention was evaluated in rats treated with different doses of spironolactone before I/R. Renal Hsp72 mRNA and protein, as well as urinary Hsp72 levels, gradually increased relative to the extent of renal injury induced by different periods of ischemia quantified by histomorphometry as a benchmark of kidney damage. Urinary Hsp72 increased significantly after 3 h and continued rising until 18 h, followed by restoration after 120 h of reperfusion in accord with histopathological findings. Spironolactone renoprotection was associated with normalization of urinary Hsp72 levels. Accordingly, urinary Hsp72 was significantly increased in patients with clinical AKI before serum creatinine elevation. Our results show that urinary Hsp72 is a useful biomarker for early detection and stratification of AKI. In addition, urinary Hsp72 levels are sensitive enough to monitor therapeutic interventions and the degree of tubular recovery following an I/R insult.

  10. The unique HCV genotype distribution and the discovery of a novel subtype 6u among IDUs co-infected with HIV-1 in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xueshan; Lu, Ling; Tee, Kok Keng; Zhao, Wenhua; Wu, Jianguo; Yu, Jing; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yixiong; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood; Hagedorn, Curt H; Takebe, Yutaka

    2008-07-01

    The Yunnan province is the epicenter of HIV-1 epidemics in China and a center for drug trafficking to the other parts of the world. In six prefectures of this province, a total of 132 IDUs were recruited to determine the sero-prevalence of HCV and HIV-1 and the positive rates were 93.94% and 68.18%, respectively (P<0.001). Co-infection with HCV and HIV-1 was found among 89 IDUs, of whom several HCV fragments were amplified and sequenced. Sequences of the HCV 5'NCR-C and NS5B region were determined from 82 IDUs. Phylogenetic analyses showed consistent genotyping among 80 IDUs. Among them HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6n, and a tentatively assigned novel 6u subtype were found in 1 (1.25%), 16 (20%), 19 (23.75%), 24 (30%), 4 (5%), 9 (11.25%) and 7 (8.75%) individuals, respectively. In two IDUs, genotyping results were discordant, suggesting mixed HCV infections or recombination. The proportion of patients with HCV 1b tended to decrease from the north to south and from the east to west in this province. Genotype 3 and 6 strains were more frequent in the southern prefectures. The novel subtype 6u strains were only detected in Dehong which borders Myanmar. Our findings showed a unique pattern of HCV genotype distribution, which is similar to that in the southeastern Asian countries but distinct from that among the general population in China. Routes of drug trafficking and the resulting high prevalence of HIV-1 infection may have contributed to this pattern of HCV genotype distribution.

  11. No evidence of Polyomavirus and EBV infections in Italian patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia infected chronically with HCV.

    PubMed

    Comar, Manola; Zanotta, Nunzia; Del Savio, Rossella; Vascotto, Fulvia; Calabrese, Nadia; Zorat, Francesca; Pozzato, Gabriele

    2014-04-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia is a lymphoproliferative disorder associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In patients chronically affected by HCV the prevalence of mixed cryoglobulinemia is variable ranging from 0% to 56%. To verify whether polyomaviruses (PyV) play a role in this disorder a total of 222 blood samples from 63 HCV chronic patients, 43 with mixed cryoglobulinemia, 59 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 50 polytransfused patients, and 50 blood donors were evaluated for Merkel (MCPyV), BKV, JCV, and SV40. EBV was additionally included in the analysis since association with this disorder has been reported. Mixed cryoglobulinemia patients infected chronically with HCV resulted negative for both PyV and EBV. MCPyV was found in 1 subject with Merkel Cell Carcinoma, in 10% of polytransfused and in 10% of blood donors while EBV was detected in 22% of polytransfused, 10% of B-cell lymphatic leukemia patients and 4% of blood donors (P < 0.01). Taken together, the absence of PyV and EBV in HCV-mixed cryoglobulinemia patients seems to exclude a direct involvement of these viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease while the presence of MCPyV in healthy individuals, at the same rate as in polytransfused patients, may reinforce data on a minimal role of this virus in other human pathologies.

  12. Metabolic Characterization of Advanced Liver Fibrosis in HCV Patients as Studied by Serum 1H-NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Embade, Nieves; Mariño, Zoe; Diercks, Tammo; Cano, Ainara; Lens, Sabela; Cabrera, Diana; Navasa, Miquel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Caballería, Joan; Castro, Azucena; Bosch, Jaume; Mato, José M; Millet, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Several etiologies result in chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). Despite its high incidence and the severe economic and medical consequences, liver disease is still commonly overlooked due to the lack of efficient non-invasive diagnostic methods. While several techniques have been tested for the detection of fibrosis, the available biomarkers still present severe limitations that preclude their use in clinical diagnostics. Liver diseases have also been the subject of metabolomic analysis. Here, we demonstrate the suitability of 1H NMR spectroscopy for characterizing the metabolism of liver fibrosis induced by HCV. Serum samples from HCV patients without fibrosis or with liver cirrhosis were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and the results were submitted to multivariate and univariate statistical analysis. PLS-DA test was able to discriminate between advanced fibrotic and non-fibrotic patients and several metabolites were found to be up or downregulated in patients with cirrhosis. The suitability of the most significantly regulated metabolites was validated by ROC analysis. Our study reveals that choline, acetoacetate and low-density lipoproteins are the most informative biomarkers for predicting cirrhosis in HCV patients. Our results demonstrate that statistical analysis of 1H-NMR spectra is able to distinguish between fibrotic and non-fibrotic patients suffering from HCV, representing a novel diagnostic application for NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Absence of neurocognitive impairment in a large Chinese sample of HCV-infected injection drug users receiving methadone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Shi, Chuan; Letendre, Scott; Knight, Adam; Li, Jianhua; Riggs, Patricia K.; Franklin, Donald R.; Duarte, Nichole; Jin, Hua; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Yu, Xin; Wu, Zunyou; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior research has demonstrated neuropsychological (NP) impairment in persons with histories of injection drug use (IDU), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), individually, but little is known about the NP effects of these three risk factors in combination. This issue is particularly important in China, which is addressing its highly HCV-comorbid IDU epidemic with widespread government sponsored MMT, especially in light of recent evidence suggesting that methadone may be neuroprotective in some circumstances. Methods We administered a comprehensive NP test battery to 195 Chinese heroin IDU individuals taking MMT (IDU+ group), the majority of whom were also HCV+ (87%; n = 169), and compared their NP performance to that of 198 demographically comparable, non-IDU Chinese controls (IDU− group). All participants in both groups tested negative for HIV infection, which is also a common comorbidity in the Chinese IDU population. Results The IDU+ group did not have an increased rate of global NP impairment, or perform significantly worse on any individual NP test measure. Within the IDU+ group, liver disease characteristics and reported details of heroin use were not significantly associated with NP performance. Conclusion Failure to detect NP impairment in IDU+ subjects with or without HCV infection was surprising, particularly considering the previously demonstrated sensitivity of our NP battery to neurocognitive disorders associated with HIV infection in China. One possible explanation, which should be explored in future research, is the potential neuroprotective effect of methadone in the context of HCV infection and/or heroin withdrawal. PMID:24508003

  14. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 3 regulates proinflammatory TNF-α responses.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aideen S; Ahmed, Suaad; Napoletano, Silvia; Schroeder, Martina; Johnston, James A; Hegarty, John E; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Stevenson, Nigel J

    2014-08-01

    TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine, dramatically elevated during pathogenic infection and often responsible for inflammation-induced disease pathology. SOCS proteins are inhibitors of cytokine signaling and regulators of inflammation. In this study, we found that both SOCS1 and SOCS3 were transiently induced by TNF-α and negatively regulate its NF-κB-mediated signal transduction. We discovered that PBMCs from HCV-infected patients have elevated endogenous SOCS3 expression but less TNF-α-mediated IκB degradation and proinflammatory cytokine production than healthy controls. HCV protein expression in Huh7 hepatocytes also induced SOCS3 and directly inhibited TNF-α-mediated IL-8 production. Furthermore, we found that SOCS3 associates with TRAF2 and inhibits TRAF2-mediated NF-κB promoter activity, suggesting a mechanism by which SOCS3 inhibits TNF-α-mediated signaling. These results demonstrate a role for SOCS3 in regulating proinflammatory TNF-α signal transduction and reveal a novel immune-modulatory mechanism by which HCV suppresses inflammatory responses in primary immune cells and hepatocytes, perhaps explaining mild pathology often associated with acute HCV infection.

  15. May some HCV genotype 1 patients still benefit from dual therapy? The role of very early HCV kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tontodonati, Monica; Cento, Valeria; Polilli, Ennio; Colabattista, Cecilia; Cascella, Raffaella; Sciotti, Mariapina; Di Giammartino, Dante; Trave, Francesca; Di Maio, Velia Chiara; Monarca, Roberto; Di Candilo, Francesco; Prinapori, Roberta; Rastrelli, Elena; Vecchiet, Jacopo; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Manzoli, Lamberto; Giardina, Emiliano; Perno, Carlo Federico; Parruti, Giustino

    2015-10-01

    When treating HCV patients with conventional dual therapy in the current context of rapidly evolving HCV therapy, outcome prediction is crucial and HCV kinetics, as early as 48 hours after the start of treatment, may play a major role. We aimed at clarifying the role of HCV very early kinetics. We consecutively enrolled mono-infected HCV patients at 7 treatment sites in Central Italy and evaluated the predictive value of logarithmic decay of HCV RNA 48 hours after the start of dual therapy (Delta48). Among the 171 enrolled patients, 144 were evaluable for early and sustained virological response (EVR, SVR) prediction; 108 (75.0%) reached EVR and 84 (58.3%) reached SVR. Mean Delta 48 was 1.68 ± 1.22 log10 IU/ml, being higher in patients with SVR and EVR. Those genotype-1 patients experiencing a Delta 48 >2 logs showed a very high chance of success (100% positive predictive value), even in the absence of rapid virological response (RVR). Evaluation of very early HCV kinetics helped identify a small but significant proportion of genotype-1 patients (close to 10%) in addition to those identified with RVR, who could be treated with dual therapy in spite of not reaching RVR. In the current European context, whereby sustainability of HCV therapy is a crucial issue, conventional dual therapy may still play a reasonable role in patients with good tolerance and early prediction of success.

  16. Hepatic fibrosis and immune phenotype vary by HCV viremia in HCV/HIV co-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Seema N.; Dodge, Jennifer L.; Landay, Alan L.; Glesby, Marshall J.; Latham, Patricia S.; Villacres, Maria C.; French, Audrey L.; Gange, Stephen J.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Peters, Marion G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HCV and HIV independently lead to immune dysregulation. The mechanisms leading to advanced liver disease progression in HCV/HIV coinfected subjects remain unclear. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the association of HCV viremia, liver fibrosis, and immune response patterns in well-characterized HIV phenotypes: Elite controllers (Elites), HIV controlled (ARTc), and HIV uncontrolled (ARTuc) matched by age and race. Groups were stratified by HCV RNA status. Regulatory T-cell frequencies, T-cell activation (HLADR+CD38+), apoptosis (Caspase-3+), and intracellular cytokines (interferon-γ, IL-2, IL-17) were assessed using multiparametric flow-cytometry. Liver fibrosis was scored by AST to platelet ratio index (APRI). We found liver fibrosis (APRI) was 50% lower in Elites and ARTc compared to ARTuc. Higher liver fibrosis was associated with significantly low CD4+ T cell counts (P < 0.001, coefficient r = −0.463). Immune activation varied by HIV phenotype but was not modified by HCV viremia. HCV viremia was associated with elevated CD8 T-cell Caspase-3 in Elites, ARTuc, and HIV− except ARTc. CD8 T-cell Caspase-3 levels were significantly higher in HCV RNA+ Elites (P = 0.04) and ARTuc (P = 0.001) and HIV− groups (P = 0.02) than ARTc. Importantly, ARTuc HCV RNA+ had significantly higher CD4 T-cell interleukin-17 levels than ARTuc HCV RNA− (P = 0.005). HIV control was associated with lower liver fibrosis in HCV/HIV co-infected women. HCV viremia is associated with an inflammatory CD4 TH-17 phenotype in absence of HIV control and higher frequency of pro-apoptosis CD8 T-cells critical to avert progression of HIV and HCV disease that is attenuated in ART controllers. Elite controllers with HCV viremia are more prone to CD8 T-cell apoptosis than ART controllers, which could have negative consequences over time, highlighting the importance of ART control in HCV/HIV coinfected individuals. PMID:27537569

  17. Detection and typing by molecular techniques of respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute respiratory infection in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, Alessandra; Gentile, Massimo; Di Marco, Paola; Pagnotti, Paolo; Scagnolari, Carolina; Trombetti, Simona; Lo Russo, Lelia; Tromba, Valeria; Moretti, Corrado; Midulla, Fabio; Antonelli, Guido

    2007-04-01

    Detection of a broad number of respiratory viruses is not undertaken currently for the diagnosis of acute respiratory infection due to the large and always increasing list of pathogens involved. A 1-year study was undertaken on children hospitalized consecutively for acute respiratory infection in a Pediatric Department in Rome to characterize the viruses involved. Two hundred twenty-seven children were enrolled in the study with a diagnosis of asthma, bronchiolitis, bronchopneumonia, or laringo-tracheo bronchitis. A molecular approach was adopted using specific reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays detecting 13 respiratory viruses including metapneumovirus (hMPV) and the novel coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1; most amplified fragments were sequenced to confirm positive results and differentiate the strain. Viral pathogens were detected in 97 samples (42.7%), with 4.8% of dual infections identified; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was detected in 17.2% of children, followed by rhinovirus (9.7%), parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) (7.5%), and influenza type A (4.4%). Interestingly, more than half the patients (9/17) that have rhinovirus as the sole respiratory pathogen had pneumonia. HMPV infected children below 3 years in two peaks in March and June causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. One case of NL63 infection is described, documenting NL63 circulation in central Italy. In conclusion, the use of a comprehensive number of PCR-based tests is recommended to define the burden of viral pathogens in patients with respiratory tract infection.

  18. No correspondence between resistance mutations in the HCV-NS3 protease at baseline and early telaprevir-based triple therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Luísa; Faffe, Débora Souza; Lima, Jennifer Fróes Cruz; Capitanio, Thayanna Araujo; Cabral, Bianca Catarina Azeredo; Ürményi, Turán Péter; Coelho, Henrique Sergio Moraes; Rondinelli, Edson; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane Alves; Silva, Rosane

    2015-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral (DAA)-based therapy is the new standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant viral variants have been often described. This study aimed to examine HCV-NS3 protease variants at baseline and at 4 weeks under triple therapy. To this end, we analyzed the presence of variants in HCV-NS3 protease region from peripheral blood samples of 16 patients infected with HCV-1 at baseline and at 4 weeks of combined therapy with telaprevir, pegylated interferon, and ribavirin, using next-generation sequencing. Several variants with synonymous and non-synonymous amino acid substitutions were detected at both time points. Variants detected at low frequency corresponded to 74% (HCV-1a) and 35% (HCV-1b) of non-synonymous substitutions. We found nine PI-resistance-associated variants (V36A, T54S, V55I, Q80K, Q80R, V107I, I132V, D168E, M175L) in HCV-NS3 of 10 patients. There was no correspondence of resistance-associated variant profile between baseline and at 4 weeks. Moreover, these resistance variants at baseline and short-term treatment are not good predictors of outcome under triple therapy. Our study also shows a large number of others minor and major non-synonymous variants in HCV-NS3 early in telaprevir-based therapy that can be important for further drug resistance association studies with newly developed PI agents. PMID:26674563

  19. No correspondence between resistance mutations in the HCV-NS3 protease at baseline and early telaprevir-based triple therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Luísa; Faffe, Débora Souza; Lima, Jennifer Fróes Cruz; Capitanio, Thayanna Araujo; Cabral, Bianca Catarina Azeredo; Ürményi, Turán Péter; Coelho, Henrique Sergio Moraes; Rondinelli, Edson; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane Alves; Silva, Rosane

    2015-06-01

    Direct-acting antiviral (DAA)-based therapy is the new standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant viral variants have been often described. This study aimed to examine HCV-NS3 protease variants at baseline and at 4 weeks under triple therapy. To this end, we analyzed the presence of variants in HCV-NS3 protease region from peripheral blood samples of 16 patients infected with HCV-1 at baseline and at 4 weeks of combined therapy with telaprevir, pegylated interferon, and ribavirin, using next-generation sequencing. Several variants with synonymous and non-synonymous amino acid substitutions were detected at both time points. Variants detected at low frequency corresponded to 74% (HCV-1a) and 35% (HCV-1b) of non-synonymous substitutions. We found nine PI-resistance-associated variants (V36A, T54S, V55I, Q80K, Q80R, V107I, I132V, D168E, M175L) in HCV-NS3 of 10 patients. There was no correspondence of resistance-associated variant profile between baseline and at 4 weeks. Moreover, these resistance variants at baseline and short-term treatment are not good predictors of outcome under triple therapy. Our study also shows a large number of others minor and major non-synonymous variants in HCV-NS3 early in telaprevir-based therapy that can be important for further drug resistance association studies with newly developed PI agents.

  20. Prevalence and clinical relevance of occult hepatitis B in the fibrosis progression and antiviral response to INF therapy in HIV-HCV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Laguno, Montserrat; Larrousse, Maria; Blanco, José Luis; Leon, Agathe; Milinkovic, Ana; Martínez-Rebozler, Maria; Loncá, Montserrat; Martinez, Esteban; Sanchez-Tapias, Jose Maria; de Lazzari, Elisa; Gatell, José Maria; Costa, Josep; Mallolas, Josep

    2008-04-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is diagnosed when HBc antibodies (HBcAb) and HBV DNA are detectable in serum while hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is not. This situation has been frequently described in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of occult hepatitis B in HIV-HCV-coinfected patients and its clinical relevance in liver histology and viral response after interferon therapy for HCV. A total of 238 HIV-HCV-infected patients,negative for HBsAg, were included. Serum samples were analyzed for the presence of HBV DNA and HBcAb.HBV DNA quantification was determined with the Cobas TaqMan HBV Test (detection limit 6 IU/ml). Data from liver biopsy and laboratory tests were also analyzed. HBcAb resulted in 142 (60%) patients, being the independent associated factors: male gender, previous history of intravenous drug use, age, CD4 count,and HAV antibody presence. Among 90 HBcAb patients that we could analyze, HBV DNA was positive in 15 (16.7% of occult hepatitis B infection in this group, and 6.3% in the whole HIV-HCV cohort studied). No baseline factors, liver histology, or HCV therapy response were related to the presence of HBV DNA. We found that occult hepatitis B is a frequent condition present in at least 6.3% of our HCV-HIV patients and in more than 16% of those with HBcAb. Despite the high prevalence, this phenomenon does not seem to affect the clinical evolution of chronic hepatitis C or modify the viral response to interferon-based HCV therapies

  1. Antibody and markers of T-cell activation illuminate the pathogenesis of HCV immune restoration disease in HIV/HCV co-infected patients commencing ART.

    PubMed

    Yunihastuti, Evy; Lee, Silvia; Gani, Rino A; Saraswati, Henny; Sundaru, Heru; Lesmana, L A; Sukmana, Nanang; Price, Patricia

    2011-04-01

    Some HIV/hepatitis C virus co-infected patients beginning ART experience Immune Restoration Disease (IRD) manifested as a rise in serum alanine transaminase. This was investigated in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals (n=50) commencing ART in Jakarta (Indonesia). Samples were collected at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, 24 and at HCV IRD. Nine patients experienced HCV IRD (incidence=9.2 per 1000 person-weeks). These resolved without changing treatment. Markers of T-cell activation (sCD26, sCD30) and immune recruitment (CXCL10) increased in many HCV IRD cases, so T-cells may mediate HCV IRD. Total anti-HCV antibody (core, NS3, NS4) remained lower in HCV IRD cases, but levels of antibody to core were not lower in HCV IRD cases. Rises in HCV RNA on ART were independent of HCV IRD, but there was a negative correlation between baseline HCV RNA and total anti-HCV antibody. High levels of antibody may protect against HCV IRD, via lower HCV antigen loads.

  2. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Africa: a review.

    PubMed

    Karoney, Mercy Jelagat; Siika, Abraham Mogisi

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a viral pandemic and a leading cause of chronic liver disease. This review highlights the epidemiology and management of Hepatitis C in Africa. We searched for articles on medline using the terms, "Hepatitis C", "Prevalence", "Epidemiology", "Africa" and "Treatment". The bibliographies of the articles found were used to find other references. We included articles published after 1995 only. The data was summarized and presented in tables and figures. Africa has the highest WHO estimated regional HCV prevalence (5.3%). Egypt has the highest prevalence (17.5%) of HCV in the world. Genotypes commonly found in Africa are 1, 4 and 5. Genotype 3 is found in Egypt and parts of Central Africa. Blood transfusion is a major means of acquisition of HCV infection. While treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin is recommended for patients with chronic HCV, no data were found on their use in Africa. Neither were there any data on definitive management (liver transplantation) for those with end stage disease. Data on HCV infection in Africa are scarce. This suggests that hepatitis C is still a neglected disease in many countries. Limited data exist in literature on HCV in Africa.

  3. IMMUNOGENETIC FACTORS INFLUENCING CLINICAL COURSE OF HCV INFECTION (REVIEW).

    PubMed

    Kamkamidze, G; Butsashvili, M; Gendzekhadze, K

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains one of the most important blood-borne diseases worldwide with about 130-170 million people chronically infected with hepatitis C virus, and more than 350 000 people die from hepatitis C-related liver diseases each year. Infection with HCV becomes chronic in approximately 80% of cases, while in up to 20% of cases hepatitis C virus is cleared from the human organism. Chronic infections of hepatitis C often leads to the end-stage liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The clinical course and the outcome of the HCV infection is determined by the complex interplay between the viral replication and the host defense mechanisms. Several recent studies have shown that MHC class I and class II as well as natural killer (NK) cell's immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) loci can be associated with the HCV protection and clearance as well as with disease progression and responsiveness to antiviral treatment. Current status of our knowledge about the influence of immunogenetic factors on the clinical course of HCV infection is presented in the paper. Plans to investigate these factors among HCV infected patients enrolled in the HCV Elimination Program (launched in April 2015 in Georgia) are discussed.

  4. Exploring the possibility of arthropod transmission of HCV.

    PubMed

    Houldsworth, Annwyne

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer occurring in up to 3% of the world's population. Parenteral exposure to HCV is the major mode of transmission of infection. Once established, infection will persist in up to 85% of individuals with only a minority of patients clearing viremia. Egypt has possibly the highest HCV prevalence in the world where 10-20% of the general population are infected with HCV. Endemic HCV appears to be concentrated in the tropics and sub-tropics where there are higher biting rates from insects. The question as to whether a bridge vector transmission is possible, via arthropods, both between humans and/or from an animal reservoir to humans is explored. Mechanical transmission, as opposed to biological transmission, is considered. Mechanical transmission can be an efficient way of transmitting an infection, as effective as biological transmission. Probability of transmission can increase as to the immediate circumstances and conditions at the time. Several factors may enhance mechanical transmission, including high levels of microbes in the vector, frequent biting, the close proximity, and contact between vectors and recipients as well as high density of insects. HCV has been isolated from bodies or heads of mosquitoes collected from the houses of HCV-infected individuals. The possibility of enzootic cycles of HCV tangential transmission via bridging vectors, such as, arthropods needs to be further investigated and possible animal reservoirs, including domestic rural epizootic cycles for HCV infection, requires further research with particular initial emphasis on equine infections. J. Med. Virol. 89:187-194, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) can coinfect the same hepatocyte in the liver of patients with chronic HCV and occult HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Iñigo, E; Bartolomé, J; Ortiz-Movilla, N; Platero, C; López-Alcorocho, J M; Pardo, M; Castillo, I; Carreño, V

    2005-12-01

    In this work, we have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) can coexist in the same hepatocyte using double fluorescent in situ hybridization in liver biopsy samples from patients with chronic HCV infection with occult HBV infection. Digital image analysis of hybridization signals showed that the HBV DNA levels in coinfected hepatocytes were lower than those in cells infected only with HBV. This finding supports the hypothesis of inhibition of HBV replication by HCV. Furthermore, HCV RNA levels were lower in coinfected cells than in cells infected only with HCV, suggesting that HBV may also inhibit HCV replication.

  6. Epidemiological profile and risk factors of HIV and HBV/HCV co-infection in Fujian Province, southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shouli; Yan, Pingping; Yang, Tianfei; Wang, Zhenghua; Yan, Yansheng

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the epidemiological features of HIV-infected subjects co-infected with HBV/HCV in Fujian Province, southeastern China, and identify the risk factors. Blood samples were collected from 2,028 HIV antibody-positive subjects in Fujian Province. Serum HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody were detected, and CD4(+) T cell count was measured. Of the 2,028 subjects, the prevalence of HIV-HBV, HIV-HCV, and HIV-HBV-HCV co-infections was 16.22%, 3.7%, and 0.79%, respectively. Man (OR = 1.912, 95% CI: 1.371-2.667), key population (OR = 0.756, 95% CI: 0.57-0.976) and detainee (OR = 0.486, 95% CI: 0.259-0.909) were risk factors of HIV-HBV co-infection, and man (OR = 2.227, 95% CI: 1.096-4.525), minority (OR = 5.04, 95% CI: 1.696-14.98), junior high school or lower education (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.071-5.025), intravenous drug use (OR = 38.46, 95% CI: 11.46-129.11) and detainee (OR = 5.687, 95% CI: 2.44-13.25) were risk factors of HIV-HCV co-infection. In addition, a lower mean CD4(+) T cell count was measured in HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects than in HIV-infected subjects among the untreated individuals, while in the treated populations, a higher mean CD4(+) T cell count was detected in HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects than in HIV-infected subjects. HIV co-infection with HBV or HCV, notably HIV-HBV co-infection, is widespread in southeastern China. Hepatitis virus screening should be included in monitoring of HIV infection, and HIV and hepatitis virus co-infection should be considered during the development of HIV antiretroviral therapy scheme. J. Med. Virol. 89:443-449, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Systemic cytokine and interferon responsiveness Patterns in HIV and HCV mono and co-infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Joshi-Barve, Swati; Ghare, Smita; Barve, Shirish; Young, Mary; Plankey, Michael; Bordon, Jose

    2014-11-01

    The role of host response-related factors in the fast progression of liver disease in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV viruses remains poorly understood. This study compared patterns of cytokines, caspase-1 activation, endotoxin exposure in plasma as well as interferon signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV/HCV co-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(+)), HCV mono-infected (HIV(-)/HCV(+)), HIV mono-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(-)) female patients and HIV- and HCV-uninfected women (HIV(-)/HCV(-)) who had enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). HIV(+)/HCV(+) women had higher plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as caspase-1 compared with other groups. Both HIV(+)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) women had significantly higher sCD14 levels compared with other groups. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HCV mono-infected patients had reduced levels of phosphorylation of STAT1 compared with other groups as well as lower basal levels of expression of the IFN-stimulated genes, OAS1, ISG15, and USP18 (UBP43). Basal expression of USP18, a functional antagonist of ISG15, as well as USP18/ISG15 ratios were increased in the HIV(+)/HCV(+) group compared with HIV(-)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) groups. A more pronounced systemic inflammatory profile as well as increased expression ratios of USP18 to ISG15 may contribute to the more rapid progression of liver disease in HIV(+)/HCV(+) individuals.

  8. Dilemma of HCV Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ashry Ahmed Gheith, Osama

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus, which usually starts during dialysis therapy, is currently the main cause of chronic liver disease in such population. The majority of patients acquired the disease through intravenous drug use or blood transfusion, with some risk factors identified. In this review we are dealing with the effect of renal transplantation on HCV infection and HCV-related complications after renal transplantation. Moreover, we are discussing the therapeutic options of HCV infection before and after renal transplantation, the best immunosuppressive protocol and lastly graft and patient survival in patients who underwent pretransplant management vs. those who were transplanted without treatment. PMID:21660304

  9. Detection of Occult Acute Kidney Injury in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hakeem, Gehan Lotfy; Abdel Naeem, Emad Allam; Swelam, Salwa Hussein; El Morsi Aboul Fotoh, Laila; El Mazary, Abdel Azeem Mohamed; Abdel Fadil, Ashraf Mohamed; Abdel Hafez, Asmaa Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency anemia is associated with intravascular hemolysis. The freely filtered hemoglobin can damage the kidney. We aimed to assess any subclinical renal injury in G6PD children. Methods Sixty children were included. Thirty G6PD deficiency anemia children were enrolled during the acute hemolytic crisis and after the hemolytic episode had elapsed. Another thirty healthy children were included as controls. Serum cystatin C, creatinine levels, and urinary albumin/creatinine (A/C) ratio were measured, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated. Results Significantly higher urinary A/C ratio (p=0.001,0.002 respectively) and lower GFR (p=0.001 for both) were found during hemolysis and after the hemolytic episode compared to the controls. Also, significant higher serum cystatin C (p=0.001), creatinine (p=0.05) and A/C (p= 0.001) ratio and insignificant lower GFR (p=0.3) during acute hemolytic crisis compared to the same children after the hemolytic episode subsided. Conclusions G6PD deficiency anemia is associated with a variable degree of acute renal injury during acute hemolytic episodes which may persist after elapsing of the hemolytic crises. PMID:27648201

  10. Dynamic Changes of Post-Translationally Modified Forms of CXCL10 and Soluble DPP4 in HCV Subjects Receiving Interferon-Free Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Casrouge, Armanda; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam; Albert, Matthew L.; Duffy, Darragh

    2015-01-01

    Serum levels of the interferon (IFN)-stimulated chemokine CXCL10 are increased during chronic HCV infection and associate with outcome of IFN-based therapy. Elevated levels of NH2-terminal truncated CXCL10 (3-77aa), produced by DPP4 cleavage, negatively associate with spontaneous clearance of acute HCV infection and sustained virological response (SVR) with IFN-based therapy for chronic infection. The association of different CXCL10 forms and DPP4 with outcome during IFN-free HCV therapy has not been examined. Using novel Simoa assays, plasma was analyzed from HCV genotype-1 (GT1) subjects who relapsed (n = 11) or achieved SVR (n = 10) after sofosbuvir and ribavirin (SOF/RBV) treatment, and from SOF/RBV relapsers who achieved SVR with a subsequent SOF/ledipasvir regimen (n = 9). While the NH2-truncated form of CXCL10 was elevated in HCV infection relative to healthy controls, pre-treatment plasma concentrations of CXCL10 forms failed to stratify subjects based on treatment outcome to IFN-free regimens. However, a trend (statistically non-significant) towards elevated higher levels of total and long CXCL10 was observed pre-treatment in subjects who relapsed. All forms of CXCL10 decreased rapidly following treatment initiation and were again elevated in subjects who experienced HCV relapse, indicating that CXCL10 production may be associated with active viral replication. While soluble DPP4 (sDPP4) and NH2-truncated CXCL10 concentrations were highly correlated, on-treatment sDPP4 levels and activity declined more slowly than CXCL10, suggesting differential regulation. Conclusion These data suggest post-translationally modified forms of CXCL10 will not support the prediction of treatment outcome in HCV GT1 subjects treated with SOF/RBV. PMID:26181438

  11. Natural history and treatment of HCV/HIV coinfection: Is it time to change paradigms?

    PubMed

    Arends, Joop E; Lieveld, Faydra I; Boeijen, Lauke L; de Kanter, Clara T M M; van Erpecum, Karel J; Salmon, Dominique; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Asselah, Tarik; Ustianowski, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Evidence over the past decades have shown that HIV/HCV coinfected patients did not respond as well to HCV therapy as HCV mono-infected patients. However, these paradigms are being recently reassessed with the improvements of care for HIV and HCV patients. This article reviews these original paradigms and how the new data is impacting upon them. Treatment efficacy now appears comparable for HIV/HCV coinfected and HCV mono-infected patients, while liver fibrosis progression is increasingly similar in optimally managed patients. Additional importance of therapy is directed to drug-drug interactions and the impact of HCV reinfection, as well as the possibility of transmitted drug resistance.

  12. HCV kinetic and modeling analyses indicate similar time to cure among sofosbuvir combination regimens with daclatasvir, simeprevir or ledipasvir

    SciTech Connect

    Dahari, Harel; Canini, Laetitia; Graw, Frederik; Uprichard, Susan L.; Araújo, Evaldo S. A.; Penaranda, Guillaume; Coquet, Emilie; Chiche, Laurent; Riso, Aurelie; Renou, Christophe; Bourliere, Marc; Cotler, Scott J.; Halfon, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Recent clinical trials of direct-acting-antiviral agents (DAAs) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) achieved >90% sustained virological response (SVR) rates, suggesting that cure often took place before the end of treatment (EOT). We sought to evaluate retrospectively whether early response kinetics can provide the basis to individualize therapy to achieve optimal results while reducing duration and cost. 58 chronic HCV patients were treated with 12-week sofosbuvir + simeprevir (n = 19), sofosbuvir + daclatasvir (n = 19), or sofosbuvir + ledipasvir in three French referral centers. HCV was measured at baseline, day 2, every other week, EOT and 12 weeks post EOT. Furthermore, mathematical modeling was used to predict the time to cure, i.e., <1 virus copy in the entire extracellular body fluid. All but one patient who relapsed achieved SVR. Mean age was 60 ± 11 years, 53% were male, 86% HCV genotype-1, 9% HIV coinfected, 43% advanced fibrosis (F3), and 57% had cirrhosis. At weeks 2, 4 and 6, 48%, 88% and 100% of patients had HCV <15 IU/ml, with 27%, 74% and 91% of observations having target not detected, respectively. Modeling results predicted that 23 (43%), 16 (30%), 7 (13%), 5 (9%) and 3 (5%) subjects were predicted to reach cure within 6, 8, 10, 12 and 13 weeks of therapy, respectively. The modeling suggested that the patient who relapsed would have benefitted from an additional week of sofosbuvir + ledipasvir. Adjusting duration of treatment according to the modeling predicts reduced medication costs of 43–45% and 17–30% in subjects who had HCV <15 IU/ml at weeks 2 and 4, respectively. Finally, the use of early viral kinetic analysis has the potential to individualize duration of DAA therapy with a projected average cost saving of 16–20% per 100-treated persons.

  13. HCV kinetic and modeling analyses indicate similar time to cure among sofosbuvir combination regimens with daclatasvir, simeprevir or ledipasvir

    DOE PAGES

    Dahari, Harel; Canini, Laetitia; Graw, Frederik; ...

    2016-06-01

    Recent clinical trials of direct-acting-antiviral agents (DAAs) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) achieved >90% sustained virological response (SVR) rates, suggesting that cure often took place before the end of treatment (EOT). We sought to evaluate retrospectively whether early response kinetics can provide the basis to individualize therapy to achieve optimal results while reducing duration and cost. 58 chronic HCV patients were treated with 12-week sofosbuvir + simeprevir (n = 19), sofosbuvir + daclatasvir (n = 19), or sofosbuvir + ledipasvir in three French referral centers. HCV was measured at baseline, day 2, every other week, EOT and 12 weeks postmore » EOT. Furthermore, mathematical modeling was used to predict the time to cure, i.e., <1 virus copy in the entire extracellular body fluid. All but one patient who relapsed achieved SVR. Mean age was 60 ± 11 years, 53% were male, 86% HCV genotype-1, 9% HIV coinfected, 43% advanced fibrosis (F3), and 57% had cirrhosis. At weeks 2, 4 and 6, 48%, 88% and 100% of patients had HCV <15 IU/ml, with 27%, 74% and 91% of observations having target not detected, respectively. Modeling results predicted that 23 (43%), 16 (30%), 7 (13%), 5 (9%) and 3 (5%) subjects were predicted to reach cure within 6, 8, 10, 12 and 13 weeks of therapy, respectively. The modeling suggested that the patient who relapsed would have benefitted from an additional week of sofosbuvir + ledipasvir. Adjusting duration of treatment according to the modeling predicts reduced medication costs of 43–45% and 17–30% in subjects who had HCV <15 IU/ml at weeks 2 and 4, respectively. Finally, the use of early viral kinetic analysis has the potential to individualize duration of DAA therapy with a projected average cost saving of 16–20% per 100-treated persons.« less

  14. Analysis of the relationship between peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets and HCV RNA levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Zheng, M J; Xu, Y H

    2015-08-21

    We investigated the relationship between peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in patients with hepatitis C. Samples from 69 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and 20 healthy controls were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect HCV RNA and flow cytometry to determine the expression levels of CD3, CD4, and CD8 in lymphocytes. The percentage of CD4+ T cells (42.87 ± 6.11%) and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ (1.34 ± 0.25) in these patients were significantly lower than those in the healthy control group (49.55 ± 6.68%, 1.82 ± 0.11, respectively) (P < 0.01, P < 0.01), while the percentage of CD8+ T cells (32.78 ± 5.48%) was higher than that in the control group (27.35 ± 4.32%) (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the percentage of CD3+ T cells between the two groups (P > 0.05). With the increase in HCV RNA replication, the percentage of CD8+ T cells increased gradually, while the CD4+ T cell percentage and CD4/CD8 ratio decreased. The change in the percentage of T lymphocyte subsets may be one of the reasons for persistent HCV infection, and the high expression levels of HCV RNA might be the reason for the low frequency of CD4+ T lymphocytes in patients with chronic HCV.

  15. Antibody dynamics and spontaneous viral clearance in patients with acute hepatitis C infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The anti-HCV antibody response has not been well characterized during the early phase of HCV infection and little is known about its relationship to the clinical course during this period. Methods We analyzed serial anti-HCV antibodies longitudinally obtained from a prospective cohort of 65 patients with acute HCV infection by using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay AxSYM HCV 3.0 (Abbott Diagnostics) during the first 12 months from HCV acquisition in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) was defined as undetectable HCV RNA in serum, in the absence of treatment, for three consecutive HCV PCR tests within 12-months of follow-up. Results Baseline antibody values were similar among patient groups with self-limiting HCV evolution (n = 34) and persistent viremia (n = 31) [median (interquartile range) signal/cut-off ratio (s/co) 78.7 (60.7-93.8) vs. 93.9 (67.8-111.9), p = 0.26]. During 12-months follow-up, patients with acute spontaneous resolving HCV infection showed significantly lower serial antibody response in comparison to individuals progressing to chronic infection [median (interquartile range) s/co 62.7 (35.2-85.0) vs. 98.4 (70.4-127.4), p < 0.0001]. In addition, patients with self-limiting HCV evolution exhibited an expeditious, sharp decline of serial antibody values after SVC in comparison to those measured before SVC [median (interquartile range) s/co 56.0 (25.4-79.3) vs. 79.4 (66.3-103.0), p < 0.0001]. Conclusion Our findings indicate a rapid short-term decline of antibody values in patients with acute spontaneous resolving HCV infection. PMID:21226945

  16. Synergistic reversal of intrahepatic HCV-specific CD8 T cell exhaustion by combined PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Cho, Hyosun; Shaked, Abraham; Olthoff, Kim; Valiga, Mary E; Kaminski, Mary; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Freeman, Gordon J; Wherry, E John; Chang, Kyong-Mi

    2009-02-01

    Viral persistence is associated with hierarchical antiviral CD8 T cell exhaustion with increased programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression. In HCV persistence, HCV-specific CD8 T cells from the liver (the site of viral replication) display increased PD-1 expression and a profound functional impairment that is not reversed by PD-1 blockade alone. Here, we report that the inhibitory receptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is preferentially upregulated in PD-1(+) T cells from the liver but not blood of chronically HCV-infected patients. PD-1/CTLA-4 co-expression in intrahepatic T cells was associated with a profound HCV-specific effector dysfunction that was synergistically reversed by combined PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade in vitro, but not by blocking PD-1 or CTLA-4 alone. A similar effect was observed in circulating HCV-specific CD8 T cells with increased PD-1/CTLA-4 co-expression during acute hepatitis C. The functional response to combined blockade was directly associated with CTLA-4 expression, lost with CD28-depletion and CD4-independent (including CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs). We conclude that PD-1 and CTLA-4 pathways both contribute to virus-specific T cell exhaustion at the site of viral replication by a redundant mechanism that requires combined PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade to reverse. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of virus-specific T cell dysfunction, and suggest that the synergistic effect by combined inhibitory receptor blockade might have a therapeutic application against chronic viral infection in vivo, provided that it does not induce autoimmunity.

  17. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  18. [Importance of the case of coronavirus-associated severe acute respiratory syndrome detected in Hungary in 2005].

    PubMed

    Rókusz, László; Jankovics, István; Jankovics, Máté; Sarkadi, Júlia; Visontai, Ildikó

    2013-11-24

    Ten years have elapsed since the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak, which resulted in more than 8000 cases worldwide with more than 700 deaths. Recently, a new coronavirus, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus emerged, causing serious respiratory cases and death. By the end of August 2013, 108 cases including 50 deaths were reported. The authors discuss a coronavirus-associated severe acute respiratory syndrome, which was detected in Hungary in 2005 and highlight its significance in 2013. In 2005 the patient was hospitalized and all relevant clinical and microbiological tests were performed. Based on the IgG antibody positivity of the serum samples, the patient was diagnosed as having severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in the past. The time and source of the infection remained unknown. The condition of the patient improved and he was discharged from the hospital. The case raises the possibility of infections in Hungary imported from remote areas of the world and the importance of thorough examination of patients with severe respiratory syndrome with unknown etiology.

  19. Performance of the COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR Test, Version 2.0, an Automated Reverse Transcription-PCR Quantitative System for Hepatitis C Virus Load Determination

    PubMed Central

    Gerken, G.; Rothaar, T.; Rumi, M. G.; Soffredini, R.; Trippler, M.; Blunk, M. J.; Butcher, A.; Soviero, S.; Colucci, G.

    2000-01-01

    A clinical evaluation of an automated quantitative PCR assay, the COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test, version 2.0 (v2.0), was carried out to assess the performance of this test in comparison with that of the previous, manual version, the AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test, and with that of nested PCR. Serial dilutions of serum samples infected with genotype 1b, 2a, or 3, as well as synthetic RNA transcripts and serum samples derived from 87 patients with chronic hepatitis C and infected with genotype 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4, or 5, were analyzed to determine the ability of the system to efficiently quantify various hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes. These experiments showed that the COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test, v2.0, has mean intra-assay, interassay, and interoperator coefficients of variation that range from 22 to 34.5% and a 3-logarithm dynamic range, which spans from 103 to 106 copies/ml. Compared to the previous, manual version of the test, the COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test, v2.0, showed an improved efficacy for all genotypes, especially genotypes 2, 3, and 4, whose estimated concentrations were on average 1 logarithm higher. When used to monitor patients under treatment, however, both versions showed the same patterns of viremia, indicating that the COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test, v2.0, and the AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test were equally effective at detecting relative viremia changes in serial samples. As expected, the automated test was less sensitive than nested PCR; among specimens from a cohort of patients treated with interferon, nested PCR identified three more viremic specimens, which probably contained very low concentrations of HCV RNA. PMID:10834978

  20. A case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Eun; Lee, Jun-Bum; Cho, Yu Na; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2012-07-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a monophasic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which typically follows acute viral or bacterial infection or vaccination. We report a case of ADEM associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) anti-HCV antibody. After steroid treatment, neurologic symptoms were improved. Virus triggers autoimmunity or direct viral invasion plays a part in the genesis of ADEM. This is the first reported case of ADEM with anti-HCV antibody in the CSF.

  1. Detecting Acute Myocardial Infarction by Diffusion-Weighted versus T2-Weighted Imaging and Myocardial Necrosis Markers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiyang; Chen, Min; Li, Yongjun; Wang, YaLing; Zhang, Shijun; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-10-01

    We used a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction to study the signal evolution of ischemic myocardium on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI). Eight Chinese miniature pigs underwent percutaneous left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery occlusion for 90 minutes followed by reperfusion, which induced acute myocardial infarction. We used DWI preprocedurally and hourly for 4 hours postprocedurally. We acquired turbo inversion recovery magnitude T2-weighted images (TIRM T2WI) and late gadolinium enhancement images from the DWI slices. We measured the serum myocardial necrosis markers myoglobin, creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, and cardiac troponin I at the same time points as the magnetic resonance scanning. We used histochemical staining to confirm injury. All images were analyzed qualitatively. Contrast-to-noise ratio (the contrast between infarcted and healthy myocardium) and relative signal index were used in quantitative image analysis. We found that DWI identified myocardial signal abnormity early (<4 hr) after acute myocardial infarction and identified the infarct-related high signal more often than did TIRM T2WI: 7 of 8 pigs (87.5%) versus 3 of 8 (37.5%) (P=0.046). Quantitative image analysis yielded a significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio and relative signal index between infarcted and normal myocardium on DWI. However, within 4 hours after infarction, the serologic myocardial injury markers were not significantly positive. We conclude that DWI can be used to detect myocardial signal abnormalities early after acute myocardial infarction-identifying the infarction earlier than TIRM T2WI and widely used clinical serologic biomarkers.

  2. Detecting Acute Myocardial Infarction by Diffusion-Weighted versus T2-Weighted Imaging and Myocardial Necrosis Markers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Li, Yongjun; Wang, YaLing; Zhang, Shijun; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-01-01

    We used a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction to study the signal evolution of ischemic myocardium on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI). Eight Chinese miniature pigs underwent percutaneous left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery occlusion for 90 minutes followed by reperfusion, which induced acute myocardial infarction. We used DWI preprocedurally and hourly for 4 hours postprocedurally. We acquired turbo inversion recovery magnitude T2-weighted images (TIRM T2WI) and late gadolinium enhancement images from the DWI slices. We measured the serum myocardial necrosis markers myoglobin, creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, and cardiac troponin I at the same time points as the magnetic resonance scanning. We used histochemical staining to confirm injury. All images were analyzed qualitatively. Contrast-to-noise ratio (the contrast between infarcted and healthy myocardium) and relative signal index were used in quantitative image analysis. We found that DWI identified myocardial signal abnormity early (<4 hr) after acute myocardial infarction and identified the infarct-related high signal more often than did TIRM T2WI: 7 of 8 pigs (87.5%) versus 3 of 8 (37.5%) (P=0.046). Quantitative image analysis yielded a significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio and relative signal index between infarcted and normal myocardium on DWI. However, within 4 hours after infarction, the serologic myocardial injury markers were not significantly positive. We conclude that DWI can be used to detect myocardial signal abnormalities early after acute myocardial infarction—identifying the infarction earlier than TIRM T2WI and widely used clinical serologic biomarkers. PMID:27777517

  3. Molecular characteristics of noroviruses genogroup I and genogroup II detected in patients with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Ham, Heejin; Oh, Seah; Seung, Hyunjung; Jo, Sukju

    2015-03-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis, including foodborne outbreak, in Korea. The prevalence of human noroviruses was studied in diarrheal stool samples of patients with acute gastroenteritis by conventional duplex reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Diarrheal stool samples were collected from 1,685 patients from the local hospitals in Seoul. The prevalence of the noroviruses was 22.8% (222/972 patients) in 2012 and 11.2% (80/713 patients) in 2013, with a total of 17.9% (302/1,685 patients). Genotyping was performed on 302 norovirus-positive stool samples to reveal 5.6% prevalence of genogroup I (GI) (17/302) and 94.4% prevalence of genogroup II (GII) (285/302). The patients with norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis mostly showed prevalence of GII norovirus, especially GII.4 (64.6%; 195/302).

  4. Awareness of Biologically Confirmed HCV Among a Community Residing Sample of Drug Users in Baltimore City

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Lauren E.; Marsiske, Michael; Kahn, Maria R.; Latimer, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The present study sought to examine: (1) the prevalence and correlates of biologically confirmed Hepatitis C (HCV) and (2) the prevalence and correlates of prior HCV diagnosis and an unmet need for HCV treatment, among a community residing sample of drug users. The current study used a subset of HCV tested participants from the larger NEURO-HIV Epidemiologic Study from Baltimore, Maryland (Mage = 34.81, SD = 9.25; 46 % female). All participants were tested for HCV at baseline. Self-report was used to assess awareness of an HCV diagnosis and participation in treatment. Of the 782 participants tested for HCV, 19 % reported having received an HCV diagnosis in the past while 48 % tested positive for HCV. Only 6 % reported having received treatment for any form of hepatitis. Of those who tested HCV positive, 63 % reported never being diagnosed, and only 13 % received any treatment for HCV. We found that only 35 % of those who reported a prior HCV diagnosis received any treatment. The findings regarding lack of HCV awareness and diagnosis were considerable as expected. These deficits suggest that there are numerous gaps in patients' knowledge and beliefs regarding HCV that may interfere at multiple steps along the path from diagnosis to treatment. This study clearly demonstrates that a critical need exists to improve public knowledge of HCV risk factors, the need for testing, and the availability of effective treatment. PMID:24173529

  5. NS3 Resistance-Associated Variants (RAVs) in Patients Infected with HCV Genotype 1a in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Sousa, María Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Mónica; Álvaro-Meca, Alejandro; García-Álvarez, Mónica; Harrigan, P. Richard; Fedele, Cesare Giovanni; Briz, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance-associated variants have been related to treatment failure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy with direct-acting antiviral drugs. The aim of our study was to analyze the prevalence of clinically relevant resistance-associated variants within NS3 in patients infected with HCV genotype 1a (GT1a) in Spain. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study on 2568 patients from 115 hospitals throughout Spain (2014–2015). The viral NS3 protease gene was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by Sanger sequencing using an ABI PRISM 377 DNA sequencer. Additionally, clade information for genotype 1a was obtained by using the software geno2pheno (http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/). Results In total, 875 out of 2568 samples were from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients. Q80K was the main RAV found in our patients (11.1%) and the rest of the resistance-associated variants had a lower frequency, including S122G (6.23%), T54S (3.47%), V55A (2.61%), and V55I (2.15%), which were among the most frequent after Q80K. Overall, 286 samples had the Q80K polymorphism (11.1%) and 614 (23.9%) were GT1a clade I. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had a higher frequency of Q80K and GT1a clade I than HCV-monoinfected patients (12.9% vs. 9.6% [p = 0.012] and 28.5% vs. 21.4% [p<0.001], respectively). Both the prevalence of Q80K and GT1a clade I were not uniform throughout the country (p<0.001), which ranged from 7.3%-22.2% and 15.7%-42.5%, respectively. The frequency of the Q80K polymorphism was far higher in patients infected with GT1a clade I than in patients infected with GT1a clade II (41.5% vs. 1.6%; p<0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of most resistance-associated variants in NS3 was low in patients infected with HCV GT1a in Spain, except for Q80K (11.1%), which was also notably higher in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. The vast majority of Q80K polymorphisms were detected in GT1a clade I. PMID:27685471

  6. Ultrasensitive HCV RNA Quantification in Antiviral Triple Therapy: New Insight on Viral Clearance Dynamics and Treatment Outcome Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Garbuglia, Anna Rosa; Visco-Comandini, Ubaldo; Lionetti, Raffaella; Lapa, Daniele; Castiglione, Filippo; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Taibi, Chiara; Montalbano, Marzia; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Paci, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identifying the predictive factors of Sustained Virological Response (SVR) represents an important challenge in new interferon-based DAA therapies. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of antiviral response associated with a triple drug regimen, and the association between negative residual viral load at different time points during treatment. Methods Twenty-three HCV genotype 1 (GT 1a n = 11; GT1b n = 12) infected patients were included in the study. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was used to establish possible association between HCV RNA values at days 1 and 4 from start of therapy and SVR. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to analyze the correlation between HCV RNA slope and SVR. A ultrasensitive (US) method was established to measure the residual HCV viral load in those samples which resulted “detected <12IU/ml” or undetectable with ABBOTT standard assay, and was retrospectively used on samples collected at different time points to establish its predictive power for SVR. Results According to LDA, there was no association between SVR and viral kinetics neither at time points earlier than 1 week (days 1 and 4) after therapy initiation nor later. The slopes were not relevant for classifying patients as SVR or no-SVR. No significant differences were observed in the median HCV RNA values at T0 among SVR and no-SVR patients. HCV RNA values with US protocol (LOD 1.2 IU/ml) after 1 month of therapy were considered; the area under the ROC curve was 0.70. Overall, PPV and NPV of undetectable HCV RNA with the US method for SVR was 100% and 46.7%, respectively; sensitivity and specificity were 38.4% and 100% respectively. Conclusion HCV RNA “not detected” by the US method after 1 month of treatment is predictive of SVR in first generation Protease inhibitor (PI)-based triple therapy. The US method could have clinical utility for advanced monitoring of virological response in new interferon based DAA combination regimens. PMID:27560794

  7. High prevalence of respiratory viral infections in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit for acute respiratory infections as detected by nucleic acid-based assays.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia.

  8. High Prevalence of Respiratory Viral Infections in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit for Acute Respiratory Infections as Detected by Nucleic Acid-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia. PMID:15635014

  9. Evaluation of a stand-alone computer-aided detection system for acute intra-cranial hemorrhage in emergency environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James; Deshpande, Ruchi; Wang, Ximing; Liu, Brent; Brazaitis, Michael; Munter, Fletcher; Liu, Margaret

    2011-03-01

    Acute intra-cranial hemorrhage (AIH) may result from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Successful management of AIH depends heavily on the speed and accuracy of diagnosis. Timely diagnosis in emergency environments in both civilian and military settings is difficult primarily due to severe time restraints and lack of resources. Often, diagnosis is performed by emergency physicians rather than trained radiologists. As a result, added support in the form of computer-aided detection (CAD) would greatly enhance the decision-making process and help in providing faster and more accurate diagnosis of AIH. This paper discusses the implementation of a CAD system in an emergency environment, and its efficacy in aiding in the detection of AIH.

  10. Evaluation of Alere i RSV for Rapid Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Children Hospitalized with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Peters, Rebecca Marie; Schnee, Sarah Valerie; Tabatabai, Julia; Schnitzler, Paul; Pfeil, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Alere i RSV is a novel rapid test which applies a nicking enzyme amplification reaction to detect respiratory syncytial virus in point-of-care settings. In this study, we evaluated the Alere i RSV assay by using frozen nasopharyngeal swab samples that were collected in viral transport medium from children hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection during the 2015-2016 winter season. Alere i RSV assay results were compared to those for Altona RealStar RSV real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). We found that the overall sensitivity and specificity of the Alere i RSV test was 100% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 93% to 100%) and 97% (95% CI, 89% to 100%), respectively. Positive samples were identified within 5 to 7 min from sample collection. Overall, the Alere i RSV test performed well compared to the RT-PCR assay and has the potential to facilitate the detection of RSV in point-of-care settings.

  11. A potential method for non-invasive acute myocardial infarction detection based on saliva Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gang; Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Huang, Zufang; Lin, Jinyong; Lin, Jia; Xu, Zhihong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Weng, Guoxing; Chen, Guannan

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was employed for human saliva biochemical analysis with the aim to develop a rapidly non-invasive test for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. High-quality Raman spectra were obtained from human saliva samples of 46 AMI patients and 43 healthy controls. Significant differences in Raman intensities of prominent bands were observed between AMI and normal saliva. The tentative assignment of the observed Raman bands indicated constituent and conformational differences between the two groups. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and classify the Raman spectra acquired from AMI and healthy saliva, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 80.4% and specificity of 81.4%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated the feasibility and potential for developing RS analysis of human saliva into a clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  12. Phase sensitive detection of light reflected from a Fabry{endash}P{acute e}rot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bava, E.; Massari, F.

    1996-05-01

    We present an analysis of the Fabry{endash}P{acute e}rot response to a phase-modulated light in the reflection mode, by considering the general problem of the lock-in detection at the {ital p}th harmonics of the rf modulating frequency. Suitable frequency modulation conditions for servo-locking purposes are obtained and the values of modulation index which maximize the sensitivity for the first, third, and fifth harmonics are found. Moreover, we investigate the effects of the residual amplitude modulation introduced by the electro-optic frequency modulator, the presence of laser amplitude and frequency noise, and the dependence of the achievable closed-loop frequency fluctuation spectrum on the modulation index and detection noise. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Role of diffusion-weighted imaging for detecting bone marrow infiltration in skull in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weiguo; Liang, Changhong; Gen, Yungan; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Cailei; Sun, Longwei

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement can detect skull bone marrow infiltration in newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) children before therapy and normalization in complete remission after treatment. METHODS Fifty-one newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and 30 healthy age-matched subjects were included. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were reviewed, and skull marrow ADC values were compared before treatment and in complete remission after therapy. RESULTS Skull marrow infiltration, manifested with abnormal DWI signals, was present in 37 patients (72.5%) before treatment. Of these, 23 (62.2%) showed scattered signal abnormalities and 14 (37.8%) showed a uniform abnormal signal pattern. Compared with the control group, ADC was significantly decreased in patients with ALL. DWI signal intensity and ADC normalized in patients with complete remission. CONCLUSION DWI is a useful and noninvasive tool for detecting skull infiltration in ALL children before treatment and normalization at complete remission after therapy, and it is superior to conventional MRI in terms of conspicuity of these lesions. DWI could be used as an MRI biomarker for evaluation of treatment in ALL children. PMID:27763327

  14. Poliomyelitis in Oman: acute flaccid paralysis surveillance leading to early detection and rapid response to a type 3 outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, S. E.; Suleiman, A. J.; Mehta, F. R.; al-Dhahry, S. H.; el-Bualy, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    Countries are increasingly requesting guidance on carrying out acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance, aimed at detecting and confirming all cases of acute paralytic poliomyelitis. The experience of Oman provides many lessons in this respect. AFP surveillance in Oman was established systematically. First, an epidemiologist was assigned to coordinate surveillance, and a laboratory for performing polio-virus isolation was identified. Next, operational guidelines for AFP surveillance were developed and widely promoted among health staff. The quality of the system has been monitored for more than 3 years with selected performance indicators. From January 1990 to April 1993, 49 AFP cases were reported, corresponding to an average annual rate of 2.1 AFP cases per 100,000 children aged less than 15 years. A total of 98% of the AFP cases were investigated within 48 hours of being reported; two stool samples were obtained from 94% of the cases. Following complete investigation, nearly a third of the reported AFP cases were classified as being clinically compatible with Guillain-Barré syndrome. Four AFP cases, all reported in 1991, were confirmed to be due to wild type 3 poliovirus. Because AFP surveillance detected these cases rapidly, Oman was able to carry out outbreak control measures promptly and more than 350,000 extra doses of oral poliovirus vaccine were delivered to children under 6 years of age. PMID:7867136

  15. Detection of Mutant NPM1 mRNA in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Custom Gene Expression Arrays

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Martin H.; Dumee, Belinda; Simons, Erik; Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Viëtor, Henk; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding nucleophosmin (NPM1) carry a prognostic value for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Various techniques are currently being used to detect these mutations in routine molecular diagnostics. Incorporation of accurate NPM1 mutation detection on a gene expression platform would enable simultaneous detection with various other expression biomarkers. Here we present an array-based mutation detection using custom probes for NPM1 WT mRNA and NPM1 type A, B, and D mutant mRNA. This method was 100% accurate on a training cohort of 505 newly diagnosed unselected AML cases. Validation on an independent cohort of 143 normal-karyotype AML cases revealed no false-negative results, and one false positive (sensitivity 100.0% and specificity 98.7%). Based on this, we conclude that this method provides a reliable method for NPM1 mutation detection. The method can be applied to other genes/mutations as long as the mutant alleles are sufficiently highly expressed. PMID:23530539

  16. Acute on-chip HIV detection through label-free electrical sensing of viral nano-lysate.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Hadi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Inci, Fatih; Wang, Shuqi; Willenbrecht, Remington B M; Giguel, Francoise F; Tsibris, Athe M N; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-08-12

    Development of portable biosensors has broad applications in environmental monitoring, clinical diagnosis, public health, and homeland security. There is an unmet need for pathogen detection at the point-of-care (POC) using a fast, sensitive, inexpensive, and easy-to-use method that does not require complex infrastructure and well-trained technicians. For instance, detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) at acute infection stage has been challenging, since current antibody-based POC technologies are not effective due to low concentration of antibodies. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time a label-free electrical sensing method that can detect lysed viruses, i.e. viral nano-lysate, through impedance analysis, offering an alternative technology to the antibody-based methods such as dipsticks and Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The presented method is a broadly applicable platform technology that can potentially be adapted to detect multiple pathogens utilizing impedance spectroscopy for other infectious diseases including herpes, influenza, hepatitis, pox, malaria, and tuberculosis. The presented method offers a rapid and portable tool that can be used as a detection technology at the POC in resource-constrained settings, as well as hospital and primary care settings.

  17. Novel real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for simultaneous detection of recurrent fusion genes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Sandra; Barragán, Eva; Fuster, Óscar; Llop, Marta; Cervera, José; Such, Esperanza; De Juan, Inmaculada; Palanca, Sarai; Murria, Rosa; Bolufer, Pascual; Luna, Irene; Gómez, Inés; López, María; Ibáñez, Mariam; Sanz, Miguel A

    2013-09-01

    The recent World Health Organization classification recognizes different subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) according to the presence of several recurrent genetic abnormalities. Detection of these abnormalities and other molecular changes is of increasing interest because it contributes to a refined diagnosis and prognostic assessment in AML and enables monitoring of minimal residual disease. These genetic abnormalities can be detected using single RT-PCR, although the screening is still labor intensive and costly. We have developed a novel real-time RT-PCR assay to simultaneously detect 15 AML-associated rearrangements that is a simple and easily applicable method for use in clinical diagnostic laboratories. This method showed 100% specificity and sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 91% to 100% and 92% to 100%, respectively). The procedure was validated in a series of 105 patients with AML. The method confirmed all translocations detected using standard cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization and some additional undetected rearrangements. Two patients demonstrated two molecular rearrangements simultaneously, with BCR-ABL1 implicated in both, in addition to RUNX1-MECOM in one patient and PML-RARA in another. In conclusion, this novel real-time RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of multiple AML-associated fusion genes is a versatile and sensitive method for reliable screening of recurrent rearrangements in AML.

  18. Diagnostic evaluation of RNA sequencing for the detection of genetic abnormalities associated with Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Yap, Kai Lee; Furtado, Larissa V; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Curran, Emily; Stock, Wendy; McNeer, Jennifer L; Kadri, Sabah; Segal, Jeremy P; Nakamura, Yusuke; Le Beau, Michelle M; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Raca, Gordana

    2017-04-01

    Philadelphia (Ph)-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a molecular subtype of high-risk B-cell ALL characterized by formation of abnormal gene fusions involving tyrosine kinase (TK) and cytokine receptor genes and activation of TK signaling. Because of the diversity of associated genetic changes, the detection of Ph-like ALL cases currently requires multiple cytogenetic and molecular assays; thus, our goal was to develop a consolidated workflow for detecting genetic abnormalities in Ph-like ALL. We found that total and targeted RNA sequencing (RNAseq)-based approach allowed the detection of abnormal fusion transcripts (EBF1-PDGFRB, P2RY8-CRLF2, RCSD1-ABL1, and RCSD1-ABL2). The bioinformatics algorithm accurately detected the fusion transcripts without prior input about possible events. Additionally, we showed that RNAseq analysis enabled evaluation for disease-associated sequence variants in expressed transcripts. While total RNAseq can be a second tier approach allowing discovery of novel genetic alterations, the targeted RNAseq workflow offers a clinically applicable method for the detection of fusion transcripts.

  19. The second extracellular loop dictates Occludin-mediated HCV entry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Kuo, Wayne; Yang, Wei; Liu, Weiqun; Gibson, Gregory A; Dorko, Kenneth; Watkins, Simon C; Strom, Stephen C; Wang, Tianyi

    2010-11-10

    Recent findings have implicated tight junction (TJ) protein Occludin (OCLN) as an essential factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) to enter human hepatocytes. To gain insights into OCLN-mediated HCV entry, we created a panel of OCLN deletion mutants and found that without impairing OCLN's cell surface localization, removal of the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) from OCLN abolished both its ability to mediate HIV-HCV pseudotypes' (HCVpp) entry as well as its ability to coprecipitate HCV glycoprotein E2. Recombinant OCLN EL2, however, failed to robustly bind soluble E2 (sE2) in pull-down assays. Subsequent studies revealed that OCLN formed complex with Dynamin II, an important GTPase for endocytosis, in an EL2-dependent fashion. HCVpp, as well as cell culture grown HCV (HCVcc), was sensitive to Dynamin knockdown or inhibition. We conclude that OCLN EL2 dictates the Dynamin-dependent HCV entry. Furthermore, OCLN could function to bridge virions to Dynamin-dependent endocytic machineries.

  20. New direct-acting antivirals for patients with chronic HCV infection: can we monitor treatment using an HCV core antigen assay?

    PubMed

    Alonso, R; Pérez-García, F; Ampuero, D; Reigadas, E; Bouza, E

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic usefulness of an HCV core antigen (HCV-Ag) assay in HCV-infected patients undergoing treatment with direct-acting antivirals. We analyzed 103 samples from 28 patients. Compared with RT-PCR, sensitivity was 96.2% and specificity was 100%. The correlation between techniques was excellent (Pearson coefficient: 0.871). HCV-Ag proved to be useful in patients with sustained viral response and in patients who experienced treatment failures.

  1. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M. Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  2. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection.

    PubMed

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V S; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-08-02

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  3. Patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus recover genotype cross-reactive neutralising antibodies to HCV during antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Silvia; Saraswati, Henny; Yunihastuti, Evy; Gani, Rino; Price, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    When severely immunodeficient HIV/HCV co-infected patients are treated with antiretroviral therapy, it is important to know whether HCV-specific antibody responses recover and whether antibody profiles predict the occurrence of HCV-associated immune restoration disease (IRD). In 50 HIV/HCV co-infected patients, we found that antibody reactivity and titres of neutralising antibodies (nAb) to JFH-1 (HCV genotype 2a virus) increased over 48 weeks of therapy. Development of HCV IRD was associated with elevated reactivity to JFH-1 before and during the first 12 weeks of therapy. Individual analyses of HCV IRD and non-HCV IRD patients revealed a lack of an association between nAb responses and HCV viral loads. These results showed that increased HCV-specific antibody levels during therapy were associated with CD4(+) T-cell recovery. Whilst genotype cross-reactive antibody responses may identify co-infected patients at risk of developing HCV IRD, neutralising antibodies to JFH-1 were not involved in suppression of HCV replication during therapy.

  4. WE-EF-207-03: Design and Optimization of a CBCT Head Scanner for Detection of Acute Intracranial Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J; Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Dang, H; Stayman, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, JH; Wang, X; Foos, DH

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design a dedicated x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) system suitable to deployment at the point-of-care and offering reliable detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, and other head and neck injuries. Methods: A comprehensive task-based image quality model was developed to guide system design and optimization of a prototype head scanner suitable to imaging of acute TBI and ICH. Previously reported models were expanded to include the effects of x-ray scatter correction necessary for detection of low contrast ICH and the contribution of bit depth (digitization noise) to imaging performance. Task-based detectablity index provided the objective function for optimization of system geometry, x-ray source, detector type, anti-scatter grid, and technique at 10–25 mGy dose. Optimal characteristics were experimentally validated using a custom head phantom with 50 HU contrast ICH inserts imaged on a CBCT imaging bench allowing variation of system geometry, focal spot size, detector, grid selection, and x-ray technique. Results: The model guided selection of system geometry with a nominal source-detector distance 1100 mm and optimal magnification of 1.50. Focal spot size ∼0.6 mm was sufficient for spatial resolution requirements in ICH detection. Imaging at 90 kVp yielded the best tradeoff between noise and contrast. The model provided quantitation of tradeoffs between flat-panel and CMOS detectors with respect to electronic noise, field of view, and readout speed required for imaging of ICH. An anti-scatter grid was shown to provide modest benefit in conjunction with post-acquisition scatter correction. Images of the head phantom demonstrate visualization of millimeter-scale simulated ICH. Conclusions: Performance consistent with acute TBI and ICH detection is feasible with model-based system design and robust artifact correction in a dedicated head CBCT system. Further improvements can be achieved with incorporation of

  5. [Detection of bocavirus in 4-week-old puppies with acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Rudolf, S; Neiger, R; König, M

    2016-01-01

    Two 4-month-old female Doberman puppies were presented with clinical signs of acute diarrhea and emesis. They also showed sneezing and nasal discharge. The clinical presentation and neutropenia were suggestive of a parvovirus infection. The puppies were hospitalized for several days and treated symptomatically. Fecal samples tested negative for parasites. Virological examination of feces using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immune electron microscopy failed to confirm a parvovirus infection. With a recently developed PCR, bocavirus could be identified, thus making an infection with this virus a possible diagnosis. This case report presents a less well-known viral puppy disease and its successful therapy.

  6. Pneumothorax in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: pathophysiology, detection, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Kenneth J; vanSonnenberg, Eric; Chon, Kenneth S; Loran, David B; Tocino, Irena M; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2003-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a frequent and potentially fatal complication of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Prompt recognition and treatment of pneumothoraces is necessary to minimize morbidity and mortality. The radiologic and clinical signs of pneumothoraces in ARDS patients may have unusual and subtle features. Furthermore, small pneumothoraces in these patients can cause severe hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise. Sparse clinical literature exists on when or how to treat pneumothoraces once they develop in patients with ARDS. In this article, the authors review the pathogenesis, radiologic signs, clinical significance, and treatment of pneumothoraces in ARDS patients. Treatment options include traditional tube thoracostomy, open thoracotomy, and image-guided percutaneous catheters.

  7. Importance of very early HCV RNA kinetics for prediction of treatment outcome of highly effective all oral direct acting antiviral combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Christoph; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Cloherty, Gavin; Cohen, Daniel E; Chevaliez, Stephane; Herman, Christine; Bernstein, Barry; Pawlotsky, Jean Michel

    2015-03-01

    Interferon-free combination therapies lead to rapid suppression of HCV RNA early during treatment. The potential to predict virologic response and failure as well as to guide treatment duration with measurement of HCV RNA very early during treatment by highly sensitive assays is not well known. In 11 IL28B CC (rs12979860) patients infected with HCV genotype 1, who received DAA combination therapy with the NS3 protease inhibitor ABT-450/r together with the non-nucleoside NS5B polymerase inhibitor ABT-072 and ribavirin for 12 weeks, HCV RNA was assessed frequently by the RealTime HCV (ART) and the High-Pure-System/Cobas TaqMan (HPS) assays during and after treatment. Overall, at 33 of 131 time points during treatment residual HCV RNA was detectable by ART but undetectable by HPS while the converse was observed in only two samples. Of the two patients who experienced virologic relapse, one patient had residual viremia at week 6 of treatment by ART only while the other patient never had undetectable HCV RNA by the ART assay. However, residual viremia was also observed by ART as late as therapy weeks 9, 10 and 12 in patients with subsequent sustained virologic response. In patients with sustained response no viremia was observed at multiple time points during post-treatment follow up by either assay. The higher sensitivity of the ART in comparison to the HPS assay may be associated with more frequent detection of residual viremia during highly effective, interferon-free combination therapies. However, the significance of this finding in predicting virologic failure appears to be limited.

  8. HCV RNA Testing of Plasma Samples from Cornea Donors: Suitability of Plasma Samples Stored at 4 °C for up to 8 Days

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Annemarie; Salla, Sabine; Keppler, Oliver T.; Rabenau, Holger F.

    2017-01-01

    Background The HCV RNA testing of potential cornea donors frequently relies on blood samples stored pre mortem. The recommended storage time of maximum 72 h frequently excludes a significant fraction of donors. Methods The influence of storage time of EDTA plasma samples at 4 °C on the viral load measured with the Roche HCV Quantitative Test vs. 2.0 was evaluated for 43 samples from HCV-positive individuals. Results The mean reduction of the viral load after 4 °C storage for 6-8 days was 0.46 log10 IU/ml (range +0.17 to −1.66 log10 IU/ml). After 1-3 days a mean loss of 0.19 log10 IU/ml (range +0.30 to −1.41 log10 IU/ml) and after 3-5 days of 0.32 log10 IU/ml (range +0.36 to −1.81 log10 IU/ml) was observed. In 23.3% of samples, a viral load reduction ≥ 1 log10 IU/ml (1.0-1.81 log10 IU/ml) was found after prolonged storage (5-8 days). In none of the samples did the HCV load fall below the detection limit. Conclusion Plasma storage for up to 8 days can quantitatively reduce the HCV RNA load, yet has no influence on the reliability of a qualitative HCV RNA detection by this ultrasensitive test to determine the HCV status of serologically negative cornea donors. PMID:28275332

  9. Assessing candidacy for acute hepatitis C treatment among active young injection drug users: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All five acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. An acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care.

  10. Favorable Outcomes of Chinese HCV-Related Cirrhotic Patients with Sustained Virological Response after Pegylated Interferon Plus Ribavirin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You-ming; Zhang, Ting; Cai, Qing-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Zhao, Zhi-xing

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have conducted follow-up investigations of the clinical course in HCV-related cirrhotic patients who achieved a sustained virological response (SVR) with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin treatment (PegIFN + RBV). We investigated the clinical course and laboratory data in a prospective cohort study enrolling HCV-related cirrhotic patients who received PegIFN + RBV between August 2008 and July 2013 in China. Complete blood counts, liver function tests, and HCV-RNA were serially examined. Liver-related complications were recorded. To detect hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), alpha-fetoprotein assays, and ultrasound scans were repeated at 6-month intervals. Twenty-five patients were enrolled, including 8 patients with decompensation events before treatment. Eighteen patients achieved SVR with a mean follow-up period of 25.78 months. During the follow-up period, only one patient exhibited HCV-RNA positivity and no decompensation events were detected, but 4 patients developed HCC after SVR. APRI decreased more in patients with SVR than in patients with non-SVR (median, −1.33 versus 0.86, P < 0.001). The albumin levels and platelet counts significantly increased during the follow-up period after SVR (44.27 ± 4.09 versus 42.63 ± 4.37, P = 0.037 and 173.89 ± 87.36 versus 160.11 ± 77.97, P = 0.047). These data indicated that HCV-related cirrhotic patients with SVR after PegIFN + RBV may have a favorable clinical course and improvements in laboratory data. Moreover, HCC should be monitored. PMID:28232944

  11. Reformatted images improve the detection rate of acute traumatic subdural hematomas on brain CT compared with axial images alone.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, Timothy J; Mostertz, William; Matheus, Maria Gisele; Maass-Bolles, Genevieve; Sharma, Komal; Collins, Heather R; Kranz, Peter G

    2017-02-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDHs) comprise a significant percentage of missed intracranial hemorrhage on axial brain CT. SDH detection rates could be improved with the addition of reformatted images. Though performed at some centers, the potential additional diagnostic sensitivity of reformatted images has not yet been investigated. The purpose of our study is to determine if the addition of coronal and sagittal reformatted images to an axial brain CT increases the sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute traumatic SDH. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive brain CTs acquired for acute trauma that contained new SDHs. An equivalent number of normal brain CTs served as control. Paired sets of images were created for each case: (1) axial images only ("axial only") and (2) axial, coronal, sagittal images ("reformat added"). Three readers interpreted both the axial only and companion reformat added for each case, separated by 1 month. Reading times and SDH detection rates were compared. One hundred SDH and 100 negative examinations were collected. Sensitivity and specificity for the axial-only scans were 75.7 and 94.3 %, respectively, compared with 88.3 and 98.3 % for reformat added. There was a 24.3 % false negative (missed SDH) rate with axial-only scans versus 11.7 % with reformat added (p = <0.001). Median reader interpretation times were longer with the addition of reformatted images (125 versus 89 s), but this difference was not significant (p = 0.23). The addition of coronal and sagittal images in trauma brain CT resulted in improved sensitivity and specificity as well as a reduction in SDH false negatives by greater than 50 %. Reformatted images substantially reduce the number of missed SDHs compared with axial images alone.

  12. Pulmonary circulatory parameters as indices for the early detection of acute rejection after single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Okada, M; Tobe, S; Tsuji, F; Ohbo, H; Nakamura, H; Yamashita, C

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the changes in the pulmonary blood flow and histology during acute rejection following single lung transplantation. In single lung transplantation using adult mongrel dogs, immunosuppression with cyclosporine and azathioprine was discontinued after postoperative day 14 to induce rejection. Doppler flow probes were placed adjacent to the ascending aorta and the left pulmonary artery to measure the blood flow on a daily basis. In addition, chest roentgenograms were also examined daily. The pulmonary pressure was measured using a Swan-Ganz catheter prior to and following the induction of rejection. Open lung biopsies were performed when the left pulmonary artery flow decreased to half of the prerejection value. The pulmonary artery flow decreased to 14.3% of the aortic flow 5 days after the discontinuation of immunosuppression. The graft pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly compared to the prerejection values (P < 0.001). This was not accompanied by any abnormalities on chest roentgenography. The histology was consistent, with marked perivascular lymphocytic infiltration with little alveolar or interstitial changes. During rejection, the increased pulmonary vascular resistance in the graft was probably the result of perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, which was seen prior to changes on chest roentgenography. Changes in the left pulmonary artery flow and histology thus appear to be closely correlated in the early stages of acute rejection.

  13. Liver Fibrosis during an Outbreak of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Men: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Daniel S.; Uriel, Alison J.; Carriero, Damaris C.; Klepper, Arielle; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Mullen, Michael P.; Thung, Swan N.; Fiel, M. Isabel; Branch, Andrea D.

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are occurring in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated risk factors and liver histopathology in 11 consecutively enrolled men with newly acquired HCV infection that was diagnosed on the basis of antibody seroconversion, new elevations in alanine aminotransferase level, and wide fluctuations in HCV RNA level. Ten patients reported unprotected anal intercourse, and 7 reported “club-drug” use, including methamphetamine. Liver biopsy showed moderately advanced fibrosis (Scheuer stage 2) in 9 patients (82%). No cause of liver damage other than acute HCV infection was identified. The specific pathways leading to periportal fibrosis in HIV-infected men with newly acquired HCV infection require investigation. PMID:18627270

  14. Chimeric hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) subviral envelope particles induce efficient anti-HCV antibody production in animals pre-immunized with HBV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2015-02-18

    The development of an effective, affordable prophylactic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a medical priority. The recently described chimeric HBV-HCV subviral envelope particles could potentially be used for this purpose, as they could be produced by industrial procedures adapted from those established for the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine. We show here, in an animal model, that pre-existing immunity acquired through HBV vaccination does not influence the immunogenicity of the HCV E2 protein presented by these chimeric particles. Thus, these chimeric HBV-HCV subviral envelope particles could potentially be used as a booster in individuals previously vaccinated against HBV, to induce protective immunity to HCV.

  15. Antiretroviral Effects on Host Lipoproteins Are Associated With Changes in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA Levels in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/HCV Coinfected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Naggie, Susanna; Patel, Keyur; Yang, Lan-Yan; Chow, Shein-Chung; Johnson, Victoria; Guyton, John R; Muir, Andrew J; Sulkowski, Mark; Hicks, Charles

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the impact of antiretroviral-induced dyslipidemia on hepatitis C virus (HCV) biogenesis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfected patients. This study used serum samples from antiretroviral-naive HIV/HCV patients initiating their first regimen as part of AIDS Clinical Trials Group study protocols (A5142, A5202). Initiation of antiretrovirals increased most lipoproteins and apolipoproteins. In the multivariable model, changes in apolipoproteins were associated with changes in log10 HCV RNA from baseline to week-24 of therapy. Off-target lipogenic changes need to be considered in the context of liver and other metabolic disease in HIV/HCV patients.

  16. Antiretroviral Effects on Host Lipoproteins Are Associated With Changes in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA Levels in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/HCV Coinfected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Naggie, Susanna; Patel, Keyur; Yang, Lan-Yan; Chow, Shein-Chung; Johnson, Victoria; Guyton, John R.; Muir, Andrew J.; Sulkowski, Mark; Hicks, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of antiretroviral-induced dyslipidemia on hepatitis C virus (HCV) biogenesis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfected patients. This study used serum samples from antiretroviral-naive HIV/HCV patients initiating their first regimen as part of AIDS Clinical Trials Group study protocols (A5142, A5202). Initiation of antiretrovirals increased most lipoproteins and apolipoproteins. In the multivariable model, changes in apolipoproteins were associated with changes in log10 HCV RNA from baseline to week-24 of therapy. Off-target lipogenic changes need to be considered in the context of liver and other metabolic disease in HIV/HCV patients. PMID:26110167

  17. Lung ultrasound and chest x-ray for detecting pneumonia in an acute geriatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Lauretani, Fulvio; Nouvenne, Antonio; Mori, Giulia; Chiussi, Giulia; Maggio, Marcello; Meschi, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Our aim was to compare the accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) and standard chest x-ray (CXR) for diagnosing pneumonia in older patients with acute respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, cough, hemoptysis, and atypical chest pain) admitted to an acute-care geriatric ward. Methods: We enrolled 169 (80 M, 89 F) multimorbid patients aged 83.0 ± 9.2 years from January 1 to October 31, 2015. Each participant underwent CXR and bedside LUS within 6 hours from ward admission. LUS was performed by skilled clinicians, blinded to CXR results and clinical history. The final diagnosis (pneumonia vs no-pneumonia) was established by another clinician reviewing clinical and laboratory data independent of LUS results and possibly prescribing chest contrast-enhanced CT. Diagnostic parameters of CXR and LUS were compared with McNemar test on the whole cohort and after stratification for Rockwood Clinical Frailty Scale. Results: Diagnostic accuracy for pneumonia (96 patients) was significantly higher in LUS (0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–0.96) compared with CXR (0.67, 95%CI 0.60–0.74, P < 0.001). LUS had a better sensitivity (0.92, 95%CI 0.86–0.97 vs 0.47, 95%CI 0.37–0.57) and negative predictive value (0.95, 95% CI 0.83–0.96 vs 0.57, 95%CI 0.48–0.56). In those patients with frailty (n = 87 with Rockwood Clinical Frailty Scale ≥5), LUS maintained a high diagnostic accuracy, but CXR did not (P = 0.0003). Interobserver agreement for LUS, calculated in a subsample of 29 patients, was high (k = 0.90). Conclusions: In multimorbid patients admitted to an acute geriatric ward, LUS was more accurate than CXR for the diagnosis of pneumonia, particularly in those with frailty. A wider use of LUS should be implemented in this setting. PMID:27399134

  18. Direct quantitative analysis of HCV RNA by atomic force microscopy without labeling or amplification

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yu Jin; Albrecht, Jeffrey A.; Kwak, Ju-Won; Park, Joon Won

    2012-01-01

    Force-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect HCV (hepatitis C virus) RNA directly and to quantitatively analyse it without the need for reverse transcription or amplification. Capture and detection DNA probes were designed. The former was spotted onto a substrate with a conventional microarrayer, and the latter was immobilized on an AFM probe. To control the spacing between the immobilized DNAs on the surface, dendron self-assembly was employed. Force–distance curves showed that the mean force of the specific unbinding events was 32 ± 5 pN, and the hydrodynamic distance of the captured RNA was 30–60 nm. Adhesion force maps were generated with criteria including the mean force value, probability of obtaining the specific curves and hydrodynamic distance. The maps for the samples whose concentrations ranged from 0.76 fM to 6.0 fM showed that cluster number has a linear relationship with RNA concentration, while the difference between the observed number and the calculated one increased at low concentrations. Because the detection limit is expected to be enhanced by a factor of 10 000 when a spot of 1 micron diameter is employed, it is believed that HCV RNA of a few copy numbers can be detected by the use of AFM. PMID:23074195

  19. Class II–Associated Invariant Chain Peptide Expression Represents a Novel Parameter for Flow Cytometric Detection of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    van Luijn, Marvin M.; Westers, Theresia M.; Chamuleau, Martine E.D.; van Ham, S. Marieke; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2011-01-01

    Because of severe bleeding complications, patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) have to be treated with all-trans retinoic acid immediately following diagnosis. In addition to morphology, flow cytometry contributes to a rapid detection of APL according to phenotypic characteristics of leukemic cells. In some patients, these analyses are inconclusive or even contradictory to diagnosis. Previously, we showed the clinical and functional impact of class II–associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study focuses on the analysis of CLIP expression on leukemic cells to characterize HLA-DR–negative AML, including APL. We demonstrate exclusive and significant CLIP expression in all cases of typical and variant APL, as compared to other HLA-DR–negative non–APL-type AML. CLIP appears to be a highly sensitive and specific flow cytometric marker, resolving discrepant identification of both genetic subgroups. Our findings show the additive value of CLIP analysis for a fast and unequivocal recognition of APL by flow cytometry in conjunction with morphology. PMID:21907692

  20. Evaluation of a pan-serotype point-of-care rapid diagnostic assay for accurate detection of acute dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Vivek, Rosario; Ahamed, Syed Fazil; Kotabagi, Shalini; Chandele, Anmol; Khanna, Ira; Khanna, Navin; Nayak, Kaustuv; Dias, Mary; Kaja, Murali-Krishna; Shet, Anita

    2017-03-01

    The catastrophic rise in dengue infections in India and globally has created a need for an accurate, validated low-cost rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for dengue. We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of NS1/IgM RDT (dengue day 1) using 211 samples from a pediatric dengue cohort representing all 4 serotypes in southern India. The dengue-positive panel consisted of 179 dengue real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive samples from symptomatic children. The dengue-negative panel consisted of 32 samples from dengue-negative febrile children and asymptomatic individuals that were negative for dengue RT-PCR/NS1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay/IgM/IgG. NS1/IgM RDT sensitivity was 89.4% and specificity was 93.8%. The NS1/IgM RDT showed high sensitivity throughout the acute phase of illness, in primary and secondary infections, in different severity groups, and detected all 4 dengue serotypes, including coinfections. This NS1/IgM RDT is a useful point-of-care assay for rapid and reliable diagnosis of acute dengue and an excellent surveillance tool in our battle against dengue.

  1. The contribution of nursing data to the development of a predictive model for the detection of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Sook; Haug, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    The increasing use of information system has resulted in the accumulation of a large volume of nursing data in electronic medical records. These data have great potential for supporting the various clinical decisions made by physicians, nurses, and managers. However, how to re-use of nursing data remains largely an issue of informatics. The aim of this study was to demonstrate how these nursing data can be used and how much they could contribute to developing a predictive model for an expert system for early detection of acute pancreatitis. We employed a probability-based model consisting of a Bayesian network and trained this model with the patient data retrospectively retrieved from the enterprise data warehouse of a tertiary hospital. The performance of the predictive model was measured based on the error rate and the area under receiver operating characteristics curve, which were 13.89 % and 0.93, respectively. The sensitivity of the acute pancreatitis to the findings from each nursing data was measured using a test of sensitivity. The results showed that the role of nursing data is as important as laboratory data in formulating a model for an expert system.

  2. Pre-Existing HCV Variants Resistant to DAAs and Their Sensitivity to PegIFN/RBV in Chinese HCV Genotype 1b Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Cao, Ying; Zhang, Renwen; Zhang, Xiaxia; Lu, Haiying; Wu, Chihong; Huo, Na; Xu, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) could be attenuated by the presence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the natural prevalence of RAVs among Chinese HCV genotype 1b patients and analyze the efficacy of pegylated interferon (PegIFN)/ribavirin (RBV) therapy in patients with and without RAVs at baseline. Methods Direct sequencing of the HCV NS3, NS5A and NS5B regions was performed in baseline serum samples of 117 DAAs-naïve subjects infected with HCV genotype 1b. The efficacy of PegIFN/RBV therapy in patients with and without RAVs at baseline was analyzed by comparing the response rates between patients with RAVs and patients with wild type virus. Results The incidence of RAVs was 8.00% (8/100) in the NS3 region (T54S, n = 1, 1.00%; R117H, n = 5, 5.00%; S122T, n = 1, 1.00%; S174F, n = 1, 1.00%), 29.91% (32/107) in the NS5A region (L28M, n = 12, 11.21%; R30Q, n = 10, 9.35%; L31M, n = 1, 0.93%; P58S, n = 4, 3.74%; Y93H, n = 8, 7.48%) and 98.15% (106/108) in the NS5B region (L159F, n = 1, 0.93%; C316N, n = 103, 95.37%; A421V, n = 6, 5.56%). The response rates to PegIFN/RBV treatment did not differ between patients with or without RAVs in the NS5A region. Conclusions Pre-existing RAVs, including key RAVs, were detected in Chinese DAAs-naïve patients infected with HCV genotype 1b. IFN-based therapy could be a good option for patients with RAVs, especially key RAVs, at baseline. PMID:27812165

  3. Detection and evaluation of renal biomarkers in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Su-Yan; Xing, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is increasing and strongly associated with long-term mortality. However, lack of reliable animal models and well-defined measures of renoprotection, made early diagnosis and therapy difficult. We previously successfully established the swine acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model of ischemia-reperfusion by blocking left anterior descending branch (LAD). Reperfusion was performed after 90-minute occlusion of the LAD. AMI was confirmed by ECG and left ventricular angiography (LVG). Then those 52 survived AMI reperfusion swine, including ventricular fibrillation-cardiac arrest after restoration of blood flow, were randomly divided into four groups (four/group) according to different interventions: resuscitation in room temperature, resuscitation with 500 ml saline in room temperature, resuscitation with 4°C 500 ml saline and normal control (with no intervention of resuscitation). Each group was further observed in four groups according to different time of resuscitation after ventricular arrhythmias: 1, 3, 5, 10-minute reperfusion after ventricular arrhythmias. Plasma and random urine were collected to evaluate renal function and test renal biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI). Our swine AMI model of ischemia-reperfusion provoked subclinical AKI with the elevation of the tubular damage biomarker, NGAL, IL-18 and L-FABP. Renal damage rapidly observed after hemodynamic instability, rather than observation after several hours as previously reported. The increasing rate of biological markers declined after interventions, however, its impact on the long-term prognosis remains to be further studied. These data show that elevation of tubular damage biomarkers without glomerular function loss may indicate appropriate timing for effective renoprotections like hypothermia resuscitation in type 1 CRS.

  4. Detection of acute osteomyelitis with indium-111 labeled white blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; Vasavada, P.J.; Black, R.R.

    1989-02-01

    A young patient with sickle cell disease (SCD) and multiple hospitalizations for crisis was admitted because of suspected osteomyelitis. Initial laboratory work, radiographs, and bone images were not contributory. An In-111 white blood cell (WBC) study demonstrated two areas of increased radionuclide uptake consistent with osteomyelitis. One of these had associated soft tissue infection. No other areas of active osteomyelitis were visualized, in spite of the presence of several additional infection sites. Imaging with In-111 WBC is probably not justified for routine diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in areas free of previous disease, where conventional bone images are highly efficient. In-111 WBC imaging, however, may be helpful in detecting osteomyelitis in selected patients with SCD in whom Tc-99m bone images and radiographs are usually abnormal and difficult to interpret due to previous bone infarcts. Localization of the infection focus is very important in choosing the aspiration site for bacteriologic studies. A negative study, however, should be interpreted cautiously.

  5. Detection and molecular characterization of caliciviruses (vesivirus and norovirus) in an outbreak of acute diarrhea in kittens from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Castro, Tatiana X; Cubel Garcia, Rita de Cássia N; Fumian, Tulio M; Costa, Erika M; Mello, Renata; White, Peter A; Leite, José Paulo G

    2015-10-01

    Feline caliciviruses (FCVs) have occasionally been described in cats in association with enteric disease, but an etiological role for these viruses in acute gastroenteritis is still unclear. In this study, molecular characterization of FCV and feline norovirus (FNoV) was undertaken using real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and sequence analysis of the ORF1 region in fecal specimens from 29 diarrheic cats. The specimens were also screened for parvovirus, coronavirus, astrovirus and group A rotavirus. A quantitative one step RT-PCR was also performed to detect and quantitate NoV genogroup IV and the role of these animal caliciviruses in feline gastroenteritis was investigated. This is the first description of enteric FCV and FNoV in South America.

  6. Antiviral activity against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) of 1-indanone thiosemicarbazones and their inclusion complexes with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Glisoni, Romina J; Cuestas, María L; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R; Moglioni, Albertina G; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2012-10-09

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Approximately 5% of the infected people die from cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The current standard therapy comprises a combination of pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin. Due to the relatively low effectiveness, the prohibitive costs and the extensive side effects of the treatment, an intense research for new direct-acting anti-HCV agents is taking place. Furthermore, NS3 protease inhibitors recently introduced into the market are not effective against all HCV subgenotypes. Thiosemicarbazones (TSCs) have shown antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses. However, their extremely low aqueous solubility and high self-aggregation tendency often preclude their reliable biological evaluation in vitro. In this work, we investigated and compared for the first time the anti-HCV activity of two 1-indanone TSCs, namely 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone TSC and 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone N4-allyl TSC, and their inclusion complexes with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβ-CD) in Huh-7.5 cells containing the full-length and the subgenomic subgenotype 1b HCV replicon system. Studies of physical stability in culture medium showed that free TSCs precipitated rapidly and formed submicron aggregates. Conversely, TSC complexation with HPβ-CD led to more stable systems with minimal size growth and drug concentration loss. More importantly, both TSCs and their inclusion complexes displayed a potent suppression of the HCV replication in both cell lines with no cytotoxic effects. The mechanism likely involves the inhibition of non-structural proteins of the virus. In addition, findings suggested that the cyclodextrin released the drug to the culture medium over time. This platform could be exploited for the study of the drug toxicity and pharmacokinetics animal models.

  7. Successful Anti-HCV Therapy of a Former Intravenous Drug User with Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir in a Peritranspant Setting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Leon Louis; Heinzow, Hauke; Kabar, Iyad; Christensen, Stefan; Hüsing, Anna; Schmidt, Hartmut H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 37 Final Diagnosis: Chronic HCV-infection • hepatic decompensation Symptoms: Esophageal varices • portal-hypertensive gastropathy • splenomegaly • recurrent ascitic decompensation • hepatorenal syndrome • hepatic encephalopathy Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Liver transplantation • antiviral therapy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) represent a new hallmark in antiviral therapy of hepatitis C virus (HCV). DAAs have been shown to be safe and effective after liver transplantation (LT), but there is little information about their use in peritransplant settings. Former intravenous drug users represent an increasing group seeking HCV treatment. This case report demonstrates the successful peritransplant antiviral treatment of a former intravenous drug user who had been treated in a methadone maintenance program. Case Report: The patient was diagnosed with Child B cirrhosis for the first time in 2009. He had a Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 21 and started antiviral therapy with sofosbuvir (SOF) and daclatasvir (DCV) in March 2014. Due to hepatic decompensation, he received a LT in April 2014. Immunosuppression was performed with tacrolimus (TAC) and mycophenolate-mofetil (MMF), and boosted with prednisolone in the initial stage. Four weeks after his LT, the patient presented with an acute renal injury. The patient was discharged one week later after sufficient hydration, discontinuation of non-steroidal anti-phlogistics therapy, and adjustments to his immunosuppressive regimen. At the beginning of his therapy, the number of RNA copies was 13,000 IU/mL. He received 24 weeks of anti-HCV treatment with SOF and DCV; the antiviral treatment was successful and his LT was well tolerated. Conclusions: Treatment of HCV is feasible in a peritransplant setting. The antiviral regimen we used did not seem to have any relevant

  8. Concurrent detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by flow cytometry and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kerst, Gunter; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Roth, Carmen; Well, Catrin; Dietz, Klaus; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Campana, Dario; Koscielniak, Ewa; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Schlegel, Paul G; Müller, Ingo; Niethammer, Dietrich; Bader, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Minimal (i.e. submicroscopic) residual disease (MRD) predicts outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). To be used clinically, MRD assays must be reliable and accurate. Two well-established techniques, flow cytometry (FC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), can detect leukaemic cells with a sensitivity of 0.01% (10(-4)). We analysed diagnostic samples of 45 ALL-patients (37 B-lineage ALL, eight T-lineage ALL) by four-colour FC and real-time PCR. Leukaemia-associated immunophenotypes, at a sensitivity of MRD detection by FC at the 0.01% level, were identified in 41 cases (91%); antigen-receptor gene rearrangements suitable for MRD detection with a sensitivity of 0.01% or better by PCR were identified in 38 cases (84%). The combined use of FC and PCR allowed MRD monitoring in all 45 patients. In 105 follow-up samples, MRD estimates by both methods were highly concordant, with a deviation factor of <5 by Bland-Altman analysis. Importantly, the concordance between FC and PCR was also observed in regenerating bone marrow samples containing high proportions of CD19(+) cells, and in samples studied 24 h after collection. We conclude that both MRD assays yield generally concordant results. Their combined use should enable MRD monitoring in virtually all patients and prevent false-negative results due to clonal evolution or phenotypic shifts.

  9. [HCV and HBV prevalence in hemodialyzed pediatric patients. Multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Cañero-Velasco, M C; Mutti, J E; Gonzalez, J E; Alonso, A; Otegui, L; Adragna, M; Antonuccio, M; Laso, M; Montenegro, M; Repetto, L; Brandi, M; Canepa, J; Baimberg, E

    1998-01-01

    Hemodialized pediatric patients are a risk population for the hepatitis B and C virus infection. The aim of this paper was to study the serum prevalence of HBV and HCV infection in hemodialized children. We study 61 pediatric patients at hemodialisis, 12 on renal transplant, range between 2 and 20 years old (mean: 12.9 years), 23 male and 38 female. The specific anti-HCV IgC were measured by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA Abbott) and confirmed by LIA-TEK (Organon). The anti-HBV were measured by ELISA Abbott and transaminases by cinetic method (ASAT: 29 UI/L and ALT: 33 UI/L). The 19.7% of studied children were HCV (+) and 29.5% were HBV (+), 38.9% of them were HbsAg (+) and 50% anti-HBs (+). The HCV and HBV infection was more elevated in relation to the transfusion number and the hemodilisis time. The elevation of ALT/ASAT activity isn't a right infection index for HCV and HBV in this children.

  10. HCV-related central and peripheral nervous system demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Claudio M; Lichtner, Miriam; Mascia, Claudia; Zuccalà, Paola; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-26

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in people coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Several studies have shown that HIV infection promotes accelerated HCV hepatic fibrosis progression, even with HIV replication under full antiretroviral control. The pathogenesis of accelerated hepatic fibrosis among HIV/HCV coinfected individuals is complex and multifactorial. The most relevant mechanisms involved include direct viral effects, immune/cytokine dysregulation, altered levels of matrix metalloproteinases and fibrosis biomarkers, increased oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis, HIV-associated gut depletion of CD4 cells, and microbial translocation. In addition, metabolic alterations, heavy alcohol use, as well drug use, may have a potential role in liver disease progression. Understanding the pathophysiology and regulation of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infection may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for the management of all patients with ongoing liver disease. In this review, we therefore discuss the evidence and potential molecular mechanisms involved in the accelerated liver fibrosis seen in patients coinfected with HIV and HCV.

  12. HCV-Related Central and Peripheral Nervous System Demyelinating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered. PMID:25198705

  13. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  14. Role of HCV Core gene of genotype 1a and 3a and host gene Cox-2 in HCV-induced pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein is thought to trigger activation of multiple signaling pathways and play a significant role in the alteration of cellular gene expression responsible for HCV pathogenesis leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the exact molecular mechanism of HCV genome specific pathogenesis remains unclear. We examined the in vitro effects of HCV Core protein of HCV genotype 3a and 1a on the cellular genes involved in oxidative stress and angiogenesis. We also studied the ability of HCV Core and Cox-2 siRNA either alone or in combination to inhibit viral replication and cell proliferation in HCV serum infected Huh-7 cells. Results Over expression of Core gene of HCV 3a genotype showed stronger effect in regulating RNA and protein levels of Cox-2, iNOS, VEGF, p-Akt as compared to HCV-1a Core in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Huh-7 accompanied by enhanced PGE2 release and cell proliferation. We also observed higher expression levels of above genes in HCV 3a patient's blood and biopsy samples. Interestingly, the Core and Cox-2-specific siRNAs down regulated the Core 3a-enhanced expression of Cox-2, iNOS, VEGF, p-Akt. Furthermore, the combined siRNA treatment also showed a dramatic reduction in viral titer and expression of these genes in HCV serum-infected Huh-7 cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated a differential response by HCV 3a genotype in HCV-induced pathogenesis, which may be due to Core and host factor Cox-2 individually or in combination. Conclusions Collectively, these studies not only suggest a genotype-specific interaction between key players of HCV pathogenesis but also may represent combined viral and host gene silencing as a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:21457561

  15. HCV RNA traffic and association with NS5A in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fiches, Guillaume N.; Eyre, Nicholas S.; Aloia, Amanda L.; Van Der Hoek, Kylie; Betz-Stablein, Brigit; Luciani, Fabio; Chopra, Abha; Beard, Michael R.

    2016-06-15

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA localisation are poorly understood. To address this we engineered HCV genomes harbouring MS2 bacteriophage RNA stem-loops within the 3′-untranslated region to allow tracking of HCV RNA via specific interaction with a MS2-Coat-mCherry fusion protein. Despite the impact of these insertions on viral fitness, live imaging revealed that replication of tagged-HCV genomes induced specific redistribution of the mCherry-tagged-MS2-Coat protein to motile and static foci. Further analysis showed that HCV RNA was associated with NS5A in both static and motile structures while a subset of motile NS5A structures was devoid of HCV RNA. Further investigation of viral RNA traffic with respect to lipid droplets (LDs) revealed HCV RNA-positive structures in close association with LDs. These studies provide new insights into the dynamics of HCV RNA traffic with NS5A and LDs and provide a platform for future investigations of HCV replication and assembly. - Highlights: • HCV can tolerate can bacteriophage MS2 stem-loop insertions within the 3′ UTR. • MS2 stem-loop containing HCV genomes allow for real-time imaging of HCV RNA. • HCV RNA is both static and motile and associates with NS5A and lipid droplets.

  16. Effectiveness of Simeprevir plus Sofosbuvir, With or Without Ribavirin, in Real-World Patients with HCV Genotype 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, MS; Vargas, HE; Di Bisceglie, AM; Kuo, PA; Reddy, KR; Lim, JK; Morelli, G; Darling, JM; Feld, JJ; Brown, RS; Frazier, LM; Stewart, TG; Fried, MW; Nelson, DR; Jacobson, IM

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The interferon-free regimen of simeprevir plus sofosbuvir was recommended by professional guidelines for certain patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection based on the findings of a phase 2 trial. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this regimen in clinical practice settings in North America. Methods We collected demographic, clinical, and virologic data, as well as reports of adverse outcomes, from sequential participants in HCV-TARGET—a prospective, observational cohort study of patients undergoing HCV treatment in routine clinical care settings. From January through October 2014, 836 patients with HCV genotype 1 infection began 12 weeks of treatment with simeprevir plus sofosbuvir (treatment duration of up to 16 weeks); 169 of these patients received ribavirin. Most patients were male (61%), Caucasian (76%), or black (13%); 59% had cirrhosis. Most had failed prior treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin without (46%) or with telaprevir or boceprevir (12%). The primary outcome was sustained virologic response (SVR), defined as level of HCV RNA below quantification at least 64 days after the end of treatment (beginning of week 12 after treatment—a 2 week window). Logistic regression models with inverse probability weights were constructed to adjust for baseline covariates and potential selection bias. Results The overall rate of SVR rate was 84% (675/802 patients, 95% CI: 81–87%). Model-adjusted estimates indicate patients with cirrhosis, prior decompensation, and previous protease inhibitor treatments were less likely to achieve an SVR. The addition of ribavirin had no detectable effects on SVR. The most common adverse events were fatigue, headache, nausea, rash, and insomnia. Serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation occurred in only 5% and 3% of participants, respectively. Conclusions In a large, prospective observational cohort study, a 12 week regimen of simeprevir plus sofosbuvir was

  17. Evaluation of prognostic factors for Peg Interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin treatment on HCV infected patients in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Hafsa; Gil, Muzaffar Latif; Waheed, Yasir; Adeeb, Uzama; Raza, Abida; Bilal, Iram; Athar, Muhammad Amin

    2011-04-01

    The effective standard therapeutic regimen for patients with chronic hepatitis C is pegylated interferon plus ribavirin. The efficacy of treatment in chronic hepatitis C is defined as absence of detectable virus at six months after treatment. Analysis of patient dependent and virus related factors that enable us to predict the response to antiviral treatment is very important. We prospectively studied 403 patients who received PEG-IFN alpha-2b 1.5 μg/kg/body weight plus ribavirin. Treatment was administrated for 24 weeks and 48 weeks for hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 3 and 1, respectively. Out of 403 treated patients, 301 patients (74.7%) showed a sustained virologic response (SVR). Seven variables (age, sex, ethnic group, pretreatment viral load, HCV genotyping and pretreatment ALT) were chosen as possible predictors of SVR and were analysed by means of univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. Five variables were statistically significant (p<0.005) on univariable analysis: age, ethnic group, pretreatment viral load, response rate at week 4, and HCV genotype. In multivariable analysis independent factors associated with SVR were low pretreatment viral load (1.97; 95%CI, 1.06-3.66; p=0.03) and attainment of rapid virological response (RVR) (7.19; 95%CI, 4.15-12.45; p<0.001). Our findings support the association between viral load and SVR to PEG-IFN-alpha-2b plus ribavirin therapy. No achievement of RVR is an unfavorable marker for SVR. These findings suggest that all patients considered for treatment should have quantification of serum HCV RNA levels. The result can be used to counsel patients on the likelihood of achieving SVR and may influence the patient's decision on treatment. Future studies should confirm and explore this observation in other ethnic groups and in relation to HCV genotypes 1 and 3.

  18. Development and characterization of a replicon-based phenotypic assay for assessing HCV NS4B from clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Rajyaguru, Sonal; Yang, Huiling; Martin, Ross; Miller, Michael D; Mo, Hongmei

    2013-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B inhibitors have shown potent inhibition of HCV replication in vitro. To assess the effect of viral diversity on the susceptibility to NS4B inhibitors, genotype (GT)-specific GT1a and GT1b replicon shuttle vectors were designed and created for cloning HCV NS4B genes from clinical isolates. For the GT1b NS4B shuttle vector, the S2204I adaptive mutation was introduced in NS5A to improve replication due to the replacement of the K1846T adaptive mutation in NS4B with NS4B from the clinical isolates. In addition to the adaptive mutations, a newly identified Huh-7 cell line, Huh-7-1C, which is highly permissive for both GT1a and GT1b replication, was used to further enhance the replication levels. HCV NS4B gene from clinical isolates was amplified and inserted into the corresponding GT1a and GT1b modified lab strain chimeric replicons. GT1a and GT1b chimeric replicons expressing diverse NS4B genes from corresponding subtypes of clinical isolates replicated at highly efficient levels for phenotypic analysis. Due to natural variation in their amino acid residues in NS4B, these isolates displayed varying drug susceptibilities to an NS4B inhibitor. In mixed populations with wild-type, the sensitivity of resistance detection of NS4B resistant mutants H94R and V105M was between 20% and 80%. The chimeric shuttle vectors can be used to characterize the activity of antiviral drugs targeting NS4B from diverse natural clinical isolates and aid in the development of novel compounds against HCV NS4B.

  19. EFFECT OF HIV PREVENTION AND TREATMENT PROGRAM ON HIV AND HCV TRANSMISSION AND HIV MORTALITY AT AN INDONESIAN NARCOTIC PRISON.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni J; Indrati, Agnes K; Isa, Ahmad; Triani, Nurlita; Alam, Nisaa Nur; Herlan, Maria S; Husen, Wahid; Pohan, Herdiman T; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Meheus, Andre; Van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-09-01

    Validated data regarding HIV-transmission in prisons in developing countries is scarce. We examined sexual and injecting drug use behavior and HIV and HCV transmission in an Indonesian narcotic prison during the implementation of an HIV prevention and treatment program during 2004-2007 when the Banceuy Narcotic Prison in Indonesia conducted an HIV transmission prevention program to provide 1) HIV education, 2) voluntary HIV testing and counseling, 3) condom supply, 4) prevention of rape and sexual violence, 5) antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners and 6) methadone maintenance treatment. During a first survey that was conducted between 2007 and 2009, new prisoners entered Banceuy Narcotics Prison were voluntary tested for HIV and HCV-infection after written informed consent was obtained. Information regarding sexual and injecting risk behavior and physical status were also recorded at admission to the prison. Participants who tested negative for both HIV and HCV during the first survey were included in a second survey conducted during 2008-2011. During both surveys, data on mortality among HIV-seropositive patients were also recorded. All HIV-seropositive participants receive treatment for HIV. HIV/ AIDS-related deaths decreased: 43% in 2006, 18% in 2007, 9% in 2008 and 0% in 2009. No HIV and HCV seroconversion inside Banceuy Narcotic Prison were found after a median of 23 months imprisonment (maximum follow-up: 38 months). Total of 484.8 person-years observation was done. Participants reported HIV transmission risk-behavior in Banceuy Prison during the second survey was low. After implementation of HIV prevention and treatment program, no new HIV or HCV cases were detected and HIV-related mortality decreased.

  20. Analysis of HCV genotypes from blood donors shows three new HCV type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Shinji, Toshiyuki; Kyaw, Yi Yi; Gokan, Katsunori; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ochi, Koji; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mizushima, Takaaki; Fujioka, Shin-ichi; Shiraha, Hidenori; Lwin, Aye Aye; Shiratori, Yasushi; Mizokami, Masashi; Khin, Myo; Miyahara, Masayuki; Okada, Shigeru; Koide, Norio

    2004-06-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in Myanmar in comparison with the rest of Southeast Asia is not well known. Serum samples were obtained from 201 HCV antibody-positive volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Of these, the antibody titers of 101 samples were checked by serial dilution using HCV antibody PA test II and Terasaki microplate as a low-cost method. To compare antibody titers by this method and RNA identification, we also checked HCV-RNA using the Amplicor 2.0 test. Most high-titer groups were positive for HCV-RNA. Of the 201 samples, 110 were successfully polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified. Among them, 35 (31.8%) were of genotype 1, 52 (47.3%) were of genotype 3, and 23 (20.9%) were of type 6 variants, and phylogenetic analysis of these type 6 variants revealed that 3 new type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar. We named the subgroups M6-1, M6-2, and M6-3. M6-1 and M6-2 were relatively close to types 8 and 9, respectively. M6-3, though only found in one sample, was a brand-new subgroup. These subtypes were not seen in Vietnam, where type 6 group variants are widely spread. These findings may be useful for analyzing how and when these subgroups were formed.

  1. MRD parameters using immunophenotypic detection methods are highly reliable in predicting survival in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Feller, N; van der Pol, M A; van Stijn, A; Weijers, G W D; Westra, A H; Evertse, B W; Ossenkoppele, G J; Schuurhuis, G J

    2004-08-01

    Outgrowth of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is responsible for the occurrence of relapses. MRD can be quantified by immunophenotyping on a flow cytometer using the expression of leukaemia-associated phenotypes. MRD was monitored in follow-up samples taken from bone marrow (BM) of 72 patients after three different cycles of chemotherapy and from autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) products. The MRD% in BM after the first cycle (n=51), second cycle (n=52) and third cycle (n=30), as well as in PBSC products (n=39) strongly correlated with relapse-free survival. At a cutoff level of 1% after the first cycle and median cutoff levels of 0.14% after the second, 0.11% after the third cycle and 0.13% for PBSC products, the relative risk of relapse was a factor 6.1, 3.4, 7.2 and 5.7, respectively, higher for patients in the high MRD group. Also, absolute MRD cell number/ml was highly predictive of the clinical outcome. After the treatment has ended, an increase of MRD% predicted forthcoming relapses, with MRD assessment intervals of < or =3 months. In conclusion, MRD parameter assessment at different stages of disease is highly reliable in predicting survival and forthcoming relapses in AML.

  2. Impact of Helicobacter pylori eradication on refractory thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic HCV awaiting antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, A S; El Hawary, A T; Hamed, E F; Hassaneen, A M

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of delaying treatment of HCV due to severe thrombocytopenia is challenging. This study aimed to detect the prevalence of active helicobacter infection as a claimed cause of thrombocytopenia in a cohort of Egyptian patients with chronic active HCV awaiting combined anti-viral therapy. The study included 400 chronic HCV patients with thrombocytopenia. Laboratory investigations included liver function tests, real time quantitative PCR, reticulocytic count, ESR, ANA, bone marrow aspiration, measurement of anti-helicobacter antibodies, and helicobacter stool antigen. Positive cases for active H. pylori were given the standard triple therapy for 2 weeks. Helicobacter stool antigen was detected 4 weeks after termination of therapy and the change in platelet count was detected 1 month after eradication. A total of 248 out of 281 seropositive patients for H. pylori (88.3 %) showed positive stool antigen (p = 0.01). Eradication was achieved in 169 (68.1 %) patients with platelet mean count 114.9 ± 18.8 × 10(3)/μl with highly significant statistical difference from pretreatment value (49.7 ± 9.2 × 10(3)/μl, p = 0.000). Seventy-nine patients were resistant to conventional triple therapy and given a 7-day course of moxifloxacin-based therapy; 61 patients responded (77.1 %) with mean platelet improvement from 76.4 ± 17.4 × 10(3)/μl to 104.2 ± 15.2 × 10(3)/μl (p = 0.000). The non-responders showed no improvement in their platelet count (74.6 ± 20.5 vs. 73.6 ± 15.3 × 10(3)/ul, P = 0.5). Eradication of active H. pylori in HCV augments platelet count and enhances the early start of antiviral therapy.

  3. Real-Time Detection and Monitoring of Acute Brain Injury Utilizing Evoked Electroencephalographic Potentials.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A N; Huang, Stanley; Ye, Meijun; Nabili, Marjan; Wilent, W Bryan; Krauthamer, Victor; Myers, Matthew R; Welle, Cristin G

    2016-09-01

    Rapid detection and diagnosis of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can significantly improve the prognosis for recovery. Helmet-mounted sensors that detect impact severity based on measurements of acceleration or pressure show promise for aiding triage and transport decisions in active, field environments such as professional sports or military combat. The detected signals, however, report on the mechanics of an impact rather than directly indicating the presence and severity of an injury. We explored the use of cortical somatosensory evoked electroencephalographic potentials (SSEPs) to detect and track, in real-time, neural electrophysiological abnormalities within the first hour following head injury in an animal model. To study the immediate electrophysiological effects of injury in vivo, we developed an experimental paradigm involving focused ultrasound that permits continuous, real-time measurements and minimizes mechanical artifact. Injury was associated with a dramatic reduction of amplitude over the damaged hemisphere directly after the injury. The amplitude systematically improved over time but remained significantly decreased at one hour, compared with baseline. In contrast, at one hour there was a concomitant enhancement of the cortical SSEP amplitude evoked from the uninjured hemisphere. Analysis of the inter-trial electroencephalogram (EEG) also revealed significant changes in low-frequency components and an increase in EEG entropy up to 30 minutes after injury, likely reflecting altered EEG reactivity to somatosensory stimuli. Injury-induced alterations in SSEPs were also observed using noninvasive epidermal electrodes, demonstrating viability of practical implementation. These results suggest cortical SSEPs recorded at just a few locations by head-mounted sensors and associated multiparametric analyses could potentially be used to rapidly detect and monitor brain injury in settings that normally present significant levels of mechanical and electrical

  4. 75 FR 19417 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment for Housing Choice Voucher (HCV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... Voucher (HCV) Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Program AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public... also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Family...

  5. HTLV infection in HCV-antibody positive patients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Ana; Aguilera, Antonio; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel A; Hernandez, Araceli; Benito, Rafael; Roc, Lourdes; Ramos, José Manuel; Ortíz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Poveda, Eva; Rodríguez, Carmen; Del Romero, Jorge; Calderon, Enrique; García, Juan; Requena, Silvia; Soriano, Vincent; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2017-03-07

    Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) share transmission routes, dual infection could be frequent. In Spain, HTLV underdiagnosis is highlighted by the high proportion of patients presenting either with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) or adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) at first diagnosis. We examined whether the renewed efforts for expanding HCV testing may provide a sentinel population that might selectively be targeted to unveil asymptomatic HTLV carriers. The presence of anti-HTLV antibodies was examined in 3,838 consecutive individuals with reactive HCV serology attended during the last three years at 13 hospitals distributed across the Spanish geography. Overall 71% were male and the median age was 41-years old. Foreigners represented 9% of the study population. A total of 50 individuals (1.3%) were seroreactive for HTLV, being 30 confirmed as HTLV-2 and two as HTLV-1 (0.12%). The remaining 18 had indeterminate Western blot patterns. Most individuals with HTLV-2 and HTLV indeterminate serology were HIV-positive, former injection drug users and native Spaniards. In contrast, the two HTLV-1 infections were found in men coming from Brazil and the Dominican Republic, respectively. In summary, the overall prevalence of HTLV infection in individuals living in Spain seropositive for HCV is 1.3%, more than 10-fold greater than in general outclinics in Spain. However, immigrants from HTLV-1 endemic regions and former injection drug users with HTLV-2 infection are by far the major contributory groups in HCV patients. Therefore, testing for HTLV in newly diagnosed HCV individuals would not contribute much to improve late HTLV diagnosis in Spain.

  6. Occult HCV Infection: The Current State of Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Hadi, Reza; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Hossein Khosravi, Mohammad; Ajudani, Reza; Dolatimehr, Fardin; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Miri, Seyyed Mohammad; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2015-01-01

    Context Occult HCV infection (OCI) is defined as the presence of HCV-RNA in hepatocytes and the absence of HCV in the serum according to usual tests. We aimed to define OCI and provide information about the currently available diagnostic methods. Then we focus on specific groups that are at high risk of OCI and finally investigate immune responses to OCI and the available treatment approaches. Evidence Acquisition PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were comprehensively searched with combination of following keywords: “occult”, “hepatitis C virus” and “occult HCV infection”. The definition of OCI, diagnostic methods, specific groups that are at high risk and available treatment approaches were extract from literature. An analysis of available articles on OCI also was done based on Scopus search results. Results OCI has been reported in several high-risk groups, especially in hemodialysis patients and subjects with cryptogenic liver disease. Furthermore, some studies have proposed a specific immune response for OCI in comparison with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Conclusions With a clinical history of approximately 11 years, occult HCV infection can be considered an occult type of CHC. Evidences suggest that considering OCI in these high-risk groups seems to be necessary. We suggest that alternative diagnostic tests should be applied and that there is a need for the participation of all countries to determine the epidemiology of this type of HCV infection. Additionally, evaluating OCI in blood transfusion centers and in patients who receive large amounts of blood and clotting factors, such as patients with hemophilia, should be performed in future projects. PMID:26734487

  7. Importance of detecting multidrug resistance proteins in acute leukemia prognosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello; Maranho, Caroline Klein; Rauber, Gabriela Schneider; Santos-Silva, Maria Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a multifactorial phenomenon and the role of these proteins in generating the MDR phenotype is controversial. With this in mind, this review compiled the current data on the role of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP proteins in the prognosis of hematologic neoplasms and their influence on the choice of therapy. Literature showed that the detection of these proteins, mainly ABCB1, is important in the AL prognosis. However, there is controversy regarding the methodology used for their detection. In summary, the expression and activity profiles of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP, proteins capable of promoting the efflux of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents from the cell cytoplasm represent one of the greatest causes of failure in AL treatment.

  8. ACUTE AND REPEATED INHALATION OF TOLUENE BY RATS PERFORMING A SIGNAL DETECTION TASK LEADS TO BEHAVIORAL TOLERANCE ON SOME PERFORMANCE MEASURES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work showed that trichloroethylene (TCE) impairs accuracy and latency in a signal detection task (SDT) in rats, and that these effects abate during repeated exposures if rats inhale TCE during SDT testing. The present experiment compared the effects of acute and repeated...

  9. Detection of acute inflammation with /sup 111/In-labeled nonspecific polyclonal IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Rubin, R.H.; Khaw, B.A.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.; Keech, F.; Nedelman, M.; Dragotakes, S.; Kramer, P.B.; LaMuraglia, G.M.

    1988-10-01

    The detection of focal sites of inflammation is an integral part of the clinical evaluation of the febrile patient. When anatomically distinct abscesses are present, lesion detection can be accomplished by standard radiographic techniques, particularly in patients with normal anatomy. At the phlegmon stage, however, and in patients who have undergone surgery, these techniques are considerably less effective. While radionuclide methods, such as Gallium-67 (67Ga)-citrate and Indium-111 (111In)-labeled WBCs have been relatively successful for the detection of early inflammation, neither approach is ideal. In the course of studies addressing the use of specific organism-directed antibodies for imaging experimental infections in animals, we observed that nonspecific polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) localized as well as specific antibodies. Preliminary experiments suggested that the Fc portion of IgG is necessary for effective inflammation localization. Since polyclonal IgG in gram quantities has been safely used for therapy in patients with immune deficiency states, we decided to test whether milligram quantities of radiolabeled IgG could image focal sites of inflammation in humans. Thus far, we have studied a series of 84 patients with suspected lesions in the abdomen, pelvis, vascular grafts, lungs, or bones/joints. In 48 of 52 patients with focal lesions detected by surgery, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound (US), the IgG scan correctly localized the site, while 31 patients without focal inflammation had no abnormal focal localization of the radiopharmaceutical. Four patients had false negative scans and one patient had a false positive scan. For this small series, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 95%, respectively. In this report, we review our experience with this exciting new agent.

  10. Spectral Detection of Acute Mental Stress with VIS-SWIR Hyperspectral Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    skin under stress should hold a unique spectral distribution as blood volume and oxygen levels change with stress. This study will be performed indoors...reflectance measurements [36]. In a similar study performed using PPG imaging, specific cardiac and respiratory bands across the spectrum were identified in...HSI [3, 4]. Yuen et al. [4] found that the facial region shows a distinctive increase 27 in HOL that can be detected through HSI. One study that

  11. The Most Common Detected Bacteria in Sputum of Patients with the Acute Exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) may be triggered by infection with bacteria or viruses or by environmental pollutants; the cause of about one-third of exacerbations cannot be identified. Objective: To determine the most common bacteria in sputum culture of patients with AECOPD hospitalized in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB “Podhrastovi” in the 2012. Material and methods: This is a retrospective analysis of sputum bacterial cultures of patients with AECOPD treated in the Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB “Podhrastovi” during 2012 .year. Each patient was required to give two sputum for bacterial examination. Each patient was treated with antibiotics prior to admission in Clinic “Podhrastovi”. The results of sputum bacterial culture findings are expressed in absolute number and percentage of examined patients. Results: In 2012, 75 patients with AECOPD were treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary disease and TB“Podhrastovi”. 44 (58.66%) of patients had normal –nonpathogenic – usual bacterial flora isolated in sputum cultures, 31 (41.34%) had a pathogen bacteria in sputum culture as follows: 7 had Streptoccocus pneumoniae, 8 had Klebsiella pneumoniae (2 with Streptococcus pneumoniae, one with Acinetobacter baumani) ,4 Escherichia colli, others are one or two cases with other bacteria. Conclusion: Bacterial airway infections play a great role in many, but not in all, of cases of AECOPD. So there is the need to do a sputum bacterial culture examination in each patient with AECOPD and with appropriate antibiotics to contribute to curing of them. PMID:24511262

  12. Acute bioassays and hazard evaluation of representative contaminants detected in Great Lakes fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passino, Dora R. May; Smith, Stephen B.

    1987-01-01

    We have provided a hazard ranking for 19 classes of compounds representing many of the nearly 500 organic compounds identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) from the Great Lakes and Lake St. Clair. We initially made a provisional hazard ranking based on available published and unpublished information on aquatic toxicity, bioaccumulation, occurrence and sources. Acute toxicity tests with Daphnia pulex at 17A°C in reconstituted hard water were performed with 30 compounds representative of the 19 classes that were highest in the provisional ranking. The resulting toxicity data, along with information on the compounds' occurrence in Great Lakes fish and their sources, were ranked and weighted and then used in calculating the revised hazard ranking. The 10 most hazardous classes, in descending order, are as follows (values shown are mean 48-h EC50s, in μ/ml): arene halides (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT), 0.0011; phthalate esters, 0.133; chlorinated camphenes (toxaphene), 0.0082; polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; e.g., dimethylnaphthalene) and reduced derivatives, 1.01; chlorinated fused polycyclics (e.g., trans-nonachlor), 0.022; nitrogen-containing compounds (e.g., O-methylhydroxyl-amine), 1.35; alkyl halides (e.g., (bromomethyl)cyclohexene), 10.1; cyclic alkanes (e.g., cyclododecane), 20.9; silicon-containing compounds (e.g., dimethyldiethoxy silane), 1.25; and heterocyclic nitrogen compounds (e.g., nicotine), 2.48. We recommend that chronic bioassays be conducted with fish and invertebrates to determine the sublethal effects of the following classes of compounds, for which few toxicity data are available: PAHs, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, other nitrogen-containing compounds, alkyl halides, cyclic alkanes and silicon-containing compounds. Information from these types of studies will aid researchers in determining the possible causal role these contaminants play in

  13. HCV antibody response and genotype distribution in different areas and races of China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Leili; Yu, Jiyun; Yang, Jinliang; Song, Hongbin; Liu, Xuelin; Wang, Yong; Xu, Yuanyong; Zhang, Chuanfu; Zhong, Yanwei; Li, Qiao

    2009-06-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) heterogeneity accounts for the failure of effective vaccine development and the lack of successful anti-viral therapy in some patients. Little is known about the immune response to HCV peptides and the region or race specific genotypes in China. The objective of this study was to characterize HCV antibody immune response to HCV peptides and HCV genotypes in different regions and races of China. A total of 363 serum samples were collected from HCV carriers in 6 regions in China. The immune response to HCV peptides was evaluated by ELISA. HCV genotypes were examined using nested RT-PCR. We found that the anti-HCV antibody neutralization rates were significantly different among the serum samples from different areas or from different races in the same area. For samples from Tibet and Sinkiang, the rates of neutralization by HCV peptides were only 3.2% and 30.8%, respectively. The genotypes of samples from Tibet and Sinkiang were apparently heterogeneic and included type I, II, III and multiple types (I/II/III, I/II, I/III, II/III). One specific sample with multiple-genotype (I/II/III) HCV infection was found to consist of type I, II, III, II/III and an unclassified genotype. These studies indicate that the anti-HCV antibody immune response to HCV peptides varied across regions and among races. The distribution of HCV genotypes among Tibetans in Tibet and Uighurs in Sinkiang was different from that in the inner areas of China. In addition, a "master" genotype, type II, was found to exist in HCV infection with multiple HCV genotypes.

  14. VX-950, a Novel Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS3-4A Protease Inhibitor, Exhibits Potent Antiviral Activities in HCV Replicon Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kai; Perni, Robert B.; Kwong, Ann D.; Lin, Chao

    2006-01-01

    The NS3-4A serine protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is essential for viral replication and therefore has been one of the most attractive targets for developing specific antiviral agents against HCV. VX-950, a highly selective, reversible, and potent peptidomimetic inhibitor of the HCV NS3-4A protease, is currently in clinical development for the treatment of hepatitis C. In this report, we describe the in vitro characterization of anti-HCV activities of VX-950 in subgenomic HCV replicon cells. Incubation with VX-950 resulted in a time- and dose-dependent reduction of HCV RNA and proteins in replicon cells. Moreover, following a 2-week incubation with VX-950, a reduction in HCV RNA levels of 4.7 log10 was observed, and this reduction resulted in elimination of HCV RNA from replicon cells, since there was no rebound in replicon RNA after withdrawal of the inhibitor. The combination of VX-950 and alpha interferon was additive to moderately synergistic in reducing HCV RNA in replicon cells with no significant increase in cytotoxicity. The benefit of the combination was sustained over time: a 4-log10 reduction in HCV RNA level was achieved following a 9-day incubation with VX-950 and alpha interferon at lower concentrations than when either VX-950 or alpha interferon was used alone. The combination of VX-950 and alpha interferon also suppressed the emergence of in vitro resistance mutations against VX-950 in replicon cells. PMID:16641454

  15. Detection of Acute and Early HIV-1 Infections in an HIV Hyper-Endemic Area with Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H.; Martin, Desmond J.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Olorunju, Steve A. S.; Tintinger, Gregory R.; Stoltz, Anton C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Two thirds of the world’s new HIV infections are in sub-Saharan Africa. Acute HIV infection (AHI) is the time of virus acquisition until the appearance of HIV antibodies. Early HIV infection, which includes AHI, is the interval between virus acquisition and establishment of viral load set-point. This study aimed to detect acute and early HIV infections in a hyper-endemic setting. Methods This was a cross-sectional diagnostic study that enrolled individuals who had negative rapid HIV results in five clinics in South Africa. Pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) was performed, followed by individual sample testing in positive pools. NAAT-positive participants were recalled to the clinics for confirmatory testing and appropriate management. HIV antibody, p24 antigen, Western Blot and avidity tests were performed for characterization of NAAT-positive samples. Results The study enrolled 6910 individuals with negative rapid HIV results. Median age was 27 years (interquartile range {IQR}: 23–31). NAAT was positive in 55 samples, resulting in 0.8% newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals (95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.6–1.0). The negative predictive value for rapid HIV testing was 99.2% (95% CI: 99.0–99.4). Characterization of NAAT-positive samples revealed that 0.04% (95% CI: 0.000–0.001) had AHI, 0.3% (95% CI: 0.1–0.4) had early HIV infection, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.5–0.7) had chronic HIV infection. Forty-seven (86%) of NAAT-positive participants returned for follow-up at a median of 4 weeks (IQR: 2–8). Follow-up rapid tests were positive in 96% of these participants. Conclusions NAAT demonstrated that a substantial number of HIV-infected individuals are misdiagnosed at South African points-of-care. Follow-up rapid tests done within a 4 week interval detected early and chronic HIV infections initially missed by rapid HIV testing. This may be a practical and affordable strategy for earlier detection of these infections in resource

  16. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (CSPG4)-specific monoclonal antibody 225.28 in detection of acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Moon; Whiteside, Theresa L; Ferrone, Soldano; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (CSPG4), a membrane-bound proteoglycan known to be expressed on the surface of malignant cells, has a restricted distribution in normal tissues. CSPG4 is a potential candidate tumor marker. We investigate CSPG4 expression on blasts in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and its relation with cytogenetic abnormalities and molecular markers known to have prognostic significance in this disease. Using hybridoma technology, we generated a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), mAb 225.28, reactive with CSPG4. Blast samples obtained from the peripheral blood of newly diagnosed AML patients were analyzed for CSPG4 expression using the CSPG4-specific mAb and multiparameter flow cytometry. The results were correlated with cytogenetic and molecular characteristics of AML. CSPG4 was found to be expressed on a variable fraction of leukemic blasts in all AML patients with different leukemia morphology, including monoblastic cases. Reactivity of CSPG4-specific mAb with leukemic blasts was not limited to those with the rearranged MLL gene. CSPG4 was also expressed on AML blasts with a complex karyotype, FLT3 mutation, or NPM1 mutation. The results indicate that CSPG4 is expressed and detectable by flow cytometry using the mAb 225.28 on a proportion of blasts of all subtypes of AML irrespective of cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. mAb 225.28 could be useful in detecting AML blasts by flow cytometry.

  17. Identification of fungal pathogens in a patient with acute myelogenic leukemia using a pathogen detection array technology

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sagarika; Peck, Kristen N.; Feldman, Michael D.; Schuster, Mindy G.; Alwine, James C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasive zygomycosis in immunocompromised patients results in a high mortality rate, and early identification is crucial to optimize therapy and to reduce morbidity. However, diagnosing specific species of zygomycetes fungi possess challenge in the clinical laboratories. A need for a rapid and sensitive diagnostic tool for early recognition of a zygomycetes fungus in clinical samples to the species level will lead to prompt and accurate therapy and the PathoChip provides one such platform. We utilized a pathogen array technology referred to as PathoChip, comprised of oligonucleotide probes that can detect all the sequenced viruses as well as known pathogenic bacteria, fungi and parasites and family-specific conserved probes, thus providing a means for detecting previously uncharacterized members of a family. We rapidly identified a zygomycetous fungus, Rhizomucor pusillus, an otherwise challenge for the clinical laboratories, predominantly in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. This report highlights the value of PathoChip as a diagnostic tool to identify micro-organisms to the species level, especially for those difficult to identify in most clinical laboratories. It will also help clinicians to obtain a critical snapshot of the infection profile of a patient to plan treatment strategies. PMID:26619325

  18. Acute inhalation of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane alters visual evoked potentials and signal detection behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Oshiro, Wendy M; El-Masri, Hisham; Degn, Laura L; Bercegeay, Mark; Krantz, Q Todd; Bushnell, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP, "isooctane") is a constituent of gasoline for which the current health effects data are insufficient to permit the US Environmental Protection Agency to conduct a risk assessment. The potential neurological impairment from acute inhalation exposure to TMP was evaluated in adult male Long-Evans rats using both electrophysiological and behavioral assessments. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from rats viewing modulated visual patterns (0.16 cycles per degree visual angle (cpd), 60% contrast, 4.55Hz appear/disappear). Rats (n=7-10/dose) were exposed to TMP vapors in concentrations of 0, 500, or 1000 ppm for 60-min. A VEP was recorded before exposure and at 10 min intervals during exposure and also for 60 min after exposure terminated. The spectral amplitude of the frequency-double component (F2) was significantly reduced after exposure to TMP. In behavioral assessments, rats (n=14) performed an appetitively motivated visual signal detection task while breathing 0, 500, 1500, 1000, 2000, or 2500 ppm TMP for 62 min. Slight reductions in accuracy of performance were observed at the 2500 ppm concentration. Concentrations of TMP in the brain were estimated using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to be less than 0.2mM after 62 min at 2500 ppm. Together these data demonstrate that TMP, like other volatile organic substances, impairs neurological function during acute inhalation exposure and that the small magnitude of the observed effects is consistent with the low concentrations of this hydrocarbon that were estimated to reach the CNS.

  19. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  20. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  1. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  2. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  3. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  4. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) interaction with astrocytes: nonproductive infection and induction of IL-18.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziqing; Zhao, Fang; He, Johnny J

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes the central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities in more than 50 % of chronically infected subjects. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the HCV interactions with astrocytes, one of the putative HCV target cells in the brain. We demonstrated that primary human astrocytes (PHA) were very inefficiently infected by HCV, either in the cell-free form or through cell-cell contact. We then determined the potential restriction steps of HCV infection and replication in these cells. PHA expressed all known HCV receptors but failed to support HCV entry. HCV IRES-mediated RNA translation was functional in PHA and further enhanced by miR122 expression. Nevertheless, PHA did not support HCV replication regardless of miR122 expression. To our great surprise, we found that HCV exposure induced robust IL-18 expression in PHA and exhibited direct neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results showed that astrocytes did not support productive HCV infection and replication, but HCV interactions with astrocytes and neurons alone might be sufficient to cause CNS dysfunction.

  5. Consensus statement on the management of patients with HCV infection in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Ancuța, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    Background HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have made treatment easier for both patients and healthcare practitioners, but have also brought new challenges in terms of patient management and monitoring prior to, during, and after treatment. Methods To sum up and unify the clinical experience of Romanian DAA prescribing physicians, we have organized a Consensus Meeting in November 2016 in Bucharest, Romania. Consensus Statement The Consensus Meeting has provided expert answers to ten significant questions regarding HCV infection, namely: How do we diagnose patients with HCV infection? How do we stage liver disease in patients with HCV infection? How do we monitor patients with HCV infection prior to treatment? Which patients with HCV infection do we treat? When do we start treatment for HCV infection? What regimens do we use for treating HCV infection? How do we monitor patients with HCV infection during treatment? What adverse events should we expect during treatment of HCV infection and how do we prevent/manage them? How do we monitor patients with HCV infection after treatment? How do we expect the landscape of HCV to change in the following years? PMID:28331840

  6. Evolution of the Humoral Response during HCV Infection: Theories on the Origin of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Implications for Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Murira, Armstrong; Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, vaccine-induced elicitation of broadly neutralizing (bNt) antibodies (Abs) is gaining traction as a key goal toward the eradication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) pandemic. Previously, the significance of the Ab response against HCV was underappreciated given the prevailing evidence advancing the role of the cellular immune response in clearance and overall control of the infection. However, recent findings have driven growing interest in the humoral arm of the immune response and in particular the role of bNt responses due to their ability to confer protective immunity upon passive transfer in animal models. Nevertheless, the origin and development of bNt Abs is poorly understood and their occurrence is rare as well as delayed with emergence only observed in the chronic phase of infection. In this review, we characterize the interplay between the host immune response and HCV as it progresses from the acute to chronic phase of infection. In addition, we place these events in the context of current hypotheses on the origin of bNt Abs against the HIV-1, whose humoral immune response is better characterized. Based on the increasing significance of the humoral immune response against HCV, characterization of these events may be critical in understanding the development of the bNt responses and, thus, provide strategies toward effective vaccine design.

  7. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-07-01

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with ~ 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of ~ 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in ~ 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of ~ 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of ~ a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of ~ 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of ~ 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33low. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  8. Specific detection of Flt3 point mutations by highly sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Sebastian; Krause, Claudia; Loncarevic, Ivan F; Müller, Rouven; Kunert, Christa; Wedding, Ulrich; Sayer, Herbert G; Clement, Joachim H; Höffken, Klaus

    2005-06-01

    Among activating class III receptor tyrosine kinase (Flt3) mutations, internal tandem duplications of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD) are detected in about 25% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In contrast, mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of Flt3 (Flt3-TKD mutations) are less frequent (approximately 7%), and there are only limited data on the frequency of recently demonstrated activating Flt3 point mutation at codon 592 (Flt3-V592A mutation). We evaluated a new approach for rapid screening of Flt3-TKD and Flt3-V592A mutations using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) principle in a group of 122 patients. Based on individual Flt3-TKD mutations, we designed patient-specific primers to perform a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid detection of minimal residual disease (MRD). We also used a model system with MonoMac-6 cells carrying the Flt3-V592A mutation to establish a mutation-specific real-time PCR approach also for this molecular aberration. We identified 9 cases (8%) of Flt3-TKD mutations (5 cases of mutation D835Y, 3 cases of mutation D835H, and 1 case of mutation Del836), and no cases of Flt3-V592A mutation. Screening for Flt3-TKD mutations with fluorescent probes is equivalent to conventional screening using standard PCR followed by EcoRV restriction. We present a real-time PCR protocol that can be used for MRD analyses based on individual Flt3-TKD mutations. Examples of MRD analyses are presented for all 3 subtypes of Flt3-TKD mutation identified in this study. In summary, we demonstrate new methodological approaches for rapid screening of Flt3 point mutations and for detection of MRD based on patient-specific Flt3-TKD mutations.

  9. Deconvoluting the Composition of Low-Frequency Hepatitis C Viral Quasispecies: Comparison of Genotypes and NS3 Resistance-Associated Variants between HCV/HIV Coinfected Hemophiliacs and HCV Monoinfected Patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ode, Hirotaka; Sugiura, Wataru; Moriya, Kyoji; Oka, Shinichi; Kimura, Satoshi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pre-existing low-frequency resistance-associated variants (RAVs) may jeopardize successful sustained virological responses (SVR) to HCV treatment with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, the potential impact of low-frequency (∼0.1%) mutations, concatenated mutations (haplotypes), and their association with genotypes (Gts) on the treatment outcome has not yet been elucidated, most probably owing to the difficulty in detecting pre-existing minor haplotypes with sufficient length and accuracy. Herein, we characterize a methodological framework based on Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) coupled with bioinformatics of quasispecies reconstruction (QSR) to realize highly accurate variant calling and genotype-haplotype detection. The core-to-NS3 protease coding sequences in 10 HCV monoinfected patients, 5 of whom had a history of blood transfusion, and 11 HCV/HIV coinfected patients with hemophilia, were studied. Simulation experiments showed that, for minor variants constituting more than 1%, our framework achieved a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and sensitivities of 91.7–100% for genotyping and 80.6% for RAV screening. Genotyping analysis indicated the prevalence of dominant Gt1a infection in coinfected patients (6/11 vs 0/10, p = 0.01). For clinical samples, minor genotype overlapping infection was prevalent in HCV/HIV coinfected hemophiliacs (10/11) and patients who experienced whole-blood transfusion (4/5) but none in patients without exposure to blood (0/5). As for RAV screening, the Q80K/R and S122K/R variants were particularly prevalent among minor RAVs observed, detected in 12/21 and 6/21 cases, respectively. Q80K was detected only in coinfected patients, whereas Q80R was predominantly detected in monoinfected patients (1/11 vs 7/10, p < 0.01). Multivariate interdependence analysis revealed the previously unrecognized prevalence of Gt1b-Q80K, in HCV/HIV coinfected hemophiliacs [Odds ratio = 13.4 (3.48–51.9), p < 0.01]. Our study

  10. Characterization of chronic HCV infection in Northwest Spain: Impact of the ttreatment strategic plan of the Spanish National Health Service on HCV cure.

    PubMed

    Grandal, Marta; Pernas, Berta; Mariño, Ana; Álvarez, Hortensia; Tabernilla, Andrés; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Mena, Álvaro; Delgado, Manuel; Pértega, Sonia; Poveda, Eva

    2017-01-12

    The aim of the study was to characterize HCV infection in Northwest Spain and assess the impact of the Spanish Strategic Plan to cure HCV infection. Overall, 387 patients were included (60.9% HIV/HCV coinfected and 28.2% cirrhotic). Of these, 72.9% of patients that were recognized as priority for HCV treatment according to the Spanish Strategic Plan (≥F2, transplant or extrahepatic manifestations), initiated treatment during 2015. Globally, SVR12 was achieved in 96.5% of patients. The implementation of the Spanish Strategic Plan has been critical to advance in HCV cure, but 27.1% of priority patients still remain awaiting HCV treatment initiation.

  11. [Detection of the rotavirus group antigen by a screening test using the ELISA-IC kit in subjects with acute gastroenteritis, at the pediatric services of Moldavia].

    PubMed

    Avram, G; Zavate, O; Combiescu, A A; Perşu, A; Ivan, A; Constantiniu, S; Pancu, V; Popovici, S; Boghean, T; Nicola, P

    1987-01-01

    The rotaviral antigen was detected by a screening test using the ELISA-IC kit in 17.6% out of 415 children with acute gastroenteritis. The highest frequency (28.9%) was found in children hospitalized in pediatric services with a diagnosis of diarrhoeic disease associated to acute respiratory infection. The rotavirus infection incidence was about three times higher during the cold season than during summer (30.4% versus 10.5%). The 6-11 month age group was the most severely affected.

  12. The Phylogeographic and Spatiotemporal Spread of HCV in Pakistani Population

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is the most prevalent human pathogen in Pakistan and is the major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in infected patients. It has shifted from being hypo-endemic to being hyper-endemic. There was no information about the origin and evolution of the local variants. Here we use newly developed phyloinformatic methods of sequence analysis to conduct the first comprehensive investigation of the evolutionary and biogeographic history in unprecedented detail and breadth. Considering evolutionary rate and molecular-clock hypothesis in context, we reconstructed the spatiotemporal spread of HCV in the whole territory of its circulation using a combination of Bayesian MCMC methods utilizing all sequences available in GenBank. Comparative analysis were performed and were addressed. Whole genome and individual gene analysis have shown that sub-types 1a, 1b and 3a are recognized as epidemic strains and are distributed globally. Here we confirm that the origin of HCV 3a genotypes is in South Asia and HCV has evolved in the region to become stably adapted to the host environment. PMID:27764129

  13. HCV-targeted antivirals: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Sandra; Brogi, Simone; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Maga, Giovanni; Brindisi, Margherita; Butini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major etiological agent of human non-A and non-B hepatitis, affecting more than 170 million people worldwide. While the current standard of care for the treatment of HCV infection is ribavirin in combination with interferon-α (IFN-α), this therapeutic regimen presents several drawbacks, mainly related to important and serious side effects, to resistance issues, and to the lack of efficacy for the treatment of specific viral genotypes. In 2011, the FDA approved two HCV-targeted antivirals, namely boceprevir and telaprevir. These two drugs inhibit the protease activity of the viral enzyme NS3/4A, and in Phase III clinical trials proved to be effective in achieving sustained virological response rate up to 75%. However, problems associated with these therapeutic regimens still exist and need to be addressed. Intense research efforts in the field are aimed at discovering small-molecule inhibitors of HCV enzymes and proteins such as NS5B and NS5A and at developing NS3 protease inhibitors active against resistant viruses expressing mutated NS3 protease. The most recent advances for the rational drug design of such inhibitors are here reviewed.

  14. Incidence of HCV induced—Esophageal varices in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-aty, Mahmoud; Fouad, Mahmoud; Sallam, Mohammad M.; Elgohary, Elsayed A.; Ismael, Ali; Nawara, Abdallah; Hawary, Baha; Tag-Adeen, Mohammed; Khaled, Salama

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal varices is one of the most important comorbidity related liver cirrhosis, patients usually presented with hematemesis, melena, or both, ultimately 20% is the mortality during the first attack, hence we aimed to investigate the incidence of such esophageal varices related chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in randomized Egyptian population. One thousand eighteen Egyptian patients, aged between 17 and 58 years, positive for Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4) by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay Ab and HCV RNA-polymerase chain reaction were screened for the presence of esophageal varices. Incidence of esophageal varices was 62.3%; 635 patients, those with large Esophageal varices (LEVs) was 47.4%; 301 patients. Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score has not been significantly improved post variceal band ligation (VBL). Using 2D U/S was useful for EVs prediction. Incidence of esophageal varices in HCV Egyptian patients still high, valuable knowledge would be helpful in clinical field have been discovered by data mining computational intelligent analysis using in practical medicine to improve overall health care. PMID:28121921

  15. Prevalence of HBV and HCV among blood donors in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Fejza, Hajrullah; Telaku, Skender

    2009-02-13

    Hepatitis is disease of the liver caused by the infectious and non-infectious agents. The aim of study was to analyze the prevalence of HBV and HCV among voluntary blood donors in Kosovo, during 2000-2003. The data from National Center for Blood Transfusion of Kosovo were collected and analyzed through descriptive and comparative epidemiological method of retrospective study. All samples were tested by ELISA test. Out of 70348 samples of the blood donors, 3145 were positive. From overall positive samples, 2939 were HBV positive, 192 HCV positive while 14 samples were positive for both viruses. The HBV prevalence among the blood donors of Kosovo is 4.2%, which range Kosovo to the second zone according to the CDC classification of the geographical spread of the HBV infection. The HCV prevalence among the blood donors in Kosovo is 0.3%. Compared to the other European countries this level of prevalence is relatively low. Age group 30-39 years old was presented with 34.8% of cases. The higher number was among the workers, 842 or 26.8%. Based on the results we can conclude that Kosovo have the similar prevalence for HBV and HCV infections as other South East European countries.

  16. The association of syringe type and syringe cleaning with HCV infection among IDUs in Budapest, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gyarmathy, V Anna; Neaigus, Alan; Mitchell, Mary M; Ujhelyi, Eszter

    2009-03-01

    We assessed whether syringe type, syringe cleaning and distributive syringe sharing were associated with self-reported and laboratory-confirmed HCV infection among Hungarian IDUs. Injecting drug users (N=215) were recruited from non-treatment settings in Budapest, Hungary between October 2005 and December 2006. Multivariate logistic regression models identified correlates of self-report of being HCV infected and testing positive for HCV. While 37% tested positive for HCV, 14% of the total (39% of those who tested positive) self-reported being HCV infected. Using any two-piece syringes was significantly associated with self-reported HCV infection, while distributive syringe sharing was not associated with self-report of being HCV infected. Engaging in receptive sharing of only one-piece syringes but always cleaning before reuse was not associated with testing HCV positive, while any receptive sharing of only one-piece syringes and not always cleaning before reuse was significantly associated with testing HCV positive. Sharing cookers and squirting drugs from one syringe into another syringe were not associated with testing HCV positive. The high percent of those HCV infected who did not know they were infected highlights the need to provide better access to confidential testing and counseling services. Counseling should emphasize secondary prevention of HCV among HCV infected IDUs. Our findings also indicate that syringe type and syringe cleaning practices may play a role in HCV transmission. Ethnographic research should identify the reasons why IDUs may use two-piece syringes and suggest means to reduce their use. Thorough cleaning of one-piece syringes when sterile syringes are unavailable may be an efficient way to reduce the risk of HCV infection.

  17. Symptomatic Acute Hepatitis C Infection Following a Single Episode of Unprotected Sexual Intercourse

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Bhaskar; Potts, Jonathan; Emmanuel, Julian

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 23-year-old MSM presented with jaundice, systemic upset, and rash 2 months after a single episode of unprotected sexual intercourse. Liver biochemistry was grossly deranged, with markedly elevated transaminases and hyperbilirubinaemia. Serology was positive for genotype 1a hepatitis C virus (HCV) and in the absence of other causes, acute HCV infection was suspected. He was subsequently successfully treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 24 weeks and made a full clinical and biochemical recovery. PMID:27957361

  18. Infection with hepatitis A, B, C, and delta viruses among patients with acute hepatitis in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Takahashi, Masaharu; Endo, Kazunori; Buyankhuu, Osorjin; Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    One hundred ten consecutive patients (60 males and 50 females; age, mean +/- standard deviation [SD], 22.6 +/- 6.4 years; range 16-48 years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis between December 2004 and January 2005 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. IgM antibodies to hepatitis A virus were detected in 18 patients (16.4%), IgM antibodies to hepatitis B core (anti-HBc IgM) in 38 patients (34.5%) including two patients with concurrent hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection, and hepatitis C virus RNA in nine patients (8.2%). There were 30 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers who had detectable hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to HDV but were negative for anti-HBc IgM, suggesting that they acquired type D acute hepatitis due to superinfection of HDV on a background of chronic HBV infection. None had IgM antibodies to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Consequently, 16.4, 32.7, 6.4, 1.8, and 27.3% of the patients were diagnosed as having acute hepatitis of type A, B, C, type B + D (HBV/HDV coinfection), and type D (superinfection of HDV), respectively. The cause of hepatitis was not known in the remaining 17 patients (15.5%). All 18 HAV isolates were genotyped as IA, all 9 HCV isolates were genotyped as 1b, and all 32 HDV isolates were classified into genotype I. The distribution of HBV genotypes among the 67 HBV isolates was A (1.5%, n = 1) and D (98.5%, n = 66). The present study indicates that de novo infections of HAV, HBV, HCV, and HDV are prevalent among young adults in Mongolia.

  19. The seroprevalences of HBs Ag and anti-HCV in pregnant women in Ankara.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Sibel; Erdogan, Mine; Danişman, Nuri

    2010-02-01

    In the previous decade, the prevalence of HBs-Ag positivity and the anti-HCV positivity declined in Turkey. We aimed to investigate the prevalences of HBs Ag and anti-HCV positivity in pregnant women in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey, while the vertical transmission should be important way of HBV and HCV transmission. HBs-Ag positivity was determined 2.8% (102) out of 4,700 pregnant women, and 0.1% (6) out of them were positive for anti-HCV. The prevalences of HBs Ag and anti-HCV were both similar to the rate of that seen in western region of Turkey.

  20. Molecular detection and sequence analysis of human caliciviruses from acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Farkas, T; Berke, T; Reuter, G; Szûcs, G; Matson, D O; Jiang, X

    2002-08-01

    Three viral gastroenteritis (VGE) outbreaks that occurred in 1998-1999, in Hungary were investigated for the presence of human caliciviruses (HuCVs). HuCVs in stool specimens were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primer pair 289/290, which was designed based on the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) sequence. RT-PCR results were confirmed by sequencing showing that all three outbreak strains belonged to genogroup II of "Norwalk-like viruses" (NLVs). Two strains had high sequence identity with strains in known genetic clusters (Hawaii and Lordsdale clusters). The third strain (MOH) had distinct RdRp sequence, sharing 77/86% (nt/aa) identity with Snow Mountain virus (SMV), the closest genogroup II virus. To characterize MOH further, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed in baculovirus its capsid gene. It had 75/79% (nt/aa) identity with SMV, but 97/98% (nt/aa) identity with NLV/Hillingdon/90/UK, a recently identified genetic cluster of HuCVs. The recombinant MOH (rMOH) capsid protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), which is antigenically distinct from other recombinant HuCV capsid antigens available in our laboratory. Further study of this VLP will have important applications in antigenic characterization and diagnosis of HuCVs.

  1. Comparison of liver fibrosis progression in HIV/HCV co-infected and HCV mono-infected patients by transient elastometry.

    PubMed

    Mazzocato, Susanna; Orsetti, Elena; Gesuita, Rosaria; Piraccini, Francesca; Drenaggi, Davide; Barchiesi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring of liver fibrosis (LF) is an essential tool for preventing liver-related complications in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. In this study, we compared LF progression by transient elastometry (TE) in 50 HIV/HCV co-infected and 115 HCV mono-infected patients followed in our institution between June 2006 and December 2011. Patients naive to interferon therapy and with at least two measurements of liver stiffness by TE were included. In all, 76% of HIV/HCV co-infected and 75% of HCV mono-infected patients remained in the same stage of LF over time. Conversely, 19% and 15% of HIV/HCV co-infected and HCV mono-infected subjects, respectively, had progression to advanced LF (≥ F3). Our study found a similar proportion of HIV/HCV co-infected and HCV mono-infected patients that developed an advanced LF during the follow-up time considered. Alcohol abuse was the only factor significantly associated with the progression as evidenced by multiple quantile regression analysis.

  2. New hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs and the hope for a cure: concepts in anti-HCV drug development.

    PubMed

    Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2014-02-01

    The development of new models and tools has led to the discovery and clinical development of a large number of new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, including direct-acting antivirals and host-targeted agents. Surprisingly, curing HCV infection appears to be easy with these new drugs, provided that a potent drug combination with a high barrier to resistance is used. HCV infection cure rates can be optimized by combining drugs with synergistic antiviral effects, tailoring treatment duration to the patients' needs, and/or using ribavirin. Two HCV drugs have been approved in 2011--telaprevir and boceprevir, both first-wave, first-generation NS3-4A protease inhibitors, two others in 2013/2014--simeprevir, a second-wave, first-generation NS3-4A protease inhibitor, and sofosbuvir, a nucleotide analogue inhibitor of the viral polymerase. Numerous other drugs have reached phase II or III clinical development. From 2015 and onwards, interferon-containing regimens will disappear, replaced by interferon-free regimens yielding infection cure rates over 90%. These therapies will raise new issues, including the need for broad-scale screening and access to care.

  3. Transient CD86 expression on hepatitis C virus-specific CD8+ T cells in acute infection is linked to sufficient IL-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Radziewicz, Henry; Ibegbu, Chris C; Hon, Huiming; Bédard, Nathalie; Bruneau, Julie; Workowski, Kimberly A; Knechtle, Stuart J; Kirk, Allan D; Larsen, Christian P; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Grakoui, Arash

    2010-03-01

    Costimulatory signals via B7/CD28 family molecules (signal 2) are critical for effective adaptive CD8(+) T cell immune responses. In addition to costimulatory signals, B7/CD28 family coinhibitory receptor/ligands that modulate immune responses have been identified. In acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, programmed death receptor 1, an inhibitory receptor in the CD28 family, is highly expressed on virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, yet vigorous immune responses often develop. We hypothesized that other costimulatory signals present during the acute phase of HCV infection would be important to counter this negative signaling. In this study, we found that CD86 was highly expressed on HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells early in acute HCV infection and was lost on transition to chronic HCV infection; the expression of CD86 was different from other activation markers, because expression was delayed after in vitro TCR stimulation and required sufficient IL-2 signaling; and HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the liver of patients with chronic HCV infection were highly activated (CD69, CD38, and HLA-DR expression), but only a minority expressed CD86 or showed evidence of recent IL-2 signaling (low basal phosphorylated STAT5), despite persistent viremia. Our study identified B7 ligand expression on HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells as a distinct marker of effective T cell stimulation with IL-2 signaling in acute HCV infection. Expression of costimulatory molecules, such as CD86, early in HCV infection may be essential in overcoming inhibitory signals from the high level of programmed death receptor 1 expression also seen at this phase of infection.

  4. Two radioimmunoassays compared with isoenzyme electrophoresis for the detection of serum creatine kinase-MB in acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, L.R.; Shuler, S.E.; Genre, C.F.; Mackenzie, F.J.; Garcia, M.M.

    1982-02-01

    We have evaluated two commercial radioimmunoassay (RIA) reagent kits for the estimation of the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK). Although both methods use CK-B antisera and radioiodinated CK-B, one (''M'' for Mallinckrodt) uses hybridized CK-MB for calibration, while the other (''NMS'' for Nuclear Medical Systems) uses CK-B. Both assays provide adequate sensitivity, precision, and specificity for the estimation of serum CK-MB. Ninety-nine patients admitted consecutively to our coronary care unit were studied. Apparent CK-MB was measured by both RIAs and results compared with CK-MB enzymatic activity after electrophoresis (E). CK-MG was elevated, as judged by E and by M, in all of 42 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and in 40 of the 42 by NMS. Of the 57 patients who did not have an AMI, eight had elevated CK-MB by E, 16 by M, and 25 by NMS. Patients with persistently elevated apparent CK-MB concentrations not associated with AMI were identified by M and by NMS, but not by E. The ability to differentiate AMI from no infarction in patients was best with E, and was not satisfactory by NMS. Although the detection of AMI by M equaled that by E, the large number of apparent false-positive results hindered the clinical application of RIA CK-MB measurements.

  5. Delineation of QRS offset by instantaneous changes in ECG vector angle can improve detection of acute inferior myocardial infarctions.

    PubMed

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T

    2016-01-01

    We developed an automated new method for determining QRS offset, based on angular velocity (AV) changes around the QRS loop, and compared the method's performance to that of manual and more established automated methods for determining QRS offset in both healthy subjects and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Specifically, using Frank leads reconstructed from standard 12-lead ECGs, we determined AV in the direction of change raised to the 4th power, d(t). We found that the d(t)-determined AV transition (ΔAV) nearly coincided with manually determined QRS offset in healthy subjects, and in 27 patients with anterior AMI. However, in 31 patients with inferior AMI, ΔAV typically preceded that of QRS offset determined by the established automated methods, and by more than 10ms in 32% of cases. While this "ΔAV precedence" coincided with diagnostic ST elevation in only a minority of patients with recent inferior AMI, the use of ΔAV precedence as a complement to traditional determination of ST elevation increased the sensitivity for detecting inferior AMIs from 23 to 42%.

  6. High sensitivity of flow cytometry improves detection of occult leptomeningeal disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Maurillo, Luca; Di Caprio, Luigi; Di Piazza, Fabio; Sarlo, Chiara; De Angelis, Gottardo; Irno Consalvo, Maria; Fraboni, Daniela; De Santis, Giovanna; Ditto, Concetta; Postorino, Massimiliano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-09-01

    Conventional cytology (CC) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fails to demonstrate malignant cells in up to 45 % of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL/LL) in whom occult leptomeningeal disease is present. Flow cytometry (FCM) is considered more sensitive than CC, but clinical implications of CC negativity/CC positivity are not yet established. CSF samples from 38 adult patients with newly diagnosed ALL/LL were examined. Five (13 %) and nine (24 %) specimens were CC positive-FC positive (FCM(pos)/CC(pos)) and CC negative-FC positive (CC(neg)/FCM(pos)), respectively. The remaining 24 (63 %) samples were double negative (CC(neg)/FCM(neg)) (p = 0.001). CC(neg)/FCM(pos) patients showed a significantly shorter overall survival (OS) compared to CC(neg)/FCM(neg) ones. In multivariate analysis, the status of single FCM positivity was demonstrated to affect independently duration of OS (p = 0.005). In conclusion, FCM significantly improves detection of leptomeningeal occult localization in ALL/LL and appears to anticipate an adverse outcome. Further prospective studies on larger series are needed to confirm this preliminary observation.

  7. Association of Periodontal Diseases and Liver Fibrosis in Patients With HCV and/or HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Yumiko; Kawahigashi, Yuji; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease and systemic health are closely associated. However, there is no data supporting the association between periodontal disease and patients with liver diseases associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontitis and progression of liver diseases in patients with HCV and/or HBV infection. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, 351 patients with HCV- and/or HBV-related liver diseases underwent screening for periodontal disease using the Salivaster® salivary occult blood test from February 2010 to June 2014. Furthermore, we examined the prevalence of fimbrillin (fimA) genotype of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in 28 HCV-infected patients visited at our hospital between January 2013 and June 2014. P. gingivalis with fimA genotype with types I to V was further detected using a PCR method. Results: Of 351 patients, 76 patients (group 1) had a strong positive result for salivary occult blood test and 275 patients (group 2) had weak positive or negative test results. Significant factors between the groups were obesity, level of AST, ALT, LDH, ALP, Alb, D.Bil, T.cho, AFP, platelets (Plt), IRI, HOMA-IR, current interferon (IFN) treatment and the daily frequency of tooth brushing. Between-groups analysis indicated that total protein (T.pro) level and liver fibrosis were significant factors. According to multivariate analysis, five factors were associated with periodontal disease as Plt count below 80000, brushing teeth only once a day, current IFN treatment, aged 65 years or older and obesity. The adjusted odds ratios for these five factors were 5.80, 3.46, 2.87, 2.50 and 2.33, respectively, and each was statistically significant. Twenty-eight saliva specimens had positive results for P. gingivalis with fimA genotype types I to V. The prevalence of fimA genotype II was higher in 14 patients with liver

  8. Determination of telaprevir in plasma of HCV-infected patients by HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Tempestilli, Massimo; Milano, Elisa; D'Offizi, Gianpiero; Montalbano, Marzia; D'Avolio, Antonio; Gasperi, Tecla; Narciso, Pasquale; Ascenzi, Paolo; Pucillo, Leopoldo P

    2013-09-01

    Telaprevir is a direct acting antiviral agent, used with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for the management of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection, in patients not responding to therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin only. Although 75% of patients achieve a sustained virological response after treatment with telaprevir, adverse drug-drug interactions and undesirable events often occur. Therefore, telaprevir monitoring is pivotal to improve the management of HCV infection. Here, the first High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) method to quantify telaprevir in human plasma of HCV-genotype 1-infected patients is reported. The volume of the plasma sample was 700 μL. This method involved automated solid-phase extraction with Oasis HLB Cartridge 1 cc (divinylbenzene and N-vinylpyrrolidone). The extracted samples were reconstituted with 150 μL of 60/40 water/acetonitrile. Thirty microliters of these samples was injected into a HPLC-UV system, and the analytes were eluted on a X Terra(®) RP18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d.) with a particle size of 5 μm. The mobile phase (ammonium acetate buffer, 150 mM, pH 8.0, and methanol:acetonitrile 50:50) was delivered at 1.0 mL/min with linear gradient elution. The total run time for a single analysis was 16 min; telaprevir was detected by UV at 276 and 286 nm. The calibration curve was linear from 312.5 to 20,000 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.996). The absolute recovery of telaprevir ranged between 89 and 93% at concentrations of quality control samples of 800, 4,000, 8,000, and 16,000 ng/mL. Both precision and accuracy were always <15%. The HPLC-UV method reported here: (i) has been validated, (ii) is currently applied to monitor telaprevir in plasma of HCV-infected patients, and (iii) appears useful in a routine laboratory. ,

  9. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  10. Using silicone passive samplers to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wildfires in streams and potential acute effects for invertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ralf Bernhard; Hearn, Laurence; Kefford, Ben J; Mueller, Jochen F; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2010-08-01

    Silicone rubber passive samplers spiked with 4 deuterated performance reference compounds were deployed for 29-33 days to estimate the concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 9 streams in Victoria, Australia, following a wildfire. Silicone rubber strips of 2 thicknesses were used to obtain information on the status of uptake of the chemicals of interest at retrieval. In addition, we monitored the stream macroinvertebrate community for potential effects of PAHs or other fire organics. All selected PAHs were detected in the passive samplers and the sampling rates ranged from 0.5 to 50 L/day significantly varying between sites but not compounds, presumably due to differences in current velocity. The estimated water concentrations were 0.1-10 ng/L for total PAHs with phenanthrene, pyrene and fluoranthene accounting for 91% of the total concentration. All PAHs were a factor of 1000 or more below the reported 48-h median lethal concentrations (48-h LC50) for Daphnia magna. Two sites located closest to the fires exhibited elevated concentrations compared to the other sites and the passive samplers in these sites remained in the integrative uptake regime for all compounds, suggesting precipitation-associated PAH input. No acute toxic effects of PAHs or other fire organics on the invertebrate community were detected using a biotic index for organic toxicants (SPEAR), whereas a non-specific biotic index (SIGNAL) decreased in two sites indicating impacts from changes in other environmental parameters. We conclude (1) that silicone-based passive samplers with two different area-to-volume ratios represent a promising tool for determining organic toxicants and (2) that PAHs from wildfires are unlikely to be a common main cause for fire-related ecological effects in streams adjacent to burnt regions.

  11. Near-haploidy: Cytogenetic guidelines for the detection of an under-reported sub-group of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    O`Malley, D.P.; Bice, G; Storto, P.D.

    1994-09-01

    We present a previously unreported case of near-haploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cytogenetic analysis of a 16-year-old Caucasian male detected the presence of two near-haploid cell lines in addition to a chromosomally normal cell line. The karyotypes of the near-haploid lines were very similar to those previously reported in the literature: 27,X,+8,+18,+20,+21 and 26,X,+8,+18,+21. Near-haploid (<30 chromosomes) ALL has been identified as a distinct sub-group of childhood ALL associated with a poor patient prognosis including short remission times and lack of response to standard treatment protocols. Literature suggests that near-haploid ALL constitutes up to 2.4% of diagnosed ALL cases, yet it has been the experience of this laboratory that the observed frequency of this sub-group is much lower. One possible conclusion is that cases of near-haploid ALL go undetected due to difficulties associated with the cytogenetic analysis of oncology specimens and the generally poor quality of abnormal metaphase spreads often observed in ALL cases. Literature also suggests that the observation of hyperdiploidy (>50 chromosomes) during cytogenetic analysis may represent clonal evolution of a previous near-haploid cell line. These cases are distinct from the common >50 ALL sub-group generally associated with a consistent pattern of chromosome retention and loss. Most chromosomes are present as a single copy, except chromosomes 8, 10, 14, 18, 21 and the sex chromosomes, which are often disomic. Because of the important prognostic implications of the near-haploid subgroup of ALL, we propose cytogenetic guidelines technologists should utilize to identify a potential near-haploid ALL patient and to detect the presence of near-haploid metaphases during microscopic analysis.

  12. Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery and Its Detection Using Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin

    PubMed Central

    Onk, Oruç Alper; Onk, Didem; Ozcelik, Fatih; Gunay, Murat; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication of cardiac surgery due to its high mortality. The aim of the present study was to detect the factors leading to AKI in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery (CABS) and also to determine the optimal timing for detecting AKI using the biomarker neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL). Materials and Methods The records of 375 patients who underwent CABS were reviewed in this case-control study. Ejection fraction (EF), common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and cross-clamp (C-C) time of the patients were recorded. Blood samples were taken from all patients on preoperative day 1 as well as 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 h and 7 days after operation. Biochemical parameters were studied in patients with and without AKI. Results According to the Risk Injury Failure Loss End Stage criteria, 24 patients had renal risk, 17 had injury and 4 had failure. Postoperative 24-hour serum creatinine levels indicated the risk of renal dysfunction for only 4 patients in the AKI group. CCA-IMT, C-C time, haematocrit (HCT) and preoperative interleukin-6 levels were significantly higher in the AKI group than in the non-AKI group. Postoperative 6- and 12-hour NGAL levels in the AKI group correlated with postoperative 36-hour serum creatinine levels. The optimal cut-off values for postoperative 6- and 12-hour NGAL test were 310 and 283 ng/ml, respectively. The area under the curve was higher in the 12-hour NGAL test (p < 0.0086). Conclusion The number of stenotic coronary arteries, EF, CCA-IMT and HCT are all important risk factors. Early postoperative NGAL results were highly specific for the early recognition of AKI. PMID:27275158

  13. Identification of urinary microRNA biomarkers for detection of gentamicin-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Qu, Zhe; Zhu, Cong; Lin, Zhi; Huo, Yan; Wang, Xue; Wang, Jufeng; Li, Bo

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been recently recognized as promising non-invasive biomarkers for detecting the organ injuries. To further understand the sensibility and reliability of miRNA measurements in urine sample for predicting drug-induced early nephrotoxicity, a global urinary miRNA expression analysis was performed in the rodent models with gentamicin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Male Wistar rats were daily administrated with gentamicin (0, 60, and 120 mg/kg) for up to 10 days by intraperitoneal injection, and the miRNA profiling of animal urine samples were subsequently analyzed using TaqMan(®) Array Rodent miRNA Cards. The results showed that four miRNAs (mmu-miR-138-5p, mmu-miR-1971, mmu-miR-218-1-3p, and rno-miR-489) were continuously increased in urine samples since day 4 after administration with gentamicin, which was not reflected by the standard markers such as serum creatinine (Cr) and urea nitrogen (BUN). Furthermore, other nine urinary miRNAs were increased in both 60 and 120 mg/kg groups on day 8. Receiver operator characteristics analysis demonstrated that the performance of these miRNAs with time- or dose-dependent increases were comparable to standard biomarkers (i.e. serum Cr and BUN), suggesting that the urinary miRNA panel can be used as potential biomarkers for the detection of gentamicin-induced AKI in rats. Moreover, the computer prediction analysis showed that these differentially expressed miRNAs were potentially targeted to many genes, which were mainly associated with the regulation of metabolic process and signaling. These data will improve the understanding and prediction of toxicology processes induced by nephrotoxicants.

  14. Label-Free Optical Detection of Acute Myocardial Infarction Based on Blood Plasma Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. X.; Chen, M. W.; Lin, J. Y.; Lai, W. Q.; Huang, W.; Chen, H. Y.; Weng, G. X.

    2016-11-01

    This study is intended to explore the potential of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-based plasma surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for providing a rapid and simple "Yes/No" assessment to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A simple, rapid, and accurate method of diagnosing AMI is critical to reduce mortality and improve prognosis. Techniques such as electrocardiography examination and use of cardiac troponins have not yet met the current clinical need. Therefore, alternative approaches need to be developed. Plasma samples from 32 patients with AMI and 32 healthy control (Clt) subjects were assessed. Multivariate statistical techniques, including principal component (PC) analysis and linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA), were employed to develop a diagnostic algorithm for differentiating between patients with AMI and Clt subjects. Furthermore, the receiver operating characteristic was tested to evaluate the performance of the PCA-LDA algorithm for AMI detection. Each plasma sample was mixed with an equal volume of Ag colloidal solution, and the SERS measurement of each plasma sample was performed. The plasma SERS spectrum showed much stronger and sharper peaks compared with the normal Raman spectrum. Tentative assignments of Raman spectroscopy bands showed specific biomolecular (e.g., proteins, adenosine, adenine, and uric acid) changes. PC analysis and LDA were employed to discriminate patients with AMI from Clt subjects, yielding a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 93.8%. The findings of this study suggest that plasma SERS has a great potential for improving AMI in the future, and this will certainly reduce the difficulty, time to draw blood, and patients' pain to a great extent.

  15. Analysis of the 5'UTR of HCV genotype 3 grown in vitro in human B cells, T cells, and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previously, we have reported the isolation and molecular characterization of human Hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV-1) from infected patients. We are now reporting an analysis of HCV obtained from patients infected with HCV genotype 3 (HCV-3) as diagnosed by clinical laboratories. Results HCV was cultured in vitro using our system. HCV RNA was isolated from patients' blood and from HCV cultured in various cell types for up to three months. The 5'UTR of these isolates were used for comparisons. Results revealed a number of sequence changes as compared to the serum RNA. The HCV RNA produced efficiently by infected macrophages, B-cells, and T-cells had sequences similar to HCV-1, which suggests that selection of the variants was performed at the level of macrophages. Virus with sequences similar to HCV-1 replicated better in macrophages than HCV having a 5'UTR similar to HCV-3. Conclusions Although HCV-3 replicates in cell types such as B-cells, T-cells, and macrophages, it may require a different primary cell type for the same purpose. Therefore, in our opinion, HCV-3 does not replicate efficiently in macrophages, and patients infected with HCV-3 may contain a population of HCV-1 in their blood. PMID:20626910

  16. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Induces Formation of Stress Granules Whose Proteins Regulate HCV RNA Replication and Virus Assembly and Egress

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Markus H.; Boyd, Bryan; Wieland, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic structures that are induced in response to environmental stress, including viral infections. Here we report that hepatitis C virus (HCV) triggers the appearance of SGs in a PKR- and interferon (IFN)-dependent manner. Moreover, we show an inverse correlation between the presence of stress granules and the induction of IFN-stimulated proteins, i.e., MxA and USP18, in HCV-infected cells despite high-level expression of the corresponding MxA and USP18 mRNAs, suggesting that interferon-stimulated gene translation is inhibited in stress granule-containing HCV-infected cells. Finally, in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown experiments, we found that the stress granule proteins T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1), TIA1-related protein (TIAR), and RasGAP-SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) are required for efficient HCV RNA and protein accumulation at early time points in the infection and that G3BP1 and TIA-1 are required for intracellular and extracellular infectious virus production late in the infection, suggesting that they are required for virus assembly. In contrast, TIAR downregulation decreases extracellular infectious virus titers with little effect on intracellular RNA content or infectivity late in the infection, suggesting that it is required for infectious particle release. Collectively, these results illustrate that HCV exploits the stress granule machinery at least two ways: by inducing the formation of SGs by triggering PKR phosphorylation, thereby downregulating the translation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes, and by co-opting SG proteins for its replication, assembly, and egress. PMID:22855484

  17. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces formation of stress granules whose proteins regulate HCV RNA replication and virus assembly and egress.

    PubMed

    Garaigorta, Urtzi; Heim, Markus H; Boyd, Bryan; Wieland, Stefan; Chisari, Francis V

    2012-10-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic structures that are induced in response to environmental stress, including viral infections. Here we report that hepatitis C virus (HCV) triggers the appearance of SGs in a PKR- and interferon (IFN)-dependent manner. Moreover, we show an inverse correlation between the presence of stress granules and the induction of IFN-stimulated proteins, i.e., MxA and USP18, in HCV-infected cells despite high-level expression of the corresponding MxA and USP18 mRNAs, suggesting that interferon-stimulated gene translation is inhibited in stress granule-containing HCV-infected cells. Finally, in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown experiments, we found that the stress granule proteins T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1), TIA1-related protein (TIAR), and RasGAP-SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) are required for efficient HCV RNA and protein accumulation at early time points in the infection and that G3BP1 and TIA-1 are required for intracellular and extracellular infectious virus production late in the infection, suggesting that they are required for virus assembly. In contrast, TIAR downregulation decreases extracellular infectious virus titers with little effect on intracellular RNA content or infectivity late in the infection, suggesting that it is required for infectious particle release. Collectively, these results illustrate that HCV exploits the stress granule machinery at least two ways: by inducing the formation of SGs by triggering PKR phosphorylation, thereby downregulating the translation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes, and by co-opting SG proteins for its replication, assembly, and egress.

  18. Retention in buprenorphine treatment is associated with improved HCV care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Norton, B L; Beitin, A; Glenn, M; DeLuca, J; Litwin, A H; Cunningham, C O

    2017-04-01

    Persons who inject drugs, most of whom are opioid dependent, comprise the majority of the HCV infected in the United States. As the national opioid epidemic unfolds, increasing numbers of people are entering the medical system to access treatment for opioid use disorder, specifically with buprenorphine. Yet little is known about HCV care in patients accessing buprenorphine-based opioid treatment. We sought to determine the HCV prevalence, cascade of care, and the association between patient characteristics and completion of HCV cascade of care milestones for patients initiating buprenorphine treatment. We reviewed electronic health records of all patients who initiated buprenorphine treatment at a primary-care clinic in the Bronx, NY between January 2009 and January 2014. Of the 390 patients who initiated buprenorphine treatment, 123 were confirmed to have chronic HCV infection. The only patient characteristic associated with achieving HCV care milestones was retention in opioid treatment. Patients retained (vs. not retained) in buprenorphine treatment were more likely to be referred for HCV specialty care (63.1% vs. 34.0%, p<0.01), achieve an HCV-specific evaluation (40.8% vs. 21.3%, p<0.05), be offered HCV treatment (22.4% vs. 8.5%, p<0.05), and initiate HCV treatment (9.2% vs. 6.4%, p=0.6). Given the current opioid epidemic in the US and the growing number of people receiving buprenorphine treatment, there is an unprecedented opportunity to access and treat persons with HCV, reducing HCV transmission, morbidity and mortality. Retention in opioid treatment may improve linkage and retention in HCV care; innovative models of care that integrate opioid drug treatment with HCV treatment are essential.

  19. Recruitment and interaction of human dendritic and T cells in autologous liver slices experimentally infected with HCV produced in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Michelina; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Penna, Christophe; Saunier, Bertrand

    2012-04-30

    Studying the immunological processes taking place during the initial steps of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been a challenge in patients. Shin et al. have recently reported that delayed induction, not impaired recruitment of specific CD8(+) T cells, causes the late onset of acute hepatitis C in chimpanzees (Gastroenterology, 2011). However, further elucidation of the underlying mechanisms is difficult in vivo. We made observations consistent with their conclusions in human liver slices inoculated ex vivo with HCV produced in cell culture (HCVcc). Autologous immune cells were purified from blood and differentially stained prior to their incubation with the slices for 2 hours. A two-photon confocal microscopic analysis revealed that many more stained dendritic and T cells contracted interactions within two-day infected slices than non-inoculated ones (p<0.001). While in the first instance some dendritic and T cells entered into closer interactions, they never did in the latter case. These results suggest that ex vivo infection of human liver slices with HCVcc may be useful for gaining experimental insight regarding the immunological processes taking place at early steps of HCV infections.

  20. The HCV Treatment Revolution Continues: Resistance Considerations, Pangenotypic Efficacy, and Advances in Challenging Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ira M.

    2016-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration has now approved 10 direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV). These therapies are combined into 6 regimens that are given for varying durations, with or without ribavirin, depending on the viral genotype, the presence or absence of baseline resistance-associated variants (RAVs), and the patient type. RAVs may be present before exposure to a drug or may become detectable de novo during exposure to a drug. Emerging resistant strains are the most common cause of failure of HCV DAA regimens. Second-generation DAAs provide superior coverage of resistant variants compared with first-generation members of that class. They may also cover a broader range of viral genotypes. Numerous clinical trials have evaluated the safety and efficacy of DAAs in a variety of patient populations, including those with cirrhosis, HIV, and end-stage renal disease. This article evaluates the data from these studies, and discusses recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidance document. PMID:28070174

  1. Strategy for improving survival and reducing recurrence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru

    2013-10-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. With advances in imaging diagnostics, accompanied by better understanding of high-risk patients, HCC is now frequently detected at an early stage; however, the prognosis remains poor. The recurrence rate after treatment of HCC is higher than that associated with cancers of other organs. This may be because of the high incidence of intrahepatic distant recurrence and multicentric recurrence, especially with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) classification has recently emerged as the standard classification system for the clinical management of patients with HCC. According to the BCLC staging system, curative therapies (resection, transplantation, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, percutaneous ethanol injection therapy, percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation) can improve survival in HCC patients diagnosed at an early stage and offer a potential long-term cure. However, treatment strategies for recurrent disease are not mentioned in the BCLC classification. The strategy for recurrence may differ according to the recurrence pattern, i.e., intrahepatic distant recurrence vs multicentric recurrence. In this article, we review recurrent HCC and the therapeutic strategies for reducing recurrent HCC, especially HCV-related HCC.

  2. Development of a rapid phenotypic test for HCV protease inhibitors with potential use in clinical decisions

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Luciana Santos; Vidal, Luãnna Liebscher; da Costa, Emmerson C.B.; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Valadão, Ana Luiza Chaves; dos Santos, André Felipe; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Approximately 185 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The first-wave of approved NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs) were Telaprevir and Boceprevir, which are currently discontinued. Simeprevir is a second-wave PI incorporated into the Brazilian hepatitis C treatment protocol. Drug resistance plays a key role in patients' treatment regimen. Here, we developed a simple phenotypic assay to evaluate the impact of resistance mutations in HCV NS3 protease to PIs, using a protein expression vector containing wild type NS3 protease domain and NS4A co-factor. We analyzed the impact of five resistance mutations (T54A, V36M, V158I, V170I and T54S+V170I) against Telaprevir, Boceprevir and Simeprevir. Protein purifications were performed with low cost methodology, and enzymatic inhibition assays were measured by FRET. We obtained recombinant proteases with detectable activity, and IC50 and fold change values for the evaluated PIs were determined. The variant T54A showed the highest reduction of susceptibility for the PIs, while the other four variants exhibited lower levels of reduced susceptibility. Interestingly, V170I showed 3.2-fold change for Simeprevir, a new evidence about this variant. These results emphasize the importance of enzymatic assays in phenotypic tests to determine which therapeutic regimen should be implemented. PMID:27575432

  3. Development of a rapid phenotypic test for HCV protease inhibitors with potential use in clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Luciana Santos; Vidal, Luãnna Liebscher; Costa, Emmerson C B da; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio da; Valadão, Ana Luiza Chaves; Santos, André Felipe Dos; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 185 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The first-wave of approved NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs) were Telaprevir and Boceprevir, which are currently discontinued. Simeprevir is a second-wave PI incorporated into the Brazilian hepatitis C treatment protocol. Drug resistance plays a key role in patients' treatment regimen. Here, we developed a simple phenotypic assay to evaluate the impact of resistance mutations in